WorldWideScience

Sample records for normal spectral emissivity

  1. Laser pulse transient method for measuring the normal spectral emissivity of samples with arbitrary surface quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeromen, A.; Grabec, I.; Govekar, E.

    2008-09-01

    A laser pulse transient method for measuring normal spectral emissivity is described. In this method, a laser pulse ( λ=1064 nm) irradiates the top surface of a flat specimen. A two-dimensional temperature response of the bottom surface is measured with a calibrated thermographic camera. By solving an axisymmetric boundary value heat conduction problem, the normal spectral emissivity at 1064 nm is determined by using an iterative nonlinear least-squares estimation procedure. The method can be applied to arbitrary sample surface quality. The method is tested on a nickel specimen and used to determine the normal spectral emissivity of AISI 304 stainless steel. The expanded combined uncertainty of the method has been estimated to be 18%.

  2. Ultrahigh infrared normal spectral emissivity of microstructured silicon coating Au film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guojin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Yu; Li, Ping; Zhu, Jingtao; Zhao, Li

    2012-02-01

    We studied infrared normal spectral emissivity on quasi-periodic microstructured silicon, which was prepared by femtosecond laser irradiation in SF6 ambient gas, coated with 100 nm thick Au thin film. The observed emissivity is higher than any reported previously for a flat material with a thickness of less than 0.5 mm, at a temperature range of 200 °C to 400 °C. The emissivity over the measured wavelength region increases with temperature and the spike height. These results show the potential to be used as a flat blackbody source or for applications in infrared thermal sensor, detector, and stealth military technology.

  3. Direct Measurements of Infrared Normal Spectral Emissivity of Solid Materials for High-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzl, S.; Kirschner, M.; Lippig, V.; Sander, T.; Mundt, Ch.; Pfitzner, M.

    2013-11-01

    A new facility for the measurement of the normal spectral emissivity of solid materials for high-temperature applications in the thermal steady state was developed at the Bundeswehr University of Munich. The measurements are performed under atmospheric conditions. The facility covers the temperature range between and and wavelengths between and . The principle of operation involves the spectral comparison of a test sample with a reference blackbody and the sample surface temperature determination with a numerical spectral ratio calculation. The optical characteristics of the blackbody and the sample surface temperature determination are discussed in detail. Furthermore, measurement results of the quasi-reference material silicon-carbide under steady-state conditions are presented to validate the measurement method.

  4. New experimental device for high-temperature normal spectral emissivity measurements of coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honnerová, Petra; Martan, Jiří; Kučera, Martin; Honner, Milan; Hameury, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental device for normal spectral emissivity measurements of coatings in the infrared spectral range from 1.38 μm to 26 μm and in the temperature range from 550 K to 1250 K is presented. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) is used for the detection of sample and blackbody spectral radiation. Sample heating is achieved by a fiber laser with a scanning head. Surface temperature is measured by two methods. The first method uses an infrared camera and a reference coating with known effective emissivity, the second method is based on the combination of Christiansen wavelength with contact and noncontact surface temperature measurement. Application of the method is shown on the example of a high-temperature high-emissivity coating. Experimental results obtained with this apparatus are compared with the results performed by a direct method of Laboratoire National d’Essais (LNE) in France. The differences in the spectra are analyzed. (paper)

  5. Infrared normal spectral emissivity of Ti–6Al–4V alloy in the 500–1150 K temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Fernández, L.; Risueño, E.; Pérez-Sáez, R.B.; Tello, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► First heating cycle acts as a annealing, relieving the surface stresses. ► Stress relieving occurs mainly above 900 K. ► Emissivity decreases between 0.35 and 0.10 in the 2.5–22 μm spectral range. ► Emissivity increases linearly with temperature, with the same slope for λ > 10 μm. ► Good agreement between resistivity and emissivity by means of Hagen–Rubens relation. - Abstract: Thermal radiative emissivity is related to the optical and electrical properties of materials, and it is a key parameter required in a large number of industrial applications. In the case of Ti–6Al–4V, spectral emissivity experimental data are not available for the range of temperatures between 400 and 1200 K, where almost all industrial applications take place. The experimental results in this paper show that the normal spectral emissivity decreases with wavelength from a value of about 0.35 at 2.5 μm to about 0.10 at 22 μm. At the same time, the spectral emissivity shows a slight linear increase with temperature between 500 and 1150 K, with approximately the same slope for all wavelengths. Additionally, the influence of the samples thermal history on the emissivity is studied. A strong decrease in the emissivity values appears due to the effect of surface stress relaxation processes. This means that the radiative properties of this alloy strongly depend on the surface stress state. A thermal treatment to relieve the surface stress should be carried out to achieve a steady state of the radiative properties. In addition, a good qualitative agreement is found between the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity obtained using conventional measurements and the one obtained from the emissivity experimental results by using the Hagen–Rubens equation.

  6. Spectral emissivity of surface blackbody calibrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik

    2007-01-01

    in emissivity using similar materials can be reduced to 0.5-1% by optimizing the coating process and the surface geometry. Results are discussed and an equation for calculation of the equivalent blackbody surface temperature from FTIR spectra is presented, including reflected ambient radiation. It is in most......The normal spectral emissivity of commercial infrared calibrators is compared with measurements of anodized aluminum samples and grooved aluminum surfaces coated with Pyromark. Measurements performed by FTIR spectroscopy in the wavelength interval from 2 to 20 mu m and at temperatures between 5...... and 550 degrees C are presented with absolute uncertainties from 0.25% to 1% in spectral regions with sufficient signal and no significant atmospheric gas absorption. A large variation in emissivity with wavelength is observed for some surfaces, i.e., from 1% to 3% to more than 10%. The variation...

  7. A Spectral Emissivity Library of Spoil Substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivovarník, Marek; Pikl, Miroslav; Frouz, J.; Zemek, František; Kopačková, V.; Notesco, G.; Ben Dor, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2016) E-ISSN 2306-5729 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : post- mining sites * spectral emissivity * spectral library * spoil substrates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7)

  8. Theory of atomic spectral emission intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yngstroem, S.

    1989-02-01

    The theoretical derivation of a new spectral line intensity formula for atomic radiative emission is presented. The theory is based on first principles of quantum physics and statistical physics. It is argued that the formulation of the theory provides a very good example of the manner in which quantum logic transforms into common sense logic. The theory is strongly supported by experimental evidence. (author) (16 refs.)

  9. Transient Evoked aotacoustic emissions otologically normal adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUTH

    Objective: To examine the effects of aging on the existence of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in normal adult. Material and methods 40 subjects ( 30 males, 10 females) aged between 20-60 years were divided into 4 groups by representing. All patients were screened to insure otologically normal subjects based on ...

  10. Study of land surface temperature and spectral emissivity using multi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LST) and spectral emissivities over a hard rock terrain using multi-sensor satellite data. The study area, of about 6000 km2, is a part of Singhbhum–Orissa craton situated in the eastern part of India. TIR data from ASTER, MODIS and Landsat ...

  11. Effective Spectral Indices of Core and Extended Emissions for Radio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effective Spectral Indices of Core and Extended Emissions for Radio Sources. R. S. Yang1,∗, J. H. Yang1,2 & J. J. Nie1. 1Department of Physics and Electronics Science, Hunan University of Arts and Science,. Changde 415000, China. 2Centre for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006, China. ∗ e-mail: ...

  12. Spectral Components Analysis of Diffuse Emission Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, Dmitry; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2012-09-14

    We develop a novel method to separate the components of a diffuse emission process based on an association with the energy spectra. Most of the existing methods use some information about the spatial distribution of components, e.g., closeness to an external template, independence of components etc., in order to separate them. In this paper we propose a method where one puts conditions on the spectra only. The advantages of our method are: 1) it is internal: the maps of the components are constructed as combinations of data in different energy bins, 2) the components may be correlated among each other, 3) the method is semi-blind: in many cases, it is sufficient to assume a functional form of the spectra and determine the parameters from a maximization of a likelihood function. As an example, we derive the CMB map and the foreground maps for seven yeas of WMAP data. In an Appendix, we present a generalization of the method, where one can also add a number of external templates.

  13. Standard Test Method for Normal Spectral Emittance at Elevated Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1972-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a highly accurate technique for measuring the normal spectral emittance of electrically conducting materials or materials with electrically conducting substrates, in the temperature range from 600 to 1400 K, and at wavelengths from 1 to 35 μm. 1.2 The test method requires expensive equipment and rather elaborate precautions, but produces data that are accurate to within a few percent. It is suitable for research laboratories where the highest precision and accuracy are desired, but is not recommended for routine production or acceptance testing. However, because of its high accuracy this test method can be used as a referee method to be applied to production and acceptance testing in cases of dispute. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this stan...

  14. Multilayer Photonic Crystal for Spectral Narrowing of Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanfang LIU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer colloidal crystal has been prepared by the layer-by-layer deposition of silica microspheres on a glass slide. Each layer is a slab consisting of a fcc close-packed colloidal arrays. By properly choosing the sizes of spheres, the whole spectral feature of multilayer colloidal crystal can be tuned. Here, we engineered a multilayer superlattice structure with an effective passband between two stop bands. This gives a strong narrowing effect on emission spectrum. With the stop bands at the shortwave and longwave edges of emission spectrum, the passband in the central wavelength region can be regarded as a strong decrease of suppression effect and enhancement of a narrow wavelength region of emission. The spectral narrowing modification effect of suitably engineered colloidal crystals shows up their importance in potential application as optical filters and lasing devices.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.3.16320

  15. Fluorescence spectral studies of Gum Arabic: Multi-emission of Gum Arabic in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam, E-mail: ndhena@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mythily, Rajan, E-mail: rajanmythily@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India); Kumaran, Rajendran, E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Gum Arabic (GA), a food hydrocolloid is a natural composite obtained from the stems and branches of Acacia Senegal and Acacia Seyal trees. GA structure is made up of highly branched arabinogalactan polysaccharides. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence spectral studies of acid hydrolyzed GA solutions were carried out at various pH conditions. The fluorescence in GA is predominantly attributed to the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine amino acids. The presence of multi-emissive peaks at different pH condition is attributed to the exposure of the fluorescing amino acids to the aqueous phase, which contains several sugar units, hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of GA exhibits a multi-exponential decay with different fluorescence lifetime of varying amplitude which confirms that tyrosine is confined to a heterogeneous microenvironment. The existence of multi-emissive peaks with large variation in the fluorescence intensities were established by 3D emission contour spectral studies. The probable location of the fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment was further ascertained by constructing a time-resolved emission spectrum (TRES) and time-resolved area normalized emission spectrum (TRANES) plots. Fluorescence spectral technique is used as an analytical tool in understanding the photophysical properties of a water soluble complex food hydrocolloid containing an intrinsic fluorophore located in a multiple environment is illustrated. - Highlights: • The Manuscript deals with the steady state absorption, emission, fluorescence lifetime and time-resolved emission spectrum studies of Gum Arabic in aqueous medium at various pH conditions. • The fluorescence emanates from the tyrosine amino acid present in GA. • Change in pH results in marked variation in the fluorescence spectral properties of tyrosine. • Fluorescence spectral techniques are employed as a tool in establishing the

  16. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom Exhibits always a Redshift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Johansson J. X.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A renewed analysis of the H.E.Ives and G.R.Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215 concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  17. Spectral Evolution of Synchrotron and Inverse Compton Emission in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    emission peaks in the optical band (e.g., Nieppola et al. 2006). In order to under- stand the evolution of synchrotron and IC spectra of BL Lac objects, the X-ray spectral analysis with XMM–Newton X-ray observations of PKS 2155–304 and. S5 0716+7145 (see Zhang 2008, 2010 for details) was performed. Here, the results.

  18. Transient Evoked aotacoustic emissions otologically normal adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUTH

    between 1999-2000 using a manually Operated Madson Audiometer ,and the IL 088 otodynamic. Analyser was used to record transient otoacoustic emission. Results The age groups were 20-30,31-40, 41-50, 51-60 years .There was no significant difference in threshold as a function of age at p<0.05 .The TEOAE amplitude ...

  19. Comparing auditory filter bandwidths, spectral ripple modulation detection, spectral ripple discrimination, and speech recognition: Normal and impaired hearinga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Venn, Evelyn; Nelson, Peggy; Souza, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Some listeners with hearing loss show poor speech recognition scores in spite of using amplification that optimizes audibility. Beyond audibility, studies have suggested that suprathreshold abilities such as spectral and temporal processing may explain differences in amplified speech recognition scores. A variety of different methods has been used to measure spectral processing. However, the relationship between spectral processing and speech recognition is still inconclusive. This study evaluated the relationship between spectral processing and speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and with hearing loss. Narrowband spectral resolution was assessed using auditory filter bandwidths estimated from simultaneous notched-noise masking. Broadband spectral processing was measured using the spectral ripple discrimination (SRD) task and the spectral ripple depth detection (SMD) task. Three different measures were used to assess unamplified and amplified speech recognition in quiet and noise. Stepwise multiple linear regression revealed that SMD at 2.0 cycles per octave (cpo) significantly predicted speech scores for amplified and unamplified speech in quiet and noise. Commonality analyses revealed that SMD at 2.0 cpo combined with SRD and equivalent rectangular bandwidth measures to explain most of the variance captured by the regression model. Results suggest that SMD and SRD may be promising clinical tools for diagnostic evaluation and predicting amplification outcomes. PMID:26233047

  20. Comparing auditory filter bandwidths, spectral ripple modulation detection, spectral ripple discrimination, and speech recognition: Normal and impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Venn, Evelyn; Nelson, Peggy; Souza, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    Some listeners with hearing loss show poor speech recognition scores in spite of using amplification that optimizes audibility. Beyond audibility, studies have suggested that suprathreshold abilities such as spectral and temporal processing may explain differences in amplified speech recognition scores. A variety of different methods has been used to measure spectral processing. However, the relationship between spectral processing and speech recognition is still inconclusive. This study evaluated the relationship between spectral processing and speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and with hearing loss. Narrowband spectral resolution was assessed using auditory filter bandwidths estimated from simultaneous notched-noise masking. Broadband spectral processing was measured using the spectral ripple discrimination (SRD) task and the spectral ripple depth detection (SMD) task. Three different measures were used to assess unamplified and amplified speech recognition in quiet and noise. Stepwise multiple linear regression revealed that SMD at 2.0 cycles per octave (cpo) significantly predicted speech scores for amplified and unamplified speech in quiet and noise. Commonality analyses revealed that SMD at 2.0 cpo combined with SRD and equivalent rectangular bandwidth measures to explain most of the variance captured by the regression model. Results suggest that SMD and SRD may be promising clinical tools for diagnostic evaluation and predicting amplification outcomes.

  1. Shaping the spatial and spectral emissivity at the diffraction limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde; Bouchon, Patrick; Jaeck, Julien; Pelouard, Jean-Luc; Haïdar, Riad

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces have attracted a growing interest for their ability to artificially tailor an electromagnetic response on various spectral ranges. In particular, thermal sources with unprecedented abilities, such as directionality or monochromaticity, have been achieved. However, these metasurfaces exhibit homogeneous optical properties whereas the spatial modulation of the emissivity up to the wavelength scale is at the crux of the design of original emitters. In this letter, we study an inhomogeneous metasurface made of a nonperiodic set of optical nano-antennas that spatially and spectrally control the emitted light up to the diffraction limit. Each antenna acts as an independent deep subwavelength emitter for given polarization and wavelength. Their juxtaposition at the subwavelength scale encodes far field multispectral and polarized images. This opens up promising breakthroughs for applications such as optical storage, anti-counterfeit devices, and multispectral emitters for biochemical sensing

  2. Spectral segmentation of polygonized images with normalized cuts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsekh, Anna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Skurikhin, Alexei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosten, Edward [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE

    2009-01-01

    We analyze numerical behavior of the eigenvectors corresponding to the lowest eigenvalues of the generalized graph Laplacians arising in the Normalized Cuts formulations of the image segmentation problem on coarse polygonal grids.

  3. Further development of artificial neural networks for spectral interference correction in optical emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Huang, S.; Karanassios, V.

    2012-06-01

    Spectral overlaps causing spectral interference are a key concern in elemental analysis by optical emission spectrometry. Spectral interferences are addressed using a variety of methods, including artificial neural networks (ANNs). In my lab, these methods are being developed using both experimentally-obtained results and spectral simulations. ANNs are being developed for inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and for optical emission measurements using microplasmas and portable emission spectrometers. In this paper, the application of ANNS for spectral interference correction is described in some detail.

  4. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions otologically in normal adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All patients were screened to insure otologically normal subjects based on history and otological examination and tympanometry. Examined was done in the KHMC between 1999-2000 using a manually Operated Madson Audiometer, and the IL 088 otodynamic Analyser was used to record transient otoacoustic emission.

  5. Miroirs multicouches C/SI a incidence normale pour la region spectrale 25-40 nanometres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigonis, Marius

    Nous avons propose la nouvelle combinaison de materiaux, C/Si, pour la fabrication de miroirs multicouches a incidence normale dans la region spectrale 25-40 nm. Les resultats experimentaux montrent que cette combinaison possede une reflectivite d'environ ~25% dans la region spectrale 25-33 nm et une reflectivite d'environ ~23% dans la region spectrale 33-40 nm. Ces valeurs de reflectivite sont les plus grandes obtenues jusqu'a maintenant dans la region spectrale 25-40 nm. Les miroirs multicouches ont ete par la suite caracterises par microscopie electronique a transmission, par diverses techniques de diffraction des rayons X et par spectroscopies d'electrons AES et ESCA. La resistance des miroirs aux temperatures elevees a ete egalement etudiee. Les resultats fournis par les methodes de caracterisation indiquent que cette combinaison possede des caracteristiques tres prometteuses pour son application comme miroir pour les rayons X mous.

  6. Single-trial normalization for event-related spectral decomposition reduces sensitivity to noisy trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain eGrandchamp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In EEG research, the classical Event-Related Potential (ERP model often proves to be a limited method when studying complex brain dynamics. For this reason, spectral techniques adapted from signal processing such as Event-Related Spectral Perturbation (ERSP – and its variant ERS (Event-Related Synchronization and ERD (Event-Related Desynchronization – have been used over the past 20-years. They represent average spectral changes in response to a stimulus.These spectral methods do not have strong consensus for comparing pre and post-stimulus activity. When computing ERSP, pre-stimulus baseline removal is usually performed after averaging the spectral estimate of multiple trials. Correcting the baseline of each single-trial prior to averaging spectral estimates is an alternative baseline correction method. However, we show that this method leads to positively skewed post-stimulus ERSP values. We eventually present new single-trial based ERSP baseline correction methods that perform trial normalization or centering prior to applying classical baseline correction methods. We show that single-trial correction methods minimize the contribution of artifactual data trials with high-amplitude spectral estimates and are robust to outliers when performing statistical inference testing. We then characterize these methods in terms of their time-frequency responses and behavior when performing statistical inference testing compared to classical ERSP methods.

  7. Effective Spectral Indices of Core and Extended Emissions for Radio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Results show that the core spectral index is different from the extended spectral index with the middle values approximately being. 0 and 0.8 respectively. Key words. Active galatic nuclei: radio ... Guangzhou City, and the research fund of Hunan University of Arts and Science. (JJZD 201101). References. Fan Jun-Hui, Yang ...

  8. Separation of Atmospheric and Surface Spectral Features in Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2000-01-01

    We present two algorithms for the separation of spectral features caused by atmospheric and surface components in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. One algorithm uses radiative transfer and successive least squares fitting to find spectral shapes first for atmospheric dust, then for water-ice aerosols, and then, finally, for surface emissivity. A second independent algorithm uses a combination of factor analysis, target transformation, and deconvolution to simultaneously find dust, water ice, and surface emissivity spectral shapes. Both algorithms have been applied to TES spectra, and both find very similar atmospheric and surface spectral shapes. For TES spectra taken during aerobraking and science phasing periods in nadir-geometry these two algorithms give meaningful and usable surface emissivity spectra that can be used for mineralogical identification.

  9. Spectral Sequences of Type Ia Supernovae. I. Connecting Normal and Subluminous SNe Ia and the Presence of Unburned Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heringer, E.; Kerkwijk, M. H. van [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Sim, S. A. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kerzendorf, W. E. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-09-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are generally agreed to arise from thermonuclear explosions of carbon–oxygen white dwarfs. The actual path to explosion, however, remains elusive, with numerous plausible parent systems and explosion mechanisms suggested. Observationally, SNe Ia have multiple subclasses, distinguished by their light curves and spectra. This raises the question of whether these indicate that multiple mechanisms occur in nature or that explosions have a large but continuous range of physical properties. We revisit the idea that normal and 91bg-like SNe can be understood as part of a spectral sequence in which changes in temperature dominate. Specifically, we find that a single ejecta structure is sufficient to provide reasonable fits of both the normal SN Ia SN 2011fe and the 91bg-like SN 2005bl, provided that the luminosity and thus temperature of the ejecta are adjusted appropriately. This suggests that the outer layers of the ejecta are similar, thus providing some support for a common explosion mechanism. Our spectral sequence also helps to shed light on the conditions under which carbon can be detected in premaximum SN Ia spectra—we find that emission from iron can “fill in” the carbon trough in cool SNe Ia. This may indicate that the outer layers of the ejecta of events in which carbon is detected are relatively metal-poor compared to events in which carbon is not detected.

  10. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the ...

  11. Normal spectral emittance of Inconel 718 aeronautical alloy coated with yttria stabilized zirconia films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Fernández, L.; Campo, L. del; Pérez-Sáez, R.B.; Tello, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Emittance of Inconel 718 coated with plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia. ► The coating is opaque for λ > 9 μm and semi-transparent for λ 9 μm. In the semi-transparent region, the contribution of the radiation emitted by the Inconel 718 substrate to the global emittance of the samples is analysed. In addition, the influence of the roughness in the emittance values in the opaque spectral region is discussed. Finally, the total normal emittance is obtained as a function of the TBC thickness.

  12. Standard Test Method for Normal Spectral Emittance at Elevated Temperatures of Nonconducting Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1971-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes an accurate technique for measuring the normal spectral emittance of electrically nonconducting materials in the temperature range from 1000 to 1800 K, and at wavelengths from 1 to 35 μm. It is particularly suitable for measuring the normal spectral emittance of materials such as ceramic oxides, which have relatively low thermal conductivity and are translucent to appreciable depths (several millimetres) below the surface, but which become essentially opaque at thicknesses of 10 mm or less. 1.2 This test method requires expensive equipment and rather elaborate precautions, but produces data that are accurate to within a few percent. It is particularly suitable for research laboratories, where the highest precision and accuracy are desired, and is not recommended for routine production or acceptance testing. Because of its high accuracy, this test method may be used as a reference method to be applied to production and acceptance testing in case of dispute. 1.3 This test metho...

  13. Spectral differentiation of atmospheric fluorescent events from background Cerenkov emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.L.; Sanecha, V.K.; Mitra, A.K.; Sapru, M.L.; Razdan, H.

    1985-01-01

    A pair of optical filters, one with transmission characteristics compatible with the atmospheric fluorescent bands and the other responding to longer wavelengths lying outside these bands, is shown to provide an efficent method for detecting fluorescent events in the presence of background Cerenkov emissions. The attendant reduction in the light of the sky at night provides the additional advantage of higher signal-to-noise ratio. (author)

  14. Infrared emission high spectral resolution atlas of the stratospheric limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, William C.; Kunde, Virgil G.; Herath, Lawrence W.

    1989-01-01

    An atlas of high resolution infrared emission spectra identifies a number of gaseous atmospheric features significant to stratospheric chemistry in the 770-900/cm and 1100-1360/cm regions at six zenith angles from 86.7 to 95.1 deg. A balloon-borne Michelson interferometer was flown to obtain about 0.03/cm resolution spectra. Two 10/cm extracts are presented here.

  15. The role of spectral and temporal cues in voice gender discrimination by normal-hearing listeners and cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qian-Jie; Chinchilla, Sherol; Galvin, John J

    2004-09-01

    The present study investigated the relative importance of temporal and spectral cues in voice gender discrimination and vowel recognition by normal-hearing subjects listening to an acoustic simulation of cochlear implant speech processing and by cochlear implant users. In the simulation, the number of speech processing channels ranged from 4 to 32, thereby varying the spectral resolution; the cutoff frequencies of the channels' envelope filters ranged from 20 to 320 Hz, thereby manipulating the available temporal cues. For normal-hearing subjects, results showed that both voice gender discrimination and vowel recognition scores improved as the number of spectral channels was increased. When only 4 spectral channels were available, voice gender discrimination significantly improved as the envelope filter cutoff frequency was increased from 20 to 320 Hz. For all spectral conditions, increasing the amount of temporal information had no significant effect on vowel recognition. Both voice gender discrimination and vowel recognition scores were highly variable among implant users. The performance of cochlear implant listeners was similar to that of normal-hearing subjects listening to comparable speech processing (4-8 spectral channels). The results suggest that both spectral and temporal cues contribute to voice gender discrimination and that temporal cues are especially important for cochlear implant users to identify the voice gender when there is reduced spectral resolution.

  16. Thermal radio emission : The brightness temperature and the spectral index of radio emission

    OpenAIRE

    Prigara, F. V.

    2001-01-01

    The condition of radio emission is proposed, on the base of which the theory of themal radio emission for gaseous disk is developed. This theory explains the radio emission spectra of known types of extended radio sources, located beyond the Solar planetary system. Besides, the thermal radio emission spectra of Venus and Jupiter are explained.

  17. The Correlation of Spectral Lag Evolution with Prompt Optical Emission in GRB 080319B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatikos, Michael; Ukwatta, Tilan N.; Sakamoto, Takanori; Dhuga, Kalvir S.; Toma, Kenji; Pe'Er, Asaf; Mészáros, Peter; Band, David L.; Norris, Jay P.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil

    2009-05-01

    We report on observations of correlated behavior between the prompt γ-ray and optical emission from GRB 080319B, which confirm that (i) they occurred within the same astrophysical source region and (ii) their respective radiation mechanisms were dynamically coupled. Our results, based upon a new cross-correlation function (CCF) methodology for determining the time-resolved spectral lag, are summarized as follows. First, the evolution in the arrival offset of prompt γ-ray photon counts between Swift-BAT 15-25 keV and 50-100 keV energy bands (intrinsic γ-ray spectral lag) appears to be anti-correlated with the arrival offset between prompt 15-350 keV γ-rays and the optical emission observed by TORTORA (extrinsic optical/γ-ray spectral lag), thus effectively partitioning the burst into two main episodes at ~T+28+/-2 sec. Second, the rise and decline of prompt optical emission at ~T+10+/-1 sec and ~T+50+/-1 sec, respectively, both coincide with discontinuities in the hard to soft evolution of the photon index for a power law fit to 15-150 keV Swift-BAT data at ~T+8+/-2 sec and ~T+48+/-1 sec. These spectral energy changes also coincide with intervals whose time-resolved spectral lag values are consistent with zero, at ~T+12+/-2 sec and ~T+50+/-2 sec. These results, which are robust across heuristic permutations of Swift-BAT energy channels and varying temporal bin resolution, have also been corroborated via independent analysis of Konus-Wind data. This potential discovery may provide the first observational evidence for an implicit connection between spectral lags and GRB emission mechanisms in the context of canonical fireball phenomenology. Future work includes exploring a subset of bursts with prompt optical emission to probe the unique or ubiquitous nature of this result.

  18. Measurement of multilayer mirror reflectivity and stimulated emission in the XUV spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, C.; Nam, C.H.; Meixler, L.; Milchberg, H.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Voorhees, D.; Barbee, T.

    1986-03-01

    We present measurements of multilayer mirror reflectivity and stimulated emission in the XUV spectral region. A molybdenum-silicon multilayer mirror with 12% measured reflectivity at 182 A was found to produce a 120% enhancement of the C VI 182 A line (3 → 2 transition) in a strongly recombining plasma. No such enhancement of the CV 186.7 A line was seen, demonstrating amplification of stimulated emission at 182 A

  19. Spectral and interferometric observation of four emission nebulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozinskaya, T.A.; Klement'eva, A.Yu.; Zhukov, G.V.; Shenavrin, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    Results of spectrophotometric and interferometric observations of four emission nebulae are presented; electron temperature Te and electron density Ne are estimated; mean beam velocities and parameters of the internal motion in the nebylae are determined. The following objects have been investigated: 1) a bright compact nebulae of unknown nature 2.5 in size which is identified with the non-thermal radiosource G6.4-0.5 in the region W28; 2) nebulae RCW171 5' in size which is identified with the radiosource G23.1+0.6; 3) the nebulae Simeiz 34/Sharpless 261/d 1950 =6sup(h)05sup(m), sigma 1950 =+15 deg 49'; its diameter is approximately 30 an extensive complex of bright emission fibres in the nebulae Swan, which are partially projected into a possible remainder of the outburst of a supernova W63; L 1950 =20sup(h)17sup(m); S 1950 =45 deg 30' its diameter is approximately 1 deg 5

  20. First Experimental Impulse-Radio Ultra-Wideband Transmission Under the Russian Spectral Emission Mask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grakhova, Elizaveta P.; Rommel, Simon; Jurado-Navas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse-radio wireless transmission under the stringent conditions and complex shape of the Russian spectral emission mask is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Transmission of 1Gbit/s and 1.25Gbit/s signals over distances of 6m and 3m is achieved with a BER below 3.8×10-3....

  1. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5–7.5 × 1013 cm−3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d–4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20–40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  2. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sasaki, Akira; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5-7.5) × 1013 cm-3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d-4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20-40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  3. Rapid subsurface detection of nanoscale defects in live microprocessors by functional infrared emission spectral microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloma, Caesar; Tarun, Alvarado; Bailon, Michelle; Soriano, Maricor

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and nondestructive detection of subsurface nanometer-size defects in 90 nm technology live microprocessors with a new technique called functional infrared emission spectral microscopy. Broken, leaky, and good transistors with similar photoemission images are identified from each other by their different emission spectra that are calculated as linear combinations of weighted basis spectra. The basis spectra are derived from a spectral library by principal component analysis. Leaky transistors do not exhibit apparent morphological damage and are undetectable by optical or scanning probe microscopy alone. The emission signals from two or more transistors combined incoherently, and defect detection is primarily limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected spectrum and not by the separation distance of neighboring transistors.

  4. Time-resolved spectral analysis of prompt emission from long gamma-ray bursts with GeV emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Arikkala Raghurama; Basak Rupal; Bhattacharya Jishnu; Chandra Sarthak; Maheshwari Nikunj; Choudhury Manojendu; Misra Ranjeev

    2014-01-01

    We performed detailed time-resolved spectroscopy of bright long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which show significant GeV emissions (GRB 080916C, GRB 090902B and GRB 090926A). In addition to the standard Band model, we also use a model consisting of a black body and a power law to fit the spectra. We find that for the latter model there are indications of an additional soft component in the spectra. While previous studies have shown that such models are required for GRB 090902B, here we find that a composite spectral model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law adequately fits the data of all the three bright GRBs. We investigate the evolution of the spectral parameters and find several interesting features that appear in all three GRBs, like (a) temperatures of the blackbodies are strongly correlated with each other, (b) fluxes in the black body components are strongly correlated with each other, (c) the temperatures of the black body trace the profile of the individual pulses of the GRBs, and (d) the characteristics of power law components like the spectral index and the delayed onset bear a close similarity to the emission characteristics in the GeV regions. We discuss the implications of these results and the possibility of identifying the radiation mechanisms during the prompt emission of GRBs. (research papers)

  5. Wide-field microscopic FRET imaging using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mengyan; Zhang, Lili; Xie, Shusen; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-07-11

    Simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra (ExEm unmixing) has the inherent ability to resolve donor emission, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-sensitized acceptor emission and directly excited acceptor emission. We here develop an ExEm unmixing-based quantitative FRET measurement method (EES-FRET) independent of excitation intensity and detector parameter setting. The ratio factor (rK), predetermined using a donor-acceptor tandem construct, of total acceptor absorption to total donor absorption in excitation wavelengths used is introduced for determining the concentration ratio of acceptor to donor. We implemented EES-FRET method on a wide-field microscope to image living cells expressing tandem FRET constructs with different donor-acceptor stoichiometry.

  6. Improvement of LOD in Fluorescence Detection with Spectrally Nonuniform Background by Optimization of Emission Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2017-10-17

    The limit-of-detection (LOD) in analytical instruments with fluorescence detection can be improved by reducing noise of optical background. Efficiently reducing optical background noise in systems with spectrally nonuniform background requires complex optimization of an emission filter-the main element of spectral filtration. Here, we introduce a filter-optimization method, which utilizes an expression for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of (i) all noise components (dark, shot, and flicker), (ii) emission spectrum of the analyte, (iii) emission spectrum of the optical background, and (iv) transmittance spectrum of the emission filter. In essence, the noise components and the emission spectra are determined experimentally and substituted into the expression. This leaves a single variable-the transmittance spectrum of the filter-which is optimized numerically by maximizing SNR. Maximizing SNR provides an accurate way of filter optimization, while a previously used approach based on maximizing a signal-to-background ratio (SBR) is the approximation that can lead to much poorer LOD specifically in detection of fluorescently labeled biomolecules. The proposed filter-optimization method will be an indispensable tool for developing new and improving existing fluorescence-detection systems aiming at ultimately low LOD.

  7. Interpretation of the far infrared emission of normal galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, Marc

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this research thesis are to highlight what IR emission of a galaxy tells us about physical phenomena occurring within it, to identify the origin of this radiation, to see whether a high IR luminosity means a high rate of stellar formation, to see if the shape of interstellar radiation field spectrum has a detectable effect in IR emission, and to see whether we can draw constraints on dust abundance by comparing IR emission with other traces of the interstellar medium. The author proposes a synthesis of available observations, discusses the different existing dust models and indicators derived from IRAS (Infrared Astronomical Satellite) observations such as dust temperatures, IR luminosity, or dust mass. He reports the study performed on Magellanic Clouds which represents an extension of the IR study to entire galaxies. In the third part, the author reports the study of the CfA catalogue, a complete sample of optically selected galaxies. The interpretation of IR flows is compared in different environments in order to highlight the effects of distribution on dust in galaxies, and thus to try to establish relationships between the total IR emission of galaxies and their other properties (visible luminosity, colours, neutral gas mass, and so on) [fr

  8. A Correlation of Spectral Lag Evolution with Prompt Optical Emission in GRBs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatikos, Michael; Ukwatta, Tilan N.; Sakamoto, Taka; Dhuga, Kalvir S.

    2008-10-01

    We report on observations of correlated behavior between the prompt γ-ray and optical emission from GRB 080319B, which (i) strongly suggest that they occurred within the same astrophysical source region and (ii) indicate that their respective radiation mechanisms were most likely dynamically coupled. Our preliminary results, based upon a new cross-correlation function (CCF) methodology for determining the time-resolved spectral lag, are summarized as follows. First, the evolution in the arrival offset of prompt γ-ray photon counts between Swift-BAT 15-25 keV and 50-100 keV energy bands (intrinsic γ-ray spectral lag) appears to be anti-correlated with the arrival offset between prompt 15-350 keV γ-rays and the optical emission observed by TORTORA (extrinsic γ-ray/optical lag), thus effectively partitioning the burst into two main episodes at ~T+28+/-2 sec. Second, prompt optical emission is nested within intervals of both (a) trivial intrinsic γ-ray spectral lag (~T+12+/-2 and ~T+50+/-2 sec) with (b) discontinuities in the hard to soft evolution of the photon index for a power law fit to 15-150 keV Swift-BAT data (~T+8+/-2 and ~T+48+/-1 sec), both of which coincide with the rise (~T+10+/-1 sec) and decline (~T+50+/-1 sec) of prompt optical emission. This potential discovery, robust across heuristic permutations of BAT energy channels and varying temporal bin resolution, provides the first observational evidence for an implicit connection between spectral lag and the dynamics of shocks in the context of canonical fireball phenomenology.

  9. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... tron temperature. A power law fit to the electron temperature showed a scaling of I0.47 with laser intensity. Keywords. X-ray spectroscopy; K-shell spectra; plasma diagnostics; ionic line radiation. PACS Nos 52.70.La; 52.70.–m; 52.50.Jm. 1. Introduction. Spectral analysis of the K-shell X-ray emission of ...

  10. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... X-ray spectroscopy; K-shell spectra; plasma diagnostics; ionic line radiation. PACS Nos 52.70.La; 52.70.–m; 52.50.Jm. 1. Introduction. Spectral analysis of the K-shell X-ray emission of plasma produced by intense laser pulses is often used to derive diagnostic information [1] of electron temperature, density, ...

  11. The Effect of Substrate Emissivity on the Spectral Emission of a Hot-Gas Overlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-30

    anode exhaust was fed into a 10 cm gas cell and the absorbance was measured with an FTIR spectrometer (b). 4 H. D. Ladouceur, J. D...transform infrared ( FTIR ) emission spectroscopy, recently implemented for in operando testing of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes by Pomfret and...coworkers, has become a novel means to directly measure the radiative emission of hot gases within the volume over an anode surface. Ideally, the FTIR

  12. Speech recognition in normal hearing and sensorineural hearing loss as a function of the number of spectral channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz

    2006-01-01

    Speech recognition by normal-hearing listeners improves as a function of the number of spectral channels when tested with a noiseband vocoder simulating cochlear implant signal processing. Speech recognition by the best cochlear implant users, however, saturates around eight channels and does not

  13. Electron emission from laser irradiating target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 171, 9-10 (2016), s. 754-765 ISSN 1042-0150. [12th Workshop on European Collaboration for Higher Education and Research in Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Protection. Bologna, Catania, Milan, 30.05.2016-01.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : electron emission from plasma * TNSA * TOF * SiC * plastic scintillator * Thomson parabola spectrometer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.443, year: 2016

  14. Macular thickness and macular volume measurements using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in normal Nepalese eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokharel A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amrit Pokharel,1 Gauri Shankar Shrestha,2 Jyoti Baba Shrestha2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, 2B P Koirala Lions Centre for Ophthalmic Studies, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal Purpose: To record the normative values for macular thickness and macular volume in normal Nepalese eyes. Methods: In all, 126 eyes of 63 emmetropic subjects (mean age: 21.17±6.76 years; range: 10–37 years were assessed for macular thickness and macular volume, using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography over 6×6 mm2 in the posterior pole. A fast macular thickness protocol was employed. Statistics such as the mean, median, standard deviation, percentiles, and range were used, while a P-value was set at 0.05 to test significance. Results: Average macular thickness and total macular volume were larger in males compared to females. With each year of increasing age, these variables decreased by 0.556 µm and 0.0156 mm3 for average macular thickness and total macular volume, respectively. The macular thickness was greatest in the inner superior section and lowest at the center of the fovea. The volume was greatest in the outer nasal section and thinnest in the fovea. The central subfield thickness (r=-0.243, P=0.055 and foveal volume (r=0.216, P=0.09 did not correlate with age. Conclusion: Males and females differ significantly with regard to macular thickness and macular volume measurements. Reports by other studies that the increase in axial length reduced thickness and volume, were negated by this study which found a positive correlation among axial length, thickness, and volume. Keywords: macular thickness, macular volume, optical coherence tomography, Nepal

  15. Radiological impact of emissions from reprocessing plants during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.; Gruendler, D.; Hesel, D.; Muenster, M.; Schmidtlein, P.; Suender, B.

    1977-01-01

    When comparing the expected radiation exposure due to emissions from reprocessing plants with those from nuclear power plants it can be seen that the emissions from reprocessing plants contribute much more to the radiation exposure of the population than those from nuclear power plants. In the vicinity of reprocessing plants the highest contributions to the radiation exposure of the population are delivered by the following radionuclides: T, C 14 , Kr 85 , Sr 90 , Ru 106 , I 129 , Cs 134 , Cs 137 and Ce 144 as will as the Pu- and Cm-isotopes. Among these nuclides T, C 14 , Kr 85 und I 129 are globally distributed. While for T the contribution to the collective dose due to globally distributed T is small in comparison with the first pass exposure, the global contribution predominates for C 14 and Kr 85 . If an integration time of less than 10 5 years is considered, the contribution due to first pass exposure predominates for I 129 . When taking the radiation protection of the population into consideration, it seems sensible to retain 10% of T, 80 to 90% of C 14 , 90% of Kr 85 and 99,5% of I 129 in reprocessing plants and dispose of this material in a controlled manner. The fraction of the aerosols released should be about 10 -9 . Considering the global effects and the increasing number of nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants, an international agreement should be reached on these matters. (orig.) [de

  16. Facility for assessing spectral normal emittance of solid materials at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercatelli, Luca; Meucci, Marco; Sani, Elisa

    2015-10-10

    Spectral emittance is a key topic in the study of new compositions, depositions, and mechanical machining of materials for solar absorption and for renewable energies in general. The present work reports on the realization and testing of a new experimental facility for the measurement of directional spectral emittance in the range of 2.5-20 μm. Our setup provides emittance spectral information in a completely controlled environment at medium-high temperatures up to 1200 K. We describe the layout and first tests on the device, comparing the results obtained for hafnium carbide and tantalum diboride ultrarefractory ceramic samples to previous quasi-monochromatic measurements carried out in the PROMES-CNRS (PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire- Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France) solar furnace, obtaining a good agreement. Finally, to assess the reliability of the widely used approach of estimating the spectral emittance from room-temperature reflectance spectrum, we compared the calculation in the 2.5-17 μm spectral range to the experimental high-temperature spectral emittance, obtaining that the spectral trend of calculated and measured curves is similar but the calculated emittance underestimates the measured value.

  17. On the Origin of the Flare Emission in IRIS ’ SJI 2832 Filter:Balmer Continuum or Spectral Lines?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleint, Lucia; Krucker, Säm [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Heinzel, Petr [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Fričova 298, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic)

    2017-03-10

    Continuum (“white-light,” WL) emission dominates the energetics of flares. Filter-based observations, such as the IRIS SJI 2832 filter, show WL-like brightenings during flares, but it is unclear whether the emission arises from real continuum emission or enhanced spectral lines, possibly turning into emission. The difficulty in filter-based observations, contrary to spectral observations, is to determine which processes contribute to the observed brightening during flares. Here we determine the contribution of the Balmer continuum and the spectral line emission to IRIS ’ SJI 2832 emission by analyzing the appropriate passband in simultaneous IRIS NUV spectra. We find that spectral line emission can contribute up to 100% to the observed slitjaw images (SJI) emission, that the relative contributions usually temporally vary, and that the highest SJI enhancements that are observed are most likely because of the Balmer continuum. We conclude that care should be taken when calling SJI 2832 a continuum filter during flares, because the influence of the lines on the emission can be significant.

  18. Evaluation of wavelength shifters for spectral separation of barium fluoride emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVol, Timothy A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1993-01-01

    BaF2 has the advantage over other scintillators, when comparing radiation hardness, scintillation decay time, and fast scintillation yield. Since the fast BaF2 emissions have peak wavelengths of 220, 195, and 170 nm, a wavelength shifter (WLS) is needed. Organic fluors were evaluated as WLS components. Results indicate that spectral separation using WLS is possible, but not to the extent desired; other techniques must be used also. Alternative scintillators, such as CeF3, should be investigated.

  19. Spontaneous emission and the natural broadening shape of spectral lines in the T-matrix theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gainutdinov, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Electronic bound states in the nuclear field and the spontaneous emission of hydrogenlike ions are investigated within the bounds of the approach to the quantum theory of scattering proposed by the author. In the process, it is clear that one must consider the instability of the excited states. We derived equations from determination of the operators C(z) and M(z), describing the energy distribution of the bound states, and of the processes of emission and absorption, without resorting to perturbation theory. These operators describe the natural broadening shape of the spectral lines which can, for example, for very heavy multiply charged ions, differ substantially from Lorentzian. They also describe the relative line intensities

  20. Spectral properties of americium(III) in silicate matrices. Concentration-dependent up-conversion emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assefa, Zerihun; Haire, R.G.; Stump, N.

    2002-01-01

    We have been pursuing the spectroscopic properties of actinide ions in silicate matrices. One facet of these studies involves the behavior of Stokes and anti-Stokes emissions exhibited by Am 3+ in these hosts. Several attributes have been found to influence the spectral profile, which include excitation wavelength, laser power, and dopant-concentration. Excitation with the 514.5 nm (19435 cm -1 ) line of argon laser provides anti-Stokes emissions at 21100 and ∼19920 cm -1 in the borosilicate matrices. This up-conversion was found to proceed through a multi-photon scheme, and the efficiency increases with increased dopant concentration. Based on our concentration-dependent studies, the up-conversion is suggested to involve a cross-relaxation process [( 5 D 1' , 7 F 0' ) ( 7 F 6' , 7 F 2' )] between neighboring americium ions. (author)

  1. On- and off-axis spectral emission features from laser-produced gas breakdown plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Skrodzki, P. J.; Miloshevsky, A.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Miloshevsky, G.

    2017-06-01

    Laser-heated gas breakdown plasmas or sparks emit profoundly in the ultraviolet and visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum with contributions from ionic, atomic, and molecular species. Laser created kernels expand into a cold ambient with high velocities during its early lifetime followed by confinement of the plasma kernel and eventually collapse. However, the plasma kernels produced during laser breakdown of gases are also capable of exciting and ionizing the surrounding ambient medium. Two mechanisms can be responsible for excitation and ionization of surrounding ambient: viz. photoexcitation and ionization by intense ultraviolet emission from the sparks produced during the early times of its creation and/or heating by strong shocks generated by the kernel during its expansion into the ambient. In this study, an investigation is made on the spectral features of on- and off-axis emission features of laser-induced plasma breakdown kernels generated in atmospheric pressure conditions with an aim to elucidate the mechanisms leading to ambient excitation and emission. Pulses from an Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm with 6 ns pulse duration are used to generate plasma kernels. Laser sparks were generated in air, argon, and helium gases to provide different physical properties of expansion dynamics and plasma chemistry considering the differences in laser absorption properties, mass density and speciation. Point shadowgraphy and time-resolved imaging were used to evaluate the shock wave and spark self-emission morphology at early and late times while space and time resolved spectroscopy is used for evaluating the emission features as well as for inferring plasma fundaments at on- and off-axis. Structure and dynamics of the plasma kernel obtained using imaging techniques are also compared to numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics code. The emission from the kernel showed that spectral features from ions, atoms and molecules are separated in

  2. Interference filter spectral imaging of twilight O+(2P-2D emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ma

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available A spectral imager specifically designed to measure the O+(2P-2D emission in the thermosphere during twilight has been constructed and tested in Toronto (43.8°N, 79.3°W, and found to show promise for long-term and campaign-mode operations. A modification of the mesopause oxygen rotational temperature imager (MORTI, it consists basically of a narrow-band interference filter (0.14 nm bandwidth to separate wavelengths as a function of off-axis angle, a lens to focus the spectrum into a series of concentric rings, and a focal plane array (CCD to record the spectral images in digital form. The instrument was built with two fields of view, one for the zenith and one for 20° above the horizon, movable to track the azimuth of the Sun, in order to provide appropriate data for inversion. Data gathered during June 1991 provided measurements of the column-integrated emission rate with a precision of about 3%. An atomic oxygen profile was deduced that showed good agreement with that predicted by the MSIS-90 model atmosphere. Geomagnetically induced variations of the O+ lines, calcium spectra resulting from meteor showers, and OH nightglow were also observed.

  3. Interference filter spectral imaging of twilight O+(2P-2D emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Wiens

    Full Text Available A spectral imager specifically designed to measure the O+(2P-2D emission in the thermosphere during twilight has been constructed and tested in Toronto (43.8°N, 79.3°W, and found to show promise for long-term and campaign-mode operations. A modification of the mesopause oxygen rotational temperature imager (MORTI, it consists basically of a narrow-band interference filter (0.14 nm bandwidth to separate wavelengths as a function of off-axis angle, a lens to focus the spectrum into a series of concentric rings, and a focal plane array (CCD to record the spectral images in digital form. The instrument was built with two fields of view, one for the zenith and one for 20° above the horizon, movable to track the azimuth of the Sun, in order to provide appropriate data for inversion. Data gathered during June 1991 provided measurements of the column-integrated emission rate with a precision of about 3%. An atomic oxygen profile was deduced that showed good agreement with that predicted by the MSIS-90 model atmosphere. Geomagnetically induced variations of the O+ lines, calcium spectra resulting from meteor showers, and OH nightglow were also observed.

  4. Different patterns of perceptual learning on spectral modulation detection between older hearing-impaired and younger normal-hearing adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Andrew T; Clark, Cynthia A; Eddins, David A; Wright, Beverly A

    2013-04-01

    Young adults with normal hearing (YNH) can improve their sensitivity to basic acoustic features with practice. However, it is not known to what extent the influence of the same training regimen differs between YNH listeners and older listeners with hearing impairment (OHI)--the largest population seeking treatment in audiology clinics. To examine this issue, we trained OHI listeners on a basic auditory task (spectral modulation detection) using a training regimen previously administered to YNH listeners (≈ 1 h/session for seven sessions on a single condition). For the trained conditions on which pretraining performance was not already at asymptote, the YNH listeners who received training learned more than matched controls who received none, but that learning did not generalize to any untrained spectral modulation frequency. In contrast, the OHI-trained listeners and controls learned similar amounts on the trained condition, implying no effect of the training itself. However, surprisingly the OHI-trained listeners improved over the training phase and on an untrained spectral modulation frequency. These population differences suggest that learning consolidated more slowly, and that training modified an aspect of processing that had broader tuning to spectral modulation frequency, in OHI than YNH listeners. More generally, these results demonstrate that conclusions about perceptual learning that come from examination of one population do not necessarily apply to another.

  5. Spectral classification indicators of emission-line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fei; Liu, Yu-Yan; Li, Pei-Yu; Yu, Ming; Lei, Yu-Ming; Wang, Jian

    2015-07-01

    To find efficient spectral classification diagrams to classify emission-line galaxies, especially in large surveys and huge data bases, an artificial neural network (ANN) supervised learning algorithms is applied to a sample of emission-line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 9 provided by the Max Planck Institute and the Johns Hopkins University (MPA/JHU) (http://www.sdss3.org/dr9/spectro/spectroaccess.php). A two-step approach is adopted. (i) The ANN network must be trained with a subset of objects that are known to be active galactic nuclei (AGNs) hosts, composites or star-forming galaxies, treating the strong emission-line flux measurements as input feature vectors in n-dimensional space, where n is the number of strong emission-line flux ratios. (ii) After the network is trained on a sample of galaxies, the remaining galaxies are classified in the automatic test analysis as AGN hosts, composites or star-forming galaxies. We show that the classification diagrams based on the [N II]/Hα versus other emission-line ratio, such as [O III]/Hβ, [Ne III]/[O II], ([O III]λ4959 + [O III]λ5007)/[O III]λ4363, [O II]/Hβ, [Ar III]/[O III], [S II]/Hα, and [O I]/Hα, plus colour, allows us to separate unambiguously AGN hosts, composites or star-forming galaxies. Among them, the diagram of [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ achieved an accuracy of 98 per cent for classification of AGN hosts, composites or star-forming galaxies. The other diagrams above except the diagram of [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ give an accuracy of ˜90 per cent. The code in the paper is available on the web (http://fshi5388.blog.163.com).

  6. Effects of normal and extreme turbulence spectral parameters on wind turbine loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Natarajan, Anand; Mann, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Loads simulations as performed to obtain design loads on wind turbines, requires wind turbulence as an input, characterized by parameters associated with the turbulence length scale, dissipation and anisotropy. The effect of variation in these turbulence spectral parameters on the magnitude...... the recommended values in the IEC 61400-1 Ed.3 that is used for wind turbine design. The present paper investigates the impact of Mann turbulence model parameter variations on the design loads envelope for 5 MW and 10 MW reference wind turbines. Specific focus is made on the blade root loads, tower top moments...

  7. [Desmoid fibromatosis in absorption infrared spectroscopy, emission spectral analysis and roentgen diffraction recording].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zejkan, A; Bejcek, Z; Horejs, J; Vrbová, H; Bakosová, M; Macholda, F; Rykl, D

    1989-10-01

    The authors present results of serial quality and quantity microanalyses of bone patterns and dental tissue patterns in patient with desmoid fibromatosis. Methods of absorption spectroscopy, emission spectral analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis with follow-up to x-ray examination are tested. The above mentioned methods function in a on-line system by means of specially adjusted monitor unit which is controlled centrally by the computer processor system. The whole process of measurement is fully automated and the data obtained are recorded processed in the unit data structure classified into index sequence blocks of data. Serial microanalyses offer exact data for the study of structural changes of dental and bone tissues which manifest themselves in order of crystal grid shifts. They prove the fact that microanalyses give new possibilities in detection and interpretation of chemical and structural changes of apatite cell.

  8. The Spectral Emission Characteristics of Laser Induced Plasma on Tea Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Peichao; Shi Minjie; Wang Jinmei; Liu Hongdi

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a useful technique for food security as well as determining nutrition contents. In this paper, optical emission studies of laser induced plasma on commercial tea samples were carried out. The spectral intensities of Mg, Mn, Ca, Al, C and CN vibration bands varying with laser energy and the detection delay time of an intensified charge coupled device were studied. In addition, the relative concentrations of six microelements, i.e., Mg, Mn, Ca, Al, Na and K, were analyzed semi-quantitatively as well as H, for four kinds of tea samples. Moreover, the plasma parameters were explored, including electron temperature and electron number density. The electron temperature and electron number density were around 11000 K and 10 17 cm −3 , respectively. The results show that it is reasonable to consider the LIBS technique as a new method for analyzing the compositions of tea leaf samples. (paper)

  9. Mapping the spectral phase of isolated attosecond pulses by extreme-ultraviolet emission spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Candong; Zeng, Zhinan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Nisoli, Mauro

    2015-04-20

    An all-optical method is proposed for the measurement of the spectral phase of isolated attosecond pulses. The technique is based on the generation of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation in a gas by the combination of an attosecond pulse and a strong infrared (IR) pulse with controlled electric field. By using a full quantum simulation, we demonstrate that, for particular temporal delays between the two pulses, the IR field can drive back to the parent ions the photoelectrons generated by the attosecond pulse, thus leading to the generation of XUV photons. It is found that the generated XUV spectrum is notably sensitive to the chirp of the attosecond pulse, which can then be reliably retrieved. A classical quantum-path analysis is further used to quantitatively explain the main features exhibited in the XUV emission.

  10. PABS: A Computer Program to Normalize Emission Probabilities and Calculate Realistic Uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, D.S.; Browne, E.; Norman, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    The program PABS normalizes relative particle emission probabilities to an absolute scale and calculates the relevant uncertainties on this scale. The program is written in Java using the JDK 1.6 library. For additional information about system requirements, the code itself, and compiling from source, see the README file distributed with this program. The mathematical procedures used are given.

  11. Normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  12. Symmetry of retinal parameters measured by spectral-domain OCT in normal young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgliesh, James D; Tariq, Yasser M; Burlutsky, George; Mitchell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    To determine interocular differences in retinal parameters in a population of young adults using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. In the Sydney Adolescent Vascular Eye Study, young adults aged 16 to 19 years received a standardized eye examination encompassing retinal photography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (Cirrus HD-OCT; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) and best-corrected visual acuity. Interocular differences in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macular parameters together with sex and ethnic variations for these differences were determined. In the 1500 subjects tested, right eyes had thicker average RNFL than left eyes (0.3 μm, P=0.0074). There were no significant interocular differences in central macular or macular cube average thickness. After adjusting for interocular difference in axial length, right eyes had slightly smaller total macular volume than left eyes (-0.0082 mm, P=0.008). The 2.5% to 97.5% limits of asymmetry were 9.3 μm for average RNFL, 8 μm for average macular thickness, and 0.20 mm for total macular volume. In the outer inferior quadrant, there was a greater macular thickness asymmetry in females than males (-0.7 μm, P=0.037). In the inferior RNFL quadrant (-2.6 μm, P=0.0013) and in the outer inferior macular quadrant (1.6 μm, P=0.0018), white individuals had greater symmetry than East Asians. In this study, we report the degree of interocular symmetry of RNFL and macular parameters measured by Cirrus HD-OCT in healthy young adults.

  13. Recognition of normal-abnormal phonocardiographic signals using deep convolutional neural networks and mel-frequency spectral coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maknickas, Vykintas; Maknickas, Algirdas

    2017-07-31

    Intensive care unit patients are heavily monitored, and several clinically-relevant parameters are routinely extracted from high resolution signals. The goal of the 2016 PhysioNet/CinC Challenge was to encourage the creation of an intelligent system that fused information from different phonocardiographic signals to create a robust set of normal/abnormal signal detections. Deep convolutional neural networks and mel-frequency spectral coefficients were used for recognition of normal-abnormal phonocardiographic signals of the human heart. This technique was developed using the PhysioNet.org Heart Sound database and was submitted for scoring on the challenge test set. The current entry for the proposed approach obtained an overall score of 84.15% in the last phase of the challenge, which provided the sixth official score and differs from the best score of 86.02% by just 1.87%.

  14. Suomi NPP CrIS Level 1B Normal Spectral Resolution V1 (SNPPCrISL1BNSR) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Level 1B Normal Spectral Resolution (NSR) data files contain radiance measurements along with ancillary spacecraft,...

  15. Pulse shaping for high data rate ultra-wideband wireless transmission under the Russian spectral emission mask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Grakhova, Elizaveta P.; Jurado-Navas, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) transmission under the Russian spectral emission mask for unlicensed UWB radio communications. Four pulse shapes are proposed and their bit error rate (BER) performance is both estimated analytically and evaluated experimentally. Well...

  16. Pulse Shaping for High Capacity Impulse Radio Ultra-Wideband Wireless Links Under the Russian Spectral Emission Mask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grakhova, Elizaveta P.; Rommel, Simon; Jurado-Navas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Two pulse shapes for IR-UWB transmission under the Russian spectral emission mask are proposed and their potential experimentally demonstrated. Pulses based on the hyperbolic secant square function and the frequency B-spline wavelet are shown to enable transmission of 1.25 Gbit/s signals, reachin...

  17. Pulse Shaping for High Capacity Impulse Radio Ultra-Wideband Wireless Links Under the Russian Spectral Emission Mask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grakhova, Elizaveta P.; Rommel, Simon; Jurado-Navas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Two pulse shapes for IR-UWB transmission under the Russian spectral emission mask are proposed and their potential experimentally demonstrated. Pulses based on the hyperbolic secant square function and the frequency B-spline wavelet are shown to enable transmission of 1.25 Gbit/s signals, reaching...

  18. Ion-Scale Spectral Break in the Normal Plasma Beta Range in the Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C.-Y.; He, J.-S.; Wang, L.-H.

    2018-01-01

    The spectral break (fb) of magnetic fluctuations at the ion scale in the solar wind is considered to give important clue on the turbulence dissipation mechanism. Among several possible mechanisms, the most notable two are related respectively to proton thermal gyroradius ρi and proton inertial length di. The corresponding frequencies of them are fρi=VSW/(2πρi) and fdi=VSW/(2πdi), respectively, where VSW is the solar wind speed. However, no definite conclusion has been given for which one is more reasonable because the two parameters have similar value when plasma beta β ˜ 1. Here we do a statistical study to see if the two ratios fb/fρi and fb/fdi have different dependence on β in the solar wind turbulence with 0.1 fdi is statistically not dependent on β, and the average value of it is 0.48 ± 0.06. However, fb/fρi increases with increasing β clearly and is significantly smaller than fb/fdi when β fdi, and the influence of β could be negligible in the studied β range. It indicates a preference of the dissipation mechanism associated with di in the solar wind with 0.1 < β < 0.8. Further theoretical studies are needed to give detailed explanation.

  19. Spectrally narrowed leaky waveguide edge emission and transient electrluminescent dynamics of OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengqing, Gan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    In summary, there are two major research works presented in this dissertation. The first research project (Chapter 4) is spectrally narrowed edge emission from Organic Light Emitting Diodes. The second project (Chapter 5) is about transient electroluminescent dynamics in OLEDs. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of OLEDs. Chapter 2 is a general introduction of organic semiconductor lasers. Chapter 3 is a description of the thermal evaporation method for OLED fabrication. The detail of the first project was presented in Chapter 4. Extremely narrowed spectrum was observed from the edge of OLED devices. A threshold thickness exists, above which the spectrum is narrow, and below which the spectrum is broad. The FWHM of spectrum depends on the material of the organic thin films, the thickness of the organic layers, and length of the OLED device. A superlinear relationship between the output intensity of the edge emission and the length of the device was observed, which is probably due to the misalignment of the device edge and the optical fiber detector. The original motivation of this research is for organic semiconductor laser that hasn't been realized due to the extremely high photon absorption in OLED devices. Although we didn't succeed in fabricating an electrically pumped organic laser diode, we made a comprehensive research in edge emission of OLEDs which provides valuable results in understanding light distribution and propagation in OLED devices. Chapter 5 focuses on the second project. A strong spike was observed at the falling edge of a pulse, and a long tail followed. The spike was due to the recombination of correlated charge pair (CCP) created by trapped carriers in guest molecules of the recombination zone. When the bias was turned off, along with the decreasing of electric field in the device, the electric field induced quenching decreases and the recombination rate of the CCP increases which result in the spike. This research project provides

  20. Spectrally narrowed leaky waveguide edge emission and transient electrluminescent dynamics of OLEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhengqing, Gan

    2010-01-01

    In summary, there are two major research works presented in this dissertation. The first research project (Chapter 4) is spectrally narrowed edge emission from Organic Light Emitting Diodes. The second project (Chapter 5) is about transient electroluminescent dynamics in OLEDs. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of OLEDs. Chapter 2 is a general introduction of organic semiconductor lasers. Chapter 3 is a description of the thermal evaporation method for OLED fabrication. The detail of the first project was presented in Chapter 4. Extremely narrowed spectrum was observed from the edge of OLED devices. A threshold thickness exists, above which the spectrum is narrow, and below which the spectrum is broad. The FWHM of spectrum depends on the material of the organic thin films, the thickness of the organic layers, and length of the OLED device. A superlinear relationship between the output intensity of the edge emission and the length of the device was observed, which is probably due to the misalignment of the device edge and the optical fiber detector. The original motivation of this research is for organic semiconductor laser that hasn't been realized due to the extremely high photon absorption in OLED devices. Although we didn't succeed in fabricating an electrically pumped organic laser diode, we made a comprehensive research in edge emission of OLEDs which provides valuable results in understanding light distribution and propagation in OLED devices. Chapter 5 focuses on the second project. A strong spike was observed at the falling edge of a pulse, and a long tail followed. The spike was due to the recombination of correlated charge pair (CCP) created by trapped carriers in guest molecules of the recombination zone. When the bias was turned off, along with the decreasing of electric field in the device, the electric field induced quenching decreases and the recombination rate of the CCP increases which result in the spike. This research project provides a

  1. Distortion-Product Otoacoustic Emission Measured Below 300 Hz in Normal-Hearing Human Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez Pizarro, Rodrigo Eduardo; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    , a custom-built low-frequency acoustic probe was put to use in 21 normal-hearing human subjects (of 34 recruited). Distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) was measured in the enclosed ear canal volume as the response to two simultaneously presented tones with frequencies f1 and f2. The stimulus......Physiological noise levels in the human ear canal often exceed naturally low levels of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) near the threshold of hearing. Low-frequency noise, and electronic filtering to cope with it, has effectively limited the study of OAE to frequencies above about 500 Hz. Presently...

  2. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  3. State-of-the art comparability of corrected emission spectra. 1. Spectral correction with physical transfer standards and spectral fluorescence standards by expert laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch-Genger, Ute; Bremser, Wolfram; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Spieles, Monika; Hoffmann, Angelika; DeRose, Paul C; Zwinkels, Joanne C; Gauthier, François; Ebert, Bernd; Taubert, R Dieter; Monte, Christian; Voigt, Jan; Hollandt, Jörg; Macdonald, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    The development of fluorescence applications in the life and material sciences has proceeded largely without sufficient concern for the measurement uncertainties related to the characterization of fluorescence instruments. In this first part of a two-part series on the state-of-the-art comparability of corrected emission spectra, four National Metrology Institutes active in high-precision steady-state fluorometry performed a first comparison of fluorescence measurement capabilities by evaluating physical transfer standard (PTS)-based and reference material (RM)-based calibration methods. To identify achievable comparability and sources of error in instrument calibration, the emission spectra of three test dyes in the wavelength region from 300 to 770 nm were corrected and compared using both calibration methods. The results, obtained for typical spectrofluorometric (0°/90° transmitting) and colorimetric (45°/0° front-face) measurement geometries, demonstrated a comparability of corrected emission spectra within a relative standard uncertainty of 4.2% for PTS- and 2.4% for RM-based spectral correction when measurements and calibrations were performed under identical conditions. Moreover, the emission spectra of RMs F001 to F005, certified by BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, were confirmed. These RMs were subsequently used for the assessment of the comparability of RM-based corrected emission spectra of field laboratories using common commercial spectrofluorometers and routine measurement conditions in part 2 of this series (subsequent paper in this issue).

  4. Comparison of choroidal thickness measurements between spectral-domain OCT and swept-source OCT in normal and diseased eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sidra; Siddiqui, Ma Rehman; Shahzad, Rida

    2016-01-01

    Sub-foveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) is affected in many ocular diseases. The aim of this study was to compare SFCT measurements between Topcon 3D 2000 spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and Topcon swept-source OCT (SS-OCT), with different laser wavelengths, in normal and diseased populations. This was a prospective, cross-sectional, noninterventional study including 27 normal volunteers and 27 participants with retinal disease. OCT scans were performed sequentially and under standardized conditions using both SD-OCT and SS-OCT. The OCT scans were evaluated by two independent graders. Paired t -tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess the statistically significant difference between SFCT measurements as measured by the two devices. Mean SFCT measurements for all 54 participants were 264.9±103.1 μm using SD-OCT (range: 47-470 μm) and 278.5±110.5 μm using SS-OCT (range: 56-502 μm), with an inter-device ICC of 0.850. Greater variability was noted in the diseased eyes. Inter-device ICCs were 0.870 (95% CI; 0.760-0.924) and 0.840 (95% CI; 0.654-0.930) for normal and diseased eyes, respectively. However, the difference was not statistically significant ( P =0.132). Both machines reliably measure SFCT. Larger studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  5. EEG spectral power and cognitive performance during sleep inertia: the effect of normal sleep duration and partial sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Patricia; Bonnefond, Anne; Engasser, Ophélie; Hoeft, Alain; Eschenlauer, Roland; Muzet, Alain

    2006-01-30

    Sleep inertia (SI) is a transient period occurring immediately after awakening, usually characterized by performance decrement. When sleep is sufficient, SI is moderate, and produces few or no deficit. When it is associated with prior sleep deprivation, SI shows dose-dependent negative effects on cognitive performance, especially when subjects have been awaken in slow wave sleep (SWS). In the present study, spectral analysis was applied during the last 10 min before and the first 10 min after awakening, and during 1 h after awakening while subjects performed the Stroop test. Seventeen subjects were divided into a Control group who slept 8 h, and a Sleep Deprived group who slept only 2 h. The results show that performance was normal in the Control group, whereas reaction time was increased during the first half hour and error level during the second half hour in the Sleep Deprived group. Spectral analysis applied on the waking EEG during the whole test session showed that alpha activity was increased in both groups, but theta power only in the Sleep Deprived group. There was a high positive correlation in sleep deprived subjects between delta power during the last 10 min of sleep and subsequent performance decrement in speed and accuracy. Comparison of individual records showed a high positive correlation between spectral power before and after awakening in the Control group (generally in the sense of an increased frequency band), but no correlation was found in the Sleep Deprived group who exhibited a rather disorganized pattern. We discuss these results in terms of incoherence in the EEG continuity during sleep offset after prior sleep loss, which could partly account for the performance decrement observed during SI in sleep deprived subjects.

  6. The Spectral Emission Characteristics of Laser Induced Plasma on Tea Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peichao; Shi, Minjie; Wang, Jinmei; Liu, Hongdi

    2015-08-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a useful technique for food security as well as determining nutrition contents. In this paper, optical emission studies of laser induced plasma on commercial tea samples were carried out. The spectral intensities of Mg, Mn, Ca, Al, C and CN vibration bands varying with laser energy and the detection delay time of an intensified charge coupled device were studied. In addition, the relative concentrations of six microelements, i.e., Mg, Mn, Ca, Al, Na and K, were analyzed semi-quantitatively as well as H, for four kinds of tea samples. Moreover, the plasma parameters were explored, including electron temperature and electron number density. The electron temperature and electron number density were around 11000 K and 1017 cm-3, respectively. The results show that it is reasonable to consider the LIBS technique as a new method for analyzing the compositions of tea leaf samples. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61205149), the Scientific and Technological Talents Training Project of Chongqing, China (No. CSTC2013kjrc-qnrc40002), the Scientific and Technological Project of Nan'an District (2011) and the Visiting Scholarship of State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment & System Security and New Technology at Chongqing University, China (No. 2007DA10512714409)

  7. [Normal macular thickness and volume using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in a reference population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé González, L; Abreu González, R; Alonso Plasencia, M; Abreu Reyes, P

    2013-09-01

    To establish normal values of macular thickness and volume obtained by the Cirrus SD-OCT (Carl ZeissMeditec, Dublin, CA, U.S.A.). Secondly, to assess the association between macular thickness and volume, sex and age. A prospective study was conducted on patients who were seen in a hospital Retina Unit, and who only had retinal disease in one eye. All the Macular Cube 512 × 128 scan protocols were performed by the same operator. Only the healthy eye was scanned in each patient. A total of 100 eyes of 100 patients were analysed. The mean central foveal thickness was 261.31 ± 17.67 microns, and was significantly (P<.05) higher in males (267.74 ± 16.98 microns) than in females (255.60 ± 16.40 microns). The mean obtained for the volume of the cube was 10.09 ± 0.37mm 3, and the mean thickness of 280.33 ± 10.34 cube um, with no statistically significant differences between gender being found (P<.05). The mean macular thickness is less at central level, increases in the inner perifoveal ring, and then decreases in the outer perifoveal ring. Furthermore, of all quadrants the greatest thickness was the nasal (328.27 ± 12.96 microns), followed by the upper (326.27 ± 11.89 microns), lower (322.53 ± 12.37mm) sectors, with the temporal sector being the thinnest (313.35 ± 14.20 microns). The mean age of the patients was 60.86 ± 14 years. The mean central foveal thickness and the thickness of the inner perifoveal ring are significantly higher in men than in women. Both the mean volume and thickness of the cube, as well as nasal and inner superior sectors decrease with age, being significantly only in women. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of choroidal thickness measurements between spectral-domain OCT and swept-source OCT in normal and diseased eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sidra Zafar,1 MA Rehman Siddiqui,2,3 Rida Shahzad1 1Medical College, Aga Khan University Hospital, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Shahzad Eye Hospital, 3South City Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan Purpose: Sub-foveal choroidal thickness (SFCT is affected in many ocular diseases. The aim of this study was to compare SFCT measurements between Topcon 3D 2000 spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and Topcon swept-source OCT (SS-OCT, with different laser wavelengths, in normal and diseased populations. Materials and methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional, noninterventional study including 27 normal volunteers and 27 participants with retinal disease. OCT scans were performed sequentially and under standardized conditions using both SD-OCT and SS-OCT. The OCT scans were evaluated by two independent graders. Paired t-tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs were used to assess the statistically significant difference between SFCT measurements as measured by the two devices. Results: Mean SFCT measurements for all 54 participants were 264.9±103.1 µm using SD-OCT (range: 47–470 µm and 278.5±110.5 µm using SS-OCT (range: 56–502 µm, with an inter-device ICC of 0.850. Greater variability was noted in the diseased eyes. Inter-device ICCs were 0.870 (95% CI; 0.760–0.924 and 0.840 (95% CI; 0.654–0.930 for normal and diseased eyes, respectively. However, the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.132. Conclusion: Both machines reliably measure SFCT. Larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. Keywords: choroidal imaging, diseased, normal, SD-OCT, SS-OCT

  9. Positron emission tomographic studies using C-11-glucose in normal aging and cerebrovascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujike, Takashi; Terashi, Akiro; Soeda, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Shin; Kato, Toshiaki; Iio, Masaaki.

    1984-01-01

    Seven normal volunteers and 11 patients with cerebrovascular dementia were studied about the relations between effect of aging, severity of dementia, cerebral glucose metabolism and metabolic response to verbal stimuli by positron emission tomography (PET) using C-11-glucose. Regional distribution of glycogenic metabolites (RDGM: mg/100 g brain), which was a semi-quantitation of the pool of glycogenic metabolites mainly amino acids, were calculated. The RDGM values in elder normal subjects were significantly low compared with young normal subjects in frontal cortex (p < 0.05). The decline in frontal cortex metabolism could have been caused by the morphological changes in the course of aging. In temporal cortex, there was no significance between two groups. RDGM increased significantly respond to the verbal stimuli in frontal and temporal cortex both young and elder normal subjects. The RDGM values in vascular dementias were significantly low (p < 0.001) compared with elder normal subjects' in frontal and temporal cortex. Significant difference existed between mild and severe dementia in frontal cortex (p < 0.05). However, there was no significance between mild and severe dementias in temporal cortex. In mild dementias, RDGM increased significantly respond to the verbal stimuli in frontal and temporal cortex. In severe dementias, metabolic response to the verbal stimuli was less or lacking. Our results suggest that the cerebral metabolic functional reserve and the ability of the cerebral cortex to function respond to psychophysiologic stimulation are preserved in young and elder normal subjects and mild cerebrovascular dementias. (J.P.N.)

  10. Relation of distortion product otoacoustic emission and tinnitus in normal hearing patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datt Modh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tinnitus, the perception of the sound in the absence of an external acoustic source, disrupts the daily life 1 out of every 200 adults, yet its physiological basis remains largely a mystery. The generation of tinnitus is commonly linked with the impaired functioning of the outer hair cells (OHC inside the cochlea. Otoacoustic emissions are the objective test used to assess their activity. Objective: The objective of the investigation was to study the features of Distortion product OtoAcoustic emissions (DPOAE in a group of tinnitus patients with normal hearing and to find out whether there is any difference in DPOAE findings in the tinnitus patients with normal hearing and in persons with normal hearing with no complaint of tinnitus. Materials and Methods: The participants consisted of two groups. The subject group consisted of 16 ears of patients, in which 6 subjects were having tinnitus in both ears while 4 subjects were having tinnitus only in one ear. All subjects were aged between 20 to 60 years with complaint of tinnitus with audiometrically normal hearing. Control group was comprised of 16 audiometrically normal hearing ears of persons who were age and gender matched with the subject groups and had no complaint of tinnitus. Both the subject group as well as control group was subjected for DPOAE test. Findings of both the groups were compared using the unpaired t test. Result and conclusion: It was observed that the amplitudes of DPOAE were significantly lower in tinnitus patients than that of persons without complaint of tinnitus, at a frequency of 1281-1560, 5120-6250, 7243-8837 Hz, which imply that decrease of DPOAEs amplitudes may be related to the presence of tinnitus. It can be concluded that there is association between tinnitus and reduced OHC activity which indicate the OHC of cochlea are involved in the generation of tinnitus.

  11. The application of the piecewise linear approximation to the spectral neighborhood of soil line for the analysis of the quality of normalization of remote sensing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyanitsa, A. L.; Rukhovich, A. D.; Rukhovich, D. D.; Koroleva, P. V.; Rukhovich, D. I.; Simakova, M. S.

    2017-04-01

    The concept of soil line can be to describe the temporal distribution of spectral characteristics of the bare soil surface. In this case, the soil line can be referred to as the multi-temporal soil line, or simply temporal soil line (TSL). In order to create TSL for 8000 regular lattice points for the territory of three regions of Tula oblast, we used 34 Landsat images obtained in the period from 1985 to 2014 after their certain transformation. As Landsat images are the matrices of the values of spectral brightness, this transformation is the normalization of matrices. There are several methods of normalization that move, rotate, and scale the spectral plane. In our study, we applied the method of piecewise linear approximation to the spectral neighborhood of soil line in order to assess the quality of normalization mathematically. This approach allowed us to range normalization methods according to their quality as follows: classic normalization > successive application of the turn and shift > successive application of the atmospheric correction and shift > atmospheric correction > shift > turn > raw data. The normalized data allowed us to create the maps of the distribution of a and b coefficients of the TSL. The map of b coefficient is characterized by the high correlation with the ground-truth data obtained from 1899 soil pits described during the soil surveys performed by the local institute for land management (GIPROZEM).

  12. Positron emission tomography studies in the normal and abnormal ageing of human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comar, D.; Baron, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Until recently, the investigation of the neurophysiological correlates of normal and abnormal ageing of the human brain was limited by methodological constraints, as the technics available provided only a few parameters (e.g. electroencephalograms, cerebral blood flow) monitored in superficial brain structures in a grossly regional and poorly quantitative way. Lately several non invasive techniques have been developed which allow to investigate in vivo both quantitatively and on local basis a number of previously inaccessible important aspects of brain function. Among these techniques, such as single photon emission tomography imaging of computerized electric events, nuclear magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography stands out as the most powerful and promising method since it allows the in vivo measurement of biochemical and pharmacological parameters

  13. Amyloid and metabolic positron emission tomography imaging of cognitively normal adults with Alzheimer's parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosconi, Lisa; Rinne, Juha O; Tsui, Wai H

    2013-01-01

    emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG). These included 19 NL with a maternal history (MH), 12 NL with a paternal history (PH), and 16 NL with negative family history of AD (NH). Automated regions of interest, statistical parametric mapping......This study examines the relationship between fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and reduced glucose metabolism, a proxy for neuronal dysfunction, in cognitively normal (NL) individuals with a parent affected by late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). Forty-seven 40-80-year-old NL received positron...

  14. Valence band circular dichroism in non-magnetic Ag/Ru(0001) at normal emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascaraque, Arantzazu [Departamento Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Onur Mentes, T; Locatelli, Andrea [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A, Basovizza, Trieste 34149 (Italy); McCarty, Kevin F [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Marco, Jose F; De la Figuera, Juan [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schmid, Andreas K [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-08-03

    For the non-magnetic system of Ag films on Ru(0001), we have measured the circular dichroism of photoelectrons emitted along the surface normal, the geometry typically used in photoemission electron microscopy. Photoemission spectra were acquired from micrometer-sized regions having uniformly thick Ag films on a single, atomically flat Ru terrace. For a single Ag layer, we find a circular dichroism that exceeds 6% at the d-derived band region around 4.5 eV binding energy. The dichroism decreases as the Ag film thickness increases to three atomic layers. We discuss the origin of the circular dichroism in terms of the symmetry lowering that can occur even in normal emission.

  15. Fine particle and gaseous emissions from normal and smouldering wood combustion in a conventional masonry heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissari, J.; Lyyränen, J.; Hytönen, K.; Sippula, O.; Tapper, U.; Frey, A.; Saarnio, K.; Pennanen, A. S.; Hillamo, R.; Salonen, R. O.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.

    The fine particle and gas emissions from the residential wood combustion (RWC) appear to be a major contributor to winter-time pollution in Europe. In this study, we characterised the effect of two different combustion conditions on particulate and gaseous emissions from a conventional masonry heater. Normal combustion (NC) is the best available operational practice for the heater, whereas smouldering combustion (SC) mimicked slow heating combustion. It was found that the operational practice in RWC can significantly influence the quantity and quality of particle and gaseous emissions into the atmosphere. In SC, the emissions of carbon monoxide were 3.5-fold, total volatile organics 14-fold and PM 1 6-fold to those of NC, whereas the mass of the inorganic compounds ("fine ash") and particle number emissions were lower from SC than from NC. According to electron microscopy analyses, the observed fine ash particles seemed to occur mainly as separate spherical or irregularly shaped particles but not as agglomerates. Ultrafine (<100 nm) fine ash particles were composed mainly of K, S and Zn, but also in a lesser extent of C, Ca, Fe, Mg, Cl, P and Na. Large agglomerates were found to contain mainly carbon and are considered to be primarily soot particles. The larger spherical and irregularly shaped particles were composed of same alkali metal compounds as ultrafine particles, but they were probably covered with heavy organic compounds. From SC, particles were composed mainly of carbon compounds and they had a more closed structure than the particles from NC, due to organic matter on the particles. In the present experiments, the ultrafine mode in the particle number distributions seemed to be determined mainly by the amount of released ash forming material in combustion, and the shifting of particle size during different combustion conditions seemed to be determined by the amount of condensed organic vapour in the flue gas.

  16. Spectral reflectance and emissivity features of broad leaf plants: Prospects for remote sensing in the thermal infrared (8.0-14.0 μm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro da Luz, Beatriz; Crowley, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Field emissivity measurements were made of leaves collected from nine deciduous tree and agricultural plant species. The data show, for the first time, that it is possible to discriminate subtle spectral emissivity features of leaves from the natural background emission. Under conditions of controlled measurement geometry (leaves arranged to cover a flat surface), the field emissivity spectra agreed fairly well with emissivity values calculated from laboratory directional hemispherical reflectance measurements. Spectral features associated with a variety of leaf chemical constituents, including cellulose, cutin, xylan, silica, and oleanolic acid could be identified in the field emissivity data. Structural aspects of leaf surfaces also influenced spectral behavior, notably the abundance of trichomes, as well as wax thickness and texture.

  17. Normal and anomalous diffusion in fluctuations of dust concentration nearby emission source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Maciejewska, Monika; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Sikora, Grzegorz; Balcerek, Michał; Teuerle, Marek

    2018-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is an important component of air. Nowadays, major attention is payed to fine dust. It has considerable environmental impact, including adverse effect on human health. One of important issues regarding PM is the temporal variation of its concentration. The variation contains information about factors influencing this quantity in time. The work focuses on the character of PM concentration dynamics indoors, in the vicinity of emission source. The objective was to recognize between the homogeneous or heterogeneous dynamics. The goal was achieved by detecting normal and anomalous diffusion in fluctuations of PM concentration. For this purpose we used anomalous diffusion exponent, β which was derived from Mean Square Displacement (MSD) analysis. The information about PM concentration dynamics may be used to design sampling strategy, which serves to attain representative information about PM behavior in time. The data analyzed in this work was collected from single-point PM concentration monitoring in the vicinity of seven emission sources in industrial environment. In majority of cases we observed heterogeneous character of PM concentration dynamics. It confirms the complexity of interactions between the emission sources and indoor environment. This result also votes against simplistic approach to PM concentration measurement indoors, namely their occasional character, short measurement periods and long term averaging.

  18. Spectral-Domain OCT Analysis of Regional Epithelial Thickness Profiles in Keratoconus, Postoperative Corneal Ectasia, and Normal Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Karolinne Maia; Straziota, Claudia Perez; Stulting, R. Doyle; Randleman, J. Bradley

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess corneal microarchitecture and regional epithelial thickness profile in eyes with keratoconus, postoperative corneal ectasia, and normal unoperated eyes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). METHODS Regional corneal epithelial thickness profiles of eyes with keratoconus (KC) and postoperative corneal ectasia (Ectasia) were measured with anterior segment SC OCT (Optovue RTVue-100, Optovue Inc., Fremont, CA) and compared retrospectively to those of normal eyes (Control). Epithelial thickness was assessed at 21 points, 0.5 mm apart, across the central 6-mm of the corneal apex in the horizontal and vertical meridians. RESULTS One hundred twenty eyes were evaluated, including 49 eyes from 29 patients with KC, 32 eyes from 16 patients with Ectasia, and 39 eyes from 21 control patients. Average epithelial thickness at the corneal apex was 41.18±6.47μm (range 30 to 51 μm) in eyes with KC, 46.5±6.72μm in eyes with ectasia (range 34 to 60 μm), and 50.45±3.92 μm in normal eyes (range 42 to 55 μm). Apical epithelial thickness was significantly thinner in eyes with KC (p ectasia (p=.0007) than it was in controls. Epithelial thickness ranges in all other areas varied widely for KC (SD, range 21 to 101 μm) and ectasia (SD, range 30 to 82 μm) compared to controls (SD, range 43 to 64), p = .0063 CONCLUSION Central epithelial thickness was, on average, significantly thinner in ectatic corneas compared to controls; however, both central and regional epithelial thickness was highly irregular and variable in corneas with keratoconus and postoperative corneal ectasia. These thickness variations may alter preoperative topographic features and measurements in unpredictable ways, especially steepest K values. Regional epithelial thickness cannot be assumed to be uniform in ectatic corneas and therefore may require direct measurement when considering treatments for which underlying stromal thickness is particularly important, such as

  19. Application of prominent spectral lines in the 125-180 nm range for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, O.; Heitland, P. [Spectro Analytical Instruments GmbH, Kleve (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    A new axially viewed ICP optical emission spectrometer featuring an argon-filled optic and CCD detectors was evaluated for the application of prominent spectral lines in the 125-180 nm range. This wavelength range was investigated for several analytical applications of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). There are different advantages for the application of spectral lines below 180 nm. A number of elements, such as Al, Br, Cl, Ga, Ge, I, In, N, P, Pb, Pt, S and Te, were found to have the most intense spectral lines in the wavelength range from 125-180 nm. Compared with lines above 180 nm higher signal-to-background ratios were found. Low limits of detection using pneumatic nebulization of aqueous solutions for sample introduction were calculated for Al II 167.080 nm (0.04 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Br I 154.065 nm (9 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Cl I 134.724 nm (19 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Ga II 141.444 nm (0.8 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Ge II 164.919 nm (1.3 {mu}g L{sup -1}), I I 142.549 nm (13 {mu}g L{sup -1}), In II 158.583 nm (0.2 {mu}g L{sup -1}), P I 177.500 nm (0.9 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Pb II 168.215 nm (1.5 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Pt II 177.709 nm (2.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}), S I 180.731 nm (1.9 {mu}g L{sup -1}) and Te I 170.00 nm (4.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}). Numerous application examples for the use of those lines and other important spectral lines below 180 nm are given. Because of fewer emission lines from transition elements, such as Fe, Co, Cr, lines below 180 nm often offer freedom from spectral interferences. Additional lines of lower intensity for the determination of higher elemental concentrations are also available in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range. This is specially useful when the concentrations are not in the linear range of calibration curves obtained with commonly used lines. (orig.)

  20. Ultrafast spectral interferometry of resonant secondary emission from quantum wells: From Rayleigh scattering to coherent emission from biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Shah, Jagdeep; Pfeiffer, L. N.

    1999-01-01

    Recent investigations of secondary emission from quantum well excitons following ultrafast resonant excitation have demonstrated an intricate interplay of coherent Rayleigh scattering and incoherent luminescence. We have very recently demonstrated that it is possible to isolate and time resolve t...

  1. The 1600 Å Emission Bump in Protoplanetary Disks: A Spectral Signature of H{sub 2}O Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Kevin [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Roueff, Evelyne; Abgrall, Hervé, E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, F-92190, Meudon (France)

    2017-08-01

    The FUV continuum spectrum of many accreting pre-main sequence stars, Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), does not continue smoothly from the well-studied Balmer continuum emission in the NUV, suggesting that additional processes contribute to the short-wavelength emission in these objects. The most notable spectral feature in the FUV continuum of some CTTSs is a broad emission approximately centered at 1600 Å, which has been referred to as the “1600 Å Bump.” The origin of this feature remains unclear. In an effort to better understand the molecular properties of planet-forming disks and the UV spectral properties of accreting protostars, we have assembled archival FUV spectra of 37 disk-hosting systems observed by the Hubble Space Telescope -Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Clear 1600 Å Bump emission is observed above the smooth, underlying 1100–1800 Å continuum spectrum in 19/37 Classical T Tauri disks in the HST -COS sample, with the detection rate in transition disks (8/8) being much higher than that in primordial or non-transition sources (11/29). We describe a spectral deconvolution analysis to separate the Bump (spanning 1490–1690 Å) from the underlying FUV continuum, finding an average Bump luminosity L (Bump) ≈ 7 × 10{sup 29} erg s{sup −1}. Parameterizing the Bump with a combination of Gaussian and polynomial components, we find that the 1600 Å Bump is characterized by a peak wavelength λ {sub o} = 1598.6 ± 3.3 Å, with FWHM = 35.8 ± 19.1 Å. Contrary to previous studies, we find that this feature is inconsistent with models of H{sub 2} excited by electron -impact. We show that this Bump makes up between 5%–50% of the total FUV continuum emission in the 1490–1690 Å band and emits roughly 10%–80% of the total fluorescent H{sub 2} luminosity for stars with well-defined Bump features. Energetically, this suggests that the carrier of the 1600 Å Bump emission is powered by Ly α photons. We argue that the most likely mechanism

  2. Metabolic reserve in normal myocardium assessed by positron emission tomography with C-11 palmitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Nagara; Kawamoto, Masahide; Takahashi, Norio; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Magata, Yasuhiro; Nohara, Ryuji; Kambara, Hirofumi; Kawai, Chuichi; Konishi, Junji

    1991-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with C-11 palmitate has been used in estimating the myocardial utilization of free fatty acid. To assess the metabolic reserve in normal subjects, a PET study was performed at control and during dobutamine infusion at 2 hour intervals in 5 normal subjects. Following monoexponential curve fitting of the time activity curve of the myocardium, the clearance half time (min) and residual fraction (%) were calculated as indices of β-oxydation of free fatty acid. A significant increase in the heart rate and systolic blood pressure were observed during dobutamine infusion (65±5 vs 100±29 bpm, p<0.05 and 119±12 vs 144±16 mmHg, p<0.01, respectively). The clearance half-time and the residual fraction were significantly decreased (23.4±2.6 vs 15.8±2.3 min and 67.0±2.5 vs 58.6±4.0%, p<0.05, each). When the left ventricular myocardium was divided into 4 segments, these indices were similar at control and uniformly decreased without regional differences during dobutamine infusion. These data suggest that β-oxydation of free fatty acid may be uniformly increased in the left ventricular myocardium in relation to the increase in cardiac work in normal subjects. PET with C-11 palmitate at control and during dobutamine infusion is considered to be promising in assessing metabolic reserve in the myocardium. (author)

  3. Emission characteristics of a discharge iodine vapor plasma in the spectral region of the main absorption maximum of DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Grabovaya, I. A.; Minya, A. Ĭ.; Gomoki, Z. T.

    2008-11-01

    Radiation of glow and capacitive discharges in inert gas-iodine vapor mixtures is studied in the spectral range 150-210 nm, which coincides with the main absorption maximum of the DNA molecules. Iodine atomic spectral lines at 150.7, 161.8, 170.2, 183.0, and 206.2 nm are observed in the spectra. The emission intensity of the iodine spectral lines is optimized by varying the glow discharge current, capacitive discharge frequency, as well as pressure and composition of the gas mixtures. The glow and capacitive discharges are ignited in cylindrical quartz tubes with interelectrode gaps of 10 and 6 cm. Helium and neon are found to be the most effective buffer gases. The optimum partial pressures of the light inert gases and iodine vapor in the glow discharge are within 0.4-0.6 kPa and 100-150 Pa, respectively. In the capacitive discharge in He(Ne)-I2 mixtures, the optimum partial helium, neon, and iodine vapor pressures are within 0.8-2.0 kPa, 0.5-1.0 kPa, and ≤ 60 Pa, respectively. It is demonstrated that pulsed bactericidal radiation sources with light pulse lengths of 400-500 ns and continuous radiation sources emitting within the spectral range 150-207 nm can be designed on the basis of low-density iodine vapor plasma.

  4. Optimal transformations leading to normal distributions of positron emission tomography standardized uptake values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpelli, Matthew; Eickhoff, Jens; Cuna, Enrique; Perlman, Scott; Jeraj, Robert

    2018-02-01

    The statistical analysis of positron emission tomography (PET) standardized uptake value (SUV) measurements is challenging due to the skewed nature of SUV distributions. This limits utilization of powerful parametric statistical models for analyzing SUV measurements. An ad-hoc approach, which is frequently used in practice, is to blindly use a log transformation, which may or may not result in normal SUV distributions. This study sought to identify optimal transformations leading to normally distributed PET SUVs extracted from tumors and assess the effects of therapy on the optimal transformations. Methods. The optimal transformation for producing normal distributions of tumor SUVs was identified by iterating the Box-Cox transformation parameter (λ) and selecting the parameter that maximized the Shapiro-Wilk P-value. Optimal transformations were identified for tumor SUVmax distributions at both pre and post treatment. This study included 57 patients that underwent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET scans (publically available dataset). In addition, to test the generality of our transformation methodology, we included analysis of 27 patients that underwent 18F-Fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) PET scans at our institution. Results. After applying the optimal Box-Cox transformations, neither the pre nor the post treatment 18F-FDG SUV distributions deviated significantly from normality (P  >  0.10). Similar results were found for 18F-FLT PET SUV distributions (P  >  0.10). For both 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT SUV distributions, the skewness and kurtosis increased from pre to post treatment, leading to a decrease in the optimal Box-Cox transformation parameter from pre to post treatment. There were types of distributions encountered for both 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT where a log transformation was not optimal for providing normal SUV distributions. Conclusion. Optimization of the Box-Cox transformation, offers a solution for identifying normal SUV transformations for when

  5. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  6. RESOLVING THE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS AND HOST EMISSION IN THE MID-INFRARED USING A MODEL-INDEPENDENT SPECTRAL DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena [Instituto de Física de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Avenida de los Castros s/n, E-39005, Santander (Spain); Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Spoon, Henrik W. W. [Cornell University, CRSR, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Almeida, Cristina Ramos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Santos, Tanio Díaz [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Hönig, Sebastian F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO18 1BJ (United Kingdom); González-Martín, Omaira [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (CRyA-UNAM), 3-72 (Xangari), 8701, Morelia (Mexico); Esquej, Pilar, E-mail: ahernan@ifca.unican.es [Departamento de Astrofísica, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-04-20

    We present results on the spectral decomposition of 118 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra from local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using a large set of Spitzer/IRS spectra as templates. The templates are themselves IRS spectra from extreme cases where a single physical component (stellar, interstellar, or AGN) completely dominates the integrated mid-infrared emission. We show that a linear combination of one template for each physical component reproduces the observed IRS spectra of AGN hosts with unprecedented fidelity for a template fitting method with no need to model extinction separately. We use full probability distribution functions to estimate expectation values and uncertainties for observables, and find that the decomposition results are robust against degeneracies. Furthermore, we compare the AGN spectra derived from the spectral decomposition with sub-arcsecond resolution nuclear photometry and spectroscopy from ground-based observations. We find that the AGN component derived from the decomposition closely matches the nuclear spectrum with a 1σ dispersion of 0.12 dex in luminosity and typical uncertainties of ∼0.19 in the spectral index and ∼0.1 in the silicate strength. We conclude that the emission from the host galaxy can be reliably removed from the IRS spectra of AGNs. This allows for unbiased studies of the AGN emission in intermediate- and high-redshift galaxies—currently inaccesible to ground-based observations—with archival Spitzer/IRS data and in the future with the Mid-InfraRed Instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope. The decomposition code and templates are available at http://denebola.org/ahc/deblendIRS.

  7. Least squares autoregressive (maximum entropy) spectral estimation for Fourier spectroscopy and its application to the electron cyclotron emission from plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwama, N.; Inoue, A.; Tsukishima, T.; Sato, M.; Kawahata, K.

    1981-07-01

    A new procedure for the maximum entropy spectral estimation is studied for the purpose of data processing in Fourier transform spectroscopy. The autoregressive model fitting is examined under a least squares criterion based on the Yule-Walker equations. An AIC-like criterion is suggested for selecting the model order. The principal advantage of the new procedure lies in the enhanced frequency resolution particularly for small values of the maximum optical path-difference of the interferogram. The usefulness of the procedure is ascertained by some numerical simulations and further by experiments with respect to a highly coherent submillimeter wave and the electron cyclotron emission from a stellarator plasma. (author)

  8. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... ... line emission occurs from the plasma region having sub-critical density, whereas K- emission arises from the bulk solid heated to a temperature of 10 eV by the impact of hot electrons. K- line from Be-like ions was used to estimate the hot electron temperature. A power law fit to the electron temperature ...

  9. Evidence of non-LTE Effects in Mesospheric Water Vapor from Spectrally-Resolved Emissions Observed by CIRRIS-1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D. K.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Zaragoza, G.

    1999-01-01

    Evidence of non-LTE effects in mesospheric water vapor as determined by infrared spectral emission measurements taken from the space shuttle is reported. A cryogenic Michelson interferometer in the CIRRIS-1A shuttle payload yielded high quality, atmospheric infrared spectra. These measurements demonstrate the enhanced daytime emissions of H2O (020-010) which are the result of non-LTE processes and in agreement with non-LTE models. The radiance ratios of H2O (010 to 000) and (020 to 010) Q(1) transitions during daytime are compared with non-LTE model calculations to assess the vibration-to-vibration exchange rate between H2O and O2 in the mesosphere. An exchange rate of 1.2 x 10(exp -12)cc/s is derived.

  10. Dual emission tunable in the near-infrared (NIR) and visible (VIS) spectral range by mix-LnMOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Roberta Anjos; da Luz, Leonis Lourenço; Santos, Danilo Oliveira; Costa, José Arnaldo Santana; Navickiene, Sandro; Gatto, Claudia Cristina; Júnior, Severino Alves; de Mesquita, Maria Eliane

    2015-10-21

    In this study, we describe the synthetic approach, crystallographic structure, luminescent behavior and elucidation of the channels of the energy conversion in heteronuclear coordination polymers with emission in the visible (Eu(3+) and organic ligand) and near-infrared (Nd(3+)) range. The [(Nd0.9Eu0.1)2(dipc)3(H2O)3]n·nH2O, [(Nd0.7Eu0.3)2(dipc)3(H2O)3]n·nH2O, [(Nd0.5Eu0.5)2(dipc)3(H2O)3]n·nH2O, [(Nd0.3Eu0.7)2(dipc)3(H2O)3]n·nH2O, [(Nd0.1Eu0.9)2(dipc)3(H2O)3]n·nH2O, [Eu2(dipc)3(H2O)3]n·nH2O and [Nd2(dipc)3(H2O)3]n·nH2O materials are obtained by hydrothermal conditions from pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (H2dipc) and Ln2O3 oxide (Ln = Eu and Nd). The fine structures in the emission spectrum and spectral profile are used to investigate the ion responsible for the emission characteristics of a material (6), based on coordination polyhedron. The heteronuclear systems show emission in the dual spectral range (NIR-VIS) tuned for blue or red. The tuning of emission on the red (Eu(3+)) or blue (organic ligand) range may be performed by controlling the stoichiometric ratio of the lanthanide ions and by controlling the excitation wavelength. Nd(3+) ions display self-absorption of emission to dipc ligand, resulting in interference on the emission band profile ranging from 400 to 600 nm. The energetic process of energy transfer is operated by a cascade of energy transfer, from dipc ligand mainly to Eu(3+) ions and finishing on the Nd(3+) ion. The efficient sensitization to Nd(3+) by Eu(3+) ions is due to the presence of many resonant energy levels and the short distance between these ions.

  11. Temporal evolution of the spectral lines emission and temperatures in laser induced plasmas through characteristic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredice, F.; Pacheco Martinez, P.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose an extended Boltzmann plot method to determine the usefulness of spectral lines for plasma parameter calculations. Based on the assumption that transient plasmas are under ideal conditions during an specific interval of time Δt, (i.e. thin, homogeneous and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)), the associated Boltzmann plots describe a surface in the space defined by the coordinates X = Energy, Y = Time and Z = ln (λ jl I j /g j A jl ), where I j is the integrated intensity of the spectral line, g j is the statistical weight of the level j, λ jl is the wavelength of the considered line and A jl is its transition rate. In order to express the Boltzmann plot surface in terms of a reduced set of constants B i , and δ i , we developed as a power series of time, the logarithm of I n (t)/I n (t 0 ), where I n (t) is the integrated intensity of any spectral line at time t, and I n (t 0 ) at initial time. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the intensity of any spectral line and consequently the temperature of the plasma can be also expressed with these constants. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the line intensity calculated using these constants with their experimental values, can be used as a criterion for selecting useful lines in plasma analysis. Furthermore, this method can also be applied to determine self-absorption or enhancement of the spectral lines, to evaluate a possible departure of LTE, and to check or estimate the upper level energy value of any spectral line. An advantage of this method is that the value of these constants does not depend on the spectral response of the detection system, the uncertainty of the transition rates belonging to the analyzed spectral lines or any other time-independent parameters. In order to prove our method, we determined the constants B i and δ i and therefore the Boltzmann plot surface from the temporal evolution of carbon lines obtained from a plasma generated by a Nd:YAG laser

  12. Temporal evolution of the spectral lines emission and temperatures in laser induced plasmas through characteristic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredice, F., E-mail: faustob@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas, P.O. Box 3 C. P.1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina); Pacheco Martinez, P. [Grupo de Espectroscopía Óptica de Emisión y Láser, Universidad del Atlántico, Barranquilla (Colombia); Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M. [Laboratorio de Fotofísica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-186, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose an extended Boltzmann plot method to determine the usefulness of spectral lines for plasma parameter calculations. Based on the assumption that transient plasmas are under ideal conditions during an specific interval of time Δt, (i.e. thin, homogeneous and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)), the associated Boltzmann plots describe a surface in the space defined by the coordinates X = Energy, Y = Time and Z = ln (λ{sub jl}I{sub j}/g{sub j}A{sub jl}), where I{sub j} is the integrated intensity of the spectral line, g{sub j} is the statistical weight of the level j, λ{sub jl} is the wavelength of the considered line and A{sub jl} is its transition rate. In order to express the Boltzmann plot surface in terms of a reduced set of constants B{sub i}, and δ{sub i}, we developed as a power series of time, the logarithm of I{sub n}(t)/I{sub n}(t{sub 0}), where I{sub n}(t) is the integrated intensity of any spectral line at time t, and I{sub n}(t{sub 0}) at initial time. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the intensity of any spectral line and consequently the temperature of the plasma can be also expressed with these constants. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the line intensity calculated using these constants with their experimental values, can be used as a criterion for selecting useful lines in plasma analysis. Furthermore, this method can also be applied to determine self-absorption or enhancement of the spectral lines, to evaluate a possible departure of LTE, and to check or estimate the upper level energy value of any spectral line. An advantage of this method is that the value of these constants does not depend on the spectral response of the detection system, the uncertainty of the transition rates belonging to the analyzed spectral lines or any other time-independent parameters. In order to prove our method, we determined the constants B{sub i} and δ{sub i} and therefore the Boltzmann plot surface from the temporal

  13. Super-Resolution Imaging of Molecular Emission Spectra and Single Molecule Spectral Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlodzianoski, Michael J; Curthoys, Nikki M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Carter, Sean; Hess, Samuel T

    2016-01-01

    Localization microscopy can image nanoscale cellular details. To address biological questions, the ability to distinguish multiple molecular species simultaneously is invaluable. Here, we present a new version of fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM) which detects the emission spectrum of each localized molecule, and can quantify changes in emission spectrum of individual molecules over time. This information can allow for a dramatic increase in the number of different species simultaneously imaged in a sample, and can create super-resolution maps showing how single molecule emission spectra vary with position and time in a sample.

  14. Quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency measurements using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Sanam; Hannagan, John; Rigby, Paul; Pfleger, Kevin; Corry, Ben

    2013-02-01

    Accurate quantification of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using intensity-based methods is difficult due to the overlap of fluorophore excitation and emission spectra. Consequently, mechanisms are required to remove bleedthrough of the donor emission into the acceptor channel and direct excitation of the acceptor when aiming to excite only the donor fluorophores. Methods to circumvent donor bleedthrough using the unmixing of emission spectra have been reported, but these require additional corrections to account for direct excitation of the acceptor. Here we present an alternative method for robust quantification of FRET efficiencies based upon the simultaneous spectral unmixing of both excitation and emission spectra. This has the benefit over existing methodologies in circumventing the issue of donor bleedthrough and acceptor cross excitation without the need for additional corrections. Furthermore, we show that it is applicable with as few as two excitation wavelengths and so can be used for quantifying FRET efficiency in microscope images as easily as for data collected on a spectrofluorometer. We demonstrate the accuracy of the approach by reproducing efficiency values in well characterized FRET standards: HEK cells expressing a variety of linked cerulean and venus fluorescent proteins. Finally we describe simple ImageJ plugins that can be used to calculate and create images of FRET efficiencies from microscope images.

  15. Studies on the spectral interference of gadolinium on different analytes in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Arijit; Thulasidas, S.K.; Natarajan, V.; Airan, Yougant

    2015-01-01

    Due to the multi-electronic nature, rare earth elements are prone to exhibit spectral interference in ICP-AES, which leads to erroneous determination of analytes in presence of such matrix. This interference is very significant, when the analytes are to be determined at trace level in presence of emission rich matrix elements. An attempt was made to understand the spectral interference of Gd on 29 common analytes like Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Fe, Ga, Gd, In, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, Pb, Pr, Sr, Tl and Zn using ICP-AES with capacitive Charged Coupled Device (CCD) as detector. The present study includes identification of suitable interference free analytical lines of these analytes, evaluation of correction factor for each analytical line and determination of tolerance levels of these analytical lines along with the ICP-AES based methodology for simultaneous determination of Gd. Based on the spectral interference study, an ICP-AES based method was developed for the determination of these analytes at trace level in presence of Gd matrix without chemical separation. Further the developed methodology was validated using synthetic samples prepared from commercially available reference material solution of individual element; the results were found to be satisfactory. The method was also compared with other existing techniques

  16. NEW METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF SPECTRAL INTERFERENCES FOR BERYLLIUM ASSAY USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S; Matthew Nelson, M; Linda Youmans, L; Maureen Bernard, M

    2008-01-14

    Beryllium has been used widely in specific areas of nuclear technology. Frequent monitoring of air and possible contaminated surfaces in U.S Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is required to identify potential health risks and to protect DOE workers from beryllium-contaminated dust. A new method has been developed to rapidly remove spectral interferences prior to beryllium (Be) measurement by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The ion exchange separation removes uranium (U), thorium (Th), niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), zirconium (Zr), tungsten (W), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cerium (Ce), erbium (Er) and titanium (Ti). A stacked column consisting of Diphonix Resin{reg_sign} and TEVA Resin{reg_sign} reduces the levels of the spectral interferences so that low level Be measurements can be performed accurately. If necessary, an additional anion exchange separation can be used for further removal of interferences, particularly chromium. The method has been tested using spiked filters, spiked wipe samples and certified reference material standards with high levels of interferences added. The method provides very efficient removal of spectral interferences with very good accuracy and precision for beryllium on filters or wipes. A vacuum box system is employed to reduce analytical time and reduce labor costs.

  17. Multichannel wide-field microscopic FRET imaging based on simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, M; Mai, Z; Yang, F; Lin, F; Wei, L; Chen, T

    2018-01-01

    Simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra (ExEm unmixing) has inherent ability resolving spectral crosstalks, two key issues of quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement, of both the excitation and emission spectra between donor and acceptor without additional corrections. We here set up a filter-based multichannel wide-field microscope for ExEm unmixing-based FRET imaging (m-ExEm-spFRET) containing a constant system correction factor (f sc ) for a stable system. We performed m-ExEm-spFRET with four- and two-wavelength excitation respectively on our system to quantitatively image single living cells expressing FRET tandem constructs, and obtained accurate FRET efficiency (E) and concentration ratio of acceptor to donor (R C ). We also performed m-ExEm-spFRET imaging for single living cells coexpressing CFP-Bax and YFP-Bax, and found that the E values were about 0 for control cells and about 28% for staurosporin-treated cells when R C were larger than 1, indicating that staurosporin induced significant oligomerisation. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Investigation of spectral interference effects on determination of uranium concentration in phosphate ore by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachari, Ayoob H.; Jalali, Fatemeh; Alahyarizadeh, Ghasem [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Engineering Dept.

    2017-04-01

    Effects of spectral interferences on determination of the uranium concentration in phosphate ore were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Eleven high intensity emission lines including four lines recommended by ICP-OES apparatus were chosen to determine the uranium concentration. The ore samples were collected from phosphate acid producing industry in the south of Iran. Three different acid combinations [(HNO{sub 3}:HCl:HF-2:6:2), (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:HF-3:3:3), (HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:HF-4:2:2)] used in microwave digestion method to explore the spectral interference effects in different solvent environments. The results showed that the trusty uranium concentration, obtained in the 367.007 nm, 386.592 nm, 389.036 nm and 409.014 nm by second acid digestion method which were 0.665 ppm, 0.972 ppm, 0.670 ppm and 0.801 ppm, respectively. Although the line of 409.014 nm was reported as the best line for determining of the uranium concentration in several literatures, the results showed that this line has a significant spectral interference with vanadium in some ores which should be considered in determining of the uranium concentration. Spectral interference effects of some elements which have high concentrations in the phosphate ore including Ca, Fe, Mg, Pb, V, Mn, and Ti on the line intensities were also investigated. Results indicated that the chosen elements affect emission intensities of all of 11 lines. They also indicated that the line of 409.014 nm provides a trusty precision in the determination of the uranium concentration in the ore sample with low vanadium concentration (at least, U/V ratio of 1:5). Results show that the line of 409.014 nm provides acceptable precision with some corrections in comparison with other selected lines. For instance in high concentrations of other elements including Fe and Ti in the ore samples, strong influences on the line intensities of the 367.007 nm (by Fe

  19. Spectral analysis of Jupiter kilometric radio emissions during the Ulysses flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echer, M. P. D. S.; Echer, E.; Gonzalez, W.; Magalães, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we analyze Ulysses URAP kilometric radio data during Ulysses Jupiter flyby. The interval selected for analysis was from October 1991 to February 1992. URAP 10-min averages of auroral (bkom) and torus (nkom) radio data are used. The wavelet and iterative regression spectral analyses techniques are employed on both data set. The results obtained will enable us to determine the major frequencies present in the auroral and torus data and study their similar and different periodicities.

  20. Spectral evolution of energetic neutral atom emissions at the heliospheric poles as measured by IBEX during its first three years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Allegrini, F.; Desai, M. I.; Ebert, R. W.; Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); DeMajistre, R. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Janzen, P.; Reisenfeld, D. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Siewert, M., E-mail: maldayeh@swri.edu [Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Abteilung f. Astrophysik und Extraterrestrische Forschung, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-12-10

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission continues to measure energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions produced by charge exchange between solar wind (SW) protons and interstellar neutrals at the edge of our heliosphere. Using the first 3 yr of IBEX-Hi ENA measurements (2009-2011), we examined the spectral evolution of ∼0.5-6 keV ENAs at the polar regions (above 60°). We found the following: (1) pixels with a characteristic 'ankle' spectra (lower spectral index at higher energies) increase by ∼5% in 2010 and ∼10% in 2011 compared to 2009. (2) The averaged spectral index in 2011 is smaller than that of 2009. (3) The slope of the ENA spectrum above ∼1.7 keV is more variable than the slope below ∼1.7 keV. The lower spectral index at higher energies of the spectrum does not appear to be caused by an increase of the ENA production at these energies, but rather from a consistent decrease at lower energies. (4) The decrease in polar ENA fluxes does not correlate significantly with the averaged SW dynamic pressure, back-traced in time to 1 AU along the flow streamlines (originating between 10° and 30° for slow SW, and 60° and 80° for fast SW), assuming these are the respective conditions of ENA progenitors back in time. These results provide insights into the complexity of relating the slow and fast SW contributions to polar ENAs and shed light on how the solar output and the resulting change in the global heliospheric structure possibly affect the heliosheath (HS) populations.

  1. The Mineral Dust Cycle in EMAC 2.40: sensitivity to the spectral resolution and the dust emission scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gläser

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This first detailed analysis of the mineral dust cycle in the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model system investigates the performance of two dust emission schemes, following the approach of Balkanski et al. (2004 and Tegen et al. (2002, respectively, and the influence of the horizontal model resolution. Here the spectral resolutions T42, T63, T85, and T106 are investigated. A basic sulphur chemistry, enabling the coating of insoluble dust particles to make them soluble, is employed in order to realistically describe the ageing and wet deposition of mineral dust. Independent of the dust emission scheme the five-year simulations with the horizontal resolutions T42 and T63 produce unrealistically high emissions at some grid points in the Tarim Basin in Central Asia, leading to very high dust loads in polar regions. With these coarse resolutions, dust source grid points in the basin and elevated grid points of the Himalayas with high wind speeds cannot be distinguished, causing this overestimation. In T85 and T106 these regions are well separated and considerably less dust is emitted there. With the chosen model setup, the dust emission scheme by Balkanski et al. (2004 places the global maximum of emissions in the Thar Desert in India. This is unrealistic as the Sahara Desert is known to be the largest dust source in the world. This is the main deficiency of this scheme compared to the one by Tegen et al. (2002, which, based on a qualitative comparison to AEROCOM data, produces a very reasonable distribution of emissions and dust loads in simulations with resolutions T85 and T106. For future climate simulations with EMAC focusing on mineral dust, we recommend to use the dust emission scheme by Tegen et al. (2002 and a model resolution of at least T85. Simulations of two selected episodes and comparison to observational data sets show that in this model configuration EMAC is able to realistically simulate also intense, episodic events of

  2. Chandra X-ray Observations of Jovian Low-latitude Emissions: Morphological, Temporal, and Spectral Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Cravens, Thomas E.; Waiate J. Hunter, Jr.; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Ford, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Chandra observed X-rays from Jupiter during 24-26 February 2003 for about 40 hours with the ACIS-S and HRC-I instruments. The analysis of Jovian low-latitude "disk" Xray emissions are presented and compared with the high-latitude "auroral" emissions. We report the first Chandra ACIS-S measured X-ray spectrum (0.3-2 keV) of Jupiter's low-latitude disk The disk X-ray emission is harder and extends to higher energies than the auroral spectrum. The temporal variation in the Jovian disk X-rays is on an average consistent with those in the solar X-rays observed by GOES, and TIMED/SSE. Contrary to the auroral X-rays, the disk emissions are uniformly distributed over Jupiter; no indication of longitudinal dependence or correlation with surface magneh field strength is visible. Also, unlike the approx. 40 +/- 20 min periodic oscillations seen in the auroral X-ray emissions, the disk emissions do not show any periodic oscillations. The disk spectrum seems to be consistent with resonant and fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays by the Jovian upper atmosphere. Jupiter's disk is found to be about 50% dimmer in soft X-rays in February 2003 compared that in December 2000, which is consistent with the decrease in solar activity. No evidence of lightning-induced X-rays is seen in the Chandra X-ray data. The Jovian disk spectra observed with Chandra-ACIS is stronger than that observed with XMM-Newton two months later during April 28-29, 2003. The XMM-Newton Xray image of Jupiter shows evidence of limb darkening on the anti-sunward side as seen from Earth, as well as an asymmetry with respect to the subsolar point: suggesting a solar driven process.

  3. Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy using lanthanide centred near-IR emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Zhiyu; Tropiano, Manuel; Mantulnikovs, Konstantins

    2015-01-01

    The narrow, near infrared (NIR) emission from lanthanide ions has attracted great interest, particularly with regard to developing tools for bioimaging, where the long lifetimes of lanthanide excited states can be exploited to address problems arising from autofluorescence and sample transparency....... Despite the promise of lanthanide-based probes for near-IR imaging, few reports on their use are present in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that images can be recorded by monitoring NIR emission from lanthanide complexes using detectors, optical elements and a microscope that were primarily designed...... for the visible part of the spectrum....

  4. Spectrally tunable mollow triplet emission from a coherently excited quantum dot in a microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Sven M.; Ates, Serkan; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Resonance fluorescence of excitonic s-shell emission from a coherently pumped single InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot inside a micropillar cavity has been investigated in dependence on optical pump power and laser detuning, respectively. For strong purely resonant excitation, Mollow triplet spectra with l...... with large Rabi splittings of j~­j » 60¹eV have been observed. Laser detuning-dependent series revealed the pronounced asymmetry of the emission triplet as predicted by theory. From our data, an electrical dipole moment of ¹ » 17:8§0:5 Debye could be derived for the excitonic state....

  5. Avoiding spectral leakage in measurements of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    The typical measurement of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) relies on the discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) to extract amplitude and phase of the response at the 2f1-f2 DPOAE frequency, f1 and f2 being the frequencies of the stimulus. The DFT measures the DPOAE response...

  6. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ε{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ε{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, λ{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1.

  7. The comparative metrological estimation of methods of emission spectral analysis for wear products in aviation oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alchimov, A.B.; Drobot, S.I.; Drokov, V.G.; Zarubin, V.P.; Kazmirov, A.D.; Skodaev, Y.D.; Podrezov, A.M. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The comparison of different spectral methods of analysis for wear diagnostics of aircraft engines has been carried out. It is shown that known techniques of determination of metals content in aviation oils with the use the spectrometers MFS (Russia) and MOA (USA) give a low accuracy of measurements. As an alternative the method of wear diagnostics on the base of a scintillation spectrometer is suggested. This method possess far better metrological properties in comparison with those on the base of the spectrometer MFS and MOA. (orig.) 6 refs.

  8. Radiometric Normalization of Temporal Images Combining Automatic Detection of Pseudo-Invariant Features from the Distance and Similarity Spectral Measures, Density Scatterplot Analysis, and Robust Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Ferreira de Carvalho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiometric precision is difficult to maintain in orbital images due to several factors (atmospheric conditions, Earth-sun distance, detector calibration, illumination, and viewing angles. These unwanted effects must be removed for radiometric consistency among temporal images, leaving only land-leaving radiances, for optimum change detection. A variety of relative radiometric correction techniques were developed for the correction or rectification of images, of the same area, through use of reference targets whose reflectance do not change significantly with time, i.e., pseudo-invariant features (PIFs. This paper proposes a new technique for radiometric normalization, which uses three sequential methods for an accurate PIFs selection: spectral measures of temporal data (spectral distance and similarity, density scatter plot analysis (ridge method, and robust regression. The spectral measures used are the spectral angle (Spectral Angle Mapper, SAM, spectral correlation (Spectral Correlation Mapper, SCM, and Euclidean distance. The spectral measures between the spectra at times t1 and t2 and are calculated for each pixel. After classification using threshold values, it is possible to define points with the same spectral behavior, including PIFs. The distance and similarity measures are complementary and can be calculated together. The ridge method uses a density plot generated from images acquired on different dates for the selection of PIFs. In a density plot, the invariant pixels, together, form a high-density ridge, while variant pixels (clouds and land cover changes are spread, having low density, facilitating its exclusion. Finally, the selected PIFs are subjected to a robust regression (M-estimate between pairs of temporal bands for the detection and elimination of outliers, and to obtain the optimal linear equation for a given set of target points. The robust regression is insensitive to outliers, i.e., observation that appears to deviate

  9. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and redness/greenness for comparison of leaf spectral profiles in multi-temporally acquired remote sensing images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Ryoichi

    2012-09-01

    Observation of leaf colour (spectral profiles) through remote sensing is an effective method of identifying the spatial distribution patterns of abnormalities in leaf colour, which enables appropriate plant management measures to be taken. However, because the brightness of remote sensing images varies with acquisition time, in the observation of leaf spectral profiles in multi-temporally acquired remote sensing images, changes in brightness must be taken into account. This study identified a simple luminosity normalization technique that enables leaf colours to be compared in remote sensing images over time. The intensity values of green and yellow (green+red) exhibited strong linear relationships with luminosity (R2 greater than 0.926) when various invariant rooftops in Bangkok or Tokyo were spectralprofiled using remote sensing images acquired at different time points. The values of the coefficient and constant or the coefficient of the formulae describing the intensity of green or yellow were comparable among the single Bangkok site and the two Tokyo sites, indicating the technique's general applicability. For single rooftops, the values of the coefficient of variation for green, yellow, and red/green were 16% or less (n=6-11), indicating an accuracy not less than those of well-established remote sensing measures such as the normalized difference vegetation index. After obtaining the above linear relationships, raw intensity values were normalized and a temporal comparison of the spectral profiles of the canopies of evergreen and deciduous tree species in Tokyo was made to highlight the changes in the canopies' spectral profiles. Future aspects of this technique are discussed herein.

  10. A non-LTE model for the Jovian methane infrared emissions at high spectral resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Decola, Philip L.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution spectra of Jupiter in the 3.3 micrometer region have so far failed to reveal either the continuum or the line emissions that can be unambiguously attributed to the nu(sub 3) band of methane (Drossart et al. 1993; Kim et al. 1991). Nu(sub 3) line intensities predicted with the help of two simple non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) models -- a two-level model and a three-level model, using experimentally determined relaxation coefficients, are shown to be one to three orders of magnitude respectively below the 3-sigma noise level of these observations. Predicted nu(sub 4) emission intensities are consistent with observed values. If the methane mixing ratio below the homopause is assumed as 2 x 10(exp -3), a value of about 300 K is derived as an upper limit to the temperature of the high stratosphere at microbar levels.

  11. Thermal tuning of spectral emission from optically trapped liquid-crystal droplet resonators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáš, A.; Pilát, Zdeněk; Ježek, Jan; Bernatová, Silvie; Fořt, Tomáš; Zemánek, Pavel; Aas, M.; Kiraz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 9 (2017), s. 1855-1864 ISSN 0740-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : emission spectroscopy * drops * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.843, year: 2016

  12. Spectral characteristics of electromagnetic emission from Sacharomyces cerevisiae in the frequency region 8-9 MHz

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jiří; Hašek, Jiří; Jelínek, František; Malínská, Kateřina; Šaroch, Jaroslav; Dohnalová, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 13, Supplement (2003), s. 21-24 ISSN 1121-0656. [Weak Photon Emission from Living Tissues. Ljubljana, 25.04.2003-26.04.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC 244B.40; GA MŠk(CZ) OC 281.001; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK2067107 Keywords : electromagnetic fields * cellular biophysics * bioelectric phenomena Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Low energy spectral index and Ep evolution of quasi-thermal photosphere emission of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations by the Fermi satellite suggest that a photosphere emission component is contributing to the observed spectrum of many gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One important question is whether the photosphere component can interpret the typical 'Band' function of GRBs with a typical low energy photon spectral index α ∼ –1. We perform a detailed study of the photosphere emission spectrum by progressively introducing several physical ingredients previously not fully incorporated, including the probability distribution of the location of a dynamically evolving photosphere, superposition of emission from an equal arrival time 'volume' in a continuous wind, the evolution of optical depth of a wind with finite but evolving outer boundary, as well as the effect of different top-hat wind luminosity (L w ) profiles. By assuming a comoving blackbody spectrum emerging from the photosphere, we find that for an outflow with a constant or increasing L w , the low-energy spectrum below the peak energy (E p ), can be modified to F ν ∼ ν 1.5 (α ∼ +0.5). A softer (–1 < α < +0.5) or flat (α = –1) spectrum can be obtained during the L w decreasing phase or high-latitude-emission-dominated phase. We also study the evolution of E p as a function of wind and photosphere luminosity in this photosphere model. An E p – L tracking pattern can be reproduced if a certain positive dependence between the dimensionless entropy η and L w is introduced. However, the hard-to-soft evolution pattern cannot be reproduced unless a contrived condition is invoked. In order to interpret the Band spectrum, a more complicated photosphere model or a different energy dissipation and radiation mechanism is needed.

  14. A three-coordinate system (ecliptic, galactic, ISMF) spectral analysis of heliospheric ENA emissions using CASSINI/INCA measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dialynas, K.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Decker, R. B

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we use all-sky energy-resolved energetic neutral atom (ENA) maps obtained by the Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) instrument on board Cassini that correspond to the time period from 2003 to 2009, in four discrete energy passbands (∼5.4 to ∼55 keV), to investigate the geometrical characteristics of the belt (a broad band of emission in the sky). The heliospheric ENA emissions are mapped in three different coordinate systems (ecliptic, Galactic, and interstellar magnetic field (ISMF)), and spectral analyses are performed to further examine the belt's possible energy dependence. Our conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) the high flux ENA belt identified in the energy range of 8-42 keV is moderately well organized in Galactic coordinates, as the ENA minima appear in the vicinity of the north and south Galactic poles; (2) using minimization criteria ( B · R ∼ 0), the deviation of the ENA emissions from the equator is effectively minimized in a rotated frame, which we interpret as ISMF, where its north pole points toward 190° ecliptic longitude and 15° ecliptic latitude; (3) ENA spectra show a power-law form in energy that can be fitted with a single function presenting higher spectral slopes in the belt region and lower outside (3.4 < γ < 4.4); (4) the spectra are almost indistinguishable between the tail and the nose regions, i.e., no noticeable asymmetry is observed; (5) the consistency of the ENA distributions as a function of latitude among the different INCA channels indicates that the morphology of the belt (peak, width, and structure) is nearly energy independent from 8 keV to 30 keV (minor deviations start to appear at >35 keV); and (6) in the low count rate regions, the long-term ENA count rate profiles do not match the measured cosmic ray profiles, indicating that even the minimum ENA emissions detected by INCA are foreground ENAs.

  15. A computed tomography-based spatial normalization for the analysis of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hanna; Kim, Jin Su; Choi, Jae Yong; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung

    2014-01-01

    We developed a new computed tomography (CT)-based spatial normalization method and CT template to demonstrate its usefulness in spatial normalization of positron emission tomography (PET) images with [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in healthy controls. Seventy healthy controls underwent brain CT scan (120 KeV, 180 mAs, and 3 mm of thickness) and [(18)F] FDG PET scans using a PET/CT scanner. T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired for all subjects. By averaging skull-stripped and spatially-normalized MR and CT images, we created skull-stripped MR and CT templates for spatial normalization. The skull-stripped MR and CT images were spatially normalized to each structural template. PET images were spatially normalized by applying spatial transformation parameters to normalize skull-stripped MR and CT images. A conventional perfusion PET template was used for PET-based spatial normalization. Regional standardized uptake values (SUV) measured by overlaying the template volume of interest (VOI) were compared to those measured with FreeSurfer-generated VOI (FSVOI). All three spatial normalization methods underestimated regional SUV values by 0.3-20% compared to those measured with FSVOI. The CT-based method showed slightly greater underestimation bias. Regional SUV values derived from all three spatial normalization methods were correlated significantly (p brain regions or highly variable within study population.

  16. Vascular response to ischemia in the feet of falanga torture victims and normal controls--color and spectral Doppler findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Amris, Kirstine; Holm, Christian Cato

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether signs of chronic compartment syndrome could be found in plantar muscles of falanga torture victims with painful feet and impaired gait. The hypothesis was that the muscular vascular response to two minutes ischemia would be decreased in torture victims compared...... to controls. On color Doppler this would be seen as less color after ischemia and on spectral Doppler as elevated resistive index (RI). METHODS: Ten male torture victims from the Middle East and nine age, sex and ethnically matched controls underwent Doppler examination of the abductor hallucis and flexor...... ischemia. RESULTS: Both torture victims and controls responded to ischemia with an increased CF. There was no difference between torture victims and controls. With spectral Doppler all subjects had an RI of 1.0 before ischemia. After ischemia, in nearly all subjects and all muscles the first RI was lowest...

  17. Spectrally and angularly resolved measurements of three-halves harmonic emission from laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N.; Liu, H.; Lin, Z.; Lei, A.; Zhou, S.; Fang, Z.; An, H.; Li, K.; Fan, W.

    2017-10-01

    Spectra of three-halves harmonic emissions (3{ω }0/2) from laser-produced plasmas were measured at different angles, including both forward and backward sides, from the direction of incident laser beams. The 3{ω }0/2 emitted from carbon-hydrogen (CH) targets was observed to be larger than that from aluminum (Al) targets with the same incident laser intensity, which supports the argument that the two-plasmon decay (TPD) instability could be inhibited by using medium-Z ablator instead of CH ablator in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Besides, the measured 3{ω }0/2-incident intensity curves for both materials suggest relatively lower threshold of TPD than the calculated values. In experiments with thin Al targets, the angular distribution of the blue- and red-shifted peaks of 3{ω }0/2 spectra were obtained, which shows that the most intense blue- and red-shifted peaks may not be produced in paired plasmons, but the spectra produced by their ‘twin’ plasmons were not observed. Because 3{ω }0/2 may have been influenced by other physical processes during their propagation from their birth places to the detectors, the mismatches on emission angle, wavelength shift, and threshold may be qualitatively explained through the assumption that small-scale light filaments widely existed in the corona of laser-produced plasmas.

  18. Vascular response to ischemia in the feet of falanga torture victims and normal controls--color and spectral Doppler findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Amris, Kirstine; Holm, Christian Cato; Kønig, Merete; Prip, Karen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether signs of chronic compartment syndrome could be found in plantar muscles of falanga torture victims with painful feet and impaired gait. The hypothesis was that the muscular vascular response to two minutes ischemia would be decreased in torture victims compared to controls. On color Doppler this would be seen as less color after ischemia and on spectral Doppler as elevated resistive index (RI). Ten male torture victims from the Middle East and nine age, sex and ethnically matched controls underwent Doppler examination of the abductor hallucis and flexor digitorum brevis muscles before and after two minutes ischemia induced with a pressure cuff over the malleoli. The color Doppler findings were quantified with the color fraction (CF) before and after ischemia. On spectral Doppler the resistive index was measured once before and three consecutive times after ischemia. Both torture victims and controls responded to ischemia with an increased CF. There was no difference between torture victims and controls. With spectral Doppler all subjects had an RI of 1.0 before ischemia. After ischemia, in nearly all subjects and all muscles the first RI was lowest, the second was higher and the third was highest indicating that the response to ischemia was disappearing as measurements were made. There was a trend that the first RI was higher in torture victims than in controls. The study was not able to confirm the presence of chronic compartment syndrome. However, the trend in RI still supports the hypothesis. The negative findings may be due to inadequate design where the CF and RI were measured in one setting, perhaps resulting in both methods being applied imperfectly. The response to ischemia seems short-lived and we suggest that the Doppler methods may be re-evaluated with separate ischemic phases for CF and RI.

  19. Hyperspectral Image-Based Night-Time Vehicle Light Detection Using Spectral Normalization and Distance Mapper for Intelligent Headlight Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heekang Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a vehicle light detection method using a hyperspectral camera instead of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD or Complementary metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS camera for adaptive car headlamp control. To apply Intelligent Headlight Control (IHC, the vehicle headlights need to be detected. Headlights are comprised from a variety of lighting sources, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs, High-intensity discharge (HID, and halogen lamps. In addition, rear lamps are made of LED and halogen lamp. This paper refers to the recent research in IHC. Some problems exist in the detection of headlights, such as erroneous detection of street lights or sign lights and the reflection plate of ego-car from CCD or CMOS images. To solve these problems, this study uses hyperspectral images because they have hundreds of bands and provide more information than a CCD or CMOS camera. Recent methods to detect headlights used the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM, Spectral Correlation Mapper (SCM, and Euclidean Distance Mapper (EDM. The experimental results highlight the feasibility of the proposed method in three types of lights (LED, HID, and halogen.

  20. Using Visible Spectral Information to Predict Long-Wave Infrared Spectral Emissivity: A Case Study over the Sokolov Area of the Czech Republic with an Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gila Notesco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote-sensing platforms are often comprised of a cluster of different spectral range detectors or sensors to benefit from the spectral identification capabilities of each range. Missing data from these platforms, caused by problematic weather conditions, such as clouds, sensor failure, low temporal coverage or a narrow field of view (FOV, is one of the problems preventing proper monitoring of the Earth. One of the possible solutions is predicting a detector or sensor’s missing data using another detector/sensor. In this paper, we propose a new method of predicting spectral emissivity in the long-wave infrared (LWIR spectral region using the visible (VIS spectral region. The proposed method is suitable for two main scenarios of missing data: sensor malfunctions and narrow FOV. We demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of this prediction scheme using the airborne hyperspectral scanner (AHS sensor, which consists of both VIS and LWIR spectral regions, in a case study over the Sokolov area, Czech Republic.

  1. Aggregation-induced emission spectral shift as a measure of local concentration of a pH-activatable rhodamine-based smart probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsov, Zoran; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2018-02-01

    Generating activatable probes that report about molecular vicinity through contact-based mechanisms such as aggregation can be very convenient. Specifically, such probes change a particular spectral property only at the intended biologically relevant target. Xanthene derivatives, for example rhodamines, are able to form aggregates. It is typical to examine aggregation by absorption spectroscopy but for microscopy applications utilizing fluorescent probes it is very important to perform characterization by measuring fluorescence spectra. First we show that excitation spectra of aqueous solutions of rhodamine 6G can be very informative about the aggregation features. Next we establish the dependence of the fluorescence emission spectral maximum shift on the dimer concentration. The obtained information helped us confirm the possibility of aggregation of a recently designed and synthesized rhodamine 6G-based pH-activatable fluorescent probe and to study its pH and concentration dependence. The size of the aggregation-induced emission spectral shift at specific position on the sample can be measured by fluorescence microspectroscopy, which at particular pH allows estimation of the local concentration of the observed probe at microscopic level. Therefore, we show that besides aggregation-caused quenching and aggregation-induced emission also aggregation-induced emission spectral shift can be a useful photophysical phenomenon.

  2. Modifying Emission Spectral Bandwidth of Phosphorescent Platinum(II) Complexes Through Synthetic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guijie; Wolfe, Alicia; Brooks, Jason; Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Jian

    2017-07-17

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of tetradentate cyclometalated Pt(II) complexes are reported. The platinum complexes have the general structure Pt(ppz-O-CbPy-R), where a tetradentate cyclometalating ligand is consisting of ppz (3,5-dimethyl-1-phenyl-pyrazole), CbPy (carbazolylpyridine) components, and an oxygen bridging group. Variations of the R group on the pyridyl ring with various electron withdrawing and donating substituents are shown to have profound effects on the photophysical properties of Pt complexes. Electrochemical analysis indicates that reduction process occurs mainly on the electron-accepting pyridyl group, and the irreversible oxidation process is primarily localized on the metal-phenyl portions. The studies of their photophysical properties indicate that the lowest excited state of the platinum complexes is a ligand-centered 3 π-π* state with minor to significant 1 MLCT/ 3 MLCT character and are strongly dependent on the nature of the electron-accepting pyridyl moiety. A systematic study of the substituent effects on the pyridyl ring demonstrates that the T 1 state properties can be tuned by altering the functionality and positions of substituents. Importantly, it is revealed that how the emission spectra of the Pt(II) complexes can be significantly narrowed and why it can be achieved by incorporating an electron-donating group on the 4-position of the pyridyl ring. Most of the Pt(II) complexes reported here are highly emissive at room temperature in dichloromethane solutions (Φ = 1.1-95%) and in doped PMMA films (Φ = 29-88%) with luminescent lifetimes in the microsecond range (τ = 0.6-13.5 μs in solution and 0.9-11.3 μs in thin film respectively) and λ max = 442-568 nm and 440-544 nm in solution and thin film, respectively. Moreover, these complexes are neutral and thermally stable for sublimation, indicating that they can be useful for display and solid-state lighting applications.

  3. The Comparison Study of Contralateral Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission (TEOAE Suppression in Normal Hearing Subjects and Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KH Mohamadkhani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: A common auditory complaint of multiple sclerosis patients, is misunderstanding speech in the presence of background noise. Evidence from animal and human studies has suggested that the medial olivocochlear bundle may play an important role in hearing noise. The medial olivocochlear bundle function can be evaluated by the suppression effect of transient otoacoustic emission in response to contralateral acoustic stimulation. The present study was conducted to investigate the suppression effect of transient otoacoustic emission in multiple sclerosis patients. Materials & Methods: This analytical case-control study was conducted on 34 multiple sclerosis patients (24 female, 10 male, aged 20-50 years and 34 controls matched for age and gender in Faculty of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2006. All cases were selected in simple random manner. The suppression effect of transient otoacoustic emission was evaluated by comparing the transient otoacoustic emission levels with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation. Data were analyzed using SPSS software and independent T- test. Results:There was no significant difference in transient otoacoustic emission levels of two groups, but a significantly reduced suppression effect of transient otoacoustic emission was found in multiple sclerosis patients, in compare with the controls. Conclusion: Outer hair cells activity in multiple sclerosis patients was normal but these patients presented low activity of the medial olivocochlear bundle system which could affect their ability to hear in the presence of background noise.

  4. On application of ion-photon emission method in spectral analysis of surface of different materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhin, A.I.; Buravlev, Yu.M.; Ryzhov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    Possibilities of application of ion-photom emission (IPE) method for determining element composition of the aluminium bronzes surface and profiles of distribution of hydrogen and helium implanted in metals (Mon Wn Cun Aln OKh18N10T steel) by ion bombardment have been studied. As ion source duoplasmatron which permits to obtain ions of inert (helium, argon) and active (hydrogenn oxygen) gases with current density 0.1-1 mA/cm 2 in the beam and energy from 5 to 25 keV has been applied. The photomultiplier PEM-79 has been used as a detector of optical radiation arising in the course of ion bombardment of the sample. For spectra recording the two-coordinate recorder has been used. Calibration charts which permit to determine the concentration of the investigated elements with 3-5% accuracy are obtained. The method sensitivity depends on excitation energy of transition observed in the spectrum. By known volumetric element concentration in the sample one can determine its concentration on a sUrface without resorting to a calibration chart in the coUrse of target sputtering. It has been found that the target impurity sputtering coefficient becomes nonselective to their relatiVe content. At wide incidence angles of ion beam. In contrast to other excitation methods (arc, spark) the IPE method possesses locality which constitutes 1 μm at a quite simple method of ion beam focussing (single lens)

  5. Dual-channel phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography for simultaneously measuring axial and normal to B-scan off-axial displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bo; Zhang, Yun; Ye, Shuangli; Zhou, Yanzhou; He, Zhaoshui; Xie, Shengli

    2017-09-01

    A dual-channel phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography (DPC-SOCT) method is proposed for measuring axial and normal to B-scan off-axial displacements inside weakly scattering translucent materials. By employing a dual-channel observation structure with depth multiplexing, only one shot before and one shot after the object deformation are required for simultaneously measuring the displacements. To validate the method, a DPC-SOCT system was built and axial and normal to B-scan off-axial displacements inside polymer films were measured at 20 frames per second. The results suggest that the method can be used for investigating inner mechanical properties of materials under different loads. In the future, a method for all orthogonal measurement of displacement components will be developed.

  6. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Characterization of Fan Beam Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging Methods for Differentiation of Normal and Neoplastic Breast Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R; Albanese, K; Lakshmanan, M; Greenberg, J; Kapadia, A [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study intends to characterize the spectral and spatial resolution limits of various fan beam geometries for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast structures via coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging techniques. In previous studies, pencil beam raster scanning methods using coherent scatter computed tomography and selected volume tomography have yielded excellent results for tumor discrimination. However, these methods don’t readily conform to clinical constraints; primarily prolonged scan times and excessive dose to the patient. Here, we refine a fan beam coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system to characterize the tradeoffs between dose, scan time and image quality for breast tumor discrimination. Methods: An X-ray tube (125kVp, 400mAs) illuminated the sample with collimated fan beams of varying widths (3mm to 25mm). Scatter data was collected via two linear-array energy-sensitive detectors oriented parallel and perpendicular to the beam plane. An iterative reconstruction algorithm yields images of the sample’s spatial distribution and respective spectral data for each location. To model in-vivo tumor analysis, surgically resected breast tumor samples were used in conjunction with lard, which has a form factor comparable to adipose (fat). Results: Quantitative analysis with current setup geometry indicated optimal performance for beams up to 10mm wide, with wider beams producing poorer spatial resolution. Scan time for a fixed volume was reduced by a factor of 6 when scanned with a 10mm fan beam compared to a 1.5mm pencil beam. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the utility of fan beam coherent scatter spectral imaging for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast tissues has successfully reduced dose and scan times whilst sufficiently preserving spectral and spatial resolution. Future work to alter the coded aperture and detector geometries could potentially allow the use of even wider fans, thereby making coded

  7. Spectral interferences in the determination of rhenium in molybdenum and copper concentrates by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadjov, Metody; Velitchkova, Nikolaya; Veleva, Olga; Velichkov, Serafim; Markov, Pavel; Daskalova, Nonka

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with spectral interferences of complex matrix containing Mo, Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca and Cu in the determination of rhenium in molybdenum and copper concentrates by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). By radial viewing 40.68 MHz ICP equipped with a high resolution spectrometer (spectral bandwidth = 5 pm) the hyperfine structure (HFS) of the most prominent lines of rhenium (Re II 197.248 nm, Re II 221.426 nm and Re II 227.525 nm) was registered. The HFS components under high resolution conditions were used as separate prominent line in order to circumvent spectral interferences. The Q-concept was applied for quantification of spectral interferences. The quantitative databases for the type and the magnitude of the spectral interferences in the presence of above mentioned matrix constituents were obtained by using a radial viewing 40.68 MHz ICP with high resolution and an axial viewing 27.12 MHz ICP with middle resolution. The data for the both ICP-OES systems were collected chiefly with a view to spectrochemical analysis for comparing the magnitude of line and wing (background) spectral interference and the true detection limits with spectroscopic apparatus with different spectral resolution. The sample pretreatment methods by sintering with magnesium oxide and oxidizing agents as well as a microwave acid digestion were applied. The feasibility, accuracy and precision of the analytical results were experimentally demonstrated by certified reference materials.

  8. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar...... to the emission evoked by click stimuli. It is concluded that significant information is obtained by the click rather than by the tonal stimuli. The click-evoked emissions were also recorded from both ears in a consecutive series of 100 full-term and otherwise normal babies 2-4 days after birth. The emission...

  9. Quantification of strong emissions of methane in the Arctic using spectral measurements from TANSO-FTS and IASI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourakkadi, Zakia; Payan, Sébastien; Bureau, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after the carbon dioxide but it is 25 times more effective in contributing to the radiative forcing than the carbon dioxide(1). Since the pre-industrial times global methane concentration have more than doubled in the atmosphere. This increase is generally caused by anthropogenic activities like the massif use and extraction of fossil fuel, rice paddy agriculture, emissions from landfills... In recent years, several studies show that climate warming and thawing of permafrost act on the mobilization of old stored carbon in Arctic causing a sustained release of methane to the atmosphere(2),(3),(4). The methane emissions from thawing permafrost and methane hydrates in the northern circumpolar region will become potentially important in the end of the 21st centry because they could increase dramatically due to the rapid climate warming of the Artic and the large carbon pools stored there. The objective of this study is to evaluate and quantify methane strong emissions in this region of the globe using spectral measurements from the Thermal And Near Infrared Sensor for carbon Observations-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). We use also the LMDZ-PYVAR model to simulate methane fluxes and to estimate how they could be observed by Infrared Sounders from space. To select spectra with high values of methane we developed a statistical approach based on the singular value decomposition. Using this approach we can identify spectra over the important emission sources of methane and we can by this way reduce the number of spectra to retrieve by an line-by-line radiative transfer model in order to focus on those which contain high amount of methane. In order to estimate the capacity of TANSO-FTS and IASI to detect peaks of methane emission with short duration at quasi-real time, we used data from MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) simulations

  10. X-points in the spectral emissivity of solid and liquid refractory transition metals measured by multichannel pyrometry. Discussion of the experimental method and physical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hyland, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    The spectral emissivities of some refractory Transition metals (Hf, Mo, Nb, Re, V, W and Zr) have been measured from about 2500 K up to temperatures above the melting point T m . The experimental method adopted is based on multiwavelength pyrometric measurements, where the determination of the spectral emissivity is implicitly related to the evaluation of temperature through the radiation emission law and an assumed relationship between the spectral emissivity ε and the wavelength λ. Heating was produced with a pulsed laser in times of the order of 100 ms. A specially constructed pyrometer was used which enabled measurements at six different wavelengths to be carried out at time intervals of the order of 0.1 ms. A model for the evaluation of temperature and spectral emissivities has been developed and its limitations due to statistical and systematic errors are discussed. Our experiments confirm the existence of a unique wavelength, λ-x for each metal to which different ε λ -isotherms converge for λ x and from which they diverge for λ>λ x and at which ε λ is independent of T, and thus equal, in particular, to its value at T m , indicate that λ x is preserved through T m and reveal that at T m these metals are effectively 'grey'. Detailed theoretical investigations reveal that the occurrence of the λ x points is intimately connected with the particular T and λ dependences of the interband contribution to the imaginary part of the complex dielectric function entailed by specific features of the electronic band-structure of the Transition metals concerned. Finally, in connection with the 'grey' phenomenon at T m , it should be stressed that this is not found in the case of the Noble metals, although, like Transition metals, they exhibit λ x points, despite their quite different band-structures. (author). 56 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  11. SAIL-Thermique: a model for land surface spectral emissivity in the thermal infrared. Evaluation and reassesment of the temperature - emissivity separation (TES) algorithm in presence of vegetation canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olioso, A.; Jacob, F.; Lesaignoux, A.

    2014-12-01

    The SAIL-Thermique model was developed to simulate thermal infrared (TIR) radiative transfers inside vegetation canopies and land surface emissivity. It is based on the SAIL model developed by Verhoef (1984) for simulating spectral reflectances in the solar domain. Due to the difficulty to measure land surface emissivity, no emissivity model was validated against ground measurements. In this study, several datasets extracted from the literature and from recent databases were used for evaluating emissivity simulations. Model simulations were performed from the knowledge of leaf area index, leaf inclination distribution, direction of viewing, and leaf and soil optical properties. As data on leaf inclination and leaf optical properties were usually not available, stochastic simulations were performed from a priori knowledges on their distribution (extracted from the literature and recent databases). Simulated 8-14 μm emissivities were favorably compared to measurements with a root mean square difference (RMSD) around 0.006 (0.004 when considering only herbaceous species). The model was then used for simulating emissivity spectra for providing information for the interpretation of TIR multispectral data from the ASTER sensor. We used the land surface emissivity simulations for re-assessing the TES algorithm used to separate emissivity and land surface temperature. We showed that the inclusion of vegetated land surfaces significantly modified the relationship between minimum emissivity and minimum maximum difference (ɛmin- MMD) which is at the heart of the TES algorithm. This relationship was originally established on the ASTER spectral library which did not include vegetated land surface (Schmugge et al. 1998). On a synthetic database, estimations of spectral emissivities and surface temperature were significantly improved when using the new ɛmin- MMD relationship in comparison to the classical one: RMSD dropped from ~0.012 to ~0.006 for spectral emissivity and from

  12. Wave normal angles of magnetospheric chorus emissions observed on the Polar spacecraft

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haque, N.; Spasojevic, M.; Santolík, Ondřej; Inan, U. S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A00F07/1-A00F07/12 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA301120601 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ME 842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : chorus * wave normal * Polar spacecraft Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  13. Evaluation of Distortion and Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission in Tinnitus Patients with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helnaz Mokrian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tinnitus is a perception of sound without external source. The exact etiology of tinnitus is not fully understood, although some researchers believe that the condition usually starts in the cochlea. The aim of this study was to determine the potential contribution of outer hair cell dysfunction to chronic tinnitus, by application of Distortion-Product Evoked Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE and Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission (TEOAE and also to determine the relationship between tinnitus loudness and the amplitude of these two potentials.   Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 20 tinnitus patients aged 20–45 years and 20 age- and gender-matched control subjects. DPOAE and TEOAE were performed on each subject.   Results: The difference in the amplitudes of TEOAE between the two groups was not significantly different (P=0.08, but the amplitude of DPOAE in patients with tinnitus was significantly lower than the corresponding value in the control subjects (P=0.01. There was no correlation between tinnitus loudness and the amplitudes of neither DPOAE nor TEOAE.   Conclusion:  Abnormal findings in the DPOAE of tinnitus sufferers suggest some form of cochlear dysfunction in these patients. As there was no correlation between the amplitude of the recorded potentials and tinnitus loudness, factors other than cochlear dysfunction may also influence the loudness of tinnitus.

  14. Deep Chandra Observations of ESO 428-G014. II. Spectral Properties and Morphology of the Large-scale Extended X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, G.; Paggi, A.; Karovska, M.; Elvis, M.; Maksym, W. P.; Risaliti, G.; Wang, Junfeng

    2018-03-01

    We present a deep Chandra spectral and spatial study of the kpc-scale diffuse X-ray emission of the Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nucleus (AGN) ESO 428-G014. The entire spectrum is best fit with composite photoionization + thermal models. The diffuse emission is more extended at lower energies (cross-cone direction, where the AGN emission would be mostly obscured by the torus in the standard AGN model. Our results suggest that the transmission of the obscuring region in the cross-cone direction is ∼10% of that in the cone direction. In the 0.3–1.5 keV band, the ratio of cross-cone to cone photons increases to ∼84%, suggesting an additional soft diffuse emission component disjoint from the AGN. This could be due to hot ISM trapped in the potential of the galaxy. The luminosity of this component, ∼5 × 1038 erg s‑1, is roughly consistent with the thermal component suggested by the spectral fits in the 170–900 pc annulus.

  15. State-of-the art comparability of corrected emission spectra. 2. Field laboratory assessment of calibration performance using spectral fluorescence standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch-Genger, Ute; Bremser, Wolfram; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Spieles, Monika; Hoffmann, Angelika; DeRose, Paul C; Zwinkels, Joanne C; Gauthier, François; Ebert, Bernd; Taubert, R Dieter; Voigt, Jan; Hollandt, Jörg; Macdonald, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    In the second part of this two-part series on the state-of-the-art comparability of corrected emission spectra, we have extended this assessment to the broader community of fluorescence spectroscopists by involving 12 field laboratories that were randomly selected on the basis of their fluorescence measuring equipment. These laboratories performed a reference material (RM)-based fluorometer calibration with commercially available spectral fluorescence standards following a standard operating procedure that involved routine measurement conditions and the data evaluation software LINKCORR developed and provided by the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This instrument-specific emission correction curve was subsequently used for the determination of the corrected emission spectra of three test dyes, X, QS, and Y, revealing an average accuracy of 6.8% for the corrected emission spectra. This compares well with the relative standard uncertainties of 4.2% for physical standard-based spectral corrections demonstrated in the first part of this study (previous paper in this issue) involving an international group of four expert laboratories. The excellent comparability of the measurements of the field laboratories also demonstrates the effectiveness of RM-based correction procedures.

  16. Application of distortion product otoacoustic emissions to inflation of the eustachian tube in low frequency tinnitus with normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Song, Ningying; Li, Xujing; Lv, Hongguang

    2013-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the applications of distortion product otoacoustic emissions to assess the efficacy of eustachian tube inflation on low frequency tinnitus with normal hearing. Ninety-four patients (155 ears) suffering from subjective tinnitus with normal hearing sensitivity participated in this study. Control group consists of fifty volunteers (100 ears) without tinnitus. They were subjected to full history taking, otoscopy, basic audiologic evaluation and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). As for the patients with decreased DPOAE amplitude over a limited frequency range from 0.5 to 1kHz, we offered nose dropping and tubal inflation for a week and DPOAE was preformed again. The patients were followed up for a month. 34.8% DPOAE-gram showed decreased amplitude at the frequencies from 0.5 to 1kHz in tinnitus group and "the ring" is mostly lower in pitch. Among the patients accepted the treatment of eustachian tube inflation, 16.7% the tinnitus disappeared, no recurrence within one month; 66.67% the tinnitus reduced within one month. 95.5% the amplitude of DPOAE showed improved over the limited frequency. 16.7% the tinnitus still existed. The changes of the mechanical properties of ossicular chain or the tympanic membrane influenced by tympanum pressure may cause tinnitus, which is sub-clinical prior to the changes of audiometry and tympanometry. The low frequency tinnitus may gain transitory relief from ringing with the tubal inflation. DPOAE was proved to be a useful tool in the evaluation of the efficacy of tubal inflation on low frequency tinnitus with normal hearing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stability of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in the normal brain measured by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, J.L.; Strother, S.C.; Zatorre, R.J.; Alivisatos, B.; Worsley, K.J.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.

    1988-01-01

    Cerebral glucose utilization (LCMRGI) was measured using the [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose method with PET in two groups of ten healthy young volunteers, each scanned in a resting state under different methodological conditions. In addition, five subjects had a second scan within 48 hr. Mean hemispheric values averaged 45.8 +/- 3.3 mumol/100 g/min in the right cerebral hemisphere and 47.0 +/- 3.7 mumol/100 g/min in the left hemisphere. A four-way analysis of variance (group, sex, region, hemisphere) was carried out on the results using three different methods of data manipulation: (a) the raw values of glucose utilization, (b) LCMRGI values normalized by the mean hemispheric gray matter LCMRGI value, and (c) log transformed LCMRGI values. For all analysis techniques, significantly higher LCMRGI values were consistently seen in the left mid and posterior temporal area and caudate nucleus relative to the right, and in the right occipital region relative to the left. The coefficient of variation of intrasubject regional differences (9.9%) was significantly smaller than the coefficient of variation for regions between subjects (16.5%). No differences were noted between the sexes and no effect of repeat procedures was seen in subjects having multiple scans. In addition, inter-regional LCMRGI correlations were examined both in values from the 20 normal subjects, as well as in a set of hypothetical abnormal values. Results were compared with those reported from other PET centers; despite certain methodological differences, the intersubject and inter-regional variation of LCMRGI is fairly constant

  18. GABA-A stimulation in normal volunteers and during temporal epilepsy measured by 18FDG with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinotti, L.; Le Bars, D.; Garcia-Larrea, L.; Peyron, R.; Gregoire, M.C.; Lavenne, F.; Comar, D.; Mauguiere, F.; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter of the brain and it has been evoked in epilepto-genesis. Using a GABA analog, the THIP, we tried to establish if the gabaergic neurotransmission was modified in the epileptic focus. For this purpose, we measured the effects of this specific GABA agonist on the cerebral glucose consumption (CMRGlu) as measured by 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) with positron emission tomography (PET). Eight patients presenting temporal epilepsy and three normal volunteers received two 18 FDG PET studies, after placebo and THIP injection, in random order. Clinical symptoms and electroencephalographic data demonstrated a trend towards sleepiness and a diminution of alpha waves after THIP injection. CMRGlu was globally increased with THIP in cortical regions, cerebellum and caudate nuclei. The average increase was 17% in grey matter while it did not reach significancy in white matter. Under the placebo condition, the asymmetry between the focus and the controlateral internal temporal zone was 18% as an average, and reduced significantly to 11% after THIP injection. In the external temporal zones, the asymmetry decreased from 28% to 14%. These results suggest that gabaergic inhibition requires energy in the normal brain tissue and in this with temporal epilepsy. Since the asymmetry of glucose consumption tends to diminish, the inhibitory GABA system appears preserved in temporal epilepsy with an enhanced sensitivity in the focus. (Authors). 6 refs., 4 figs

  19. Emission characterization of a single CdSe-ZnS nanocrystal with high temporal and spectral resolution by photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, L; Brokmann, X; Spinicelli, P; Hermier, J-P

    2008-01-18

    We report a spectroscopic study of single colloidal CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals at low temperature. We use photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy, a technique based on measuring the correlations of the intensities detected at the outputs of a Michelson interferometer. Spectral diffusion over a few microeV is evidenced, on a typical time scale of 200 micros. A time resolution as high as 20 micros is obtained, and an upper limit of 6.5 microeV emission linewidth is measured, corresponding to a coherence time of at least 200 ps, similar to the values for epitaxial quantum dots.

  20. In vivo imaging of palisades of Vogt in dry eye versus normal subjects using en-face spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajdene Ghouali

    Full Text Available To evaluate a possible clinical application of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT using en-face module for the imaging of the corneoscleral limbus in normal subjects and dry eye patients.Seventy-six subjects were included in this study. Seventy eyes of 35 consecutive patients with dry eye disease and 82 eyes of 41 healthy control subjects were investigated. All subjects were examined with the Avanti RTVue® anterior segment OCT. En-face OCT images of the corneoscleral limbus were acquired in four quadrants (inferior, superior, nasal and temporal and then were analyzed semi-quantitatively according to whether or not palisades of Vogt (POV were visible. En-face OCT images were then compared to in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM in eleven eyes of 7 healthy and dry eye patients.En-face SD-OCT showed POV as a radially oriented network, located in superficial corneoscleral limbus, with a good correlation with IVCM features. It provided an easy and reproducible identification of POV without any special preparation or any direct contact, with a grading scale from 0 (no visualization to 3 (high visualization. The POV were found predominantly in superior (P<0.001 and inferior (P<0.001 quadrants when compared to the nasal and temporal quadrants for all subjects examined. The visibility score decreased with age (P<0.001 and was lower in dry eye patients (P<0.01. In addition, the score decreased in accordance with the severity of dry eye disease (P<0.001.En-face SD-OCT is a non-contact imaging technique that can be used to evaluate the POV, thus providing valuable information about differences in the limbal anatomy of dry eye patients as compared to healthy patients.

  1. A first-principles model of spectrally resolved 5.3 μm nitric oxide emission from aurorally dosed nighttime high-altitude terrestrial thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, J. W.; Dothe, H.; Sharma, R. D.

    2005-09-01

    The spectrally resolved nighttime 5.3 μm emission from NO observed by the Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle (CIRRIS-1A) experiment aboard space shuttle Discovery at 195 km tangent altitude during a strong auroral event is modeled using a first-principles kinetics model. An appropriate SHARC (Strategic High Altitude Radiance Code) Atmospheric Generator (SAG) is dosed with an IBC class III aurora. The spectrally resolved fundamental vibration-rotation band emissions from NO around 5.3 μm resulting from impacts of ambient NO with O as well as reactions of N atoms with O2 are calculated under steady state conditions. The calculated results, using a local translational temperature derived from the observed spectrum, are in excellent agreement with the CIRRIS-1A observations, validating our model. The importance of the accurate nascent vibrational and rotational distribution of chemically produced NO as well as the collisonally induced rotation-to-vibration relaxation of rotationally hot NO is pointed out.

  2. The use of double laser pulses for the atomic-emission spectral estimation of uranium content in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patapovich, M.P.; Umreiko, D.S.; Zajogin, A.P.; Buloichik, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is aimed at the development of the techniques for estimation of the uranium content in biological objects (hair) using the atomic-emission laser analysis with a sufficient accuracy and high processing rate. (authors)

  3. Solar spectral irradiance variability of some chromospheric emission lines through the solar activity cycles 21-23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göker Ü.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI in the wave-length ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN from interactive data centers such as SME (NSSDC, UARS (GDAAC, SORCE (LISIRD and SIDC, respectively. We reduced these data by using the MATLsoftware package. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm spectral lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar activity cycles (SACs 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the variations of solar activity indices obtained by the ground-based telescopes. Therefore, we found that plage regions decrease while facular areas are increasing in SAC 23. However, the decrease in plage regions is seen in small sunspot groups (SGs, contrary to this, these regions in large SGs are comparable to previous SACs or even larger as is also seen in facular areas. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these variations are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/SGs, faculae and plage regions. Finally, we applied the time series analysis of spectral lines corresponding to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and made comparisons with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increase in the 298.5 nm line for the Fe II ion. The variability of Fe II ion 298.5 nm line is in close connection with the facular areas and plage regions, and the sizes of these solar surface indices play an important role for the SSI variability, as well. So, we compared the connection between the sizes of faculae and plage regions, sunspots/SGs, chemical elements and SSI variability. Our future work will be the theoretical study of this connection and developing of a corresponding model.

  4. Automated ablation of dental composite using an IR pulsed laser coupled to a plume emission spectral feedback system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Andrew T.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Dental composites are used as restorative materials for filling cavities, shaping, and covering teeth for esthetic purposes, and as adhesives. Dentists spend more time replacing existing restorations that fail than they do placing new restorations. Tooth colored restorations are difficult to differentiate from the surrounding tooth structure making them challenging to remove without damaging healthy tooth structure. Previous studies have demonstrated that CO2 lasers in conjunction with spectral feedback can be used to selectively remove composite from tooth surfaces. The purpose of this study is to assemble a system that is feasible for clinical use incorporating a spectral feedback system, a scanning system, articulating arm and a clinical handpiece and then evaluate the performance of that system on extracted teeth. In addition, the selectivity of composite removal was analyzed using a high-speed optical coherence tomography system that is suitable for clinical use. The system was capable of rapidly removing composite from small preparations on tooth occlusal surfaces with a mean loss of enamel of less than 20-μm.

  5. Flow-injection analysis utilizing a spectrally segmented photodiode-array inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer—I. Microcolumn preconcentration for the determination of molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, N.; Brushwyler, K. R.; Hieftje, G. M.

    A flow-injection analysis (FIA) system incorporating a microcolumn of activated alumina was used for the determination of molybdenum by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The transient signal resulting from the injection of molybdenum was determined by a spectrally segmented photodiode-array spectrometer. Linear calibration was established for molybdenum over a concentration range 0-1000 ng ml -1. The detection capability was approximately 50 times better than that offered by comparable continuous-nebulization systems. The detection limit for molybdenum was 0.2 ng ml -1, and the relative standard deviations at 500 and 10 ng ml -1 were about 2 and 5%, respectively. The ability of the multichannel photodiode-array spectrometer to correct for background shifts which occur during the signal integration period provided improved precision and accuracy. Application to the determination of molybdenum in standard sea water (NASS-2) was demonstrated.

  6. Flow-injection analysis utilizing a spectrally segmented photodiode-array inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer. 1: Microcolumn preconcentration for the determination of molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Naoki; Brushwyler, K. R.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    1989-02-01

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) system incorporating a microcolumn of activated alumina was used for the determination of molybdenum by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The transient signal resulting from the injection of molybdenum was determined by a spectrally segmented photodiode-array spectro-meter. Linear calibration was established for molybdenum over a concentration range 0 to 1000 ng/ml. The detection capability was approximately 50 times better than offered by comparable continuous-nebulization systems. The detection limit for molybdenum was 0.2 ng/ml, and the relative standard deviations at 500 and 10 ng/ml were about 2 and 5 percent, respectively. The ability of the multichannel photodiode array spectrometer to correct for background shifts which occur during signal integration period provided improved precision and accuracy. Application to the analysis of molybdenum in standard sea water (NASS-2) was demonstrated.

  7. Spatially and spectrally resolved filamentary structures in the (3/2)omega 0 emission from laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Willi, O.; Rumsby, P.T.

    This study was conducted to explore the problem of filamentation of laser light in the underdense plasma corona surrounding ablatively imploded spherical targets, a phenomenon which may prevent the realization of laser-driven fusion schemes. Preliminary observations were made of filamentary structures in the (3/2)(omega sub o) emission from microballoon targets irradiated in the ablative mode. Time integrated spectroscopy showed double and single peaked (3/2)(omega sub o) emission spectra. A simple model for the growth and collapse of filaments was based on the movement of the density contours at the bottom of the filament with large velocity. Here the laser intensity was high and various decay instabilities and scattering processes took place. In particular the two plasmon decay instability occurred where the electron density was nc/4, a region of (3/2)(omega sub o) emission. The model was consistent with the experimentally observed spectra and predicted the type of omega sub o and 2 omega sub o that should be observed in future experiments

  8. Tuning the light emission of novel donor-acceptor phenoxazine dye-based materials towards the red spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaceanu, Mariana-Dana; Constantin, Catalin-Paul

    2018-04-01

    A novel red fluorescent push-pull system able to generate an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) complex was synthesized. The novel dye (R-POX) combines some structural features which are rarely encountered in the design of other push-pull systems: hexyl-substituted phenoxazine as donor moiety, divinylketone as π-linker, and p-fluorobenzene as electron acceptor group. The relationship between the structural motif, photo-physical and electrochemical properties by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence and cyclic voltammetry was thoroughly investigated both as red dopant in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) or polyimide (PI) matrix, and non-doped host emitter. The molecular rigid cores of the synthesized dye formed supramolecular rod-like structures in condensed phase with a strong impact on the emissive centers. The aggregation was totally suppressed when the dye was used as dopant in an amorphous polymeric matrix, such as PMMA or PI. Electrochemical measurements revealed the dye ability for both hole and electron injection and transport. The fluorescence emission was found to be highly sensitive to solvent polarity, rendering blue-green, yellow, orange and red light emission in different organic solvents. The absolute fluorescence quantum yield reached 39.57% in solution, and dropped to 1.2% in solid state and to 14.01% when the dye was used as dopant in PMMA matrix. According to the available CIE 1931 standard, R-POX emitted pure and saturated red light of single wavelength with chromaticity coordinates very close to those of National Television System Committee (NTSC) standard red colour. The R-POX photo-optical features were compared to those of the commercial red emitter 6, 13-diphenylpentacene.

  9. The Evolution of Normal Galaxy X-Ray Emission Through Cosmic History: Constraints from the 6 MS Chandra Deep Field-South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Mineo, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Eurfrasio, R. T.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Lou, B.; Xue, Y. Q.; Bauer, F. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the evolution of normal-galaxy X-ray emission from z (is) approx. 0-7 using local galaxies and galaxy samples in the approx. 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. The majority of the CDF-S galaxies are observed at rest-frame energies above 2 keV, where the emission is expected to be dominated by X-ray binary (XRB) populations; however, hot gas is expected to provide small contributions to the observed-frame (is) less than 1 keV emission at z (is) less than 1. We show that a single scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L(sub x)) and star-formation rate (SFR) literature, is insufficient for characterizing the average X-ray emission at all redshifts. We establish that scaling relations involving not only SFR, but also stellar mass and redshift, provide significantly improved characterizations of the average X-ray emission from normal galaxy populations at z (is) approx. 0-7. We further provide the first empirical constraints on the redshift evolution of X-ray emission from both low-mass XRB (LMXB) and high-mass XRB (HMXB) populations and their scalings with stellar mass and SFR, respectively. We find L2 -10 keV(LMXB)/stellar mass alpha (1+z)(sub 2-3) and L2 -10 keV(HMXB)/SFR alpha (1+z), and show that these relations are consistent with XRB population-synthesis model predictions, which attribute the increase in LMXB and HMXB scaling relations with redshift as being due to declining host galaxy stellar ages and metallicities, respectively. We discuss how emission from XRBs could provide an important source of heating to the intergalactic medium in the early universe, exceeding that of active galactic nuclei.

  10. Comparison of the Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions (TEOAEs) and Distortion Products Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) in Normal Hearing Subjects With and Without Tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, Maryam; Rezaei, Mohammad; Najafi, Sirvan; Faramarzi, Ali; Farahani, Farhad

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of cochlear outer hair cell function with TEOAE and DPOAE tests in patients with normal hearing and tinnitus. 25 tinnitus patients with normal hearing sensitivity selected as study group. Control group consist of 50 normal hearing subjects without tinnitus. All subjects had thresholds below 25 dBHL at frequencies 250-8,000 Hz, tympanogram type A and normal acoustic reflex thresholds. TEOAE were recorded with click stimulus at 80 dB SPL at 1,000, 2,000, 3,000 and 4000 Hz. DPOAE were measured at frequencies 1,000-8,000 Hz and intensity of L1 55 dB SPL and L2 65 dB SPL. Amplitude of DPOAE and TEOAE were decreased in all frequencies in study group. There was significant difference regarding prevalence abnormal TEOAE and DPOAE between study group and control group. There was relationship between dysfunction of outer hair cells and tinnitus in subjects with normal hearing.

  11. Thermal coagulation-induced changes of the optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro in the spectral range 400-1100 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Huilan; Xing Da; Wei Huajiang; Gu Huaimin; Wu Guoyong; Lu Jianjun

    2008-01-01

    The absorption coefficients, the reduced scattering coefficients and the optical penetration depths for native and coagulated human normal and adenomatous colon tissues in vitro were determined over the range of 400-1100 nm using a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere system, and the inverse adding-doubling method was applied to calculate the tissue optical properties from diffuse reflectance and total transmittance measurements. The experimental results showed that in the range of 400-1100 nm there were larger absorption coefficients (P < 0.01) and smaller reduced scattering coefficients (P < 0.01) for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, and there were smaller optical penetration depths for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, especially in the near-infrared wavelength. Thermal coagulation induced significant increase of the absorption coefficients and reduced scattering coefficients for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues, and significantly reduced decrease of the optical penetration depths for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues. The smaller optical penetration depth for coagulated adenomatous colon tissues is a disadvantage for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is necessary to adjust the application parameters of lasers to achieve optimal therapy

  12. Thermal coagulation-induced changes of the optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro in the spectral range 400-1100 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao Huilan; Xing Da; Wei Huajiang; Gu Huaimin [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, ina Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Guoyong; Lu Jianjun [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)], E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn

    2008-04-21

    The absorption coefficients, the reduced scattering coefficients and the optical penetration depths for native and coagulated human normal and adenomatous colon tissues in vitro were determined over the range of 400-1100 nm using a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere system, and the inverse adding-doubling method was applied to calculate the tissue optical properties from diffuse reflectance and total transmittance measurements. The experimental results showed that in the range of 400-1100 nm there were larger absorption coefficients (P < 0.01) and smaller reduced scattering coefficients (P < 0.01) for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, and there were smaller optical penetration depths for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, especially in the near-infrared wavelength. Thermal coagulation induced significant increase of the absorption coefficients and reduced scattering coefficients for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues, and significantly reduced decrease of the optical penetration depths for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues. The smaller optical penetration depth for coagulated adenomatous colon tissues is a disadvantage for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is necessary to adjust the application parameters of lasers to achieve optimal therapy.

  13. Effects of high amphetamine dose on mood and cerebral glucose metabolism in normal volunteers using positron emission tomography (PET)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollenweider, FX; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Mathys, K; Angst, J

    1998-01-01

    The effects of high euphorigenic doses of D-amphetamine (0.9-1.0 mg/kg p.o.) on regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglu) and psychological measures were investigated in 10 healthy human volunteers using a within-subject design and [F-18]-fluorodeoxygrucose positron emission tomography

  14. Improved spectrometer-microscope for quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurement based on simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fangrui; Du, Mengyan; Yang, Fangfang; Wei, Lichun; Chen, Tongsheng

    2018-01-01

    Based on our recently developed quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement method using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra (ExEm-spFRET), we here set up an improved spectrometer-microscope (SM) for implementing modified ExEm-spFRET (mExEm-spFRET), in which a system correction factor (fsc) is introduced. Our SM system is very stable for at least six months. Implementation of mExEm-spFRET with four or two excitation wavelengths on SM for single living cells expressing different FRET constructs obtained consistent FRET efficiency (E) and acceptor-donor concentration ratio (Rc) values. We also performed mExEm-spFRET measurement for single living cells coexpressing cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Bax and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-Bax and found that the E values between CFP-Bax and YFP-Bax were very low (2.2%) and independent of Rc for control cells, indicating that Bax did not exist as homooligomer in healthy cells, but positively proportional to Rc in the case of Rc1 for staurosporine (STS)-treated cells, demonstrating that all Bax formed homooligomer after STS treatment for 6 h. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  15. Emission Spectral Control of a Silicon Light Emitting Diode Fabricated by Dressed-Photon-Phonon Assisted Annealing Using a Short Pulse Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kawazoe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a high-efficiency infrared light emitting diode (LED via dressed-photon-phonon (DPP assisted annealing of a p-n homojunctioned bulk Si crystal. The center wavelength in the electroluminescence (EL spectrum of this LED was determined by the wavelength of a CW laser used in the DPP-assisted annealing. We have proposed a novel method of controlling the EL spectral shape by additionally using a pulsed light source in order to control the number of phonons for the DPP-assisted annealing. In this method, the Si crystal is irradiated with a pair of pulses having an arrival time difference between them. The number of coherent phonons created is increased (reduced by tuning (detuning this time difference. A Si-LED was subjected to DPP-assisted annealing using a 1.3 μm (hν=0.94 eV CW laser and a mode-locked pulsed laser with a pulse width of 17 fs. When the number of phonons was increased, the EL emission spectrum broadened toward the high-energy side by 200 meV or more. The broadening towards the low-energy side was reduced to 120 meV.

  16. Unified approach to catastrophic events: from the normal state to geological or biological shock in terms of spectral fractal and nonlinear analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Eftaxias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An important question in geophysics is whether earthquakes (EQs can be anticipated prior to their occurrence. Pre-seismic electromagnetic (EM emissions provide a promising window through which the dynamics of EQ preparation can be investigated. However, the existence of precursory features in pre-seismic EM emissions is still debatable: in principle, it is difficult to prove associations between events separated in time, such as EQs and their EM precursors. The scope of this paper is the investigation of the pre-seismic EM activity in terms of complexity. A basic reason for our interest in complexity is the striking similarity in behavior close to irreversible phase transitions among systems that are otherwise quite different in nature. Interestingly, theoretical studies (Hopfield, 1994; Herz and Hopfield 1995; Rundle et al., 1995; Corral et al., 1997 suggest that the EQ dynamics at the final stage and neural seizure dynamics should have many similar features and can be analyzed within similar mathematical frameworks. Motivated by this hypothesis, we evaluate the capability of linear and non-linear techniques to extract common features from brain electrical activities and pre-seismic EM emissions predictive of epileptic seizures and EQs respectively. The results suggest that a unified theory may exist for the ways in which firing neurons and opening cracks organize themselves to produce a large crisis, while the preparation of an epileptic shock or a large EQ can be studied in terms of ''Intermittent Criticality''.

  17. Spectral filtering modulation method for estimation of hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation based on a single fluorescence emission spectrum in tissue phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-10-01

    Hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation in tissue are important biomarkers that are useful in both research and clinical diagnostics of a wide variety of diseases such as cancer. The authors aim to develop simple ratiometric method based on the spectral filtering modulation (SFM) of fluorescence spectra to estimate the total hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation in tissue using only a single fluorescence emission spectrum, which will eliminate the need of diffuse reflectance measurements and prolonged data processing as required by most current methods, thus enabling rapid clinical measurements. The proposed method consists of two steps. In the first step, the total hemoglobin concentration is determined by comparing a ratio of fluorescence intensities at two emission wavelengths to a calibration curve. The second step is to estimate oxygen saturation by comparing a double ratio that involves three emission wavelengths to another calibration curve that is a function of oxygen saturation for known total hemoglobin concentration. Theoretical derivation shows that the ratio in the first step is linearly proportional to the total hemoglobin concentrations and the double ratio in the second step is related to both total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation for the chosen fiber-optic probe geometry. Experiments on synthetic fluorescent tissue phantoms, which included hemoglobin with both constant and varying oxygenation as the absorber, polystyrene spheres as scatterers, and flavin adenine dinucleotide as the fluorophore, were carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. Tissue phantom experiments confirm that the ratio in the first step is linearly proportional to the total hemoglobin concentration and the double ratio in the second step is related to both total hemoglobin concentrations and hemoglobin oxygenation. Furthermore, the relations between the two ratios and the total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation are insensitive

  18. Non-Contact Measurement of the Spectral Emissivity through Active/Passive Synergy of CO2 Laser at 10.6 µm and 102F FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ren-Hua; Su, Hong-Bo; Tian, Jing; Mi, Su-Juan; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the inversion of land surface temperature (LST) from satellite data, obtaining the information on land surface emissivity is most challenging. How to solve both the emissivity and the LST from the underdetermined equations for thermal infrared radiation is a hot research topic related to quantitative thermal infrared remote sensing. The academic research and practical applications based on the temperature-emissivity retrieval algorithms show that directly measuring the emissivity of objects at a fixed thermal infrared waveband is an important way to close the underdetermined equations for thermal infrared radiation. Based on the prior research results of both the authors and others, this paper proposes a new approach of obtaining the spectral emissivity of the object at 8–14 µm with a single-band CO2 laser at 10.6 µm and a 102F FTIR spectrometer. Through experiments, the spectral emissivity of several key samples, including aluminum plate, iron plate, copper plate, marble plate, rubber sheet, and paper board, at 8–14 µm is obtained, and the measured data are basically consistent with the hemispherical emissivity measurement by a Nicolet iS10 FTIR spectrometer for the same objects. For the rough surface of materials, such as marble and rusty iron, the RMSE of emissivity is below 0.05. The differences in the field of view angle and in the measuring direction between the Nicolet FTIR method and the method proposed in the paper, and the heterogeneity in the degree of oxidation, polishing and composition of the samples, are the main reasons for the differences of the emissivities between the two methods. PMID:27347964

  19. Head and neck: normal variations and benign findings in FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectral properties of 441 radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, F.; van Straten, W.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Johnston, S.; Kerr, M.

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of the spectral properties of 441 pulsars observed with the Parkes radio telescope near the centre frequencies of 728, 1382 and 3100 MHz. The observations at 728 and 3100 MHz were conducted simultaneously using the dual-band 10-50 cm receiver. These high-sensitivity, multifrequency observations provide a systematic and uniform sample of pulsar flux densities. We combine our measurements with spectral data from the literature in order to derive the spectral properties of these pulsars. Using techniques from robust regression and information theory, we classify the observed spectra in an objective, robust and unbiased way into five morphological classes: simple or broken power law, power law with either low- or high-frequency cut-off and log-parabolic spectrum. While about 79 per cent of the pulsars that could be classified have simple power-law spectra, we find significant deviations in 73 pulsars, 35 of which have curved spectra, 25 with a spectral break and 10 with a low-frequency turn-over. We identify 11 gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) pulsars, with 3 newly identified in this work and 8 confirmations of known GPS pulsars; 3 others show tentative evidence of GPS, but require further low-frequency measurements to support this classification. The weighted mean spectral index of all pulsars with simple power-law spectra is -1.60 ± 0.03. The observed spectral indices are well described by a shifted log-normal distribution. The strongest correlations of spectral index are with spin-down luminosity, magnetic field at the light-cylinder and spin-down rate. We also investigate the physical origin of the observed spectral features and determine emission altitudes for three pulsars.

  1. Figure-of-merit (FOM), an improved criterion over the normalized chi-squared test for assessing goodness-of-fit of gamma-ray spectral peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garo Balian, H.; Eddy, N.W.

    1977-01-01

    A careful experimenter knows that in order to choose the best curve fits of peaks from a gamma ray spectrum for such purposes as energy or intensity calibration, half-life determination, etc., the application of the normalized chi-squared test, [chisub(N)] 2 =chi 2 /(n-m), is insufficient. One must normally verify the goodness-of-fit with plots, detailed scans of residuals, etc. Because of different techniques of application, variations in backgrounds, in peak sizes and shapes, etc., quotation of the [chisub(N)] 2 value associated with an individual peak fit conveys very little information unless accompanied by considerable ancillary data. (This is not to say that the traditional chi 2 formula should not be used as the source of the normal equations in the least squares fitting procedure. But after the fitting, it is unreliable as a criterion for comparison with other fits.) The authors present a formula designated figure-of-merit (FOM) which greatly improves on the uncertainty and fluctuations of the [chisub(N)] 2 formula. An FOM value of less than 2.5% indicates a good fit (in the authors' judgement) irrespective of background conditions and variations in peak sizes and shapes. Furthermore, the authors feel the FOM formula is less subject to fluctuations resulting from different techniques of application. (Auth.)

  2. Thermal coagulation-induced changes of the optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro in the spectral range 400 1100 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Huilan; Xing, Da; Wei, Huajiang; Gu, Huaimin; Wu, Guoyong; Lu, Jianjun

    2008-04-01

    The absorption coefficients, the reduced scattering coefficients and the optical penetration depths for native and coagulated human normal and adenomatous colon tissues in vitro were determined over the range of 400-1100 nm using a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere system, and the inverse adding-doubling method was applied to calculate the tissue optical properties from diffuse reflectance and total transmittance measurements. The experimental results showed that in the range of 400-1100 nm there were larger absorption coefficients (P thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is necessary to adjust the application parameters of lasers to achieve optimal therapy.

  3. Determining H2O Vapor Temperature and Concentration in Particle-Free and Particle-Laden Combustion Flows Using Spectral Line Emission Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasson, John Robert

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing need for the clean generation of electricity in the world, and increased efficiency is one way to achieve cleaner generation. Increased efficiency may be achieved through an improved understanding of the heat flux of participating media in combustion environments. Real-time in-situ optical measurements of gas temperature and concentrations in combustion environments is needed. Optical methods do not disturb the flow characteristics and are not subject to the temperature limitation of current methods. Simpler, less-costly optical measurements than current methods would increase the ability to apply them in more circumstances. This work explores the ability to simultaneously measure gas temperature and H2O concentration via integrated spectral intensity ratios in regions where H2O is the dominant participating gas. This work considered combustion flows with and without fuel and soot particles, and is an extension of work previously performed by Ellis et al. [1]. Five different combustion regimes were used to investigate the robustness of the infrared intensity integral method first presented by Ellis et al. [1]. These included Post-Flame Natural Gas (PFNG), Post-Flame Medium Wood (PFMW), Post-Flame Fine Wood (PFFW), In-Flame Natural Gas (IFNG), and In-Flame Fine Wood (IFFW). Optical spectra were collected as a function of path length for each regime. Methods for processing the spectra to obtain gas temperature, gas concentration, broadband temperature, and broadband emissivity were developed. A one-dimensional spectral intensity model that allowed for specular reflection, and investigated differences between measured and modeled spectral intensities was created. It was concluded that excellent agreement (within 2.5%) was achieved between optical and suction pyrometer gas temperatures as long as 1) the optical probe and cold target used were well-aligned 2) the path length was greater than 0.3 m and 3) the intensity from broadband emitters within

  4. Tomographic-spectral approach for dark matter detection in the cross-correlation between cosmic shear and diffuse γ-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camera, S.; Fornasa, M.; Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.

    2015-01-01

    We recently proposed to cross-correlate the diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background with the gravitational lensing signal of cosmic shear. This represents a novel and promising strategy to search for annihilating or decaying particle dark matter (DM) candidates. In the present work, we demonstrate the potential of a tomographic-spectral approach: measuring the cross-correlation in separate bins of redshift and energy significantly improves the sensitivity to a DM signal. Indeed, the technique proposed here takes advantage of the different scaling of the astrophysical and DM components with redshift and, simultaneously of their different energy spectra and different angular extensions. The sensitivity to a particle DM signal is extremely promising even when the DM-induced emission is quite faint. We first quantify the prospects of detecting DM by cross-correlating the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) diffuse γ-ray background with the cosmic shear expected from the Dark Energy Survey. Under the hypothesis of a significant subhalo boost, such a measurement can deliver a 5σ detection of DM, if the DM particle is lighter than 300 GeV and has a thermal annihilation rate. We then forecast the capability of the European Space Agency Euclid satellite (whose launch is planned for 2020), in combination with an hypothetical future γ-ray detector with slightly improved specifications compared to current telescopes. We predict that the cross-correlation of their data will allow a measurement of the DM mass with an uncertainty of a factor of 1.5–2, even for moderate subhalo boosts, for DM masses up to few hundreds of GeV and thermal annihilation rates

  5. Effects of substrate availability on myocardial C-11 palmitate kinetics by positron emission tomography in normal subjects and patients with ventricular dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Henze, E.; Sochor, H.; Grossman, R.G.; Huang, S.C.; Barrio, J.R.; Schwaiger, M.; Phelps, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of demonstrating noninvasively with C-11 palmitate and positron emission tomography (PET) changes in myocardial substrate metabolism in normal and diseased human myocardium in response to altered substrate availability in blood and disease-related abnormalities was examined in five normal volunteers and 16 patients with ventricular dysfunction. C-11 palmitate injection and serial PET imaging were performed after an overnight fast (control period) and again 2 hours later after oral glucose (50 gm). Myocardial C-11 time-activity curves from serial PET images revealed a biexponential clearance pattern. An early rapid phase, defined by relative size and clearance half-time, reflects C-11 palmitate oxidation and the late slow phase tracer deposition in the endogenous lipid pool. During the control period, the tracer fraction entering the early rapid phase averaged 47 +/- 13% (SD) in normal subjects and 45 +/- 12% in patients. Corresponding clearance half-times were 19 +/- 7 and 20 +/- 5 minutes, respectively. Heart rate and blood pressure remained unchanged after glucose, but plasma glucose levels rose by 72.5% in normal subjects and by 98.9% in patients, while free fatty acid levels fell by 72% and 42% respectively. In normal subjects, the tracer fraction in the early rapid phase fell by 43% (p less than 0.005) and the clearance half-time increased by 46%. In patients, the response of C-11 palmitate tissue kinetics to glucose was variable. In nine patients, it was similar to normal subjects while in the other seven patients, the tracer fraction entering the rapid clearance phase increased after glucose by 30% (p less than 0.05) associated with a 36% (p less than 0.05) decline in clearance half-times. This was unrelated to disease etiology or plasma substrate levels but occurred mostly in left ventricles with more severely depressed function

  6. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T. [Also at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA. (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ∼0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ ≳ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  7. Comparison of Auditory Efferen Pathway between Learning Disabled and Normal Students Aged 7-10 Years with Suppression of Otoacoustic Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyedeh Manoush Sobhani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: A common complaint of children with learning disability (LD is difficulty in understanding speech in the presence of background noise. Evidence from animal and human studies has indicated that the medial olivocochlear bundle (MOCB play a role in hearing in the presence of noise. The MOCB function can be evaluated by the suppression effect of the click evoked otoacoustic emission (CEOAEs in response to contralateral white noise. The present study was conducted to compare the suppression effect of CEOAEs between LD and normal students. Materials and Method: This research is an analytic-interventional study. The study group consisted of 20 learning disabled and 20 normal male students. The suppression effect of CEOAEs was evaluated by a comparison between CEOAEs levels in two conditions- with and without presentation of contralateral white noise. Results: In the absence of noise there was no significant difference between CEOAEs amplitudes of two groups while there was significant difference between CEOAEs of two groups in the presence of noise. The suppression effect of CEOAEs in normal students had significant difference with LD students. Conclusion: The reduced suppression effect in LD students indicates the reduced activity of the MOCB function and efferent pathway in LD students which affect their ability to hear in the presence of background noise. Consequently, the suppression effect of CEOAEs can be used in the test battery approach of LD children.

  8. Determination of spectral limits imposed by four-wave mixing and amplified spontaneous emission in the 1550 nm region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Chavez, J A; Sanchez-Lara, R; Martinez-Piñon, F; Mendez-Martinez, F; De la Cruz-May, L; Perez-Sanchez, G G

    2015-01-01

    Dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) systems are normally limited by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), self-phase modulation (SPM), cross-phase modulation (XPM) and four-wave mixing (FWM) besides amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise from erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs). In this paper, theoretical calculation of FWM-based limits and noise from EDFAs in the 1535–1565 nm region, are reported. Results show that FWM power per channel extended from −55 to −20 dBm for dispersion values of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 ps (nm⋅km) −1 . In a similar manner, for negative dispersion coefficient (D) values ranging from 0.0 to −1.5 ps (nm⋅km) −1 , the FWM power per channel extended from −60 to −30 dBm. As for the maximum span length, the calculations demonstrated a rigorous limitation due to noise, suggesting error compensation techniques. A full set of results for the design of multi-span links is included. (paper)

  9. Spectral analysis of the process emission during laser welding of AISI 304 stainless steel with disk and Nd:YAG laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Optical emissions from the laser welding process can be obtained relatively easy in real-time. Such emissions come from the melt pool, keyhole, or plume during welding. Therefore it is very beneficial to establish a clear relation between characteristics of these emissions and the resulting weld

  10. Early and late stage positron emission tomography (PET) studies on the hemocirculation and metabolism of structurally normal brain tissue in patients with gliomas following radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Yoshitaka

    1988-01-01

    Hemocirculatory and metabolic changes in structurally normal brain tissue following radiochemotherapy including nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) and tegafur (FT) were analyzed in seven patients with gliomas, using oxygen-15 and fluorine-18 positron emission tomography (PET). Region of interests were placed in the gray matter opposite to the tumor side, assumably the normal brain structure on X-ray computerized tomography (CT). At an early stage (within one month) after radiochemotherapy, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) increased marginally, oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) (0.39 ± 0.05, mean ± SD, n = 7) decreased significantly (p 2 ) (p < 0.01, vs early stage) and cerebral glucose consumption (rCMRGl) in the contralateral gray matter. rOEF remained decreased at the same level as the early stage study. Accordingly, metabolism in the gray matter at the late stage decreased more selectively than rCBF did. There results indicate that the radiotherapeutic effect on the contralateral gray matter is primarily a progressive fall in metabolism in the late stages ; this presumably being the direct effect on the brain parenchyma. (author)

  11. Topography of pulmonary structure and function in man using positron emission tomography (PET) with special reference to methodology and normal physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brundin, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows regional quantification of specific tracer compounds to be made within a tomographic slice of the body. The present thesis which is methodological and descriptive, centers on in vivo measurements of regional lung compartments (gas, red cells, plasma and extravascular tissue) and ventilation and blood flow in normal subjects. A method of measuring regional lung hematocrit (rH) was developed and rH was found to be found to be 90% of the peripheral hematocrit in normal subjects. No significant regional variations within the lung fields were found in normal subjects or in patients with anemia or pneumonia, which enables the pulmonary whole blood volume to be regionally quantified using a single vascular tracer. This allowed a deeper examination of the interrelationship between the different lung compartments and their variation in the gravity dependent axis and during hyperinflation. Smokers were found to have higher extravascular density than non-smokers. By combining measurement of ventilation and . V A / . Q, methods were developed to 1. correct the measured . V A / . Q for incomplete equilibrium of 13 N within the alveolar space. 2. calculate regional pulmonary perfusion. By further combining these measurements with measurements of vascular and extravascular lung volumes 1. relationship between ventilation and vascular and extravascular volumes were explored and found to be consistent with the theory that ventilation is determined by the elastic properties of lung tissue and 2. relationships between blood flow and blood volume (transit times) were investigated. We conclude that blood volume plays a significant role in the matching of ventilation and perfusion and that blood flow is fairly well matched by blood volumes, thus reducing the gravitational impact on capillary transit time and hematocrit ratio which might be of rheological importance. (au)

  12. Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balick, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillespie, Alan [UN. WASHINGTON; French, Andrew [USDA-ARS; Danilina, Iryna [UN. WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

  13. Dependence of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions on primary levels in normal and impaired ears. I. Effects of decreasing L2 below L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, M L; McCoy, M J; Lonsbury-Martin, B L; Martin, G K

    1995-04-01

    The 2f1-f2 distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) is evoked by two primary tones of frequencies f1 L1 and L2. Previous reports indicate that decreasing L2 below L1 = L2 can; (1) increase DPOAE amplitude in normal ears, and (2) increase the degree to which DPOAE amplitudes are reduced by cochlear trauma. Although both of these factors could be advantageous for clinical applications of DPOAEs, neither has been explored in detail. In the present study, 2f1-f2 DPOAE-amplitude frequency functions were collected from normal and impaired ears of rabbits and humans, with L1 = L2, and with L2 L1, at each of three values of L1. In rabbits, controlled tonal or noise overexposures were used to produce permanent reductions of DPOAE amplitudes. Comparison of pre- and postexposure DPOAE-amplitude frequency functions demonstrated that the frequency-specific reductions of DPOAEs were enhanced by decreasing L2 below L1. In humans, DPOAE-amplitude frequency functions obtained with the various L1 and L2 combinations were collected from 16 normal ears to provide preliminary normative data for each stimulus-level condition. The L1-L2 that produced the maximum DPOAE amplitude in normal ears was systematically dependent on L1. Thus at most frequencies, decreasing L2 below L1 = L2 substantially reduced mean DPOAE amplitude when L1 > or = 75 dB SPL, but increased mean DPOAE amplitudes at L1 = 65 dB SPL. However, the increase of mean DPOAE amplitude obtained by decreasing L2 below L1 = 65 dB SPL was small, being less than 3.5 dB at most frequencies. More importantly, at L1 = 65 dB SPL, L2 could be decreased considerably below L1 = L2 without reducing mean DPOAE amplitude relative to that at L1 = L2. Inspection of DPOAE-amplitude frequency functions obtained from subjects with mild or moderate sensorineural hearing losses indicated that, in frequency regions of hearing impairment, decreasing L2 below L1 can enhance the degree of reduction of DPOAEs below the corresponding normative

  14. Normal coordinate analysis, molecular structure, vibrational and electronic spectral investigation of 7-(1,3-dioxolan-2-ylmethyl)-1,3-dimethylpurine-2,6-dione by ab initio HF and DFT method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakaran, A.; Muthu, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the characterization of 7-(1,3-dioxolan-2-ylmethyl)-1,3-dimethylpurine-2,6-dione (7DDMP26D) molecule was carried out by quantum chemical method and vibrational spectral techniques. The FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm-1) spectra of 7DDMP26D were recorded in solid phase. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the 7DDMP26D was recorded in the range of 200-400 nm. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies and bonding features of 7DDMP26D in the ground state have been calculated by HF and DFT methods using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The complete vibrational frequency assignments were made by normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology (SQMF). The molecular stability and bond strength were investigated by applying the natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelength, HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by time-depended DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The other molecular properties like electrostatic potential (ESP), Fukui function and thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures have been calculated. Finally, the calculation results were analyzed to simulate infrared, FT-Raman and UV spectra of the title compound which shows better agreement with observed spectra.

  15. Emission from radiatively coupled periodic quantum well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M.; Ell, C.; Brick, P.; Prineas, J.; Khitrova, G.; Gibbs, H. M.; Hoyer, W.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.

    We study light emission from large number periodic quantum well (PQW) structures following nonresonant excitation into the free carrier continuum. We investigate the spectrally resolved excitonic emission from high quality InGaAs/GaAs PQW structures with up to N=100 quantum wells in dependence on the period d and the number N of quantum wells. By tuning the period in a range of up to 30% around the excitonic Bragg resonance, we find for N≥30 large normal mode splitting and a nonlinear increase of the vertical emission with the number of coupled wells. Angle dependent detection reveals a complex spatial emission.

  16. A perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation for the Floquet energies, spectral intensities, and cutoff energy of harmonic generation in photon emission from nonadiabatic electron-transfer dynamics driven by infrared CW laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuta; Arasaki, Yasuki; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A complicated yet interesting induced photon emission can take place by a nonadiabatic intramolecular electron transfer system like LiF under an intense CW laser [Y. Arasaki, S. Scheit, and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 161103 (2013)]. Behind this phenomena, the crossing point between two potential energy curves of covalent and ionic natures in diabatic representation is forced to oscillate, since only the ionic potential curve is shifted significantly up and down repeatedly (called the Dynamical Stark effect). The wavepacket pumped initially to the excited covalent potential curve frequently encounters such a dynamically moving crossing point and thereby undergoes very complicated dynamics including wavepacket bifurcation and deformation. Intramolecular electron transfer thus driven by the coupling between nonadiabatic state-mixing and laser fields induces irregular photon emission. Here in this report we discuss the complicated spectral features of this kind of photon emission induced by infrared laser. In the low frequency domain, the photon emission is much more involved than those of ultraviolet/visible driving fields, since many field-dressed states are created on the ionic potential, which have their own classical turning points and crossing points with the covalent counterpart. To analyze the physics behind the phenomena, we develop a perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation that is transformed from coupled first-order linear differential equations with periodic coefficients, which are supposed to produce the so-called Floquet states. We give mathematical expressions for the Floquet energies, frequencies, and intensities of the photon emission spectra, and the cutoff energy of their harmonic generation. Agreement between these approximate quantities and those estimated with full quantum calculations is found to be excellent. Furthermore, the present analysis provides with notions to facilitate deeper understanding for the physical and

  17. CRISS power spectral density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeth, W.

    1979-04-01

    The correlation of signal components at different frequencies like higher harmonics cannot be detected by a normal power spectral density measurement, since this technique correlates only components at the same frequency. This paper describes a special method for measuring the correlation of two signal components at different frequencies: the CRISS power spectral density. From this new function in frequency analysis, the correlation of two components can be determined quantitatively either they stem from one signal or from two diverse signals. The principle of the method, suitable for the higher harmonics of a signal as well as for any other frequency combinations is shown for the digital frequency analysis technique. Two examples of CRISS power spectral densities demonstrates the operation of the new method. (orig.) [de

  18. An Impurity Emission Survey in the near UV and Visible Spectral Ranges of Electron Cyclotron Heated (ECH) Plasma in the TJ-II Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2001-01-01

    We report on a near-ultraviolet and visible spectroscopic survey (220-600 nm) of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator, with central electron temperatures up to 2 keV and central electron densities up to 1.7 x 10 ''19 m''-3. Approximately 1200 lines from thirteen elements have been identified. The purpose of the work is to identify the principal impurities and spectral lines present in TJ-II plasmas, as well as their possible origin to search for transitions from highly ionised ions. This work will act as a base for identifying suitable transitions for following the evolution of impurities under different operating regimens and multiplet systems for line polarisation studies. It is intended to use the database creates as a spectral line reference for comparing spectra under different operating and plasma heating regimes. (Author)

  19. An Impurity Emission Survey in the near UV and Visible Spectral Ranges of Electron Cyclotron Heated (ECH) Plasma in the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on a near-ultraviolet and visible spectroscopic survey (220-600 nm) of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator, with central electron temperatures up to 2 keV and central electron densities up to 1.7 x 10 ''19 m''-3. Approximately 1200 lines from thirteen elements have been identified. The purpose of the work is to identify the principal impurities and spectral lines present in TJ-II plasmas, as well as their possible origin to search for transitions from highly ionised ions. This work will act as a base for identifying suitable transitions for following the evolution of impurities under different operating regimens and multiplet systems for line polarisation studies. It is intended to use the database creates as a spectral line reference for comparing spectra under different operating and plasma heating regimes. (Author)

  20. Survival Outcomes in Asymptomatic Patients With Normal Conventional Imaging but Raised Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels in Colorectal Cancer Following Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khurum; Athauda, Avani; Aitken, Katharine; Cunningham, David; Watkins, David; Starling, Naureen; Cook, Gary J; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; Chau, Ian; Rao, Sheela

    2016-12-01

    This study had two aims: (a) to evaluate the utility of fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) in detecting occult disease recurrence with raised carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and (b) to establish the prognostic effects of early detection of disease recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Clinico-pathological data were obtained from all consecutive patients undergoing CRC surveillance from 2004 to 2010 who had an elevated CEA level (>3 ng/mL in nonsmokers, >5 ng/mL in smokers) but normal or equivocal conventional investigations. Histopathological confirmation or a minimum of 12 months' clinical and radiological follow-up were required to ascertain disease relapse. A total of 1,200 patients were screened; of those, 88 (59% men; mean age, 66 years [SD, 9.6]) eligible patients (67 with normal and 21 with equivocal results on conventional investigations) were identified. Recurrent disease was detected in 56 of 88 patients (64%). The sensitivity of FDG PET-CT to detect recurrence was 49 of 56 (88%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76%-95%) and specificity was 28 of 32 (88%; 95% CI, 71%-97%). Twenty-seven of 49 (55%) patients with PET-CT-detected relapsed disease were deemed eligible for further curative therapy; 19 (70%) went on to receive potentially curative therapy. The median time to progression (8.8 months [interquartile range (IQR), 4.5-19.1 months] vs. 2.2 months [IQR, 0.7-5.6]), median overall survival (39.9 months [IQR, 23.6-65.4 months] vs. 15.6 months [IQR, 7.3-25.7 months]), and 5-year survival (36.8% [95% CI, 16.5%-57.5%] vs. 6.1% [95% CI, 1.1%-17.6%]; p ≤ .001) were higher in patients who received potentially curative therapy than in those who received noncurative therapy. FDG PET-CT is a highly sensitive and specific tool for the detection of occult CRC recurrence. In >50% of patients, recurrent disease may still be potentially amenable to curative therapy. Long-term survival can be

  1. First hard X-ray detection of the non-thermal emission around the Arches cluster: morphology and spectral studies with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.

    2014-01-01

    and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity......The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Ku line emission at 6.4 keV from material...... that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology...

  2. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (including out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors. This was determined by measuring the output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer coupled with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. Ver...

  3. Wideband thulium–holmium-doped fiber source with combined forward and backward amplified spontaneous emission at 1600–2300 nm spectral band

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honzátko, Pavel; Baravets, Yauhen; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 12 (2014), s. 3650-3653 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1840 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Bandwidth * Spontaneous emission * Holmium Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2014

  4. Age- and Sex-Associated Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Normal Healthy Subjects: Statistical Parametric Mapping Analysis of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Brain Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, Yong-Ki (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea); Medical Research Institute, Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea)). e-mail: growthkim@daum.net/growthkim@pusan.ac.kr)

    2009-12-15

    Background: The age- and sex-associated changes of brain development are unclear and controversial. Several previous studies showed conflicting results of a specific pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism or no differences of cerebral glucose metabolism in association with normal aging process and sex. Purpose: To investigate the effects of age and sex on changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in healthy subjects using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) brain positron emission tomography (PET) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight healthy subjects (32 males, mean age 46.6+-18.2 years; 46 females, mean age 40.6+-19.8 years) underwent F-18 FDG brain PET. Using SPM, age- and sex-associated changes in cerebral glucose metabolism were investigated. Results: In males, a negative correlation existed in several gray matter areas, including the right temporopolar (Brodmann area [BA] 38), right orbitofrontal (BA 47), left orbitofrontal gyrus (BA 10), left dorsolateral frontal gyrus (BA 8), and left insula (BA 13) areas. A positive relationship existed in the left claustrum and left thalamus. In females, negative changes existed in the left caudate body, left temporopolar area (BA 38), right orbitofrontal gyri (BA 47 and BA 10), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46). A positive association was demonstrated in the left subthalamic nucleus and the left superior frontal gyrus. In white matter, an age-associated decrease in FDG uptake in males was shown in the left insula, and increased FDG uptake was found in the left corpus callosum. The female group had an age-associated negative correlation of FDG uptake only in the right corpus callosum. Conclusion: Using SPM, we found not only similar areas of brain, but also sex-specific cerebral areas of age-associated changes of FDG uptake

  5. A Comparison of Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission Properties in Ménière's Disease Patients and Normal-Hearing Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexl, Markus; Krause, Eike; Gürkov, Robert

    Postmortem examination of temporal bones of Ménière's disease patients consistently show dilated endolymphatic spaces of the inner ear, for which the term endolymphatic hydrops has been coined. During the past decade, magnetic resonance imaging techniques for the inner ear appeared, advancing the diagnosis of Ménière's disease. They require, however, a field-strength of at least 3 T, are costly and not universally available. Alternative, noninvasive, cost-effective tests with high sensitivity and specifity for endolymphatic hydrops are desirable. In this study, we test the suitability of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) for endolymphatic hydrops detection. Previous measurements of the commonly recorded cubic DPOAEs mainly register cochlear hearing loss and are not specific for Ménière's disease. Simultaneous recordings of cubic and quadratic DPOAEs might be more suitable to detect endolymphatic hydrops, because both DPOAE orders react differently to changes of the cochlear operating point as they might occur in Ménière's disease patients. Cubic and quadratic DPOAEs were recorded in normal-hearing participants (N = 45) and in the affected and unaffected ears of patients with a diagnosis of definite Ménière's disease (N = 32). First, to assess the integrity of DPOAE-generating mechanisms, cubic DPOAE-grams were obtained with primary tone frequencies f2 between 1 and 8 kHz with primary tone levels l1 = 60 dB SPL and l2 = 50 dB SPL, and a fixed primary tone frequency ratio of 1.22. Then, cubic and quadratic DPOAEs were simultaneously recorded with primary tone levels l1 = l2 = 65 dB SPL and at primary tone frequencies f2 = 4 and 5 kHz, where f1 was successively varied such that the ratio f2/f1 ranged between 1.1 and 1.6 in 0.04 steps while quadratic and cubic DPOAE levels were extracted from the same recording. Cubic DPOAEs were significantly reduced in the affected ears of Ménière's disease patients, and slightly reduced in the

  6. Simultaneous quantum dash-well emission in a chirped dash-in-well superluminescent diode with spectral bandwidth >700 nm

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    We report on the quantitative evidence of simultaneous amplified spontaneous emission from the AlGaInAs/InAs/ InP-based quantum-well (Qwell) and quantum-dashes (Qdash) in a multistack dash-in-an-asymmetric-well superluminescent diode heterostructure. As a result, an emission bandwidth (full width at half-maximum) of 700 nm is achieved, covering entire O-E-S-C-L-U communication bands, and a maximum continuous wave output power of 1.3 mW, from this device structure. This demonstration paves a way to bridge entire telecommunication bands through proper optimization of device gain region, bringing significant advances and impact to a variety of cross-disciplinary field applications. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  7. OT1_tueta_2: Far-IR Emission from Planetary Nebulae: Simultaneous Mapping and Spectral Probing of the Multi-Phased Dusty Gaseous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, T.

    2010-07-01

    We propose to undertake an ambitious Herschel large survey of planetary nebulae (PNs), mustering the full strengths of Herschel's broadband mapping, spectral mapping, and spatio-spectroscopic capabilities. Our proposed PN survey will exploit Herschel's unprecedented spatial-resolving power in the far-IR wavelengths to its fullest potential. We will perform (1) deep PACS/SPIRE broadband mapping to account for the coldest dust component of the nebulae in the target PNs and determine the spatial distribution of the dusty PN haloes, (2) exhaustive PACS/SPIRE line mapping in far-IR fine-structure and CO transition lines in two representative PNs to diagnose the energetics of the nebulae as a function of location in the nebulae, and (3) PACS/SPIRE spectral-energy-distribution spectroscopy at several positions in the target PNs to understand variations in the physical conditions as a function of location in the nebulae. This PN survey is distinguished from the existing MESS KPGT program by the extra dimension added by spectral mapping and spatio-spectroscopy that permit simultaneous probing of the gas and dust component in the target PNs. Through these investigations, we will consider the energetics of the entire gas-dust system as a function of location in the nebulae. Herschel will allow us to take this novel approach which has rarely been taken previously. The proposed Herschel survey will be conducted in collaboration with the recently-approved Chandra X-ray Observatory Large Project to furnish substantial PN data resources that would allow us - a community of PN astronomers - to tackle a multitude of unanswered issues in PN physics, from the shaping mechanisms of the nebulae to the energetics of the multi-phased gas-dust system surrounding the central white dwarf. The proposed Herschel survey and the approved Chandra survey, combined with the community assets from optical to mid-IR, will provide an extremely valuable and comprehensive compilation of PN resource that

  8. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal. Because biological intrinsic emission is generally very weak and extends from the ultraviolet to the visible spectral range, a broad-spectral range and high sensitivity 3D spectral imaging system is developed. Imaging the spectral characteristics of the biological intrinsic emission reveals the structure and biochemistry of the cells and extra-cellular components. By using different methods in visualizing the spectral images, discrimination between different tissue structures is achieved without the use of any stain or fluorescent label. For instance, RGB real color spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues show blue cells, green hair follicles, and purple collagen fibers. The color signature of each tissue component is directly related to its characteristic emission spectrum. The results of this study show that skin tissue nonlinear intrinsic emission is mainly due to the autofluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), flavins, keratin, melanin, phospholipids, elastin and collagen and nonlinear Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation in Type I collagen. In vivo time-lapse spectral imaging is implemented to study metabolic changes in epidermal cells in tissues. Optical scattering in tissues, a key factor in determining the maximum achievable imaging depth, is also investigated in this work.

  9. Emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    This 16th article in the series of biennial reviews of emission spectroscopy surveys with emphasis the emission spectrochemical literature appearing in referred publications during 1976 and 1977. Books and general reviews of emission spectroscopy and closely related subjects are considered in the first section, whereas specific reviews and texts are included in each of the five tropical sections. Spectral descriptions and classifications are examined in the second section. An abbreviated instrumentation section follows, and standards, samples, calibrations, and calculations are evaluated in the fourth section. The emphasis on excitation sources reflects the size of section five. In the sixth section, important applications are explored

  10. Spectral Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, E B; Plum, M

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the problems arising when computing eigenvalues of self-adjoint operators which lie in a gap between two parts of the essential spectrum. Spectral pollution, i.e. the apparent existence of eigenvalues in numerical computations, when no such eigenvalues actually exist, is commonplace in problems arising in applied mathematics. We describe a geometrically inspired method which avoids this difficulty, and show that it yields the same results as an algorithm of Zimmermann and Mertins.

  11. Myocardial perfusion assessed by contrast echocardiography and single photon emission computed tomography in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain and normal electrocardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, J. Jr.; Ferreira, S.M.A.; Matias, W. Jr.; Giorgi, M.C.P.; Izaki, M.; Luz, P.L.; Ramires, J.A.F.; Meneghetti, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Aim : Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in comparison with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for the detection of myocardial ischemia in patients with acute chest pain. Material and Methods : Eighteen patients (pts) with chest pain lasting ≥30 minutes, occurring within 6 hours of emergency room presentation and a normal or no diagnostic electrocardiogram were studied. Pts underwent rest MCE and SPECT. For both exams myocardial perfusion was assessed in the same 7 segments (apical, anterior, inferior, anteroseptal, inferoseptal, lateral and posterior) of left ventricle. A total of 126 segments were analyzed. Images were classified as positive for ischemia if they had a perfusion defect. Coronary angiography was performed if MCE or SPECT images were classified as positive for ischemia or by clinical indication. Otherwise the patients underwent stress SPECT. Significant coronary artery disease (CAD) was defined as ≥70% stenosis in a major coronary artery or its branches. Final diagnosis of an acute coronary event (ACE) was established in the presence of positive findings in MCE or SPECT in addition to significant CAD in the corresponding territory. Kappa statistics were calculated to evaluate the concordance between MCE and SPECT. κ values of ≤0.4, >0.4 and >0.7 indicate fair, good and excellent agreement, respectively. Results: Thirteen out of 18 pts underwent coronary angiography (seven pts had positive findings on SPECT, 2 on MCE, 2 on both exams and 1 had clinical indication). Significant CAD was detected on six. Five pts underwent stress SPECT and no perfusion defect was detected. Therefore, six pts (33.3%) had an ACE and 12 (66.6%) had not. There were no statistical differences between groups according to age, gender, duration of pain, free pain interval, presence of risk factors and antecedents. Concordance between MCE and SPECT for evaluation of perfusion defects showed a ? coefficient of 0

  12. Effect of the field dependence of the coefficient of ion-electron emission on the characteristics of a normal cathode discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarov, AV; Ochkin, VN

    2004-01-01

    The electric characteristics of the cathode layer of a normal glow discharge are discussed. The value of the normal current density and its dependence on the discharge parameters are modeled within a one-dimensional drift approximation with a local ionization. The dependence of the coefficient of

  13. Models of Emission-Line Profiles and Spectral Energy Distributions to Characterize the Multi-Frequency Properties of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni La Mura

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs are often characterized by a wealth of emission lines with different profiles and intensity ratios that lead to a complicated classification. Their electromagnetic radiation spans more than 10 orders of magnitude in frequency. In spite of the differences between various classes, the origin of their activity is attributed to a combination of emitting components, surrounding an accreting supermassive black hole (SMBH, in the unified model. Currently, the execution of sky surveys, with instruments operating at various frequencies, provides the possibility to detect and to investigate the properties of AGNs on very large statistical samples. As a result of the spectroscopic surveys that allow the investigation of many objects, we have the opportunity to place new constraints on the nature and evolution of AGNs. In this contribution, we present the results obtained by working on multi-frequency data, and we discuss their relations with the available optical spectra. We compare our findings with the AGN unified model predictions, and we present a revised technique to select AGNs of different types from other line-emitting objects. We discuss the multi-frequency properties in terms of the innermost structures of the sources.

  14. Comparison of conventional and cadmium-zinc-telluride single-photon emission computed tomography for analysis of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging: an exploratory study in normal databases for different ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Masaru; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Taniguchi, Yasuyo; Shibutani, Takayuki

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the differences in thallium-201-chloride (thallium-201) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) scans evaluated by conventional anger-type single-photon emission computed tomography (conventional SPECT) versus cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT (CZT SPECT) imaging in normal databases for different ethnic groups. MPI scans from 81 consecutive Japanese patients were examined using conventional SPECT and CZT SPECT and analyzed with the pre-installed quantitative perfusion SPECT (QPS) software. We compared the summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS), and summed difference score (SDS) for the two SPECT devices. For a normal MPI reference, we usually use Japanese databases for MPI created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, which can be used with conventional SPECT but not with CZT SPECT. In this study, we used new Japanese normal databases constructed in our institution to compare conventional and CZT SPECT. Compared with conventional SPECT, CZT SPECT showed lower SSS (p < 0.001), SRS (p = 0.001), and SDS (p = 0.189) using the pre-installed SPECT database. In contrast, CZT SPECT showed no significant difference from conventional SPECT in QPS analysis using the normal databases from our institution. Myocardial perfusion analyses by CZT SPECT should be evaluated using normal databases based on the ethnic group being evaluated.

  15. GALILEO NIMS SPECTRAL IMAGE CUBES: JUPITER OPERATIONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The natural form of imaging spectrometer data is the spectral image cube. It is normally in band sequential format, but has a dual nature. It is a series of 'images'...

  16. GALILEO NIMS SPECTRAL IMAGE TUBES: JUPITER OPERATIONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The natural form of imaging spectrometer data is the spectral image cube. It is normally in band sequential format, but has a dual nature. It is a series of 'images'...

  17. Light distribution system comprising spectral conversion means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    System (200, 300) for the distribution of white light, having a supply side (201, 301, 401) and a delivery side (202, 302, 402), the system being configured for guiding light with a multitude of visible wavelengths in a propagation direction P from the supply side to the distribution side...... fibre being operationally connected to the spectral conversion fibre having a length extending from an input end (221, 321)to an output end (222, 322), the spectral conversion fibre comprising a photoluminescent agent (511, 611, 711) for converting light of a first wavelength to light of a second......, longer wavelength,a spectral conversion characteristics of the spectral conversion fibre being essentially determined by the spectral absorption and emission properties of the photoluminescent agent, the amount of photo- luminescent agent,and the distribution of the photoluminescent agent in the spectral...

  18. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. Detection of asymmetries in solar coronal emission lines is one example. Removal of line blends is another. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It can be used with any fitting function, but we employ a cubic spline in a new analysis routine called Intensity Conserving Spline Interpolation (ICSI). As the name implies, it conserves the observed intensity within each wavelength bin, which ordinary fits do not. Given the rapid convergence, speed of computation, and ease of use, we suggest that ICSI be made a standard component of the processing pipeline for spectroscopic data.

  19. Fluorescence Spectrum and Decay Measurement for Hsil VS Normal Cytology Differentiation in Liquid Pap Smear Supernatant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2009-06-01

    Cervical smear material contains endo and exocervical cells, mucus and inflammative, immune cells in cases of pathology. Just not destroyed keratinocytes lay on the glass for microscopy. Liquid cytology supernatant apart other diagnostics could be used for photodiagnostic. The spectroscopic parameters suitable for Normal and HSIL cytology groups supernatant differentiation are demonstrated. The dried liquid PAP supernatant fractions—sediment and liquid were investigated. Excitation and emission matrices (EEM), supernatant fluorescence decay measured under 280 nm diode short pulse excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy by excitation with 355 nm laser light were analyzed. The differences between Normal and HSIL groups were statistically proven in the certain spectral regions. Fluorescence decay peculiarities show spectral regions consisting of few fluorophores. Obtained results on fluorescence differences in Normal and HSIL groups' supernatant shows the potency of photodiagnosis application in cervical screening.

  20. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  1. Spectral Imaging by Upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard sili...... silicon based cameras designed for visible/near infrared radiation to be used for spectral images in the mid infrared. This can lead to much lower costs for such imaging devices, and a better performance.......We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard...

  2. Early Science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: Detection of Dust Emission in Multiple Images of a Normal Galaxy at z > 4 Lensed by a Frontier Fields Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Alexandra; Battisti, Andrew; Wilson, Grant W.; Calzetti, Daniela; Cybulski, Ryan; Giavalisco, Mauro; Kirkpatrick, Allison [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Montaña, Alfredo; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hughes, David [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, 72840 Puebla (Mexico); Limousin, Marceau [Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, LAM, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille (France); Marchesini, Danilo; Kado-Fong, Erin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Alberts, Stacey [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Avila-Reese, Vladimir [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-264, 04510, CDMX (Mexico); Bermejo-Climent, José Ramón [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna. Vía Láctea s/n, La Laguna 38200, Tenerife (Spain); Brammer, Gabriel [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bravo-Alfaro, Hector [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal 144, Guanajuato 36000 (Mexico); Chary, Ranga-Ram [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Keller, Erica, E-mail: pope@astro.umass.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); and others

    2017-04-01

    We directly detect dust emission in an optically detected, multiply imaged galaxy lensed by the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. We detect two images of the same galaxy at 1.1 mm with the AzTEC camera on the Large Millimeter Telescope leaving no ambiguity in the counterpart identification. This galaxy, MACS0717-Az9, is at z > 4 and the strong lensing model ( μ = 7.5) allows us to calculate an intrinsic IR luminosity of 9.7 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ⊙} and an obscured star formation rate of 14.6 ± 4.5 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. The unobscured star formation rate from the UV is only 4.1 ± 0.3 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, which means the total star formation rate (18.7 ± 4.5 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) is dominated (75%–80%) by the obscured component. With an intrinsic stellar mass of only 6.9 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ⊙}, MACS0717-Az9 is one of only a handful of z > 4 galaxies at these lower masses that is detected in dust emission. This galaxy lies close to the estimated star formation sequence at this epoch. However, it does not lie on the dust obscuration relation (IRX- β ) for local starburst galaxies and is instead consistent with the Small Magellanic Cloud attenuation law. This remarkable lower mass galaxy, showing signs of both low metallicity and high dust content, may challenge our picture of dust production in the early universe.

  3. Effects of aortic tortuosity on left ventricular diastolic parameters derived from gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in patients with normal myocardial perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurisu, Satoshi; Nitta, Kazuhiro; Sumimoto, Yoji; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Ishibashi, Ken; Fukuda, Yukihiro; Kihara, Yasuki

    2017-12-05

    Aortic tortuosity is often found on chest radiograph, especially in aged patients. We tested the hypothesis that aortic tortuosity was associated with LV diastolic parameters derived from gated SPECT in patients with normal myocardial perfusion. One-hundred and twenty-two patients with preserved LV ejection fraction and normal myocardial perfusion were enrolled. Descending aortic deviation was defined as the horizontal distance from the left line of the aortic knob to the most prominent left line of the descending aorta. This parameter was measured for the quantitative assessment of aortic tortuosity. Peak filling rate (PFR) and one-third mean filling rate (1/3 MFR) were obtained from redistribution images as LV diastolic parameters. Descending aortic deviation ranged from 0 to 22 mm with a mean distance of 4.5 ± 6.3 mm. Descending aortic deviation was significantly correlated with age (r = 0.38, p < 0.001) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (r = - 0.21, p = 0.02). Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that eGFR (β = 0.23, p = 0.02) and descending aortic deviation (β = - 0.23, p = 0.01) were significantly associated with PFR, and that only descending aortic deviation (β = - 0.21, p = 0.03) was significantly associated with 1/3 MFR. Our data suggest that aortic tortuosity is associated with LV diastolic parameters derived from gated SPECT in patients with normal myocardial perfusion.

  4. Assessment of cerebral perfusion with single-photon emission tomography in normal subjects and in patients with Alzheimer's disease: effects of region of interest selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, J.J.; Harskamp, F. van; Breteler, M.M.B.; Krenning, E.P.; Cammen, T.J.M. van der; Hofman, A.; Hasan, D.

    1994-01-01

    We compared three different ROIs in a SPET study with 60 controls and in 48 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease diagnosed according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was assessed with SPET using technetium-99m d,l-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ( 99m Tc-HMPAO), normalized to the mean activity in a cerebellar reference slice. The three different ROIs were: a multi-slice and a single-slice ROI with reference to the normal brain anatomy (using an anatomical atlas), and a rectangular (2x4 pixels) ROI in the frontal, temporal, temporoparietal and occipital cortices. No differences were observed for the means of rCBF values between the single-slice and multi-slice ROI's with reference to the normal anatomy, but some variability was present for individual comparisons. In contrast, significantly higher mean rCBF values were obtained with the single-slice rectangular ROIs in all four regions for both patients and controls and considerable variability was shown for individual subjects. After analysis with multivariate logistic regression and receiver operator characteristic curves, the ability of SPET to discriminate between controls and Alzheimer patients was similar in the three methods for mild and moderate Alzheimer patients (Global Deterioration Scale = GDS of 3 and 4). However, with increasing dementia severity (GDS>4) the rectangular ROIs showed lower ability to discriminate between groups compared to the single-slice and multi-slice anatomically defined ROIs. This study suggests that results of rCBF assessment with SPET using 99m Tc-HMPAO in patients with severe Alzheimer's disease are influenced by the shape and size of the ROI. (orig.)

  5. Generation of spectrally-stable continuous-wave emission and ns pulses at 800 nm and 975 nm with a peak power of 4 W using a distributed Bragg reflector laser and a ridge-waveguide power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klehr, A.; Wenzel, H.; Fricke, J.; Bugge, F.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor based sources which emit high-power spectrally stable nearly diffraction-limited optical pulses in the nanosecond range are ideally suited for a lot of applications, such as free-space communications, metrology, material processing, seed lasers for fiber or solid state lasers, spectroscopy, LIDAR and frequency doubling. Detailed experimental investigations of 975 nm and 800 nm diode lasers based on master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) light sources are presented. The MOPA systems consist of distributed Bragg reflector lasers (DBR) as master oscillators driven by a constant current and ridge waveguide power amplifiers which can be driven DC and by current pulses. In pulse regime the amplifiers modulated with rectangular current pulses of about 5 ns width and a repetition frequency of 200 kHz act as optical gates, converting the continuous wave (CW) input beam emitted by the DBR lasers into a train of short optical pulses which are amplified. With these experimental MOPA arrangements no relaxation oscillations in the pulse power occur. With a seed power of about 5 mW at a wavelength of 973 nm output powers behind the amplifier of about 1 W under DC injection and 4 W under pulsed operation, corresponding to amplification factors of 200 (amplifier gain 23 dB) and 800 (gain 29 dB) respectively, are reached. At 800 nm a CW power of 1 W is obtained for a seed power of 40 mW. The optical spectra of the emission of the amplifiers exhibit a single peak at a constant wavelength with a line width 50 dB. The output beams are nearly diffraction limited with beam propagation ratios M2lat ~ 1.1 and M2ver ~ 1.2 up to 4 W pulse power.

  6. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide: A potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Takeo [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Division of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Senda, Michio [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Division of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PET images showed high uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide in the normal pancreas. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide specifically binds to somatostatin receptors in the pancreas. •The pancreatic uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide was decreased in the diabetic rats. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a candidate PET probe to measure the beta cell mass. -- Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with {sup 68}Gallium ({sup 68}Ga). After intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM.

  7. Spectral properties of molecular charge-transfer probe QMOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomin, V. I.; Jaworski, R.; Yushchenko, D. A.

    2010-09-01

    The spectral characteristics of solutions of a dye with dual fluorescence, 1-methyl-2-(4-methoxy)phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, in acetonitrile are studied upon selective excitation. This dye is a structural analogue of 3-hydroxyflavone and also exhibits excited-state proton transfer, which, as well as in the case of 3-hydroxyflavone, has a kinetic nature. The fluorescence spectra are studied upon excitation by photons of various energies, and the excitation spectra are recorded at wavelengths of different fluorescence bands. It is found that the intensity ratio of the emission of the normal and tautomeric forms (at wavelength of 415 and 518 nm, respectively) is almost the same (0.23-0.25) for excitation in the regions of the main and the second absorption bands. At the same time, in the case of excitation between these bands, this ratio decreases to 0.19. The second interesting feature is the existence of a third latent emission band peaked at about 480 nm, which is reliably detected upon excitation at wavelengths in the region of 400-450 nm. This study shows that this emission belongs to the anionic form of the dye. This form is also responsible for a decrease in the intensity ratio of the emission of the two main forms in the case of excitation between the first and second absorption bands.

  8. Normal incidence X-ray telescope power spectra of X-ray emission from solar active regions. I - Observations. II - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Golub, Leon

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to very high resolution image of coronal active regions obtained by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope is used to find a broad isotropic power-law spectrum of the spatial distribution of soft X-ray intensities. Magnetic structures of all sizes are present down to the resolution limit of the instrument. Power spectra for the X-ray intensities of a sample of topologically different active regions are found which fall off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. A model is presented that relates the basic features of coronal magnetic fluctuations to the subphotospheric hydrodynamic turbulence that generates them. The model is used to find a theoretical power spectrum for the X-ray intensity which falls off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. The implications of a turbulent regime in active regions are discussed.

  9. Effects of low-dose dobutamine on left ventricular function in normal subjects as assessed by gated single-photon emission tomography myocardial perfusion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everaert, H.; Vanhove, C.; Franken, P.R. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Free University of Brussels (Belgium)

    1999-10-01

    Electrocardiography gated single-photon emission tomography (gated SPET) allows the assessment of regional perfusion and function simultaneously and in full spatial congruency. In this study changes in global and regional left ventricular function in response to dobutamine infusion were assessed in ten healthy volunteers using sequential gated SPET myocardial perfusion acquisitions. Four consecutive gated SPET images were recorded 60 min after injection of 925 MBq technetium-99m tetrofosmin on a three-head camera equipped with focussing collimators. Two acquisitions were made at rest (baseline 1 and 2), and the third and fourth acquisitions were started 5 min after the beginning of the infusion of 5 and 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine, respectively. Systolic wall thickening (WT) was quantified using a method based on circumferential profile analysis. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and volumes were calculated automatically using the Cedars-Sinai program. Nine of the ten subjects presented a definite increase in WT during dobutamine infusion. WT increased on average from 46%{+-}14% at baseline to 71%{+-}23% (range: 37%-106%; P<0.05) during 5 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine infusion and to 85%{+-}25% (range: 62%-123%; P<0.05 with respect to WT at 5 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}) during 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine infusion. Apical segments showed the largest WT at baseline. The average WT response to dobutamine was similar for all parts of the myocardium. It is concluded that changes in WT induced by infusion of low-dose dobutamine can be assessed by sequential gated SPET myocardial perfusion studies. The ''stress gated SPET'' protocol proposed in this study might be helpful to distinguish viable from scar tissue in patients with coronary artery disease, by demonstrating a preserved inotropic response in hypoperfused myocardium. (orig.)

  10. Quantification of regional myocardial oxygen metabolism in normal pigs using positron emission tomography with injectable {sup 15}O-O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temma, Takashi; Saji, Hideo [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Iida, Hidehiro; Hayashi, Takuya; Teramoto, Noboru; Ohta, Youichiro; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Watabe, Hiroshi [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Department of Investigative Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Magata, Yasuhiro [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Laboratory of Genome Bio-Photonics, Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Although {sup 15}O-O{sub 2} gas inhalation can provide a reliable and accurate myocardial metabolic rate for oxygen by PET, the spillover from gas volume in the lung distorts the images. Recently, we developed an injectable method in which blood takes up {sup 15}O-O{sub 2} from an artificial lung, and this made it possible to estimate oxygen metabolism without the inhalation protocol. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of the injectable {sup 15}O-O{sub 2} system in porcine hearts. PET scans were performed after bolus injection and continuous infusion of injectable {sup 15}O-O{sub 2} via a shunt between the femoral artery and the vein in normal pigs. The injection method was compared to the inhalation method. The oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in the lateral walls of the heart was calculated by a compartmental model in view of the spillover and partial volume effect. A significant decrease of lung radioactivity in PET images was observed compared to the continuous inhalation of {sup 15}O-O{sub 2} gas. Furthermore, the injectable {sup 15}O-O{sub 2} system provides a measurement of OEF in lateral walls of the heart that is similar to the continuous-inhalation method (0.71 {+-} 0.036 and 0.72 {+-} 0.020 for the bolus-injection and continuous-infusion methods, respectively). These results indicate that injectable {sup 15}O-O{sub 2} has the potential to evaluate myocardial oxygen metabolism. (orig.)

  11. Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury. A study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka [Nagoya City Rehabilitation and Sports Center (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerebral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with {sup 15}O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO{sub 2} between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO{sub 2} of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of ''relative luxury perfusion''. Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO{sub 2} of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the

  12. Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury. A study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka

    2002-01-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerebral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with 15 O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO 2 between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO 2 of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of ''relative luxury perfusion''. Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO 2 of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the normal group in the bilateral frontal, temporal, and occipital

  13. Uniformity of the soft-x-ray emissions from gold foils irradiated by OMEGA laser beams determined by a two-mirror normal-incidence microscope with multilayer coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, John F.; Boehly, Thomas; Pien, Gregory; Bradley, David

    1998-01-01

    A two-mirror normal-incidence microscope with multilayer coatings was used to image the soft-x-ray emissions from planar foils irradiated by OMEGA laser beams. The bandpass of the multilayer coatings was centered at a wavelength of 48.3 Angstrom (257-eV energy) and was 0.5 Angstrom wide. Five overlapping OMEGA beams, without beam smoothing, were typically incident on the gold foils. The total energy was 1500 J, and the focused intensity was 6x10 13 Wcm -2 . The 5.8x magnified images were recorded by a gated framing camera at various times during the 3-ns laser pulse. A pinhole camera imaged the x-ray emission in the energy range of >2 keV. On a spatial scale of 10 μm, it was found that the soft-x-ray images at 257 eV were quite uniform and featureless. In contrast, the hard-x-ray images in the energy range of >2 kev were highly nonuniform with numerous features of size 150 μm. copyright 1998 Optical Society of America

  14. Normal regional distribution of cerebral blood flow in dogs: comparison between (99m) Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer and (99m) Tc- hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, Antita; Polis, Ingeborgh; Waelbers, Tim; Vandermeulen, Eva; Dobbeleir, André; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2013-01-01

    Functional imaging provides important insights into canine brain pathologies such as behavioral problems. Two (99m) Tc-labeled single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cerebral blood flow tracers-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) and hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO)-are commonly used in human medicine and have been used previously in dogs but intrasubject comparison of both tracers in dogs is lacking. Therefore, this study investigated whether regional distribution differences between both tracers occur in dogs as is reported in humans. Eight beagles underwent two SPECT examinations first with (99m) Tc-ECD and followed by (99m) Tc-HMPAO. SPECT scanning was performed with a triple head gamma camera equipped with ultrahigh resolution parallel hole collimators. Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection with a Butterworth filter. Emission data were fitted to a template permitting semiquantification using predefined regions or volumes of interest (VOIs). For each VOI, perfusion indices were calculated by normalizing the regional counts per voxel to total brain counts per voxel. The obtained perfusion indices for each region for both tracers were compared with a paired Student's T-test. Significant (P < 0.05) regional differences were seen in the subcortical region and the cerebellum. Both tracers can be used to visualize regional cerebral blood flow in dogs, however, due to the observed regional differences, they are not entirely interchangeable. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  15. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  16. Phenomenology of magnetospheric radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, T. D.; Desch, M. D.; Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Jupiter has now been observed over 24 octaves of the radio spectrum, from about 0.01 MHz to 300,000 MHz. Its radio emissions fill the entire spectral region where interplanetary electromagnetic propagation is possible at wavelengths longer than infrared. Three distinct types of radiation are responsible for this radio spectrum. Thermal emission from the atmosphere accounts for virtually all the radiation at the high frequency end. Synchrotron emission from the trapped high-energy particle belt deep within the inner magnetosphere is the dominant spectral component from about 4000 to 40 MHz. The third class of radiation consists of several distinct components of sporadic low frequency emission below 40 MHz. The decimeter wavelength emission is considered, taking into account the discovery of synchrotron emission, radiation by high-energy electrons in a magnetic field, and the present status of Jovian synchrotron phenomenology. Attention is also given to the decameter and hectometer wavelength emission, and emissions at kilometric wavelengths.

  17. The Chandra Source Catalog 2.0: Spectral Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Michael L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Burke, Douglas; Nowak, Michael A.; Primini, Francis Anthony; Laurino, Omar; Nguyen, Dan T.; Allen, Christopher E.; Anderson, Craig S.; Budynkiewicz, Jamie A.; Chen, Judy C.; Civano, Francesca Maria; D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Ian N.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Graessle, Dale E.; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Harbo, Peter N.; Houck, John C.; Lauer, Jennifer L.; Lee, Nicholas P.; Martínez-Galarza, Juan Rafael; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Miller, Joseph; McLaughlin, Warren; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Paxson, Charles; Plummer, David A.; Rots, Arnold H.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael; Van Stone, David W.; Zografou, Panagoula; Chandra Source Catalog Team

    2018-01-01

    The second release of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) contains all sources identified from sixteen years' worth of publicly accessible observations. The vast majority of these sources have been observed with the ACIS detector and have spectral information in 0.5-7 keV energy range. Here we describe the methods used to automatically derive spectral properties for each source detected by the standard processing pipeline and included in the final CSC. The sources with high signal to noise ratio (exceeding 150 net counts) were fit in Sherpa (the modeling and fitting application from the Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations package) using wstat as a fit statistic and Bayesian draws method to determine errors. Three models were fit to each source: an absorbed power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung emission. The fitted parameter values for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models were included in the catalog with the calculated flux for each model. The CSC also provides the source energy fluxes computed from the normalizations of predefined absorbed power-law, black-body, Bremsstrahlung, and APEC models needed to match the observed net X-ray counts. For sources that have been observed multiple times we performed a Bayesian Blocks analysis will have been performed (see the Primini et al. poster) and the most significant block will have a joint fit performed for the mentioned spectral models. In addition, we provide access to data products for each source: a file with source spectrum, the background spectrum, and the spectral response of the detector. Hardness ratios were calculated for each source between pairs of energy bands (soft, medium and hard). This work has been supported by NASA under contract NAS 8-03060 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for operation of the Chandra X-ray Center.

  18. [Application study of the thermal infrared emissivity spectra in the estimation of salt content of saline soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Tashpolat, Tiyip; Mamat, Sawut; Zhang, Fei; Han, Gui-Hong

    2012-11-01

    Studying of soil salinization is of great significance for agricultural production in arid area oasis, thermal infrared remote sensing technology provides a new technology and method in this field. Authors used Fourier transform infrared spectrometer to measure the oasis saline soil in field, employed iterative spectrally smooth temperature/emissivity separation algorithm (ISSTES) to separate temperature and emissivity, and acquired the thermal infrared emissivity data of the saline soil. Through researching the emissivity spectral feature of saline soil, and concluded that soil emissivity will reduce with the increasing of salt content from 8 to 13 microm, so emissivity spectra is more sensitive to salt factor from 8 to 9.5 microm. Then, analyzed the correlation between original emissivity spectra and its first derivative, second derivative and normalized ratio with salt content, the result showed that they have a negative correlation relationship between soil emissivity and salt content, and the correlation between emissivity first derivative and salt content is highest, reach to 0.724 2, the corresponding bands are from 8.370 745-8.390 880 microm. Finally, established the quadratic function regression model, its determination coefficient is 0.741 4, and root mean square error is 0.235 5, the result explained that the approach of using thermal infrared emissivity to retrieve the salt content of saline soil is feasible.

  19. Assessing FRET using Spectral Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Britain, Andrea L.; Cichon, Lauren K.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques have proven invaluable for probing the complex nature of protein–protein interactions, protein folding, and intracellular signaling events. These techniques have traditionally been implemented with the use of one or more fluorescence band-pass filters, either as fluorescence microscopy filter cubes, or as dichroic mirrors and band-pass filters in flow cytometry. In addition, new approaches for measuring FRET, such as fluorescence lifetime and acceptor photobleaching, have been developed. Hyperspectral techniques for imaging and flow cytometry have also shown to be promising for performing FRET measurements. In this study, we have compared traditional (filter-based) FRET approaches to three spectral-based approaches: the ratio of acceptor-to-donor peak emission, linear spectral unmixing, and linear spectral unmixing with a correction for direct acceptor excitation. All methods are estimates of FRET efficiency, except for one-filter set and three-filter set FRET indices, which are included for consistency with prior literature. In the first part of this study, spectrofluorimetric data were collected from a CFP–Epac–YFP FRET probe that has been used for intracellular cAMP measurements. All comparisons were performed using the same spectrofluorimetric datasets as input data, to provide a relevant comparison. Linear spectral unmixing resulted in measurements with the lowest coefficient of variation (0.10) as well as accurate fits using the Hill equation. FRET efficiency methods produced coefficients of variation of less than 0.20, while FRET indices produced coefficients of variation greater than 8.00. These results demonstrate that spectral FRET measurements provide improved response over standard, filter-based measurements. Using spectral approaches, single-cell measurements were conducted through hyperspectral confocal microscopy, linear unmixing, and cell segmentation with quantitative image analysis

  20. Individual Sensitivity to Spectral and Temporal Cues in Listeners with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamela E.; Wright, Richard A.; Blackburn, Michael C.; Tatman, Rachael; Gallun, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to evaluate use of spectral and temporal cues under conditions in which both types of cues were available. Method: Participants included adults with normal hearing and hearing loss. We focused on 3 categories of speech cues: static spectral (spectral shape), dynamic spectral (formant change), and temporal…

  1. Adaptive Spectral Doppler Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    . The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to pro- vide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the ob- servation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested......In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence...... and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch’s method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set...

  2. Evidence for the distortion product frequency place as a source of distribution product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) fine structure in humans : I. Fine structure and higher-order DPOAE as a function of the frequency ratio f2/f1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauermann, M; Uppenkamp, S; van Hengel, P.W.J.; Kollmeier, B

    1999-01-01

    Critical experiments were performed in order to validate the two-source hypothesis of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) generation. Measurements of the spectral fine structure of DPOAE in response to stimulation with two sinusoids have been:performed with normal-hearing subjects. The

  3. Pursuing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Louise Sofia; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study...... implying an influence on whether to participate in cancer survivorship care programs. Because of "pursuing normality," 8 of 9 participants opted out of cancer survivorship care programming due to prospects of "being cured" and perceptions of cancer survivorship care as "a continuation of the disease...

  4. Single shot, double differential spectral measurements of inverse Compton scattering in the nonlinear regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sakai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inverse Compton scattering (ICS is a unique mechanism for producing fast pulses—picosecond and below—of bright photons, ranging from x to γ rays. These nominally narrow spectral bandwidth electromagnetic radiation pulses are efficiently produced in the interaction between intense, well-focused electron and laser beams. The spectral characteristics of such sources are affected by many experimental parameters, with intense laser effects often dominant. A laser field capable of inducing relativistic oscillatory motion may give rise to harmonic generation and, importantly for the present work, nonlinear redshifting, both of which dilute the spectral brightness of the radiation. As the applications enabled by this source often depend sensitively on its spectra, it is critical to resolve the details of the wavelength and angular distribution obtained from ICS collisions. With this motivation, we present an experimental study that greatly improves on previous spectral measurement methods based on x-ray K-edge filters, by implementing a multilayer bent-crystal x-ray spectrometer. In tandem with a collimating slit, this method reveals a projection of the double differential angular-wavelength spectrum of the ICS radiation in a single shot. The measurements enabled by this diagnostic illustrate the combined off-axis and nonlinear-field-induced redshifting in the ICS emission process. The spectra obtained illustrate in detail the strength of the normalized laser vector potential, and provide a nondestructive measure of the temporal and spatial electron-laser beam overlap.

  5. UV spectroscopy of Z Chamaeleontis. II - The 1988 January normal outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaftis, E. T.; Naylor, T.; Hassall, B. J. M.; Charles, P. A.; Sonneborn, G.; Bailey, J.

    1992-01-01

    IUE observations taken during the 1988 January normal outburst of Z Cha are presented and a detailed comparison with the 1987 April superoutburst is made. The most important difference from the superoutburst is that the normal outburst continuum flux shows less than 10 percent orbital variation away from the eclipse, implying that there is no 'cool' bulge on the disk to occult the brighter inner disk periodically. The implications for the outburst mechanism in the types of outburst are discussed. The evolution of the continuum flux distribution and emission-line fluxes, the modulation of the continuum and line fluxes with orbital phase, and the behavior of the mideclipse spectral during normal outburst are investigated.

  6. Emissivity model of steel 430 during the growth of oxide layer at 800-1100 K and 1.5 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2018-01-01

    This work studied the variation in spectral emissivity with growth of oxide layer at the different temperatures. For this reason, we measured the normal spectral emissivity during the growth of oxide layer on the sample surface at a wavelength of 1.5 μm over a temperature range 800-1100 K. In the experiment, the temperature was measured by the two thermocouples, which were symmetrically welded onto the front surface of specimens. The average of their readings was regarded as the true temperature. The detector should be perpendicular to the specimen surface as accurately as possible. The variation in spectral emissivity with growth of oxide layer was evaluated at a certain temperature. Altogether 11 emissivity models were evaluated. The conclusion was gained that the more the number of parameters used in the models was, the better the fitting accuracy became. On the whole, all the PEE models, the four-parameter LEE model and the five-parameter PFE, PLE and LEE models could be employed to well fit this kind of variation. The variation in spectral emissivity with temperature was determined at a certain thickness of oxide film. Almost all the models studied in this paper could be used to accurately evaluate this variation. The approximate models of spectral emissivity as a function of temperature and oxide-layer thickness were proposed. The strong oscillations of spectral emissivity were observed, which were affirmed to arise from the interference effect between the two radiations stemming from the oxide layer and from the substrate. The uncertainties in the temperature of steel 430 generated only by the surface oxidization were approximately 4.1-10.7 K in this experiment.

  7. Perceptual Adaptation of Voice Gender Discrimination with Spectrally Shifted Vowels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianhao; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether perceptual adaptation improves voice gender discrimination of spectrally shifted vowels and, if so, which acoustic cues contribute to the improvement. Method: Voice gender discrimination was measured for 10 normal-hearing subjects, during 5 days of adaptation to spectrally shifted vowels, produced by processing the…

  8. GABA-A stimulation in normal volunteers and during temporal epilepsy measured by {sup 18}FDG with positron emission tomography; Stimulation GABA-A chez le volontaire sain et au cours des epilepsies temporales etudiee par le {sup 18}FDG en tomographie d`emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinotti, L.; Le Bars, D.; Garcia-Larrea, L.; Peyron, R.; Gregoire, M.C.; Lavenne, F.; Comar, D.; Mauguiere, F. [CERMEP, 69 - Lyon (France); Krogsgaard-Larsen, P. [Royal Danish School of Pharmacy, Copenhague (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    The {gamma}-amino butyric acid (GABA) is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter of the brain and it has been evoked in epilepto-genesis. Using a GABA analog, the THIP, we tried to establish if the gabaergic neurotransmission was modified in the epileptic focus. For this purpose, we measured the effects of this specific GABA agonist on the cerebral glucose consumption (CMRGlu) as measured by 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG) with positron emission tomography (PET). Eight patients presenting temporal epilepsy and three normal volunteers received two {sup 18}FDG PET studies, after placebo and THIP injection, in random order. Clinical symptoms and electroencephalographic data demonstrated a trend towards sleepiness and a diminution of alpha waves after THIP injection. CMRGlu was globally increased with THIP in cortical regions, cerebellum and caudate nuclei. The average increase was 17% in grey matter while it did not reach significancy in white matter. Under the placebo condition, the asymmetry between the focus and the controlateral internal temporal zone was 18% as an average, and reduced significantly to 11% after THIP injection. In the external temporal zones, the asymmetry decreased from 28% to 14%. These results suggest that gabaergic inhibition requires energy in the normal brain tissue and in this with temporal epilepsy. Since the asymmetry of glucose consumption tends to diminish, the inhibitory GABA system appears preserved in temporal epilepsy with an enhanced sensitivity in the focus. (Authors). 6 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Variations in the spectral values of specific absorption of phytoplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Lazzara, L; Prieur, L

    Absorption spectra of laboratory cultures of eight species of phytoplankton were studied. These spectra, normalized per unit of chlorophyll a concentration (specific absorption) show variability in magnitude and spectral form. Specific absorption...

  10. Spectral radius of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Stevanovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Radius of Graphs provides a thorough overview of important results on the spectral radius of adjacency matrix of graphs that have appeared in the literature in the preceding ten years, most of them with proofs, and including some previously unpublished results of the author. The primer begins with a brief classical review, in order to provide the reader with a foundation for the subsequent chapters. Topics covered include spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem. From this introduction, the

  11. Unmixing of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available techniques is complicated when considering very similar spectral signatures. Iron-bearing oxide/hydroxide/sulfate minerals have similar spectral signatures. The study focuses on how could estimates of abundances of spectrally similar iron-bearing oxide...

  12. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    It has been traditional in phonetic research to characterize monophthongs using a set of static formant frequencies, i.e., formant frequencies taken from a single time-point in the vowel or averaged over the time-course of the vowel. However, over the last twenty years a growing body of research has demonstrated that, at least for a number of dialects of North American English, vowels which are traditionally described as monophthongs often have substantial spectral change. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change has been observed in speakers’ productions, and has also been found to have a substantial effect on listeners’ perception. In terms of acoustics, the traditional categorical distinction between monophthongs and diphthongs can be replaced by a gradient description of dynamic spectral patterns. This book includes chapters addressing various aspects of vowel inherent spectral change (VISC), including theoretical and experimental studies of the perceptually relevant aspects of VISC, the relationship between ar...

  13. High Resolution Spectral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-25

    liable methods for high resolution spectral analysis of multivariable processes, as well as to distance measures for quantitative assessment of...called "modern nonlinear spectral analysis methods " [27]. An alternative way to reconstruct /„(#), based on Tn, is the periodogram/correlogram f{6...eie). A homotopy method was proposed in [8, 9] leading to a differential equation for A(T) in a homotopy variable r. If the statistics are consistent

  14. Spectrally selective glazings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  15. Multiple spectral splits of supernova neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Raffelt, Georg G; Smirnov, Alexei Yu

    2009-07-31

    Collective oscillations of supernova neutrinos swap the spectra f(nu(e))(E) and f(nu[over ](e))(E) with those of another flavor in certain energy intervals bounded by sharp spectral splits. This phenomenon is far more general than previously appreciated: typically one finds one or more swaps and accompanying splits in the nu and nu[over ] channels for both inverted and normal neutrino mass hierarchies. Depending on an instability condition, swaps develop around spectral crossings (energies where f(nu(e))=f(nu(x)), f(nu[over ](e))=f(nu[over ](x)) as well as E-->infinity where all fluxes vanish), and the widths of swaps are determined by the spectra and fluxes. Washout by multiangle decoherence varies across the spectrum and splits can survive as sharp spectral features.

  16. Temporal Profiles and Spectral Lags of XRF 060218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Stamatikos, Mike; Zhang, Bing; Norris, Jay; Gehrels, Neil; Zhang, Jin; Dai, Z. G.

    2006-01-01

    The spectral and temporal properties of the nonthermal emission of the nearby XRF 060218 in the 0.3-150 keV band are studied. We show that both the spectral energy distribution and the light-curve properties suggest the same origin of the nonthermal emission detected by Swift BAT and XRT. This event has the longest pulse duration and spectral lag observed to date among the known GRBs. The pulse structure and its energy dependence are analogous to typical GRBs,. By extrapolating the observed spectral lag to the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) BATSE bands we find that the hypothesis that this event complies with the same luminosity-lag relation with bright GRBs cannot be ruled out at 2 sigma significance level. These intriguing facts, along with its compliance with the Amati relation, indicate that XRF 060218 shares the similar radiation physics as typical GRBs.

  17. Chapter 1: Direct Normal Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Daryl R.

    2016-04-15

    This chapter addresses the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the solar resource, the direct solar radiation. It discusses the total or integrated broadband direct beam extraterrestrial radiation (ETR). This total integrated irradiance is comprised of photons of electromagnetic radiation. The chapter also discusses the impact of the atmosphere and its effect upon the direct normal irradiance (DNI) beam radiation. The gases and particulates present in the atmosphere traversed by the direct beam reflect, absorb, and scatter differing spectral regions and proportions of the direct beam, and act as a variable filter. Knowledge of the available broadband DNI beam radiation resource data is essential in designing a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) system. Spectral variations in the DNI beam radiation affect the performance of a CPV system depending on the solar cell technology used. The chapter describes propagation and scattering processes of circumsolar radiation (CSR), which includes the Mie scattering from large particles.

  18. (LMRG): Microscope Resolution, Objective Quality, Spectral Accuracy and Spectral Un-mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayles, Carol J.; Cole, Richard W.; Eason, Brady; Girard, Anne-Marie; Jinadasa, Tushare; Martin, Karen; McNamara, George; Opansky, Cynthia; Schulz, Katherine; Thibault, Marc; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    The second study by the LMRG focuses on measuring confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) resolution, objective lens quality, spectral imaging accuracy and spectral un-mixing. Affordable test samples for each aspect of the study were designed, prepared and sent to 116 labs from 23 countries across the globe. Detailed protocols were designed for the three tests and customized for most of the major confocal instruments being used by the study participants. One protocol developed for measuring resolution and objective quality was recently published in Nature Protocols (Cole, R. W., T. Jinadasa, et al. (2011). Nature Protocols 6(12): 1929–1941). The first study involved 3D imaging of sub-resolution fluorescent microspheres to determine the microscope point spread function. Results of the resolution studies as well as point spread function quality (i.e. objective lens quality) from 140 different objective lenses will be presented. The second study of spectral accuracy looked at the reflection of the laser excitation lines into the spectral detection in order to determine the accuracy of these systems to report back the accurate laser emission wavelengths. Results will be presented from 42 different spectral confocal systems. Finally, samples with double orange beads (orange core and orange coating) were imaged spectrally and the imaging software was used to un-mix fluorescence signals from the two orange dyes. Results from 26 different confocal systems will be summarized. Time will be left to discuss possibilities for the next LMRG study.

  19. The spectral energy distribution of powerful starburst galaxies - I. Modelling the radio continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, T. J.; Seymour, N.; Marvil, J.; Filipović, M. D.; Tothill, N. F. H.; McDermid, R. M.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Hancock, P. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Cook, R. H.; Norris, R. P.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2018-02-01

    We have acquired radio-continuum data between 70 MHz and 48 GHz for a sample of 19 southern starburst galaxies at moderate redshifts (0.067 < z < 0.227) with the aim of separating synchrotron and free-free emission components. Using a Bayesian framework, we find the radio continuum is rarely characterized well by a single power law, instead often exhibiting low-frequency turnovers below 500 MHz, steepening at mid to high frequencies, and a flattening at high frequencies where free-free emission begins to dominate over the synchrotron emission. These higher order curvature components may be attributed to free-free absorption across multiple regions of star formation with varying optical depths. The decomposed synchrotron and free-free emission components in our sample of galaxies form strong correlations with the total-infrared bolometric luminosities. Finally, we find that without accounting for free-free absorption with turnovers between 90 and 500 MHz the radio continuum at low frequency (ν < 200 MHz) could be overestimated by upwards of a factor of 12 if a simple power-law extrapolation is used from higher frequencies. The mean synchrotron spectral index of our sample is constrained to be α = -1.06, which is steeper than the canonical value of -0.8 for normal galaxies. We suggest this may be caused by an intrinsically steeper cosmic ray distribution.

  20. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  1. Spectral analysis by correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauque, J.M.; Berthier, D.; Max, J.; Bonnet, G.

    1969-01-01

    The spectral density of a signal, which represents its power distribution along the frequency axis, is a function which is of great importance, finding many uses in all fields concerned with the processing of the signal (process identification, vibrational analysis, etc...). Amongst all the possible methods for calculating this function, the correlation method (correlation function calculation + Fourier transformation) is the most promising, mainly because of its simplicity and of the results it yields. The study carried out here will lead to the construction of an apparatus which, coupled with a correlator, will constitute a set of equipment for spectral analysis in real time covering the frequency range 0 to 5 MHz. (author) [fr

  2. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  3. Zebra pattern in decametric radio emission of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Rošker, S.; Rucker, H. O.; Brazhenko, A.; Zarka, P.; Litvinenko, G.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Melnik, V.; Franzuzenko, A. V.; Schiemel, J.

    2018-03-01

    We report the systematic analysis of zebra-like fine spectral structures in decametric frequency range of Jovian radio emission. Observations were performed by the large ground-based radio telescope URAN-2 during three observation campaigns between, Sep., 2012, and May, 2015. In total, 51 zebra pattern (ZP) events were detected. These rare fine radio features are observed in frequency range from 12.5 to 29.7 MHz as quasi-harmonically related bands of enhanced brightness. ZPs are strongly polarized radio emission with a duration from 20 s to 290 s and flux densities 105-106 Jy (normalized to 1 AU), that is, 1-2 orders lower than for Io-decametric radio emission (DAM). Occurrence of the events does not depend on the position of Io satellite but is strongly controlled by the Jovian central meridian longitude (CML). ZPs are mainly detected in two active sectors of Jovian CMLs: 100∘ to 160∘ for Northern sources (right-handed polarized) and 300∘ and 60∘ (via 360∘) for the Southern sources (left-handed). The frequency interval between neighboring stripes is from 0.26 to 1.5 MHz and in most cases this interval increases with frequency. We discussed the double plasma resonance with electrons or ions as a possible source of the ZPs. The performed analysis of the observations allows us to conclude that the observed ZPs are a new type of narrow band spectral structures in the Jovian DAM.

  4. IR spectral analysis for the diagnostics of crust earthquake precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umarkhodgaev, R. M.; Liperovsky, V. A.; Mikhailin, V. V.; Meister, C.-V.; Naumov, D. Ju

    2012-04-01

    In regions of future earthquakes, a few days before the seismic shock, the emanation of radon and hydrogen is being observed, which causes clouds of increased ionisation in the atmosphere. In the present work the possible diagnostics of these clouds using infrared (IR) spectroscopy is considered, which may be important and useful for the general geophysical system of earthquake prediction and the observation of industrial emissions of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. Some possible physical processes are analysed, which cause, under the condition of additional ionisation in a pre-breakdown electrical field, emissions in the IR interval. In doing so, the transparency region of the IR spectrum at wavelengths of 7-15 μm is taken into account. This transparency region corresponds to spectral lines of small atmospheric constituents like CH4, CO2, N2O, NO2, NO, and O3. The possible intensities of the IR emissions observable in laboratories and in nature are estimated. The acceleration process of the electrons in the pre-breakdown electrical field before its adhesion to the molecules is analysed. The laboratory equipment for the investigation of the IR absorption spectrum is constructed for the cases of normal and decreased atmospheric pressures. The syntheses of ozone and nitrous oxides are performed in the barrier discharge. It is studied if the products of the syntheses may be used to model atmospheric processes where these components take part. Spectra of products of the syntheses in the wavelength region of 2-10 μm are observed and analysed. A device is created for the syntheses and accumulation of nitrous oxides. Experiments to observe the IR-spectra of ozone and nitrous oxides during the syntheses and during the further evolution of these molecules are performed. For the earthquake prediction, practically, the investigation of emission spectra is most important, but during the laboratory experiments, the radiation of the excited molecules is shifted by a

  5. A radio spectral index map and catalogue at 147-1400 MHz covering 80 per cent of the sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gasperin, F.; Intema, H. T.; Frail, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    The radio spectral index is a powerful probe for classifying cosmic radio sources and understanding the origin of the radio emission. Combining data at 147 MHz and 1.4 GHz from the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), we produced a large-area radio spectral index map of ˜80 per cent of the sky (Dec. > - 40 deg), as well as a radio spectral index catalogue containing 1396 515 sources, of which 503 647 are not upper or lower limits. Almost every TGSS source has a detected counterpart, while this is true only for 36 per cent of NVSS sources. We released both the map and the catalogue to the astronomical community. The catalogue is analysed to discover systematic behaviours in the cosmic radio population. We find a differential spectral behaviour between faint and bright sources as well as between compact and extended sources. These trends are explained in terms of radio galaxy evolution. We also confirm earlier reports of an excess of steep-spectrum sources along the galactic plane. This corresponds to 86 compact and steep-spectrum source in excess compared to expectations. The properties of this excess are consistent with normal non-recycled pulsars, which may have been missed by pulsation searches due to larger than average scattering along the line of sight.

  6. Spectral Ensemble Kalman Filters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mandel, Jan; Kasanický, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin; Fuglík, Viktor; Turčičová, Marie; Eben, Kryštof; Resler, Jaroslav; Juruš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2014), EMS2014-446 [EMS Annual Meeting /14./ & European Conference on Applied Climatology (ECAC) /10./. 06.10.2014-10.10.2014, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant - others:NSF DMS -1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * spectral filter Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  7. Performance Evaluation of Spectral Clustering Algorithm using Various Clustering Validity Indices

    OpenAIRE

    M. T. Somashekara; D. Manjunatha

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the popularity of spectral clustering algorithm, the evaluation procedures are still in developmental stage. In this article, we have taken benchmarking IRIS dataset for performing comparative study of twelve indices for evaluating spectral clustering algorithm. The results of the spectral clustering technique were also compared with k-mean algorithm. The validity of the indices was also verified with accuracy and (Normalized Mutual Information) NMI score. Spectral clustering algo...

  8. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and redness/greenness for comparison of leaf spectral profiles in multi-temporally acquired remote sensing images. Ryoichi Doi. Articles Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 723-730 ...

  9. A Simple Spectral Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth Torres

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The principal aim of a spectral observer is twofold: the reconstruction of a signal of time via state estimation and the decomposition of such a signal into the frequencies that make it up. A spectral observer can be catalogued as an online algorithm for time-frequency analysis because is a method that can compute on the fly the Fourier transform (FT of a signal, without having the entire signal available from the start. In this regard, this paper presents a novel spectral observer with an adjustable constant gain for reconstructing a given signal by means of the recursive identification of the coefficients of a Fourier series. The reconstruction or estimation of a signal in the context of this work means to find the coefficients of a linear combination of sines a cosines that fits a signal such that it can be reproduced. The design procedure of the spectral observer is presented along with the following applications: (1 the reconstruction of a simple periodical signal, (2 the approximation of both a square and a triangular signal, (3 the edge detection in signals by using the Fourier coefficients, (4 the fitting of the historical Bitcoin market data from 1 December 2014 to 8 January 2018 and (5 the estimation of a input force acting upon a Duffing oscillator. To round out this paper, we present a detailed discussion about the results of the applications as well as a comparative analysis of the proposed spectral observer vis-à-vis the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT, which is a well-known method for time-frequency analysis.

  10. Positive Flash High-Speed Spectral Characteristics in the Upward Lightning Triggering Study (UPLIGHTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orville, R. E.; Warner, T.

    2013-12-01

    The spectral properties of positive lightning flashes have been recorded for the first time. Two high-speed cameras, each operating at 35,000 fps, have recorded the positive leaders in the UPLIGHTS experiment in Rapid City, South Dakota. One of the cameras is modified to a spectrograph with a transmission diffraction grating to capture the lightning emissions from 400 to 900 nm. The positive leader infrared spectral emissions are relatively more intense compared to the visible spectral emissions. The positive lightning return stroke peak currents range from 24 to 91 kA.

  11. Wavelength conversion based spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    There has been a strong, application driven development of Si-based cameras and spectrometers for imaging and spectral analysis of light in the visible and near infrared spectral range. This has resulted in very efficient devices, with high quantum efficiency, good signal to noise ratio and high...... resolution for this spectral region. Today, an increasing number of applications exists outside the spectral region covered by Si-based devices, e.g. within cleantech, medical or food imaging. We present a technology based on wavelength conversion which will extend the spectral coverage of state of the art...... visible or near infrared cameras and spectrometers to include other spectral regions of interest....

  12. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... local chapter Join our online community Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a brain disorder ... Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Normal pressure hydrocephalus occurs when excess cerebrospinal fluid ...

  13. Luminosity and spectral evolution of QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y Y; Yi, I S

    1999-01-01

    We apply the observed spectral states of the Galactic black hole candidates (GBHCs) to the quasi-stellar object (QSO) luminosity evolution based on the correlation between luminosity and the spectrum, which is strongly supported by the similarities of emission mechanisms in GBHCs and QSOs. We derive the QSO luminosity evolution trends in the UV/optical and the X-ray energy bands and demonstrate that their trends are significantly affected by the spectral evolution. Each energy band shows distinct evolution properties. We test one of the widely discussed cosmological evolution scenarios of QSOs, in which QSOs evolve as a single long-lived population, and show that the resulting luminosity functions seen in different energy bands exhibit distinguishable and potentially observable evolution signatures in the X-ray energy bands.

  14. The Galah Survey: Classification and Diagnostics with t-SNE Reduction of Spectral Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traven, G.; Zwitter, T.; Žerjal, M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Matijevič, G. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Kos, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; De Silva, G.; Sharma, S. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Asplund, M.; Freeman, K.; Lin, J.; Da Costa, G.; Duong, L. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Casey, A. R. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Martell, S. L. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Schlesinger, K. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Simpson, J. D. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia); Zucker, D. B. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Anguiano, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Horner, J., E-mail: gregor.traven@fmf.uni-lj.si [Computational Engineering and Science Research Centre, University of Southern Queensland, Towoomba QLD 4350 (Australia); and others

    2017-02-01

    Galah is an ongoing high-resolution spectroscopic survey with the goal of disentangling the formation history of the Milky Way using the fossil remnants of disrupted star formation sites that are now dispersed around the Galaxy. It is targeting a randomly selected magnitude-limited ( V ≤ 14) sample of stars, with the goal of observing one million objects. To date, 300,000 spectra have been obtained. Not all of them are correctly processed by parameter estimation pipelines, and we need to know about them. We present a semi-automated classification scheme that identifies different types of peculiar spectral morphologies in an effort to discover and flag potentially problematic spectra and thus help to preserve the integrity of the survey results. To this end, we employ the recently developed dimensionality reduction technique t-SNE ( t -distributed stochastic neighbor embedding), which enables us to represent the complex spectral morphology in a two-dimensional projection map while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority (178,483) of the 209,533 Galah spectra considered in this study represents normal single stars, whereas 31,050 peculiar and problematic spectra with very diverse spectral features pertaining to 28,579 stars are distributed into 10 classification categories: hot stars, cool metal-poor giants, molecular absorption bands, binary stars, H α /H β emission, H α /H β emission superimposed on absorption, H α /H β P-Cygni, H α /H β inverted P-Cygni, lithium absorption, and problematic. Classified spectra with supplementary information are presented in the catalog, indicating candidates for follow-up observations and population studies of the short-lived phases of stellar evolution.

  15. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  16. Context Dependent Spectral Unmixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    remote sensing [1–13]. It is also used in food safety [14–17], pharmaceutical process monitoring and quality control [18–22], as well as in biomedical...23,24], industrial [25], biometric [26] and forensic applications [27]. Hyperspectral sensors capture both the spatial and spectral information of a...imagery,” IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 58–69, 2002. [12] A. Plaza, J. A. Benediktsson, J. W. Boardman, J. Brazile , L. Bruzzone, G

  17. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin P Clark

    Full Text Available Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID. In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM. Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with

  18. Spectral distributions and symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesne, C.

    1980-01-01

    As it is now well known, the spectral distribution method has both statistical and group theoretical aspects which make for great simplifications in many-Fermion system calculations with respect to more conventional ones. Although both aspects intertwine and are equally essential to understand what is going on, we are only going to discuss some of the group theoretical aspects, namely those connected with the propagation of information, in view of their fundamental importance for the actual calculations of spectral distributions. To be more precise, let us recall that the spectral distribution method may be applied in principle to many-Fermion spaces which have a direct-product structure, i.e., are obtained by distributing a certain number n of Fermions over N single-particle states (O less than or equal to n less than or equal to N), as it is the case for instance for the nuclear shell model spaces. For such systems, the operation of a central limit theorem is known to provide us with a simplifying principle which, when used in conjunction with exact or broken symmetries, enables us to make definite predictions in those cases which are not amendable to exact shell model diagonalizations. The distribution (in energy) of the states corresponding to a fixed symmetry is then defined by a small number of low-order energy moments. Since the Hamiltonian is defined in few-particle subspaces embedded in the n-particlespace, the low-order moments, we are interested in, can be expressed in terms of simpler quantities defined in those few-particle subspaces: the information is said to propagate from the simple subspaces to the more complicated ones. The possibility of actually calculating spectral distributions depends upon the finding of simple ways to propagate the information

  19. Spectral and Diffraction Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Lionheart, William

    2016-01-01

    We discuss several cases of what we call "Rich Tomography" problems in which more data is measured than a scalar for each ray. We give examples of infra red spectral tomography and Bragg edge neutron tomography in which the data is insufficient. For diffraction tomography of strain for polycrystaline materials we give an explicit reconstruction procedure. We go on to describe a way to find six independent rotation axes using Pascal's theorem of projective geometry

  20. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises a reactive core having fuel assemblies accommodating both water displacer elements and neutron absorbing control rods for selectively changing the volume of water-moderator in the core. The fuel assemblies with displacer and control rods are arranged in alternating fashion so that one displacer element drive mechanism may move displacer elements in more than one fuel assembly without interfering with the movement of control rods of a corresponding control rod drive mechanisms. (author)

  1. [A new automated method to identify emission line star from massive spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing-Chang; Zhang, Cai-Ming; Wei, Peng; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2012-06-01

    Stellar spectra are characterized by obvious absorption lines or absorption bands, while those with emission lines are usually special stars such as cataclysmic variable stars (CVs), HerbigAe/Be etc. The further study of this kind of spectra is meaningful. The present paper proposed a new method to identify emission line stars (ELS) spectra automatically. After the continuum normalization is done for the original spectral flux, line detection is made by comparing the normalized flux with the mean and standard deviation of the flux in its neighbor region The results of the experiment on massive spectra from SDSS DR8 indicate that the method can identify ELS spectra completely and accurately. Since no complex transformation and computation are involved in this method, the identifying process is fast and it is ideal for the ELS detection in large sky survey projects like LAMOST and SDSS.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  3. Computerized spectral analyses of EEG in chronic schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Haruhiro

    1985-01-01

    This study was aimed at clarifying the EEG difference between chronic schizophrenic patients and normal controls by using the EEG method of spectral analyses. Twelve comparatively homogenous chronic schizophrenic patients and the 10 healthy controls were subjected to EEG investigations. 1) The EEG of schizophrenic patients had a slowing tendency of the frequency in the frontal pole, anterior temporal and central regions of the scalp compared with control subjects. 2) There was a decrease of mutual relation among the five electrodes' peak frequency in the schizophrenic patients. 3) The EEG of schizophrenic patients had more fast waves of β 1 and β 2 band than that of control subjects. 4) A slowing tendency of the frequency in the first half regions of the scalp was not found in 3 chronic schizophrenic patients which showed defective functions in the frontal area by positron emission tomography. 5) When mental arithmetic was given, the schizophrenic patients showed an increase of fast wave in the central, posterior temporal and occipital regions of the scalp. 6) When they opened their eyes, attenuation in the α band was not so marked in the schizophrenic patients. (author)

  4. Method of photon spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  5. H.E.S.S. observations of RX J1713.7-3946 with improved angular and spectral resolution: Evidence for gamma-ray emission extending beyond the X-ray emitting shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Fukuyama, T.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.

    2018-04-01

    Supernova remnants exhibit shock fronts (shells) that can accelerate charged particles up to very high energies. In the past decade, measurements of a handful of shell-type supernova remnants in very high-energy gamma rays have provided unique insights into the acceleration process. Among those objects, RX J1713.7-3946 (also known as G347.3-0.5) has the largest surface brightness, allowing us in the past to perform the most comprehensive study of morphology and spatially resolved spectra of any such very high-energy gamma-ray source. Here we present extensive new H.E.S.S. measurements of RX J1713.7-3946, almost doubling the observation time compared to our previous publication. Combined with new improved analysis tools, the previous sensitivity is more than doubled. The H.E.S.S. angular resolution of 0.048° (0.036° above 2 TeV) is unprecedented in gamma-ray astronomy and probes physical scales of 0.8 (0.6) parsec at the remnant's location. The new H.E.S.S. image of RX J1713.7-3946 allows us to reveal clear morphological differences between X-rays and gamma rays. In particular, for the outer edge of the brightest shell region, we find the first ever indication for particles in the process of leaving the acceleration shock region. By studying the broadband energy spectrum, we furthermore extract properties of the parent particle populations, providing new input to the discussion of the leptonic or hadronic nature of the gamma-ray emission mechanism. All images (FITS files) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A6

  6. Spectral Properties and Orientation of Voltage-Sensitive Dyes in Lipid Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Matson, Maria

    2012-07-24

    Voltage-sensitive dyes are frequently used for probing variations in the electric potential across cell membranes. The dyes respond by changing their spectral properties: measured as shifts of wavelength of absorption or emission maxima or as changes of absorption or fluorescence intensity. Although such probes have been studied and used for decades, the mechanism behind their voltage sensitivity is still obscure. We ask whether the voltage response is due to electrochromism as a result of direct field interaction on the chromophore or to solvatochromism, which is the focus of this study, as result of changed environment or molecular alignment in the membrane. The spectral properties of three styryl dyes, di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, and RH421, were investigated in solvents of varying polarity and in model membranes using spectroscopy. Using quantum mechanical calculations, the spectral dependence of monomer and dimer ANEPPS on solvent properties was modeled. Also, the kinetics of binding to lipid membranes and the binding geometry of the probe molecules were found relevant to address. The spectral properties of all three probes were found to be highly sensitive to the local environment, and the probes are oriented nearly parallel with the membrane normal. Slow binding kinetics and scattering in absorption spectra indicate, especially for di-8-ANEPPS, involvement of aggregation. On the basis of the experimental spectra and time-dependent density functional theory calculations, we find that aggregate formation may contribute to the blue-shifts seen for the dyes in decanol and when bound to membrane models. In conclusion, solvatochromic and other intermolecular interactions effects also need to be included when considering electrochromic response voltage-sensitive dyes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  8. Polarized spectral features of human breast tissues through wavelet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluorescence characteristics of human breast tissues are investigated through wavelet transform and principal component analysis (PCA). Wavelet transform of polarized fluorescence spectra of human breast tissues is found to localize spectral features that can reliably differentiate different tissue types. The emission range ...

  9. An experimental method for making spectral emittance and surface temperature measurements of opaque surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Travis J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Tree, Dale R.; Daniel Maynes, R.; Baxter, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed to make spectral emittance and temperature measurements. The spectral emittance of an object is calculated using measurements of the spectral emissive power and of the surface temperature of the object obtained using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. A calibration procedure is described in detail which accounts for the temperature dependence of the detector. The methods used to extract the spectral emissive power and surface temperature from measured infrared spectra were validated using a blackbody radiator at known temperatures. The average error in the measured spectral emittance was 2.1% and the average difference between the temperature inferred from the recorded spectra and the temperature indicated on the blackbody radiator was 1.2%. The method was used to measure the spectral emittance of oxidized copper at various temperatures.

  10. Measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using dynamic single-photon emission computed tomography (DSPECT): Definition of a generally acceptable normal range and follow-up checks after extracranial bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreisig, T.

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of dynamic single-photon emission computed tomography was evaluated in 50 volunteers with unobtrusive cerebral findings, who were to provide the relevant standard values. It was found that the values measured were easily reproducible. Measurements in patients showing cerebrovascular disease that were carried out before and after extracranial bypass surgery did mostly not suggest any perceivable improvement of cerebral blood flow. In isolated cases the cerebral reserve was influenced favourably, as judged from measurements after administration of acetazolamide. (MBC) [de

  11. Radiation from an equilibrium CO2-N2 plasma in the [250-850 nm] spectral region: II. Spectral modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M Lino da; Vacher, D; Andre, P; Faure, G; Dudeck, M

    2008-01-01

    In the first part of this work, described in a previous paper, the thermodynamic conditions in an atmospheric pressure inductively coupled CO 2 -N 2 plasma have been determined, and the radiation emission spectrum has been measured and calibrated in the [250-850 nm] spectral region. In the second part of this work, a synthetic radiation spectrum is obtained taking into account (a) the geometry of the plasma torch and (b) the local thermodynamic conditions of the plasma. This synthetic spectrum has then been compared against the measured spectrum. The good agreement between the two spectra allows validating the spectral database of the line-by-line code SPARTAN for the simulation of the radiative emission of CO 2 -N 2 plasmas from the near-UV to the near-IR spectral region.

  12. QCD spectral sum rules

    CERN Document Server

    Narison, Stéphan

    The aim of the book is to give an introduction to the method of QCD Spectral Sum Rules and to review its developments. After some general introductory remarks, Chiral Symmetry, the Historical Developments of the Sum Rules and the necessary materials for perturbative QCD including the MS regularization and renormalization schemes are discussed. The book also gives a critical review and some improvements of the wide uses of the QSSR in Hadron Physics and QSSR beyond the Standard Hadron Phenomenology. The author has participated actively in this field since 1978 just before the expanding success

  13. Spectral signatures of chirality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    We present a new way of measuring chirality, via the spectral shift of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional structures. We derive an explicit mapping of the problem of oblique incidence of circularly polarized light on a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal with negligible index contrast...... to the formally equivalent problem of linearly polarized light incident on-axis on a non-chiral structure with index contrast. We derive analytical expressions for the first-order shifts of the band gaps for negligible index contrast. These are modified to give good approximations to the band gap shifts also...

  14. On spectral pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llobet, X.; Appert, K.; Bondeson, A.; Vaclavik, J.

    1990-01-01

    Finite difference and finite element approximations of eigenvalue problems, under certain circumstances exhibit spectral pollution, i.e. the appearance of eigenvalues that do not converge to the correct value when the mesh density is increased. In the present paper this phenomenon is investigated in a homogeneous case by means of discrete dispersion relations: the polluting modes belong to a branch of the dispersion relation that is strongly distorted by the discretization method employed, or to a new, spurious branch. The analysis is applied to finite difference methods and to finite element methods, and some indications about how to avoiding polluting schemes are given. (author) 5 figs., 10 refs

  15. Spectrally resolved multiphoton imaging of in vivo and excised mouse skin tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palero, Jonathan A.; de Bruijn, Henriëtte S.; van der Ploeg van den Heuvel, Angélique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2007-01-01

    The deep tissue penetration and submicron spatial resolution of multiphoton microscopy and the high detection efficiency and nanometer spectral resolution of a spectrograph were utilized to record spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues. Autofluorescence from both cellular

  16. Spectral Index Changes with Brightness for γ-Ray Loud Blazars J. H. ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    spectral index changes depending on γ-ray brightness is obtained. ... the γ-ray band. Key words. Active galactic nuclei (AGN): blazars: γ-ray emission: spectral index. 1. Introduction. Generally, the spectrum of one source changes with its .... Pearl River Scholar Funded Scheme (GDUPS) (2009), Yangcheng Scholar Funded.

  17. Variability of Spectral Energy Distribution of Blazar S5 0716+714 B ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The emission from blazars is known to be variable at all wave- lengths. The flux variability is often accompanied by spectral changes. Spectral energy distribution (SED) changes must be associated with changes in the spectra of emitting electrons and/or the physical param- eters of the jet. Meaningful modeling of ...

  18. Spectral Index Changes with Brightness for γ-Ray Loud Blazars J. H. ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    spectral index changes depending on γ-ray brightness is obtained. ... the γ-ray band. Key words. Active galactic nuclei (AGN): blazars: γ-ray emission: spectral index. 1. Introduction. Generally, the spectrum of one source changes with its .... China (NSFC 11173009, NSFC 11203007), the research fund of Hunan University.

  19. Testing for normality

    CERN Document Server

    Thode, Henry C

    2002-01-01

    Describes the selection, design, theory, and application of tests for normality. Covers robust estimation, test power, and univariate and multivariate normality. Contains tests ofr multivariate normality and coordinate-dependent and invariant approaches.

  20. Gaussian model for emission rate measurement of heated plumes using hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Samuel J.; Conrad, Bradley M.; Miguel, Rodrigo B.; Daun, Kyle J.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a novel model for measuring the emission rate of a heated gas plume using hyperspectral data from an FTIR imaging spectrometer. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is used to relate the spectral intensity of a pixel to presumed Gaussian distributions of volume fraction and temperature within the plume, along a line-of-sight that corresponds to the pixel, whereas previous techniques exclusively presume uniform distributions for these parameters. Estimates of volume fraction and temperature are converted to a column density by integrating the local molecular density along each path. Image correlation velocimetry is then employed on raw spectral intensity images to estimate the volume-weighted normal velocity at each pixel. Finally, integrating the product of velocity and column density along a control surface yields an estimate of the instantaneous emission rate. For validation, emission rate estimates were derived from synthetic hyperspectral images of a heated methane plume, generated using data from a large-eddy simulation. Calculating the RTE with Gaussian distributions of volume fraction and temperature, instead of uniform distributions, improved the accuracy of column density measurement by 14%. Moreover, the mean methane emission rate measured using our approach was within 4% of the ground truth. These results support the use of Gaussian distributions of thermodynamic properties in calculation of the RTE for optical gas diagnostics.

  1. Silicon nanocrystal-based photonic crystal slabs with broadband and efficient directional light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondič, L; Varga, M; Pelant, I; Valenta, J; Kromka, A; Elliman, R G

    2017-07-18

    Light extraction from a thin planar layer can be increased by introducing a two-dimensional periodic pattern on its surface. This structure, the so-called photonic crystal (PhC) slab, then not only enhances the extraction efficiency of light but can direct the extracted emission into desired angles. Careful design of the structures is important in order to have a spectral overlap of the emission with extraction (leaky) modes. We show that by fabricating PhC slabs with optimized dimensions from silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) active layers, the extraction efficiency of vertical light emission from SiNCs at a particular wavelength can be enhanced ∼ 11 times compared to that of uncorrugated SiNCs-rich layer. More importantly, increased light emission can be obtained in a broad spectral range and, simultaneously, the extracted light can stay confined within relatively narrow angle around the normal to the sample plane. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the physical origin of the enhancement is such that light originating from SiNCs first couples to leaky modes of the PhCs and is then efficiently extracted into the surrounding.

  2. The Normal Distribution From Binomial to Normal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 6. The Normal Distribution From Binomial to Normal. S Ramasubramanian. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 6 June 1997 pp 15-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/06/0015-0024 ...

  3. Spectral clustering for water body spectral types analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Leping; Li, Shijin; Wang, Lingli; Chen, Deqing

    2017-11-01

    In order to study the spectral types of water body in the whole country, the key issue of reservoir research is to obtain and to analyze the information of water body in the reservoir quantitatively and accurately. A new type of weight matrix is constructed by utilizing the spectral features and spatial features of the spectra from GF-1 remote sensing images comprehensively. Then an improved spectral clustering algorithm is proposed based on this weight matrix to cluster representative reservoirs in China. According to the internal clustering validity index which called Davies-Bouldin(DB) index, the best clustering number 7 is obtained. Compared with two clustering algorithms, the spectral clustering algorithm based only on spectral features and the K-means algorithm based on spectral features and spatial features, simulation results demonstrate that the proposed spectral clustering algorithm based on spectral features and spatial features has a higher clustering accuracy, which can better reflect the spatial clustering characteristics of representative reservoirs in various provinces in China - similar spectral properties and adjacent geographical locations.

  4. SpecViz: Interactive Spectral Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Nicholas Michael; STScI

    2016-06-01

    The astronomical community is about to enter a new generation of scientific enterprise. With next-generation instrumentation and advanced capabilities, the need has arisen to equip astronomers with the necessary tools to deal with large, multi-faceted data. The Space Telescope Science Institute has initiated a data analysis forum for the creation, development, and maintenance of software tools for the interpretation of these new data sets. SpecViz is a spectral 1-D interactive visualization and analysis application built with Python in an open source development environment. A user-friendly GUI allows for a fast, interactive approach to spectral analysis. SpecViz supports handling of unique and instrument-specific data, incorporation of advanced spectral unit handling and conversions in a flexible, high-performance interactive plotting environment. Active spectral feature analysis is possible through interactive measurement and statistical tools. It can be used to build wide-band SEDs, with the capability of combining or overplotting data products from various instruments. SpecViz sports advanced toolsets for filtering and detrending spectral lines; identifying, isolating, and manipulating spectral features; as well as utilizing spectral templates for renormalizing data in an interactive way. SpecViz also includes a flexible model fitting toolset that allows for multi-component models, as well as custom models, to be used with various fitting and decomposition routines. SpecViz also features robust extension via custom data loaders and connection to the central communication system underneath the interface for more advanced control. Incorporation with Jupyter notebooks via connection with the active iPython kernel allows for SpecViz to be used in addition to a user’s normal workflow without demanding the user drastically alter their method of data analysis. In addition, SpecViz allows the interactive analysis of multi-object spectroscopy in the same straight

  5. Emissivity independent optical pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; Kisner, Roger A.

    2017-04-04

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for determining the temperature of an object using an optical pyrometer. Certain embodiments of the disclosed technology allow for making optical temperature measurements that are independent of the surface emissivity of the object being sensed. In one of the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein, a plurality of spectral radiance measurements at a plurality of wavelengths is received from a surface of an object being measured. The plurality of the spectral radiance measurements is fit to a scaled version of a black body curve, the fitting comprising determining a temperature of the scaled version of the black body curve. The temperature is then output. The present disclosure is not to be construed as limiting and is instead directed toward all novel and nonobvious features and aspects of the various disclosed embodiments, alone or in various combinations and subcombinations with one another.

  6. Spectral Automorphisms in Quantum Logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexandru; Caragheorgheopol, Dan

    2010-12-01

    In quantum mechanics, the Hilbert space formalism might be physically justified in terms of some axioms based on the orthomodular lattice (OML) mathematical structure (Piron in Foundations of Quantum Physics, Benjamin, Reading, 1976). We intend to investigate the extent to which some fundamental physical facts can be described in the more general framework of OMLs, without the support of Hilbert space-specific tools. We consider the study of lattice automorphisms properties as a “substitute” for Hilbert space techniques in investigating the spectral properties of observables. This is why we introduce the notion of spectral automorphism of an OML. Properties of spectral automorphisms and of their spectra are studied. We prove that the presence of nontrivial spectral automorphisms allow us to distinguish between classical and nonclassical theories. We also prove, for finite dimensional OMLs, that for every spectral automorphism there is a basis of invariant atoms. This is an analogue of the spectral theorem for unitary operators having purely point spectrum.

  7. Rectangular spectral collocation

    KAUST Repository

    Driscoll, Tobin A.

    2015-02-06

    Boundary conditions in spectral collocation methods are typically imposed by removing some rows of the discretized differential operator and replacing them with others that enforce the required conditions at the boundary. A new approach based upon resampling differentiated polynomials into a lower-degree subspace makes differentiation matrices, and operators built from them, rectangular without any row deletions. Then, boundary and interface conditions can be adjoined to yield a square system. The resulting method is both flexible and robust, and avoids ambiguities that arise when applying the classical row deletion method outside of two-point scalar boundary-value problems. The new method is the basis for ordinary differential equation solutions in Chebfun software, and is demonstrated for a variety of boundary-value, eigenvalue and time-dependent problems.

  8. [Review of digital ground object spectral library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Hu; Zhou, Ding-Wu

    2009-06-01

    A higher spectral resolution is the main direction of developing remote sensing technology, and it is quite important to set up the digital ground object reflectance spectral database library, one of fundamental research fields in remote sensing application. Remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics, and quantitative analysis has been developed to a new stage. The present article summarized and systematically introduced the research status quo and development trend of digital ground object reflectance spectral libraries at home and in the world in recent years. Introducing the spectral libraries has been established, including desertification spectral database library, plants spectral database library, geological spectral database library, soil spectral database library, minerals spectral database library, cloud spectral database library, snow spectral database library, the atmosphere spectral database library, rocks spectral database library, water spectral database library, meteorites spectral database library, moon rock spectral database library, and man-made materials spectral database library, mixture spectral database library, volatile compounds spectral database library, and liquids spectral database library. In the process of establishing spectral database libraries, there have been some problems, such as the lack of uniform national spectral database standard and uniform standards for the ground object features as well as the comparability between different databases. In addition, data sharing mechanism can not be carried out, etc. This article also put forward some suggestions on those problems.

  9. Spectral Theory of Chemical Bonding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Boatz, J. A; Hinde, R. J; Sheehy, J. A

    2004-01-01

    New theoretical methods are reported for obtaining the binding energies of molecules and other chemical aggregates employing the spectral eigenstates and related properties of their atomic constituents...

  10. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Ejmalian, G.

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is an intrinsically tool that provide a unique and unparalleled approach for clinicians and researchers to interrogate the heart noninvasively. The ability to label substances of physiological interest with positron-emitting radioisotopes has permitted insight into normal blood flow and metabolism and the alterations that occur with disease states. Positron emission tomography of the heart has evolved as a unique, noninvasive approach for the assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and function. Because of the intrinsic quantitative nature of positron emission tomography measurements as well as the diverse compounds that can be labeled with positron- emitting radioisotopes, studies with positron emission tomography have provided rich insight into the physiology of the heart under diverse conditions

  11. Borel functional calculus for quaternionic normal operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, G.; Santhosh Kumar, P.

    2017-05-01

    In this article, we give an approach to Borel functional calculus for quaternionic normal operators, which are not necessarily bounded. First, we establish the definition of functional calculus for a subclass of quaternion valued Borel functions, and then we extend the same to the class of quaternion valued Borel functions as well as L∞-functions. We also prove spectral mapping theorem as a consequence.

  12. Multi-Spectral imaging of vegetation for detecting CO2 leaking from underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouse, J.H.; Shaw, J.A.; Lawrence, R.L.; Lewicki, J.L.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Spangler, L.H.

    2010-06-01

    Practical geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration will require long-term monitoring for detection of possible leakage back into the atmosphere. One potential monitoring method is multi-spectral imaging of vegetation reflectance to detect leakage through CO{sub 2}-induced plant stress. A multi-spectral imaging system was used to simultaneously record green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) images with a real-time reflectance calibration from a 3-m tall platform, viewing vegetation near shallow subsurface CO{sub 2} releases during summers 2007 and 2008 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology field site in Bozeman, Montana. Regression analysis of the band reflectances and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index with time shows significant correlation with distance from the CO{sub 2} well, indicating the viability of this method to monitor for CO{sub 2} leakage. The 2007 data show rapid plant vigor degradation at high CO{sub 2} levels next to the well and slight nourishment at lower, but above-background CO{sub 2} concentrations. Results from the second year also show that the stress response of vegetation is strongly linked to the CO{sub 2} sink-source relationship and vegetation density. The data also show short-term effects of rain and hail. The real-time calibrated imaging system successfully obtained data in an autonomous mode during all sky and daytime illumination conditions.

  13. Composite Fillers and their Influence on Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, Milan; Kalenda, Petr; Honner, Milan; Vacíková, Petra

    The research work presented in this paper shows influence of filler composition in inorganic composite on its emissivity. Development of system which will provide a very high emissivity (0.90 - 0.99) within a short wavelength range is the intention of our project. Active ingredients (Chromium Oxide, Iron powder, Kaolin, Silicon Carbide, Boron Carbide, Boron Nitride and Aluminum Nitride) were built in matrix of the composite. Furrier Transform Infra- Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy method was applied for measurement of spectral emissivity. Block hot plate was used for heating samples in relative emissivity measurement and laser beam in absolute emissivity measurement. These tests demonstrated that filler composition is able to influence emissive properties in range of short IR wavelength (1.5-4.0 μm) within 0.7 - 1.5 times (against the reference). Also influence of content of active ingredient in ceramic matrix on emissivity was measured. Content of active ingredients had no significant effect on emissivity.

  14. Understanding Soliton Spectral Tunneling as a Spectral Coupling Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Wang, Shaofei; Zeng, Xianglong

    2013-01-01

    Soliton eigenstate is found corresponding to a dispersive phase profile under which the soliton phase changes induced by the dispersion and nonlinearity are instantaneously counterbalanced. Much like a waveguide coupler relying on a spatial refractive index profile that supports mode coupling...... between channels, here we suggest that the soliton spectral tunneling effect can be understood supported by a spectral phase coupler. The dispersive wave number in the spectral domain must have a coupler-like symmetric profile for soliton spectral tunneling to occur. We show that such a spectral coupler...... exactly implies phase as well as group-velocity matching between the input soliton and tunneled soliton, namely a soliton phase matching condition. Examples in realistic photonic crystal fibers are also presented....

  15. In-vivo Validation of Fast Spectral Velocity Estimation Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Gran, Fredrik; Pedersen, Mads Møller

    2010-01-01

    Spectrograms in medical ultrasound are usually estimated with Welch’s method (WM). WM is dependent on an observation window (OW) of up to 256 emissions per estimate to achieve sufficient spectral resolution and contrast. Two adaptive filterbank methods have been suggested to reduce the OW: Blood...... spectral Power Capon (BPC) and the Blood Amplitude and Phase EStimation method (BAPES). Ten volunteers were scanned over the carotid artery. From each data set, 28 spectrograms were produced by combining four approaches (WM with a Hanning window (W.HAN), WM with a boxcar window (W.BOX), BPC and BAPES...

  16. Normalized modes at selected points without normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausel, Eduardo

    2018-04-01

    As every textbook on linear algebra demonstrates, the eigenvectors for the general eigenvalue problem | K - λM | = 0 involving two real, symmetric, positive definite matrices K , M satisfy some well-defined orthogonality conditions. Equally well-known is the fact that those eigenvectors can be normalized so that their modal mass μ =ϕT Mϕ is unity: it suffices to divide each unscaled mode by the square root of the modal mass. Thus, the normalization is the result of an explicit calculation applied to the modes after they were obtained by some means. However, we show herein that the normalized modes are not merely convenient forms of scaling, but that they are actually intrinsic properties of the pair of matrices K , M, that is, the matrices already "know" about normalization even before the modes have been obtained. This means that we can obtain individual components of the normalized modes directly from the eigenvalue problem, and without needing to obtain either all of the modes or for that matter, any one complete mode. These results are achieved by means of the residue theorem of operational calculus, a finding that is rather remarkable inasmuch as the residues themselves do not make use of any orthogonality conditions or normalization in the first place. It appears that this obscure property connecting the general eigenvalue problem of modal analysis with the residue theorem of operational calculus may have been overlooked up until now, but which has in turn interesting theoretical implications.Á

  17. Audiovisual Integration in Children Listening to Spectrally Degraded Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, David W.; Kang, Hi Jee; Stewart, Hannah J.; Amitay, Sygal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study explored whether visual information improves speech identification in typically developing children with normal hearing when the auditory signal is spectrally degraded. Method: Children (n = 69) and adults (n = 15) were presented with noise-vocoded sentences from the Children's Co-ordinate Response Measure (Rosen, 2011) in…

  18. Emissions Trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdman, Edwin; Backhaus, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Emissions trading is a market-based instrument to achieve environmental targets in a cost-effective way by allowing legal entities to buy and sell emission rights. The current international dissemination and intended linking of emissions trading schemes underlines the growing relevance of this

  19. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF EXCHANGE RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEŠA LOTRIČ DOLINAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using spectral analysis is very common in technical areas but rather unusual in economics and finance, where ARIMA and GARCH modeling are much more in use. To show that spectral analysis can be useful in determining hidden periodic components for high-frequency finance data as well, we use the example of foreign exchange rates

  20. Picosecond laser krypton plasma emission in water window spectral range.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Pavel; Vrbová, M.; Müller, M.; Mann, K.; Pánek, D.; Parkman, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 12 (2017), č. článku 123301. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15013 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.115, year: 2016 http://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.4998533

  1. Study of land surface temperature and spectral emissivity using multi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LST2) are found to have closer agreement with ground temperature measurements (ground LST) over waterbody, Dalma forest and Simlipal forest, than that derived from ASTER data (TES with. AST 13). However, over agriculture land, there is some uncertainty and difference between the measured and the estimated LSTs ...

  2. Spectral Evolution of Synchrotron and Inverse Compton Emission in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the 0.5–10 keV fluxes for the IC component, and Fig. 2(c) the synchrotron and. IC 0.5–10 keV fluxes are plotted against the total (i.e., synchrotron plus IC) 0.5–10. keV fluxes, respectively. The results can be summarized as follows. The synchrotron spectra appear to harden with larger synchrotron fluxes, whereas the IC ...

  3. Spectral interferences in atomic absorption spectrometry, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daidoji, Hidehiro

    1979-01-01

    Spectral interferences were observed in trace element analysis of concentrated solutions by atomic absorption spectrometry. Molecular absorption and emission spectra for strontium chloride and nitrate, barium chloride and nitrate containing 12 mg/ml of metal ion in airacetylene flame were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 700 nm. The absorption and emission spectra of SrO were centered near 364.6 nm. The absorption spectra of SrOH around 606.0, 671.0 and 682.0 nm were very strong. And, emission spectrum of BaOH in the wavelength range from 480 to 550 nm was stronger. But, the absorption of this band spectrum was very weak. In the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm, some unknown bands of absorption were observed for strontium and barium. Absorption spectra of SrCl and BaCl were observed in the argon-hydrogen flame. Also, in the carbon tube atomizer, the absorption spectra of SrCl and BaCl were detected clearly in the wavelength range from 185 to 400 nm. (author)

  4. Intersection numbers of spectral curves

    CERN Document Server

    Eynard, B

    2011-01-01

    We compute the symplectic invariants of an arbitrary spectral curve with only 1 branchpoint in terms of integrals of characteristic classes in the moduli space of curves. Our formula associates to any spectral curve, a characteristic class, which is determined by the laplace transform of the spectral curve. This is a hint to the key role of Laplace transform in mirror symmetry. When the spectral curve is y=\\sqrt{x}, the formula gives Kontsevich--Witten intersection numbers, when the spectral curve is chosen to be the Lambert function \\exp{x}=y\\exp{-y}, the formula gives the ELSV formula for Hurwitz numbers, and when one chooses the mirror of C^3 with framing f, i.e. \\exp{-x}=\\exp{-yf}(1-\\exp{-y}), the formula gives the topological vertex formula, i.e. the generating function of Gromov-Witten invariants of C^3. In some sense this formula generalizes ELSV formula, and Mumford formula.

  5. Spectral imagery collection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Joao M.; Rosario, Dalton; Farley, Vincent; Sohr, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is a collaborative effort between the US Army ARDEC and ARL for the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The objective of the program is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities over the course of 1 to 2 years to capture sensor performance over a wide variety of adverse weather conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Using the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors will autonomously collect the desired data around the clock at different ranges where surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets are positioned at different viewing perspectives at 549 and 1280m from the sensor location. The collected database will allow for: 1) Understand of signature variability under the different weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of hyperspectral and polarimetric technologies; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will present the SPICE data collection objectives, the ongoing effort, the sensors that are currently deployed, and how this work will assist researches on the development and evaluation of sensors, algorithms, and fusion applications.

  6. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  7. Comparison of spectrum normalization techniques for univariate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-02-29

    Feb 29, 2016 ... their three-point smoothing methods were studied using LIBS for quantification of Cr, Mn and Ni in stainless steel. Optimization of the number of laser shots per spectrum was carried out to obtain the best analytical results. Internal normalization technique model was used for selecting the best emission lines ...

  8. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  9. Far-red to near infrared emission and scattering spectroscopy for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang

    2001-06-01

    The thesis investigates the far-red and near infrared (NIR) spectral region from biomedical tissue samples for monitoring the state of tissues. The NIR emission wing intensity is weak in comparison to the emission in the visible spectral region. The wing emission from biomedical samples has revealed meaningful information about the state of the tissues. A model is presented to explain the shape of the spectral wing based on a continuum of energy levels. The wing can be used to classify different kinds of tissues; especially it can be used to differentiate cancer part from normal human breast tissues. The research work of the far-red emission from thermal damaged tissue samples shows that the emission intensity in this spectral region is proportional to the extent of the thermal damage of the tissue. Near infrared spectral absorption method is used to investigate blood hemodynamics (perfusion and oxygenation) in brain during sleep-wake transition. The result of the research demonstrates that the continuous wave (CW) type near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device can be used to investigate brain blood perfusion and oxygenation with a similar precision with frequency domain (FD) type device. The human subject sleep and wake transition, has been monitored by CW type NIRS instrument with traditional electroencephalograph (EEG) method. Parallel change in oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb is a discrete event that occurs in the transition from both sleep to wakefulness and wakefulness to sleep. These hemodynamic switches are generally about few seconds delayed from the human decided transition point between sleep and wake on the polygraph EEG recording paper. The combination of NIRS and EEG methods monitor the brain activity, gives more information about the brain activity. The sleep apnea investigation was associated with recurrent apneas, insufficient nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and the different response of the peripheral and central compartments to breathing

  10. Emission inventory; Inventaire des emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontelle, J.P. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    Statistics on air pollutant (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and ammonium) emissions, acid equivalent emissions and their evolution since 1990 in the various countries of Europe and the USA, are presented. Emission data from the industrial, agricultural, transportation and power sectors are given, and comparisons are carried out between countries based on Gnp and population, pollution import/export fluxes and compliance to the previous emission reduction objectives

  11. Spectral similarity approach for mapping turbidity of an inland waterbody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vaibhav; Senthil Kumar, A.; Aggarwal, S. P.; Kumar, Vinay; Dhote, Pankaj R.; Thakur, Praveen K.; Nikam, Bhaskar R.; Sambare, Rohit S.; Siddiqui, Asfa; Muduli, Pradipta R.; Rastogi, Gurdeep

    2017-07-01

    Turbidity is an important quality parameter of water from its optical property point of view. It varies spatio-temporally over large waterbodies and its well distributed measurement on field is tedious and time consuming. Generally, normalized difference turbidity index (NDTI), or band ratio, or regression analysis between turbidity concentration and band reflectance, approaches have been adapted to retrieve turbidity using multispectral remote sensing data. These techniques usually provide qualitative rather than quantitative estimates of turbidity. However, in the present study, spectral similarity analysis, between the spectral characteristics of spaceborne hyperspectral remote sensing data and spectral library generated on field, was carried out to quantify turbidity in the part of Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. Spatial spectral contextual image analysis, spectral angle mapper (SAM) technique was evaluated for the same. The SAM spectral matching technique has been widely used in geological application (mineral mapping), however, the application of this kind of techniques is limited in water quality studies due to non-availability of reference spectral libraries. A spectral library was generated on field for the different concentrations of turbidity using well calibrated instruments like field spectro-radiometer, turbidity meter and hand held global positioning system. The field spectra were classified into 7 classes of turbidity concentration as 100 NTU for analysis. Analysis reveal that at each location in the lake under consideration, the field spectra matched with the image spectra with SAM score of 0.8 and more. The observed turbidity at each location was also very much falling in the estimated turbidity class range. It was observed that the spectral similarity approach provides more quantitative estimate of turbidity as compared to NDTI.

  12. Reduction of Spectral Interferences in Flame Emission Spectrometry by Selective Spectral-Line Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-18

    Front-surface aluminum; M, diameter - 2.5 cm, N 2 diameter - 5.1 cm (Melles Griot , Irvine, CA) Lenses L1 diameter - 4.5 cm, F.L. = 30 cm L2 diameter...2.5 ci-, F.L. 7 .5 cm Lens material Suprasil I (Melles Griot . Irvine, CA) Beam Attenuator NRC (Fountain Valley, CA) 50600 AV.1 variable circular

  13. Emission polarization study on quartz and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the spectral emission polarization of quartz and calcite polished plates for observation angles of 20 and 70 deg by the substitution of complex index of refraction values for each mineral into Fresnel's equations. The emission polarization is shown to be quite wavelength-dependent, demonstrating that selected narrow or medium-width spectral bands exhibit a significantly higher percentage of polarization than a broad spectral band for these two minerals. Field measurements with a broadband infrared radiometer yield polarizations on the order of 2% for a coarse-grained granite rock and beach sand (both quartz-rich). This implies that a more sensitive detector with a selected medium-width filter may be capable of measuring emission polarization accurately enough to make this parameter useful as a remote sensing tool for discrimination among rocks on the basis of texture.

  14. Spectral modeling of laser-produced underdense titanium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Back, Christina A.; Scott, Howard A.; Constantin, Carmen; Lee, Richard W.

    2004-11-01

    Experiments were performed at the NIKE laser to create underdense low-Z plasmas with a small amount of high-Z dopant in order to study non-LTE population kinetics. An absolutely calibrated spectra in 470-3000 eV was measured in time-resolved and time-averaged fashion from SiO2 aerogel target with 3% Ti dopant. K-shell Ti emission was observed as well as L-shell Ti emission. Time-resolved emission show that lower energy photons peak later than higher energy photons due to plasma cooling. In this work, we compare the measured spectra with non-LTE spectral calculations of titanium emission at relatively low temperatures distributions dominated by L-shell ions will be discussed.

  15. IR spectral analysis for the diagnostics of crust earthquake precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Umarkhodgaev

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Some possible physical processes are analysed that cause, under the condition of additional ionisation in a pre-breakdown electric field, emissions in the infrared (IR interval. The atmospheric transparency region of the IR spectrum at wavelengths of 7–15 μm is taken into account. This transparency region corresponds to spectral lines of small atmospheric constituents like CH4, CO2, N2O, NO2, NO, and O3. The possible intensities of the IR emissions observable in laboratories and in nature are estimated. The acceleration process of the electrons in the pre-breakdown electrical field before its adhesion to the molecules is analyzed. For daytime conditions, modifications of the adsorption spectra of the scattered solar emissions are studied; for nighttime, variations of emission spectra may be used for the analysis.

  16. Spectral evolution of Nova V400 Per (1974) and Nova V373 Sct (1975)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosino, L.

    1978-01-01

    Photographic and spectroscopic observations of the two galactic novae, V400 Per and V373 Sct, which appeared in 1974 and 1975, have been carried out at Asiago. The light curves of the two novae were characterized by the presence of brightness oscillations during the early decline. The spectral evolution was quite normal: the spectra showed at first, over a relatively strong continuum, wide emission bands of moderate excitation, accompanied by blueshifted absorptions, with radial velocities of - 1760 kms -1 (Nova Per) and - 1260 kms -1 (Nova Sct). Later, after the novae entered the nebular stage, the continuum weakened, the absorption disappeared and the novae displayed the usual emission spectrum, with permitted and forbidden lines of high excitation ([O III], N III, He I, He II). Forbidden lines of Fe VI and Fe VII - and in Nova Sct, also Fe X and A X - were present for a time, but they soon disappeared, so that at the end the spectrum was dominated by the [O III] nebular lines, even stronger than Hα. (Auth.)

  17. Blood velocity estimation using ultrasound and spectral iterative adaptive approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes two novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation techniques for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The techniques make no assumption on the sampling pattern of the emissions or the depth samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B......-mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the techniques are shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations as well as in vivo data, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30......% of the transmissions, thereby allowing for the examination of two separate vessel regions while retaining an adequate updating rate of the B-mode images. In addition, the proposed methods also allow for more flexible transmission patterns, as well as exhibit fewer spectral artifacts as compared to earlier techniques....

  18. Word Recognition for Temporally and Spectrally Distorted Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Sherri L.; Pichora-Fuller, Margaret Kathleen; Wilson, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    their susceptibility to changes in speech level and distortion types. The results across groups and listening conditions were compared to assess the extent to which the effects of the distortions on word recognition resembled the effects of age-related differences in auditory processing or pure-tone hearing loss......Objectives: The purpose of Experiment 1 was to measure word recognition in younger adults with normal hearing when speech or babble was temporally or spectrally distorted. In Experiment 2, older listeners with near-normal hearing and with hearing loss (for pure tones) were tested to evaluate....... Design: In Experiment 1, word recognition was measured in 16 younger adults with normal hearing using Northwestern University Auditory Test No. 6 words in quiet and the Words-in-Noise test distorted by temporal jittering, spectral smearing, or combined jittering and smearing. Another 16 younger adults...

  19. Continuum emission from irradiated solid deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forrest, J.A.; Brooks, R.L.; Hunt, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new emission feature from the spectrum of irradiated solid deuterium has been observed in the very near-infrared spectral region. Experiments from three laboratories, using different excitation conditions, have confirmed the observation. Comparison of the timing and temperature dependence...... of the spectral feature to the information previously available from electron spin resonance studies of solid deuterium, points to atomic association as the underlying cause. We shall show the connection of this emission to the occurrence of thermal spikes and optical flashes, previously observed in solid...

  20. Spectral intensities in trivalent lanthanide systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, Roberto [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Mayor, Avenida Manuel Montt 367, Postal code 7500994, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: roberto.acevedo@umayor.cl; Soto-Bubert, Andres; Bosch, Paul [Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejercito 441, Casilla 298-V, Santiago (Chile); Strek, Wieslaw [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Okoelna 2, 50-422 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2008-08-11

    The main goal of this research work is to rationalize the rich vibronic structure of lanthanide type crystals, such as Cs{sub 2}NaDyCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}NaHoCl{sub 6}, in the space group Fm3m(O{sub h}{sup 5}). These systems are known to be highly relativistic and as a consequence, major corrections to previous model calculations should be taken into account so as to explain from a semi-quantitative viewpoint, the observed spectral intensities. We have decided to tackle this study taking special care, of both the physics and the chemistry involved with special emphasis on the theoretical model to be employed as well as, in the strategy to be followed to rationalize the available experimental data. This paper aims to advance our understanding of the intensity mechanisms, associated with observed radiative transitions, say for complex highly relativistic systems, in the solid state physics. The spectral intensities associated with superpositions (juxtapositions) of peaks and/or bands in the absortion and emission spectra are considered in detail and a preliminary working methodology is put forward with reference to the Cs{sub 2}NaDyCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}NaHoCl{sub 6} crystals.

  1. The spectral changes of deforestation in the Brazilian tropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trancoso, Ralph; Sano, Edson E; Meneses, Paulo R

    2015-01-01

    The Cerrado is a biome in Brazil that is experiencing the most rapid loss in natural vegetation. The objective of this study was to analyze the changes in the spectral response in the red, near infrared (NIR), middle infrared (MIR), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) when native vegetation in the Cerrado is deforested. The test sites were regions of the Cerrado located in the states of Bahia, Minas Gerais, and Mato Grosso. For each region, a pair of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) scenes from 2008 (before deforestation) and 2009 (after deforestation) was compared. A set of 1,380 samples of deforested polygons and an equal number of samples of native vegetation have their spectral properties statistically analyzed. The accuracy of deforestation detections was also evaluated using high spatial resolution imagery. Results showed that the spectral data of deforested areas and their corresponding native vegetation were statistically different. The red band showed the highest difference between the reflectance data from deforested areas and native vegetation, while the NIR band showed the lowest difference. A consistent pattern of spectral change when native vegetation in the Cerrado is deforested was identified regardless of the location in the biome. The overall accuracy of deforestation detections was 97.75%. Considering both the marked pattern of spectral changes and the high deforestation detection accuracy, this study suggests that deforestation in Cerrado can be accurately monitored, but a strong seasonal and spatial variability of spectral changes might be expected.

  2. SCORPIO - II. Spectral indices of weak Galactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Leto, P.; Ingallinera, A.; Buemi, C. S.; Marvil, J.; Agliozzo, C.; Bufano, F.; Cerrigone, L.; Riggi, S.

    2018-01-01

    In the next few years the classification of radio sources observed by the large surveys will be a challenging problem and spectral index is a powerful tool for addressing it. Here we present an algorithm to estimate the spectral index of sources from multiwavelength radio images. We have applied our algorithm to SCORPIO, a Galactic plane survey centred around 2.1 GHz carried out with Australian Telescope Compact Array and found we can measure reliable spectral indices only for sources stronger than 40 times the rms noise. Above a threshold of 1 mJy, the source density in SCORPIO is 20 per cent greater than in a typical extragalactic field, like Australia Telescope Large Area Survey because of the presence of Galactic sources. Among this excess population, 16 sources per square degree have a spectral index of about zero suggesting optically thin thermal emission such as H II regions and planetary nebulae, while 12 per square degree present a rising spectrum, suggesting optically thick thermal emission such as stars and UCH II regions.

  3. Crosstalk-free multicolor RICS using spectral weighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpf, Waldemar; Lemmens, Veerle; Smisdom, Nick; Ameloot, Marcel; Lamb, Don C; Hendrix, Jelle

    2018-02-21

    Raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (ccRICS) can be used to quantify the interaction affinities between diffusing molecules by analyzing the fluctuations between two-color confocal images. Spectral crosstalk compromises the quantitative analysis of ccRICS experiments, limiting multicolor implementations to dyes with well-separated emission spectra. Here, we remove this restriction by introducing raster spectral image correlation spectroscopy (RSICS), which employs statistical filtering based on spectral information to quantitatively separate signals of fluorophores during spatial correlation analysis. We investigate the performance of RSICS by testing how different levels of spectral overlap or different relative signal intensities affect the correlation function and analyze the influence of statistical filter quality. We apply RSICS in vitro to resolve dyes with very similar emission spectra, and carry out RSICS in live cells to simultaneously analyze the diffusion of molecules carrying three different fluorescent protein labels (eGFP, Venus and mCherry). Finally, we successfully apply statistical weighting to data that was recorded with only a single detection channel per fluorophore, highlighting the general applicability of this method to data acquired with any type of multicolor detection. In conclusion, RSICS enables artifact-free quantitative analysis of concentrations, mobility and interactions of multiple species labeled with different fluorophores. It can be performed on commercial laser scanning microscopes, and the algorithm can be easily extended to other image correlation methods. Thus, RSICS opens the door to quantitative multicolor fluctuation analyses of complex (bio-) molecular systems. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Spectral Unmixing With Multiple Dictionaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy E.; Gillis, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Spectral unmixing aims at recovering the spectral signatures of materials, called endmembers, mixed in a hyperspectral or multispectral image, along with their abundances. A typical assumption is that the image contains one pure pixel per endmember, in which case spectral unmixing reduces to identifying these pixels. Many fully automated methods have been proposed in recent years, but little work has been done to allow users to select areas where pure pixels are present manually or using a segmentation algorithm. Additionally, in a non-blind approach, several spectral libraries may be available rather than a single one, with a fixed number (or an upper or lower bound) of endmembers to chose from each. In this paper, we propose a multiple-dictionary constrained low-rank matrix approximation model that address these two problems. We propose an algorithm to compute this model, dubbed M2PALS, and its performance is discussed on both synthetic and real hyperspectral images.

  5. Special topics in spectral distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    We discuss two problems which relate to the foundations of the subject, and a third about asymptotic properties of spectral distributions. We give also a brief list of topics which should be further explored

  6. Substitution dynamical systems spectral analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Queffélec, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This volume mainly deals with the dynamics of finitely valued sequences, and more specifically, of sequences generated by substitutions and automata. Those sequences demonstrate fairly simple combinatorical and arithmetical properties and naturally appear in various domains. As the title suggests, the aim of the initial version of this book was the spectral study of the associated dynamical systems: the first chapters consisted in a detailed introduction to the mathematical notions involved, and the description of the spectral invariants followed in the closing chapters. This approach, combined with new material added to the new edition, results in a nearly self-contained book on the subject. New tools - which have also proven helpful in other contexts - had to be developed for this study. Moreover, its findings can be concretely applied, the method providing an algorithm to exhibit the spectral measures and the spectral multiplicity, as is demonstrated in several examples. Beyond this advanced analysis, many...

  7. Antepartum Fetal Monitoring and Spectral Analysis of Preterm Birth Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Păsăricără, Alexandru; Nemescu, Dragoş; Arotăriţei, Dragoş; Rotariu, Cristian

    2017-11-01

    The monitoring and analysis of antepartum fetal and maternal recordings is a research area of notable interest due to the relatively high value of preterm birth. The interest stems from the improvement of devices used for monitoring. The current paper presents the spectral analysis of antepartum heart rate recordings conducted during a study in Romania at the Cuza Voda Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinical Hospital from Iasi between 2010 and 2014. The study focuses on normal and preterm birth risk subjects in order to determine differences between these two types or recordings in terms of spectral analysis.

  8. Quantitative Spectral Radiance Measurements in the HYMETS Arc Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Hires, Drew V.; Johansen, Craig T.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jones, Stephen B.; Gragg, Jeffrey G.; Splinter, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Calibrated spectral radiance measurements of gaseous emission spectra have been obtained from the HYMETS (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) 400 kW arc-heated wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A fiber-optic coupled spectrometer collected natural luminosity from the flow. Spectral radiance measurements are reported between 340 and 1000 nm. Both Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) samples were placed in the flow. Test gases studied included a mostly-N2 atmosphere (95% nitrogen, 5% argon), a simulated Earth Air atmosphere (75% nitrogen, 20% oxygen, 5% argon) and a simulated Martian atmosphere (71% carbon dioxide, 24% nitrogen, 5% argon). The bulk enthalpy of the flow was varied as was the location of the measurement. For the intermediate flow enthalpy tested (20 MJ/kg), emission from the Mars simulant gas was about 10 times higher than the Air flow and 15 times higher than the mostly-N2 atmosphere. Shock standoff distances were estimated from the spectral radiance measurements. Within-run, run-to-run and day-to-day repeatability of the emission were studied, with significant variations (15-100%) noted.

  9. Spectral Analysis of Ultraviolet Clutter Sources to Improve Probability of Detection in Helicopter UV Missile Warning Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forney, Bryan J

    2008-01-01

    ...) emissions of the three UV sources. The collected data were analyzed to identify common spectral characteristics of all clutter sources that may allow for improved clutter rejection by current and future MWS...

  10. Spectral dimensionality reduction for HMMs

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Dean P.; Rodu, Jordan; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2012-01-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) can be accurately approximated using co-occurrence frequencies of pairs and triples of observations by using a fast spectral method in contrast to the usual slow methods like EM or Gibbs sampling. We provide a new spectral method which significantly reduces the number of model parameters that need to be estimated, and generates a sample complexity that does not depend on the size of the observation vocabulary. We present an elementary proof giving bounds on the rel...

  11. Compressive spectroscopy by spectral modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Isaac; Stern, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    We review two compressive spectroscopy techniques based on modulation in the spectral domain that we have recently proposed. Both techniques achieve a compression ratio of approximately 10:1, however each with a different sensing mechanism. The first technique uses a liquid crystal cell as a tunable filter to modulate the spectral signal, and the second technique uses a Fabry-Perot etalon as a resonator. We overview the specific properties of each of the techniques.

  12. Spectral unmixing: estimating partial abundances

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available the ingredients for this chocolate cake? Debba (CSIR) Spectral Unmixing LQM 2009 3 / 22 Background and Research Question Ingredients Quantity unsweetened chocolate unsweetened cocoa powder boiling water flour baking powder baking soda salt unsalted... butter white sugar eggs pure vanilla extract milk Table: Chocolate cake ingredients Debba (CSIR) Spectral Unmixing LQM 2009 4 / 22 Background and Research Question Ingredients Quantity unsweetened chocolate 120 grams unsweetened cocoa powder 28...

  13. Change Detection Analysis With Spectral Thermal Imagery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behrens, Richard

    1998-01-01

    ... (LWIR) region. This study used analysis techniques of differencing, histograms, and principal components analysis to detect spectral changes and investigate the utility of spectral change detection...

  14. Effects of Surface Roughness, Oxidation, and Temperature on the Emissivity of Reactor Pressure Vessel Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J. L. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Jo, H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Tirawat, R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power Group, Golden, Colorado; Blomstrand, K. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Sridharan, K. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin

    2017-08-31

    Thermal radiation will be an important mode of heat transfer in future high-temperature reactors and in off-normal high-temperature scenarios in present reactors. In this work, spectral directional emissivities of two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) candidate materials were measured at room temperature after exposure to high-temperature air. In the case of SA508 steel, significant increases in emissivity were observed due to oxidation. In the case of Grade 91 steel, only very small increases were observed under the tested conditions. Effects of roughness were also investigated. To study the effects of roughening, unexposed samples of SA508 and Grade 91 steel were roughened via one of either grinding or shot-peening before being measured. Significant increases were observed only in samples having roughness exceeding the roughness expected of RPV surfaces. While the emissivity increases for SA508 from oxidation were indeed significant, the measured emissivity coefficients were below that of values commonly used in heat transfer models. Based on the observed experimental data, recommendations for emissivity inputs for heat transfer simulations are provided.

  15. SU-F-J-46: Feasibility of Cerenkov Emission for Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oraiqat, I; Rehemtulla, A; Lam, K; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Clarke, R [University of Michigan, Physics Department, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission (CE) is a promising tool for online tumor microenvironment interrogation and targeting during radiotherapy. In this work, we utilize CE generated during radiotherapy as a broadband excitation source for real-time absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of CE spectroscopy using a controlled experiment of materials with known emission/absorption properties. Methods: A water tank is irradiated with 20 MeV electron beam to induce Cerenkov emission. Food coloring dyes (Yellow #5, Red #40, and Blue #1), which have known emission/absorption properties were added to the water tank with increasing concentration (1 drop (0.05 mL), 2 drops, and 4 drops from a dispenser bottle). The signal is collected using a condensing lens which is coupled into a 20m optical fiber that is fed into a spectrometer that measures the emitted spectra. The resulting spectra from water/food coloring dye solutions were normalized by the reference spectrum, which is the Cerenkov spectrum of pure water, correcting for both the nonlinearity of the broadband Cerenkov emission spectrum as well as the non-uniform spectral response of the spectrometer. The emitted spectra were then converted into absorbance and their characteristics were analyzed. Results: The food coloring dye had a drastic change on the Cerenkov emission, shifting its wavelength according to its visible color. The collected spectra showed various absorbance peaks which agrees with tabulated peak positions of the dyes added within 0.3% for yellow, 1.7% for red, and 0.16% for blue. The CE peak heights proportionally increased as the dye concentration is increased. Conclusion: This work shows the potential for real-time functional spectroscopy using Cerenkov emission during radiotherapy. It was demonstrated that molecule identification as well as relative concentration can be extracted from the Cerenkov emission color shift.

  16. Photon-Emission From Peeling Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, J. T.

    1988-04-01

    When materials are deformed and fractured, new surfaces are formed which may contain charge concentrations, defects, and broken bonds. The consequences of such departures from non-equilibrium can be the emission of particles (electrons, ions, and neutral species) as well as photons (triboluminescence). Collectively, we refer to these emissions as fracto-emission. In the case of peeling pressure sensitive adhesives from various substrates, charge separation plays a dominant role in producing relatively intense photon-emission as well as other emissions. Here we report on a few of the properties of the photon emission from peeling commercial adhesive tapes and address in particular the time, spectral, and spatial domains.

  17. Corners of normal matrices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structure of general normal matrices is far more complicated than that of two special kinds — hermitian and unitary. There are many interesting theorems for hermitian and unitary matrices whose extensions to arbitrary normal matrices have proved to be extremely recalcitrant (see e.g., [1]). The problem whose study we ...

  18. Normalized medical information visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Somolinos, Roberto; Castro, Antonio; Velázquez, Iker; Moreno, Oscar; García-Pacheco, José L; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H

    2015-01-01

    A new mark-up programming language is introduced in order to facilitate and improve the visualization of ISO/EN 13606 dual model-based normalized medical information. This is the first time that visualization of normalized medical information is addressed and the programming language is intended to be used by medical non-IT professionals.

  19. Baby Poop: What's Normal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I'm breast-feeding my newborn and her bowel movements are yellow and mushy. Is this normal for baby poop? Answers from Jay L. Hoecker, M.D. Yellow, mushy bowel movements are perfectly normal for breast-fed babies. Still, ...

  20. The Binary Neutron Star Event LIGO/Virgo GW170817 160 Days after Merger: Synchrotron Emission across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margutti, R.; Alexander, K. D.; Xie, X.; Sironi, L.; Metzger, B. D.; Kathirgamaraju, A.; Fong, W.; Blanchard, P. K.; Berger, E.; MacFadyen, A.; Giannios, D.; Guidorzi, C.; Hajela, A.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Eftekhari, T.; Nicholl, M.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.; Zrake, J.

    2018-03-01

    We report deep Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Karl J. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the binary neutron star event GW170817 at t spectrum extending for eight orders of magnitude in frequency enables the most precise measurement of the index p of the distribution of non-thermal relativistic electrons N(γ )\\propto {γ }-p accelerated by a shock launched by a neutron star (NS)–NS merger to date. We find p = 2.17 ± 0.01, which indicates that radiation from ejecta with Γ ∼ 3–10 dominates the observed emission. While constraining the nature of the emission process, these observations do not constrain the nature of the relativistic ejecta. We employ simulations of explosive outflows launched in NS ejecta clouds to show that the spectral and temporal evolution of the non-thermal emission from GW170817 is consistent with both emission from radially stratified quasi-spherical ejecta traveling at mildly relativistic speeds, and emission from off-axis collimated ejecta characterized by a narrow cone of ultra-relativistic material with slower wings extending to larger angles. In the latter scenario, GW170817 harbored a normal short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) directed away from our line of sight. Observations at t ≤ 200 days are unlikely to settle the debate, as in both scenarios the observed emission is effectively dominated by radiation from mildly relativistic material.

  1. HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGE RESOLUTION ENHANCEMENT BASED ON SPECTRAL UNMIXING AND INFORMATION FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bieniarz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging sensors exibit high spectral resolution, but normally low spatial resolution. This leads to spectral signatures of pixels originating from different object types. Such pixels are called mixed pixels. Spectral unmixing methods can be employed to estimate the fractions of reflected light from the different objects within the pixel area. However, spectral unmixing does not provide any spatial information about the sources and therefore additional information is needed to precisely locate the sources. In order to restore the spatial information of hyperspectral images we propose a hyperspectral and multispectral image fusion method based on spectral unmixing. The algorithm is tested with HyMAP image data consisting of 125 spectral bands and a simulated multispectral image consisting of 8 bands.

  2. Making nuclear 'normal'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haehlen, Peter; Elmiger, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    The mechanics of the Swiss NPPs' 'come and see' programme 1995-1999 were illustrated in our contributions to all PIME workshops since 1996. Now, after four annual 'waves', all the country has been covered by the NPPs' invitation to dialogue. This makes PIME 2000 the right time to shed some light on one particular objective of this initiative: making nuclear 'normal'. The principal aim of the 'come and see' programme, namely to give the Swiss NPPs 'a voice of their own' by the end of the nuclear moratorium 1990-2000, has clearly been attained and was commented on during earlier PIMEs. It is, however, equally important that Swiss nuclear energy not only made progress in terms of public 'presence', but also in terms of being perceived as a normal part of industry, as a normal branch of the economy. The message that Swiss nuclear energy is nothing but a normal business involving normal people, was stressed by several components of the multi-prong campaign: - The speakers in the TV ads were real - 'normal' - visitors' guides and not actors; - The testimonials in the print ads were all real NPP visitors - 'normal' people - and not models; - The mailings inviting a very large number of associations to 'come and see' activated a typical channel of 'normal' Swiss social life; - Spending money on ads (a new activity for Swiss NPPs) appears to have resulted in being perceived by the media as a normal branch of the economy. Today we feel that the 'normality' message has well been received by the media. In the controversy dealing with antinuclear arguments brought forward by environmental organisations journalists nowadays as a rule give nuclear energy a voice - a normal right to be heard. As in a 'normal' controversy, the media again actively ask themselves questions about specific antinuclear claims, much more than before 1990 when the moratorium started. The result is that in many cases such arguments are discarded by journalists, because they are, e.g., found to be

  3. How to Collect National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Traceable Fluorescence Excitation and Emission Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Adam Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary spectrofluorimeters comprise exciting light sources, excitation and emission monochromators, and detectors that without correction yield data not conforming to an ideal spectral response. The correction of the spectral properties of the exciting and emission light paths first requires calibration of the wavelength and spectral accuracy. The exciting beam path can be corrected up to the sample position using a spectrally corrected reference detection system. The corrected reference response accounts for both the spectral intensity and drift of the exciting light source relative to emission and/or transmission detector responses. The emission detection path must also be corrected for the combined spectral bias of the sample compartment optics, emission monochromator, and detector. There are several crucial issues associated with both excitation and emission correction including the requirement to account for spectral band-pass and resolution, optical band-pass or neutral density filters, and the position and direction of polarizing elements in the light paths. In addition, secondary correction factors are described including (1) subtraction of the solvent's fluorescence background, (2) removal of Rayleigh and Raman scattering lines, as well as (3) correcting for sample concentration-dependent inner-filter effects. The importance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable calibration and correction protocols is explained in light of valid intra- and interlaboratory studies and effective spectral qualitative and quantitative analyses including multivariate spectral modeling.

  4. Multiband fluorescence spectral properties of QMOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomin, V. I.; Jaworski, R.

    2011-02-01

    The spectral characteristics of the 1-methyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-4(1 H)-quinolone (QMOM) dye with dual fluorescence in acetonitrile were studied under selective excitation in a wide temperature range. This dye is a structural analog of 3-hydroxyflavone and exhibits excited-state proton transfer, which forms a fluorescent tautomeric form, while the solution is characterized by dual fluorescence. The thermal behavior of the relative band intensities revealed the kinetic character of the proton transfer. The third form showed itself as a maximum between the bands of the normal and tautomeric forms upon excitation in several regions of the absorption spectrum and became dominant in solution at 60-80°C. The characteristics of the third form were studied. Additional experiments showed that this was possibly the anionic form of the dye.

  5. Spectral filtering for plant production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, R.E.; McMahon, M.J.; Rajapakse, N.C.; Becoteau, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Research to date suggests that spectral filtering can be an effective alternative to chemical growth regulators for altering plant development. If properly implemented, it can be nonchemical and environmentally friendly. The aqueous CuSO{sub 4}, and CuCl{sub 2} solutions in channelled plastic panels have been shown to be effective filters, but they can be highly toxic if the solutions contact plants. Some studies suggest that spectral filtration limited to short EOD intervals can also alter plant development. Future research should be directed toward confirmation of the influence of spectral filters and exposure times on a broader range of plant species and cultivars. Efforts should also be made to identify non-noxious alternatives to aqueous copper solutions and/or to incorporate these chemicals permanently into plastic films and panels that can be used in greenhouse construction. It would also be informative to study the impacts of spectral filters on insect and microbal populations in plant growth facilities. The economic impacts of spectral filtering techniques should be assessed for each delivery methodology.

  6. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  7. Induced spectral gap and pairing correlations from superconducting proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Cole, William S.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically consider superconducting proximity effect, using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) theory, in heterostructure sandwich-type geometries involving a normal s -wave superconductor and a nonsuperconducting material with the proximity effect being driven by Cooper pairs tunneling from the superconducting slab to the nonsuperconducting slab. Applications of the superconducting proximity effect may rely on an induced spectral gap or induced pairing correlations without any spectral gap. We clarify that in a nonsuperconducting material the induced spectral gap and pairing correlations are independent physical quantities arising from the proximity effect. This is a crucial issue in proposals to create topological superconductivity through the proximity effect. Heterostructures of three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) slabs on conventional s -wave superconductor (SC) substrates provide a platform, with proximity-induced topological superconductivity expected to be observed on the "naked" top surface of a thin TI slab. We theoretically study the induced superconducting gap on this naked surface. In addition, we compare against the induced spectral gap in heterostructures of SC with a normal metal or a semiconductor with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman splitting potential (another promising platform for topological superconductivity). We find that for any model for the non-SC metal (including metallic TI) the induced spectral gap on the naked surface decays as L-3 as the thickness (L ) of the non-SC slab is increased in contrast to the slower 1 /L decay of the pairing correlations. Our distinction between proximity-induced spectral gap (with its faster spatial decay) and pairing correlation (with its slower spatial decay) has important implications for the currently active search for topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in various superconducting heterostructures.

  8. The Spectral Index and Beaming Effect for Radio Sources J. Pan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to the spectral index of our previous studies (Fan et al. 2010), namely αt = [R/(1 +. R)]αj + [1/(1 + R)]αunb, here αj, αunb and αt indicate respectively the spectral indexes for the beamed, the unbeamed components, and the total emission. In this paper, we will use a larger sample to revisit this correlation. 2. Data analysis and ...

  9. EVIDENCE OF SPREADING LAYER EMISSION IN A THERMONUCLEAR SUPERBURST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koljonen, K. I. I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, P.O. Box 129188, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kajava, J. J. E.; Kuulkers, E., E-mail: karri.koljonen@nyu.edu [European Space Astronomy Centre (ESA/ESAC), Science Operations Department, E-28691, Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-01

    When a neutron star (NS) accretes matter from a companion star in a low-mass X-ray binary, the accreted gas settles onto the stellar surface through a boundary/spreading layer. On rare occasions the accumulated gas undergoes a powerful thermonuclear superburst powered by carbon burning deep below the NS atmosphere. In this paper, we apply the non-negative matrix factorization spectral decomposition technique to show that the spectral variations during a superburst from 4U 1636–536 can be explained by two distinct components: (1) the superburst emission characterized by a variable temperature blackbody radiation component and (2) a quasi-Planckian component with a constant, ∼2.5 keV, temperature varying by a factor of ∼15 in flux. The spectrum of the quasi-Planckian component is identical in shape and characteristics to the frequency-resolved spectra observed in the accretion/persistent spectrum of NS low-mass X-ray binaries and agrees well with the predictions of the spreading layer model by Inogamov and Sunyaev. Our results provide yet more observational evidence that superbursts—and possibly also normal X-ray bursts—induce changes in the disc–star boundary.

  10. Source location of chorus emissions observed by Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of the Cluster mission is to study sources of various electromagnetic waves using the four satellites. This paper describes the methods we have applied to data recorded from the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. This spectral matrix is analysed to determine, for each satellite, the direction of the wave normal relative to the Earth’s magnetic field as a function of frequency and of time. Due to the Cluster orbit, chorus emissions are often observed close to perigee, and the data analysis determines the direction of these waves. Three events observed during different levels of magnetic activity are reported. It is shown that the component of the Poynting vector parallel to the magnetic field changes its sense when the satellites cross the magnetic equator, which indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from the equator. Detailed analysis indicates that the source is located in close vicinity of the plane of the geomagnetic equator.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms; Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities

  11. Spectral element simulation of ultrafiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Barker, Vincent A.; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A spectral element method for simulating stationary 2-D ultrafiltration is presented. The mathematical model is comprised of the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity field of the fluid and a transport equation for the concentration of the solute. In addition to the presence of the velocity...... vector in the transport equation, the system is coupled by the dependency of the fluid viscosity on the solute concentration and by a concentration-dependent boundary condition for the Navier-Stokes equations at the membrane surface. The spectral element discretization yields a nonlinear algebraic system....... The performance of the spectral element code when applied to several ultrafiltration problems is reported. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Spectrally Compatible Iterative Water Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Jan; Bogaert, Etienne Vanden; Bostoen, Tom; Zanier, Francesca; Luise, Marco; Cendrillon, Raphael; Moonen, Marc

    2006-12-01

    Until now static spectrum management has ensured that DSL lines in the same cable are spectrally compatible under worst-case crosstalk conditions. Recently dynamic spectrum management (DSM) has been proposed aiming at an increased capacity utilization by adaptation of the transmit spectra of DSL lines to the actual crosstalk interference. In this paper, a new DSM method for downstream ADSL is derived from the well-known iterative water-filling (IWF) algorithm. The amount of boosting of this new DSM method is limited, such that it is spectrally compatible with ADSL. Hence it is referred to as spectrally compatible iterative water filling (SC-IWF). This paper focuses on the performance gains of SC-IWF. This method is an autonomous DSM method (DSM level 1) and it will be investigated together with two other DSM level-1 algorithms, under various noise conditions, namely, iterative water-filling algorithm, and flat power back-off (flat PBO).

  13. Spectrally Compatible Iterative Water Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cendrillon Raphael

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now static spectrum management has ensured that DSL lines in the same cable are spectrally compatible under worst-case crosstalk conditions. Recently dynamic spectrum management (DSM has been proposed aiming at an increased capacity utilization by adaptation of the transmit spectra of DSL lines to the actual crosstalk interference. In this paper, a new DSM method for downstream ADSL is derived from the well-known iterative water-filling (IWF algorithm. The amount of boosting of this new DSM method is limited, such that it is spectrally compatible with ADSL. Hence it is referred to as spectrally compatible iterative water filling (SC-IWF. This paper focuses on the performance gains of SC-IWF. This method is an autonomous DSM method (DSM level 1 and it will be investigated together with two other DSM level-1 algorithms, under various noise conditions, namely, iterative water-filling algorithm, and flat power back-off (flat PBO.

  14. Children with autism spectrum disorder have reduced otoacoustic emissions at the 1 kHz mid-frequency region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetto, Loisa; Keith, Jessica M; Allen, Paul D; Luebke, Anne E

    2017-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a behaviorally diagnosed disorder of early onset characterized by impairment in social communication and restricted and repetitive behaviors. Some of the earliest signs of ASD involve auditory processing, and a recent study found that hearing thresholds in children with ASD in the mid-range frequencies were significantly related to receptive and expressive language measures. In addition, otoacoustic emissions have been used to detect reduced cochlear function in the presence of normal audiometric thresholds. We were interested then to know if otoacoustic emissions in children with normal audiometric thresholds would also reveal differences between children with ASD and typical developing (TD) controls in mid-frequency regions. Our objective was to specifically measure baseline afferent otoacoustic emissions (distortion-product otoacoustic emissions [DPOAEs]), transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TrOAEs), and efferent suppression, in 35 children with high-functioning ASD compared with 42 aged-matched TD controls. All participants were males 6-17 years old, with normal audiometry, and rigorously characterized via Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Children with ASD had greatly reduced DPOAE responses in the 1 kHz frequency range, yet had comparable DPOAE responses at 0.5 and 4-8 kHz regions. Furthermore, analysis of the spectral features of TrOAEs revealed significantly decreased emissions in ASD in similar frequencies. No significant differences were noted in DPOAE or TrOAE noise floors, middle ear muscle reflex activity, or efferent suppression between children with ASD and TD controls. In conclusion, attention to specific-frequency deficits using non-invasive measures of cochlear function may be important in auditory processing impairments found in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 337-345. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International

  15. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity. PMID:25379262

  16. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inner lining called the endometrium. Normal female reproductive system anatomy. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Type: Color, Medical Illustration Source: National Cancer Institute Creator: Terese Winslow (Illustrator) AV Number: CDR609921 Date Created: November 17, 2014 Date Added: ...

  17. Normal growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    A child's growth and development can be divided into four periods: Infancy Preschool years Middle childhood years Adolescence Soon after birth, an infant normally loses about 5% to 10% of their birth weight. By about age ...

  18. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrocephalus - occult; Hydrocephalus - idiopathic; Hydrocephalus - adult; Hydrocephalus - communicating; Dementia - hydrocephalus; NPH ... Ferri FF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. In: Ferri FF, ed. ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 648. Rosenberg GA. Brain edema and disorders ...

  19. Normal Functioning Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  20. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improves the chance of a good recovery. Without treatment, symptoms may worsen and cause death. What research is being done? The NINDS conducts and supports research on neurological disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus. Research on disorders such ...

  1. Coherence energies in pre-equilibrium emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rosa, A.; Inglima, C.; Perillo, E.; Rosato, E.; Sandoli, M.; Spadaccini, G.

    1979-01-01

    A method, based on the spectral density analysis, has been developped in order to evaluate coherence of statistical fluctuations. It is specially suitable for reactions showing the contemporary presence of different emission mechanism (e.g. preequilibrium and evaporation - like mechanism)

  2. Laboratory technique for quantitative thermal emissivity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This laboratory at the Department of Earth Sciences, IIT-Bombay is currently developing pure end mineral library of mineral particulates (> 65 m), and adding new end members to the existing ASU spectral library. The paper argues the need for considering Lunar Orbiter Thermal Emission Spectrometer (LOTES) for future ...

  3. Spectral scheme for spacetime physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seriu, Masafumi

    2002-01-01

    Based on the spectral representation of spatial geometry, we construct an analysis scheme for spacetime physics and cosmology, which enables us to compare two or more universes with each other. In this scheme the spectral distance plays a central role, which is the measure of closeness between two geometries defined in terms of the spectra. We apply this scheme for analyzing the averaging problem in cosmology; we explicitly investigate the time evolution of the spectra, distance between two nearby spatial geometries, simulating the relation between the real Universe and its model. We then formulate the criteria for a model to be a suitable one

  4. Spectral ellipsometry of nanodiamond composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yastrebov, S.G.; Ivanov-Omskij, V.I.; Gordeev, S.K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of spectral ellipsometry were applied for analysis of optical properties of nanodiamond based composite in spectral region 1.4-5 eV. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding of ultradispersed nanodiamond powder in the course of heterogeneous chemical reaction of decomposition of methane, forming pyrocarbon interconnecting nanodiamond grains. The energy of σ + π plasmon of pyrocarbon component of nanodiamond composite was restored which proves to be ∼ 24 eV; using this value, an estimation was done of pyrocarbon matrix density, which occurs to be 2 g/cm 3 [ru

  5. Spectrally resolved multiphoton imaging of in vivo and excised mouse skin tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, Jonathan A; de Bruijn, Henriëtte S; van der Ploeg van den Heuvel, Angélique; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2007-08-01

    The deep tissue penetration and submicron spatial resolution of multiphoton microscopy and the high detection efficiency and nanometer spectral resolution of a spectrograph were utilized to record spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues. Autofluorescence from both cellular and extracellular structures, second-harmonic signal from collagen, and a narrowband emission related to Raman scattering of collagen were detected. Visualization of the spectral images by wavelength-to-RGB color image conversion allowed us to identify and discriminate tissue structures such as epidermal keratinocytes, lipid-rich corneocytes, intercellular structures, hair follicles, collagen, elastin, and dermal cells. Our results also showed morphological and spectral differences between excised tissue section, thick excised tissue, and in vivo tissue samples of mouse skin. Results on collagen excitation at different wavelengths suggested that the origin of the narrowband emission was collagen Raman peaks. Moreover, the oscillating spectral dependency of the collagen second-harmonic intensity was experimentally studied. Overall, spectral imaging provided a wealth of information not easily obtainable with present conventional multiphoton imaging systems.

  6. Ultrasound Assessment of Normal Portal Vein Diameter in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even if the additional use of color and spectral Doppler improves the assessment of patients suspected of having portal hypertension, gray scale assessment of portal vein diameter is corner stone in the initial evaluation. Knowing the normal portal venous dimension in a specified population is so crucial. Methods: This is a ...

  7. Commutative $C^*$-algebras and $\\sigma$-normal morphisms

    OpenAIRE

    de Jeu, Marcel

    2003-01-01

    We prove in an elementary fashion that the image of a commutative monotone $\\sigma$-complete $C^*$-algebra under a $\\sigma$-normal morphism is again monotone $\\sigma$-complete and give an application of this result in spectral theory.

  8. On the different derivatives of the half spectral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Diord Rescinho Amador, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    the negative part of the correlation function. It turns out, however, that when the negative part is neglected, a discontinuity is created around zero. It is well known that this discontinuity introduces increasing constant noise levels in the frequency domain, which is normally reduced by dividing the initial......The half spectral density is normally used as primary data by frequency-domain output-only identification techniques. It is defined as the Fourier transform of the half (positive part) of the correlation function. The classical way of computing the half spectral density consists of disregarding...... value of the correlation function by a factor of two. In this paper, different ways of reducing the discontinuity are considered, and the effect of these modifications on the increased noise in the frequency domain is studied....

  9. Perceptual adaptation of voice gender discrimination with spectrally shifted vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianhao; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2011-08-01

    To determine whether perceptual adaptation improves voice gender discrimination of spectrally shifted vowels and, if so, which acoustic cues contribute to the improvement. Voice gender discrimination was measured for 10 normal-hearing subjects, during 5 days of adaptation to spectrally shifted vowels, produced by processing the speech of 5 male and 5 female talkers with 16-channel sine-wave vocoders. The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups; one subjected to 50-Hz, and the other to 200-Hz, temporal envelope cutoff frequencies. No preview or feedback was provided. There was significant adaptation in voice gender discrimination with the 200-Hz cutoff frequency, but significant improvement was observed only for 3 female talkers with F(0) > 180 Hz and 3 male talkers with F(0) gender discrimination under spectral shift conditions with perceptual adaptation, but spectral shift may limit the exclusive use of spectral information and/or the use of formant structure on voice gender discrimination. The results have implications for cochlear implant users and for understanding voice gender discrimination.

  10. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Connor J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. More information about the instrument can be found through the manufacturer’s website. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. Calibrated sky radiance spectra are produced on cycle of about 141 seconds with a group of 6 radiance spectra zenith having dwell times of about 14 seconds each interspersed with 55 seconds of calibration and mirror motion. The ASSIST data is comparable to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data and can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  11. Estimating Land Surface Temperature from Feng Yun-3C/MERSI Data Using a New Land Surface Emissivity Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangchen Meng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is a key parameter for a wide number of applications, including hydrology, meteorology and surface energy balance. In this study, we first proposed a new land surface emissivity (LSE scheme, including a lookup table-based method to determine the vegetated surface emissivity and an empirical method to derive the bare soil emissivity from the Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS broadband emissivity (BBE product. Then, the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA reanalysis data and the Feng Yun-3C/Medium Resolution Spectral Imager (FY-3C/MERSI precipitable water vapor product were used to correct the atmospheric effects. After resolving the land surface emissivity and atmospheric effects, the LST was derived in a straightforward manner from the FY-3C/MERSI data by the radiative transfer equation algorithm and the generalized single-channel algorithm. The mean difference between the derived LSE and field-measured LSE over seven stations is approximately 0.002. Validation of the LST retrieved with the LSE determined by the new scheme can achieve an acceptable accuracy. The absolute biases are less than 1 K and the STDs (RMSEs are less than 1.95 K (2.2 K for both the 1000 m and 250 m spatial resolutions. The LST accuracy is superior to that retrieved with the LSE determined by the commonly used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI threshold method. Thus, the new emissivity scheme can be used to improve the accuracy of the LSE and further the LST for sensors with broad spectral ranges such as FY-3C/MERSI.

  12. Spectral dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor in quantum dot lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubov, F. I., E-mail: fedyazu@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Maximov, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Livshits, D. A. [Innolume GmbH (Germany); Payusov, A. S.; Nadtochiy, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Savelyev, A. V.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Gordeev, N. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The spectral analysis of amplified spontaneous emission is used to determine the linewidth enhancement factor (α-factor) in lasers based on InAs/InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) in a wide spectral range near the ground-state optical transition energy. The effect of the pump current and number of QDs on the spectral dependences of the α-factor is examined. The temperature dependence of the spectra of the α-factor is experimentally determined for the first time for lasers with InAs/InGaAs QDs. An explanation is suggested for the observed anomalous decrease in the α-factor with increasing temperature.

  13. Spectrally resolved eclipse maps of the accretion disk in UX Ursae Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Rene G. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Horne, Keith; Kuulkers, E.; Van Paradijs, J.

    1993-01-01

    An effort is made to observationally constrain accretion disks on the basis of light curves from the eclipsing cataclysmic variable UX Ursae Majoris, reconstructing the spectral energy distribution across the face of an accretion disk. The spectral resolution obtained suffices to reveal not only the radial dependence of absorption and emission line features within the disk, but also the spectral details of the bright spot that is formed where the accretion stream from the secondary star collides with the disk. The importance of such constraints for theoretical models is noted.

  14. Special Electrophysiological Tests: Brain Spiking, EEG Spectral Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Mental Sciences 9TIC E-~ MAY (In Press) Handbook of Diagnostic Procedifre, Spectrum Pblications, Jamaica , New York. > This wk was pa -tially supported...likelihood is sufficiently small, then we reject the hypothesis that an EEG record containing N spikes in a time t is a normal record, - ,- - Flor several...significantly from zero, one may concl de that the two signal processes in question are related through ,o linear transformation over the spectral

  15. New estimators of spectral distributions of Wigner matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wang

    2011-01-01

    We introduce kernel estimators for the semicircle law. In this first part of our general theory on the estimators, we prove the consistency and conduct simulation study to show the performance of the estimators. We also point out that Wigner's semicircle law for our new estimators and the classical empirical spectral distributions is still true when the elements of Wigner matrices don't have finite variances but are in the domain of attraction of normal law.

  16. Fugitive methane emissions from an agricultural biodigester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flesch, Thomas K.; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Worth, Devon

    2011-01-01

    The use of agricultural biodigesters provides a strategy for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while generating energy. The GHG reduction associated with a biodigester will be affected by fugitive emissions from the facility. The objective of this study was to measure fugitive methane (CH 4 ) emissions from a Canadian biodigester. The facility uses anaerobic digestion to produce biogas from cattle manure and other organic feedstock, which is burnt to generate electricity (1 MW capacity) and heat. An inverse dispersion technique was used to calculate emissions. Fugitive emissions were related to the operating state of the biodigester, and over four seasonal campaigns the emission rate averaged 3.2, 0.8, and 26.6 kg CH 4 hr -1 for normal operations, maintenance, and flaring periods, respectively. During normal operations the average fugitive emission rate corresponded to 3.1% of the CH 4 gas production rate. -- Highlights: → Biodigesters reduce greenhouse gas emissions. → Net emission reduction affected by fugitive emissions. → Fugitive CH 4 measured at agricultural biodigester (1 MW generating capacity). → Emissions were 3.1% of gas production. → Emissions lower than assumed in carbon credit protocols.

  17. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, Johann Valentin

    2013-05-15

    validation of simplified CFD models. In the second results section, spectral measurements (2.4 - 5.4 {mu}m) of a 70 kW turbulent natural gas ame in air blown combustion and in wet and dry oxyfuel combustion were compared with simulated spectra based on measured gas atmospheres. The line-by-line database HITEMP2010 and the two statistical-narrow-band models EM2C and RADCAL were used for the numerical simulation. The measured spectra showed large fluctuations due to turbulence. The averaged experimental intensity was found to be up to 75% higher than the simulated intensity, thus demonstrating the importance of the effect of turbulence-radiation-interaction in combustion simulations. Finally, total emissivities were calculated with the most common spectral models and compared with benchmark calculations by the detailed spectral line-by-line model HITEMP2010. The models were compared at path lengths ranging from 0.001m to 100m and at temperatures from 800 C to 1800 C for atmospheres of pure gases and of various combustion processes (air blown and oxyfuel combustion with wet and dry recirculation) as well as with different fuels (natural gas, brown coal and anthracite). The statistical-narrow-band models RADCAL and EM2C, the exponential-wide-band model and the statistical-line-width model were chosen as models, which are valid for oxyfuel combustion without modifications. A number of weighted-sum-of-grey-gases models from different authors were chosen as computationally efficient models especially developed for oxyfuel combustion. The statistical-narrow-band model EM2C had the highest accuracy with maximum deviations of up to 12%. The weighted-sum-of-grey-gases model from Johansson et al. [64] proved to be the most valid and versatile model for computationally efficient simulations of spectral gas properties with an overall accuracy of 21% or better.

  18. Multiple Spectral Components in Large-Scale Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eileen; Georganopoulos, Markos; Petropoulou, Maria; Breiding, Peter

    2018-01-01

    One of the most striking discoveries of the Chandra X-ray Observatory is the population of bright X-ray emitting jets hosted by powerful quasars. Most of these jets show hard X-ray spectra which requires a separate spectral component compared with the radio-optical synchrotron emission, which usually peaks at or before the infrared. Though the origin of this high-energy spectral component has been a matter of debate for nearly two decades, it is still not understood, with major implications for our understanding of particle acceleration in jets, as well as the total energy carried by them. Until recently the prevailing interpretation for the second component has been inverse-Compont upscattering of the CMB by a still highly relativistic jet at kpc scales. I will briefly describe the recent work calling the IC/CMB model into serious question (including X-ray variability, UV polarization, gamma-ray upper limits, and proper motions), and present new results, based on new ALMA, HST, and Chandra observations, which suggest that more than two distinct spectral components may be present in some large-scale jets, and that these multiple components appear to arise in jets across the full range in jet power, and not just in the most powerful sources. These results are very difficult to reconcile with simple models of jet emission, and I will discuss these failures and some possible directions for the future, including hadronic models.

  19. SPECTRAL DEPENDENT ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The illuminated current-voltage characteristics of thin film a-Si:H. p-i-n solar cells were measured for the visible and near infrared spectral regions. The fill factor, the conversion efficiency, the open circuit Voltage and the short circuit current were compared to the parameters of crystalline silicon pit-junction.

  20. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Information is carried in changes of a signal. The paper starts with revis- iting Dudley's concept of the carrier nature of speech. It points to its close connection to modulation spectra of speech and argues against short-term spectral envelopes as dominant carriers of the linguistic information in speech. The history of ...

  1. Optical Spectral Variability of Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... It is well established that blazars show flux variations in the complete electromagnetic (EM) spectrum on all possible time scales ranging from a few tens of minutes to several years. Here, we report the review of optical flux and spectral variability properties of different classes of blazars on IDV and STV ...

  2. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next ...

  3. Spectral problems for operator matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bátkai, A.; Binding, P.; Dijksma, A.; Hryniv, R.; Langer, H.

    2005-01-01

    We study spectral properties of 2 × 2 block operator matrices whose entries are unbounded operators between Banach spaces and with domains consisting of vectors satisfying certain relations between their components. We investigate closability in the product space, essential spectra and generation of

  4. Spectral Methods for Numerical Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandclément Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Equations arising in general relativity are usually too complicated to be solved analytically and one must rely on numerical methods to solve sets of coupled partial differential equations. Among the possible choices, this paper focuses on a class called spectral methods in which, typically, the various functions are expanded in sets of orthogonal polynomials or functions. First, a theoretical introduction of spectral expansion is given with a particular emphasis on the fast convergence of the spectral approximation. We then present different approaches to solving partial differential equations, first limiting ourselves to the one-dimensional case, with one or more domains. Generalization to more dimensions is then discussed. In particular, the case of time evolutions is carefully studied and the stability of such evolutions investigated. We then present results obtained by various groups in the field of general relativity by means of spectral methods. Work, which does not involve explicit time-evolutions, is discussed, going from rapidly-rotating strange stars to the computation of black-hole–binary initial data. Finally, the evolution of various systems of astrophysical interest are presented, from supernovae core collapse to black-hole–binary mergers.

  5. Functional Analysis-Spectral Theoryl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 4. Functional Analysis - Spectral Theory1. Cherian Varughese. Book Review Volume 6 Issue 4 April 2001 pp 91-92 ... Author Affiliations. Cherian Varughese1. Indian Statistical Institute, 8th Mile, Mysore Road, Bangalore 560 059, India.

  6. Spectral Diagonal Ensemble Kalman Filters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasanický, Ivan; Mandel, Jan; Vejmelka, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2015), s. 485-497 ISSN 1023-5809 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant - others:NSF(US) DMS -1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * ensemble Kalman filter * spectral representation Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.321, year: 2015

  7. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next, the frequency ...

  8. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    automatic recognition of speech (ASR). Instead, likely for historical reasons, envelopes of power spectrum were adopted as main carrier of linguistic information in ASR. However, the relationships between phonetic values of sounds and their short-term spectral envelopes are not straightforward. Consequently, this asks for ...

  9. Spectral representation of Gaussian semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to characterize the spectral representation of Gaussian semimartingales. That is, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions on the kernel K for X t =∫ K t (s) dN s to be a semimartingale. Here, N denotes an independently scattered Gaussian random measure...

  10. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin, E-mail: demetk@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2–250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550−5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806−20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  11. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2-250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550-5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806-20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  12. RADIATION SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF RELATIVISTIC FILAMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Haugboelle, Troels; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Nordlund, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Radiation from many astrophysical sources, e.g., gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei, is believed to arise from relativistically shocked collisionless plasmas. Such sources often exhibit highly transient spectra evolving rapidly compared with source lifetimes. Radiation emitted from these sources is typically associated with nonlinear plasma physics, complex field topologies, and non-thermal particle distributions. In such circumstances, a standard synchrotron paradigm may fail to produce accurate conclusions regarding the underlying physics. Simulating spectral emission and spectral evolution numerically in various relativistic shock scenarios is then the only viable method to determine the detailed physical origin of the emitted spectra. In this Letter, we present synthetic radiation spectra representing the early stage development of the filamentation (streaming) instability of an initially unmagnetized plasma, which is relevant for both collisionless shock formation and reconnection dynamics in relativistic astrophysical outflows as well as for laboratory astrophysics experiments. Results were obtained using a highly efficient in situ diagnostics method, based on detailed particle-in-cell modeling of collisionless plasmas. The synthetic spectra obtained here are compared with those predicted by a semi-analytical model for jitter radiation from the filamentation instability, the latter including self-consistent generated field topologies and particle distributions obtained from the simulations reported upon here. Spectra exhibit dependence on the presence-or the absence-of an inert plasma constituent, when comparing baryonic plasmas (i.e., containing protons) with pair plasmas. The results also illustrate that considerable care should be taken when using lower-dimensional models to obtain information about the astrophysical phenomena generating observed spectra.

  13. Low thermal emissivity surfaces using AgNW thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Elisa; Bhatt, Rajendra; Liu, Anping; Gupta, Mool C.

    2017-12-01

    The properties of silver nanowire (AgNW) films in the optical and infrared spectral regime offer an interesting opportunity for a broad range of applications that require low-emissivity coatings. This work reports a method to reduce the thermal emissivity of substrates by the formation of low-emissivity AgNW coating films from solution. The spectral emissivity was characterized by thermal imaging with an FLIR camera, followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In a combined experimental and simulation study, we provide fundamental data of the transmittance, reflectance, haze, and emissivity of AgNW thin films. Emissivity values were finely tuned by modifying the concentration of the metal nanowires in the films. The simulation models based on the transfer matrix method developed for the AgNW thin films provided optical values that show a good agreement with the measurements.

  14. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    In the physics of the upper atmosphere the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation plays a dominant role controlling most of the thermospheric/ionospheric (T/I) processes. Since this part of the solar spectrum is absorbed in the thermosphere, platforms to measure the EUV fluxes became only available with the development of rockets reaching altitude levels exceeding 80 km. With the availability of V2 rockets used in space research, recording of EUV spectra started in 1946 using photographic films. The development of pointing devices to accurately orient the spectrographs toward the sun initiated intense activities in solar-terrestrial research. The application of photoelectric recording technology enabled the scientists placing EUV spectrometers aboard satellites observing qualitatively strong variability of the solar EUV irradiance on short-, medium-, and long-term scales. However, as more measurements were performed more radiometric EUV data diverged due to the inherent degradation of the EUV instruments with time. Also, continuous recording of the EUV energy input to the T/I system was not achieved. It is only at the end of the last century that there was progress made in solving the serious problem of degradation enabling to monitore solar EUV fluxes with sufficient radiometric accuracy. The data sets available allow composing the data available to the first set of EUV data covering a period of 11 years for the first time. Based on the sophisticated instrumentation verified in space, future EUV measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are promising accuracy levels of about 5% and less. With added low-cost equipment, real-time measurements will allow providing data needed in ionospheric modeling, e.g., for correcting propagation delays of navigation signals from space to earth. Adding EUV airglow and auroral emission monitoring by airglow cameras, the impact of space weather on the terrestrial T/I system can be studied with a spectral terrestrial

  15. Monitoring the normal body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Nina Konstantin; Holm, Lotte; Baarts, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    provides us with knowledge about how to prevent future overweight or obesity. This paper investigates body size ideals and monitoring practices among normal-weight and moderately overweight people. Methods : The study is based on in-depth interviews combined with observations. 24 participants were...... recruited by strategic sampling based on self-reported BMI 18.5-29.9 kg/m2 and socio-demographic factors. Inductive analysis was conducted. Results : Normal-weight and moderately overweight people have clear ideals for their body size. Despite being normal weight or close to this, they construct a variety...... of practices for monitoring their bodies based on different kinds of calculations of weight and body size, observations of body shape, and measurements of bodily firmness. Biometric measurements are familiar to them as are health authorities' recommendations. Despite not belonging to an extreme BMI category...

  16. SPECTRAL UNMIXING BASED CONSTRUCTION OF LUNAR MINERAL ABUNDANCE MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bernhardt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we apply a nonlinear spectral unmixing algorithm to a nearly global lunar spectral reflectance mosaic derived from hyper-spectral image data acquired by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3 instrument. Corrections for topographic effects and for thermal emission were performed. A set of 19 laboratory-based reflectance spectra of lunar samples published by the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC were used as a catalog of potential endmember spectra. For a given spectrum, the multi-population population-based incremental learning (MPBIL algorithm was used to determine the subset of endmembers actually contained in it. However, as the MPBIL algorithm is computationally expensive, it cannot be applied to all pixels of the reflectance mosaic. Hence, the reflectance mosaic was clustered into a set of 64 prototype spectra, and the MPBIL algorithm was applied to each prototype spectrum. Each pixel of the mosaic was assigned to the most similar prototype, and the set of endmembers previously determined for that prototype was used for pixel-wise nonlinear spectral unmixing using the Hapke model, implemented as linear unmixing of the single-scattering albedo spectrum. This procedure yields maps of the fractional abundances of the 19 endmembers. Based on the known modal abundances of a variety of mineral species in the LSCC samples, a conversion from endmember abundances to mineral abundances was performed. We present maps of the fractional abundances of plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine and compare our results with previously published lunar mineral abundance maps.

  17. Spectral Unmixing Based Construction of Lunar Mineral Abundance Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, V.; Grumpe, A.; Wöhler, C.

    2017-07-01

    In this study we apply a nonlinear spectral unmixing algorithm to a nearly global lunar spectral reflectance mosaic derived from hyper-spectral image data acquired by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) instrument. Corrections for topographic effects and for thermal emission were performed. A set of 19 laboratory-based reflectance spectra of lunar samples published by the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) were used as a catalog of potential endmember spectra. For a given spectrum, the multi-population population-based incremental learning (MPBIL) algorithm was used to determine the subset of endmembers actually contained in it. However, as the MPBIL algorithm is computationally expensive, it cannot be applied to all pixels of the reflectance mosaic. Hence, the reflectance mosaic was clustered into a set of 64 prototype spectra, and the MPBIL algorithm was applied to each prototype spectrum. Each pixel of the mosaic was assigned to the most similar prototype, and the set of endmembers previously determined for that prototype was used for pixel-wise nonlinear spectral unmixing using the Hapke model, implemented as linear unmixing of the single-scattering albedo spectrum. This procedure yields maps of the fractional abundances of the 19 endmembers. Based on the known modal abundances of a variety of mineral species in the LSCC samples, a conversion from endmember abundances to mineral abundances was performed. We present maps of the fractional abundances of plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine and compare our results with previously published lunar mineral abundance maps.

  18. The Identification of Two Different Spectral Types of Pulses in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, G. N. (Editor); Paciesas, W. S. (Editor); Briggs, M. S. (Editor); Preece, R. D. (Editor); Mallozzi, R. S. (Editor); Meegan, C. A. (Editor); Horack, J. M. (Editor); Fishman, G. J. (Editor); Band, D. L. (Editor); Matteson, J. L. (Editor); hide

    1997-01-01

    It is shown in this study that two different types of spectral emission are generally produced in gamma-ray bursts. A subset of bursts is identified that exhibits a marked lack of fluence above 300 keV, and these bursts are shown to have luminosities about an order of magnitude lower than bursts with significant fluence above 300 keV. The bursts lacking emission above 300 keV exhibit an effectively homogeneous intensity distribution. In addition, it is shown that both types of emission are common in many bursts, demonstrating that a single source object is capable of generating both of them. These results strongly favor a gamma-ray burst source object that produces two different types of emission with varying degrees of superposition. The impact of this behavior is strong enough that it affects the properties of the burst intensity distribution, as well as the burst spectral characteristics.

  19. Time variations of oxygen emission lines and solar wind dynamic parameters in low latitude region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamlongkul, P.; Wannawichian, S.; Mkrtichian, D.; Sawangwit, U.; A-thano, N.

    2017-09-01

    Aurora phenomenon is an effect of collision between precipitating particles with gyromotion along Earth’s magnetic field and Earth’s ionospheric atoms or molecules. The particles’ precipitation occurs normally around polar regions. However, some auroral particles can reach lower latitude regions when they are highly energetic. A clear emission from Earth’s aurora is mostly from atomic oxygen. Moreover, the sun’s activities can influence the occurrence of the aurora as well. This work studies time variations of oxygen emission lines and solar wind parameters, simultaneously. The emission’s spectral lines were observed by Medium Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (MRES) along with 2.4 meters diameter telescope at Thai National Observatory, Intanon Mountain, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Oxygen (OI) emission lines were calibrated by Dech-Fits spectra processing program and Dech95 2D image processing program. The correlations between oxygen emission lines and solar wind dynamics will be analyzed. This result could be an evidence of the aurora in low latitude region.

  20. Efecto Zeeman Normal

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón Chamochumbi, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Se describe el Efecto Zeeman Normal y se presenta una derivación general del torque experimentado por un dipolo magnético debido a su interacción con un campo magnético externo. Los cálculos correspondientes al elemento diferencial de energía potencial magnética y de la energía potencial magnética convencional son estándares. ABSTRACT: The Normal Zeeman Effect is described and a general derivation of the torque undergone by a magnetic dipole due to its interactio...

  1. The normal holonomy group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmos, C.

    1990-05-01

    The restricted holonomy group of a Riemannian manifold is a compact Lie group and its representation on the tangent space is a product of irreducible representations and a trivial one. Each one of the non-trivial factors is either an orthogonal representation of a connected compact Lie group which acts transitively on the unit sphere or it is the isotropy representation of a single Riemannian symmetric space of rank ≥ 2. We prove that, all these properties are also true for the representation on the normal space of the restricted normal holonomy group of any submanifold of a space of constant curvature. 4 refs

  2. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  3. Medically-enhanced normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Claus; Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To consider public perspectives on the use of medicines for non-medical purposes, a usage called medically-enhanced normality (MEN). Method: Examples from the literature were combined with empirical data derived from two Danish research projects: a Delphi internet study and a Telebus......, to optimise economic, working and family conditions. The term "doping" does not cover or explain the use of medicines as enhancement among healthy non-athletes. Conclusion: We recommend wider use of the term medically-enhanced normality as a conceptual framework for understanding and analysing perceptions...... of what is considered rational medicine use in contemporary society....

  4. Connecting complexity with spectral entropy using the Laplace transformed solution to the fractional diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingjie; Chen, Wen; Magin, Richard L.

    2016-07-01

    Analytical solutions to the fractional diffusion equation are often obtained by using Laplace and Fourier transforms, which conveniently encode the order of the time and the space derivatives (α and β) as non-integer powers of the conjugate transform variables (s, and k) for the spectral and the spatial frequencies, respectively. This study presents a new solution to the fractional diffusion equation obtained using the Laplace transform and expressed as a Fox's H-function. This result clearly illustrates the kinetics of the underlying stochastic process in terms of the Laplace spectral frequency and entropy. The spectral entropy is numerically calculated by using the direct integration method and the adaptive Gauss-Kronrod quadrature algorithm. Here, the properties of spectral entropy are investigated for the cases of sub-diffusion and super-diffusion. We find that the overall spectral entropy decreases with the increasing α and β, and that the normal or Gaussian case with α = 1 and β = 2, has the lowest spectral entropy (i.e., less information is needed to describe the state of a Gaussian process). In addition, as the neighborhood over which the entropy is calculated increases, the spectral entropy decreases, which implies a spatial averaging or coarse graining of the material properties. Consequently, the spectral entropy is shown to provide a new way to characterize the temporal correlation of anomalous diffusion. Future studies should be designed to examine changes of spectral entropy in physical, chemical and biological systems undergoing phase changes, chemical reactions and tissue regeneration.

  5. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  6. Corners of normal matrices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ∗Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 2E4, Canada. E-mail: rbh@isid.ac.in; choi@math.toronto.edu. To Kalyan Sinha on his sixtieth birthday. Abstract. We study various conditions on matrices B and C under which they can be the off-diagonal blocks of a partitioned normal matrix. Keywords.

  7. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Myers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity.

  8. Normalized information distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitányi, P.M.B.; Balbach, F.J.; Cilibrasi, R.L.; Li, M.; Emmert-Streib, F.; Dehmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string

  9. X-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei with Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, G. C.; Mathur, S.; Griffiths, R. E.; Rao, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present a systematic X-ray study of eight active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intermediate-mass black holes (MBH ~ 8-95 × 104 M⊙) based on 12 XMM-Newton observations. The sample includes the two prototype AGNs in this class—NGC 4395 and POX 52 and six other AGNs discovered with the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. These AGNs show some of the strongest X-ray variability, with the normalized excess variances being the largest and the power density break timescales being the shortest observed among radio-quiet AGNs. The excess-variance-luminosity correlation appears to depend on both the BH mass and the Eddington luminosity ratio. The break timescale-black hole mass relations for AGN with IMBHs are consistent with that observed for massive AGNs. We find that the FWHM of the Hβ/Hα line is uncorrelated with the BH mass, but shows strong anticorrelation with the Eddington luminosity ratio. Four AGNs show clear evidence for soft X-ray excess emission (kTin ~ 150-200 eV). X-ray spectra of three other AGNs are consistent with the presence of the soft excess emission. NGC 4395 with lowest L/LEdd lacks the soft excess emission. Evidently small black mass is not the primary driver of strong soft X-ray excess emission from AGNs. The X-ray spectral properties and optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions of these AGNs are similar to those of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The observed X-ray/UV properties of AGNs with IMBHs are consistent with these AGNs being low-mass extensions of more massive AGNs, those with high Eddington luminosity ratio looking more like narrow-line Seyfert 1 s and those with low L/LEdd looking more like broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  10. Positron Emission Mammotomography with Dual Planar Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Smith; Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski

    2003-06-29

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) is usually performed with two stationary planar detectors above and below a compressed breast. There is image blurring normal to the detectors due to the limited angular range of the lines of response. Positron emission mammotomography (PEM-T) with dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation.

  11. Noise-evoked otoacoustic emissions in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, B; Wit, HP; van Dijk, P

    2000-01-01

    Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) and acoustical responses evoked by bandlimited Gaussian noise (noise-evoked otoacoustic emissions; NEOAEs) were measured in three normal-hearing subjects. For the NEOAEs the first- and second-order Wiener kernel and polynomial correlation functions up to

  12. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  13. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    discretizations of the target function. We assess the performance of the method on a range of numerical examples: a modified set of Genz functions with dimension up to 100, and functions with mixed Fourier modes or with local features. We observe significant improvements in performance over an anisotropic......The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT.......e., the “cores”) comprising the functional TT decomposition. This result motivates an approximation scheme employing polynomial approximations of the cores. For functions with appropriate regularity, the resulting spectral tensor-train decomposition combines the favorable dimension-scaling of the TT...

  14. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  15. A spatially resolved radio spectral index study of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Jonathan; Brinks, Elias; Hindson, Luke; Beswick, Robert; Heesen, Volker

    2018-04-01

    We study the resolved radio continuum spectral energy distribution of the dwarf irregular galaxy, NGC 1569, on a beam-by-beam basis to isolate and study its spatially resolved radio emission characteristics. Utilizing high-quality NRAO Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations that densely sample the 1-34 GHz frequency range, we adopt a Bayesian fitting procedure, where we use H α emission that has not been corrected for extinction as a prior, to produce maps of how the separated thermal emission, non-thermal emission, and non-thermal spectral index vary across NGC 1569's main disc. We find a higher thermal fraction at 1 GHz than is found in spiral galaxies (26^{+2}_{-3} {per cent}) and find an average non-thermal spectral index α = -0.53 ± 0.02, suggesting that a young population of cosmic ray electrons is responsible for the observed non-thermal emission. By comparing our recovered map of the thermal radio emission with literature H α maps, we estimate the total reddening along the line of sight to NGC 1569 to be E(B - V) = 0.49 ± 0.05, which is in good agreement with other literature measurements. Spatial variations in the reddening indicate that a significant portion of the total reddening is due to internal extinction within NGC 1569.

  16. Biomarkers and Biological Spectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-23

    karyotyping (SKY) in hematological neoplasia [4259-13] B. S. Preiss, R. K. Pedersen, G. B. Kerndrup, Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark) 60 Structure of...astronomy and airborne monitoring to forensic and biomedical sciences or industrial qualit\\ and process monitoring. There is growing need for a sensitive...SPIE Vol. 4259 55 Spectral Karyotyping (SKY) in Hematologic Neoplasia. Birgitte S. Preiss*a, Rikke K. Pedersena, Gitte B. Kerndrupa aInstitute of

  17. Chebyshev and Fourier spectral methods

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, John P

    2001-01-01

    Completely revised text focuses on use of spectral methods to solve boundary value, eigenvalue, and time-dependent problems, but also covers Hermite, Laguerre, rational Chebyshev, sinc, and spherical harmonic functions, as well as cardinal functions, linear eigenvalue problems, matrix-solving methods, coordinate transformations, methods for unbounded intervals, spherical and cylindrical geometry, and much more. 7 Appendices. Glossary. Bibliography. Index. Over 160 text figures.

  18. Abundance estimation of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates a spectral unmixing method for estimating the partial abundance of spectrally similar minerals in complex mixtures. The method requires formulation of a linear function of individual spectra of individual minerals. The first...

  19. Acoustic emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Universidade do Minho, Department Engineering Mecânica, Azurém,. 4800058 Guimar˜aes, Portugal e-mail: mathew@dem.uminho.pt. Abstract. Acoustic Emission (AE) has been widely used for monitoring man- ufacturing processes particularly those involving metal cutting. Monitoring the condition of the cutting tool in the ...

  20. Turbulent Fluid Motion 5: Fourier Analysis, the Spectral Form of the Continuum Equations, and Homogeneous Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Background material on Fourier analysis and on the spectral form of the continuum equations, both averaged and unaveraged, are given. The equations are applied to a number of cases of homogeneous turbulence with and without mean gradients. Spectral transfer of turbulent activity between scales of motion is studied in some detail. The effects of mean shear, heat transfer, normal strain, and buoyancy are included in the analyses.

  1. Spectral-Line Observations Using a Phased Array Feed on the Parkes Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, T. N.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Rhee, J.; Westmeier, T.; Chippendale, A. P.; Deng, X.; Ekers, R. D.; Kramer, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present first results from pilot observations using a phased array feed (PAF) mounted on the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. The observations presented here cover a frequency range from 1 150 to 1 480 MHz and are used to show the ability of PAFs to suppress standing wave problems by a factor of 10, which afflict normal feeds. We also compare our results with previous HIPASS observations and with previous H i images of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Drift scan observations of the GAMA G23 field resulted in direct H i detections at z = 0.0043 and z = 0.0055 of HIPASS galaxies J2242-30 and J2309-30. Our new measurements generally agree with archival data in spectral shape and flux density, with small differences being due to differing beam patterns. We also detect signal in the stacked H i data of 1 094 individually undetected galaxies in the GAMA G23 field in the redshift range 0.05 ⩽ z ⩽ 0.075. Finally, we use the low standing wave ripple and wide bandwidth of the PAF to set a 3σ upper limit to any positronium recombination line emission from the Galactic Centre of <0.09 K, corresponding to a recombination rate of <3.0 × 1045 s-1.

  2. Wide-field spectrally resolved quantitative fluorescence imaging system: toward neurosurgical guidance in glioma resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijing; Thom, Maria; Ebner, Michael; Wykes, Victoria; Desjardins, Adrien; Miserocchi, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Vercauteren, Tom

    2017-11-01

    In high-grade glioma surgery, tumor resection is often guided by intraoperative fluorescence imaging. 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) provides fluorescent contrast between normal brain tissue and glioma tissue, thus achieving improved tumor delineation and prolonged patient survival compared with conventional white-light-guided resection. However, commercially available fluorescence imaging systems rely solely on visual assessment of fluorescence patterns by the surgeon, which makes the resection more subjective than necessary. We developed a wide-field spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging system utilizing a Generation II scientific CMOS camera and an improved computational model for the precise reconstruction of the PpIX concentration map. In our model, the tissue's optical properties and illumination geometry, which distort the fluorescent emission spectra, are considered. We demonstrate that the CMOS-based system can detect low PpIX concentration at short camera exposure times, while providing high-pixel resolution wide-field images. We show that total variation regularization improves the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed quantitative concentration map by approximately twofold. Quantitative comparison between the estimated PpIX concentration and tumor histopathology was also investigated to further evaluate the system.

  3. Calibration with near-continuous spectral measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Rasmussen, Michael; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    In chemometrics traditional calibration in case of spectral measurements express a quantity of interest (e.g. a concentration) as a linear combination of the spectral measurements at a number of wavelengths. Often the spectral measurements are performed at a large number of wavelengths and in thi...... by an example in which the octane number of gasoline is related to near infrared spectral measurements. The performance is found to be much better that for the traditional calibration methods....

  4. Normal Weight Dyslipidemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, David Hojland; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The liver coordinates lipid metabolism and may play a vital role in the development of dyslipidemia, even in the absence of obesity. Normal weight dyslipidemia (NWD) and patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) who do not have obesity constitute a unique subset...... of individuals characterized by dyslipidemia and metabolic deterioration. This review examined the available literature on the role of the liver in dyslipidemia and the metabolic characteristics of patients with NAFLD who do not have obesity. Methods: PubMed was searched using the following keywords: nonobese......, dyslipidemia, NAFLD, NWD, liver, and metabolically obese/unhealthy normal weight. Additionally, article bibliographies were screened, and relevant citations were retrieved. Studies were excluded if they had not measured relevant biomarkers of dyslipidemia. Results: NWD and NAFLD without obesity share a similar...

  5. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant R. Nassar BS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” “gait disturbances,” “cognitive function,” “neuropsychology,” “imaging,” and “pathogenesis,” articles were obtained for this review. The majority of the articles were retrieved from the past 10 years. The purpose of this review article is to aid general practitioners in further understanding current findings on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of iNPH.

  6. Spectral State Evolution of 4U 1820-30: the Stability of the Spectral Index of Comptonization Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev G.; Seifina, Elena; Frontera, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the X-ray spectra and their timing properties of the compact Xray binary 4U 1820-30. We establish spectral transitions in this source seen with BeppoSAX and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). During the RXTE observations (1996 - 2009), the source were approximately approximately 75% of its time in the soft state making the lower banana and upper banana transitions combined with long-term low-high state transitions. We reveal that all of the X-ray spectra of 4U 1820-30 are fit by a composition of a thermal (blackbody) component, a Comptonization component (COMPTB) and a Gaussian-line component. Thus using this spectral analysis we find that the photon power-law index Gamma of the Comptonization component is almost unchangeable (Gamma approximately 2) while the electron temperature kTe changes from 2.9 to 21 keV during these spectral events. We also establish that for these spectral events the normalization of COMPTB component (which is proportional to mass accretion rate ?M) increases by factor 8 when kTe decreases from 21 keV to 2.9 keV. Before this index stability effect was also found analyzing X-ray data for Z-source GX 340+0 and for atolls, 4U 1728-34, GX 3+1. Thus, we can suggest that this spectral stability property is a spectral signature of an accreting neutron star source. On the other hand in a black hole binary G monotonically increases with ?Mand ultimately its value saturates at large ?M.

  7. USGS Spectral Library Version 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Pearson, Neil C.; Wise, Richard A.; Benzel, William M.; Lowers, Heather A.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Klein, Anna J.

    2017-04-10

    We have assembled a library of spectra measured with laboratory, field, and airborne spectrometers. The instruments used cover wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.2 to 200 microns [μm]). Laboratory samples of specific minerals, plants, chemical compounds, and manmade materials were measured. In many cases, samples were purified, so that unique spectral features of a material can be related to its chemical structure. These spectro-chemical links are important for interpreting remotely sensed data collected in the field or from an aircraft or spacecraft. This library also contains physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures. Four different spectrometer types were used to measure spectra in the library: (1) Beckman™ 5270 covering the spectral range 0.2 to 3 µm, (2) standard, high resolution (hi-res), and high-resolution Next Generation (hi-resNG) models of Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) field portable spectrometers covering the range from 0.35 to 2.5 µm, (3) Nicolet™ Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) interferometer spectrometers covering the range from about 1.12 to 216 µm, and (4) the NASA Airborne Visible/Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer AVIRIS, covering the range 0.37 to 2.5 µm. Measurements of rocks, soils, and natural mixtures of minerals were made in laboratory and field settings. Spectra of plant components and vegetation plots, comprising many plant types and species with varying backgrounds, are also in this library. Measurements by airborne spectrometers are included for forested vegetation plots, in which the trees are too tall for measurement by a field spectrometer. This report describes the instruments used, the organization of materials into chapters, metadata descriptions of spectra and samples, and possible artifacts in the spectral measurements. To facilitate greater application of the spectra, the library has also been convolved to selected spectrometer and imaging spectrometers sampling and

  8. Calibrating spectral images using penalized likelihood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Glasbey, C.

    2003-01-01

    A new method is presented for automatic correction of distortions and for spectral calibration (which band corresponds to which wavelength) of spectral images recorded by means of a spectrograph. The method consists of recording a bar-like pattern with an illumination source with spectral bands

  9. Spectral properties of generalized eigenparameter dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jost function, spectrum, the spectral singularities, and the properties of the principal vectors corresponding to the spectral singularities of L, if. ∞Σn=1 n(∣1 - an∣ + ∣bnl) < ∞. Mathematics Subject Classication (2010): 34L05, 34L40, 39A70, 47A10, 47A75. Key words: Discrete equations, eigenparameter, spectral analysis, ...

  10. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  11. Spectral Characterization of Laser Induced Plasma from Titanium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dann, V J; Mathew, M V; Nampoori, V P N; Vallabhan, C P G; Nandakumaran, V M; Radhakrishnan, P

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission from TiO 2 plasma, generated by a nanosecond laser is spectroscopically analysed. The main chemical species are identified and the spatio-temporal distribution of the plasma parameters such as electron temperature and density are characterized based on the study of spectral distribution of the line intensities and their broadening characteristics. The parameters of laser induced plasma vary quickly owing to its expansion at low background pressure and the possible deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are tested to show its validity

  12. On the Intrinsic Simplicity of Spectral Variability of GRBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chernenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a Multi-Scale Correlation Analysis (MSCA of the light curves of gamma-ray bursts recorded in different energy ranges. This analysis allows us to identify time intervals where emission variability can be reduced to a single physical parameter and can therefore be robustly attributed to a single physical emitter. The properties of these intervals can then be investigated separately, and the spectral properties of individual emitters can be analysed. The signatures of hidden dynamical relations between individual emitters are also discussed.

  13. Neuroethics beyond Normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, John R; Giordano, James

    2016-01-01

    An integrated and principled neuroethics offers ethical guidelines able to transcend conventional and medical reliance on normality standards. Elsewhere we have proposed four principles for wise guidance on human transformations. Principles like these are already urgently needed, as bio- and cyberenhancements are rapidly emerging. Context matters. Neither "treatments" nor "enhancements" are objectively identifiable apart from performance expectations, social contexts, and civic orders. Lessons learned from disability studies about enablement and inclusion suggest a fresh way to categorize modifications to the body and its performance. The term "enhancement" should be broken apart to permit recognition of enablements and augmentations, and kinds of radical augmentation for specialized performance. Augmentations affecting the self, self-worth, and self-identity of persons require heightened ethical scrutiny. Reversibility becomes the core problem, not the easy answer, as augmented persons may not cooperate with either decommissioning or displacement into unaccommodating societies. We conclude by indicating how our four principles of self-creativity, nonobsolescence, empowerment, and citizenship establish a neuroethics beyond normal that is better prepared for a future in which humans and their societies are going so far beyond normal.

  14. Ethics and "normal birth".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2012-12-01

    The concept of "normal birth" has been promoted as ideal by several international organizations, although debate about its meaning is ongoing. In this article, I examine the concept of normalcy to explore its ethical implications and raise a trio of concerns. First, in its emphasis on nonuse of technology as a goal, the concept of normalcy may marginalize women for whom medical intervention is necessary or beneficial. Second, in its emphasis on birth as a socially meaningful event, the mantra of normalcy may unintentionally avert attention to meaning in medically complicated births. Third, the emphasis on birth as a normal and healthy event may be a contributor to the long-standing tolerance for the dearth of evidence guiding the treatment of illness during pregnancy and the failure to responsibly and productively engage pregnant women in health research. Given these concerns, it is worth debating not just what "normal birth" means, but whether the term as an ideal earns its keep. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fermionic spectral functions in backreacting p-wave superconductors at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, G.L.; Grandi, N.E.; Lugo, A.R. [Instituto de Física de La Plata - CONICET & Departamento de Física - UNLP,C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2017-04-14

    We investigate the spectral function of fermions in a p-wave superconducting state, at finite both temperature and gravitational coupling, using the AdS/CFT correspondence and extending previous research. We found that, for any coupling below a critical value, the system behaves as its zero temperature limit. By increasing the coupling, the “peak-dip-hump” structure that characterizes the spectral function at fixed momenta disappears. In the region where the normal/superconductor phase transition is first order, the presence of a non-zero order parameter is reflected in the absence of rotational symmetry in the fermionic spectral function at the critical temperature.

  16. Hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a factor affecting the cosmic 6.2 micron emission band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Harrison, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    While many of the characteristics of the cosmic unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands observed for interstellar and circumstellar sources within the Milky Way and other galaxies, can be best attributed to vibrational modes of the variants of the molecular family known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), there are open questions that need to be resolved. Among them is the observed strength of the 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) band relative to other strong bands, and the generally low strength for measurements in the laboratory of the 1600 cm(-1) skeletal vibration band of many specific neutral PAH molecules. Also, experiments involving laser excitation of some gas phase neutral PAH species while producing long lifetime state emission in the 3.3 micron (3000 cm(-1)) spectral region, do not result in significant 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) emission. A potentially important variant of the neutral PAH species, namely hydrogenated-PAH (H(N)-PAH) which exhibit intriguing spectral correlation with interstellar and circumstellar infrared emission and the 2175 A extinction feature, may be a factor affecting the strength of 6.2 micron emission. These species are hybrids of aromatic and cycloalkane structures. Laboratory infrared absorption spectroscopy augmented by density function theory (DFT) computations of selected partially hydrogenated-PAH molecules, demonstrates enhanced 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) region skeletal vibration mode strength for these molecules relative to the normal PAH form. This along with other factors such as ionization or the incorporation of nitrogen or oxygen atoms could be a reason for the strength of the cosmic 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) feature.

  17. Spectrally resolved multiphoton imaging of post-mortem biopsy and in-vivo mouse skin tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, Jonathan A.; de Bruijn, Henriëtte S.; van der Ploeg van den Heuvel, Angélique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2007-02-01

    The deep-tissue penetration and submicron spatial resolution of multi-photon microscopy and the high-detection efficiency and nanometer spectral resolution capability of a spectrograph were combined to study the intrinsic emission of mouse skin post mortem biopsy and section, and in vivo tissue samples. The different layers of skin could be clearly distinguished based on both their spectral signature and morphology. Auto fluorescence could be detected from both cellular and extra cellular structures. In addition SHG from collagen and a narrowband spectral emission band related to collagen were observed. Visualization of the spectral images in RGB color allowed us to identify tissue structures such as epidermal cells, lipid-rich keratinocytes and intercellular structures, hair follicles, collagen, elastin, and dermal fibroblasts. The results also showed morphological and spectral differences between the mouse skin post mortem biopsy and in vivo samples which explained by biochemical differences, specifically of NAD(P)H. Overall, spectral imaging provided a wealth of information not easily obtainable with present conventional multi-photon imaging methods.

  18. In vivo quantification of gingival inflammation using spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakian, Christian; Pretty, Iain; Ellwood, Roger; Hamlin, David

    2008-01-01

    Erythema is a reaction of the skin and oral soft tissues commonly associated with inflammation and an increase in blood flow. Diffuse reflection spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the assessment of skin inflammation where erythema has been linked to the relative concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin and blood perfusion. Here we demonstrate the applicability of a spectral imaging method for the quantification of gingival inflammation by looking at the gingival margin and papillary tip erythema. We present a longitudinal study on 22 healthy volunteers divided in two groups. The first was allowed to have normal oral hygiene and the second was subjected to an induced gingivitis for two weeks by cessation of oral hygiene. The spectral reflectance ratio at 615 and 460 nm, R(615)R(460), was proposed as a method to quantify and map the erythema spatial distribution. These wavelengths represent spectral absorption crossovers observed between oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin. The spectral method presented shows a significant separation (pgingivitis was induced and correlates significantly (pgingival index scores. We believe that these investigations could contribute to the development of functional imaging methods for periodontal disease detection and monitoring.

  19. Prediction of spectral acceleration response ordinates based on PGA attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graizer, V.; Kalkan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Developed herein is a new peak ground acceleration (PGA)-based predictive model for 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (SA) ordinates of free-field horizontal component of ground motion from shallow-crustal earthquakes. The predictive model of ground motion spectral shape (i.e., normalized spectrum) is generated as a continuous function of few parameters. The proposed model eliminates the classical exhausted matrix of estimator coefficients, and provides significant ease in its implementation. It is structured on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) database with a number of additions from recent Californian events including 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. A unique feature of the model is its new functional form explicitly integrating PGA as a scaling factor. The spectral shape model is parameterized within an approximation function using moment magnitude, closest distance to the fault (fault distance) and VS30 (average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) as independent variables. Mean values of its estimator coefficients were computed by fitting an approximation function to spectral shape of each record using robust nonlinear optimization. Proposed spectral shape model is independent of the PGA attenuation, allowing utilization of various PGA attenuation relations to estimate the response spectrum of earthquake recordings.

  20. Discrimination of periodontal diseases using diffuse reflectance spectral intensity ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Sekhar, Prasanth; Betsy, Joseph; Presanthila, Janam; Subhash, Narayanan

    2012-02-01

    This clinical study was to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) intensity ratio R620/R575 in the quantification and discrimination of periodontitis and gingivitis from healthy gingiva. DR spectral measurements were carried out with white-light illumination from 70 healthy sites in 30 healthy volunteers, and 63 gingivitis- and 58 periodontitis-infected sites in 60 patients. Clinical parameters such as probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, and gingival index were recorded in patient population. Diagnostic accuracies for discrimination of gingivitis and periodontitis from healthy gingiva were determined by comparison of spectral signatures with clinical parameters. Divergence of average DR spectral intensity ratio between control and test groups was studied using analysis of variance. The mean DR spectrum on normalization at 620 nm showed marked differences between healthy tissue, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Hemoglobin concentration and apparent SO2 (oxygen saturation) were also calculated for healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites. DR spectral intensities at 545 and 575 nm showed a decreasing trend with progression of disease. Among the various DR intensity ratios studied, the R620/R575 ratio provided a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94% for discrimination of healthy tissues from gingivitis and a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 100% for discrimination of gingivitis from periodontitis.

  1. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Harding, Alice K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Parent, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems, The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA I pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models. within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle. maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius. under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry

  2. Spectral analysis in microscopy : a study of FRET and single quantum dot luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederix, Patrick Louis Theodorus Martin

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of new techniques and luminescent markers, to improve the quality of luminescence studies in microscopy. A sensitive spectrograph that can be used for spectrally resolved emission spectroscopy in the microscope is described, including design considerations,

  3. SPECTRAL OPTICAL MONITORING OF THE NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Ark 564

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalova, A. I.; Burenkov, A. N.; Popović, L. Č.; Kovačević, J.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Valdes, J. R.; Torrealba, J.; Carrasco, L.; Ilić, D.; Kovačević, A.; Kollatschny, W.; Bochkarev, N. G.; León-Tavares, J.; Mercado, A.; Benítez, E.; Dultzin, D.; De la Fuente, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a long-term (1999-2010) spectral optical monitoring campaign of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) Ark 564, which shows a strong Fe II line emission in the optical. This AGN is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy, a group of AGNs with specific spectral characteristics. We analyze the light curves of the permitted Hα, Hβ, optical Fe II line fluxes, and the continuum flux in order to search for a time lag between them. Additionally, in order to estimate the contribution of iron lines from different multiplets, we fit the Hβ and Fe II lines with a sum of Gaussian components. We find that during the monitoring period the spectral variation (F max /F min ) of Ark 564 is between 1.5 for Hα and 1.8 for the Fe II lines. The correlation between the Fe II and Hβ flux variations is of higher significance than that of Hα and Hβ (whose correlation is almost absent). The permitted-line profiles are Lorentzian-like and do not change shape during the monitoring period. We investigate, in detail, the optical Fe II emission and find different degrees of correlation between the Fe II emission arising from different spectral multiplets and the continuum flux. The relatively weak and different degrees of correlations between permitted lines and continuum fluxes indicate a rather complex source of ionization of the broad-line emission region.

  4. A Spectral Geometrical Model for Compton Scatter Tomography Based on the SSS Approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazantsev, Ivan G.; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2016-01-01

    The forward model of single scatter in the Positron Emission Tomography for a detector system possessing an excellent spectral resolution under idealized geometrical assumptions is investigated. This model has the form of integral equations describing a flux of photons emanating from the same ann...

  5. Spectral Measurements of Cyg X-3: A Thermal Source Embedded in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. The attempts at unified model fitting to explain the spectral variations in Cyg X-3 suggest equally probable fits with a combination of an absorbed blackbody and a separately absorbed power law with an expo- nential cut-off or a composite of absorbed free-free emission with a power law hard X-ray component ...

  6. Benchmarking of refinery emissions performance : Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    This study was undertaken to collect emissions performance data for Canadian and comparable American refineries. The objective was to examine parameters that affect refinery air emissions performance and develop methods or correlations to normalize emissions performance. Another objective was to correlate and compare the performance of Canadian refineries to comparable American refineries. For the purpose of this study, benchmarking involved the determination of levels of emission performance that are being achieved for generic groups of facilities. A total of 20 facilities were included in the benchmarking analysis, and 74 American refinery emission correlations were developed. The recommended benchmarks, and the application of those correlations for comparison between Canadian and American refinery performance, were discussed. The benchmarks were: sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, particulate, volatile organic compounds, ammonia and benzene. For each refinery in Canada, benchmark emissions were developed. Several factors can explain differences in Canadian and American refinery emission performance. 4 tabs., 7 figs

  7. Spectral multitude and spectral dynamics reflect changing conjugation length in single molecules of oligophenylenevinylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule study of phenylenevinylene oligomers revealed distinct spectral forms due to different conjugation lengths which are determined by torsional defects. Large spectral jumps between different spectral forms were ascribed to torsional flips of a single phenylene ring. These spectral changes reflect the dynamic nature of electron delocalization in oligophenylenevinylenes and enable estimation of the phenylene torsional barriers. © 2012 The Owner Societies.

  8. Remote sensing of species diversity using Landsat 8 spectral variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonsela, Sabelo; Cho, Moses Azong; Ramoelo, Abel; Mutanga, Onisimo

    2017-11-01

    The application of remote sensing in biodiversity estimation has largely relied on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The NDVI exploits spectral information from red and near infrared bands of Landsat images and it does not consider canopy background conditions hence it is affected by soil brightness which lowers its sensitivity to vegetation. As such NDVI may be insufficient in explaining tree species diversity. Meanwhile, the Landsat program also collects essential spectral information in the shortwave infrared (SWIR) region which is related to plant properties. The study was intended to: (i) explore the utility of spectral information across Landsat-8 spectrum using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and estimate alpha diversity (α-diversity) in the savannah woodland in southern Africa, and (ii) define the species diversity index (Shannon (H‧), Simpson (D2) and species richness (S) - defined as number of species in a community) that best relates to spectral variability on the Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager dataset. We designed 90 m × 90 m field plots (n = 71) and identified all trees with a diameter at breast height (DbH) above 10 cm. H‧, D2 and S were used to quantify tree species diversity within each plot and the corresponding spectral information on all Landsat-8 bands were extracted from each field plot. A stepwise linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between species diversity indices (H‧, D2 and S) and Principal Components (PCs), vegetation indices and Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) texture layers with calibration (n = 46) and test (n = 23) datasets. The results of regression analysis showed that the Simple Ratio Index derivative had a higher relationship with H‧, D2 and S (r2= 0.36; r2= 0.41; r2= 0.24 respectively) compared to NDVI, EVI, SAVI or their derivatives. Moreover the Landsat-8 derived PCs also had a higher relationship with H‧ and D2 (r2 of 0.36 and 0.35 respectively) than the

  9. [Spectral analysis in nanometer material science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Sun, Shi-gang

    2002-06-01

    Spectral analysis is an important means in studies of nanometer scale systems, and is essential for deep understanding the structure and properties of nanometer materials. This paper reviews the recent progresses made in studies of nanometer materials using spectral analysis methods such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, positron annihilation and photoacoustic spectroscopy. The principle, characteristics and applications of most frequently employed spectral methods are introduced briefly and illustrated with typical examples. Future perspectives of spectral analysis in nanometer field are discussed. New directions of establishing spectral analysis methods at nanometer scale resolution and developing new spectroscopy technology in nanometer material studies are also emphasized.

  10. Visible and UV emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monier-Garbet, P.

    1991-01-01

    Visible and ultra-violet emission spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic technique extensively used in contemporary fusion experiments. Theoretical plasma models are required to derive the relevant physical parameters. These models are reviewed in the first part of this paper. They allow spectral line intensities and radiative power losses to be calculated from the knowledge of the detailed atomic physics processes occurring in the plasma. In tokamak plasma experiments, impurity contamination and transport are important concerns. Basic spectroscopic methods used in their understanding are described. They include the determination of impurity concentrations either by line emission modelling (through the use of an impurity transport code), or by direct charge-exchange recombination measurement. They also include the evaluation of neutral particle fluxes at the plasma periphery. Finally, the experimental techniques used in the derivation of impurity transport coefficients are reported

  11. Final Report: Spectral Analysis of L-shell Data in the Extreme Ultraviolet from Tokamak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jernigan, J. Garrett [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    We performed detailed analyses of extreme ultraviolet spectra taken by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and on the Alcator CKmod tokamak at the M.I.T. Plasma Science and Fusion Center. We focused on the emission of iron, carbon, and other elements in several spectral band pass regions covered by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We documented emission lines of carbon not found in currently used solar databases and demonstrated that this emission was due to charge exchange.

  12. Normal radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.

    1987-01-01

    This book is intended for learners in radiology, presenting a wealth of normal radiological findings together with a systematic guide for appraisal and interpretation, and for formulation of reports. The text examples and criteria given will help beginners in learning to 'read' a radiograph, and to verify their conclusions by means of checklists and standard reports. The case material covers numerous illustrations from the following sectors: Skeletal radiography, mammography, tomography, contrast radiography, organ examination by intravenous techniques, arthrography and angiography, and specialized radiography, (ECB) With 184 figs [de

  13. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Peterson, V.J.; Floyd, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This atlas of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy records the spectra of the elements in a way that would reveal the general nature of the spectra, in all their simplicity or complexity; and offers a definitive summary of the most prominent spectral lines of the elements, i.e., those most likely to be useful for the determination of trace and ultratrace concentrations; it provides reliable estimates, based on the recorded experimental spectra, of the powers of detection of the listed prominent lines; and assesses the very important problem of spectral interferences. The atlas is composed of three main sections. Part I is concerned with the historical aspects of compilations of spectral information. Part II is based on 232 wavelength scans of 70 elements. Each of the wavelength scans covers an 80 nm spectral region. These scans allow a rapid comparison of the background and spectral line intensities emitted in the ICP and provide a ready means for identification of the most prominent lines of each element and for estimation of the trace element analytical capabilities of these lines. A listing of 973 prominent lines with associated detection limits is also presented. Part III addresses the problem of spectral interferences. On this topic a detailed collection of coincidence profiles is presented for 281 of the most prominent lines, each with profiles of ten of the most prevalent concomitants superimposed. (Auth.)

  14. Semiclassical Theory of Spectral Rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. V.

    1985-08-01

    The spectral rigidity Δ(L) of a set of quantal energy levels is the mean square deviation of the spectral staircase from the straight line that best fits it over a range of L mean level spacings. In the semiclassical limit (hslash-> 0), formulae are obtained giving Δ(L) as a sum over classical periodic orbits. When L ~= Lmax, where Lmax ~ hslash-(N-1) for a system of N freedoms, Δ(L) is shown to display the following universal behaviour as a result of properties of very long classical orbits: if the system is classically integrable (all periodic orbits filling tori), Δ(L) = 1/15L (as in an uncorrelated (Poisson) eigenvalue sequence); if the system is classically chaotic (all periodic orbits isolated and unstable) and has no symmetry, Δ(L) = ln L/2π^2 + D if 1 ~= L ~= Lmax (as in the gaussian unitary ensemble of random-matrix theory); if the system is chaotic and has time-reversal symmetry, Δ(L) = ln L/π^2 + E if 1 ~= L ~= Lmax (as in the gaussian orthogonal ensemble). When L >> Lmax, Δ(L) saturates non-universally at a value, determined by short classical orbits, of order hslash-(N-1) for integrable systems and ln (hslash-1) for chaotic systems. These results are obtained by using the periodic-orbit expansion for the spectral density, together with classical sum rules for the intensities of long orbits and a semiclassical sum rule restricting the manner in which their contributions interfere. For two examples Δ(L) is studied in detail: the rectangular billiard (integrable), and the Riemann zeta function (assuming its zeros to be the eigenvalues of an unknown quantum system whose unknown classical limit is chaotic).

  15. Enhanced peptide quantification using spectral count clustering and cluster abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Seungmook

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of protein expression by means of mass spectrometry (MS has been introduced in various proteomics studies. In particular, two label-free quantification methods, such as spectral counting and spectra feature analysis have been extensively investigated in a wide variety of proteomic studies. The cornerstone of both methods is peptide identification based on a proteomic database search and subsequent estimation of peptide retention time. However, they often suffer from restrictive database search and inaccurate estimation of the liquid chromatography (LC retention time. Furthermore, conventional peptide identification methods based on the spectral library search algorithms such as SEQUEST or SpectraST have been found to provide neither the best match nor high-scored matches. Lastly, these methods are limited in the sense that target peptides cannot be identified unless they have been previously generated and stored into the database or spectral libraries. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel method, namely Quantification method based on Finding the Identical Spectral set for a Homogenous peptide (Q-FISH to estimate the peptide's abundance from its tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS spectra through the direct comparison of experimental spectra. Intuitively, our Q-FISH method compares all possible pairs of experimental spectra in order to identify both known and novel proteins, significantly enhancing identification accuracy by grouping replicated spectra from the same peptide targets. Results We applied Q-FISH to Nano-LC-MS/MS data obtained from human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and normal liver tissue samples to identify differentially expressed peptides between the normal and disease samples. For a total of 44,318 spectra obtained through MS/MS analysis, Q-FISH yielded 14,747 clusters. Among these, 5,777 clusters were identified only in the HCC sample, 6,648 clusters only in the normal tissue sample

  16. Spectral fluctuations and zeta functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, N.L.; Schmit, C.; Voros, A.

    1987-01-01

    The study theoretically and numerically the role of the fluctuations of eigenvalue spectra {μ/sub n} in a particular analytical continuation process applied to the (generalized) zeta function Z(s) = Σ/sub n/μ/sub n//sup -s/ for s large and positive. A particularly interesting example is the spectrum of the Laplacian on a triangular domain which tessellates a compact surface of constant negative curvature (of genus two). The authors indeed find that the fluctuations restrict the abscissa of convergence, and also affect the rate of convergence. This then initiates a new approach to the exploration of spectral fluctuations through the convergence of analytical continuation processes

  17. Spectral downshifting in MBO3:Nd3+ (M=Y, La) phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omanwar, S. K.; Sawala, N. S.

    2017-11-01

    The spectral downshifting (DS) from ultra-violet (UV)/visible (VIS) light to near infra-red (NIR) radiation in Nd3+ doped YBO3 and LaBO3 phosphors is reported. The prepared materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) properties along with time-decay curves were studied which confirmed the spectral DS from VIS to NIR radiation. This can be employed to overcome the spectral mismatch of crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell with solar spectrum. The prepared Nd3+ doped as prepared phosphors provide NIR emission (1052 nm) at excitation of 586 nm where response of c-Si solar cell was optimum. Thus spectral modification by mentioned phosphor can be utilized to improve solar cells performance. Hence these phosphors have potential application for photovoltaic (PV) technology.

  18. Affinement spectral dans les lasers à colorants pulsés.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamant, P

    1978-03-15

    Spectral narrowing in pulsed dye lasers is studied theoretically. Fabry-Perot etalons, gratings, and prisms are considered as tuning elements. Each one is characterized by a new parameter: the spectral width associated with a round trip in the laser cavity. Numerical examples show that depending on cavity parameters it is either the round-trip spectral width or the width due to beam divergence which limits the bandwidth of the laser emission. Instantaneous spectral narrowing is found to be proportional to the square root of the time elapsed after the laser onset when a Fabry-Perot etalon or grating is used. When a prism is set in the laser cavity the instantaneous narrowing is proportional to time.

  19. Spectral statistics in the quantized cardioid billiard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baecker, A.; Steiner, F.; Stifter, P.

    1994-11-01

    The spectral statistics in the strongly chaotic cardioid billiard are studied. The analysis is based on the first 11000 quantal energy levels for odd and even symmetry respectively. It is found that the level-spacing distribution is in good agreement with the GOE distribution of random-matrix theory. In case of the number variance and rigidity we observe agreement with the random-matrix model for short-range correlations only, whereas for long-range correlations both statistics saturate in agreement with semiclassical expectations. Furthermore the conjecture that for classically chaotic systems the normalized mode fluctuations have a universal Gaussian distribution with unit variance is tested and found to be in very good agreement for both symmetry classes. By means of the Gutzwiller trace formula the trace of the cosine-modulated heat kernel is studied. Since the billiard boundary is focusing there are conjugate points giving rise to zeros at the locations of the periodic orbits instead of exclusively Gaussian peaks. (orig.)

  20. The Complete Spectral Catalog of Bright BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Band, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We present a systematic spectral analysis of 350 bright Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE; approx. 30 keV - 2 MeV; including 17 short GRBs) with high energy and time resolution. Our sample was selected from the complete set of 2704 BATSE GRBs based on their energy fluence or peak photon flux values to assure good statistics. To obtain well-constrained, model-unbiased spectral parameters, a set of various photon models is used to fit each spectrum, and internal characteristics of each model are also investigated. A thorough analysis has been performed on 342 time-integrated and 8459 time-resolved burst spectra, and the effects of integration times in determining the spectral parameters are explored. The analysis results presented here provide the most detailed perspective of spectral aspects of the GRB prompt emission to date. Using the results, we study correlations among spectral parameters and spectral evolutions. The results of all spectral fits are available electronically in FITS format, from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  1. JPSS-1 VIIRS RSB sensor spectral response calibration and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinan; Butler, Jim; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Schwarting, Tom; Mcintire, Jeff; Ji, Qiang; Oudrari, Hassan

    2017-09-01

    We present system-level responsivity calibration results of the visible and near infrared channels of JPSS-1 VIIRS in the reflective solar band (RSB) from bands M1( 412 nm) to M7 (865 nm). A monochromator-based method based on the Spectral Measurement Assembly (SpMA), and a laser-based calibration method based on Travelling-Spectral Irradiance and Radiance responsivity Calibrations using Uniform Sources (T-SIRCUS) were applied with different illumination methods to obtain the relative and absolute spectral responses (RSR and ASR). The spectral features of RSR for each band are verified by comparing to the component-level spectral transmittance of the VIIRS bandpass filters. Variation of RSR results of a single pixel/detector with respect to the band-averaged for each band is also investigated. Utilization of RSR results from SpMA and T-SIRCUS with different illumination methods as well as the component transmittance results enables us to recognize optical and electrical cross-talk from out-of-band, which is estimated at about 3 %. We also attempted to use the ASRs from T-SIRCUS to validate the gain coefficients derived from an independent radiometric calibration test using a broadband source. Three spectral shapes of flat spectral radiance, Tungsten lamp, and solar emission are used to simulate different scenarios for baseline, pre-launch calibration, and on-orbit calibration to verify the radiometric coefficients with the more accurate NIST-traceable calibration.

  2. Spectral signatures of fluorescence and light absorption to identify crude oils found in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2014-08-01

    To protect the natural marine ecosystem, it is necessary to continuously enhance knowledge of environmental contamination, including oil pollution. Therefore, to properly track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the natural components of seawater, a description of the essential spectral features describing petroleum products is necessary. This study characterises two optically-different types of crude oils (Petrobaltic and Romashkino) - substances belonging to multi-fluorophoric systems. To obtain the spectral features of crude oils, the excitation-emission spectroscopy technique was applied. The fluorescence and light absorption properties for various concentrations of oils at a stabilised temperature are described. Both excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) and absorption spectra of crude oils are discussed. Based on the EEM spectra, both excitation end emission peaks for the wavelengthindependent fluorescence maximum (Exmax/ Emmax) - characteristic points for each type of oil - were identified and compared with the literature data concerning typical marine chemical structures.

  3. Dust-deficient Palomar-Green Quasars and the Diversity of AGN Intrinsic IR Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Jianwei; Rieke, G. H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Shi, Yong, E-mail: jianwei@email.arizona.edu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-02-01

    To elucidate the intrinsic broadband infrared (IR) emission properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 87 z ≲ 0.5 Palomar-Green (PG) quasars. While the Elvis AGN template with a moderate far-IR correction can reasonably match the SEDs of the AGN components in ∼60% of the sample (and is superior to alternatives such as that by Assef), it fails on two quasar populations: (1) hot-dust-deficient (HDD) quasars that show very weak emission thoroughly from the near-IR to the far-IR, and (2) warm-dust-deficient (WDD) quasars that have similar hot dust emission as normal quasars but are relatively faint in the mid- and far-IR. After building composite AGN templates for these dust-deficient quasars, we successfully fit the 0.3–500 μm SEDs of the PG sample with the appropriate AGN template, an infrared template of a star-forming galaxy, and a host galaxy stellar template. 20 HDD and 12 WDD quasars are identified from the SED decomposition, including seven ambiguous cases. Compared with normal quasars, the HDD quasars have AGNs with relatively low Eddington ratios and the fraction of WDD quasars increases with AGN luminosity. Moreover, both the HDD and WDD quasar populations show relatively stronger mid-IR silicate emission. Virtually identical SED properties are also found in some quasars from z = 0.5 to 6. We propose a conceptual model to demonstrate that the observed dust deficiency of quasars can result from a change of structures of the circumnuclear tori that can occur at any cosmic epoch.

  4. Parametric image reconstruction using spectral analysis of PET projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meikle, Steven R.; Matthews, Julian C.; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Bailey, Dale L.; Livieratos, Lefteris; Jones, Terry; Price, Pat

    1998-01-01

    Spectral analysis is a general modelling approach that enables calculation of parametric images from reconstructed tracer kinetic data independent of an assumed compartmental structure. We investigated the validity of applying spectral analysis directly to projection data motivated by the advantages that: (i) the number of reconstructions is reduced by an order of magnitude and (ii) iterative reconstruction becomes practical which may improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A dynamic software phantom with typical 2-[ 11 C]thymidine kinetics was used to compare projection-based and image-based methods and to assess bias-variance trade-offs using iterative expectation maximization (EM) reconstruction. We found that the two approaches are not exactly equivalent due to properties of the non-negative least-squares algorithm. However, the differences are small ( 1 and, to a lesser extent, VD). The optimal number of EM iterations was 15-30 with up to a two-fold improvement in SNR over filtered back projection. We conclude that projection-based spectral analysis with EM reconstruction yields accurate parametric images with high SNR and has potential application to a wide range of positron emission tomography ligands. (author)

  5. Cosmic backgrounds of relic gravitons and their absolute normalization

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Provided the consistency relations are not violated, the recent Bicep2 observations pin down the absolute normalization, the spectral slope and the maximal frequency of the cosmic graviton background produced during inflation. The properly normalized spectra are hereby computed from the lowest frequencies (of the order of the present Hubble rate) up to the highest frequency range in the GHz region. Deviations from the conventional paradigm cannot be excluded and are examined by allowing for different physical possibilities including, in particular, a running of the tensor spectral index, an explicit breaking of the consistency relations and a spike in the high-frequency tail of the spectrum coming either from a post-inflationary phase dominated by a stiff fluid of from the contribution of waterfall fields in a hybrid inflationary context. The direct determinations of the tensor to scalar ratio at low frequencies, if confirmed by the forthcoming observations, will also affect and constrain the high-frequencies...

  6. Normal Untreated Jurkat Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions. These Jurkat cells, a human acute T-cell leukemia was obtained to evaluate three types of potential experimental stressors: a) Temperature elevation; b) Serum starvation; and c) Centrifugal force. The data from previous spaceflight experiments showed that actin filaments and cell shape are significantly different for the control. These normal cells serve as the baseline for future spaceflight experiments.

  7. Normal shoulder: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, G.J.; Bloem, J.L.; Obermann, W.R.; Verbout, A.J.; Rozing, P.M.; Doornbos, J.

    1986-06-01

    Relatively poor spatial resolution has been obtained in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the shoulder because the shoulder can only be placed in the periphery of the magnetic field. The authors have devised an anatomically shaped surface coil that enables MR to demonstrate normal shoulder anatomy in different planes with high spatial resolution. In the axial plane anatomy analogous to that seen on computed tomographic (CT) scans can be demonstrated. Variations in scapular position (produced by patient positioning) may make reproducibility of sagittal and coronal plane images difficult by changing the relationship of the plane to the shoulder anatomy. Oblique planes, for which the angle is chosen from the axial image, have the advantage of easy reproducibility. Obliquely oriented structures and relationships are best seen in oblique plane images and can be evaluated in detail.

  8. Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis of Luminous Infrared Galaxies from GOALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    U, Vivian; Sanders, D.; Evans, A.; Mazzarella, J.; Armus, L.; Iwasawa, K.; Vavilkin, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; GOALS Team

    2009-05-01

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) were thought to be well understood and exemplified by that of Arp 220, the "poster child" of these objects; but in fact, Arp 220 has been shown to be special in more than one way. Here we present comprehensive SEDs (from radio through x-ray) for the 88 most luminous (U)LIRGs in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which combines multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic data from space telescopes (Spitzer, HST, GALEX, and Chandra) in an effort to fully understand galaxy evolution processes and the enhanced infrared emission in the local universe. Spanning the luminosity range 11.4 < log(L_ir/L_sun) < 12.5, our objects are a complete subset of the flux-limited IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. To complement spacecraft data, we also took optical imaging data from Mauna Kea as well as searched through literature in order to compile accurate and consistent photometry and fully characterize the spectral shapes of the SEDs. We then analyzed the ratios of the radio, infrared, optical, and x-ray emission as a function of infrared luminosity and discussed the trends observed.

  9. Spectral Properties of AGN with Very Weak [O III] Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacevic, J.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectral properties of a sample of 58 Active GalacticNuclei (AGN spectra, in which emission [O~III] $lambdalambda$4959, 5007 AA lines are weak or totally absent, are analyzed. In order to investigate thephysical reason for the [O~III] emission suppression, the spectral propertiesof the weak [O~III] spectra sample are compared with the same properties of asample of 269 spectra with the strong [O~III] lines. The spectra are obtainedfrom Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS Database. It is found that the objectswith the weak or absent [O~III] $lambdalambda$4959, 5007 AA linesgenerally have the high continuum luminosities (log($lambda$L$_{5100}$ $>$45, that they are very rare at smaller redshifts ($z <$ 0.3 and that theyusually have strong starburst influence. From the sample with weak or absent[O~III] lines, two boundary subgroups may be distinguished: the subgroup witha strong H$beta$ narrow component and subgroup with a very weak or negligibleH$beta$ narrow component. The physical causes for the [O~III] linessuppressing are probably different in these two subgroups: the [O~III] linesare absent in objects with strong narrow H$beta$ probably because of strongstarburst (SB activity, which produces high density of the gas, while in theobjects with the negligible narrow H$beta$, the reason for [O~III] and narrowH$beta$ suppression may be a low covering factor.

  10. Spectral properties of AGN with very weak [O III] lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević J.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectral properties of a sample of 58 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN spectra, in which emission [O III] λλ4959, 5007 Å lines are weak or totally absent, are analyzed. In order to investigate the physical reason for the [O III] emission suppression, the spectral properties of the weak [O III] spectra sample are compared with the same properties of a sample of 269 spectra with the strong [O III] lines. The spectra are obtained from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS Database. It is found that the objects with the weak or absent [O III] λλ4959, 5007 Å lines generally have the high continuum luminosities (log(λL5100 > 45, that they are very rare at smaller redshifts (z < 0.3 and that they usually have strong starburst influence. From the sample with weak or absent [O III] lines, two boundary subgroups may be distinguished: the subgroup with a strong Hβ narrow component and subgroup with a very weak or negligible Hβ narrow component. The physical causes for the [O III] lines suppressing are probably different in these two subgroups: the [O III] lines are absent in objects with strong narrow Hβ probably because of strong starburst (SB activity, which produces high density of the gas, while in the objects with the negligible narrow Hβ, the reason for [O III] and narrow Hβ suppression may be a low covering factor.

  11. Synthesis and Spectral Evaluation of Some Unsymmetrical Mesoporphyrinic Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rica Boscencu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and spectral evaluation of new zinc and copper unsymmetrical mesoporphyrinic complexes are reported. Zn(II-5-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl-10,15,20-tris-(4-carboxymethylphenylporphyrin, Zn(II-5-[(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl]-10,15,20-tris-(4-carboxymethylphenylporphyrin, Cu(II-5-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl-10,15,20-tris-(4-carboxymethylphenylporphyrin and Cu(II-5-[(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl]-10,15,20-tris-(4-carboxymethylphenylporphyrin were synthesized using microwave-assisted synthesis. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, EPR and NMR spectroscopy, which fully confirmed their structure. The spectral absorption properties of the porphyrinic complexes were studied in solvents with different polarities. Fluorescence emission and singlet oxygen formation quantum yields were evaluated for the compounds under study, revealing high yields for the zinc derivatives. The copper complexes are not emissive and only display residual capacity for singlet oxygen formation.

  12. Auditory evoked fields elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal changes in human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko eOkamoto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral-temporal change were very similar to those elicited by the spectral change, but those elicited by the temporal change were delayed by 30 – 50 ms and differed from the others in morphology. The results suggest that human brain responses corresponding to spectral sound changes precede those corresponding to temporal sound changes, even when the spectral and temporal changes occur simultaneously.

  13. X-ray burst-induced spectral variability in 4U 1728-34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajava, J. J. E.; Sánchez-Fernández, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Poutanen, J.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: INTEGRAL has been monitoring the Galactic center region for more than a decade. Over this time it has detected hundreds of type-I X-ray bursts from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34, also known as the slow burster. Our aim is to study the connection between the persistent X-ray spectra and the X-ray burst spectra in a broad spectral range. Methods: We performed spectral modeling of the persistent emission and the X-ray burst emission of 4U 1728-34 using data from the INTEGRAL JEM-X and IBIS/ISGRI instruments. Results: We constructed a hardness intensity diagram to track spectral state variations. In the soft state, the energy spectra are characterized by two thermal components likely coming from the accretion disc and the boundary/spreading layer, together with a weak hard X-ray tail that we detect in 4U 1728-34 for the first time in the 40 to 80 keV range. In the hard state, the source is detected up to 200 keV and the spectrum can be described by a thermal Comptonization model plus an additional component: either a powerlaw tail or reflection. By stacking 123 X-ray bursts in the hard state, we detect emission up to 80 keV during the X-ray bursts. We find that during the bursts the emission above 40 keV decreases by a factor of approximately three with respect to the persistent emission level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the enhanced X-ray burst emission changes the spectral properties of the accretion disc in the hard state. The likely cause is an X-ray burst induced cooling of the electrons in the inner hot flow near the neutron star.

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Infrared Emission From Inorganic and Organic Substances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, C.S; Brown, E; Hommerich, U; Trivedi, S. B; Snyder, A. P; Samuels, A. C

    2006-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been established as a powerful method for identifying trace elemental contaminants by analyzing the atomic spectral emission lines that result subsequent to plasmas generated by laser power...

  15. Spectral Quantitation Of Hydroponic Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Kahle, Scott J.; Wilson, Monica A.; Boehlen, Michelle

    1996-01-01

    Instrument continuously monitors hydroponic solution by use of absorption and emission spectrometry to determine concentrations of principal nutrients, including nitrate, iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, and others. Does not depend on extraction and processing of samples, use of such surrograte parameters as pH or electrical conductivity for control, or addition of analytical reagents to solution. Solution not chemically altered by analysis and can be returned to hydroponic process stream after analysis.

  16. Measurement of Emissivity of Porous Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKALACA, Orhan

    1998-01-01

    In this study, measurements of spectral and total emissivities of seven different porous ceramic materials and one ceramic fibre material are reported. Measurements were made for wavelength range from 1.2 µm to 20 µm and temperature range from 200 °C to 700 °C. It was found that total emissivity increases with increase of pore size but decreases with increase of temperature. The results showed all the porous ceramic materials tested to be much better than ceramic fibre in terms of total em...

  17. Spectral functions in mathematics and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsten, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    The literature on the spectral analysis of second order elliptic differential operators contains a great deal of information on the spectral functions for explicitly known spectra. The same is not true, however, for situations where the spectra are not explicitly known. Over the last several years, the author and his colleagues have developed new, innovative methods for the exact analysis of a variety of spectral functions occurring in spectral geometry and under external conditions in statistical mechanics and quantum field theory. Spectral Functions in Mathematics and Physics presents a detailed overview of these advances. The author develops and applies methods for analyzing determinants arising when the external conditions originate from the Casimir effect, dielectric media, scalar backgrounds, and magnetic backgrounds. The zeta function underlies all of these techniques, and the book begins by deriving its basic properties and relations to the spectral functions. The author then uses those relations to d...

  18. Quantitative spectral comparison by weighted spectral difference for protein higher order structure confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Nikita N; Winn, Bradley C; Arthur, Kelly K; Gabrielson, John P

    2014-11-01

    Previously, different approaches of spectral comparison were evaluated, and the spectral difference (SD) method was shown to be valuable for its linearity with spectral changes and its independence on data spacing (Anal. Biochem. 434 (2013) 153-165). In this note, we present an enhancement of the SD calculation, referred to as the "weighted spectral difference" (WSD), by implementing a weighting function based on relative signal magnitude. While maintaining the advantages of the SD method, WSD improves the method sensitivity to spectral changes and tolerance for baseline inclusion. Furthermore, a generalized formula is presented to unify further development of approaches to quantify spectral difference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. IRAS far-infrared colours of normal stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.; Cote, J.; Aumann, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of IRAS observations at 12, 25, 60 and 100 microns of bright stars of spectral type O to M is presented. The objective is to identify the 'normal' stellar population and to characterize it in terms of the relationships between (B-V) and (V-/12/), between (R-I) and (V-/12/), and as a function of spectral type and luminosity class. A well-defined relation is found between the color of normal stars in the visual (B-V), (R-I) and in the IR, which does not depend on luminosity class. Using the (B-V), (V-/12/) relation for normal stars, it is found that B and M type stars show a large fraction of deviating stars, mostly with IR excess that is probably caused by circumstellar material. A comparison of IRAS colors with the Johnson colors as a function of spectral type shows good agreement except for the K0 to M5 type stars. The results will be useful in identifying the deviating stars detected with IRAS.

  20. Controlling fugitive emissions from mechanical seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, W.V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that enactment of the 1990 Federal Clean Air Amendments will sharply focus efforts in the process industries to reduce fugitive emissions. Moreover, state and local governments may be imposing stricter laws and regulations which will affect allowable fugitive emissions from U.S. refineries and process plants. Plants outside the U.S. have similar concerns. Clearly, mechanical seals for process pumps represent an enormous population and is one category of equipment destined for careful evaluation as a means to control fugitive emissions. Fugitive are unintentional emissions from valves, pumps, flanges, compressors, etc., as opposed to point-source emissions from stacks, vents and flares. Fugitive emissions do not occur as a part of normal plant operations, but result from the effects of: Malfunctions, Age, Lack of proper maintenance, Operator error, Improper equipment specification, Use of inferior technology, and externally caused damage