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Sample records for normal prostate cells

  1. Notch signaling is required for normal prostatic epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

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    Wang, Xi-De; Leow, Ching Ching; Zha, Jiping; Tang, Zhijun; Modrusan, Zora; Radtke, Freddy; Aguet, Michel; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2006-02-01

    Notch pathway is crucial for stem/progenitor cell maintenance, growth and differentiation in a variety of tissues. Using a transgenic cell ablation approach, we found in our previous study that cells expressing Notch1 are crucial for prostate early development and re-growth. Here, we further define the role of Notch signaling in regulating prostatic epithelial cell growth and differentiation using biochemical and genetic approaches in ex vivo or in vivo systems. Treatment of developing prostate grown in culture with inhibitors of gamma-secretase/presenilin, which is required for Notch cleavage and activation, caused a robust increase in proliferation of epithelial cells co-expressing cytokeratin 8 and 14, lack of luminal/basal layer segregation and dramatically reduced branching morphogenesis. Using conditional Notch1 gene deletion mouse models, we found that inactivation of Notch1 signaling resulted in profound prostatic alterations, including increased tufting, bridging and enhanced epithelial proliferation. Cells within these lesions co-expressed both luminal and basal cell markers, a feature of prostatic epithelial cells in predifferentiation developmental stages. Microarray analysis revealed that the gene expression in a number of genetic networks was altered following Notch1 gene deletion in prostate. Furthermore, expression of Notch1 and its effector Hey-1 gene in human prostate adenocarcinomas were found significantly down-regulated compared to normal control tissues. Taken together, these data suggest that Notch signaling is critical for normal cell proliferation and differentiation in the prostate, and deregulation of this pathway may facilitate prostatic tumorigenesis.

  2. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

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    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  3. Comparative analysis of gene expression in normal and cancer human prostate cell lines

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    E. E. Rosenberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in men with malignant tumors. The urgent problem was a search for biomarkers of prostate cancer, which would allow distinguishing between aggressive metastatic and latent tumors. The aim of this work was to search for differentially expressed genes in normal epithelial cells PNT2 and prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, produced from tumors with different aggressiveness and metas­tatic ability. Such genes might be used to create a panel of prognostic markers for aggressiveness and metastasis. Relative gene expression of 65 cancer-related genes was determined by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR. Expression of 29 genes was changed in LNCaP cells, 20 genes in DU145 and 16 genes in PC3 cell lines, compared with normal line PNT2. The obtained data make it possible to conclude that the epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition took place, which involved the loss of epithelial markers, reduced cell adhesion and increased migration. We have also found few differentially expressed genes among 3 prostate cancer cell lines. We have found that genes, involved in cell adhesion (CDH1, invasiveness and metastasis (IL8, CXCL2 and cell cycle control (P16, CCNE1 underwent most changes. These genes might be used for diagnosis and prognosis of invasive metastatic prostate tumors.

  4. Effect of resveratrol and zinc on intracellular zinc status in normal human prostate epithelial cells

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    To evaluate the influence of resveratrol on cellular zinc status, normal human prostate epithelial (NHPrE) cells were treated with 6 levels of resveratrol (0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM) and 4 levels of zinc [0, 4, 16, and 32 microM for zinc-deficient (ZD), zinc-normal (ZN), zinc-adequate (ZA), an...

  5. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  6. Differential expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and its regulation by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in normal and malignant prostate cells.

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    Subbarayan, V; Sabichi, A L; Llansa, N; Lippman, S M; Menter, D G

    2001-03-15

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression is elevated in some malignancies; however, information is scarce regarding COX-2 contributions to the development of prostate cancer and its regulation by inflammatory cytokines. The present study compared and contrasted the expression levels and subcellular distribution patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 in normal prostate [prostate epithelial cell (PrEC), prostate smooth muscle (PrSM), and prostate stromal (PrSt)] primary cell cultures and prostatic carcinoma cell lines (PC-3, LNCaP, and DU145). The basal COX-2 mRNA and protein levels were high in normal PrEC and low in tumor cells, unlike many other normal cells and tumor cells. Because COX-2 levels were low in prostate smooth muscle cells, prostate stromal cells, and tumor cells, we also examined whether COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression was elevated in response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a strong inducer of COX-2 expression. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated different patterns and kinetics of expression for COX-1 and COX-2 among normal cells and tumor cells in response to TNF-alpha. In particular, COX-2 protein levels increased, and the subcellular distribution formed a distinct perinuclear ring in the normal cells at 4 h after TNF-alpha exposure. The COX-2 protein levels also increased in cancer cells, but the subcellular distribution was less organized; COX-2 protein appeared diffuse in some cells and accumulated as focal deposits in the cytoplasm of other cells. TNF-alpha induction of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 correlated inversely with induction of apoptosis. We conclude that COX-2 expression may be important to PrEC cell function. Although it is low in stromal and tumor cells, COX-2 expression is induced by TNF-alpha in these cells, and this responsiveness may play an important role in prostate cancer progression.

  7. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

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    Victor Trevino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell

  8. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells

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    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J.; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication

  9. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antczak, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  10. Hypoxia primes human normal prostate epithelial cells and cancer cell lines for the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation.

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    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Choubey, Divaker

    2016-05-10

    The molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to prostatic chronic inflammation (PCI) remain largely unknown. Because hypoxia stimulates the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, which "primes" cells for inflammasome activation by inducing the expression of NLRP3 or AIM2 receptor and pro-IL-1β, we investigated whether hypoxia could activate the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) and cancer cell lines. Here we report that hypoxia (1% O2) treatment of PrECs, prostate cell lines, and a macrophage cell line (THP-1) increased the levels of NLRP3, AIM2, and pro-IL-1β. Further, hypoxia in cells potentiated activation of the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activity. Notably, hypoxia "primed" cells for NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation through stimulation of the NF-κB activity. Our observations support the idea that hypoxia in human prostatic tumors contributes to PCI, in part, by priming cells for the activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome.

  11. Protein Profiling of Isolated Leukocytes, Myofibroblasts, Epithelial, Basal, and Endothelial Cells from Normal, Hyperplastic, Cancerous, and Inflammatory Human Prostate Tissues

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    Zahraa I. Khamis, Kenneth A. Iczkowski, Ziad J. Sahab, Qing-Xiang Amy Sang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ neoplastic prostate cells are not lethal unless they become invasive and metastatic. For cells to become invasive, the prostate gland must undergo degradation of the basement membrane and disruption of the basal cell layer underneath the luminal epithelia. Although the roles of proteinases in breaking down the basement membrane have been well-studied, little is known about the factors that induce basal cell layer disruption, degeneration, and its eventual disappearance in invasive cancer. It is hypothesized that microenvironmental factors may affect the degradation of the basal cell layer, which if protected may prevent tumor progression and invasion. In this study, we have revealed differential protein expression patterns between epithelial and stromal cells isolated from different prostate pathologies and identified several important epithelial and stromal proteins that may contribute to inflammation and malignant transformation of human benign prostate tissues to cancerous tissues using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and proteomics methods. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 was downregulated in basal cells of benign prsotate. Caspase-1 and interleukin-18 receptor 1 were highly expressed in leukocytes of prostate cancer. Proto-oncogene Wnt-3 was downregulated in endothelial cells of prostatitis tissue and tyrosine phosphatase non receptor type 1 was only found in normal and benign endothelial cells. Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 14 was downregulated in myofibroblasts of prostatitis tissue. Interestingly, integrin alpha-6 was upregulated in epithelial cells but not detected in myofibroblasts of prostate cancer. Further validation of these proteins may generate new strategies for the prevention of basal cell layer disruption and subsequent cancer invasion.

  12. Withaferin A Induces Cell Death Selectively in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells but Not in Normal Fibroblast Cells.

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    Yukihiro Nishikawa

    Full Text Available Withaferin A (WA, a major bioactive component of the Indian herb Withania somnifera, induces cell death (apoptosis/necrosis in multiple types of tumor cells, but the molecular mechanism underlying this cytotoxicity remains elusive. We report here that 2 μM WA induced cell death selectively in androgen-insensitive PC-3 and DU-145 prostate adenocarcinoma cells, whereas its toxicity was less severe in androgen-sensitive LNCaP prostate adenocarcinoma cells and normal human fibroblasts (TIG-1 and KD. WA also killed PC-3 cells in spheroid-forming medium. DNA microarray analysis revealed that WA significantly increased mRNA levels of c-Fos and 11 heat-shock proteins (HSPs in PC-3 and DU-145, but not in LNCaP and TIG-1. Western analysis revealed increased expression of c-Fos and reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP(L. Expression of HSPs such as HSPA6 and Hsp70 was conspicuously elevated; however, because siRNA-mediated depletion of HSF-1, an HSP-inducing transcription factor, reduced PC-3 cell viability, it is likely that these heat-shock genes were involved in protecting against cell death. Moreover, WA induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in PC-3 and DU-145, but not in normal fibroblasts. Immunocytochemistry and immuno-electron microscopy revealed that WA disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton, possibly inducing the ROS generation, c-Fos expression and c-FLIP(L suppression. These observations suggest that multiple events followed by disruption of the vimentin cytoskeleton play pivotal roles in WA-mediated cell death.

  13. 17Beta-estradiol at low concentrations acts through distinct pathways in normal versus benign prostatic hyperplasia-derived prostate stromal cells.

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    Park, Irwin I; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Victoria; Kozlowski, James M; Zhang, Ju; Lee, Chung

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differential responses to low concentrations of 17beta-estradiol (E2) in primary stromal cell cultures derived from either normal organ donors or benign prostatic hyperplasia or hypertrophy (BPH) specimens. Furthermore, we sought to identify the potential mechanism of E2 action in these cell types, through either a genomic or nongenomic mechanism. We initially treated stromal cells derived from five normal prostates or five BPH specimens with low concentrations of E2 (0.001-1.0 nM) and analyzed their growth response. To determine whether genomic or nongenomic pathways were involved, we performed studies using specific estrogen receptor antagonists to confirm transcriptional activity or MAPK inhibitors to confirm the involvement of rapid signaling. Results of these studies revealed a fundamental difference in the mechanism of the response to E2. In normal cells, we found that a nongenomic, rapid E2 signaling pathway is predominantly involved, mediated by G protein-coupled receptor-30 and the subsequent activation of ERK1/2. In BPH-derived prostate stromal cells, a genomic pathway is predominantly involved because the addition of ICI 182780 was sufficient to abrogate any estrogenic effects. In conclusion, prostate stromal cells respond to far lower concentrations of E2 than previously recognized or examined, and this response is mediated through two distinct mechanisms, depending on its origin. This may provide the basis for new insights into the causes of, and possible treatments for, BPH.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- gamma expression in human malignant and normal brain, breast and prostate-derived cells.

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    Nwankwo, J O; Robbins, M E

    2001-01-01

    The constitutive and gamma -linolenic acid (GLA)-induced expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) immunoreactive protein in a panel of human malignant brain (U87MG, T98G); breast (MCF-7, MB MDA-231, MB MDA 435) and prostate (ALVA, DU-145, LNCaP, PC3) cell lines have been compared with those for their normal cell counterparts, the human normal astrocyte (NHA), mammary epithelial (HMEC) and prostate epithelial (PrEC) cells, respectively. Constitutive levels of expression for PPAR gamma protein were significantly higher in the malignant cell lines relative to their normal cells. GLA supplementation did not affect the protein expression in malignant cells but caused 6- and 3-fold increases in normal breast and prostate cells, respectively. Since activation of PPAR gamma protein in some human malignant cell lines has been demonstrated to induce tumour cell death, these findings signal the need to exploit the significantly elevated expression of this protein in the therapy of human cancer. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  15. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

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    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  16. Vitamin D3 modulated gene expression patterns in human primary normal and cancer prostate cells.

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    Guzey, Meral; Luo, Jianhua; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2004-10-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the steroid/retinoid receptor superfamily of nuclear receptors and has potential tumor-suppressive functions in prostate and other cancer types. Vitamin D3 (VD3) exerts its biological actions by binding within cells to VDR. The VDR then interacts with specific regions of the DNA in cells, and triggers changes in the activity of genes involved in cell division, cell survival, and cellular function. Using human primary cultures and the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line, ALVA-31, we examined the effects of VD3 under different culture conditions. Complete G0/G1 arrest of ALVA-31 cells and approximately 50% inhibition of tumor stromal cell growth was observed. To determine changes in gene expression patterns related to VD3 activity, microarray analysis was performed. More than approximately 20,000 genes were evaluated for twofold relative increases and decreases in expression levels. A number of the gene targets that were up- and down-regulated are related to potential mechanisms of prostatic growth regulation. These include estrogen receptor (ER), heat shock proteins: 70 and 90, Apaf1, Her-2/neu, and paxillin. Utilizing antibodies generated against these targets, we were able to confirm the changes at the protein level. These newly reported gene expression patterns provide novel information not only potential markers, but also on the genes involved in VD3 induced apoptosis in PCa.

  17. TRPM8 ion channels differentially modulate proliferation and cell cycle distribution of normal and cancer prostate cells.

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    María Ll Valero

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells.

  18. TRPM8 ion channels differentially modulate proliferation and cell cycle distribution of normal and cancer prostate cells.

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    Valero, María Ll; Mello de Queiroz, Fernanda; Stühmer, Walter; Viana, Félix; Pardo, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells.

  19. L-lactate metabolism can occur in normal and cancer prostate cells via the novel mitochondrial L-lactate dehydrogenase.

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    De Bari, Lidia; Chieppa, Gabriella; Marra, Ersilia; Passarella, Salvatore

    2010-12-01

    Both normal (PTN1A) and cancer (PC3) prostate cells produce high levels of L-lactate because of a low energy supply via the citric cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. Since some mammalian mitochondria possess a mitochondrial L-lactate dehydrogenase (mLDH), we investigated whether prostate cells can take up L-lactate and metabolize it in the mitochondria. We report here that externally added L-lactate can enter both normal and cancer cells and mitochondria, as shown by both the oxygen consumption and by the increase in fluorescence of NAD(P)H which occur as a result of L-lactate addition. In both cell types L-lactate enters mitochondria in a carrier-mediated manner, as shown by the inhibition of swelling measurements due to the non-penetrant thiol reagent mersalyl. An L-lactate dehydrogenase exists in mitochondria of both cell types located in the inner compartment, as shown by kinetic investigation and by immunological analysis. The mLDHs proved to differ from the cytosolic enzymes (which themselves differ from one another) as functionally investigated with respect to kinetic features and pH profile. Normal and cancer cells were found to differ from one another with respect to mLDH protein level and activity, being the enzyme more highly expressed and of higher activity in PC3 cells. Moreover, the kinetic features and pH profiles of the PC3 mLDH also differ from those of the PNT1A enzyme, this suggesting the occurrence of separate isoenzymes.

  20. Characterization of prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia and normal prostates using transrectal 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a preliminary report

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    Narayan, P.; Jajodia, P.; Kurhanewicz, J.; Thomas, A.; MacDonald, J.; Hubesch, B.; Hedgcock, M.; Anderson, C.M.; James, T.L.; Tanagho, E.A. (Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco (USA))

    1991-07-01

    We assessed the ability of 31phosphorus (31P) transrectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize normal human prostates as well as prostates with benign and malignant neoplasms. With a transrectal probe that we devised for surface coil spectroscopy we studied 15 individuals with normal (5), benign hyperplastic (4) and malignant (6) prostates. Digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to aid in accurate positioning of the transrectal probe against the region of interest within the prostate. The major findings of the in vivo studies were that normal prostates had phosphocreatine-to-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios of 1.2 +/- 0.2, phosphomonoester-to-beta-ATP ratios of 1.1 +/- 0.1 and phosphomonoester-to-phosphocreatine ratios of 0.9 +/- 0.1. Malignant prostates had phosphocreatine-to-beta-ATP ratios that were lower (0.7 +/- 0.1) than those of normal prostates (p less than 0.02) or prostates with benign hyperplasia. Malignant prostates had phosphomonoester-to-beta-ATP ratios (1.8 +/- 0.2) that were higher than that of normal prostates (p less than 0.02). Using the phosphomonoester-to-phosphocreatine ratio, it was possible to differentiate metabolically malignant (2.7 +/- 0.3) from normal prostates (p less than 0.001), with no overlap of individual ratios. The mean phosphomonoester-to-phosphocreatine ratio (1.5 +/- 0.5) of prostates with benign hyperplasia was midway between the normal and malignant ratios, and there was overlap between individual phosphomonoester-to-phosphocreatine ratios of benign prostatic hyperplasia glands with that of normal and malignant glands. To verify the in vivo results, we performed high resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy on perchloric acid extracts of benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue obtained at operation and on a human prostatic cancer cell line DU145.

  1. Stem cells and the role of ETS transcription factors in the differentiation hierarchy of normal and malignant prostate epithelium.

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    Archer, Leanne K; Frame, Fiona M; Maitland, Norman J

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer of men in the UK and accounts for a quarter of all new cases. Although treatment of localised cancer can be successful, there is no cure for patients presenting with invasive prostate cancer and there are less treatment options. They are generally treated with androgen-ablation therapies but eventually the tumours become hormone resistant and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) for which there are no further successful or curative treatments. This highlights the need for new treatment strategies. In order to prevent prostate cancer recurrence and treatment resistance, all the cell populations in a heterogeneous prostate tumour must be targeted, including the rare cancer stem cell (CSC) population. The ETS transcription factor family members are now recognised as a common feature in multiple cancers including prostate cancer; with aberrant expression, loss of tumour suppressor function, inactivating mutations and the formation of fusion genes observed. Most notably, the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is present in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and in prostate CSCs. However, the role of other ETS transcription factors in prostate cancer is less well understood. This review will describe the prostate epithelial cell hierarchy and discuss the evidence behind prostate CSCs and their inherent resistance to conventional cancer therapies. The known and proposed roles of the ETS family of transcription factors in prostate epithelial cell differentiation and regulation of the CSC phenotype will be discussed, as well as how they might be targeted for therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Heterogenous induction of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-like differentiation in normal human prostatic fibroblasts by co-culturing with prostate cancer cells.

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    Ishii, Kenichiro; Mizokami, Atsushi; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Kato, Manabu; Hori, Yasuhide; Arima, Kiminobu; Namiki, Mikio; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    2011-12-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are considered to play a critical role in the promotion of tumorigenesis. However, the mechanisms that generate CAFs are not well elucidated. To understand how CAFs are generated during primary cancer progression, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of normal human prostate stromal cells (PrSC) co-cultured with human prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vitro. In primary cultures of human PCa-derived stromal cells (PCaSC-8 and PCaSC-9), expression of TNC, ACTA2, EGF, FGF7, and IGF1 mRNA was generally higher than PrSC but gene expression patterns were not uniform between PCaSC-8 and PCaSC-9 cells. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels in both PCaSC-8 and PCaSC-9 cells were generally higher than PrSC but levels of both secreted proteins were not same. When PrSCs were co-cultured with androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells or its sublines, androgen-low-sensitive E9 cells and androgen-insensitive AIDL cells, mRNA expression of IGF1 was significantly increased in all combinations. In contrast, expression of COL1A1, TNC, and ACTA2 mRNA was significantly increased only in LNCaP + PrSC and E9 + PrSC co-cultures. Protein production of VEGF was significantly increased only in LNCaP + PrSC and E9 + PrSC co-cultures. Increase of TGFβ protein was observed only in E9 + PrSC co-cultures. These biochemical characteristics of PrSC were partially recapitulated in TGFβ-treated PrSC. We have demonstrated that normal fibroblasts co-cultured with cancer cells become activated and exhibit biochemical characteristics of CAFs in a heterogenous manner. Our results suggest that heterogenous induction of CAF-like differentiation might be strongly dependent on biochemical characteristics of adjacent cancer cells.

  3. Analysis of normal-tumour tissue interaction in tumours: prediction of prostate cancer features from the molecular profile of adjacent normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Trevino

    Full Text Available Statistical modelling, in combination with genome-wide expression profiling techniques, has demonstrated that the molecular state of the tumour is sufficient to infer its pathological state. These studies have been extremely important in diagnostics and have contributed to improving our understanding of tumour biology. However, their importance in in-depth understanding of cancer patho-physiology may be limited since they do not explicitly take into consideration the fundamental role of the tissue microenvironment in specifying tumour physiology. Because of the importance of normal cells in shaping the tissue microenvironment we formulate the hypothesis that molecular components of the profile of normal epithelial cells adjacent the tumour are predictive of tumour physiology. We addressed this hypothesis by developing statistical models that link gene expression profiles representing the molecular state of adjacent normal epithelial cells to tumour features in prostate cancer. Furthermore, network analysis showed that predictive genes are linked to the activity of important secreted factors, which have the potential to influence tumor biology, such as IL1, IGF1, PDGF BB, AGT, and TGFβ.

  4. Lycopene inhibits IGF-I signal transduction and growth in normal prostate epithelial cells by decreasing DHT-modulated IGF-I production in co-cultured reactive stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xunxian; Allen, Jeffrey D; Arnold, Julia T; Blackman, Marc R

    2008-04-01

    Prostate stromal and epithelial cell communication is important in prostate functioning and cancer development. Primary human stromal cells from normal prostate stromal cells (PRSC) maintain a smooth muscle phenotype, whereas those from prostate cancer (6S) display reactive and fibroblastic characteristics. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) stimulates insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production by 6S but not PSRC cells. Effects of reactive versus normal stroma on normal human prostate epithelial (NPE or PREC) cells are poorly understood. We co-cultured NPE plus 6S or PRSC cells to compare influences of different stromal cells on normal epithelium. Because NPE and PREC cells lose androgen receptor (AR) expression in culture, DHT effects must be modulated by associated stromal cells. When treated with camptothecin (CM), NPE cells, alone and in stromal co-cultures, displayed a dose-dependent increase in DNA fragmentation. NPE/6S co-cultures exhibited reduced CM-induced cell death with exposure to DHT, whereas NPE/PRSC co-cultures exhibited CM-induced cell death regardless of DHT treatment. DHT blocked CM-induced, IGF-I-mediated, NPE death in co-cultured NPE/6S cells without, but not with, added anti-IGF-I and anti-IGF-R antibodies. Lycopene consumption is inversely related to human prostate cancer risk and inhibits IGF-I and androgen signaling in rat prostate cancer. In this study, lycopene, in dietary concentrations, reversed DHT effects of 6S cells on NPE cell death, decreased 6S cell IGF-I production by reducing AR and beta-catenin nuclear localization and inhibited IGF-I-stimulated NPE and PREC growth, perhaps by attenuating IGF-I's effects on serine phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3beta and tyrosine phosphorylation of GSK3. This study expands the understanding of the preventive mechanisms of lycopene in prostate cancer.

  5. Stromal Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Normal Prostate, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, and Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa,...

  6. The Aging Prostate Is Never "Normal"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlomm, Thorsten; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We argue against the recently published statement that tumor-specific molecular alterations found in "normal" prostate tissue from cancer patients challenge focal therapy approaches that only target a visible cancer lesion and not the adjacent molecular field....

  7. Comparative characterization of the canine normal prostate in intact and castrated animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chen-Li; van den Ham, René; van Leenders, Geert; van der Lugt, Jaco; Teske, Erik

    2008-04-01

    Prostate diseases in the dog are generally regarded as representative for their human counterparts. We characterized the normal canine prostate in comparison to the normal human prostate. Prostates of dogs were examined histomorphologically and by immunohistochemical detection of the markers CK14, HMWCK, CK5, CK18, CK7, UPIII, PSA, and PSMA. Histomorphologically, the canine prostate lacks the human zonal differentiation, has much more prominent acini, while comprising less stromal tissue. In general, the canine prostate epithelium displayed a highly differentiated character, with no cells expressing CK14, minimal amounts of cells expressing HMWCK/CK5 and the vast majority of cells expressing CK18 and PSA. After castration, the prostate epithelium regressed, and the remaining tubules were largely populated by cells showing a ductal phenotype (HMWCK+/CK5+/CK18+/CK7+). The human and canine prostate are histologically differently organized. The general scheme of cellular differentiation of the prostate epithelium may however be applicable to both species.

  8. Prostate cancer and metastasis initiating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Kelly; Juan Juan Yin

    2008-01-01

    Androgen refractory prostate cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge.Mechanism-based approaches to treating prostate cancer metastasis require an understanding of the developmental origin of the metastasis-initiating cell.Properties of prostate cancer metastases such as plasticity with respect to differentiated phenotype and androgen independence are consistent with the transformation of a prostate epithelial progenitor or stem cell leading to metastasis.This review focuses upon current evidence and concepts addressing the identification and properties of normal prostate stem or progenitor cells and their transformed counterparts.

  9. Hyperspectral Raman imaging of human prostatic cells: An attempt to differentiate normal and malignant cell lines by univariate and multivariate data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, P.; Calarco, A.; Pannico, M.; La Manna, P.; Margarucci, S.; Tafuri, A.; Peluso, G.

    2017-02-01

    Hyperspectral Raman images of human prostatic cells have been collected and analysed with several approaches to reveal differences among normal and tumor cell lines. The objective of the study was to test the potential of different chemometric methods in providing diagnostic responses. We focused our analysis on the ν(Csbnd H) region (2800-3100 cm- 1) owing to its optimal Signal-to-Noise ratio and because the main differences between the spectra of the two cell lines were observed in this frequency range. Multivariate analysis identified two principal components, which were positively recognized as due to the protein and the lipid fractions, respectively. The tumor cells exhibited a modified distribution of the cytoplasmatic lipid fraction (mainly localized alongside the cell boundary) which may result very useful for a preliminary screening. Principal Component analysis was found to provide high contrast and to be well suited for image-processing purposes. Self-Modelling Curve Resolution made available meaningful spectra and relative-concentration values; it revealed a 97% increase of the lipid fraction in the tumor cell with respect to the control. Finally, a univariate approach confirmed significant and reproducible differences between normal and tumor cells.

  10. Utility of ADC measurement on diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiation of prostate cancer, normal prostate and prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Meltem; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Akpolat, Nusret; Orhan, Irfan; Kocakoc, Ercan

    2013-08-01

    To determine the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate parenchyma and prostatitis we obtained ADC values of 50 patients at b 100, 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) diffusion gradients. The ADC values of prostate cancer group were significantly lower than normal prostate and prostatitis group at b 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) gradients. The ADC values at high diffusion gradients may be used in differentiation prostate cancer from normal prostate and prostatitis.

  11. Chromosome-wide mapping of DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells reveals pervasive methylation of gene-associated and conserved intergenic sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA methylation has been linked to genome regulation and dysregulation in health and disease respectively, and methods for characterizing genomic DNA methylation patterns are rapidly emerging. We have developed/refined methods for enrichment of methylated genomic fragments using the methyl-binding domain of the human MBD2 protein (MBD2-MBD) followed by analysis with high-density tiling microarrays. This MBD-chip approach was used to characterize DNA methylation patterns across all non-repetitive sequences of human chromosomes 21 and 22 at high-resolution in normal and malignant prostate cells. Results Examining this data using computational methods that were designed specifically for DNA methylation tiling array data revealed widespread methylation of both gene promoter and non-promoter regions in cancer and normal cells. In addition to identifying several novel cancer hypermethylated 5' gene upstream regions that mediated epigenetic gene silencing, we also found several hypermethylated 3' gene downstream, intragenic and intergenic regions. The hypermethylated intragenic regions were highly enriched for overlap with intron-exon boundaries, suggesting a possible role in regulation of alternative transcriptional start sites, exon usage and/or splicing. The hypermethylated intergenic regions showed significant enrichment for conservation across vertebrate species. A sampling of these newly identified promoter (ADAMTS1 and SCARF2 genes) and non-promoter (downstream or within DSCR9, C21orf57 and HLCS genes) hypermethylated regions were effective in distinguishing malignant from normal prostate tissues and/or cell lines. Conclusions Comparison of chromosome-wide DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells revealed significant methylation of gene-proximal and conserved intergenic sequences. Such analyses can be easily extended for genome-wide methylation analysis in health and disease. PMID:21669002

  12. Molecular decoy to the Y-box binding protein-1 suppresses the growth of breast and prostate cancer cells whilst sparing normal cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Law

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1 is an oncogenic transcription/translation factor that is activated by phosphorylation at S102 whereby it induces the expression of growth promoting genes such as EGFR and HER-2. We recently illustrated by an in vitro kinase assay that a novel peptide to YB-1 was highly phosphorylated by the serine/threonine p90 S6 kinases RSK-1 and RSK-2, and to a lesser degree PKCα and AKT. Herein, we sought to develop this decoy cell permeable peptide (CPP as a cancer therapeutic. This 9-mer was designed as an interference peptide that would prevent endogenous YB-1(S102 phosphorylation based on molecular docking. In cancer cells, the CPP blocked P-YB-1(S102 and down-regulated both HER-2 and EGFR transcript level and protein expression. Further, the CPP prevented YB-1 from binding to the EGFR promoter in a gel shift assay. Notably, the growth of breast (SUM149, MDA-MB-453, AU565 and prostate (PC3, LNCap cancer cells was inhibited by ∼90% with the CPP. Further, treatment with this peptide enhanced sensitivity and overcame resistance to trastuzumab in cells expressing amplified HER-2. By contrast, the CPP had no inhibitory effect on the growth of normal immortalized breast epithelial (184htert cells, primary breast epithelial cells, nor did it inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. These data collectively suggest that the CPP is a novel approach to suppressing the growth of cancer cells while sparing normal cells and thereby establishes a proof-of-concept that blocking YB-1 activation is a new course of cancer therapeutics.

  13. PATE, a gene expressed in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis, identified by a functional genomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Tapan K.; Maitra, Rangan; Iavarone, Carlo; Salvatore, Giuliana; Kumar, Vasantha; Vincent, James J.; Sathyanarayana, B. K.; Duray, Paul; Lee, B. K.; Pastan, Ira

    2002-03-01

    To identify target antigens for prostate cancer therapy, we have combined computer-based screening of the human expressed sequence tag database and experimental expression analysis to identify genes that are expressed in normal prostate and prostate cancer but not in essential human tissues. Using this approach, we identified a gene that is expressed specifically in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis. The gene has a 1.5-kb transcript that encodes a protein of 14 kDa. We named this gene PATE (expressed in prostate and testis). In situ hybridization shows that PATE mRNA is expressed in the epithelial cells of prostate cancers and in normal prostate. Transfection of the PATE cDNA with a Myc epitope tag into NIH 3T3 cells and subsequent cell fractionation analysis shows that the PATE protein is localized in the membrane fraction of the cell. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of PATE shows that it has structural similarities to a group of proteins known as three-finger toxins, which includes the extracellular domain of the type transforming growth factor receptor. Restricted expression of PATE makes it a potential candidate for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  14. Functional Implications of Neuroendocrine Differentiated Cells in Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jongsma (Johan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on NE differentiation in prostate cancer, especially in prostate cancer models. We studied the effects of androgen depletion on the NE differentiated status of in vivo and in vitro prostatic tumor models. Knowledge concerning the function of NE cells in the normal hum

  15. Functional Implications of Neuroendocrine Differentiated Cells in Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jongsma (Johan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on NE differentiation in prostate cancer, especially in prostate cancer models. We studied the effects of androgen depletion on the NE differentiated status of in vivo and in vitro prostatic tumor models. Knowledge concerning the function of NE cells in the normal

  16. IL-8 secretion in primary cultures of prostate cells is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neveu B

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bertrand Neveu*, Xavier Moreel*, Marie-Pier Deschênes-Rompré, Alain Bergeron, Hélène LaRue, Cherifa Ayari, Yves Fradet, Vincent FradetDepartment of Surgery, Laval University Cancer Research Centre, CHU de Quebec Research Centre, Quebec, QC, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Chronic inflammation is believed to be a major factor in prostate cancer initiation and promotion and has been studied using prostate cancer cells and immortalized cell lines. However, little is known about the contribution of normal cells to the prostatic microenvironment and inflammation. We aim to study the contribution of normal prostate epithelial cells to prostate inflammation and to link the inflammatory status of normal cells to prostate cancer aggressiveness.Materials and methods: Short-term primary cell cultures of normal epithelial prostate cells were derived from prostate biopsies from 25 men undergoing radical prostatectomy, cystoprostatectomy, or organ donation. Cells were treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, a mimic of double-stranded viral RNA and a potent inducer of the inflammatory response. Secretion of interleukin (IL-8 in the cell culture medium by untreated and treated cells was measured and we determined the association between IL-8 levels in these primary cell cultures and prostate cancer characteristics. The Fligner–Policello test was used to compare the groups.Results: Baseline and induced IL-8 secretion were highly variable between cultured cells from different patients. This variation was not related to drug use, past medical history, age, or preoperative prostate-specific antigen value. Nonetheless, an elevated secretion of IL-8 from normal cultured epithelial cells was associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness (P=0.0005.Conclusion: The baseline secretion of IL-8 from normal prostate epithelial cells in culture is strongly correlated with cancer aggressiveness and may drive prostate cancer

  17. Accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia: comparison with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Takei, Toshiki; Shiga, Tohru; Nakada, Kunihiro; Tamaki, Nagara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Kita 15, Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Katoh, Chietsugu [Department of Tracer Kinetics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shinohara, Nobuo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Carbon-11 acetate positron emission tomography (PET) has been reported to be of clinical value for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, no detailed analysis has yet been carried out on the physiological accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in the prostate. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the physiological accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in the prostate using dynamic PET. The study included 30 subjects without prostate cancer [21 with normal prostate and nine with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)] and six patients with prostate cancer. A dynamic PET study was performed for 20 min after intravenous administration of 555 MBq of [{sup 11}C]acetate. The standardised uptake value (SUV) at 16-20 min post tracer administration and the early-to-late-activity ratio of the SUV (E/L ratio), which was determined by dividing the SUV{sub 6-10} {sub min} by the SUV {sub 16-20min}, were calculated to evaluate the accumulation of [ {sup 11}C]acetate. The prostate was clearly visualised and distinguished from adjacent organs in PET images in most of the cases. The SUV of the prostate (2.6 {+-}0.8) was significantly higher than that of the rectum (1.7 {+-}0.4) or bone marrow (1.3 {+-}0.3) (P <0.0001 in each case). The SUV of the normal prostate of subjects aged <50 years (3.4 {+-}0.7) was significantly higher than both the SUV for the normal prostate of subjects aged {>=}50 years (2.3 {+-}0.7) and that of subjects with BPH (2.1 {+-}0.6) (P <0.01 in each case). The primary prostate cancer in six cases was visualised by [ {sup 11}C]acetate PET. However, the difference in the SUV between subjects aged {>=}50 with normal prostate or with BPH and the patients with prostate cancer (1.9 {+-}0.6) was not statistically significant. There was also no significant difference in the E/L ratio between subjects aged {>=}50 with normal prostate (0.98 {+-}0.04) or BPH (0.96 {+-}0.08) and patients with prostate cancer (1.02 {+-}0.12). In conclusion, a normal prostate exhibits age

  18. uPAR EXPRESSION IN CANINE NORMAL PROSTATE AND WITH PROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodrigues Faleiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic lesions such as prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN and proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA are studied in human and canine species due to their malignance potential. The plasminogen activator (PA system has been suggested to play a central role in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, inflammation, and tumor invasion. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR is a component of the PA, with a range of expression in tumor and stromal cells. In this study, uPAR expression in both canine normal prostates and with proliferative disorders (benign prostatic hyperplasia-BPH, proliferative inflammatory atrophy-PIA, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-PIN, and carcinoma-PC was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA slide to establish the role of this enzyme in extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling and in the processes of tissue invasion. A total of 298 cores and 355 diagnoses were obtained, with 36 (10.1% normal prostates, 46 (13.0% with BPH, 128 (36.1% with PIA, 74 (20.8% with PIN and 71 (20.0% with PC. There is variation in the expression of uPAR in canine prostate according to the lesion, with lower expression in normal tissue and with BPH, and higher expression in tissue with PIA, PIN and PC. The high expression of uPAR in inflammatory and neoplastic microenvironment indicates increased proteolytic activity in canine prostates with PIA, PIN, and PC.

  19. Apoptosis and hormonal milieu in ductal system of normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Jie XIA; Chun-Xiao XU; Xiao-Da TANG; Wan-Zhong WANG; De-Li DU

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study theapoptotic rate (AR) and the androgen and estrogen milieu in the proximal and distal ductal sys tems of prostate, in order to help exploring the effects of these factors on prostatic growth and the pathogenesis of be nign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Methods: The proximal and distal ends of the ductal system were incised from 20 normal prostate as well as the hypertrophic prostate tissue from 20 patients with BPH. The AR was determined by the DNA end-labeling method and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estrodiol (E2), by radioimmunoassay. Results:There was no significant difference in DHT and E2 density between the proximal and distal ends of the ductal systems in normal prostate. E2 appeared to be higher in BPH than in normal prostatic tissues, but the difference was statistically in significant. In normal prostatic tissue, the AR was significantly higher in the distal than in the proximal ends of the ductal system ( P < 0.05), while the AR of the proximal ends was significantly higher ( P < 0.01) than that in the BPH tissue. No significant correlation was noted between the DHT and E2 density and the AR both in the normal prostate and BPH tissues. Conclusion: The paper is the first time describing a difference in AR in different regions of the ductal system of normal prostate, while the hormonal milieu is similar, indicating a functional inhomogeneity of these regions. A low AR in the proximal duct, where BPH originates, and an even lower AR in the BPH tissue, sug gesting the participation of apoptosis in the BPH pathogenesis.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    identifying primitive cell populations from normal and malignant human prostate tissue, as new treatments may be designed to target cancer stem cells rather...To investigate Trop2 as a functional progenitor marker, we turned to 2 in vitro assays that measure primitive cell activity: the prostate colony and...assays indicative of primitive cell populations. Trop2 Fractionates LinSca-1CD49fhi Cells into Two Basal Subpopu- lations. We have previously

  1. Expression of basal cell keratins in human prostate cancer metastases and cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Aalders, M.W.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Ruiter, D.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Within normal human prostate epithelium, basal and luminal cells can be discriminated by their expression of keratins (K). While basal cells express K5/14, luminal cells show expression of K8/18 and an intermediate cell population can be identified by co-expression of K5/18. Prostate cancer is predo

  2. Prostate size correlates with fasting blood glucose in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with normal testosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok Joong; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Gi-Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Isaac Yi; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the correlations between BMI, fasting glucose, insulin, testosterone level, insulin resistance, and prostate size in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with normal testosterone levels. Data from 212 non-diabetic BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) due to medical treatment failure, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels of ≥ 3 ng/mL underwent multicore transrectal prostate biopsy before TURP to rule out prostate cancer. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or serum testosterone levels of Prostate size correlated positively with age (r = 0.227, P 0.05). Testosterone level inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.327, P prostate size, PSA, or fasting glucose level (each P > 0.05). Upon multiple adjusted linear regression analysis, prostate size correlated with elevated PSA (P prostate hyperplasia.

  3. Discrimination of zone-specific spectral signatures in normal human prostate using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Imran I; Martin, Francis L

    2010-12-01

    The prostate gland is the most common site of pathology in human males. Using the urethra as an anatomical reference point, it can be divided into three distinct zones known as the transition zone (TZ), peripheral zone (PZ) and central zone (CZ). The pathological conditions of benign prostatic hypertrophy and/or prostate adenocarcinoma are highly prevalent in this gland. This preliminary study set out to determine whether biochemical intra-individual differences between normal prostate zones could be identified using Raman spectroscopy with subsequent exploratory analyses. A normal (benign) prostate transverse tissue section perpendicular to the rectal surface and above the verumontanum was obtained in a paraffin-embedded block. A 10-µm-thick slice was floated onto a gold substrate, de-waxed and analysed using Raman spectroscopy (200 epithelial-cell and 140 stromal spectra/zone). Raman spectra were subsequently processed in the 1800-367 cm(-1) spectral region employing principal component analysis (PCA) to determine whether wavenumber-intensity relationships expressed as single points in hyperspace might reveal biochemical differences associated with inter-zone pathological susceptibility. Visualisation of PCA scores plots and their corresponding loadings plots highlighted 781 cm(-1) (cytosine/uracil) and 787 cm(-1) (DNA) as the key discriminating factors segregating PZ from less susceptible TZ and CZ epithelia (P prostate zones to specific pathological conditions.

  4. Role of IAPs in prostate cancer progression: immunohistochemical study in normal and pathological (benign hyperplastic, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer human prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olmedilla Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study was investigate IAPs in normal human prostate (NP, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN and prostatic carcinoma (PC, and their involvement in apoptosis/proliferation via NF-kB (TNF-α, IL-1 stimulation. Methods Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were performed in 10 samples of normal prostates, 35 samples of BPH, 27 samples diagnosis of PIN (with low-grade PIN or high-grade PIN and 95 samples of PC (with low, medium or high Gleason grades. Results In NP, cytoplasm of epithelial cells were positive to c-IAP1/2 (80% of samples, c-IAP-2 (60%, ILP (20%, XIAP (20%; negative to NAIP and survivin. In BPH, epithelial cells were immunostained to c-IAP1/2 (57.57%, c-IAP-2 (57.57%, ILP (66.6%, NAIP (60.6%, XIAP (27.27%, survivin (9.1%. Whereas low-grade PIN showed intermediate results between NP and BPH; results in high-grade PIN were similar to those found in PC. In PC, epithelial cells were immunostained to c-IAP1/2, c-IAP-2, ILP, NAIP, XIAP (no Gleason variation and survivin (increasing with Gleason. Conclusions IAPs could be involved in prostate disorder (BPH, PIN and PC development since might be provoke inhibition of apoptosis and subsequently cell proliferation. At the same time, different transduction pathway such as IL-1/NIK/NF-kB or TNF/NF-kB (NIK or p38 also promotes proliferation. Inhibitions of IAPs, IL-1α and TNFα might be a possible target for PC treatment since IAPs are the proteins that inhibited apoptosis (favour proliferation and IL-1α and TNFα would affect all the transduction pathway involucrate in the activation of transcription factors related to survival or proliferation (NF-kB, Elk-1 or ATF-2.

  5. [Small cell prostatic carcinoma detected at the stage of metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabii, Redouane; Meziane, Anas; Taha, Abdelatif; Joual, Abdenabi; El Mrini, Mohamed

    2004-09-01

    Small cell prostatic carcinoma is rare, with a poor prognosis. The authors report a case of small cell prostatic carcinoma in a 30-year-old patient diagnosed at the stage of metastases. Immunohistochemistry showed positive anti-neuron-specific enolase (NSE.) and anti-synaptophysin antibodies, while serum PSA was normal (1.2 ng/ml). The patient was treated by cisplatin-etoposide combination chemotherapy, but died 20 days after the first course.

  6. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation.

  7. Stromal mesenchyme cell genes of the human prostate and bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Laura E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal mesenchyme cells play an important role in epithelial differentiation and likely in cancer as well. Induction of epithelial differentiation is organ-specific, and the genes responsible could be identified through a comparative genomic analysis of the stromal cells from two different organs. These genes might be aberrantly expressed in cancer since cancer could be viewed as due to a defect in stromal signaling. We propose to identify the prostate stromal genes by analysis of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells, and to examine their expression in prostate cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to cluster designation (CD cell surface antigens was first used to characterize the stromas of the prostate and bladder. Stromal cells were prepared from either prostate or bladder tissue for cell culture. RNA was isolated from the cultured cells and analyzed by DNA microarrays. Expression of candidate genes in normal prostate and prostate cancer was examined by RT-PCR. Results The bladder stroma was phenotypically different from that of the prostate. Most notable was the presence of a layer of CD13+ cells adjacent to the urothelium. This structural feature was also seen in the mouse bladder. The prostate stroma was uniformly CD13-. A number of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells were identified. One prostate gene, proenkephalin (PENK, was of interest because it encodes a hormone. Secreted proteins such as hormones and bioactive peptides are known to mediate cell-cell signaling. Prostate stromal expression of PENK was verified by an antibody raised against a PENK peptide, by RT-PCR analysis of laser-capture microdissected stromal cells, and by database analysis. Gene expression analysis showed that PENK expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Conclusion Our findings show that the histologically similar stromas of the prostate and

  8. Actions of estrogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals on human prostate stem/progenitor cells and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Nelles, Jason L; Prins, Gail S

    2012-05-06

    Estrogen reprogramming of the prostate gland as a function of developmental exposures (aka developmental estrogenization) results in permanent alterations in structure and gene expression that lead to an increased incidence of prostatic lesions with aging. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with estrogenic activity have been similarly linked to an increased prostate cancer risk. Since it has been suggested that stem cells and cancer stem cells are potential targets of cancer initiation and disease management, it is highly possible that estrogens and EDCs influence the development and progression of prostate cancer through reprogramming and transforming the prostate stem and early stage progenitor cells. In this article, we review recent literature highlighting the effects of estrogens and EDCs on prostate cancer risk and discuss recent advances in prostate stem/progenitor cell research. Our laboratory has recently developed a novel prostasphere model using normal human prostate stem/progenitor cells and established that these cells express estrogen receptors (ERs) and are direct targets of estrogen action. Further, using a chimeric in vivo prostate model derived from these normal human prostate progenitor cells, we demonstrated for the first time that estrogens initiate and promote prostatic carcinogenesis in an androgen-supported environment. We herein discuss these findings and highlight new evidence using our in vitro human prostasphere assay for perturbations in human prostate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by natural steroids as well as EDCs. These findings support the hypothesis that tissue stem cells may be direct EDC targets which may underlie life-long reprogramming as a consequence of developmental and/or transient adult exposures.

  9. Implication of expression of Nanog in prostate cancer cells and their stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Liao, Hui; Guo, Fengjin; Qin, Liang; Qi, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies suggested that the prostate cancer may arise from prostate cancer stem cells that share some same characteristics with normal stem cells. The purpose of this study was to detect the differences of Nanog expression between PC3 prostate cancer cell line and its tumor stem cells, and the relationship was preliminarily examined between Nanog and prostate cancer and its tumor stem cells. By using magnetic active cell sorting (MACS), we isolated a population of CD44(+)/CD133(+) prostate cancer cells that display stem cell characteristics from PC3 cell line. Immunohistochemistry revealed positive expressions of CD44, CD133 and α(2)β(1)-integin in the isolated cells. CCK-8 analysis showed that isolated cells had a strong proliferative ability. The formation of the cell spheres in serum-free medium and holoclones in serum-supplied medium showed that the cells were capable of self-renewing, indicating that the isolated cells were a population of cancer stem-like cells derived from PC3 cell line. Western blotting exhibited that the isolated cells had higher experession of Nanog, an embryonic stem marker, as compared with PC3 cells. Our study showed that Nanog might be helpful in sustaining the self-renewal and the undifferentiation of prostate cancer stem cells, and may serve as a marker for prostate cancer stem cells for isolation and identification.

  10. Effects of androgen receptor and androgen on gene expression in prostate stromal fibroblasts and paracrine signaling to prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Tanner

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR is expressed in a subset of prostate stromal cells and functional stromal cell AR is required for normal prostate developmental and influences the growth of prostate tumors. Although we are broadly aware of the specifics of the genomic actions of AR in prostate cancer cells, relatively little is known regarding the gene targets of functional AR in prostate stromal cells. Here, we describe a novel human prostate stromal cell model that enabled us to study the effects of AR on gene expression in these cells. The model involves a genetically manipulated variant of immortalized human WPMY-1 prostate stromal cells that overexpresses wildtype AR (WPMY-AR at a level comparable to LNCaP cells and is responsive to dihydrotestosterone (DHT stimulation. Use of WPMY-AR cells for gene expression profiling showed that the presence of AR, even in the absence of DHT, significantly altered the gene expression pattern of the cells compared to control (WPMY-Vec cells. Treatment of WPMY-AR cells, but not WPMY-Vec control cells, with DHT resulted in further changes that affected the expression of 141 genes by 2-fold or greater compared to vehicle treated WPMY-AR cells. Remarkably, DHT significantly downregulated more genes than were upregulated but many of these changes reversed the initial effects of AR overexpression alone on individual genes. The genes most highly effected by DHT treatment were categorized based upon their role in cancer pathways or in cell signaling pathways (transforming growth factor-β, Wnt, Hedgehog and MAP Kinase thought to be involved in stromal-epithelial crosstalk during prostate or prostate cancer development. DHT treatment of WPMY-AR cells was also sufficient to alter their paracrine potential for prostate cancer cells as conditioned medium from DHT-treated WPMY-AR significantly increased growth of LNCaP cells compared to DHT-treated WPMY-Vec cell conditioned medium.

  11. Induction of apoptosis by cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijo, T; Sato, T; Nagatomi, Y; Kitamura, T

    2001-07-01

    Prostaglandins are thought to play an important role in the proliferation of prostate cancer and are highly expressed in prostate cancer tissue. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), or prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase, is a key enzyme in the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin. In several cancers, COX-2 contributes to the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. To assess the role of COX-2 in prostate cancer, we investigated whether the inhibition of COX-2 affected the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. The human prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and PC 3, and a normal prostate stromal cell line (PrSC) were treated with COX-2 inhibitors NS 398 and Etodolac. The proliferation rate of the cell lines was examined using 3(4,5-dimethylethiazoly 1-2-) 2,5-diphonyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. A DNA fragmentation assay was also used for proof of apoptosis. COX-2 inhibitors could suppress the proliferation of LNCaP and PC 3 cells. In contrast, PrSC was not affected by COX-2 inhibitors. These suppressive effects occurred in a time- and dose-dependent manner. One of mechanisms responsible for cell death was apoptosis. COX-2 seems to play a significant role in the progression of prostate cancer. COX-2 may be a therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Since COX-2 inhibitors suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, and have no effect in normal prostate stromal cells, COX-2 inhibitors will be useful for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  12. Regulation of Prostate Development and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Autocrine Cholinergic Signaling via Maintaining the Epithelial Progenitor Cells in Proliferating Status

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    Naitao Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells is important in prostate development and prostate diseases. Our previous study demonstrated a function of autocrine cholinergic signaling (ACS in promoting prostate cancer growth and castration resistance. However, whether or not such ACS also plays a role in prostate development is unknown. Here, we report that ACS promoted the proliferation and inhibited the differentiation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells in organotypic cultures. These results were confirmed by ex vivo lineage tracing assays and in vivo renal capsule recombination assays. Moreover, we found that M3 cholinergic receptor (CHRM3 was upregulated in a large subset of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH tissues compared with normal tissues. Activation of CHRM3 also promoted the proliferation of BPH cells. Together, our findings identify a role of ACS in maintaining prostate epithelial progenitor cells in the proliferating state, and blockade of ACS may have clinical implications for the management of BPH.

  13. Targeting Btk/Etk of prostate cancer cells by a novel dual inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W; Liu, R; Bhardwaj, G; Yang, J C; Changou, C; Ma, A-H; Mazloom, A; Chintapalli, S; Xiao, K; Xiao, W; Kumaresan, P; Sanchez, E; Yeh, C-T; Evans, C P; Patterson, R; Lam, K S; Kung, H-J

    2014-01-01

    Btk and Etk/BMX are Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Btk has previously been reported to be expressed primarily in B cells and has an important role in immune responses and B-cell malignancies. Etk has been shown previously to provide a strong survival and metastasis signal in human prostate cancer cells, and to confer androgen independence and drug resistance. While the role of Etk in prostate carcinogenesis is well established, the functions of Btk in prostate cancer have never been investigated, likely due to the perception that Btk is a hematopoietic, but not epithelial, kinase. Herein, we found that Btk is overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. The level of Btk in prostate cancer tissues correlates with cancer grades. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of prostate cancer cells, but not that of the normal prostate epithelial cells, which express very little Btk. Dual inhibition of Btk and Etk has an additive inhibitory effect on prostate cancer cell growth. To explore Btk and Etk as targets for prostate cancer, we developed a small molecule dual inhibitor of Btk and Etk, CTN06. Treatment of PC3 and other prostate cancer cells, but not immortalized prostate epithelial cells with CTN06 resulted in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk/Etk signals. The killing effect of CTN06 is more potent than that of commonly used inhibitors against Src, Raf/VEGFR and EGFR. CTN06 induces apoptosis as well as autophagy in human prostate cancer cells, and is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTN06 also impeded the migration of human prostate cancer cells based on a ‘wound healing' assay. The anti-cancer effect of CTN06 was further validated in vivo in a PC3 xenograft mouse model. PMID:25188519

  14. Prostate progenitor cells proliferate in response to castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Shi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation is a mainstay of therapy for advanced prostate cancer but tumor regression is usually incomplete and temporary because of androgen-independent cells in the tumor. It has been speculated that these tumor cells resemble the stem/progenitor cells of the normal prostate. The purpose of this study was to examine the response of slow-cycling progenitor cells in the adult mouse prostate to castration. Proliferating cells in the E16 urogenital sinus were pulse labeled by BrdU administration or by doxycycline-controlled labeling of the histone-H2B GFP mouse. A small population of labeled epithelial cells in the adult prostate localized at the junction of the prostatic ducts and urethra. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS showed that GFP label-retaining cells were enriched for cells co-expressing stem cell markers Sca-1, CD133, CD44 and CD117 (4- marker cells; 60-fold enrichment. FACS showed, additionally, that 4-marker cells were androgen receptor positive. Castration induced proliferation and dispersal of E16 labeled cells into more distal ductal segments. When naïve adult mice were administered BrdU daily for 2 weeks after castration, 16% of 4-marker cells exhibited BrdU label in contrast to only 6% of all epithelial cells (P < 0.01. In sham-castrated controls less than 4% of 4-marker cells were BrdU labeled (P < 0.01. The unexpected and admittedly counter-intuitive finding that castration induced progenitor cell proliferation suggests that androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer could not only exert pleiotrophic effects on tumor sub-populations but may induce inadvertent expansion of tumor stem cells.

  15. Prostate stromal cells express the progesterone receptor to control cancer cell mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reciprocal interactions between epithelium and stroma play vital roles for prostate cancer development and progression. Enhanced secretions of cytokines and growth factors by cancer associated fibroblasts in prostate tumors create a favorable microenvironment for cancer cells to grow and metastasize. Our previous work showed that the progesterone receptor (PR was expressed specifically in prostate stromal fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. However, the expression levels of PR and its impact to tumor microenvironment in prostate tumors are poorly understood. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry assays are applied to human prostate tissue biopsies. Cell migration, invasion and proliferation assays are performed using human prostate cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA are applied to measure gene expression at molecular levels. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry assays showed that PR protein levels were decreased in cancer associated stroma when compared with paired normal prostate stroma. Using in vitro prostate stromal cell models, we showed that conditioned media collected from PR positive stromal cells inhibited prostate cancer cell migration and invasion, but had minor suppressive impacts on cancer cell proliferation. PR suppressed the secretion of stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and interlukin-6 (IL-6 by stromal cells independent to PR ligands. Blocking PR expression by siRNA or supplementation of exogenous SDF-1 or IL-6 to conditioned media from PR positive stromal cells counteracted the inhibitory effects of PR to cancer cell migration and invasion. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased expression of the PR in cancer associated stroma may contribute to the elevated SDF-1 and IL-6 levels in prostate tumors and enhance prostate tumor progression.

  16. Indentation loading response of a resonance sensor--discriminating prostate cancer and normal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Bergh, Anders; Ljungberg, Börje; Lindahl, Olof A

    2013-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men worldwide. Mechanical properties of prostate tissue are promising for distinguishing prostate cancer from healthy prostate tissue. The aim was to investigate the indentation loading response of a resonance sensor for discriminating prostate cancer tissue from normal tissue. Indentation measurements were done on prostate tissue specimens ex vivo from 10 patients from radical prostatectomy. The measurement areas were analysed using standard histological methods. The stiffness parameter was linearly dependent on the loading force (average R(2 )= 0.90) and an increased loading force caused a greater stiffness contrast of prostate cancer vs normal tissue. The accuracy of the stiffness contrast was assessed by the ROC curve with the area under the curve being 0.941 for a loading force of 12.8 mN. The results are promising for the development of a resonance sensor instrument for detecting prostate cancer.

  17. Cancer Patient T Cells Genetically Targeted to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Specifically Lyse Prostate Cancer Cells and Release Cytokines in Response to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Gong

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of immunoglobulin-based artificial receptors in normal T lymphocytes provides a means to target lymphocytes to cell surface antigens independently of major histocompatibility complex restriction. Such artificial receptors have been previously shown to confer antigen-specific tumoricidal properties in murine T cells. We constructed a novel ζ chain fusion receptor specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA termed Pz-1. PSMA is a cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on prostate cancer cells and the neovascular endothelium of multiple carcinomas. We show that primary T cells harvested from five of five patients with different stages of prostate cancer and transduced with the Pz-1 receptor readily lyse prostate cancer cells. Having established a culture system using fibroblasts that express PSMA, we next show that T cells expressing the Pz-1 receptor release cytokines in response to cell-bound PSMA. Furthermore, we show that the cytokine release is greatly augmented by B7.1-mediated costimulation. Thus, our findings support the feasibility of adoptive cell therapy by using genetically engineered T cells in prostate cancer patients and suggest that both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte functions can be synergistically targeted against tumor cells.

  18. MicroRNA-181b expression in prostate cancer tissues and its influence on the biological behavior of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L; Yao, H; Fan, L H; Liu, L; Qiu, S; Li, X; Gao, J P; Hao, C Q

    2013-04-02

    We examined microRNA-181b (miRNA) expression in prostate cancer tissues and its effect on the prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Tissues from 27 cases of prostate cancer and 30 samples of normal human prostate were collected by surgical removal. Total miRNA was extracted, and the relative expression of miR-181b was quantified using RT-PCR. miR-181b ASO was transfected into prostate cancer PC-3 cells. miR-181b expression in transfected and non-transfected cells was measured using RT-PCR. Changes in cell apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry. MTT and cell growth curve methods were used to assess the influence of miR-181b expression on cell proliferation. The changes in cell invasive ability in vitro were detected using the Transwell chamber method. miR-181b was up-regulated in the prostate cancer tissues compared with the normal prostate samples. It was down-regulated after miR-181b ASO transfection into the prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Down-regulation of miR-181b in the PC-3 cell induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, and depressed invasion of PC-3 cells in vitro. As miR-181b is over-expressed in prostate cancer, its down-regulation could have potential as gene therapy for prostate cancer by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation and depressing invasion by cancer cells.

  19. Effects of TRPC6 on invasibility of low-differentiated prostate cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Xiang Li; Jing Liu; Jun Li; Li-Jun Li; Ming-Xing Qiu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of TRPC6 among prostate cancer cells, establish high expression cell lines of TRPC6, and to provide potential cell mode for prostate cancer oncogenesis and development. Methods: Occurrence and development of prostate cancer cells, PC3, PC-3 m DU145, 22 rv1, LNCaP and normal prostate epithelial cells in the PrEC TRPC6 expression level were detected by QPCR method. Calcium phosphate transfection method was used to package retrovirus pLEGFP-N1-TRPC6 and pLEGFP-N1-vector and infect the prostate cancer cells, a stable high expression of TRPC6 prostate cancer cells. Sable cell lines of TRPC6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2, MMP9 expression was detected by QPCR and Western blot. Change of cell invasion ability was detected by Transwell. Results: The expression level of prostate cancer cells TRPC6 were higher than control group PrEC cells. Among TPRC6 the expression of cell line PC 3 transfer potential wre the lowest, and high transfer cell line PC-3M express was the highest. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR and western blot results showed that after filter, the seventh generation of cell TRPC6 protein and mRNA expression levels were higher than the control group obviously. Transwell experimental results showed that the overexpression of TRPC6 could promote the invasion ability of PC3 prostate cancer cells. Conclusions: TRPC6 expressed in prostate cancer cells is in disorder, and its action may be associated with the invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells; successful establishment of stable high expression of TRPC6 prostate cancer cells primarily confirm the invasion-trigger ability of TRPC6 on prostate cancer, and lay down the foundation for exploring the TRPC6’s role in the occurrence and development of prostate cancer mechanism.

  20. MiR-203 controls proliferation, migration and invasive potential of prostate cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viticchiè, Giuditta; Lena, Anna Maria; Latina, Alessia;

    2011-01-01

    transition and invasion of healthy tissues (usually bones). MicroRNA-203 (miR-203) is a tumor suppressor microRNA often silenced in different malignancies. Here, we show that miR-203 is downregulated in clinical primary prostatic tumors compared to normal prostate tissue, and in metastatic prostate cancer...... cell lines compared to normal epithelial prostatic cells. Overexpression of miR-203 in brain or bone metastatic prostate cell lines (DU145 and PC3) is sufficient to induce a mesenchymal to epithelial transition with inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasiveness. We have identified CKAP2......, LASP1, BIRC5, WASF1, ASAP1 and RUNX2 as new miR-203 direct target mRNAs involved in these events. Therefore, miR-203 could be a potentially new prognostic marker and therapeutic target in metastatic prostate cancer....

  1. 不同年龄段前列腺外周带基质细胞超微结构差异%Ultrastructural Difference of Stromal Cells from Normal Human Prostate Peripheral Zone of Varying Ages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永传; 韩邦旻; 朱平; 杨洁; 夏术阶

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究不同年龄段前列腺外周带基质细胞超微结构并探讨其意义.方法:透射电镜观察3例年轻组(23-、26-、32-岁)和3例老年组(56-、64-、71-岁)正常前列腺外周带和3例前列腺癌组织的超微结构.Masson'sTrichrome染色法观察前列腺外周带基质胶原的分布情况.结果:年轻组、老年组前列腺外周带间质均以平滑肌细胞分布为主,间杂成纤维细胞,但老年组平滑肌细胞和成纤维细胞体积较大、形态不规则.与正常年轻组相比,老年组前列腺外周带成纤维细胞存在明显老化和肌化改变,部分细胞内与蛋白合成相关的细胞器粗面内质网发达,呈现肌成纤维细胞特征.与年轻组和老年组外周带相比,前列腺癌基质中功能更加活跃的肌成纤维细胞和胶原蛋白数量增加明显.Masson's Trichrome 染色支持超微观察到的基质胶原分布差异:年轻组<老年组<前列腺癌组.结论:不同年龄段前列腺外周带基质细胞超微结构间存在差异,老年组前列腺外周带和前列腺癌基质组织中具有活性的肌成纤维细胞的增加可能是造成老年前列腺癌高发和恶性进展的重要病理基础之一.%Objective: To characterize the phenotype of stromal cells from the human prostate peripheral zone (PZ) of varying ages.Methods: The ultrastrictural features ofstromal cells from normal prostate PZ of 3 young donors (23, 26 and 32 years old), 3 old donors (56, 64 and 71 years old) and 3 cases of prostate cancer tissue specimen were compared by transmission electron microscopy, also the distribution of collagen were determined by Masson's Trichrome staining.Results: Smooth muscle cells in the stroma of PZ-old and PCa groups were larger in size and number than those in the PZ-young group.Fibroblasts in the stroma of PZ-old and PCa groups showed phenotype of myodifferentiation and more active cellular function, characterized by prominent protein synthesis associated

  2. Chalcones Enhance TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Szliszka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chalcones exhibit chemopreventive and antitumor effects. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a naturally occurring anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in cancer cells and is not toxic to normal cells. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of five chalcones in combination with TRAIL on prostate cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC. Our study showed that all five tested chalcones: chalcone, licochalcone-A, isobavachalcone, xanthohumol, butein markedly augmented TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells and confirmed the significant role of chalcones in chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

  3. Ezrin mediates c-Myc actions in prostate cancer cell invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuan, Yin Choy; Iglesias Gato, Diego; Fernandez-Perez, L

    2010-01-01

    The forced overexpression of c-Myc in mouse prostate and in normal human prostate epithelial cells results in tumor transformation with an invasive phenotype. How c-Myc regulates cell invasion is poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the interplay of c-Myc and androgens in the re...

  4. 正常培养的人类前列腺癌细胞对白藜芦醇的吸收及白藜芦醇对靶向蛋白醌还原酶2QR2的作用%Uptake of resveratrol and role of resveratrol-targeting protein, quinone reductase 2, in normally cultured human prostate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tze-Chen Hsieh

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol is a dietary polyphenol espoused to have chemopreventive activity against a variety of human cancer types. We first reported that resveratrol significantly decreases the proliferation of both androgen-dependent and hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells. However, the effects of resveratrol in normal prostate epithelial and stromal cells, particularly with regard to its uptake, subcellular distribution and intracellular targets, have not been investigated. To advance the knowledge on accessibility and cellular disposition of resveratrol in prostate cells, [3H] resveratrol, fractionation of cell extracts into subcellular compartments, Western blot analysis, resveratrol affinity column chromatography and flow cytometry were used to study the uptake and intracellular distribution of resveratrol in normally cultured prostate stromal (PrSCs) and epithelial cells (PrECs). Pretreatment of both PrSCs and PrECs for 2 days with resveratrol modulated its uptake and selectively increased its distribution to the membrane and organelle compartments. Resveratrol affinity column chromatography studies showed differential expression of a previously identified resveratrol-targeting protein, quinone reductase 2 (QR2), in PrSCs and PrECs. Flow cytometric analysis comparing resveratrol-treated and untreated PrSCs showed a large decrease in G1-phase and a concomitant increase in S and G2/M-phases of the cell cycle. These results suggest that resveratrol suppresses PrSC proliferation by affecting cell cycle phase distribution, which may involve the participation by QR2.

  5. Evaluation of discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) expression level in normal, benign, and malignant human prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemikhah, Mitra; Ashtiani, Hamidreza Ahmadi; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) is a new member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. There are two isoforms of discoidin domain receptor (DDR), DDR1 and DDR2. These receptors play a major role in the adhesion, motility and cell proliferation. Due to the important role of DDR2 in the development of tumor extension, this receptor is pivotal in the field of carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of DDR2, in the malignant, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal tissues of patients with prostate cancer. In this study the gene and protein expression of DDR2 in adjacent normal (n=40), BPH (n=40), and malignant (n=40) prostate tissue were measured using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then, the correlation of DDR2 gene and protein expression with prognostic factors such as age, tumor grade, tumor stage, lymph node involvement, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration were evaluated. The relative mRNA and protein expression level of DDR2 in malignant and benign prostate tissue was significantly higher than those of adjacent normal tissues (PDDR2 mRNA and protein expression with prognostic factors such as tumor grade, stage, lymph node involvement, and serum PSA concentration. However, significant correlation with age was not observed. These findings suggest that DDR2 is a cancer-related gene associated with the aggressive progression of prostate cancer patients.

  6. CK2 abrogates the inhibitory effects of PRH/HHEX on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion and acts through PRH to control cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Y H; Kershaw, R M; Humphreys, E H; Assis Junior, E M; Chaudhri, S; Jayaraman, P-S; Gaston, K

    2017-01-01

    PRH/HHEX (proline-rich homeodomain protein/haematopoietically expressed homeobox protein) is a transcription factor that controls cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell migration. Our previous work has shown that in haematopoietic cells, Protein Kinase CK2-dependent phosphorylation of PRH results in the inhibition of PRH DNA-binding activity, increased cleavage of PRH by the proteasome and the misregulation of PRH target genes. Here we show that PRH and hyper-phosphorylated PRH are present in normal prostate epithelial cells, and that hyper-phosphorylated PRH levels are elevated in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatic adenocarcinoma, and prostate cancer cell lines. A reduction in PRH protein levels increases the motility of normal prostate epithelial cells and conversely, PRH over-expression inhibits prostate cancer cell migration and blocks the ability of these cells to invade an extracellular matrix. We show that CK2 over-expression blocks the repression of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion by PRH. In addition, we show that PRH knockdown in normal immortalised prostate cells results in an increase in the population of cells capable of colony formation in Matrigel, as well as increased cell invasion and decreased E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of CK2 reduces PRH phosphorylation and reduces prostate cell proliferation but the effects of CK2 inhibition on cell proliferation are abrogated in PRH knockdown cells. These data suggest that the increased phosphorylation of PRH in prostate cancer cells increases both cell proliferation and tumour cell migration/invasion. PMID:28134934

  7. Influence of Melatonin on the Proliferative and Apoptotic Responses of the Prostate under Normal and Hyperglycemic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Gobbo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antitumor properties of melatonin (MLT are known for prostate cancer cells. This study investigated whether MLT affects prostate maturation and interferes with tissue injuries induced by diabetes. MLT was administered to Wistar rats from 5 weeks of age in the drinking water (10 μg/kg b.w., and diabetes was induced at the 13th week by streptozotocin (4.5 mg/100g b.w., i.p.. The animals were euthanized in the 14th and 21st weeks. MLT reduced the immunostained cells for androgen receptor (AR by 10% in younger rats. Diabetes decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. MLT treatment impeded apoptosis p=0.02 and augmented proliferation p=0.0008 and PCNA content in prostate following long-term diabetes due to restoration of testosterone levels and expression of melatonin receptor type 1B. The effect of MLT (500 µM, 5 mM, and 10 mM on androgen-dependent (22Rv1 and androgen-independent (PC3 cancer cells and human prostate epithelial cells (PNTA1 under normal and hyperglycemic conditions (HG, 450 mg/dL was analyzed. Contrary to PNTA1 and 22Rv1 cells, MLT improved the proliferation of PC3 cells in hyperglycemic medium. The combined data indicated that MLT had proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in prostate cells subjected to HG levels and it seems to involve specific MLT pathways rather than AR.

  8. Chalcones Enhance TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Chalcones exhibit chemopreventive and antitumor effects. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a naturally occurring anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in cancer cells and is not toxic to normal cells. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of five chalcones in combination with TRAIL on prostate cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC. Our study showe...

  9. [Measurement of T and DHT contents in normal and diseased human prostate tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Ye, L; Ding, Q; Fang, Z; Yao, M; Shi, D

    2000-07-01

    To measure T and DHT contents in normal and diseased human prostate tissues. Serum and prostatic T and DHT levels were measured in patients with normal, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. A decline was observed in serum T level, but no change in DHT concentration with aging. There were no significant differences in both blood T and DHT levels between the patients with BPH or PCA and normal controls. Serum T level remained constant. There were excessive accumulation of DHT in BPH, and cancerous prostate tissues were responsible for the pathogenesis of BPH and PCA. Finasteride treatment did not produce a reduction in prostatic DHT content. More than one form of 5a-reductases is responsible for the high level of DHT in the gland.

  10. Expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) in prostate cancer: a tissue microarray study of Iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeb, Jaleh; Asgari, Mojgan; Abolhasani, Maryam; Farajollahi, Mohammad M; Madjd, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Proteins expressed in prostate cancer, including prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), have been investigated as biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of PSCA expression was performed on tissue microarrays of 185 paraffin-embedded tissues of Iranian patients, including 114 prostate cancers (PCa), 21 High Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasias (HGPIN) and 50 samples of benign prostate tissue. The level of PSCA expression was compared between benign tissues, HGPIN and PCa. Then the correlations of PSCA expression with clinicopathologic parameters were assessed in PCa. The PSCA expression was detected in the membrane and cytoplasm of epithelial secretory cells in normal prostate tissues, HGPIN and PCa with a variety of intensities. The intensity of PSCA staining was significantly increased in the PCa group as compared with HGPIN and benign prostate tissues (P-valuetissues (BPH) and HGPIN to PCa, and its expression in PCa was positively associated with poor cell differentiation, suggesting that PSCA could be considered as a valuable target for diagnosis and therapy of PCa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation and functional interrogation of adult human prostate epithelial stem cells at single cell resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yang Hu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using primary cultures of normal human prostate epithelial cells, we developed a novel prostasphere-based, label-retention assay that permits identification and isolation of stem cells at a single cell level. Their bona fide stem cell nature was corroborated using in vitro and in vivo regenerative assays and documentation of symmetric/asymmetric division. Robust WNT10B and KRT13 levels without E-cadherin or KRT14 staining distinguished individual stem cells from daughter progenitors in spheroids. Following FACS to isolate label-retaining stem cells from label-free progenitors, RNA-seq identified unique gene signatures for the separate populations which may serve as useful biomarkers. Knockdown of KRT13 or PRAC1 reduced sphere formation and symmetric self-renewal highlighting their role in stem cell maintenance. Pathways analysis identified ribosome biogenesis and membrane estrogen-receptor signaling enriched in stem cells with NF-ĸB signaling enriched in progenitors; activities that were biologically confirmed. Further, bioassays identified heightened autophagy flux and reduced metabolism in stem cells relative to progenitors. These approaches similarly identified stem-like cells from prostate cancer specimens and prostate, breast and colon cancer cell lines suggesting wide applicability. Together, the present studies isolate and identify unique characteristics of normal human prostate stem cells and uncover processes that maintain stem cell homeostasis in the prostate gland.

  12. Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA): a Jekyll and Hyde molecule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Norihisa; Gu, Jian; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Wu, Xifeng

    2010-01-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface protein. Although PSCA is thought to be involved in intracellular signaling, much remain unknown regarding its physiological function and regulatory mechanism in normal and cancer cells. It is up-regulated in several major cancers including prostate, bladder and pancreatic cancers. The expression of PSCA is positively correlated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis in prostate cancers and is also associated with malignant progression of pre-malignant prostate lesions. Therefore, PSCA has been proposed as a biomarker of diagnosis and prognosis, as well as a target of therapy for these cancers. In addition, PSCA has also shown clinical potential in immunotherapy as a prostate specific antigen which, when presented by dendritic cells, may elicit strong tumor specific immunity. In contrast, PSCA is down-regulated in esophageal and gastric cancer and may have tumor-suppressing function in the gastric epithelium. Recent exciting findings that genetic variations of PSCA conferred increased risks of gastric cancer and bladder cancer have opened up a new avenue of research regarding the pathological function of PSCA. PSCA appears to be a Jekyll and Hyde molecule that plays differential roles, tumor promoting or suppressing, depending on the cellular context. PMID:20501618

  13. Prostate stem cell antigen: a Jekyll and Hyde molecule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Norihisa; Gu, Jian; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Wu, Xifeng

    2010-07-15

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface protein. Although PSCA is thought to be involved in intracellular signaling, much remains unknown about its physiological function and regulatory mechanism in normal and cancer cells. It is up-regulated in several major cancers including prostate, bladder, and pancreatic cancers. The expression of PSCA is positively correlated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis in prostate cancers and is also associated with malignant progression of premalignant prostate lesions. Therefore, PSCA has been proposed as a biomarker of diagnosis and prognosis, as well as a target of therapy for these cancers. In addition, PSCA has also shown clinical potential in immunotherapy as a prostate-specific antigen, which, when presented by dendritic cells, may elicit strong tumor-specific immunity. In contrast, PSCA is down-regulated in esophageal and gastric cancer and may have a tumor-suppressing function in the gastric epithelium. Recent exciting findings that genetic variations of PSCA conferred increased risks of gastric cancer and bladder cancer have opened up a new avenue of research about the pathological function of PSCA. PSCA seems to be a Jekyll and Hyde molecule that plays differential roles, tumor promoting or suppressing, depending on the cellular context. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  14. A Cancer-Indicative microRNA Pattern in Normal Prostate Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schlomm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the levels of selected micro-RNAs in normal prostate tissue to assess their potential to indicate tumor foci elsewhere in the prostate. Histologically normal prostate tissue samples from 31 prostate cancer patients and two cancer negative control groups with either unsuspicious or elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA levels (14 and 17 individuals, respectively were analyzed. Based on the expression analysis of 157 microRNAs in a pool of prostate tissue samples and information from data bases/literature, we selected eight microRNAs for quantification by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs. Selected miRNAs were analyzed in histologically tumor-free biopsy samples from patients and healthy controls. We identified seven microRNAs (miR-124a, miR-146a & b, miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a & b, which displayed significant differential expression in normal prostate tissue from men with prostate cancer compared to both cancer negative control groups. Four microRNAs (miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a and let-7b remained to significantly discriminate normal tissues from prostate cancer patients from those of the cancer negative control group with elevated PSA levels. The transcript levels of these microRNAs were highly indicative for the presence of cancer in the prostates, independently of the PSA level. Our results suggest a microRNA-pattern in histologically normal prostate tissue, indicating prostate cancer elsewhere in the organ.

  15. Development of PIN and Prostate Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines: A Model System for Multistage Tumor Progression

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    Colin R. Soares

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing prostate cancer cell lines have been derived from late stages of human prostate cancer. In this paper, we present two cell lines generated from prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, the precursor lesion for prostate adenocarcinoma. Pr-111 and Pr-117 were established from PIN lesions that developed in the C3(1/Tag transgenic model of prostate cancer. Pr-111 and Pr-117 cells express simian virus 40 large T antigen (SV40 Tag and are immortalized in culture, distinguishing them from normal prostate cells. The growth rates of these two cell lines are quite different; with Pr-111 cells growing much more slowly (doubling time approximately 40 hours compared to Pr-117 cells (doubling time approximately 22 hours, and also show significantly different growth rates in different media. Both prostate cell lines express cytokeratin and androgen receptor (AR with Pr-111 cells demonstrating androgen-dependent growth and Pr-117 cells exhibiting androgen-responsive growth characteristics. Athymic nude mice injected with Pr-111 cells either do not develop tumors or develop tumors after a long latency period of 14 weeks. Pr-117 cells, however, develop tumors by 3 to 6 weeks, suggesting that Pr-117 cells represent a later stage of tumor progression. These two novel cell lines will be useful for studying early stages of prostate tumor development and androgen responsiveness.

  16. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

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    Wang, K [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  17. Androgen receptor signaling is required for androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Wanda V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgens and androgen receptors (AR regulate normal prostate development and growth. They also are involved in pathological development of prostatic diseases, including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PCa. Antiandrogen therapy for PCa, in conjunction with chemical or surgical castration, offers initial positive responses and leads to massive prostate cell death. However, cancer cells later appear as androgen-independent PCa. To investigate the role of AR in prostate cell proliferation and survival, we introduced a vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA. This siRNA targeted 5'-untranslated region of AR mRNA for extended suppression of AR expression in androgen-sensitive human prostate LNCaP cells. Results The siRNA design successfully suppressed endogenous AR expression, as revealed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining in LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells did not proliferate in the absence of AR and underwent apoptosis, based on elevated phospho-Histone H2B expression and higher number of apoptotic body as compared to control cells. Conclusion We demonstrated that AR is vital for prostate cell proliferation and survival in this androgen-sensitive prostate cell line. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that AR can be a therapeutic target for treating androgen-sensitive stages of PCa. Unlike antiandorgens, however, siRNA targeting AR provides a direct inactivation of AR function through the suppression of AR protein expression.

  18. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  19. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  20. [Basal cell carcinoma of prostate: a report of three cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Ma, L L; Zhang, S D; Lu, M; Tian, Y; He, Q; Jin, J

    2016-02-18

    To explore the clinical pathological characteristics and improve the recognition in the diagnosis and treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of prostate. Three cases of BCC of prostate were reported and the relevant literature was reviewed to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We analyzed three cases of prostatic BCC. Their ages were within a range of 57 to 83 years. One of them complained of hematuria and two complained of dysuria. All of them presented with prostatic hyperplasia. Two of them presented with high prostate specific antigen (PSA) and one with normal PSA. Case 1 had prostate cancer invasion of bladder, rectal fascia, with lymph node metastasis, bone metastasis and lung metastases. The patient received bladder resection+bilateral ureteral cutaneous ureterostomy+lymph node dissection on November 2, 2014 . Postoperative pathological diagnosis showed BCC. Reexamination of pelvic enhanced MRI in January 8, 2015 suggested pelvic recurrence. Abdominal enhanced CT showed multiple liver metastases and pancreatic metastasis on July 11, 2015. Prostate cancer specific death occurred in October 2015. Case 2 was diagnosed as BCC in prostate biopsy on March 27, 2015. Positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) showed pulmonary metastasis and bone metastasis. Then the patient received chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and local radiation therapy. Reexamination of PET-CT on January 11, 2016 showed that the lung metastase tumors and bone metastase tumors were larger than before. Up to January 10, 2016, the patient was still alive. Postoperative pathological changes of transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) in case 3 showed BCC might be considered. The PET-CT suggested residual prostate cancer, which might be associated with bilateral pelvic lymph node metastasis. In April 20, 2016, the review of PET-CT showed pelvic huge irregular hybrid density shadow, about 14.5 cm×10.0 cm×12.9 cm in size, and tumor recurrence was

  1. Computerized whole slide quantification shows increased microvascular density in pT2 prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate tissue.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niekerk, G.C. van; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Borger, E.; Huisman, H.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contrast enhanced imaging enables powerful, non-invasive diagnostics, important for detection and staging of early prostate cancer. The uptake of contrast agent is increased in prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate tissue. To reveal the underlying physiological mechanisms, quant

  2. Semiquantitative imaging measurement of baseline and vasomodulated normal prostatic blood flow using sildenafil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaga, JR; Exner, A; Fei, B; Seftel, AD

    2013-01-01

    The physiologic variability of blood flow to the prostate has not been studied until this time. We report the vasoactive effects of sildenafil and phenylephrine on blood flow of the normal prostate. Sildenafil increases prostate blood flow by approximately 75% and phenylephrine reduces the flow incrementally. Administration of these drugs with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may improve the diagnosis of cancerous tissue because according to the literature, tumor angiogenic vessels lack the vasoactive physiologic response of the normal tissue. PMID:16728965

  3. Investigating the cell death mechanisms in primary prostate cancer cells using low-temperature plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, A. M.; Packer, J. R.; Simms, M. S.; Mann, V. M.; Frame, F. M.; Maitland, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown considerable promise as a potential cancer therapy. An atmospheric pressure plasma driven with kHz kV excitation, operated with helium and oxygen admixtures is used to investigate the interaction with prostate cancer cells. The cytopathic effect was verified first in two commonly used prostate cancer cell lines (BPH-1 and PC-3 cells) and further extended to examine the effects in paired normal and tumour prostate epithelial cells cultured directly from patient tissues. Through the formation of reactive species in cell culture media, and potentially other plasma components, we observed high levels of DNA damage, together with reduced cell viability and colony-forming ability. We observed differences in response between the prostate cell lines and primary cells, particularly in terms of the mechanism of cell death. The primary cells ultimately undergo necrotic cell death in both the normal and tumour samples, in the complete absence of apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence of an autophagic response in primary cells. This work highlights the importance of studying primary cultures in order to gain a more realistic insight into patient efficacy. EPSRC EP/H003797/1 & EP/K018388/1, Yorkshire Cancer Research: YCR Y257PA.

  4. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  5. Prostate stromal cell telomere shortening is associated with risk of prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Christopher M.; Gaonkar, Gaurav; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Lucia, M. Scott; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Lippman, Scott M.; Thompson, Ian M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Meeker, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Telomeres are repetitive nucleoproteins that help maintain chromosomal stability by inhibiting exonucleolytic degradation, prohibiting inappropriate homologous recombination, and preventing chromosomal fusions by suppressing double-strand break signals. We recently observed that men treated for clinically localized prostate cancer with shorter telomeres in their cancer-associated stromal cells, in combination with greater variation in cancer cell telomere lengths, were significantly more likely to progress to distant metastases and die from their disease. Here, we hypothesized that shorter stromal cell telomere length would be associated with prostate cancer risk at time of biopsy. Methods Telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed in normal-appearing stromal, basal epithelial, and luminal epithelial cells in biopsies from men randomized to the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Prostate cancer cases (N=32) were either detected on a biopsy performed for cause or at the end of the study per trial protocol, and controls (N=50), defined as negative for cancer on an end-of-study biopsy performed per trial protocol (e.g. irrespective of indication), were sampled. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between mean telomere length of the particular cell populations, cell-to-cell telomere length variability, and risk of prostate cancer. Results Men with short stromal cell telomere lengths (below median) had 2.66 (95% CI 1.04-3.06; p=0.04) times the odds of prostate cancer compared with men who had longer lengths (at or above median). Conversely, we did not observe statistically significant associations for short telomere lengths in normal-appearing basal (OR=2.15, 95% CI 0.86-5.39; p=0.10) or luminal (OR=1.15, 95% CI 0.47-2.80; p=0.77) cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that telomere shortening in normal stromal cells is associated with prostate cancer risk. It is essential to

  6. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Brian [Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 7416, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Rochefort, Holly [Department of Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, HCT 4300, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Goldkorn, Amir, E-mail: agoldkor@usc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 3440, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  7. Targeting the unique methylation pattern of androgen receptor (AR) promoter in prostate stem/progenitor cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) leads to suppressed prostate tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Lee, Soo Ok; Liang, Liang; Luo, Jie; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Li, Lei; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-11-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) expression surveys found that normal prostate/prostate cancer (PCa) stem/progenitor cells, but not embryonic or mesenchymal stem cells, expressed little AR with high methylation in the AR promoter. Mechanism dissection revealed that the differential methylation pattern in the AR promoter could be due to differential expression of methyltransferases and binding of methylation binding protein to the AR promoter region. The low expression of AR in normal prostate/PCa stem/progenitor cells was reversed after adding 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent, which could then lead to decreased stemness and drive cells into a more differentiated status, suggesting that the methylation in the AR promoter of prostate stem/progenitor cells is critical not only in maintaining the stemness but also critical in protection of cells from differentiation. Furthermore, induced AR expression, via alteration of its methylation pattern, led to suppression of the self-renewal/proliferation of prostate stem/progenitor cells and PCa tumorigenesis in both in vitro assays and in vivo orthotopic xenografted mouse studies. Taken together, these data prove the unique methylation pattern of AR promoter in normal prostate/PCa stem/progenitor cells and the influence of AR on their renewal/proliferation and differentiation. Targeting PCa stem/progenitor cells with alteration of methylated AR promoter status might provide a new potential therapeutic approach to battle PCa because the PCa stem/progenitor cells have high tumorigenicity.

  8. Normal appearance of the prostate and seminal tract: MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil

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    Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Lee, Moo Sang; Choi, Pil Sik; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Yeon Hee; Choi, Hak Yong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    To assess the ability of MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil for the depiction of normal anatomical structure of prostate and its adjacent organs. MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil was performed in 23 male patients(age ; 20-75) to evaluate various prostatic and vasovesicular disorders, i. e, 14 cases of ejaculatory problems, 3 cases of hypogonadism, and 4 cases of prostatic cancers and 2 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia. MR images were obtained with axial, sagittal and coronal fast spin echo long TR/TE images and axial spin echo short TR/TE images. Field of views was 10-12 cm and scan thickness was 3-5 mm. Depiction of normal anatomcial structures was excellent in all cases. On T2WI, zonal anatomy of the prostate and prostatic urethra, urethral crest, and ejaculatory duct were cleary visualized. On T1WI, periprostatic fat plane is more cleary visualized. On transverse images, periprostatic structures were well visualized on T1WI,and on T2WI, anterior fibromuscular stroma, transition zone and peripheral zone could be readily differentiated. Coronal images were more helpful in visualization of both central and peripheral zones. Vas deferens, ejaculatory duct and vermontanum were also more easily defined on these images. Sagittal images was helpful in the depiction of anterior fibromuscular stroma, central zone and peripheral zone with prostatic urethra and ejaculatory duct in a single plane. High resolution MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil can readily visualize the normal anatomy of the prostate and its related structures and may be useful in the evaluation of various diseases of prostate and vasvesicular system.

  9. Zinc inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B activation and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzo, Robert G; Leavis, Paul; Hatch, William; Gabai, Vladimir L; Dulin, Nickolai; Zvartau, Nadezhda; Kolenko, Vladimir M

    2002-11-01

    Prostate carcinogenesis involves transformation of zinc-accumulating normal epithelial cells to malignant cells, which do not accumulate zinc. In this study, we demonstrate by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry that physiological levels of zinc inhibit activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B transcription factor in PC-3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer cells, reduce expression of NF-kappa B-controlled antiapoptotic protein c-IAP2, and activate c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. Preincubation of PC-3 cells with physiological concentrations of zinc sensitized tumor cells to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and paclitaxel mediated cell death as defined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay. These results suggest one possible mechanism for the inhibitory effect of zinc on the development and progression of prostate malignancy and might have important consequences for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer.

  10. Survivin gene silencing sensitizes prostate cancer cells to selenium growth inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xichun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in men worldwide. Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP protein family that is expressed in the majority of human tumors including prostate cancer, but is barely detectable in terminally differentiated normal cells. Downregulation of survivin could sensitize prostate cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Selenium is an essential trace element. Several studies have shown that selenium compounds inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. The objective of this study is to investigate whether survivin gene silencing in conjunction with selenium treatment could enhance the therapeutic efficacy for prostate cancer and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods Expression of survivin was analyzed in a collection of normal and malignant prostatic tissues by immunohistochemical staining. In vitro studies were conducted in PC-3M, C4-2B, and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells. The effect of selenium on survivin expression was analyzed by Western blotting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Survivin gene knockdown was carried out by transfecting cells with a short hairpin RNA (shRNA designed against survivin. Cell proliferation was quantitated by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl- 2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT assay and apoptosis by propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry analysis. Finally, in vivo tumor growth assay was performed by establishing PC-3M xenograft in nude mice and monitoring tumor growth following transfection and treatment. Results We found that survivin was undetectable in normal prostatic tissues but was highly expressed in prostate cancers. Survivin knockdown or selenium treatment inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells, but the selenium effect was modest. In contrast to what have been observed in other cell lines, selenium treatment had little or no effect on survivin expression in several androgen

  11. Distinct function of estrogen receptor α in smooth muscle and fibroblast cells in prostate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkus, Spencer; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Hsu, Iawen; Yu, Jiangzhou; Chen, Ming; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen signaling, through estrogen receptor (ER)α, has been shown to cause hypertrophy in the prostate. Our recent report has shown that epithelial ERα knockout (KO) will not affect the normal prostate development or homeostasis. However, it remains unclear whether ERα in different types of stromal cells has distinct roles in prostate development. This study proposed to elucidate how KO of ERα in the stromal smooth muscle or fibroblast cells may interrupt cross talk between prostate stromal and epithelial cells. Smooth muscle ERαKO (smERαKO) mice showed decreased glandular infolding with the proximal area exhibiting a significant decrease. Fibroblast ERαKO mouse prostates did not exhibit this phenotype but showed a decrease in the number of ductal tips. Additionally, the amount of collagen observed in the basement membrane was reduced in smERαKO prostates. Interestingly, these phenotypes were found to be mutually exclusive among smERαKO or fibroblast ERαKO mice. Compound KO of ERα in both fibroblast and smooth muscle showed combined phenotypes from each of the single KO. Further mechanistic studies showed that IGF-I and epidermal growth factor were down-regulated in prostate smooth muscle PS-1 cells lacking ERα. Together, our results indicate the distinct functions of fibroblast vs. smERα in prostate development.

  12. Distinct Redox Profiles of Selected Human Prostate Carcinoma Cell Lines: Implications for Rational Design of Redox Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiswing, Luksana [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Ave., WIMR 7168, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Zhong, Weixiong; Oberley, Terry D., E-mail: toberley@wisc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Ave., WIMR 7168, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Service, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Rm A-35, 2500 Overlook Terrace, Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2011-09-13

    The effects of several cancer chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation are mediated, at least in part, by oxidative stress. To better understand this process, we analyzed certain biochemical properties affecting reduction-oxidation (redox) balance in normal prostate epithelial cells and several prostate cancer cell lines. Highly aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer PC3 cells demonstrated significantly higher levels of total antioxidant capacity (AC) and intra- and extracellular glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratios when compared with normal prostate epithelial PrEC cells. WPE1-NB26 cells, a prostate cancer cell line derived from immortalized RWPE1 human prostate epithelial cells, demonstrated significantly higher levels of total AC and intra- and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratios, but lower levels of intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and lipid peroxidation compared with RWPE1 cells. LNCaP-C4-2 cells, a more aggressive prostate cancer derived from less aggressive androgen-responsive LNCaP cells, exhibited higher levels of AC and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratio when compared to LNCaP cells. Specific cell types showed distinct cytotoxic responses to redox-modulating compounds. WPE1-NB26 cells were more sensitive to phenethyl isothiocyanate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) than RWPE1 cells, while PC3 cells were more sensitive to TNF than PrEC cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cancer cell redox state may modulate responses to redox-modulating therapeutic regimens.

  13. Distinct Redox Profiles of Selected Human Prostate Carcinoma Cell Lines: Implications for Rational Design of Redox Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luksana Chaiswing

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of several cancer chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation are mediated, at least in part, by oxidative stress. To better understand this process, we analyzed certain biochemical properties affecting reduction-oxidation (redox balance in normal prostate epithelial cells and several prostate cancer cell lines. Highly aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer PC3 cells demonstrated significantly higher levels of total antioxidant capacity (AC and intra- and extracellular glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG ratios when compared with normal prostate epithelial PrEC cells. WPE1-NB26 cells, a prostate cancer cell line derived from immortalized RWPE1 human prostate epithelial cells, demonstrated significantly higher levels of total AC and intra- and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratios, but lower levels of intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and lipid peroxidation compared with RWPE1 cells. LNCaP-C4-2 cells, a more aggressive prostate cancer derived from less aggressive androgen-responsive LNCaP cells, exhibited higher levels of AC and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratio when compared to LNCaP cells. Specific cell types showed distinct cytotoxic responses to redox-modulating compounds. WPE1-NB26 cells were more sensitive to phenethyl isothiocyanate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF than RWPE1 cells, while PC3 cells were more sensitive to TNF than PrEC cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cancer cell redox state may modulate responses to redox-modulating therapeutic regimens.

  14. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Wittig-Blaich

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases.

  15. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie M; Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Eismann, Thorsten; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Kruse, Petra; Winkler, Eva; Strauss, Wolfgang S L; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Schrader, Mark; Mertens, Daniel; Sültmann, Holger; Wittig, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox)-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases. PMID:21750652

  16. Bax and Bcl-2 are focally overexpressed in the normal epithelium of cancerous prostates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Teemu T; Tommola, Satu; Jokinen, Samuli; Parviainen, Tiina; Martikainen, Paula M

    2007-01-01

    Development of prostate cancer is connected with a disturbance of apoptosis. Prostate cancer is multifocal, suggesting that the control of apoptosis is impaired at multiple foci. We wanted to know whether apoptosis is generally disturbed in cancerous prostates and if changes in apoptotic control could be detected even in the absence of any morphologically visible changes. Therefore, we compared expression of two common apoptotic markers, Bax and Bcl-2, in normal epithelium of cancerous prostates and controls. We also evaluated the expression of these proteins in hyperplasia, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), carcinomas of different Gleason grades and capsular perineural invasion. The tissue material was obtained from radical prostatectomies, transurethral resection chips and autopsies. Individual tissue arrays were done for each patient. The intensity of Bax and Bcl-2 immunostaining was estimated semiquantitatively. The data were analyzed using a linear mixed-models analysis as well as dichotomized staining indices. Normal epithelium of cancerous prostates contained foci with high expression of Bax and Bcl-2. The expression of Bax in Gleason grades 3-5 carcinoma was significantly higher than that in Gleason grade 2, and was highest in foci with perineural invasion. The expression of Bcl-2 was strongest in PIN foci. Expression of Bax and Bcl-2 in normal epithelium of cancerous prostates suggests that increases in these indirect markers may reflect altered apoptotic control in these foci. Further studies are needed to show whether these changes represent the earliest step of the multifocal carcinogenetic process. Control of apoptosis seems to be involved and modulated during local progression of prostate cancer.

  17. The role of Cajal cells in chronic prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haki Yuksel, Ozgur; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2016-07-04

    Types of prostatitis can be defined as groups of syndromes in adult men associated with infectious and noninfectious causes characterized frequently by lower abdominal and perineal signs and diverse clinical symptoms and complications. Etiopathogenesis of chronic prostatitis is not well defined. Moreover, its treatment outcomes are not satisfactory. Presence of c-kit positive interstitial cells in human prostate is already known. It has been demonstrated that these cells can be pacemaker cells which trigger spontaneous slow-wave electrical activity in the prostate and can be responsible for the transport of glandular secretion from acinar cells into major and minor prostatic ducts and finally into urethra. In the light of all these data, when presence of a possible inflammatory pathology is thought to involve prostate that secretes and has a reservoir which drains its secretion (for prostate, prostatic urethra), two points are worth mentioning. Impairment of secretion mechanism and collection of secretion within the organ with reflux of the microbial material from its reservoir back into prostate gland. Both of these potential conditions can be explained by ductal neuromuscular mechanism, which induces secretion. We think that in this neuromuscular mechanism interstitial Cajal cells have an important role in chronic prostatitis. Our hypothesis is that curability of prostatitis is correlated with the number of Cajal cells not subjected to apoptosis.

  18. The role of Cajal cells in chronic prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Haki Yuksel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Types of prostatitis can be defined as groups of syndromes in adult men associated with infectious and noninfectious causes characterized frequently by lower abdominal and perineal signs and diverse clinical symptoms and complications. Etiopathogenesis of chronic prostatitis is not well defined. Moreover, its treatment outcomes are not satisfactory. Presence of c-kit positive interstitial cells in human prostate is already known. It has been demonstrated that these cells can be pacemaker cells which trigger spontaneous slow-wave electrical activity in the prostate and can be responsible for the transport of glandular secretion from acinar cells into major and minor prostatic ducts and finally into urethra. In the light of all these data, when presence of a possible inflammatory pathology is thought to involve prostate that secretes and has a reservoir which drains its secretion (for prostate, prostatic urethra, two points are worth mentioning. Impairment of secretion mechanism and collection of secretion within the organ with reflux of the microbial material from its reservoir back into prostate gland. Both of these potential conditions can be explained by ductal neuromuscular mechanism, which induces secretion. We think that in this neuromuscular mechanism interstitial Cajal cells have an important role in chronic prostatitis. Our hypothesis is that curability of prostatitis is correlated with the number of Cajal cells not subjected to apoptosis.

  19. Identification of intermediate cell types by keratin expression in the developing human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y; Smedts, F; Debruyne, FMJ; de la Rosette, JJMCH; Schalken, JA

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The secretory acini of the adult human prostate contain basal, luminal, and intermediate types of exocrine cells. Intermediate cells are thought to play an important role in normal growth and neoplastic transformation. In this study we investigated whether this cell type is present in

  20. Identification of intermediate cell types by keratin expression in the developing human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y; Smedts, F; Debruyne, FMJ; de la Rosette, JJMCH; Schalken, JA

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The secretory acini of the adult human prostate contain basal, luminal, and intermediate types of exocrine cells. Intermediate cells are thought to play an important role in normal growth and neoplastic transformation. In this study we investigated whether this cell type is present in ea

  1. Reference gene for primary culture of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Aline Francielle Damo; Brum, Ilma Simoni; Neto, Brasil Silva; Berger, Milton; Branchini, Gisele

    2013-04-01

    Selection of reference genes to normalize mRNA levels between samples is critical for gene expression studies because their expression can vary depending on the tissues or cells used and the experimental conditions. We performed ten cell cultures from samples of prostate cancer. Cells were divided into three groups: control (with no transfection protocol), cells transfected with siRNA specific to knockdown the androgen receptor and cells transfected with inespecific siRNAs. After 24 h, mRNA was extracted and gene expression was analyzed by Real-time qPCR. Nine candidates to reference genes for gene expression studies in this model were analyzed (aminolevulinate, delta-, synthase 1 (ALAS1); beta-actin (ACTB); beta-2-microglobulin (B2M); glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH); hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1); succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit A, flavoprotein (Fp) (SDHA); TATA box binding protein (TBP); ubiquitin C (UBC); tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ)). Expression stability was calculated NormFinder algorithm to find the most stable genes. NormFinder calculated SDHA as the most stable gene and the gene with the lowest intergroup and intragroup variation, and indicated GAPDH and SDHA as the best combination of two genes for the purpose of normalization. Androgen receptor mRNA expression was evaluated after normalization by each candidate gene and showed statistical difference in the transfected group compared to control group only when normalized by combination of GAPDH and SDHA. Based on the algorithm analysis, the combination of SDHA and GAPDH should be used to normalize target genes mRNA levels in primary culture of prostate cancer cells submitted to transfection with siRNAs.

  2. Membrane androgen binding sites are preferentially expressed in human prostate carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delakas Dimitrios

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in males. Nevertheless, to this moment, there is no specific routine diagnostic marker to be used in clinical practice. Recently, the identification of a membrane testosterone binding site involved in the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton structures and PSA secretion, on LNCaP human prostate cancer cells has been reported. We have investigated whether this membrane testosterone binding component could be of value for the identification of prostate cancer. Methods Using a non-internalizable testosterone-BSA-FITC analog, proven to bind on membrane sites only in LNCaP cells, we have investigated the expression of membrane testosterone binding sites in a series of prostate carcinomas (n = 14, morphologically normal epithelia, taken from areas of the surgical specimens far from the location of the carcinomas (n = 8 and benign prostate hyperplasia epithelia (n = 10. Isolated epithelial cells were studied by flow cytometry, and touching preparations, after 10-min incubation. In addition, routine histological slides were assayed by confocal laser microscopy. Results We show that membrane testosterone binding sites are preferentially expressed in prostate carcinoma cells, while BPH and non-malignant epithelial cells show a low or absent binding. Conclusions Our results indicate that membrane testosterone receptors might be of use for the rapid routine identification of prostate cancer, representing a new diagnostic marker of the disease.

  3. Elemental concentration analysis in PCa, BPH and normal prostate tissues using SR-TXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Correia, Rodrigo C., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Souza, Pedro A.V.R.; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Lab. de Interacoes Celulares; Ferreira, Luiz C., E-mail: luiz.ferreira@ipec.fiocruz.b [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the main causes of illness and death all over the world. In Brazil, prostate cancer currently represents the second most prevalent malignant neoplasia in men, representing 21% of all cancer cases. Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH) is an illness prevailing in men above the age of 50, close to 90% after the age of 80. The prostate presents a high zinc concentration, about 10-fold higher than any other body tissue. In this work, samples of human prostate tissues with cancer (PCa), BPH and normal tissue were analyzed utilizing the total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation technique (SRTXRF) to investigate the differences in the elemental concentrations in these tissues. SR-TXRF analyses were performed at the X-Ray fluorescence beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. By using Mann-Whitney U test it was observed that almost all elements presented concentrations with significant differences alpha = 0.05) between the groups studied. The elements and groups were: S, K, Ca, Fe, Zn, Br and Rb (PCa X Normal); S, Fe, Zn and Br (PCa X BPH); K, Ca, Fe, Zn, Br and Rb (BPH X Normal). (author)

  4. Definition of molecular determinants of prostate cancer cell bone extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Steven R; Hays, Danielle L; Yazawa, Erika M; Opperman, Matthew; Walley, Kempland C; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Burdick, Monica M; Gillard, Bryan M; Moser, Michael T; Pantel, Klaus; Foster, Barbara A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2013-01-15

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone, but transit of malignant cells across the bone marrow endothelium (BMEC) remains a poorly understood step in metastasis. Prostate cancer cells roll on E-selectin(+) BMEC through E-selectin ligand-binding interactions under shear flow, and prostate cancer cells exhibit firm adhesion to BMEC via β1, β4, and αVβ3 integrins in static assays. However, whether these discrete prostate cancer cell-BMEC adhesive contacts culminate in cooperative, step-wise transendothelial migration into bone is not known. Here, we describe how metastatic prostate cancer cells breach BMEC monolayers in a step-wise fashion under physiologic hemodynamic flow. Prostate cancer cells tethered and rolled on BMEC and then firmly adhered to and traversed BMEC via sequential dependence on E-selectin ligands and β1 and αVβ3 integrins. Expression analysis in human metastatic prostate cancer tissue revealed that β1 was markedly upregulated compared with expression of other β subunits. Prostate cancer cell breaching was regulated by Rac1 and Rap1 GTPases and, notably, did not require exogenous chemokines as β1, αVβ3, Rac1, and Rap1 were constitutively active. In homing studies, prostate cancer cell trafficking to murine femurs was dependent on E-selectin ligand, β1 integrin, and Rac1. Moreover, eliminating E-selectin ligand-synthesizing α1,3 fucosyltransferases in transgenic adenoma of mouse prostate mice dramatically reduced prostate cancer incidence. These results unify the requirement for E-selectin ligands, α1,3 fucosyltransferases, β1 and αVβ3 integrins, and Rac/Rap1 GTPases in mediating prostate cancer cell homing and entry into bone and offer new insight into the role of α1,3 fucosylation in prostate cancer development.

  5. Stem cell characteristics in prostate cancer cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, M.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate the presence of a small, stem-like cell population in several human cancers that is crucial for the tumour (re)population. OBJECTIVE: Six established prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines-DU145, DuCaP, LAPC-4, 22Rv1, LNCaP, and PC-3-were examined for their stem cell pr

  6. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells. Our

  7. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    IGF1, SOX15, BMPR1B, TGFBR1, etc), which fall into distinct GO categories including SC, development, stress response, and wound healing (unpublished...prostate cancer through the elucidation of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. During the past year, we have made the...studies, ii) in vitro co-culture of human prostate cancer cells (established cell lines and primary patient samples) with human prostate fibroblasts

  8. Effect of cyclin G2 on proliferative ability of prostate cancer PC-3 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D W; Cheng, Y J; Jing, S W; Sun, G G

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the expression, clinical significance of cyclin G2 (CCNG2) in prostate carcinoma, and the biological effect in its cell line by CCNG2 overexpression. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to analyze CCNG2 protein expression in 85 cases of prostate cancer and normal tissues to study the relationship between CCNG2 expression and clinical factors. CCNG2 lentiviral vector and empty vector were, respectively, transfected into prostate cancer PC-3 cell line. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to detect the mRNA level and protein of CCNG2. MTT assay and cell cycle were also conducted as to the influence of the upregulated expression of CCNG2 that might be found on PC-3 cells biological effect. The level of CCNG2 protein expression was found to be significantly lower in prostate cancer tissue than normal tissues (P size (P lymph node metastasis, clinic stage, and Gleason score (P prostate cancer and correlated significantly with lymph node metastasis, clinic stage, and Gleason score, suggesting that CCNG2 may play important roles as a negative regulator to prostate cancer cell.

  9. Tyrosine Kinase Display of Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Signaling 255 tion of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels (26). A variety of physiological and pharmacological agents can increase cAMP levels, such... pheochromocytoma cell line which can be induced by IL-6 to undergo neuronal differentiation-revealed the role of the P13K pathway in this process...growth effect of NT at physiological concentrations. Prostate 31:183--192. cancer xenograft with strongly androgen-dependent and relapsed strains 81

  10. Role of ART-27, a Novel Androgen Receptor Coactivator, in Normal Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    07$15.00/0 Printed m U 8 .A. Molecular Endocrino logy 21 (12):2864- 2876 Copyright C’l 2007 by The Endocrine Society d ol: 10.121G/ me.2007-0094...mutations identified in prostate cancer and androgen insensitivity syndrome display aberrant ART -27 coacti- vator function. Mol Endocrino l 19

  11. Mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells changed by endocrine effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yun LIU; Dong-mei Li; Xiao-fang ZHANG; Jian-hui WU; Zu-yue SUN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of androgen and estrogen on mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells of male rats. Methods: Castrated rats were treated with a single injection of testosterone propionate (TP) or benzogynestry (E2). There were 8 rats in the control group and TP-treated or E2-treated group. Prostate, liver, a specimen of skin, and a segment of the jejunum and colon were removed after the corresponding treatment. The results were observed through immunohistochemistry and iron hematoxylin-eosin staining.Results: All mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats with TP were oriented parallel to the basement membrane; however, mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats in E2 and the control group were oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane. TP treatment resulted in marked changes in mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled positive cells could be seen throughout the stroma and prostate epithelial cells with an injection of TP; however, the positive cells could only be seen in the stroma of prostate with an injection of E2, and the positive cells could hardly be seen in the control group. Conclusion: We found a novel effect of TP in the prostate as a marked change of mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells.

  12. [Grape seed extract inhibits the growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Ting; Shang, Xue-Jun; Yao, Gen-Hong; Ge, Jing-Ping; Teng, Wen-Hui; Sun, Yi; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of grape seed extract (GSE) on the growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells. PC-3 cells were treated with GSE at the concentration of 100, 200 and 300 microg/ml for 24, 48 and 72 hours, respectively. The the inhibitory effect of GSE on the growth of the PC-3 cells and the kidney cells of SD rats was determined by MTT reduction assay, with primarily cultured kidney cells of 1-3 days old SD rats as the normal control. GSE significantly inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but had only a mild inhibitory effect on the kidney cells. GSE inhibits the growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells and can be used as a new drug for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  13. Primary stromal cells isolated from human various histological/pathological prostate have different phenotypes and tumor promotion role

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hai; ZHAO Fu-jun; HAN Bang-min; JIANG Qi; WANG Yong-chuan; WU Jian-hong; TANG Yue-qing; ZHANG Yue-ping; XIA Shu-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostate stromal cells are known to regulate epithelial growth as well as support and maintain epithelial function. However, how stromal cells regulate epithelial cells and what differences among various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells in prostate cancer progression still remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the different phenotypes of human various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells, and their role in tumor promotion.Methods The different phenotypes of the human normal prostatic peripheral zonal primary stromal cells (NPPF),transitional zonal primary stromal cells (NPTF), and prostate cancer associated primary stromal cells (CAF) were examined with growth curves and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) assay. The different effects on prostate cancer cell line C4-2B by NPPF, NPTF, and CAF were examined with MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC assay. The gene expression of different histological/pathological prostate stromal cells was profiled by microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis.Results The growth rate of NPPF, NPTF and CAF gradually increased, followed by decreasing apoptosis. In vitro stromal-C4-2B cell line co-culture models, the proliferation and apoptosis of C4-2B cell line were differently affected by human various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells. CAF showed the most powerful effect to C4-2B cell line,as opposed to a weakest effect of NPTF. Microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes of CAF and NPPF were less than NPPF and NPTF, or CAF and NPTF. This was consistent with clinical observations that prostate cancer mostly derived from the peripheral zone and does not usually occur in the transitional zone.Conclusion NPPF, NPTF and CAF possess extremely different biological characteristics and gene expression, which may play an important role in genesis and development of prostate cancer.

  14. Characterization of a Gene Expression Signature in Normal Rat Prostate Tissue Induced by the Presence of a Tumor Elsewhere in the Organ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanibal Hani Adamo

    Full Text Available Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating changes in the tumor-bearing organ, for example growth of the vasculature, an altered extracellular matrix, and influx of inflammatory cells. To investigate this response further, we compared prostate morphology and the gene expression profile of tumor-bearing normal rat prostate tissue (termed tumor-instructed/indicating normal tissue (TINT with that of prostate tissue from controls. Dunning rat AT-1 prostate cancer cells were injected into rat prostate and tumors were established after 10 days. As controls we used intact animals, animals injected with heat-killed AT-1 cells or cell culture medium. None of the controls showed morphological TINT-changes. A rat Illumina whole-genome expression array was used to analyze gene expression in AT-1 tumors, TINT, and in medium injected prostate tissue. We identified 423 upregulated genes and 38 downregulated genes (p<0.05, ≥2-fold change in TINT relative to controls. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis verified key TINT-changes, and they were not detected in controls. Expression of some genes was changed in a manner similar to that in the tumor, whereas other changes were exclusive to TINT. Ontological analysis using GeneGo software showed that the TINT gene expression profile was coupled to processes such as inflammation, immune response, and wounding. Many of the genes whose expression is altered in TINT have well-established roles in tumor biology, and the present findings indicate that they may also function by adapting the surrounding tumor-bearing organ to the needs of the tumor. Even though a minor tumor cell contamination in TINT samples cannot be ruled out, our data suggest that there are tumor-induced changes in gene expression in the normal tumor-bearing organ which can probably not be explained by tumor cell contamination. It is important to validate these changes further, as they could

  15. Evaluation of prostatic cancer prevalence in patients with prostatic-specific antigen between 4 and 10 and normal digital rectal examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Tadayon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, PSA density smaller than 0.12-0.15, and percent of free PSA greater than 18%, the prevalence of prostate cancer is very few and we can safely ignore the TRUS and prostate biopsy in these males and eliminate its costs and side effects.

  16. Comparative uptake of polyamines by prostate and non-prostate cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinath, P.; McQuarrie, S.A.; Suresh, M.R. E-mail: msuresh@pharmacy.ualberta.ca

    2002-05-01

    The Km and Vmax of [{sup 14}C]-radiolabeled polyamines were determined for PC-3 and AT3B-1 cell lines. With PC-3 Km values are in the following order: ornithine> spermidine> spermine> putrescine, while with AT3B-1 it was spermidine> ornithine> spermine> putrescine. To determine which of these polyamines exhibit higher accumulation, the relative uptake of all the four amines was studied with prostate (PC-3, AT3B-1, LNCaP) and non-prostate (MCF-7, KLN-205, OVCAR) cell lines at 10 and 20 {mu}M after 1 hour. Spermine and spermidine accumulated at higher levels in prostate (AT3B-1 and LNCaP) over non-prostate cell lines (p<0.01). Putrescine accumulated more in PC-3 and LNCaP than the non-prostate cancer cells.

  17. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of normal, benign and malignant conditions in the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visschere, Pieter J.L. de; Pattyn, Eva; Villeirs, Geert M. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Vral, Anne [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent (Belgium); Perletti, Gianpaolo [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent (Belgium); University of Insubria, Clinical Pharmacology, Medical and Surgical Sciences Section, Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, Varese (Italy); Praet, Marleen [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Ghent (Belgium); Magri, Vittorio [Instituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Urology Clinic, Milano (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    To identify the multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) characteristics of normal, benign and malignant conditions in the prostate. Fifty-six histopathological whole-mount radical prostatectomy specimens from ten randomly selected patients with prostate cancer (PC) were matched with corresponding transverse mpMRI slices. The mpMRI was performed prior to biopsy and consisted of T2-weighted imaging (T2-WI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCE) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). In each prostate specimen, a wide range of histopathological conditions were observed. They showed consistent but overlapping characteristics on mpMRI. Normal glands in the transition zone showed lower signal intensity (SI) on T2-WI, lower ADC values and lower citrate peaks on MRSI as compared to the peripheral zone (PZ) due to sparser glandular elements and more prominent collagenous fibres. In the PZ, normal glands were iso-intense on T2-WI, while high SI areas represented cystic atrophy. Mimickers of well-differentiated PC on mpMRI were inflammation, adenosis, HG-PIN and post-atrophic hyperplasia. Each prostate is a unique mix of normal, benign and/or malignant areas that vary in extent and distribution resulting in very heterogeneous characteristics on mpMRI. Understanding the main concepts of this mpMRI-histopathological correlation may increase the diagnostic confidence in reporting mpMRI. (orig.)

  18. Radioprotection of normal tissue cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Patrick; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten [Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Improvements of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and systemic therapy have resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity is still dose limiting. Several strategies have been pursued with the goal to develop substances which may prevent or reduce damage to normal tissue. Drugs applied before radiotherapy are called radioprotectors; those given after radiotherapy to reduce long-term effects are radiomitigators. Despite more than 50 years of research, until now only two substances, amifostine and palifermin, have overcome all obstacles of clinical approval and are applied during radiotherapy of head and neck cancer or total body irradiation, respectively. However, better understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response has allowed the development of several highly promising drugs functioning as scavengers of reactive oxygen species or targeting specific molecules involved in regulation of cell death pathways or cell cycle arrest. The present review describes the major targets for radioprotectors or radiomitigators currently tested in clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Verbesserungen in der Radiotherapie in Kombination mit Chirurgie und Chemotherapie fuehrten zu erhoehten Ueberlebensraten von Tumorpatienten. Trotzdem sind Strahlenfolgen am Normalgewebe weiterhin dosislimitierend. Verschiedene Ansaetze wurden verfolgt, um Substanzen zu entwickeln, die Normalgewebstoxizitaeten verhindern oder verringern. Medikamente, die vor der Radiotherapie verabreicht werden, heissen Radioprotektoren, solche die danach gegeben werden, um langfristige Effekte zu reduzieren, Radiomitigatoren. Trotz mehr als 50 Jahre Forschung ueberwanden nur zwei Substanzen, Amifostin und Palifermin, alle Huerden der klinischen Pruefung und sind fuer die Anwendung waehrend der Radiotherapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren bzw. bei Ganzkoerperbestrahlung zugelassen. Jedoch erlaubte das bessere Verstaendnis der Signalwege

  19. Identification of candidate genes for prostate cancer-risk SNPs utilizing a normal prostate tissue eQTL data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, S. N.; French, A. J.; McDonnell, S. K.; Cheville, J.; Middha, S.; Tillmans, L.; Riska, S.; Baheti, S.; Larson, M. C.; Fogarty, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Larson, N.; Nair, A.; O'Brien, D.; Wang, L.; Schaid, D J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have identified loci associated with the risk of developing prostate cancer but the associated genes are not well studied. Here we create a normal prostate tissue-specific eQTL data set and apply this data set to previously identified prostate cancer (PrCa)-risk SNPs in an effort to identify candidate target genes. The eQTL data set is constructed by the genotyping and RNA sequencing of 471 samples. We focus on 146 PrCa-risk SNPs, including all SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with each risk SNP, resulting in 100 unique risk intervals. We analyse cis-acting associations where the transcript is located within 2 Mb (±1 Mb) of the risk SNP interval. Of all SNP–gene combinations tested, 41.7% of SNPs demonstrate a significant eQTL signal after adjustment for sample histology and 14 expression principal component covariates. Of the 100 PrCa-risk intervals, 51 have a significant eQTL signal and these are associated with 88 genes. This study provides a rich resource to study biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk to PrCa. PMID:26611117

  20. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α in human normal, benign, and malignant prostate tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    都镇先; 藤山千里; 陈永昕; 真崎善二郎

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) protein expression in normal prostates (NP), benign prostatic glandular hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate adenocarcinoma (Pca).Methods HIF-1α protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens obtained from 13 cases of NP, 28 cases of BPH, and 34 cases of Pca. In cases of Pca, the relationship between HIF-1α protein expression and certain clinicopathological factors, such as clinicopathologic stage and Gleason score, was evaluated.Results NP manifested no immunoreactivity, whereas Pca and BPH showed significantly increased HIF-1α protein expression. A significantly higher expression was observed in Pca specimens compared with BPH samples. In Pca, no significant relationship between HIF-1α protein expression and clinicopathological factors was found.Conclusion Our findings of increased HIF-1α protein expression in BPH and Pca specimens suggests the potential role of this protein in BPH and Pca.

  1. Prediagnostic Obesity and Physical Inactivity Are Associated with Shorter Telomere Length in Prostate Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshu, Corinne E; Peskoe, Sarah B; Heaphy, Christopher M; Kenfield, Stacey A; Van Blarigan, Erin L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J; Yoon, GhilSuk; Lee, Thomas K; Hicks, Jessica L; De Marzo, Angelo M; Meeker, Alan K; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and inactivity have been associated with advanced-stage prostate cancer, and poor prostate cancer outcomes, though the underlying mechanism(s) is unknown. To determine whether telomere shortening, which has been associated with lethal prostate cancer, may be a potential underlying mechanism, we prospectively evaluated the association between measures of adiposity, physical activity, and telomere length in 596 participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, who were surgically treated for prostate cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we measured telomere length in cancer and benign cells using a telomere-specific FISH assay. Adiposity and activity were assessed via questionnaire within 2 years of diagnosis. Adjusting for age, pathologic stage, and grade, the median and SD of the per cell telomere signals were determined for each man for stromal cells and cancer cells by adiposity and activity categories. Overweight/obese men (54%) were similar to normal weight men on most factors, but had higher Gleason sum and lower activity levels. Overweight/obese men had 7.4% shorter telomeres in stromal cells than normal weight men (P = 0.06). The least active men had shorter telomeres in stromal cells than more active men (Ptrend = 0.002). Men who were overweight/obese and the least active had the shortest telomeres in stromal cells (20.7% shorter; P = 0.0005) compared with normal weight men who were the most active. Cancer cell telomere length and telomere length variability did not differ by measures of adiposity or activity. Telomere shortening in prostate cells may be one mechanism through which lifestyle influences prostate cancer risk and outcomes. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Silibinin decreases prostate-specific antigen with cell growth inhibition via G1 arrest, leading to differentiation of prostate carcinoma cells: Implications for prostate cancer intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Zi, Xiaolin; Agarwal, Rajesh

    1999-01-01

    Reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels has been proposed as an endpoint biomarker for hormone-refractory human prostate cancer intervention. We examined whether a flavonoid antioxidant silibinin (an active constituent of milk thistle) decreases PSA levels in hormone-refractory human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells and whether this effect has biological relevance. Silibinin treatment of cells grown in serum resulted in a significant decrease in both intracellular and secreted...

  3. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles inhibit prostate cancer by attenuating the stemness of cancer cells via inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Yang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Tie; Shi, Min-Feng; Sun, Chen-Xia; Gao, Xiu-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Qiong; Cui, Xin-Gang; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Disordered copper metabolism plays a critical role in the development of various cancers. As a nanomedicine containing copper, cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) exert ideal antitumor pharmacological effects in vitro and in vivo. Prostate cancer is a frequently diagnosed male malignancy prone to relapse, and castration resistance is the main reason for endocrine therapy failure. However, whether CONPs have the potential to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer is still unknown. Here, using the castration-resistant PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line as a model, we report that CONPs can selectively induce apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. CONPs can also attenuate the stemness of cancer cells and inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway, both of which highlight the great potential of CONPs as a new clinical castration-resistant prostate cancer therapy.

  4. Molecular signatures of the primitive prostate stem cell niche reveal novel mesenchymal-epithelial signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Blum

    be common to mammalian niches in general. This study provides a comprehensive source for further studies of mesenchymal/epithelial interactions in the prostate stem cell niche. The elucidation of pathways in the normal primitive niche may provide greater insight into mechanisms subverted during abnormal proliferative and oncogenic processes. Understanding these events may result in the development of specific targeted therapies for prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hypertrophy and carcinomas.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Prostate: From Birth to Death and Potential Applications in Between. Prostate Cancer Foundation Tumor Microenvironment/ Immunology Working Group...Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0304 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs CONTRACTING...Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions

  6. Differentiation of Neonatal Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Prostate Epithelial Cells: A Model to Study Prostate Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0189 TITLE: Differentiation of Neonatal Human...CONTRACT NUMBER Differentiation of Neonatal Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Prostate Epithelial Cells: A Model to Study Prostate Cancer...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We set out to establish conditions for differentiation of human neonatal foreskin skin fibroblast

  7. Analysis of spatial heterogeneity in normal epithelium and preneoplastic alterations in mouse prostate tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkonen, Mira; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Kartasalo, Kimmo; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2017-01-01

    Cancer involves histological changes in tissue, which is of primary importance in pathological diagnosis and research. Automated histological analysis requires ability to computationally separate pathological alterations from normal tissue with all its variables. On the other hand, understanding connections between genetic alterations and histological attributes requires development of enhanced analysis methods suitable also for small sample sizes. Here, we set out to develop computational methods for early detection and distinction of prostate cancer-related pathological alterations. We use analysis of features from HE stained histological images of normal mouse prostate epithelium, distinguishing the descriptors for variability between ventral, lateral, and dorsal lobes. In addition, we use two common prostate cancer models, Hi-Myc and Pten+/− mice, to build a feature-based machine learning model separating the early pathological lesions provoked by these genetic alterations. This work offers a set of computational methods for separation of early neoplastic lesions in the prostates of model mice, and provides proof-of-principle for linking specific tumor genotypes to quantitative histological characteristics. The results obtained show that separation between different spatial locations within the organ, as well as classification between histologies linked to different genetic backgrounds, can be performed with very high specificity and sensitivity. PMID:28317907

  8. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer.

  9. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanna Ihnatovych

    Full Text Available Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate- cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  10. File list: DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: DNS.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 DNase-seq Prostate Prostate cancer cell...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  12. Prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Domingue, Gerald J.; Hellstrom, Wayne J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of acute bacterial prostatitis is straightforward and easily accomplished in clinical laboratories. Chronic bacterial prostatitis, and especially chronic idiopathic prostatitis (most often referred to as abacterial prostatitis), presents a real challenge to the clinician and clinical microbiologist. Clinically, the diagnosis of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is differentiated from that of acute prostatitis by a lack of prostatic inflammation and no “significant” (cont...

  13. Prostate specific antigen gene expression in androgen insensitive prostate carcinoma subculture cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chung, Li-Chuan; Chao, Chun-Hsiang; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2008-01-01

    A novel prostate cancer cell line (PC-J) was isolated from an androgen independent non-prostate specific antigen (non-PSA) producing carcinoma cell line. The homologous correlation between PC-J and PC-3 was determined by short tandem repeat analysis. The PSA promoter activity was detected by transient expression assay in the PC-J and LNCaP cells but not in androgen insensitive PC-3 cells. When the PC-J cells were cotransfected with androgen receptor, androgen receptor coactivators and PSA reporter vector cells, the reporter assays indicated that nuclear receptor coactivator 4 (NCOA4) but not androgen receptor activator 24 (ARA24) increased the sensitivity and maximum stimulation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-inducing PSA promoter activity. The RT-PCR assays revealed that the expression of several tumor markers, including interleukin-6, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), prostate epithelium-specific Ets transcription factor (PDEF) and matriptase, was lower in the PC-J cells than in the PC-3 cells. This cell model elucidated the regulation of PSA expression and enabled comparison of the gene profile at different stages of metastasis in prostatic carcinoma.

  14. File list: His.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 TFs and others Prostate Prostate cancer... cells SRX022577,SRX022578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: Oth.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Pol.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Prostate Prostate cancer... cells SRX022582 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. Enrichment of prostate cancer stem-like cells from human prostate cancer cell lines by culture in serum-free medium and chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xing; Zheng, Xinmin; Wang, Xinghuan; Li, Shiwen; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Zhonghua; Xia, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of rare subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has created a new focus in cancer research. As CSCs demonstrate resistance to chemoradiation therapy relative to other cancer cells, this allows the enrichment of CSC populations by killing apoptosis-susceptible cancer cells. In this study, three commonly used human prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines (DU145, PC-3 and LNCaP) were examined for their expression of the putative stem cell markers CD133 and CD44 via flow cytometric analysis. Under normal culture conditions, CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells were only present in the DU145 cell line, and comprised only a minor percentage (0.1% ± 0.01%) of the total population. However, the proportion of these CD133(+)/CD44(+) prostate CSCs could be increased in these cell lines via culture in serum-free medium (SFM), or through chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Indeed, after culture in SFM, the proportion of CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells in DU145 and PC-3 had increased to 10.3% and 3.0%, respectively. Moreover, the proportion had increased to 9.8% enriched by chemotherapy and 3.5% by radiotherapy in DU145. Colony-formation tests, cell invasion assays, and tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice were used to evaluate the stem cell properties of CD133(+)/CD44(+) PCa cells that were isolated via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells had an enhanced colony-formation capability and invasive ability in vitro, and displayed greater tumorigenic properties in vivo. These results demonstrate the presence of CD133(+)/CD44(+) prostate CSCs in established PCa cell lines and that populations of these cells can be enriched by culture in SFM or chemoradiotherapy. Finding novel therapies to override chemoradiation resistance in the prostate CSCs is the key to improve long-term results in PCa management.

  4. Gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Thompson, T C

    2008-05-01

    There is a critical need to develop new and effective cancer therapies that target bone, the primary metastatic site for prostate cancer and other malignancies. Among the various therapeutic approaches being considered for this application, gene-modified cell-based therapies may have specific advantages. Gene-modified cell therapy uses gene transfer and cell-based technologies in a complementary fashion to chaperone appropriate gene expression cassettes to active sites of tumor growth. In this paper, we briefly review potential cell vehicles for this approach and discuss relevant gene therapy strategies for prostate cancer. We further discuss selected studies that led to the conceptual development and preclinical testing of IL-12 gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy for prostate cancer. Finally, we discuss future directions in the development of gene-modified cell therapy for metastatic prostate cancer, including the need to identify and test novel therapeutic genes such as GLIPR1.

  5. Snail transcription factor negatively regulates maspin tumor suppressor in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Corey L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maspin, a putative tumor suppressor that is down-regulated in breast and prostate cancer, has been associated with decreased cell motility. Snail transcription factor is a zinc finger protein that is increased in breast cancer and is associated with increased tumor motility and invasion by induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Snail increases tumor motility and invasion utilizing prostate cancer cells. Methods Expression levels were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Cell motility and invasion assays were performed, while Snail regulation and binding to maspin promoter was analyzed by luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays. Results Snail protein expression was higher in different prostate cancer cells lines as compared to normal prostate epithelial cells, which correlated inversely with maspin expression. Snail overexpression in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells inhibited maspin expression and led to increased migration and invasion. Knockdown of Snail in DU145 and C4-2 cancer cells resulted in up-regulation of maspin expression, concomitant with decreased migration. Transfection of Snail into 22Rv1 or LNCaP cells inhibited maspin promoter activity, while stable knockdown of Snail in C4-2 cells increased promoter activity. ChIP analysis showed that Snail is recruited to the maspin promoter in 22Rv1 cells. Conclusions Overall, this is the first report showing that Snail can negatively regulate maspin expression by directly repressing maspin promoter activity, leading to increased cell migration and invasion. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail may be useful to re-induce expression of maspin tumor suppressor and prevent prostate cancer tumor progression.

  6. Obesity promotes aerobic glycolysis in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos, David A; deGraffenried, Matthew J; Apte, Shruti A; Bowers, Laura W; Whelan, Kaitlin A; deGraffenried, Linda A

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is the leading preventable comorbidity associated with increased prostate cancer-related recurrence and mortality. Epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that a body mass index >30 is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage within the prostate gland and increased prostate cancer-related mortality. Here we provide evidence that obesity promotes worse clinical outcome through induction of metabolic abnormalities known to promote genotoxic stress. We have previously reported that blood serum derived from obese mice may enhance the proliferative and invasive potential of human prostate cancer cell lines ex vivo. Here we show that a 1-h exposure of LNCaP or PacMetUT1 prostate cancer cell lines and nonmalignant RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells to 2% serum from obese mice induces markers of aerobic glycolysis relative to those exposed to serum from nonobese mice. This metabolic change was correlated with accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased frequency of DNA double-strand breaks. Interestingly, N-tert-Butylhydroxylamine, an antioxidant, significantly suppressed markers of aerobic glycolysis in the cells exposed to the blood serum of obese mice, suggesting that ROS contributes to a metabolic shift toward aerobic glycolysis. Here we describe obesity-induced changes in key metabolic markers that impact prostate cancer cell progression and explore the role of antioxidants in ameliorating these effects.

  7. Ethanolic Extract of Propolis Augments TRAIL-Induced Apoptotic Death in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Szliszka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer in men. The ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP and its phenolic compounds possess immunomodulatory, chemopreventive and antitumor effects. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/APO2L is a naturally occurring anticancer agent that preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells and is not toxic to normal cells. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of EEP and phenolic compounds isolated from propolis in combination with TRAIL on two prostate cancer cell lines, hormone-sensitivity LNCaP and hormone-refractory DU145. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. The prostate cancer cell lines were proved to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our study demonstrated that EEP and its components significantly sensitize to TRAIL-induced death in prostate cancer cells. The percentage of the apoptotic cells after cotreatment with 50 μg mL−1 EEP and 100 ng mL−1 TRAIL increased to 74.9 ± 0.7% for LNCaP and 57.4 ± 0.7% for DU145 cells. The strongest cytotoxic effect on LNCaP cells was exhibited by apigenin, kaempferid, galangin and caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE in combination with TRAIL (53.51 ± 0.68–66.06 ± 0.62% death cells. In this work, we showed that EEP markedly augmented TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in prostate cancer cells and suggested the significant role of propolis in chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

  8. Ethanolic Extract of Propolis Augments TRAIL-Induced Apoptotic Death in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szliszka, Ewelina; Czuba, Zenon P; Bronikowska, Joanna; Mertas, Anna; Paradysz, Andrzej; Krol, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer in men. The ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) and its phenolic compounds possess immunomodulatory, chemopreventive and antitumor effects. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/APO2L) is a naturally occurring anticancer agent that preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells and is not toxic to normal cells. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of EEP and phenolic compounds isolated from propolis in combination with TRAIL on two prostate cancer cell lines, hormone-sensitivity LNCaP and hormone-refractory DU145. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. The prostate cancer cell lines were proved to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our study demonstrated that EEP and its components significantly sensitize to TRAIL-induced death in prostate cancer cells. The percentage of the apoptotic cells after cotreatment with 50 μg mL(-1) EEP and 100 ng mL(-1) TRAIL increased to 74.9 ± 0.7% for LNCaP and 57.4 ± 0.7% for DU145 cells. The strongest cytotoxic effect on LNCaP cells was exhibited by apigenin, kaempferid, galangin and caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE) in combination with TRAIL (53.51 ± 0.68-66.06 ± 0.62% death cells). In this work, we showed that EEP markedly augmented TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in prostate cancer cells and suggested the significant role of propolis in chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

  9. Increased cancer cell proliferation in prostate cancer patients with high levels of serum folate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: A recent clinical trial revealed that folic acid supplementation is associated with an increased incidence of prostate cancer (1). The present study evaluates serum and prostate tissue folate levels in men with prostate cancer, compared to histologically normal prostate glands from can...

  10. Cancer-secreted AGR2 induces programmed cell death in normal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitello, Elizabeth A.; Quek, Sue-Ing; Kincaid, Heather; Fuchs, Thomas; Crichton, Daniel J.; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) is a protein expressed in many solid tumor types including prostate, pancreatic, breast and lung. AGR2 functions as a protein disulfide isomerase in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, AGR2 is secreted by cancer cells that overexpress this molecule. Secretion of AGR2 was also found in salamander limb regeneration. Due to its ubiquity, tumor secretion of AGR2 must serve an important role in cancer, yet its molecular function is largely unknown. This study examined the effect of cancer-secreted AGR2 on normal cells. Prostate stromal cells were cultured, and tissue digestion media containing AGR2 prepared from prostate primary cancer 10-076 CP and adenocarcinoma LuCaP 70CR xenograft were added. The control were tissue digestion media containing no AGR2 prepared from benign prostate 10-076 NP and small cell carcinoma LuCaP 145.1 xenograft. In the presence of tumor-secreted AGR2, the stromal cells were found to undergo programmed cell death (PCD) characterized by formation of cellular blebs, cell shrinkage, and DNA fragmentation as seen when the stromal cells were UV irradiated or treated by a pro-apoptotic drug. PCD could be prevented with the addition of the monoclonal AGR2-neutralizing antibody P3A5. DNA microarray analysis of LuCaP 70CR media-treated vs. LuCaP 145.1 media-treated cells showed downregulation of the gene SAT1 as a major change in cells exposed to AGR2. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the array result. SAT1 encodes spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, which maintains intracellular polyamine levels. Abnormal polyamine metabolism as a result of altered SAT1 activity has an adverse effect on cells through the induction of PCD. PMID:27283903

  11. Prostate cancer cells metastasize to the hematopoietic stem cell niche in bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evan T Keller

    2011-01-01

    @@ The majority of men with advanced prostate cancer develop bone metastases as opposed to metastases at other sites.1 It has been unclear why prostate cancer selectively metastasizes to and proliferates in bone.Recently, Shiozawa et al.Delineated a mechanism that may account for the establishment of prostate cancer in bone.2 Specifically, they identified that prostate cancer cells compete with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for the osteoblast in the HSC niche of the bone.Defining the mechanisms through which prostate cancer cells establish themselves in bone is critical towards developing effective therapeutic strategies to prevent or target bone metastases.

  12. Equivalent normalized total dose estimates in cyberknife radiotherapy dose delivery in prostate cancer hypofractionation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudahar, H; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Mahadev, P; Velmurugan, J

    2012-04-01

    As the α/β value of prostate is very small and lower than the surrounding critical organs, hypofractionated radiotherapy became a vital mode of treatment of prostate cancer. Cyberknife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) treatment for localized prostate cancer is performed in hypofractionated dose regimen alone. Effective dose escalation in the hypofractionated regimen can be estimated if the corresponding conventional 2 Gy per fraction equivalent normalized total dose (NTD) distribution is known. The present study aims to analyze the hypofractionated dose distribution of localized prostate cancer in terms of equivalent NTD. Randomly selected 12 localized prostate cases treated in cyberknife with a dose regimen of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions were considered. The 2 Gy per fraction equivalent NTDs were calculated using the formula derived from the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Dose distributions were analyzed with the corresponding NTDs. The conformity index for the prescribed target dose of 36.25 Gy equivalent to the NTD dose of 90.63 Gy (α/β = 1.5) or 74.31 Gy (α/β = 3) was ranging between 1.15 and 1.73 with a mean value of 1.32 ± 0.15. The D5% of the target was 111.41 ± 8.66 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 90.15 ± 6.57 Gy for α/β = 3. Similarly, the D95% was 91.98 ± 3.77 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 75.35 ± 2.88 Gy for α/β = 3. The mean values of bladder and rectal volume receiving the prescribed dose of 36.25 Gy were 0.83 cm3 and 0.086 cm3, respectively. NTD dose analysis shows an escalated dose distribution within the target for low α/β (1.5 Gy) with reasonable sparing of organs at risk. However, the higher α/β of prostate (3 Gy) is not encouraging the fact of dose escalation in cyberknife hypofractionated dose regimen of localized prostate cancer.

  13. Oncogenic ETS proteins mimic activated RAS/MAPK signaling in prostate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenhorst, Peter C.; Ferris, Mary W.; Hull, Megan A.; Chae, Heejoon; Kim, Sun; Graves, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    The aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS transcription factor is implicated in the progression of the majority of prostate cancers, 40% of melanomas, and most cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and Ewing's sarcoma. Chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer result in overexpression of any one of four ETS transcription factors. How these four oncogenic ETS genes differ from the numerous other ETS genes expressed in normal prostate and contribute to tumor progression is not understood. We report that these oncogenic ETS proteins, but not other ETS factors, enhance prostate cell migration. Genome-wide binding analysis matched this specific biological function to occupancy of a unique set of genomic sites highlighted by the presence of ETS- and AP-1-binding sequences. ETS/AP-1-binding sequences are prototypical RAS-responsive elements, but oncogenic ETS proteins activated a RAS/MAPK transcriptional program in the absence of MAPK activation. Thus, overexpression of oncogenic ETS proteins can replace RAS/MAPK pathway activation in prostate cells. The genomic description of this ETS/AP-1-regulated, RAS-responsive, gene expression program provides a resource for understanding the role of these ETS factors in both an oncogenic setting and the developmental processes where these genes normally function. PMID:22012618

  14. Prostate Mucinous Adenocarcinoma with Signet Ring Cells: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Wang; Guang Sun; Jiangang Pan; Jiwu Chang; Shumin Zhang; Tao Li; Binghuang Ren

    2006-01-01

    @@ Prostate mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells(MCSRC)is a rare morphologic variant of prostate cancer,with only 12 cases reported to date.[1] Diagnosis of this carcinoma requires that at least 25% of the tumor tissue should consist of an extracellular mucin pool.[2] In this report, we present a case of prostate prostate mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cells.

  15. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanka Jähnisch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs, which display an extraordinary capacity to induce, sustain, and regulate T-cell responses providing the opportunity of DC-based cancer vaccination strategies. Thus, clinical trials enrolling prostate cancer patients were conducted, which were based on the administration of DCs loaded with tumor-associated antigens. These clinical trials revealed that DC-based immunotherapeutic strategies represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in prostate cancer patients. In this context, the administration of the vaccine sipuleucel-T consisting of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells including APCs, which were pre-exposed in vitro to the fusion protein PA2024, resulted in a prolonged overall survival among patients with metastatic castration-resistent prostate cancer. In April 2010, sipuleucel-T was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for prostate cancer therapy.

  16. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Y

    2016-05-01

    growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells. Our findings suggest that cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors such as RO, when used in combination with commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs or ERβ specific ligands, could represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent the growth of prostate cancer tumors. Keywords: prostate cancer, cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor, cell viability, xenograft, castration resistant

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging features of the normal central zone of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Barry G; Karademir, Ibrahim; Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Karczmar, Gregory; Thomas, Stephen; Yousuf, Ambereen; Antic, Tatjana; Eggener, Scott; Oto, Aytekin

    2014-05-01

    Evaluate qualitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of normal central zone based on recently described central zone MRI features. Institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant study, 59 patients with prostate cancer, histopathology proven to not involve central zone or prostate base, underwent endorectal MRI before prostatectomy. Two readers independently reviewed T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps identifying normal central zone based on low signal intensity and location. Next, two readers drew bilateral central zone regions of interest on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images in consensus and independently recorded enhancement curve types as type 1 (progressive), type 2 (plateau), and type 3 (wash-out). Identification rates of normal central zone and enhancement curve type were recorded and compared for each reviewer. The institutional review board waiver was approved and granted 05/2010. Central zone identified in 92%-93% of patients on T2-weighted images and 78%-88% on ADC maps without significant difference between identification rates (P = .63 and P = .15 and inter-reader agreement (κ) is 0.64 and 0.29, for T2-weighted images and ADC maps, respectively). All central zones were rated either curve type 1 or curve type 2 by both radiologists. No statistically significant difference between the two radiologists (P = .19) and inter-reader agreement was κ = 0.37. Normal central zone demonstrates either type 1 (progressive) or type 2 (plateau) enhancement curves on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI that can be potentially useful to differentiate central zone from prostate cancer that classically demonstrates a type 3 (wash-out) enhancement curve. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microenvironment -Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0352 TITLE: Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dean...G. Tang, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston, TX 77030 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF...Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  19. Aminomethylphosphonic Acid and Methoxyacetic Acid Induce Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab R. Parajuli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA and its parent compound herbicide glyphosate are analogs to glycine, which have been reported to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells, but not normal cells. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA is the active metabolite of ester phthalates widely used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer; its exposure is associated with developmental and reproductive toxicities in both rodents and humans. MAA has been reported to suppress prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether AMPA and MAA can inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, we found that AMPA and MAA inhibited cell growth in prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3 and DU-145 through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Importantly, the AMPA-induced apoptosis was potentiated with the addition of MAA, which was due to downregulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3. These results demonstrate that the combination of AMPA and MAA can promote the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells, suggesting that they can be used as potential therapeutic drugs in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  20. Spindle-cell carcinoma of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hirokatsu Watanabe Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoma of the prostate and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate are rareconditions, both characterized by a poor prognosis. Sarcomatoid carcinoma ofthe prostate typically arises from the evolution of an underlying adenocarcinoma,occasionally featuring heterologous elements, bulky disease being possiblebut rare. In contrast, sarcoma of the prostate derives from non-epithelialmesenchymal components of the prostatic stroma, shows rapid growth, andfrequently presents as massive pelvic tumors obstructing the urinary tractat the time of diagnosis. We report the case of a 55-year-old patient with atwo-month history of symptoms of urinary obstruction. The patient presentedwith an extremely enlarged heterogeneous prostate, although his prostatespecificantigen level was low. The lack of a history of prostatic neoplasia ledus to suspect sarcoma, and a transrectal prostate biopsy was carried out. Animmunohistochemical study of the biopsy specimen did not confirm the clinicalsuspicion. However, in view of the clinical features, we believe that sarcoma ofthe prostate was the most likely diagnosis. The patient received neoadjuvantchemotherapy followed by radiation therapy. At this writing, surgical resectionhad yet to be scheduled.

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillerdal, Victoria; Essand, Magnus

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy was selected as the Breakthrough of the Year 2013 by the editors of Science, in part because of the successful treatment of refractory hematological malignancies with adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells. Effective treatment of B cell leukemia may pave the road to future treatment of solid tumors, using similar approaches. The prostate expresses many unique proteins and, since the prostate gland is a dispensable organ, CAR T cells can potentially be used to target these tissue-specific antigens. However, the location and composition of prostate cancer metastases complicate the task of treating these tumors. It is therefore likely that more sophisticated CAR T cell approaches are going to be required for prostate metastasis than for B cell malignancies. Two main challenges that need to be resolved are how to increase the migration and infiltration of CAR T cells into prostate cancer bone metastases and how to counteract the immunosuppressive microenvironment found in bone lesions. Inclusion of homing (chemokine) receptors in CAR T cells may improve their recruitment to bone metastases, as may antibody-based combination therapies to normalize the tumor vasculature. Optimal activation of CAR T cells through the introduction of multiple costimulatory domains would help to overcome inhibitory signals from the tumor microenvironment. Likewise, combination therapy with checkpoint inhibitors that can reduce tumor immunosuppression may help improve efficacy. Other elegant approaches such as induced expression of immune stimulatory cytokines upon target recognition may also help to recruit other effector immune cells to metastatic sites. Although toxicities are difficult to predict in prostate cancer, severe on-target/off-tumor toxicities have been observed in clinical trials with use of CAR T cells against hematological malignancies; therefore, the choice of the target antigen is going to be crucial. This review

  2. A Milk Protein, Casein, as a Proliferation Promoting Factor in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Sang Jin; Chung, Moon Kee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite most epidemiologic studies reporting that an increase in milk intake affects the growth of prostate cancer, the results of experimental studies are not consistent. In this study, we investigated the proliferation of prostate cancer cells treated with casein, the main protein in milk. Materials and Methods Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and PC3), lung cancer cells (A459), stomach cancer cells (SNU484), breast cancer cells (MCF7), immortalized human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), and immortalized normal prostate cells (RWPE1) were treated with either 0.1 or 1 mg/mL of α-casein and total casein extracted from bovine milk. Treatments were carried out in serum-free media for 72 hours. The proliferation of each cell line was evaluated by an 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results α-Casein and total casein did not affect the proliferations of RWPE1, HEK293, A459, SNU484, MCF7, HEK293, or RWPE1 cells. However, PC3 cells treated with 1 mg/mL of α-casein and casein showed increased proliferation (228% and 166%, respectively), and the proliferation of LNCaP cells was also enhanced by 134% and 142%, respectively. The proliferation mechanism of α-casein in PC3 and LNCaP cells did not appear to be related to the induction of Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), since the level of IGF-1 did not change upon the supplementation of casein. Conclusions The milk protein, casein, promotes the proliferation of prostate cancer cells such as PC3 and LNCaP. PMID:25237656

  3. Analysis of the Genetic Phylogeny of Multifocal Prostate Cancer Identifies Multiple Independent Clonal Expansions in Neoplastic and Morphologically Normal Prostate Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Colin S.; Eeles, Rosalind; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G.; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E.; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J.; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of on-going abnormal mutational pr...

  4. Benign prostate hyperplasia and stem cells: a new therapeutic opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notara, Maria; Ahmed, Aamir

    2012-12-01

    Most men over 50 experience some lower urinary tract symptoms of nocturia, poor stream, urgency and frequency for urination, due to hyperplastic enlargement of the prostate (benign prostate hyperplasia, BPH). BPH is thought to be a disease with multiple aetiologies including hormone signalling, disruption of proliferation and apoptosis dynamics and chronic inflammation with changes in the morphology and phenotype of the prostate stroma. It has been proposed, recently, that stromal stem cells in prostate may be caused by the development of BPH. This review focuses on this putative role of stromal stem or stem-like cells in the development of BPH and assesses the potential of targeting the stem cells for the treatment of BPH.

  5. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  6. The dietary bioflavonoid, quercetin, selectively induces apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by down-regulating the expression of heat shock protein 90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Bindukumar, B; Reynolds, Jessica L; Sykes, Donald E; Mahajan, Supriya D; Chadha, Kailash C; Schwartz, Stanley A

    2008-12-01

    Human and animal studies have suggested that diet-derived flavonoids, in particular quercetin may play a beneficial role by preventing or inhibiting oncogenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect(s) of quercetin on normal and malignant prostate cells and to identify the target(s) of quercetin's action. We addressed this question using cells in culture and investigated whether quercetin affects key biological processes responsible for tumor cell properties such as cell proliferation and apoptosis and also studied the effect of quercetin on the proteome of prostate cancer cells using difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to assess changes in the expression of relevant proteins. Our findings demonstrate that quercetin treatment of prostate cancer cells results in decreased cell proliferation and viability. Furthermore, we demonstrate that quercetin promotes cancer cell apoptosis by down-regulating the levels of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90. Depletion of Hsp90 by quercetin results in decreased cell viability, levels of surrogate markers of Hsp90 inhibition (intracellular and secreted), induced apoptosis and activation of caspases in cancer cells but not in normal prostate epithelial cells. Knockdown of Hsp90 by short interfering RNA also resulted in induction apoptosis similar to quercetin in cancer cells as indicated by annexin V staining. Our results demonstrate that quercetin down-regulates the expression of Hsp90 which, in turn, induces inhibition of growth and cell death in prostate cancer cells while exerting no quantifiable effect on normal prostate epithelial cells.

  7. [Circulating tumor cells and prostate cancer prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoun, Otakar; Soukup, Viktor; Mikulová, Veronika; Jančíková, Markéta; Honová, Hana; Kološtová, Katarína; Zima, Tomáš; Hanuš, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common malignant disease in men. Prognosis of patients with metastatic PC is generally unfavourable; however there are significant differences in survival at this stage of the disease. The definition of prognosis is essential for the selection of therapy, respecting an individual risk. In recent years, the association between circulating tumor cells (CTC) detection and response to PC treatment has been widely investigated. Detection of CTC is based on a metastatic process theory and uses well-known tumor-specific antigens on the cell surface. Individual methods assess CTC with different sensitivity and are not yet efficient at the localised PC stage. Only the method of immunomagnetic separation and semi-automatic visualisation (CellSearchTM) has been validated and approved for the use in the PC management. Assessment of the CTC count directly correlates with the prognosis of patients with castration-resistant PC. Change in the CTC count during the therapy also considerably improves risk estimation and represents a marker of overall survival. New methods of CTC cultivation and gene profiling may contribute to individualisation of the treatment similarly to breast cancer. The authors present a review article about theory, methods of detection and clinical use of CTC in castration-resistant PC.

  8. Expression of androgen and estrogen related proteins in normal weight and obese prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Mitchell; Ramirez, Cristina; Luthringer, Daniel; Nepomuceno, Edward; Vollmer, Robin; Burchette, James; Freedland, Stephen J

    2009-04-01

    Obesity is associated with an aggressive form of prostate cancer and with alterations in androgen and estrogen metabolism. We hypothesized that changes in components of the sex steroid receptor axis may contribute to the clinical aggressiveness of prostate cancer in obese patients. A database was assembled containing clinical and pathological variables from 539 patients treated with radical prostatectomy at a single urban hospital between 1994 and 2002. Tissue microarrays were constructed from representative patients and expression of androgen receptor (AR), PSA, estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta), and aromatase was examined. Higher BMI correlated strongly with black race, the presence of extra-capsular extension, and higher pathologic stage. Expression of AR, PSA, ERbeta and aromatase in cancerous epithelial cells did not differ according to obesity status. However, decreased expression of ERalpha and aromatase was observed in the stromal compartment surrounding non-cancerous acini in obese patients. We confirm the previously reported associations between obesity and aggressive clinical and pathologic features in our single-institution, urban teaching hospital. In comparing obese versus non-obese patients, there was no difference in expression of androgen or estrogen related proteins in cancerous epithelial cells. However, there was a down-regulation of ERalpha and aromatase in the stroma of obese patients. Our data suggest obesity may cause stromal changes in the sex steroid production and signaling pathways which may affect prostate cancer growth via intracrine/paracrine mechanisms. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Fisetin Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effect of Cabazitaxel against Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Siddiqui, Imtiaz Ahmad; Verma, Ajit Kumar; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2016-12-01

    Although treatment of prostate cancer has improved over the past several years, taxanes, such as cabazitaxel, remain the only form of effective chemotherapy that improves survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, the effectiveness of this class of drugs has been associated with various side effects and drug resistance. We previously reported that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule-stabilizing agent and inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and suggested its use as an adjuvant for treatment of prostate and other cancer types. In this study, we investigated the effect of fisetin in combination with cabazitaxel with the objective to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit, reduce dose and toxicity, and minimize or delay the induction of drug resistance and metastasis. Our data show for the first time that a combination of fisetin (20 μmol/L) enhances cabazitaxel (5 nmol/L) and synergistically reduces 22Rν1, PC-3M-luc-6, and C4-2 cell viability and metastatic properties with minimal adverse effects on normal prostate epithelial cells. In addition, the combination of fisetin with cabazitaxel was associated with inhibition of proliferation and enhancement of apoptosis. Furthermore, combination treatment resulted in the inhibition of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis when assessed in two in vivo xenograft mouse models. These results provide evidence that fisetin may have therapeutic benefit for patients with advanced prostate cancer through enhancing the efficacy of cabazitaxel under both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent conditions. This study underscores the benefit of the combination of fisetin with cabazitaxel for the treatment of advanced and resistant prostate cancer and possibly other cancer types. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2863-74. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Effect of anthralin on cell viability in human prostate adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevskaya, A A; Gorbunova, S L; Savvateeva, M V; Severin, S E; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-07-01

    The study revealed the key role of serine protease hepsin activity in transition of in situ prostate adenocarcinoma into the metastasizing form. Inhibition of hepsin activity suppresses the invasive growth of the tumor. Hepsin is an convenient target for pharmacological agents, so the study of its inhibitory mechanisms is a promising avenue in drug development. Assay of proteolytic activity in various tumor cell lines in vitro showed that this activity in prostate adenocarcinoma cells significantly surpasses proteolytic activity in other examined tumor cell lines. Selective cytotoxic action of anthralin, an inhibitor of hepsin activity, on human adenocarcinoma cells was demonstrated in comparison with other tumor cell lines.

  11. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  12. Investigation of scattering coefficients and anisotropy factors of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues using Mie theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Chen, Jun; Wang, Wubao

    2014-02-01

    The scattering coefficient, μs, the anisotropy factor, g, the scattering phase function, p(θ), and the angular dependence of scattering intensity distributions of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues were systematically investigated as a function of wavelength, scattering angle and scattering particle size using Mie theory and experimental parameters. The Matlab-based codes using Mie theory for both spherical and cylindrical models were developed and applied for studying the light propagation and the key scattering properties of the prostate tissues. The optical and structural parameters of tissue such as the index of refraction of cytoplasm, size of nuclei, and the diameter of the nucleoli for cancerous and normal human prostate tissues obtained from the previous biological, biomedical and bio-optic studies were used for Mie theory simulation and calculation. The wavelength dependence of scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor were investigated in the wide spectral range from 300 nm to 1200 nm. The scattering particle size dependence of μs, g, and scattering angular distributions were studied for cancerous and normal prostate tissues. The results show that cancerous prostate tissue containing larger size scattering particles has more contribution to the forward scattering in comparison with the normal prostate tissue. In addition to the conventional simulation model that approximately considers the scattering particle as sphere, the cylinder model which is more suitable for fiber-like tissue frame components such as collagen and elastin was used for developing a computation code to study angular dependence of scattering in prostate tissues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to deal with both spherical and cylindrical scattering particles in prostate tissues.

  13. Extracellular vesicles such as prostate cancer cell fragments as a fluid biopsy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, S I; Kim, Y; Biggs, C N; Chin, J L; Leong, H S

    2015-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles generated through a process of cell membrane shedding or storage vesicle release, as occurs during apoptosis, necrosis or exocytosis. Initially perceived as cellular by-products or 'dust' of insignificant biological importance, recent research has shed light on the role of EVs as mediators of intercellular communication, blood coagulation and disease progression. The prostate is a source of EVs and their abundance in complex biological fluids such as plasma, serum and urine make them compelling entities for a 'fluid biopsy'. As such, prostate cancer cell fragments (PCCF) are EVs generated by the tumor resident within the prostate and are also present in blood, expressing a portion of biomarkers representative of the primary tumor. High-throughput analytical techniques to determine biomarker expression on EVs is the last hurdle towards translating the full potential of prostate EVs for clinical use. We describe current state-of-the-art methods for the analysis of prostate-derived EVs in patient fluids such as plasma and the challenges that lie ahead in this emerging field of translational research.

  14. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) enhances the oncogenic characteristics of prostate carcinoma cells and reduces sensitivity to ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Omesha; Evans, Angharad; Pertziger, Mikhail; MacDonald, Christa; Chen, Helen; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E; Perry, Jo K

    2015-05-28

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a secreted protein which functions in mucosal repair of the gastrointestinal tract. This is achieved through the combined stimulation of cell migration and prevention of apoptosis and anoikis, thus facilitating repair. Deregulated TFF3 expression at the gene and protein level is implicated in numerous cancers. In prostate cancer TFF3 has previously been reported as a potential biomarker, overexpressed in a subset of primary and metastatic cases. Here we investigated the effect of increased TFF3 expression on prostate cancer cell behaviour. Oncomine analysis demonstrated that TFF3 mRNA expression was upregulated in prostate cancer compared to normal tissue. Forced-expression models were established in the prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC3, by stable transfection of an expression vector containing the TFF3 cDNA. Forced expression of TFF3 significantly increased total cell number and cell viability, cell proliferation and cell survival. In addition, TFF3 enhanced anchorage independent growth, 3-dimensional colony formation, wound healing and cell migration compared to control transfected cell lines. We also observed reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in stably transfected cell lines. In dose response experiments, forced expression of TFF3 significantly enhanced the regrowth of PC3 cells following ionising radiation compared with control transfected cells. In addition, TFF3 enhanced clonogenic survival of DU145 and PC3 cells. These studies indicate that targeting TFF3 for the treatment of prostate cancer warrants further investigation.

  15. Resveratrol and propolis as necrosis or apoptosis inducers in human prostate carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scifo, Christian; Cardile, Venera; Russo, Alessandra; Consoli, Rosanna; Vancheri, Carlo; Capasso, Francesco; Vanella, Angelo; Renis, Marcella

    2004-01-01

    Vegetables and fruit help the prevention and the therapy of several kinds of cancer because they contain micronutrients, a class of substances that have been shown to exhibit chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. In the present study the effects of resveratrol (100 and 200 microM), a phytoalexin found in grapes, and of the ethanolic extract of propolis (50 and 100 microg/ml), a natural honeybee hive product, were tested in androgen-resistant prostate cancer cells (DU145), a cell line resembling the last stage of prostate carcinoma. A comparison between the activity of these micronutrients and vinorelbine bitartrate (Navelbine), a semi-synthetic drug normally used in the therapy of prostate cancer, was conducted. Several biochemical parameters were tested, such as cell viability (MTT assay), cell membrane integrity (lactate dehydrogenase release), cell redox status (nitric oxide formation, reactive oxygen species production, reduced glutathione levels), genomic DNA fragmentation (COMET assay) with special attention on the presence of apoptotic DNA damage (TUNEL test), and possible mitochondrial transmembrane potential alteration (deltapsi). Our results point out the anticancer activity of resveratrol and propolis extract in human prostate cancer, exerting their cytotoxicity through two different types of cell death: necrosis and apoptosis, respectively. The data obtained suggest the possible use of these micronutrients both in alternative to classic chemotherapy, and in combination with very low dosage of vinorelbine (5 microM).

  16. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  17. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Omi/HtrA2 Expression in Prostate Cancer and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiaoyong; CHEN Xiaochun; PING Hao; CHEN Zhaohui; ZENG Fuqing; LU Gongcheng

    2005-01-01

    To study the expression and significance of the serine protease Omi/HtrA2 in prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The expression of Omi/HtrA2 was assayed by means of immunohistochemical technique in 41 prostate cancer (Cap), 20 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 10 normal prostate (NP) specimens. Omi/HtrA2 expression was positive in 30 (73.17%) prostate cancer specimens, and the positive rate of Omi/HtrA2 was lower in well differentiated than in poorly and moderately differentiated groups (P<0.05). By contrast, the cells in normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia groups showed no or weak expression of Omi/HtrA2.Prostate cancer cells in vivo may need Omi/HtrA2 expression for apoptosis, and that Omi/HtrA2expression might be involved in prostate cancer development.

  18. Regulation of GLUT transporters by flavonoids in androgen-sensitive and -insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Menendez, Pedro; Hevia, David; Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Mayo, Juan C; Sainz, Rosa M

    2014-09-01

    Cancer cells show different metabolic requirements from normal cells. In prostate cancer, particularly, glycolytic metabolism differs in androgen-responsive and nonresponsive cells. In addition, some natural compounds with antiproliferative activities are able to modify glucose entry into cells by either modulating glucose transporter (GLUT) expression or by altering glucose binding. The aim of this work was to study the regulation of some GLUTs (GLUT1 and GLUT4) in both androgen-sensitive (LNCaP) and -insensitive (PC-3) prostate cancer cells by 4 structurally different flavonoids (ie, genistein, phloretin, apigenin, and daidzein). Glucose uptake was measured using nonradiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose. The evaluation of protein levels as well as subcellular distribution of GLUT1/4 were analyzed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Androgen-insensitive LNCaP-R and androgen-sensitive PC-3-AR cells were used to study the effect of androgen signaling. Additionally, a docking simulation was employed to compare interactions between flavonoids and XylE, a bacterial homolog of GLUT1 to -4. Results show for the first time the presence of functionally relevant GLUT4 in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, differences in GLUT1 and GLUT4 levels and glucose uptake were found, without differences on subcellular distribution, after incubation with flavonoids. Docking simulation showed that all compounds interact with the same location of transporters. More importantly, differences between androgen-sensitive and -insensitive prostate cancer cells were found in both GLUT protein levels and glucose uptake. Thus, phenotypic characteristics of prostate cancer cells are responsible for the different effects of these flavonoids in glucose uptake and in GLUT expression rather than their structural differences, with the most effective in reducing cell growth being the highest in modifying glucose uptake and GLUT levels.

  19. Zoledronic acid increases docetaxel cytotoxicity through pMEK and Mcl-1 inhibition in a hormone-sensitive prostate carcinoma cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestrini Rosella; Tesei Anna; Vannini Ivan; Ulivi Paola; Carloni Silvia; Brigliadori Giovanni; Fabbri Francesco; Amadori Dino; Zoli Wainer

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In prostate cancer, the identification of drug combinations that could reduce the tumor cell population and rapidly eradicate hormone-resistant cells potentially present would be a remarkable breakthrough in the treatment of this disease. Methods The study was performed on a hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP) grown in normal or hormone-deprived charcoal-stripped (c.s.) medium. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by SRB assay and Annexin-V/TUNEL assa...

  20. Plant-derived SAC domain of PAR-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4 exhibits growth inhibitory effects in prostate cancer cells

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    Shayan eSarkar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The gene Par-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4 was originally identified in prostate cancer cells undergoing apoptosis and its product Par-4 showed cancer specific pro-apoptotic activity. Particularly, the SAC domain of Par-4 (SAC-Par-4 selectively kills cancer cells leaving normal cells unaffected. The therapeutic significance of bioactive SAC-Par-4 is enormous in cancer biology; however, its large scale production is still a matter of concern. Here we report the production of SAC-Par-4-GFP fusion protein coupled to translational enhancer sequence (5′ AMV and apoplast signal peptide (aTP in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN plants under the control of a unique recombinant promoter M24. Transgene integration was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR, Southern and Northern blotting, Real-time PCR and Nuclear run-on assays. Results of Western blot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP protein and it was as high as 0.15% of total soluble protein. In addition, we found that targeting of plant recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP to the apoplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER was essential for the stability of plant recombinant protein in comparison to the bacterial derived SAC-Par-4. Deglycosylation analysis demonstrated that ER-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP-SEKDEL undergoes O-linked glycosylation unlike apoplast-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP. Furthermore, various in vitro studies like mammalian cells proliferation assay (MTT, apoptosis induction assays, and NF-κB suppression suggested the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of plant-derived SAC-Par-4-GFP against multiple prostate cancer cell lines. Additionally, pre-treatment of MAT-LyLu prostate cancer cells with purified SAC-Par-4-GFP significantly delayed the onset of tumor in a syngeneic rat prostate cancer model. Taken altogether, we proclaim that plant made SAC-Par-4 may become a useful alternate therapy for effectively alleviating cancer in the new era.

  1. Saposin C promotes survival and prevents apoptosis via PI3K/Akt-dependent pathway in prostate cancer cells

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    Lee Tae-Jin

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to androgens, growth factors are also implicated in the development and neoplastic growth of the prostate gland. Prosaposin is a potent neurotrophic molecule. Homozygous inactivation of prosaposin in mice has led to the development of a number of abnormalities in the male reproductive system, including atrophy of the prostate gland and inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and Akt in prostate epithelial cells. We have recently reported that prosaposin is expressed at a higher level by androgen-independent (AI prostate cancer cells as compared to androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells or normal prostate epithelial and stromal cells. In addition, we have demonstrated that a synthetic peptide (prosaptide TX14A, derived from the trophic sequence of the saposin C domain of prosaposin, stimulated cell proliferation, migration and invasion and activated the MAPK signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells. The biological significances of saposin C and prosaposin in prostate cancer are not known. Results Here, we report that saposin C, in a cell type-specific and dose-dependent manner, acts as a survival factor, activates the Akt-signaling pathway, down-modulates caspase-3, -7, and -9 expression and/or activity, and decreases the cleaved nuclear substrate of caspase-3 in prostate cancer cells under serum-starvation stress. In addition, prosaptide TX14A, saposin C, or prosaposin decreased the growth-inhibitory effect, caspase-3/7 activity, and apoptotic cell death induced by etoposide. We also discovered that saposin C activates the p42/44 MAP kinase pathway in a pertussis toxin-sensitive and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K /Akt-dependent manner in prostate cancer cells. Our data also show that the anti-apoptotic activity of saposin C is at least partially mediated via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Conclusion We postulate that as a mitogenic, survival, and anti-apoptotic factor for prostate cancer cells

  2. Notch activation by phenethyl isothiocyanate attenuates its inhibitory effect on prostate cancer cell migration.

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    Su-Hyeong Kim

    Full Text Available Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC is a promising cancer chemopreventive component of edible cruciferous vegetables with in vivo efficacy against prostate cancer in experimental rodents. Cancer chemopreventive response to PEITC is characterized by its ability to inhibit multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, including nuclear factor-κB, Akt, and androgen receptor. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that PEITC treatment activates Notch signaling in malignant as well as normal human prostate cells. Exposure of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, PC-3, and DU145 and a normal human prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC to PEITC resulted in cleavage (active form of Notch1 and Notch2, and increased transcriptional activity of Notch. In PC-3 and LNCaP cells, PEITC treatment caused induction of Notch ligands Jagged1 and Jagged2 (PC-3, overexpression of γ-secretase complex components Presenilin1 and Nicastrin (PC-3, nuclear enrichment of cleaved Notch2, and/or up-regulation of Notch1, Notch2, Jagged1, and/or Jagged2 mRNA. PEITC-induced apoptosis in LNCaP and PC-3 cells was significantly attenuated by RNA interference of Notch2, but not by pharmacological inhibition of Notch1. Inhibition of PC-3 and LNCaP cell migration resulting from PEITC exposure was significantly augmented by knockdown of Notch2 protein as well as pharmacological inhibition of Notch1 activation. Nuclear expression of cleaved Notch2 protein was significantly higher in PC-3 xenografts from PEITC-treated mice and dorsolateral prostates from PEITC-fed TRAMP mice compared with respective control. Because Notch signaling is implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis, the present study suggests that anti-metastatic effect of PEITC may be augmented by a combination regimen involving a Notch inhibitor.

  3. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  4. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurposeTo evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes.Materials and MethodsOne hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38% unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3% patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17% patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04. There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity.ConclusionsDosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes.

  5. Complement C1q activates tumor suppressor WWOX to induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

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    Qunying Hong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue exudates contain low levels of serum complement proteins, and their regulatory effects on prostate cancer progression are largely unknown. We examined specific serum complement components in coordinating the activation of tumor suppressors p53 and WWOX (also named FOR or WOX1 and kinases ERK, JNK1 and STAT3 in human prostate DU145 cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DU145 cells were cultured overnight in 1% normal human serum, or in human serum depleted of an indicated complement protein. Under complement C1q- or C6-free conditions, WOX1 and ERK were mainly present in the cytoplasm without phosphorylation, whereas phosphorylated JNK1 was greatly accumulated in the nuclei. Exogenous C1q rapidly restored the WOX1 activation (with Tyr33 phosphorylation in less than 2 hr. Without serum complement C9, p53 became activated, and hyaluronan (HA reversed the effect. Under C6-free conditions, HA induced activation of STAT3, an enhancer of metastasis. Notably, exogenous C1q significantly induced apoptosis of WOX1-overexpressing DU145 cells, but not vehicle-expressing cells. A dominant negative and Y33R mutant of WOX1 blocked the apoptotic effect. C1q did not enhance p53-mediated apoptosis. By total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy, it was determined that C1q destabilized adherence of WOX1-expressing DU145 cells by partial detaching and inducing formation of clustered microvilli for focal adhesion particularly in between cells. These cells then underwent shrinkage, membrane blebbing and death. Remarkably, as determined by immunostaining, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer were shown to have a significantly reduced expression of tissue C1q, compared to age-matched normal prostate tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that complement C1q may induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q enhances prostate hyperplasia and cancerous

  6. Differences in phenotype and gene expression of prostate stromal cells from patients of varying ages and their influence on tumour formation by prostate epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Chuan Wang; Sheng-Qiang Yu; Xiao-Hai Wang; Bang-Min Han; Fu-Jun Zhao; Guang-Hui Zhu; Yan Hong; Shu-Jie Xia

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer (PCa) is an age-related disease,and the stromal microenvironment plays an important role in prostatic malignant progression.However,the differences in prostate stromal cells present in young and old tissue are still obscure.We established primary cultured stromal cells from normal prostatic peripheral zone (PZ) of donors of varying ages and found that cultured stromal cells from old donors (PZ-old) were more enlarged and polygonal than those from young donors (PZ-young).Furthermore,based on immunocytochemical and ultrastructural analysis,the components of stromal cells changed from a majority of fibroblasts to a mixture of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts with increasing donor age.Using a three-dimensional in vitro culture system,we found that PZ-old stromal cells could enhance the proliferation,migration and invasion of cocultured benign BPH-1 and PC-3 cells.Using an in vivo tissue recombination system,we also found that PZ-old stromal cells are more effective than PZ-young cells in promoting tumour formation by BPH-1 cells of high passage(>100) and PC-3 cells.To probe the possible mechanism of these effects,we performed cDNA microarray analysis and profiled 509 upregulated genes and 188 downregulated genes in PZ-old cells.Among the changed genes,we found genes coding for a subset of paracrine factors that are capable of influencing adjacent epithelial cells; these include hepatocyte growth factor (HGF),fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5),insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2),insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP4),IGFBP5 and matrix metal lopeptidase 1 (MMP1).Changes in the expression of these genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR),Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.Overall,our findings indicate that stromal cells from prostate PZ of old donors are more active than similar cells from young donors in promoting the malignant process of adjacent epithelial cells

  7. Cascaded discrimination of normal, abnormal, and confounder classes in histopathology: Gleason grading of prostate cancer

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    Doyle Scott

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated classification of histopathology involves identification of multiple classes, including benign, cancerous, and confounder categories. The confounder tissue classes can often mimic and share attributes with both the diseased and normal tissue classes, and can be particularly difficult to identify, both manually and by automated classifiers. In the case of prostate cancer, they may be several confounding tissue types present in a biopsy sample, posing as major sources of diagnostic error for pathologists. Two common multi-class approaches are one-shot classification (OSC, where all classes are identified simultaneously, and one-versus-all (OVA, where a “target” class is distinguished from all “non-target” classes. OSC is typically unable to handle discrimination of classes of varying similarity (e.g. with images of prostate atrophy and high grade cancer, while OVA forces several heterogeneous classes into a single “non-target” class. In this work, we present a cascaded (CAS approach to classifying prostate biopsy tissue samples, where images from different classes are grouped to maximize intra-group homogeneity while maximizing inter-group heterogeneity. Results We apply the CAS approach to categorize 2000 tissue samples taken from 214 patient studies into seven classes: epithelium, stroma, atrophy, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, and prostate cancer Gleason grades 3, 4, and 5. A series of increasingly granular binary classifiers are used to split the different tissue classes until the images have been categorized into a single unique class. Our automatically-extracted image feature set includes architectural features based on location of the nuclei within the tissue sample as well as texture features extracted on a per-pixel level. The CAS strategy yields a positive predictive value (PPV of 0.86 in classifying the 2000 tissue images into one of 7 classes, compared with the OVA (0.77 PPV and OSC

  8. Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia species, inhibits adrenergic contraction of human prostate strips and induces stromal cell death

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    Daniel Herrmann

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Honokiol inhibits smooth muscle contraction in the human prostate, and induces cell death in cultured stromal cells. Because prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate growth may cause LUTS, it appears possible that honokiol improves voiding symptoms.

  9. Midkine is a NF-κB-inducible gene that supports prostate cancer cell survival

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    You Zongbing

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Midkine is a heparin-binding growth factor that is over-expressed in various human cancers and plays important roles in cell transformation, growth, survival, migration, and angiogenesis. However, little is known about the upstream factors and signaling mechanisms that regulate midkine gene expression. Methods Two prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC3 were studied for their expression of midkine. Induction of midkine expression in LNCaP cells by serum, growth factors and cytokines was determined by Western blot analysis and/or real-time quantitative reverse-transcription – polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The cell viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion assay when the LNCaP cells were treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and/or recombinant midkine. When the LNCaP cells were treated with recombinant midkine, activation of intracellular signalling pathways was determined by Western blot analysis. Prostate tissue microarray slides containing 129 cases (18 normal prostate tissues, 40 early stage cancers, and 71 late stage cancers were assessed for midkine expression by immunohistochemical staining. Results We identified that fetal bovine serum, some growth factors (epidermal growth factor, androgen, insulin-like growth factor-I, and hepatocyte growth factor and cytokines (TNFα and interleukin-1beta induced midkine expression in a human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP cells. TNFα also induced midkine expression in PC3 cells. TNFα was the strongest inducer of midkine expression via nuclear factor-kappa B pathway. Midkine partially inhibited TNFα-induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. Knockdown of endogenous midkine expression by small interfering RNA enhanced TNFα-induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. Midkine activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in LNCaP cells. Furthermore, midkine expression was significantly increased in late stage

  10. Spontaneous cancer-stromal cell fusion as a mechanism of prostate cancer androgen-independent progression.

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    Ruoxiang Wang

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that human prostate cancer cells are capable of acquiring malignant attributes through interaction with stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment, while the interacting stromal cells can also become affected with both phenotypic and genotypic alterations. This study used a co-culture model to investigate the mechanism underlying the co-evolution of cancer and stromal cells. Red fluorescent androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells were cultured with a matched pair of normal and cancer-associated prostate myofibroblast cells to simulate cancer-stromal interaction, and cellular changes in the co-culture were documented by tracking the red fluorescence. We found frequent spontaneous fusions between cancer and stromal cells throughout the co-culture. In colony formation assays assessing the fate of the hybrid cells, most of the cancer-stromal fusion hybrids remained growth-arrested and eventually perished. However, some of the hybrids survived to form colonies from the co-culture with cancer-associated stromal cells. These derivative clones showed genomic alterations together with androgen-independent phenotype. The results from this study reveal that prostate cancer cells are fusogenic, and cancer-stromal interaction can lead to spontaneous fusion between the two cell types. While a cancer-stromal fusion strategy may allow the stromal compartment to annihilate invading cancer cells, certain cancer-stromal hybrids with increased survival capability may escape annihilation to form a derivative cancer cell population with an altered genotype and increased malignancy. Cancer-stromal fusion thus lays a foundation for an incessant co-evolution between cancer and the cancer-associated stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  11. Differential expression of thromboxane synthase in prostate carcinoma: role in tumor cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Daotai; Che, Mingxin; Zacharek, Alex; Qiao, Yan; Li, Li; Li, Xinglin; Lamberti, Mario; Tang, Keqin; Cai, Yilong; Guo, Yande; Grignon, David; Honn, Kenneth V

    2004-02-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolism through cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, or P-450 epoxygenase pathways can generate a variety of eicosanoids. Thromboxane synthase (TxS) metabolizes the cyclooxygenase product, prostanglandin H(2), into thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)), which can cause vessel constriction, platelet activation, and aggregation. Here we demonstrate that human prostate cancer (PCa) cells express enzymatically active TxS and that this enzyme is involved in cell motility. In human PCa cell lines, PC-3, PC-3M, and ML-2 cells expressed higher levels of TxS than normal prostate epithelial cells or other established PCa cell lines such as DU145, LNCaP, or PPC-1. We cloned and sequenced the full-length TxS cDNA from PC-3 cells and found two changes in the amino acid residues. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens revealed that expression of TxS is weak or absent in normal differentiated luminal, or secretory cells, significantly elevated in less differentiated or advanced prostate tumors, and markedly increased in tumors with perineural invasion. TxS expressed in PC-3 cells was enzymatically active and susceptible to carboxyheptal imidazole, an inhibitor of TxS. The biosynthesis of TXA(2) in PC-3 cells was dependent on COX-2, and to a lesser extent, COX-1. Treatment of PC-3 cells with a COX-1 selective inhibitor, piroxicam, reduced TXA(2) synthesis by approximately 40%, while the COX-2 specific inhibitor NS398 reduced TXA(2) production by approximately 80%. Inhibition of TxS activity or blockade of TXA(2) function reduced PC-3 cell migration on fibronectin, while having minimal effects on cell cycle progression or survival. Finally, increased expression of TxS in DU145 cells increased cell motility. Our data suggest that human PCa cells express TxS and that this enzyme may contribute to PCa progression through modulating cell motility.

  12. Diminished expression of h2-calponin in prostate cancer cells promotes cell proliferation, migration and the dependence of cell adhesion on substrate stiffness

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    M. Moazzem Hossain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calponin is an actin filament-associated protein and its h2 isoform inhibits cell motility. Here we report significant expression of h2-calponin in prostate epithelial cells, which is diminished in cancerous cells. Comparison between a prostate cancer cell line PC3 and its metastatic derivative PC3-M showed lower levels of h2-calponin in PC3-M, corresponding to faster rates of cell proliferation and migration. Substrate adhesion of PC3 and PC3-M cells was positively correlated to the level of h2-calponin and the adhesion of PC3-M exhibited a higher dependence on substrate stiffness. Such effects of h2-calponin on cell proliferation, migration and substrate adhesion were also seen in normal versus cancerous primary prostate cells. Further supporting the role of h2-calponin in inhibiting cell motility, fibroblasts isolated from h2-calponin knockout mice proliferated and migrated faster than that of wild type fibroblasts. Transfective over-expression of h2-calponin in PC3-M cells effectively inhibited cell proliferation and migration. The results suggest that the diminished expression of h2-calponin in prostate cancer cells increases cell motility, decreases substrate adhesion, and promotes adhesion on high stiffness substrates.

  13. Diminished expression of h2-calponin in prostate cancer cells promotes cell proliferation, migration and the dependence of cell adhesion on substrate stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzem Hossain, M; Wang, Xin; Bergan, Raymond C; Jin, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated protein and its h2 isoform inhibits cell motility. Here we report significant expression of h2-calponin in prostate epithelial cells, which is diminished in cancerous cells. Comparison between a prostate cancer cell line PC3 and its metastatic derivative PC3-M showed lower levels of h2-calponin in PC3-M, corresponding to faster rates of cell proliferation and migration. Substrate adhesion of PC3 and PC3-M cells was positively correlated to the level of h2-calponin and the adhesion of PC3-M exhibited a higher dependence on substrate stiffness. Such effects of h2-calponin on cell proliferation, migration and substrate adhesion were also seen in normal versus cancerous primary prostate cells. Further supporting the role of h2-calponin in inhibiting cell motility, fibroblasts isolated from h2-calponin knockout mice proliferated and migrated faster than that of wild type fibroblasts. Transfective over-expression of h2-calponin in PC3-M cells effectively inhibited cell proliferation and migration. The results suggest that the diminished expression of h2-calponin in prostate cancer cells increases cell motility, decreases substrate adhesion, and promotes adhesion on high stiffness substrates.

  14. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  15. The complexities of identifying a cell of origin for human prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail P Risbridger; Renea A Taylor

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer(PCa)is the second most common malignancy in men1 and ifloca-lized or confined to the gland at diagnosis,the choice of treatment includes surgery,radiation or watchful waiting.If and when the disease spreads,androgen blockade is effective but inevitably relapse occurs,resulting in incurable castrate-resistant PCa.Understanding the etiology of PCa will underpin the development of better treatment options In particular,the identity of the cell type(s)that are the origin of PCa(or cancer-initiating cells)will enable them to become therapeutic targets that could lead to newer and more sophisticated treatment options.These cells of origin are defined as epithelial cells in the normal prostate,susceptible to malignant transformation and therefore capable of initiating tumourigenesis.However,their identity is unknown.

  16. Probing Androgen Receptor Signaling in Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    translational prostate cancer research. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, circulating tumor cells , androgen receptor, castration-resistant prostate...Appendix, Fig. S2B). Twenty-eight cells were excluded given the presence of leukocyte transcripts suggestive of cellular contamination or...Single CTCs from an individual patient showed considerably greater intercellular heterogeneity in their transcriptional profiles than single cells

  17. Effects of maternal diabetes on male offspring: high cell proliferation and increased activity of MMP-2 in the ventral prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, A A; Carvalho, C P; Santos, E M B; Botelho, F V; Araújo, F A; Deconte, S R; Tomiosso, T C; Balbi, A P C; Zanon, R G; Taboga, S R; Góes, R M; Ribeiro, D L

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a comprehensive view of the histological and functional status of the prostate of adult rat offspring of mothers subjected to gestational diabetes induced by alloxan. The ventral prostate of male adult offspring of diabetic (DP) or normal (CP) mothers was evaluated for collagen fibres, cell death, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), androgen receptors (AR), transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ-1), catalase and total antioxidant activity. The prostates of DP animals were lower in weight than those of the CP group. The DP group also exhibited hyperglycaemia and hypotestosteronemia, higher cell proliferation and AR expression, a reduction in α-actin (possibly interfering with the reproductive function of the prostate), and enhanced activity of MMP-2, although the absolute content of MMP-2 was lower in this group. These findings were associated with increased TGFβ-1 and decreased collagen distribution. The prostates of DP rats additionally exhibited reductions in catalase and total antioxidant activity. Thus, rats developing in a diabetic intrauterine environment have glycaemic and hormonal changes that impact on the structure and physiology of the prostate in adulthood. The increased AR expression possibly leads to elevated cell proliferation. Stromal remodelling was characterized by enhanced activity of MMP-2 and collagen degradation, even with increased TGFβ-1 activation. These changes associated with increased oxidative stress might interfere with tissue architecture and glandular homeostasis.

  18. Pre-diagnostic obesity and physical inactivity are associated with shorter telomere length in prostate stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshu, Corinne E; Peskoe, Sarah B; Heaphy, Christopher M; Kenfield, Stacey A; Van Blarigan, Erin L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J; Yun, GhilSuk; Lee, Thomas K; Hicks, Jessica L; De Marzo, Angelo M; Meeker, Alan K; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and inactivity have been with associated advanced stage prostate cancer, and poor prostate cancer outcomes, though the underlying mechanism(s) is unknown. To determine if telomere shortening, which has been associated with lethal prostate cancer, may be a potential underlying mechanism, we prospectively evaluated the association between measures of adiposity, physical activity and telomere length in 596 participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, who were surgically treated for prostate cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we measured telomere length in cancer and benign cells using a telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. Adiposity and activity were assessed via questionnaire within 2 years of diagnosis. Adjusting for age, pathologic stage and grade, the median and standard deviation of the per cell telomere signals were determined for each man for stromal cells and cancer cells by adiposity and activity categories. Overweight/obese men (54%) were similar to normal weight men on most factors, but had higher Gleason sum and lower activity levels. Overweight/obese men had 7.4% shorter telomeres in stromal cells than normal weight men (P=0.06). The least active men had shorter telomeres in stromal cells than more active men (P-trend=0.002). Men who were overweight/obese and the least active had the shortest telomeres in stromal cells (20.7% shorter; P=0.0005) compared to normal weight men who were the most active. Cancer cell telomere length and telomere length variability did not differ by measures of adiposity or activity. Telomere shortening in prostate cells may be one mechanism through which lifestyle influences prostate cancer risk and outcomes. PMID:25990087

  19. A novel three serum phospholipid panel differentiates normal individuals from those with prostate cancer.

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    Nima Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The results of prostate specific antigen (PSA and digital rectal examination (DRE screenings lead to both under and over treatment of prostate cancer (PCa. As such, there is an urgent need for the identification and evaluation of new markers for early diagnosis and disease prognosis. Studies have shown a link between PCa, lipids and lipid metabolism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the concentrations and distribution of serum lipids in patients with PCa as compared with serum from controls. METHOD: Using Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS lipid profiling, we analyzed serum phospholipids from age-matched subjects who were either newly diagnosed with PCa or healthy (normal. RESULTS: We found that cholester (CE, dihydrosphingomyelin (DSM, phosphatidylcholine (PC, egg phosphatidylcholine (ePC and egg phosphatidylethanolamine (ePE are the 5 major lipid groups that varied between normal and cancer serums. ePC 38:5, PC 40:3, and PC 42:4 represent the lipids species most prevalent in PCa as compared with normal serum. Further analysis revealed that serum ePC 38:5 ≥0.015 nmoles, PC 40.3 ≤0.001 nmoles and PC 42:4 ≤0.0001 nmoles correlated with the absence of PCa at 94% prediction. Conversely, serum ePC 38:5 ≤0.015 nmoles, PC 40:3 ≥0.001 nmoles, and PC 42:4 ≥0.0001 nmoles correlated with the presence of PCa. CONCLUSION: In summary, we have demonstrated that ePC 38:5, PC 40:3, and PC 42:4 may serve as early predictive serum markers for the presence of PCa.

  20. Combined effects of terazosin and genistein on a metastatic, hormone-independent human prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kee-Lung; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Li-Wen; Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Hu, Yu-Chen; Chih, Tsai-Tung; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Su, Shu-Jem

    2009-04-08

    Metastatic prostate cancer progresses from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent. Terazosin, a long-acting selective alpha1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, induces apoptosis of prostate cancer cells in an alpha1-adrenoreceptor-independent manner, while genistein, a major soy isoflavone, inhibits the growth of several types of cancer cells. The present study was designed to test the therapeutic potential of a combination of terazosin and genistein using a metastatic, hormone-independent prostatic cancer cell line, DU-145. Terazosin or genistein treatment inhibited the growth of DU-145 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas had no effect on normal prostate epithelial cells. Addition of 1 microg/ml of terazosin, which was inactive alone, augmented the growth inhibitory effect of 5 microg/ml of genistein. Co-treatment with terazosin resulted in the genistein-induced arrest of DU-145 cells in G2/M phase being overridden and an increase in apoptotic cells, as evidenced by procaspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. The combination also caused a greater decrease in the levels of the apoptosis-regulating protein, Bcl-XL, and of VEGF165 and VEGF121 than genistein alone. In conclusion, the terazosin/genistein combination was more effective in inhibiting cell growth and VEGF expression as well as inducing apoptosis of the metastatic, androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line, DU-145, than either alone. The doses used in this study are in lower and nontoxic anticancer dosage range, suggesting this combination has potential for therapeutic use.

  1. Optimization of b-value distribution for biexponential diffusion-weighted MR imaging of normal prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambor, Ivan; Merisaari, Harri; Aronen, Hannu J; Järvinen, Jukka; Saunavaara, Jani; Kauko, Tommi; Borra, Ronald; Pesola, Marko

    2014-05-01

    To determine the optimal b-value distribution for biexponential diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of normal prostate using both a computer modeling approach and in vivo measurements. Optimal b-value distributions for the fit of three parameters (fast diffusion Df, slow diffusion Ds, and fraction of fast diffusion f) were determined using Monte-Carlo simulations. The optimal b-value distribution was calculated using four individual optimization methods. Eight healthy volunteers underwent four repeated 3 Tesla prostate DWI scans using both 16 equally distributed b-values and an optimized b-value distribution obtained from the simulations. The b-value distributions were compared in terms of measurement reliability and repeatability using Shrout-Fleiss analysis. Using low noise levels, the optimal b-value distribution formed three separate clusters at low (0-400 s/mm2), mid-range (650-1200 s/mm2), and high b-values (1700-2000 s/mm2). Higher noise levels resulted into less pronounced clustering of b-values. The clustered optimized b-value distribution demonstrated better measurement reliability and repeatability in Shrout-Fleiss analysis compared with 16 equally distributed b-values. The optimal b-value distribution was found to be a clustered distribution with b-values concentrated in the low, mid, and high ranges and was shown to improve the estimation quality of biexponential DWI parameters of in vivo experiments. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. 5{alpha}-reductase expression by prostate cancer cell lines and benign prostatic hyperplasia in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.M.; Masters, J.R.W. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom)]|[Pfizer Central Research, Kent (United Kingdom); Ballard, S.A.; Worman, N. [Pfizer Central Research, Sandwich (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    5{alpha}-Reductase (5{alpha}R) activity in two human prostate cancer cell lines was compared to that in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue and COS cells transfected with and expressing the human genes for 5{alpha}-reductase type 1 (5{alpha}R1) and type 2 (5{alpha}R2). Comparisons were based on pH profiles and sensitivities to selective inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase. In the cancer lines, activity was greatest over the pH range 7-8, compared to a sharp peak of activity between pH 5-5.5 in BPH tissue and COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R2. Finasteride and SKF105,657 were potent inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase activity in BPH tissue and COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R2, but weak inhibitors in the cancer lines and in COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R1. In contrast, LTK1 17,026 was a more potent inhibitor of 5{alpha}-reductase activity in the prostate cancer cell lines and in COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R1. These data indicate that human prostate cancer cell lines express 5{alpha}-reductase activity similar to that in COS cells transfected with 5{alpha}R1, but different from that in BPH tissue. This may be a consequence of in vitro culture. Alternatively, it may reflect a change occurring as a result of neoplastic transformation, in which case it will be important to select appropriate inhibitors in the clinic. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. KLF5 expression in prostate cancer tissue and effect of KLF5 knockdown on prostate cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-Jun Shi; Wei-Zhong Yang; Yuan-Rong Kong; Wen-Guang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the KLF5 expression in prostate cancer tissue and the effect of KLF5 knockdown on prostate cancer cell growth.Methods:Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue were collected to extract RNA and determine the mRNA levels ofKLF5as well as proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes; DU145 cells were cultured and transfected with KLF5 siRNA and negative control siRNA, and then RNA was extracted to determine the mRNA levels of proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes.Results:KLF5, SRSF1, Survivin, MACC1, c-Met, N-cadherinand Vimentin mRNA levels in prostate cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue whileTGF-β,E-cadherinandβ-catenin mRNA levels were significantly lower than those in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue;SRSF1, Survivin, MACC1, c-Met, TGF-β,N-cadherin andVimentinmRNA levels in si-KLF5 group were significantly lower than those in si-NC group while E-cadherin andβ-cateninmRNA levels were significantly higher than those in si-NC group.Conclusions: KLF5 expression levels are unusually high in prostate cancer tissue, and targeted knockdown of KLF5 expression can inhibit the prostate cancer cell proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  4. Survey of Differentially Methylated Promoters in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Wang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation, copy number in the genomes of three immortalized prostate epithelial, five cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3, PC3M, PC3M-Pro4, PC3MLN4 were compared using a microarray-based technique. Genomic DNA is cut with a methylation-sensitive enzyme Hpall, followed by linker ligation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification, labeling, hybridization to an array of promoter sequences. Only those parts of the genomic DNA that have unmethylated restriction sites within a few hundred base pairs generate PCR products detectable on an array. Of 2732 promoter sequences on a test array, 504 (18.5% showed differential hybridization between immortalized prostate epithelial, cancer cell lines. Among candidate hypermethylated genes in cancer-derived lines, there were eight (CD44, CDKN1A, ESR1, PLAU, RARB, SFN, TNFRSF6, TSPY previously observed in prostate cancer, 13 previously known methylation targets in other cancers (ARHI, bcl-2, BRCA1, CDKN2C, GADD45A, MTAP, PGR, SLC26A4, SPARC, SYK, TJP2, UCHL1, WIT-1. The majority of genes that appear to be both differentially methylated, differentially regulated between prostate epithelial, cancer cell lines are novel methylation targets, including PAK6, RAD50, TLX3, PIR51, MAP2K5, INSR, FBN1, GG2-1, representing a rich new source of candidate genes used to study the role of DNA methylation in prostate tumors.

  5. Functional prostate-specific membrane antigen is enriched in exosomes from prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tiancheng; Mendes, Desiree E; Berkman, Clifford E

    2014-03-01

    Developing simple and effective approaches to detect tumor markers will be critical for early diagnosis or prognostic evaluation of prostate cancer treatment. Prostate‑specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been validated as an important tumor marker for prostate cancer progression including angiogenesis and metastasis. As a type II membrane protein, PSMA can be constitutively internalized from the cell surface into endosomes. Early endosomes can fuse with multivesicular bodies (MVB) to form and secrete exosomes (40-100 nm) into the extracellular environment. Herein, we tested whether some of the endosomal PSMA could be transferred to exosomes as an extracellular resource for PSMA. Using PSMA-positive LNCaP cells, the secreted exosomes were collected and isolated from the cultured media. The vesicular structures of exosomes were identified by electron microscopy, and exosomal marker protein CD9 and tumor susceptibility gene (TSG 101) were confirmed by western blot analysis. Our present data demonstrate that PSMA can be enriched in exosomes, exhibiting a higher content of glycosylation and partial proteolysis in comparison to cellular PSMA. An in vitro enzyme assay further confirmed that exosomal PSMA retains functional enzymatic activity. Therefore, our data may suggest a new role for PSMA in prostate cancer progression, and provide opportunities for developing non-invasive approaches for diagnosis or prognosis of prostate cancer.

  6. Interpatient variation in normal peripheral zone apparent diffusion coefficient: effect on the prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litjens, Geert J S; Hambrock, Thomas; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina; Barentsz, Jelle O; Huisman, Henkjan J

    2012-10-01

    To determine the interpatient variability of prostate peripheral zone (PZ) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and its effect on the assessment of prostate cancer aggressiveness. The requirement for institutional review board approval was waived. Intra- and interpatient variation of PZ ADCs was determined by means of repeated measurements of normal ADCs at three magnetic resonance (MR) examinations in a retrospective cohort of 10 consecutive patients who had high prostate-specific antigen levels and negative findings at transrectal ultrasonographically-guided biopsy. In these patients, no signs of PZ cancer were found at all three MR imaging sessions. The effect of interpatient variation on the assessment of prostate cancer aggressiveness was examined in a second retrospective cohort of 51 patients with PZ prostate cancer. Whole-mount step-section pathologic evaluation served as reference standard for placement of regions of interest on tumors and normal PZ. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine the significance of the interpatient variations in ADCs. Linear logistic regression was used to assess whether incorporating normal PZ ADCs improves the prediction of cancer aggressiveness. Analysis of variance revealed that interpatient variability (1.2-2.0×10(-3) mm2/sec) was significantly larger than measurement variability (0.068×10(-3) mm2/sec±0.027 [standard deviation]) (P=.0058). Stand-alone tumor ADCs showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.91 for discriminating low-grade versus high-grade tumors. Incorporating normal PZ ADC significantly improved the AUC to 0.96 (P=.0401). PZ ADCs show significant interpatient variation, which has a substantial effect on the prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness. Correcting this effect results in a significant increase in diagnostic accuracy. © RSNA, 2012.

  7. A multi-classifier system for the characterization of normal, infectious, and cancerous prostate tissues employing transrectal ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotsos, Dimitris; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Theocharakis, Pantelis; Georgiadis, Pantelis; Daskalakis, Antonis; Ninos, Kostas; Zoumboulis, Pavlos; Filippidou, Anna; Cavouras, Dionisis

    2010-01-01

    A computer-aided diagnostic system has been developed for the discrimination of normal, infectious and cancer prostate tissues based on texture analysis of transrectal ultrasound images. The proposed system has been designed using a panel of three classifiers, which have been evaluated individually or as a mutli-classifier scheme, using the external cross-validation procedure. Clinical data consisted of 165 transrectal ultrasound images, characterized by an experienced physician as normal (55/165), cancerous (55/165), and infectious (55/165) prostate cases. From each image, the physician delineated the most representative regions of interest, from which, 23 textural features were extracted. Classification was seen as a two level hierarchical decision tree. Normal from infectious and infectious from cancer cases were discriminated at the 1st and 2nd level of the decision tree, respectively. The best classification results for the 1st level were 89.5%, whereas for the 2nd level 90.1%. The utilization of multi-classifier system improved the discrimination of prostate pathologies as compared to individual classifiers; for infectious prostate cases improvement was from 87.3% to 88.7% and for cancer prostate cases improvement was from 84.1% to 91.4%. In terms of overall system performance (the decision tree's node propagating error taken into account), best classification accuracies were 89.5%, 79.6% and 82.7% for the recognition of normal, infectious and cancer cases, respectively. The proposed system might be used as a second opinion tool for assisting diagnosis of different prostate pathologies.

  8. Chemopreventive Effects of Magnesium Chloride Supplementation on Hormone Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Quiroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lifestyle significantly impacts the risk factors associated with prostate cancer, out of which diet appears to be the most influential. An emerging chemopreventive approach, which involves the adequate intake of dietary constituents, has shown great potential in preventing the occurrence or progression of cancer. Magnesium is known to be an essential cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic processes, and is responsible for the regulation of various cellular reactions in the body. A plethora of studies have shown evidence that changes in the intracellular levels of magnesium could contribute to cell proliferation and apoptosis in some normal and malignant cells. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of magnesium chloride (MgCl2 in DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Methodology: Cultured DU-145 cells were subjected to graded concentrations or doses (50-500 µM of MgCl2 for 48 hours. The cell viability was assessed using MTT and Resazurin reduction assays. NBT assay was also used to assess the treatment-induced intracellular ROS levels. Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide (AcrO/EtBr and Rh123/EtBr fluorescent stains were used to assess the cell death type and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm respectively. Results: The results revealed a dose-dependent decrease (P < 0.05 in cell viability in treated DU-145 cells after 48 hours. The NBT assay also revealed a dose dependent biphasic response (P < 0.05 in intracellular levels of ROS. There was a drop (P < 0.05 in ROS levels in all groups except at 100 µM, where ROS level was higher than the control. Apoptosis was the primary mode of cell death as observed in the fluorescence analysis. Conclusion: Our finding suggests that MgCl2 may be potentially chemopreventive for prostate cancer. This justifies further studies into its mechanism of action in DU-145 and other prostate cancer cell types.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma suppresses cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabichi, Anita L; Subbarayan, Vemparala; Llansa, Norma; Lippman, Scott M; Menter, David G

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies have found that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression was low and inducible with cytokines in prostate cancer cells (in the absence of serum) and that, in contrast, COX-2 expression was high in normal prostate epithelial cells (EC). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) was expressed at high levels in the prostate cancer cell line PC-3 but not in ECs. In contrast to previous findings by others, PPAR-gamma ligands did not induce PPAR-gamma expression in EC or PC-3. The present study examined the relationship between PPAR-gamma and COX-2 expression patterns in EC and PC-3 in the presence and absence of serum and/or the PPAR-gamma agonist 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)). We also evaluated the effects that the forced expression of PPAR-gamma1 and PPAR-gamma2 had on COX-2 in ECs. We found that expression of PPAR-gamma and COX-2 protein was inversely correlated in ECs and PC-3. Low COX-2 expression in PC-3 was up-regulated by serum, and 15d-PGJ(2) blocked serum-induced COX-2 expression and activity in a dose-dependent manner. 15d-PGJ(2) had no effect on COX-2 expression in ECs or PPAR-gamma expression in either cell type. However, forced expression of PPAR-gamma1 or PPAR-gamma2 in ECs suppressed the high level of endogenous COX-2. This effect was not isoform specific and was augmented by 15d-PGJ(2). The present study showed that PPAR-gamma activation can be an important regulator of COX-2 in prostate cells and may be an important target for prostate cancer chemoprevention.

  10. Adipocyte secreted factors enhance aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Moreira

    Full Text Available Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1 and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01. Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01. Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05. Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade.

  11. Discrimination of prostate cancer from normal peripheral zone and central gland tissue by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbrecht, M.R.W.; Huisman, H.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jager, G.J.; Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la; Blickman, J.G.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate which parameters of dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T2 relaxation rate would result in optimal discrimination of prostatic carcinoma from normal peripheral zone (PZ) and central gland (CG) tissues and to correlate these parameters with tumor stage, Gleason score, pat

  12. Lineage relationship of prostate cancer cell types based on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ware Carol B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate tumor heterogeneity is a major factor in disease management. Heterogeneity could be due to multiple cancer cell types with distinct gene expression. Of clinical importance is the so-called cancer stem cell type. Cell type-specific transcriptomes are used to examine lineage relationship among cancer cell types and their expression similarity to normal cell types including stem/progenitor cells. Methods Transcriptomes were determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis for the following cell types. Putative prostate progenitor cell populations were characterized and isolated by expression of the membrane transporter ABCG2. Stem cells were represented by embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cells. The cancer cell types were Gleason pattern 3 (glandular histomorphology and pattern 4 (aglandular sorted from primary tumors, cultured prostate cancer cell lines originally established from metastatic lesions, xenografts LuCaP 35 (adenocarcinoma phenotype and LuCaP 49 (neuroendocrine/small cell carcinoma grown in mice. No detectable gene expression differences were detected among serial passages of the LuCaP xenografts. Results Based on transcriptomes, the different cancer cell types could be clustered into a luminal-like grouping and a non-luminal-like (also not basal-like grouping. The non-luminal-like types showed expression more similar to that of stem/progenitor cells than the luminal-like types. However, none showed expression of stem cell genes known to maintain stemness. Conclusions Non-luminal-like types are all representatives of aggressive disease, and this could be attributed to the similarity in overall gene expression to stem and progenitor cell types.

  13. Resistance of prostate cancer cell lines to COX-2 inhibitor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Matthew; Loos, James; Weksler, Nicole; Gantner, Marin; Corless, Christopher L; Barry, John M; Beer, Tomasz M; Garzotto, Mark

    2005-07-08

    Targeting of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for cancer chemoprevention is well supported for several tumor types, most notably colon cancer. In contrast, the data for its role in prostate cancer carcinogenesis are correlative only. Thus, we compared the COX-2 expression, activity, and effects of inhibition in prostate cancer cells on COX-2-dependent colon cancer cells. COX-2 levels in benign and malignant human prostate tissue were determined by immunohistochemistry. Compared to colon cancer cells, prostate cancer cells expressed lower levels of COX-2, produced less PGE2, and were resistant to selective COX-2 inhibition. Examination of benign prostatic epithelium from prostatectomy samples demonstrated rare foci of COX-2. Whereas, human prostate cancer sections were uniformly negative for COX-2. In conclusion, these studies indicate the lack of a putative role for COX-2 in prostate cancer development. Direct evidence for the involvement of COX-2 in prostate cancer carcinogenesis is desperately needed.

  14. Cystine dimethyl ester induces apoptosis through regulation of PKC-δ and PKC-ε in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Nilgun; Park, Margaret A; Dent, Paul; Abdel Mageed, Asim B; Sikka, Suresh C; Baykal, Asli

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ) and PKC-ε are reported to be effective in cancer prevention via S-thiolation-mediated mechanisms. This may be through stimulation of the pro-apoptotic, tumor-suppressive isozyme PKC-δ and/or inactivation of the growth stimulatory, oncogenic isozyme PKC-ε. We investigated oxidative regulatory responses of PKC-δ and PKC-ε to cystine dimethyl ester (CDME), a metabolic precursor of cystine, which, by inducing release of cellular cystine stimulates apoptosis in different prostate cancer cells, PC3 and LNCaP, compared to normal RWPE1 cells. Treatment of CDME in doses of 0.5mM and 5mM significantly induces apoptosis due to regulation of concentration-dependent PKC-δ stimulation and PKC-ε reduction in these prostate cancer cells. This apoptotic regulation was confirmed by immunoblot analyses and specific PKC enzyme assays in immunoprecipitated samples. Additionally, inhibition of PKC-δ by small interfering RNA (siRNA) proved that CDME-induced cell death was dependent on PKC-δ activity in prostate cancer cells. These data demonstrated that CDME induces apoptosis by cysteinylation of both PKC-δ and PKC-ε in tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells compared to control nontumorigenic cells. Cellular cystine may play a critical role in treatment and/or prevention of prostate cancer by regulating PKC activity.

  15. Single cell transcriptomic analysis of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Christopher J; Coleman, Ilsa; Coleman, Roger; Lakely, Bryce; Xia, Jing; Chen, Shu; Gulati, Roman; Larson, Sandy R; Lange, Paul H; Montgomery, Bruce; Nelson, Peter S; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm

    2013-02-16

    The ability to interrogate circulating tumor cells (CTC) and disseminated tumor cells (DTC) is restricted by the small number detected and isolated (typically <10). To determine if a commercially available technology could provide a transcriptomic profile of a single prostate cancer (PCa) cell, we clonally selected and cultured a single passage of cell cycle synchronized C4-2B PCa cells. Ten sets of single, 5-, or 10-cells were isolated using a micromanipulator under direct visualization with an inverted microscope. Additionally, two groups of 10 individual DTC, each isolated from bone marrow of 2 patients with metastatic PCa were obtained. RNA was amplified using the WT-Ovation™ One-Direct Amplification System. The amplified material was hybridized on a 44K Whole Human Gene Expression Microarray. A high stringency threshold, a mean Alexa Fluor® 3 signal intensity above 300, was used for gene detection. Relative expression levels were validated for select genes using real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Using this approach, 22,410, 20,423, and 17,009 probes were positive on the arrays from 10-cell pools, 5-cell pools, and single-cells, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of gene detection on the single-cell analyses were 0.739 and 0.972 respectively when compared to 10-cell pools, and 0.814 and 0.979 respectively when compared to 5-cell pools, demonstrating a low false positive rate. Among 10,000 randomly selected pairs of genes, the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.875 between the single-cell and 5-cell pools and 0.783 between the single-cell and 10-cell pools. As expected, abundant transcripts in the 5- and 10-cell samples were detected by RT-qPCR in the single-cell isolates, while lower abundance messages were not. Using the same stringency, 16,039 probes were positive on the patient single-cell arrays. Cluster analysis showed that all 10 DTC grouped together within each patient. A transcriptomic profile can be reliably obtained from a single cell using

  16. Silencing KRAS overexpression in arsenic-transformed prostate epithelial and stem cells partially mitigates malignant phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngalame, Ntube N O; Tokar, Erik J; Person, Rachel J; Waalkes, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human carcinogen that likely targets the prostate. Chronic arsenic exposure malignantly transforms the RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial line to chronic arsenic exposed-prostate epithelial (CAsE-PE) cells, and a derivative normal prostate stem cell (SC) line, WPE-stem to arsenic-cancer SCs (As-CSCs). The KRAS oncogene is highly overexpressed in CAsE-PE cells and activation precedes transformation, inferring mechanistic significance. As-CSCs also highly overexpress KRAS. Thus, we hypothesize KRAS activation is key in causing and maintaining an arsenic-induced malignant phenotype, and hence, KRAS knockdown (KD) may reverse this malignant phenotype. RNA interference using shRNAmirs to obtain KRAS KD was used in CAsE-PE and As-CSC cells. Cells analyzed 2 weeks post transduction showed KRAS protein decreased to 5% of control after KD, confirming stable KD. KRAS KD decreased phosphorylated ERK, indicating inhibition of RAS/ERK signaling, a proliferation/survival pathway activated with arsenic transformation. Secreted metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was increased by arsenic-induced malignant transformation, but KRAS KD from 4 weeks on decreased secreted MMP-9 activity by 50% in As-CSCs. Colony formation, a characteristic of cancer cells, was decreased in both KRAS KD transformants. KRAS KD also decreased the invasive capacity of both cell types. KRAS KD decreased proliferation in As-CSCs, consistent with loss of rapid tumor growth. Genes predicted to impact cell proliferation (eg, Cyclin D1, p16, and p21) changed accordingly in both KD cell types. Thus, KRAS silencing impacts aspects of arsenic-induced malignant phenotype, inducing loss of many typical cancer characteristics particularly in As-CSCs.

  17. Correlation of hepatitis C and prostate cancer, inverse correlation of basal cell hyperplasia or prostatitis and epidemic syphilis of unknown duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Krystyna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The accuracy of prostate specific antigen (PSA to detect prostate cancer has not yet been determined. Autopsy evidence suggests one-third of men have evidence of prostate cancer. Correlation between prostate cancer and sexually transmitted infection is indeterminate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective database was created of all men who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy over 3 years. Men were 49% African or African Caribbean, and 51% Central or South American. Information about prostate specific antigen, cholesterol, hepatitis A, B and C, human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, tuberculin skin testing and histology were collected. RESULTS: Hepatitis C antibody detection correlated with prostate cancer OR 11.2 (95% CI 3.0 to 72.4. The odds of prostate cancer increased annually (p = 0.0003. However, no correlation was found between prostate cancer and the following: PSA, biopsy date, repeat biopsy, more than 12 cores at biopsy, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein, risk measure reported with free and total PSA, hepatitis B surface antibody, high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia or atypical small acinar proliferation. Histologic prostatitis and basal cell hyperplasia were inversely correlated with prostate cancer. Syphilis of unknown duration occurred in 17% of men with indeterminate correlation to prostate cancer. CONCLUSION: In inner city men of African and African-Caribbean, or Central and South American descent, prostate specific antigen levels did not correlate with prostate cancer. Hepatitis C antibody detection correlates significantly with prostate cancer. One prostate biopsy is sufficient to diagnose statistically significant prostate cancer. Histologic prostatitis and basal cell hyperplasia decrease odds of prostate cancer. Atypical small acinar proliferation may not correlate to prostate cancer and is pending further investigation. Men should be

  18. Impact of adjustable cryogel properties on the performance of prostate cancer cells in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäcker, A; Göppert, B; Sturm, S; Abaffy, P; Sollich, T; Gruhl, F J

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical and physical characteristics of extracellular environment play a key role in assisting cell behavior over different molecular pathways. In this study, we investigated how the presence of chemical binding sites, the pore network and the stiffness of designed scaffolds affected prostate cancer cells. A blend of poly hydroxyethyl methacrylate-alginate-gelatin scaffold was synthesized by cryogelation process using polyethyleneglycol diacrylate (PEGda) and glutaraldehyde as cross linkers. The chemical and mechanical scaffold properties were varied by concentration of gelatin and PEGda, respectively. The pore network was modified by applying different 'freezing time'. Growth, spheroid formation and localization of androgen receptor (AR) were measured to evaluate cell response within various cryogel types. Insufficient porosity in combination with a brittle nature affects cell growth negatively. Spheroid size was reduced by porosity, elasticity as well as by the absence of the cell adhesive motif composed of arginine, glycine und aspartic acid (RGD). Localization of AR indicates its activity and should be under normal culture conditions in the nucleus. But in this study, we could investigate for the first time that AR remains in the cytoplasm when AR positive prostate cancer cells are cultured in scaffolds without RGD as well as in case of an insufficient pore network (total porosity under 10 %) and a too less stiffness of around 10 kPa. The results indicate that for getting a reliable preclinical drug screening a three-dimensional prostate model system with appropriate biochemical and physical surrounding is needed.

  19. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China

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    J. Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on self-report including demographics, weight, height, and WC (>90 cm=obese. Fasting blood glucose (FBG and prostate volume (PV were assessed clinically. Patients were grouped by BMI (normal=22.9, overweight=23-27.4, obese≥27.5 kg/m2. PSA parameters of density (PSAD, PSA serum level, and PSA increasing rate per year (PSAR were calculated per BMI and age groups (30-40, 41-59, 60-85 years. Obesity indicators (BMI and WC and PSA parameter relationships were modeled by age-stratified linear regression. Of 35,632 Chinese men surveyed, 13,084 were analyzed, including 13.44% obese, 57.44% overweight, and 29.12% normal weight, according to BMI; 25.84% were centrally (abdominally obese according to WC. BMI and WC were negatively associated with all PSA parameters, except PSAD and PSAR [P<0.05, BMI: β=-0.081 (95%CI=-0.055 to -0.036, WC: β=-0.101 (-0.021 to -0.015], and independent of FBG and PV (P<0.05 in an age-adjusted model. In conclusion, obesity was associated with lower PSA in Chinese men. Therefore, an individual's BMI and WC should be considered when PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer.

  20. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Ma, M; Nan, X; Sheng, B

    2016-07-11

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC)] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on self-report including demographics, weight, height, and WC (>90 cm=obese). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and prostate volume (PV) were assessed clinically. Patients were grouped by BMI (normal=22.9, overweight=23-27.4, obese≥27.5 kg/m2). PSA parameters of density (PSAD), PSA serum level, and PSA increasing rate per year (PSAR) were calculated per BMI and age groups (30-40, 41-59, 60-85 years). Obesity indicators (BMI and WC) and PSA parameter relationships were modeled by age-stratified linear regression. Of 35,632 Chinese men surveyed, 13,084 were analyzed, including 13.44% obese, 57.44% overweight, and 29.12% normal weight, according to BMI; 25.84% were centrally (abdominally) obese according to WC. BMI and WC were negatively associated with all PSA parameters, except PSAD and PSAR [Pobesity was associated with lower PSA in Chinese men. Therefore, an individual's BMI and WC should be considered when PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer.

  1. File list: NoD.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 No description Prostate Prostate cancer... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: NoD.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 No description Prostate Prostate cancer... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 Input control Prostate Prostate cancer ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  4. A receptor tyrosine kinase, UFO/Axl, and other genes isolated by a modified differential display PCR are overexpressed in metastatic prostatic carcinoma cell line DU145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, A N; Kalapurakal, J; Davidson, W R; Kandpal, G; Dunson, N; Prashar, Y; Kandpal, R P

    1999-01-01

    We have used a modified differential display PCR protocol for isolating 3' restriction fragments of cDNAs specifically expressed or overexpressed in metastatic prostate carcinoma cell line DU145. Several cDNA fragments were identified that matched to milk fat globule protein, UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, human homologue of a Xenopus maternal transcript, laminin and laminin receptor, human carcinoma-associated antigen, and some expressed sequence tags. The transcript for milk fat globule protein, a marker protein shown to be overexpressed in breast tumors, was elevated in DU145 cells. The expression of UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, was considerably higher in DU145 cells as compared to normal prostate cells and prostatic carcinoma cell line PC-3. The overexpression of UFO oncogene in DU145 cells is discussed in the context of prostate cancer metastasis.

  5. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Heon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new upgraded cellular vehicle or vector because of its homing effects. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells or neural stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Therapeutic achievements using stem cells in prostate cancer include the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir, carboxyl esterase/CPT11, and interferon-beta. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy in prostate cancer including its proven mechanisms and also limitations.

  6. Proapoptotic effect of endocannabinoids in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana-Serradell, O; Poblete, C E; Sanchez, C; Castellón, E A; Gallegos, I; Huidobro, C; Llanos, M N; Contreras, H R

    2015-04-01

    In the early stages, prostate cancer is androgen‑ dependent; therefore, medical castration has shown significant results during the initial stages of this pathology. Despite this early effect, advanced prostate cancer is resilient to such treatment. Recent evidence shows that derivatives of Cannabis sativa and its analogs may exert a protective effect against different types of oncologic pathologies. The purpose of the present study was to detect the presence of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) on cancer cells with a prostatic origin and to evaluate the effect of the in vitro use of synthetic analogs. In order to do this, we used a commercial cell line and primary cultures derived from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The presence of the CB1 and CB2 receptors was determined by immunohistochemistry where we showed a higher expression of these receptors in later stages of the disease (samples with a high Gleason score). Later, treatments were conducted using anandamide, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and a synthetic analog of anandamide, methanandamide. Using the MTT assay, we proved that the treatments produced a cell growth inhibitory effect on all the different prostate cancer cultures. This effect was demonstrated to be dose-dependent. The use of a specific CB1 receptor blocker (SR141716) confirmed that this effect was produced primarily from the activation of the CB1 receptor. In order to understand the MTT assay results, we determined cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry, which showed no variation at the different cell cycle stages in all the cultures after treatment. Treatment with endocannabinoids resulted in an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells as determined by Annexin V assays and caused an increase in the levels of activated caspase-3 and a reduction in the levels of Bcl-2 confirming that the reduction in cell viability noted in the MTT assay was caused by the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Finally, we observed

  7. Expression of the Bcl-2 family genes and complexes involved in the mitochondrial transport in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmarinah, Asmarinah; Paradowska-Dogan, Agnieszka; Kodariah, Ria; Tanuhardja, Budiana; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw; Mochtar, Chaidir Arif; Weidner, Wolfgang; Hinsch, Elvira

    2014-10-01

    Alteration of molecular pathways triggering apoptosis gives raise to various pathological tissue processes, such as tumorigenesis. The mitochondrial pathway is regulated by both the genes of the Bcl-2 family and the genes encoding mitochondrial transport molecules. Those proteins allow a release of cyctochrome c through the outer mitochondrial membrane. This release activates the caspase cascade resulting in death of cells. There are at least two main transport systems associated with the family of Bcl-2 proteins that are involved in transport of molecules through the outer mitochondrial membrane, i.e., the voltage dependent anion channels (VDACs) and translocases of the outer mitochondrial membrane proteins (TOMs). We investigated the expression of genes of the Bcl-2 family, i.e., pro-apoptotic Bak and Bid, and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2; VDAC gene, i.e., VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3; and TOMM genes, i.e., TOMM20, TOMM22 and TOMM40. This study was performed at the mRNA and the protein level. Fourteen paraffin embedded prostate cancer tissues and five normal prostate tissues were analyzed by the quantitative PCR array and immunohistochemistry. We found a significant increase in both mRNA expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene and VDAC1 gene in prostate cancer tissue in comparison with their normal counterparts. Translation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and VDAC1 genes in prostate cancer tissue was slightly increased. We observed no significant differences in the mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic Bak and Bid genes, VDAC2 or VDAC3 genes or the three TOMM genes in these tissues. The pro-apoptotic Bax protein was downtranslated significantly in secretory cells of prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate. We suggest that this protein is a good candidate as biomarker for prostate cancer.

  8. Plant Flavone Apigenin Binds to Nucleic Acid Bases and Reduces Oxidative DNA Damage in Prostate Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Gupta, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to prostate carcinogenesis as human prostate tissue is vulnerable to oxidative DNA damage. Apigenin, a dietary plant flavone, possesses anti-proliferative and anticancer effects; however, its antioxidant properties have not been fully elucidated. We investigated sub-cellular distribution of apigenin, it’s binding to DNA and protective effects against H2O2-induced DNA damage using transformed human prostate epithelial RWPE-1 cells and prostate cancer LNCaP, PC-3 and DU145 cells. Exposure of cells to apigenin exhibited higher accumulation in RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells, compared to PC-3 and DU145 cells. The kinetics of apigenin uptake in LNCaP cells was estimated with a Km value of 5 µmole/L and Vmax of 190 pmoles/million cells/h. Sub-cellular fractionation demonstrated that nuclear matrix retains the highest concentration of apigenin (45.3%), followed by cytosol (23.9%), nuclear membranes (17.9%) and microsomes (12.9%), respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of apigenin with calf-thymus DNA exhibited intercalation as the dominant binding mode to DNA duplex. Apigenin exposure resulted in significant genoprotective effects in H2O2-stressed RWPE-1 cells by reduction in reactive oxygen species levels. In addition, apigenin exposure suppressed the formation of 8-hydroxy-2′ deoxyguanosine and protected exposed cells from apoptosis. Our studies demonstrate that apigenin is readily taken up by normal prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, and is incorporated into their nuclei, where its intercalation with nucleic acid bases may account for its antioxidant and chemopreventive activities. PMID:24614817

  9. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells incorporate into the prostate during regrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica R Placencio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer recurrence involves increased growth of cancer epithelial cells, as androgen dependent prostate cancer progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC following initial therapy. Understanding CRPC prostate regrowth will provide opportunities for new cancer therapies to treat advanced disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Elevated chemokine expression in the prostate stroma of a castrate resistant mouse model, Tgfbr2(fspKO, prompted us to look at the involvement of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs in prostate regrowth. We identified bone marrow cells recruited to the prostate in GFP-chimeric mice. A dramatic increase in BMDC recruitment for prostate regrowth occurred three days after exogenous testosterone implantation. Recruitment led to incorporation of BMDCs within the prostate epithelia. Immunofluorescence staining suggested BMDCs in the prostate coexpressed androgen receptor; p63, a basal epithelial marker; and cytokeratin 8, a luminal epithelial marker. A subset of the BMDC population, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, were specifically found to be incorporated in the prostate at its greatest time of remodeling. Rosa26 expressing MSCs injected into GFP mice supported MSC fusion with resident prostate epithelial cells through co-localization of β-galactosidase and GFP during regrowth. In a human C4-2B xenograft model of CRPC, MSCs were specifically recruited. Injection of GFP-labeled MSCs supported C4-2B tumor progression by potentiating canonical Wnt signaling. The use of MSCs as a targeted delivery vector for the exogenously expressed Wnt antagonist, secreted frizzled related protein-2 (SFRP2, reduced tumor growth, increased apoptosis and potentiated tumor necrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mesenchymal stem cells fuse with prostate epithelia during the process of prostate regrowth. MSCs recruited to the regrowing prostate can be used as a vehicle for transporting genetic information with potential

  10. Tumorigenic Potential of Transit Amplifying Prostate Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Montani, M., Wild, P., Beer , M., Huber, F., Hermanns, T., Muntener, M., and Kristiansen, G. 2012. FOXA1 promotes tumor progression in prostate cancer...Eldin Eltoum,5 and Sarki A. Abdulkadir1,4 1Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville...Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, 1161 21st Ave. South, B-MCN-3321A, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. Phone: 615.322.9668; Fax

  11. Mast cell distribution in normal adult skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, A S; Heide, R; den Hollander, J C; Mulder, P G M; Tank, B; Oranje, A P

    2005-03-01

    To investigate mast cell distribution in normal adult skin to provide a reference range for comparison with mastocytosis. Mast cells (MCs) were counted in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders in adults. There was an uneven distribution of MCs in different body sites using the anti-tryptase monoclonal antibody technique. Numbers of MCs on the trunk, upper arm, and upper leg were similar, but were significantly different from those found on the lower leg and forearm. Two distinct groups were formed--proximal and distal. There were 77.0 MCs/mm2 at proximal body sites and 108.2 MCs/mm2 at distal sites. Adjusted for the adjacent diagnosis and age, this difference was consistent. The numbers of MCs in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders were not different from those in the control group. Differences in the numbers of MCs between the distal and the proximal body sites must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. A pilot study in patients with mastocytosis underlined the variation in the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin, but showed a considerable overlap. The observed numbers of MCs in adults cannot be extrapolated to children. MC numbers varied significantly between proximal and distal body sites and these differences must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. There was a considerable overlap between the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin.

  12. Re-epithelialization resulted from prostate basal cells in canine prostatic urethra may represent the ideal healing method after two-micron laser resection of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to characterize the re-epithelialization of wound healing in canine prostatic urethra and to evaluate the effect of this re-epithelialization way after two-micron laser resection of the prostate (TmLRP. TmLRP and partial bladder neck mucosa were performed in 15 healthy adult male crossbred canines. Wound specimens were harvested at 3 days, and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after operation, respectively. The histopathologic characteristics were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of cytokeratin 14 (CK14, CK5, CK18, synaptophysin (Syn, chromogranin A (CgA, uroplakin, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 , and TGF-β type II receptor in prostatic urethra wound were examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Van Gieson staining was performed to determine the expression of collagen fibers in prostatic urethra and bladder neck would. The results showed that the re-epithelialization of the prostatic urethra resulted from the mobilization of proliferating epithelial cells from residual prostate tissue under the wound. The proliferating cells expressed CK14, CK5, but not CK18, Syn, and CgA and re-epithelialize expressed uroplakin since 3 weeks. There were enhanced TGF-β1 and TGF-β type II receptor expression in proliferating cells and regenerated cells, which correlated with specific phases of re-epithelialization. Compared with the re-epithelialization of the bladder neck, re-epithelialization of canine prostatic urethra was faster, and the expression of collagen fibers was relatively low. In conclusion, re-epithelialization in canine prostatic urethra resulted from prostate basal cells after TmLRP and this re-epithelialization way may represent the ideal healing method from anatomic repair to functional recovery after injury.

  13. Distinct impact of targeted actin cytoskeleton reorganization on mechanical properties of normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Yu M; Dokrunova, A A; Efremenko, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V; Sokolova, O S

    2015-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is substantially modified in cancer cells because of changes in actin-binding protein abundance and functional activity. As a consequence, cancer cells have distinctive motility and mechanical properties, which are important for many processes, including invasion and metastasis. Here, we studied the effects of actin cytoskeleton alterations induced by specific nucleation inhibitors (SMIFH2, CK-666), cytochalasin D, Y-27632 and detachment from the surface by trypsinization on the mechanical properties of normal Vero and prostate cancer cell line DU145. The Young's modulus of Vero cells was 1300±900 Pa, while the prostate cancer cell line DU145 exhibited significantly lower Young's moduli (600±400 Pa). The Young's moduli exhibited a log-normal distribution for both cell lines. Unlike normal cells, cancer cells demonstrated diverse viscoelastic behavior and different responses to actin cytoskeleton reorganization. They were more resistant to specific formin-dependent nucleation inhibition, and reinforced their cortical actin after detachment from the substrate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  14. Collision tumor of kidney: A case of renal cell carcinoma with metastases of prostatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Vyas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous occurrence of prostatic adenocarcinoma and renal cell carcinoma is well documented in the literature. However, metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma in a kidney harboring a renal cell carcinoma (RCC is quite rare. Although renal cell carcinoma is the most common tumor that can harbor metastasis, metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma in a kidney harboring a RCC is quite rare. There are four cases in the literature showing metastasis of prostatic adenocarcinoma to RCC. However, as per our knowledge, this is the first case of a collision between RCC and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  15. A case with primary signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the prostate and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orcun Celik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary signet cell carcinoma of the prostate is a rare histological variant of prostate malignancies. It is commonly originated from the stomach, colon, pancreas, and less commonly in the bladder. Prognosis of the classical type is worse than the adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Primary signet cell adenocarcinoma is diagnosed by eliminating the adenocarcinomas of other organs such as gastrointestinal tract organs. In this case report, we present a case with primary signet cell adenocarcinoma of the prostate who received docetaxel chemotherapy because of short prostate specific antigen doubling time.

  16. Heterogeneous patterns of DNA methylation-based field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue from cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Mia; Strand, Siri Hundtofte; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Liang, Gangning; Gill, Inderbir; Haldrup, Christa; Borre, Michael; Høyer, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard

    2017-01-13

    Prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis is based on histological evaluation of prostate needle biopsies, which have high false negative rates. Here, we investigated if cancer-associated epigenetic field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue may be used to increase sensitivity for PC. We focused on nine genes (AOX1, CCDC181 (C1orf114), GABRE, GAS6, HAPLN3, KLF8, MOB3B, SLC18A2, and GSTP1) known to be hypermethylated in PC. Using quantitative methylation-specific PCR, we analysed 66 malignant and 134 non-malignant tissue samples from 107 patients, who underwent ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (67 patients had at least one cancer-positive biopsy, 40 had exclusively cancer-negative biopsies). Hypermethylation was detectable for all genes in malignant needle biopsy samples (AUC: 0.80 to 0.98), confirming previous findings in prostatectomy specimens. Furthermore, we identified a four-gene methylation signature (AOX1xGSTP1xHAPLN3xSLC18A2) that distinguished histologically non-malignant biopsies from patients with vs. without PC in other biopsies (AUC = 0.65; sensitivity = 30.8%; specificity = 100%). This signature was validated in an independent patient set (59 PC, 36 adjacent non-malignant, and 9 normal prostate tissue samples) analysed on Illumina 450 K methylation arrays (AUC = 0.70; sensitivity = 40.6%; specificity = 100%). Our results suggest that a novel four-gene signature may be used to increase sensitivity for PC diagnosis through detection of epigenetic field effects in histologically non-malignant prostate tissue samples.

  17. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate presenting with Cushing Syndrome. A narrative review of an uncommon condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Camino, José Antonio; Losada-Vila, Beatriz; De Ancos-Aracil, Cristina Lucía; Rodríguez-Lajusticia, Laura; Tardío, Juan Carlos; Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is an uncommon condition; there are very few cases in which presenting symptoms are consistent with Cushing Syndrome (CS). We report a new case in which CS triggers the suspicion of an SCC of the prostate and a review of the published cases of SCC of the prostate presenting with CS. The origin of these neoplasms is still unclear. It may be suspected when laboratory features appear in patients diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma which becomes resistant to specific therapy. SCC usually occurs after the 6th decade. Patients suffering SCC of the prostate presenting with CS usually present symptoms such as hypertension, hyperglycemia, alkalosis or hypokalemia; cushingoid phenotype is less frequent. Cortisol and ACTH levels are often high. Prostatic-specific antigen levels are usually normal. CT scan is the preferred imaging test to localize the lesion, but its performance may be improved by adding other tests, such as FDG-PET scan. All patients have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Lymph nodes, liver and bone are the most frequent metastases sites. Surgery and Ketokonazole are the preferred treatments for CS. The prognosis is very poor: 2- and 5-year survival rates are 27.5 and 14.3%, respectively. Key messages When a patient presents with ectopic Cushing Syndrome but lungs are normal, an atypical localization should be suspected. We should suspect a prostatic origin if Cushing Syndrome is accompanied by obstructive inferior urinary tract symptoms or in the setting of a prostatic adenocarcinoma with rapid clinical and radiological progression with relatively low PSA levels. Although no imaging test is preferred to localize these tumors, FDG-PET-TC can be very useful. Hormone marker scintigraphy (e.g. somatostatin) could be used too. As Cushing Syndrome is a paraneoplastic phenomenon, treatment of the underlying disease may help control hypercortisolism manifestations. These tumors are usually metastatic by the

  18. Computational imaging reveals shape differences between normal and malignant prostates on MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Purysko, Andrei S.; Verma, Sadhna; Kiechle, Jonathan; Gollamudi, Jay; Ghose, Soumya; Herrmann, Karin; Gulani, Vikas; Paspulati, Raj; Ponsky, Lee; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Moses, Daniel; Shnier, Ron; Delprado, Warick; Thompson, James; Stricker, Phillip; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-01-01

    We seek to characterize differences in the shape of the prostate and the central gland (combined central and transitional zones) between men with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer and men who were identified as not having prostate cancer either on account of a negative biopsy or had pelvic imaging done for a non-prostate malignancy. T2w MRI from 70 men were acquired at three institutions. The cancer positive group (PCa+) comprised 35 biopsy positive (Bx+) subjects from three institutions (Gleason scores: 6–9, Stage: T1–T3). The negative group (PCa−) combined 24 biopsy negative (Bx−) from two institutions and 11 subjects diagnosed with rectal cancer but with no clinical or MRI indications of prostate cancer (Cl−). The boundaries of the prostate and central gland were delineated on T2w MRI by two expert raters and were used to construct statistical shape atlases for the PCa+, Bx− and Cl− prostates. An atlas comparison was performed via per-voxel statistical tests to localize shape differences (significance assessed at p < 0.05). The atlas comparison revealed central gland hypertrophy in the Bx− subpopulation, resulting in significant volume and posterior side shape differences relative to PCa+ group. Significant differences in the corresponding prostate shapes were noted at the apex when comparing the Cl− and PCa+ prostates. PMID:28145532

  19. Prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in diseased prostates and its inflammatory and transforming activity on prostate epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassi Fehri, Lina; Mak, Tim N; Laube, Britta; Brinkmann, Volker; Ogilvie, Lesley A; Mollenkopf, Hans; Lein, Michael; Schmidt, Timo; Meyer, Thomas F; Brüggemann, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of male cancer deaths in the Western world. Mounting evidence has revealed that chronic inflammation can be an important initiating factor of PCa. Recent work has detected the anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes in cancerous prostates, but with wide-ranging detection rates. Here, using in situ immunofluorescence (ISIF), P. acnes was found in 58 out of 71 (81.7%) tested cancerous prostate tissue samples, but was absent from healthy prostate tissues (20 samples) and other cancerous tissue biopsies (59 mamma carcinoma samples). Live P. acnes bacteria were isolated from cancerous prostates and cocultured with the prostate epithelial cell line RWPE1. Microarray analysis showed that the host cell responded to P. acnes with a strong multifaceted inflammatory response. Active secretion of cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8, from infected cells was confirmed. The host cell response was likely mediated by the transcriptional factors NF-κB and STAT3, which were both activated upon P. acnes infection. The P. acnes-induced host cell response also included the activation of the COX2-prostaglandin, and the plasminogen-matrix metalloproteinase pathways. Long-term exposure to P. acnes altered cell proliferation, and enabled anchorage-independent growth of infected epithelial cells, thus initiating cellular transformation. Our results suggest that P. acnes infection could be a contributing factor to the initiation or progression of PCa.

  20. ERBB2 increases metastatic potentials specifically in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells.

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    Jessica Tome-Garcia

    Full Text Available Despite all the blood-based biomarkers used to monitor prostate cancer patients, prostate cancer remains as the second common cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. This is largely due to a lack of understanding of the molecular pathways that are responsible for the aggressive forms of prostate cancers, the castrate-resistant prostate cancer and the metastatic prostate cancer. Cell signaling pathways activated by the ERBB2 oncogene or the RAS oncogene are frequently found to be altered in metastatic prostate cancers. To evaluate and define the role of the ERBB2/RAS pathway in prostate cancer metastasis, we have evaluated the impact of ERBB2- or RAS-overexpression on the metastatic potentials for four prostate cancer cell lines derived from tumors with different androgen sensitivities. To do so, we transfected the human DU145, LnCaP, and PC3 prostate cancer cells and the murine Myc-CaP prostate cancer cells with the activated form of ERBB2 or H-RAS and assessed their metastatic potentials by three complementary assays, a wound healing assay, a transwell motility assay, and a transwell invasion assay. We showed that while overexpression of ERBB2 increased the metastatic potential of the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. PC3 and DU145, it did not affect metastatic potentials of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. LnCaP and Myc-CaP. In contrast, overexpression of H-RAS only increased the cell motility of Myc-CaP cells, which overexpress the human c-MYC oncogene. Our data suggest that ERBB2 collaborates with androgen signaling to promote prostate cancer metastasis, and that although RAS is one of the critical downstream effectors of ERBB2, it does not phenocopy ERBB2 for its impact on the metastatic potentials of prostate cancer cell lines.

  1. Elevated AKR1C3 expression promotes prostate cancer cell survival and prostate cell-mediated endothelial cell tube formation: implications for prostate cancer progressioan

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    Davis Jeffrey S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aldo-keto reductase (AKR 1C family member 3 (AKR1C3, one of four identified human AKR1C enzymes, catalyzes steroid, prostaglandin, and xenobiotic metabolism. In the prostate, AKR1C3 is up-regulated in localized and advanced prostate adenocarcinoma, and is associated with prostate cancer (PCa aggressiveness. Here we propose a novel pathological function of AKR1C3 in tumor angiogenesis and its potential role in promoting PCa progression. Methods To recapitulate elevated AKR1C3 expression in cancerous prostate, the human PCa PC-3 cell line was stably transfected with an AKR1C3 expression construct to establish PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis were performed to identify AKR1C3-mediated pathways of activation and their potential biological consequences in PC-3 cells. Western blot analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and an in vitro Matrigel angiogenesis assays were applied to validate the pro-angiogenic activity of PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants identified by bioinformatics analysis. Results Microarray and bioinformatics analysis suggested that overexpression of AKR1C3 in PC-3 cells modulates estrogen and androgen metabolism, activates insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and Akt signaling pathways, as well as promotes tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. Levels of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R and Akt activation as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression and secretion were significantly elevated in PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants in comparison to PC3-mock transfectants. PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants also promoted endothelial cell (EC tube formation on Matrigel as compared to the AKR1C3-negative parental PC-3 cells and PC3-mock transfectants. Pre-treatment of PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants with a selective IGF-1R kinase inhibitor (AG1024 or a non-selective phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K inhibitor (LY294002 abolished ability of the cells

  2. In Search of the Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Inhibitory Effect of the GnRH Antagonist Degarelix on Human Prostate Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Monica; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Patterson, Nathan H.; Chaurand, Pierre; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor (GnRHR) antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i) the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii) MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii) the clusters of genes affected by degarelix suggest that

  3. In search of the molecular mechanisms mediating the inhibitory effect of the GnRH antagonist degarelix on human prostate cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Sakai

    Full Text Available Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH receptor (GnRHR antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry (MS. The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii the clusters of genes affected by degarelix

  4. Matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 expression in canine normal prostate and with proliferative disorders Expressão de metaloproteinases de matriz 2 e 9 na próstata canina normal e com lesões proliferativas

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    Mariana Batista Rodrigues Faleiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the expression of metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2 and 9 (MMP-9 in canine normal prostates and with proliferative disorders was evaluated to verify the role of these enzymes in extracellular matrix remodeling (ECM and in the tissue invasion process. A total of 355 prostatic samples were obtained, from which 36 (10.1% were normal prostates, 46 (13.0% with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, 128 (36.1% with proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA, 74 (20.8% with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, and 71 (20.0% with prostatic carcinoma (PC. Difference in cytoplasmic immunohistochemical staining of MMP-2 and MMP-9 between acinar epithelium and periacinar stroma was found regarding the different diagnosis. The correlation between MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in relation to the number of labeled cells in acinar epithelium and periacinar stroma, as well as to the staining intensity in the periacinar stromal cells was evidenced in canine prostates with PIA. In conclusion, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression has a variation in canine prostate according to the lesion, with lower expression in normal tissue and with BPH, and higher expression in those with PIA, PIN and PC. Moreover, the inflammatory microenvironment of the PIA has influence in the activity of both enzymes.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a expressão das metaloproteinases 2 (MMP-2 e 9 (MMP-9 em próstatas caninas normais e com desordens proliferativas, verificando o papel dessas enzimas na remodelação da matriz extracelular (MEC e no processo de invasão tecidual. Um total de 355 amostras prostáticas foram obtidas, sendo 36 (10,1% normais, 46 (13,0% com hiperplasia prostática benigna (HPB, 128 (36,1% com atrofia inflamatória proliferativa (PIA, 74 (20,8% com neoplasia intraepitelial prostática (PIN e 71 (20,0% com carcinoma prostático (CP. Houve diferença de imunomarcação citoplasmática para MMP-2 e MMP-9 entre o epitélio acinar e o estroma periacinar, quanto aos

  5. Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Normal and Cancer Stem Cells

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    Kenneth C. Valkenburg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Wnt ligands to initiate a signaling cascade that results in cytoplasmic stabilization of, and nuclear localization of, β-catenin underlies their ability to regulate progenitor cell differentiation. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying Wnt/β-catenin signaling and how the pathway regulates normal differentiation of stem cells in the intestine, mammary gland, and prostate. We will also discuss how dysregulation of the pathway is associated with putative cancer stem cells and the potential therapeutic implications of regulating Wnt signaling.

  6. Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Prostate Organoids In Vitro and its Perturbation by Low-Dose Bisphenol A Exposure.

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    Esther L Calderon-Gierszal

    Full Text Available Studies using rodent and adult human prostate stem-progenitor cell models suggest that developmental exposure to the endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A (BPA can predispose to prostate carcinogenesis with aging. Unknown at present is whether the embryonic human prostate is equally susceptible to BPA during its natural developmental window. To address this unmet need, we herein report the construction of a pioneer in vitro human prostate developmental model to study the effects of BPA. The directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC into prostatic organoids in a spatial system was accomplished with precise temporal control of growth factors and steroids. Activin-induced definitive endoderm was driven to prostate specification by combined exposure to WNT10B and FGF10. Matrigel culture for 20-30 days in medium containing R-Spondin-1, Noggin, EGF, retinoic acid and testosterone was sufficient for mature prostate organoid development. Immunofluorescence and gene expression analysis confirmed that organoids exhibited cytodifferentiation and functional properties of the human prostate. Exposure to 1 nM or 10 nM BPA throughout differentiation culture disturbed early morphogenesis in a dose-dependent manner with 1 nM BPA increasing and 10 nM BPA reducing the number of branched structures formed. While differentiation of branched structures to mature organoids seemed largely unaffected by BPA exposure, the stem-like cell population increased, appearing as focal stem cell nests that have not properly entered lineage commitment rather than the rare isolated stem cells found in normally differentiated structures. These findings provide the first direct evidence that low-dose BPA exposure targets hESC and perturbs morphogenesis as the embryonic cells differentiate towards human prostate organoids, suggesting that the developing human prostate may be susceptible to disruption by in utero BPA exposures.

  7. Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Prostate Organoids In Vitro and its Perturbation by Low-Dose Bisphenol A Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Gierszal, Esther L; Prins, Gail S

    2015-01-01

    Studies using rodent and adult human prostate stem-progenitor cell models suggest that developmental exposure to the endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A (BPA) can predispose to prostate carcinogenesis with aging. Unknown at present is whether the embryonic human prostate is equally susceptible to BPA during its natural developmental window. To address this unmet need, we herein report the construction of a pioneer in vitro human prostate developmental model to study the effects of BPA. The directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into prostatic organoids in a spatial system was accomplished with precise temporal control of growth factors and steroids. Activin-induced definitive endoderm was driven to prostate specification by combined exposure to WNT10B and FGF10. Matrigel culture for 20-30 days in medium containing R-Spondin-1, Noggin, EGF, retinoic acid and testosterone was sufficient for mature prostate organoid development. Immunofluorescence and gene expression analysis confirmed that organoids exhibited cytodifferentiation and functional properties of the human prostate. Exposure to 1 nM or 10 nM BPA throughout differentiation culture disturbed early morphogenesis in a dose-dependent manner with 1 nM BPA increasing and 10 nM BPA reducing the number of branched structures formed. While differentiation of branched structures to mature organoids seemed largely unaffected by BPA exposure, the stem-like cell population increased, appearing as focal stem cell nests that have not properly entered lineage commitment rather than the rare isolated stem cells found in normally differentiated structures. These findings provide the first direct evidence that low-dose BPA exposure targets hESC and perturbs morphogenesis as the embryonic cells differentiate towards human prostate organoids, suggesting that the developing human prostate may be susceptible to disruption by in utero BPA exposures.

  8. Gold nanocages for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Laura; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Locarno, Silvia A.; Macchi, Chiara; D'Alfonso, Laura; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Magni, Paolo; Collini, Maddalena; Romeo, Sergio; Chirico, Giuseppe; Prosperi, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanocages (AuNCs) have been shown to be a useful tool both for imaging and hyperthermia therapy of cancer, thanks to their outstanding optical properties, low toxicity and facile functionalization with targeting molecules, including peptides and antibodies. In particular, hyperthermia is a minimally invasive therapy which takes advantage of the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles to efficiently convert the absorbed light into heat. Here, we use AuNCs for the selective targeting and imaging of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we report the hyperthermic effect characterization of the AuNCs both in solution and internalized in cells. Prostate cancer cells were irradiated at different exposure times, with a pulsed near infrared laser, and the cellular viability was evaluated by confocal microscopy.

  9. Different Phenotypes in Human Prostate Cancer: α6 or α3 Integrin in Cell-extracellular Adhesion Sites

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    Monika Schmelz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of α6/α3 integrin in adhesion complexes at the basal membrane in human normal and cancer prostate glands was analyzed in 135 biopsies from 61 patients. The levels of the polarized α6/α3 integrin expression at the basal membrane of prostate tumor glands were determined by quantitative immunohistochemistry. The α6/α3 integrin expression was compared with Gleason sum score, pathological stage, and preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA. The associations were assessed by statistical methods. Eighty percent of the tumors expressed the α6 or α3 integrin and 20% was integrin-negative. Gleason sum score, but not serum PSA, was associated with the integrin expression. Low Gleason sum score correlated with increased integrin expression, high Gleason sum score with low and negative integrin expression. Three prostate tumor phenotypes were distinguished based on differential integrin expression. Type I coexpressed both α6 and α3 subunits, type II exclusively expressed a6 integrin, and type III expressed α3 integrin only. Fifteen cases were further examined for the codistribution of vinculin, paxillin, and CD 151 on frozen serial sections using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The α6/α3 integrins, CD151, paxillin, and vinculin were present within normal glands. In prostate carcinoma, α6 integrin was colocalized with CD 151, but not with vinculin or paxillin. In tumor phenotype I, the α6 subunit did not colocalize with the α3 subunit indicating the existence of two different adhesion complexes. Human prostate tumors display on their cell surface the α6β1 and/or α3β1 integrins. Three tumor phenotypes associated with two different adhesion complexes were identified, suggesting a reorganization of cell adhesion structures in prostate cancer.

  10. [Abberant methylation of p16, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1 genes in tumor epitelium and tumor-associated stromal cells of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Alekseev, B Ia; Adnreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2007-01-01

    The methylation status of four genes significant in prostate carcinogenesis p16, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1, were evaluated using quantitative methylationsensitive polymerase chain reaction. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma, normal epithelia, foci of PIN and benign prostate hyperplasia, and stroma adjacent to tumor tissues were isolated from whole-mount prostatectomy specimens of patients with localized prostate cancer by using laser capture microdissection. We found high levels of gene methylation in the tumor epithelium and tumor-associated stromal cells and some methylation in both hyperplastic epithelium and stromal cells in normal-appearing tissues located adjacent to tumors. Promoter methylation in the non-neoplastic cells of the prostate tumor microenvironment may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We examined the promoter methylation status of pl6, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1 in prostate biopsy fragments and prostate tissues after radical prostatectomy from patients with adenocarcinoma without laser capture microdissection. Methylation frequencies of all genes in tumor samples were considerably lower than frequencies in microdissected tumour samples (HIC1, 71 versus 89%; p16, 22 versus 78%; GSTP1, 32 versus 100%; N33, 20 versus 33%). The laser capture microdissection is required procedure in methylation studies taking into account multifocality and heterogenity of prostate cancer tissue.

  11. Differentiation of Neonatal Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Prostate Epithelial Cells: A Model to Study Prostate Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    mass is capable of initiating new tumors [3-5]. Therefore, for metastasis to occur, cells that have the ability to initiate the tumor must reach a...glioblastoma multiforme stem cells [31]. CD133 has since been described in CSC from osteosarcoma , Ewing’s sarcoma, endome- trial, hepatocellular, colon...and lung carcinomas and ovarian and pancreatic adenocarcinoma [32-35]. CD44 is present in head and neck can- cer, prostate, gastric and colorectal

  12. Expression of the Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor, the Prostate Stem Cell Antigen and the Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen in Lymph Node and Bone Metastases of Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ananias, Hildo J. K.; van den Heuvel, Marius C.; Helfrich, Wijnand; de Jong, Igle J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Cell membrane antigens like the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), and the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), expressed in prostate cancer, are attractive targets for new therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Therefore, we investig

  13. Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Coexist with Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder and Prostate-A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TongZhang; YongXu; ShuminZhang

    2004-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma(PAC) with transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) of the bladder and prostate is a rare clinicopathological entity, presentation is usually late. We report a case with obstructive voiding symptoms and lumbago. Prostatic and cystic biopsy revealed PAC and TCC of bladder. Bone scan showed multiple bone metastases. He underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and bladder tumor and was found to have PAC with TCC of the bladder and prostate. We discuss the cases of PAC with TCC of the bladder and prostate.

  14. Comparison of the clinical efficacy of medical treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia between normal and obese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung Hwan Lee; Cheol Young Oh; Kyung Kgi Park; Mun Su Chung; Se Jeong Yoo; Byung Ha Chung

    2011-01-01

    @@ We aimed to investigate the difference in efficacy of medical treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) between normal and obese patients with BPH; obesity was determined by either body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC).In this 12-week prospective observational study,a total of 175 patients aged >,40 years with International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS))12 points and prostate volume ≧20ml were prospectively enrolled.The patients were divided into two groups according to BMI orWC.Patients received the doxazosin gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) at a dose of 4 mg once per day for 12 weeks.The changes from baseline in the IPSS,maximal urinary flow rate (Qmax),post-void residual volume,quality of life (QoL) scores and adverse events (AEs) were analysed.Of the 175 enrolled patients,132 completed the study.Sixty-seven patients had BMI >23kg m-2,and 43 had WC>90 cm.Obese patients represented by WC>90 cm or BMI≧23kg m-2 had a significantly greater prostate volume compared with non-obese patients at baseline.Total IPSS was significantly higher in the WC >90 cm group compared to the WC≦90 cm group.Total IPSS was positively correlated with prostate volume (P=0.031) and WC (P=0.045).All groups showed significant improvements in total I PSS and QoL at 12 weeks.However,the improvement of total IPSS was greater in the high-BMI and high-WC groups.The most frequent AE was dizziness (n=13),and it was significantly lower in the obese BPH patients.Obesity was associated with increased prostate volume and lower urinary tract symptoms.Alpha-blockers appear to be efficacious for controlling symptoms,especially in obese men.

  15. Apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of Salvia triloba extract in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Harika; Bozkurt, Emir

    2016-03-01

    Plants, due to their remarkable composition, are considered as natural resources of bioactive compounds with specific biological activities. Salvia genus (Lamiaceae) has been used around the world in complementary medicine since ancient times. We investigated the cytotoxic, apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of methanolic Salvia triloba extract (STE) in prostate cancer cells. Cell viability was evaluated by XTT; apoptosis was investigated by DNA fragmentation and caspase 3/7 activity assays. Changes in the angiogenic cytokine levels were investigated by human angiogenesis antibody array. Scratch assay was used to determine the cell motility. STE induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in both cancer cells; however, it was not cytotoxic to normal cells. Cell motility was reduced in PC-3, DU-145 and HUVEC cells by STE treatment. ANG, ENA-78, bFGF, EGF, IGF-1 and VEGF-D levels were significantly decreased by -2.9, -3.7, -1.7, -1.7, -2.0 and -1.8 fold in STE-treated DU-145 cells, however, ANG, IL-8, LEP, RANTES, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and VEGF levels were significantly decreased by -5.1, -2.0, -2.4, -3.1, -1.5, -2.0 and -2.5 fold in PC-3 cells. These data suggest that STE might be a promising candidate for anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic treatment of prostate cancer.

  16. Momordin Ic, a new natural SENP1 inhibitor, inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjing; Lei, Hu; Zhang, Jinfu; Chen, Xiangyun; Tang, Caixia; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Hanzhang; Xiao, Weilie; Gu, Wenli; Wu, Yingli

    2016-09-13

    SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1), a member of the de-SUMOylation protease family, is elevated in prostate cancer (PCa) cells and is involved in PCa pathogenesis. Momordin Ιc (Mc), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibited SENP1 in vitro, as reflected by reduced SENP1C-induced cleavage of SUMO2-ΔRanGAP1. Mc also altered the thermal stability of SENP1 in a newly developed cellular thermal shift assay, indicating that Mc directly interacts with SENP1 in PCa cells. Consistent with SENP1 inhibition, Mc increased SUMOylated protein levels, which was further confirmed by the accumulation of two known SUMOylated proteins, hypoxia inducible factor-1a and nucleus accumbens associated protein 1 in PC3 cells. Compared to LNCaP and normal prostate epithelial RWPE-1 cells, PC3 cells had higher levels of SENP1 mRNA and were more sensitive to Mc-induced growth inhibition. Mc also reduced SENP1 mRNA levels in PCa cells. Overexpression of SENP1 rescued PC3 cells from Mc-induced apoptosis. Finally, Mc suppressed cell proliferation and induced cell death in vivo in a xenograft PC3 tumor mouse model. These findings demonstrate that Mc is a novel SENP1 inhibitor with potential therapeutic value for PCa. Investigation of other pentacyclic triterpenoids may aid in the development of novel SENP1 inhibitor drugs.

  17. Saposin C stimulates growth and invasion, activates p42/44 and SAPK/JNK signaling pathways of MAPK and upregulates uPA/uPAR expression in prostate cancer and stromal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahriar Koochekpour; Oliver Sartor; Masao Hiraiwa; Tae-Jin Lee; Walter Rayford; Natascha Remmel; Konrad Sandhoff; Ardalan Minokadeh; David Y. Patten

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine the effect of saposin C (a known trophic domain of prosaposin) on proliferation, migration and invasion, as well as its effect on the expression of urokinase plasmonogen activator (uPA), its receptor (uPAR) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9 in normal and malignant prostate cells. In addition, we tested whether saposin C can activate p42/44 and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) signal transduction pathways of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily. Methods: We employed Westem blot analysis, phospho-specific antibodies, cell proliferation assay, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction,in vitro kinase assays and migration and invasion to determine the effect of saposin C on various biological behaviors of prostate stromal and cancer cells. Results: Saposin C, in a cell type-specific manner, upregulates uPA/uPAR and immediate early gene c-Jun expression, stimulates cell proliferation, migration and invasion and activates p42/44 and SAPK/JNK MAPK pathways in prostate stromal and cancer cells. Normal prostate epithelial cells were not responsive to saposin C treatment in the above studies. Conclusion: Saposin C functions as a multipotential modulator of diverse biological activities in prostate cancer and stromal cells. These results strongly suggest that saposin C functions as a potent growth factor for prostatic cells and may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis and/or the development of hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  18. Adipocytes promote prostate cancer stem cell self-renewal through amplification of the cholecystokinin autocrine loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kai-Dun; Liu, Ji; Jovanovic, Lidija; An, Jiyuan; Hill, Michelle M; Vela, Ian; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Ma, Stephanie; Nelson, Colleen; Russell, Pamela J; Clements, Judith A; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2016-01-26

    Obesity has long been linked with prostate cancer progression, although the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown. Here, we report that adipocytes promote the enrichment of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) through a vicious cycle of autocrine amplification. In the presence of adipocytes, prostate cancer cells actively secrete the peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), which not only stimulates prostate CSC self-renewal, but also induces cathepsin B (CTSB) production of the adipocytes. In return, CTSB facilitates further CCK secretion by the cancer cells. More importantly, inactivation of CCK receptor not only suppresses CTSB secretion by the adipocytes, but also synergizes the inhibitory effect of CTSB inhibitor on adipocyte-promoted prostate CSC self-renewal. In summary, we have uncovered a novel mechanism underlying the mutual interplay between adipocytes and prostate CSCs, which may help explaining the role of adipocytes in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for effective intervention.

  19. Prostate Cancer Stem-like Cells Contribute to the Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Ojo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard care for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC since the 1940s. Although ADT shows clear benefits for many patients, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC inevitably occurs. In fact, with the two recent FDA-approved second-generation anti-androgens abiraterone and enzalutamide, resistance develops rapidly in patients with CRPC, despite their initial effectiveness. The lack of effective therapeutic solutions towards CRPC largely reflects our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for CRPC development. While persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling under castration levels of serum testosterone (<50 ng/mL contributes to resistance to ADT, it is also clear that CRPC evolves via complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the physiological impact of individual mechanisms and whether these mechanisms function in a cohesive manner in promoting CRPC are elusive. In spite of these uncertainties, emerging evidence supports a critical role of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSLCs in stimulating CRPC evolution and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this review, we will discuss the recent evidence supporting the involvement of PCSLC in CRPC acquisition as well as the pathways and factors contributing to PCSLC expansion in response to ADT.

  20. Influence of daily imaging on plan quality and normal tissue toxicity for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katharina; Heitfeld, Marina; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian; Dzierma, Yvonne

    2017-01-10

    Modern radiotherapy offers various possibilities for image guided verification of patient positioning. Different clinically relevant IGRT (image guided radiotherapy) scenarios were considered with regard to their influence on dosimetric plan quality and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). This study is based on treatment plans of 50 prostate patients. We evaluate the clinically performed IGRT and simulate the influence of different daily IGRT scenarios on plan quality. Imaging doses of planar and cone-beam-CT (CBCT) images for three different energies (6 MV, 1 MV and 121 kV) were added to the treatment plans. The plan quality of the different scenarios was assessed by a visual inspection of the dose distribution and dose-volume-histogram (DVH) and a statistical analysis of DVH criteria. In addition, an assessment of the normal tissue complication probability was performed. Daily 1MV-CBCTs result in undesirable high dose regions in the target volume. The DVH shows that the scenarios with actual imaging performed, daily kV-CBCT and daily 6MV imaging (1x CBCT, 4x planar images per week) do not differ exceedingly from the original plan; especially imaging with daily kV-CBCT has little influence to the sparing of organs at risk. In contrast, daily 1MV- CBCT entails an additional dose of up to two fraction doses. Due to the additional dose amount some DVH constraints for plan acceptability could no longer be satisfied, especially for the daily 1MV-CBCT scenario. This scenario also shows increased NTCP for the rectum. Daily kV-CBCT has negligible influence on plan quality and is commendable for the clinical routine. If no kV-modality is available, a daily IGRT scenario with one CBCT per week and planar axial images on the other days should be preferred over daily MV-CBCT.

  1. Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Popescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aims to provide practicing clinicians with the most recent knowledge of the biological nature of prostate cancer especially the information regarding neuroendocrine differentiation. Methods: Review of the literature using PubMed search and scientific journal publications. Results: Much progress has been made towards an understanding of the development and progression of prostate cancer. The prostate is a male accessory sex gland which produces a fraction of seminal fluid. The normal human prostate is composed of a stromal compartment (which contains: nerves, fibroblast, smooth muscle cells, macrophages surrounding glandular acins – epithelial cells. Neuroendocrine cells are one of the epithelial populations in the normal prostate and are believed to provide trophic signals trough the secretion of neuropeptides that diffuse and influence surrounding epithelial cells. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. In prostate cancer, neuroendocrine cells can stimulate growth of surrounding prostate adenocarcinoma cells (proliferation of neighboring cancer cells in a paracrine manner by secretion of neuroendocrine products. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is an aggressive variant of prostate cancer that commonly arises in later stages of castration resistant prostate cancer. The detection of neuroendocrine prostate cancer has clinical implications. These patients are often treated with platinum chemotherapy rather than with androgen receptor targeted therapies. Conclusion: This review shows the need to improve our knowledge regarding diagnostic and treatment methods of the Prostate Cancer, especially cancer cells with neuroendocrine phenotype.

  2. Circulating Prostate Cells Found in Men with Benign Prostate Disease Are P504S Negative: Clinical Implications

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    Nigel P. Murray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developments in immunological and quantitative real-time PCR-based analysis have enabled the detection, enumeration, and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs. It is assumed that the detection of CTCs is associated with cancer, based on the finding that CTCs can be detected in all major cancer and not in healthy subjects or those with benign disease. Methods and Patients. Consecutive men, with suspicion of prostate cancer, had blood samples taken before prostate biopsy; mononuclear cells were obtained using differential gel centrifugation and CPCs detecting using anti-PSA immunocytochemistry. Positive samples underwent further classification with anti-P504S. Results. 329 men underwent prostate biopsy; of these men 83 underwent a second biopsy and 44 a third one. Of those with a biopsy negative for cancer, 19/226 (8.4% had CPCs PSA (+ P504S (− detected at first biopsy, 6/74 (8.1% at second biopsy, and 5/33 (15.2% at third biopsy. Men with cancer-positive biopsies did not have PSA (+ P504S (− CPCs detected. These benign cells were associated with chronic prostatitis. Conclusions. Patients with chronic prostatitis may have circulating prostate cells detected in blood, which do not express the enzyme P504S and should be thought of as benign in nature.

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs; Jeffrey Karp ...clinical trials for CRPC. The team is composed of Drs. Jeffrey Karp Co-Director of Regenerative Therapeutics at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital...encapsulating a PSA-activated thapsigargin-based prodrug (G115, Fig. 5) were generated by the Karp lab with the properties outlined in Table 7. These

  4. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    application • Conferences/journal clubs : o Attend cancer stem cell seminar; monthly: completed o Meet with mentors (Drs. Messing and Jordan) to... club , Wilmot Cancer Center Research seminar, Urology PI Research seminar: all completed • Clinical responsibilities o Continue Urology clinic and...Eschwege P, Loric S, Dumas F, Ba N, Benoit G, Jardin A, Bedossa P. De novo expression of CD44 in prostate carcinoma is correlated with systemic

  5. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundqvist, Helene; Augsten, Martin; Strömberg, Anna; Rullman, Eric; Mijwel, Sara; Kharaziha, Pedram; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Gustafsson, Thomas; Östman, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum) and after completed exercise (exercise serum). The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  6. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Rundqvist

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum and after completed exercise (exercise serum. The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  7. Strigolactone analogues induce apoptosis through activation of p38 and the stress response pathway in cancer cell lines and in conditionally reprogrammed primary prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Claire B; McDonough, Sara; Wang, Victor S; Lee, Hyojung; Ringer, Lymor; Li, Xin; Prandi, Cristina; Lee, Richard J; Feldman, Adam S; Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram; Rodriguez, Olga C; Schlegel, Richard; Albanese, Christopher; Yarden, Ronit I

    2014-03-30

    Strigolactones are a novel class of plant hormones produced in roots and regulate shoot and root development. We have previously shown that synthetic strigolactone analogues potently inhibit growth of breast cancer cells and breast cancer stem cells. Here we show that strigolactone analogues inhibit the growth and survival of an array of cancer-derived cell lines representing solid and non-solid cancer cells including: prostate, colon, lung, melanoma, osteosarcoma and leukemic cell lines, while normal cells were minimally affected. Treatment of cancer cells with strigolactone analogues was hallmarked by activation of the stress-related MAPKs: p38 and JNK and induction of stress-related genes; cell cycle arrest and apoptosis evident by increased percentages of cells in the sub-G1 fraction and Annexin V staining. In addition, we tested the response of patient-matched conditionally reprogrammed primary prostate normal and cancer cells. The tumor cells exhibited significantly higher sensitivity to the two most potent SL analogues with increased apoptosis confirmed by PARP1 cleavage compared to their normal counterpart cells. Thus, Strigolactone analogues are promising candidates for anticancer therapy by their ability to specifically induce cell cycle arrest, cellular stress and apoptosis in tumor cells with minimal effects on growth and survival of normal cells.

  8. Detection of Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Expression in Human Prostate Cancer Using Quantum-Dot-Based Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Larré; Yuan Ruan; Weimin Yu; Fan Cheng; Xiaobin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a new class of fluorescent labeling for biological and biomedical applications. In this study, we detected prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) expression correlated with tumor grade and stage in human prostate cancer by QDs-based immunolabeling and conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC), and evaluated the sensitivity and stability of QDs-based immunolabeling in comparison with IHC. Our data revealed that increasing levels of PSCA expression accompanied advanced tumor gra...

  9. Study of mast cells in prostate lesions: Adenocarcinoma compared with hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittal Rakshith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: (1 To study and correlate the mast cell numbers in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma lesions. (2 To compare mast cell numbers of intratumoral and peritumoral regions in prostate adenocarcinomas. (3 To ascertain a relationship between the number of mast cells and age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels, and Gleason Grade. Subjects and Methods: One-hundred cases of prostate lesions, consisting of 75 cases of BPH and 25 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma, received in the form of transurethral resection of prostate chips in the Department of Pathology, were included in the study. After histopathological diagnosis, the paraffin sections were stained with toluidine blue. Results: The mean value of mast cell count per mm2 in benign and malignant lesion was 37.05 and 92.20, respectively. The difference in mean mast cell count in BPH and prostatic adenocarcinoma was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.001. The correlation between mast cell count and Gleason Grade was found to be statistically significant (P: Grades I–III - 0.043; 0.002; 0.012. However, no correlation was found between mast cell count with age and PSA levels. Conclusion: In this study, an increase in the number of mast cells was observed in patients with prostate cancer than in benign lesions. This suggests a stimulating role of mast cells in the progression of cancer.

  10. FLIM data analysis of NADH and Tryptophan autofluorescence in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Melia, Meghan J.; Wallrabe, Horst; Svindrych, Zdenek; Rehman, Shagufta; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is one of the most sensitive techniques to measure metabolic activity in living cells, tissues and whole animals. We used two- and three-photon fluorescence excitation together with time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) to acquire FLIM signals from normal and prostate cancer cell lines. FLIM requires complex data fitting and analysis; we explored different ways to analyze the data to match diverse cellular morphologies. After non-linear least square fitting of the multi-photon TCSPC images by the SPCImage software (Becker & Hickl), all image data are exported and further processed in ImageJ. Photon images provide morphological, NAD(P)H signal-based autofluorescent features, for which regions of interest (ROIs) are created. Applying these ROIs to all image data parameters with a custom ImageJ macro, generates a discrete, ROI specific database. A custom Excel (Microsoft) macro further analyzes the data with charts and statistics. Applying this highly automated assay we compared normal and cancer prostate cell lines with respect to their glycolytic activity by analyzing the NAD(P)H-bound fraction (a2%), NADPH/NADH ratio and efficiency of energy transfer (E%) for Tryptophan (Trp). Our results show that this assay is able to differentiate the effects of glucose stimulation and Doxorubicin in these prostate cell lines by tracking the changes in a2% of NAD(P)H, NADPH/NADH ratio and the changes in Trp E%. The ability to isolate a large, ROI-based data set, reflecting the heterogeneous cellular environment and highlighting even subtle changes -- rather than whole cell averages - makes this assay particularly valuable.

  11. Adipose-derived stromal cells inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation inducing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Kiyoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Ii, Masaaki, E-mail: masaii@art.osaka-med.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Asahi, Michio [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Azuma, Haruhito [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • AdSC transplantation exhibits inhibitory effect on tumor progressions of PCa cells. • AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway. • High expression of the TGF-β1 gene in AdSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Adipose-derived stromal cells (AdSCs) are known to exhibit extensive proliferation potential and can undergo multilineage differentiation, sharing similar characteristics to bone marrow-derived MSCs. However, as the effect of AdSCs on tumor growth has not been studied sufficiently, we assessed the degree to which AdSCs affect the proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa) cell. Human AdSCs exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of androgen-responsive (LNCaP) and androgen-nonresponsive (PC3) human PCa cells, while normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) did not, and in fact promoted PCa cell proliferation to a degree. Moreover, AdSCs induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, activating the caspase3/7 signaling pathway. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that AdSC-induced apoptosis in both LNCaP and PC3 cells was related to the TGF-β signaling pathway. Consistent with our in vitro observations, local transplantation of AdSCs delayed the growth of tumors derived from both LNCaP- and PC3-xenografts in immunodeficient mice. This is the first preclinical study to have directly demonstrated that AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway, irrespective of androgen-responsiveness. Since autologous AdSCs can be easily isolated from adipose tissue without any ethical concerns, we suggest that therapy with these cells could be a novel approach for patients with PCa.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Growth curves of the fetal prostate based on three-dimensional reconstructions : a correlation with gestational age and maternal testosterone levels. BJU...cell surface markers can be used for molecular imaging [53] and/or for internalizing a death-inducing compound for targeted therapies [54], our work...M. Cancer stem cells. N Engl J Med 2006;355:1253– 61.[9] Polyak K, Hahn WC. Roots and stems: Stem cells in cancer. Nat Med 2006;12:296–300. 10] Dontu

  13. The reverse transcription inhibitor abacavir shows anticancer activity in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Carlini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transposable Elements (TEs comprise nearly 45% of the entire genome and are part of sophisticated regulatory network systems that control developmental processes in normal and pathological conditions. The retroviral/retrotransposon gene machinery consists mainly of Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs-1 and Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs that code for their own endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT. Interestingly, RT is typically expressed at high levels in cancer cells. Recent studies report that RT inhibition by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs induces growth arrest and cell differentiation in vitro and antagonizes growth of human tumors in animal model. In the present study we analyze the anticancer activity of Abacavir (ABC, a nucleoside reverse transcription inhibitor (NRTI, on PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ABC significantly reduces cell growth, migration and invasion processes, considerably slows S phase progression, induces senescence and cell death in prostate cancer cells. Consistent with these observations, microarray analysis on PC3 cells shows that ABC induces specific and dose-dependent changes in gene expression, involving multiple cellular pathways. Notably, by quantitative Real-Time PCR we found that LINE-1 ORF1 and ORF2 mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated by ABC treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the potential of ABC as anticancer agent able to induce antiproliferative activity and trigger senescence in prostate cancer cells. Noteworthy, we show that ABC elicits up-regulation of LINE-1 expression, suggesting the involvement of these elements in the observed cellular modifications.

  14. Expression of novel genes linked to the androgen-induced, proliferative shutoff in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geck, P; Szelei, J; Jimenez, J; Lin, T M; Sonnenschein, C; Soto, A M

    1997-01-01

    Androgens control cell numbers in the prostate through three separate pathways: (a) inhibition of cell death, (b) induction of cell proliferation (Step-1) and (c) inhibition of cell proliferation (Step-2, proliferative shutoff). The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are incompletely understood. The human prostate carcinoma LNCaP variants express these pathways as follows: LNCaP-FGC express both steps, LNCaP-LNO expresses Step-2, LNCaP-TAC expresses Step-1, and LNCaP-TJA cells express neither step. These cells facilitated the search for mediators of the androgen-induced proliferative shutoff pathway. Androgen exposure for 24 h or longer induced an irreversible proliferative shutoff in LNCaP-FGC cells. The Wang and Brown approach for identifying differentially expressed mRNAs was used to search for mediators of Step-2. Ten unique inserts were identified and from those ten, three genes were further studied. The basal expression of these genes in shutoff-negative variants was not affected by androgen exposure. They were induced by androgens in shutoff-positive LNCaP variants and the androgen receptor-transfected, shutoff-positive, MCF7-AR1 cells. These genes were induced only in the range of androgen concentrations that elicited the shutoff response. Time course analysis showed that their induction precedes the commitment point by 12-18 h. In addition, they were expressed in the normal prostate during proliferative shutoff. These features suggest that the candidate genes have a role in the regulation cascade for proliferative shutoff.

  15. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  16. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  17. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Dayal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1 to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  18. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 is a key molecular target for mithramycin A-induced apoptosis in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells and a tumor xenograft animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Jung, Ji-Youn; Lee, Jin-Seok; Park, Jong-Hwan; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2013-01-01

    Mithramycin A (Mith) is a natural polyketide that has been used in multiple areas of research including apoptosis of various cancer cells. Here, we examined the critical role of Mith in apoptosis and its molecular mechanism in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells and tumor xenografts. Mith decreased cell growth and induced apoptosis in DU145 and PC-3 cells. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was over-expressed in both cell lines compared to RWPE1 cells. Mith inhibited Mcl-1 protein expression in both cells, but only altered Mcl-1 mRNA levels in PC-3 cells. We also found that Mith reduced Mcl-1 protein levels through both proteasome-dependent protein degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis in DU145 cells. Studies using siRNA confirmed that the knockdown of Mcl-1 induced apoptosis. Mith significantly suppressed TPA-induced neoplastic cell transformation through the down-regulation of the Mcl-1 protein in JB6 cells, and suppressed the transforming activity of both cell types. Mith also inhibited tumor growth and Mcl-1 levels, in addition to inducing apoptosis, in athymic nude mice bearing DU145 cell xenografts without affecting five normal organs. Therefore, Mith inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis by suppressing Mcl-1 in both prostate cancer cells and xenograft tumors, and thus is a potent anticancer drug candidate for prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Volume effects of late term normal tissue toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonta, Dacian Viorel

    Modeling of volume effects for treatment toxicity is paramount for optimization of radiation therapy. This thesis proposes a new model for calculating volume effects in gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. The radiobiological and the pathological basis for this model and its relationship to other models are detailed. A review of the radiobiological experiments and published clinical data identified salient features and specific properties a biologically adequate model has to conform to. The new model was fit to a set of actual clinical data. In order to verify the goodness of fit, two established NTCP models and a non-NTCP measure for complication risk were fitted to the same clinical data. The method of fit for the model parameters was maximum likelihood estimation. Within the framework of the maximum likelihood approach I estimated the parameter uncertainties for each complication prediction model. The quality-of-fit was determined using the Aikaike Information Criterion. Based on the model that provided the best fit, I identified the volume effects for both types of toxicities. Computer-based bootstrap resampling of the original dataset was used to estimate the bias and variance for the fitted parameter values. Computer simulation was also used to estimate the population size that generates a specific uncertainty level (3%) in the value of predicted complication probability. The same method was used to estimate the size of the patient population needed for accurate choice of the model underlying the NTCP. The results indicate that, depending on the number of parameters of a specific NTCP model, 100 (for two parameter models) and 500 patients (for three parameter models) are needed for accurate parameter fit. Correlation of complication occurrence in patients was also investigated. The results suggest that complication outcomes are correlated in a patient, although

  20. Detection of circulating prostate tumor cells: alternative spliced variant of PSM induced false-positive result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatomi, Hisashi; Nagao, Kumi; Kawakita, Mutsuji; Matsuda, Tadashi; Hirata, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Nakamoto, Takaaki; Harasawa, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Noboru; Hikiji, Kazumasa; Tsukada, Yutaka

    2002-11-01

    RT-nested PCR has been introduced as a highly specific and sensitive assay method to detect the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) mRNA in peripheral blood. However, appreciable percentages of false-positive cases have been reported. Additionally, primer sets reported previously could not discriminate between PSM and PSM', an alternatively spliced variant, mRNA. These isoforms can be produced from a single gene. Switches in alternative splicing patterns are often controlled with strict cell-type or developmental-stage specificity. Therefore, it is most important to discriminate between PSM mRNA and PSM' mRNA. Using our highly specific primer sets, PSM mRNA was detected in 3 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (12.5%) and was not detected in peripheral blood of 11 normal female volunteers. PSM' mRNA was detected in 5 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (20.8%) and in 4 of 11 of normal female volunteers (36.4%). PSM' mRNA induced false-positive results, it is important for genetic diagnosis of prostate cancer to discriminate between PSM and PSM' using our primer sets with high specificity. The advances in the uniquely designed primer sets may allow researchers to detect a real PSM mRNA without PSM' mRNA.

  1. Echinophora platyloba DC (Apiaceae crude extract induces apoptosis in human prostate adenocarcinoma cells (PC 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zare Shahneh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the second leading malignancy worldwide and the second prominent cause of cancer-related deaths among men. Therefore, there is a serious necessity for finding advanced alternative therapeutic measures against this lethal malignancy. In this article, we report the cytotoxicity and the mechanism of cell death of the methanolic extract prepared from Echinophora platyloba DC plant against human prostate adenocarcinoma PC 3 cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells HUVEC cell line. Methods: Cytotoxicity and viability of the methanolic extract were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and dye exclusion assay. Cell death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was employed to quantify the nucleosome production resulting from nuclear DNA fragmentation during apoptosis and determine whether the mechanism involves induction of apoptosis or necrosis. The cell death was identified as apoptosis using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay and DNA fragmentation gel electrophoresis. Results: E. platyloba could decrease cell viability in malignant cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 values against PC 3 were determined as 236.136 ± 12.4, 143.400 ± 7.2, and 69.383 ± 1.29 μg/ml after 24, 36, and 48 h, respectively, but there was no significant activity in HUVEC normal cell (IC50 > 800 μg/ml. Morphological characterizations and DNA laddering assay showed that the methanolic extract treated cells displayed marked apoptotic characteristics such as nuclear fragmentation, appearance of apoptotic bodies, and DNA laddering fragment. Increase in an early apoptotic population was observed in a dose-dependent manner. PC 3 cell death elicited by the extract was found to be apoptotic in nature based a clear indication of TUNEL assay and gel electrophoresis DNA fragmentation, which is a hallmark of apoptosis

  2. ID4 promotes AR expression and blocks tumorigenicity of PC3 prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaragiri, Shravan Kumar; Bostanthirige, Dhanushka H.; Morton, Derrick J.; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Upadhyay, Sunil; Chaudhary, Jaideep, E-mail: jchaudhary@cau.edu

    2016-09-09

    Deregulation of tumor suppressor genes is associated with tumorigenesis and the development of cancer. In prostate cancer, ID4 is epigenetically silenced and acts as a tumor suppressor. In normal prostate epithelial cells, ID4 collaborates with androgen receptor (AR) and p53 to exert its tumor suppressor activity. Previous studies have shown that ID4 promotes tumor suppressive function of AR whereas loss of ID4 results in tumor promoter activity of AR. Previous study from our lab showed that ectopic ID4 expression in DU145 attenuates proliferation and promotes AR expression suggesting that ID4 dependent AR activity is tumor suppressive. In this study, we examined the effect of ectopic expression of ID4 on highly malignant prostate cancer cell, PC3. Here we show that stable overexpression of ID4 in PC3 cells leads to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and migration. In addition, in vivo studies showed a decrease in tumor size and volume of ID4 overexpressing PC3 cells, in nude mice. At the molecular level, these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR), p21, and AR dependent FKBP51 expression. At the mechanistic level, ID4 may regulate the expression or function of AR through specific but yet unknown AR co-regulators that may determine the final outcome of AR function. - Highlights: • ID4 expression induces AR expression in PC3 cells, which generally lack AR. • ID4 expression increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and invasion. • Overexpression of ID4 reduces tumor growth of subcutaneous xenografts in vivo. • ID4 induces p21 and FKBP51 expression- co-factors of AR tumor suppressor activity.

  3. A novel mechanism of methylglyoxal cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognelli, Cinzia; Mezzasoma, Letizia; Fettucciari, Katia; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is one of the most powerful glycating agents of proteins and other important cellular components and has been shown to be toxic to cultured cells. Methylglyoxal cytotoxicity appears to occur through cell-cycle arrest but, more often, through induction of apoptosis. In this study we examined whether, and through which molecular mechanism, methylglyoxal affects the growth of poorly aggressive LNCaP and invasive PC3 human prostate cancer cells, where its role has not been exhaustively investigated yet. We demonstrated that methylglyoxal is cytotoxic on LNCaP and PC3 and that such cytotoxicity occurs not via cell proliferation but apoptosis control. Moreover, we demonstrated that methylglyoxal cytotoxicity, potentiated by the silencing of its major scavenging enzyme Glyoxalase I, occurred via different apoptotic responses in LNCaP and PC3 cells that also showed a different susceptibility to this metabolite. Finally, we showed that the observed methylglyoxal apoptogenic role involved different molecular pathways, specifically mediated by methylglyoxal or methylglyoxal-derived argpyrimidine intracellular accumulation and NF-kB signaling-pathway. In particular, in LNCaP cells, methylglyoxal, through the accumulation of argpyrimidine, desensitized the key cell survival NF-kB signaling pathway, which was consistent with the modulation of NF-kB-regulated genes, triggering a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The results suggest that this physiological compound merits investigation as a potential chemo-preventive/-therapeutic agent, in differently aggressive prostate cancers.

  4. Effect of D-allose on prostate cancer cell lines: phospholipid profiling by nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Rae Ung; Lim, Sangsoo; Kim, Myoung Ok; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2011-08-01

    D-Allose, a rare, naturally occurring monosaccharide, is known to exert anti-proliferative effects on cancer cells. The effects of D-allose on the cellular membranes of hormone-refractory prostate cancer cell line (DU145), hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP), and normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) were studied at the molecular level by phospholipid (PL) profiling using a shotgun lipidomic method. The molecular structures of 85 PL species including 23 phosphatidylcholines, 12 phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs), 11 phosphatidylserines (PSs), 16 phosphatidylinositols, 9 phosphatidic acids (PAs), and 14 phosphatidylglycerols (PGs) were identified by data-dependent collision-induced dissociation of nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and the PL amounts were quantified. The addition of D-allose to prostate cancer cell lines during their growth phases had negligible or decreased effects on the relative regulation of PL species, but several new PS molecules (two for DU145 and three for LNCaP) emerged. In contrast, experiments on the PrEC cell line revealed that some high abundant species (14:0/14:0-PE, 16:2/16:0-PG, and 20:6/18:1-PA) showed significant increases in concentration. These findings support a mechanism for the anti-proliferative effect of D-allose on prostate cancer cell lines that involves the induction of programmed cell death since PS molecules are known to induce apoptosis. Principal component analysis was carried out to examine differences in PL distributions among the three cell lines promoted by D-allose.

  5. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Treating Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2 (a mixed CB1 / CB2 agonist) resulted in...34 CBI receptor, and the "peripheral" CB2 receptor. Recently we have shown that expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are higher...in human prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2 (a mixed CB1 / CB2 agonist

  6. Clonotypic Diversification of Intratumoral T Cells Following Sipuleucel-T Treatment in Prostate Cancer Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Nadeem; Cham, Jason; Zhang, Li; DeVries, Todd; Letarte, Simon; Pufnock, Jeff; Hamm, David; Trager, James; Fong, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular therapy for asymptomatic, or minimally symptomatic, metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, designed to stimulate an immune response against prostate cancer. In a recent clinical trial (NCT00715104), we found that neoadjuvant sipuleucel-T increased the number of activated T cells within the tumor microenvironment. The current analysis examined whether sipuleucel-T altered adaptive T-cell responses by expanding pre-existing T cells or by recruiting new T cells to prostate tissue. Next-generation sequencing of the T-cell receptor (TCR) genes from blood or prostate tissue was used to quantitate and track T-cell clonotypes in these treated subjects with prostate cancer. At baseline, there was a significantly greater diversity of circulating TCR sequences in subjects with prostate cancer compared with healthy donors. Among healthy donors, circulating TCR sequence diversity remained unchanged over the same time interval. In contrast, sipuleucel-T treatment reduced circulating TCR sequence diversity versus baseline as measured by the Shannon index. Interestingly, sipuleucel-T treatment resulted in greater TCR sequence diversity in resected prostate tissue in sipuleucel-T-treated subjects versus tissue of nonsipuleucel-T-treated subjects with prostate cancer. Furthermore, sipuleucel-T increased TCR sequence commonality between blood and resected prostate tissue in treated versus untreated subjects with prostate cancer. The broadening of the TCR repertoire within the prostate tissue supports the hypothesis that sipuleucel-T treatment facilitates the recruitment of T cells into the prostate. Our results highlight the importance of assessing T-cell response to immunotherapy both in the periphery and in tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3711-8. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Sublethal Irradiation Promotes Migration and Invasiveness of Prostate Cancer PC-3 Cells: Implications for Radiotherapy of Human Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyi Zhang; Baofa Hong; Jianguang Zhou; Liquan Zhou; Lian Zou

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the changes in the matrix metalloproteinases-2 and 9 (MMP2, MMP9) induced by 60Co y-ray external irradiation of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells.METHODS Human prostate cancer PC-3 cells were irradiated with different doses of 60Coy-rays. Cell migration and invasiveness were evaluated and the expression of MMP2, and MMP9 was investigated by RT-PCR, Western blotting and flow cytometry(FCM).RESULTS Irradiation enchances invasive protential at the doses of 1,3 and 5 Gy.whereas it significantly inhibits cell migration. CONCLUSION The different doses of 60Co y-ray external irradiation for prostate cancer may have different effects through the changes of MMP2, and MMP9 expression.

  8. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate may be similar to symptoms of prostate cancer . Enlarge Normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A normal prostate does not block the flow of urine from the bladder. An enlarged prostate presses on the bladder and urethra and blocks the flow of urine. See the ...

  9. Dynamics of notch expression during murine prostate development and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, J; Ross, S; Koeppen, H; de Sauvage, F J; Gao, W Q

    2001-10-01

    Notch signaling has been widely demonstrated to be responsible for cell fate determination during normal development and implicated in human T-cell leukemia and mouse mammary carcinomas. Here we show that Notch signaling may be involved in prostatic development and cancer cell growth. In situ hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that Notch1 was expressed in prostate epithelial cells during normal development and in prostate cancer cells. Characterization of Notch1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, in which the expression of reporter green fluorescent protein is under the control of the Notch1 promoter, indicated that Notch1-expressing cells were associated with the basal epithelial cell population in the prostate. Examination of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate showed that expression of Notch1 was elevated in malignant prostatic epithelial cells of primary and metastatic tumors. Expression of Notch ligands, however, was low or undetectable in cultured prostate cancer cells or in malignant prostatic epithelial cells in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate. Furthermore, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Notch1 inhibited the proliferation of various prostate cancer cells, including DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data indicate for the first time that Notch signaling may play a role in murine prostatic development and tumorigenesis.

  10. Calcification in human osteoblasts cultured in medium conditioned by the prostatic cancer cell line PC-3 and prostatic acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, G; Sugisaki, Y; Masugi, Y; Nakazawa, N

    1992-01-01

    A medium that had been conditioned by PC-3 cells stimulated the calcification of a human osteoblastic cell line, Tak-10, in a nonmitogenic culture. The calcification of the osteoblasts was stimulated maximally at a 25% concentration of the conditioned medium. Calcification activity was markedly enhanced by the addition of both prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and its substrate, alpha-glycerophosphate, to the medium; however, PAP added alone did not enhance this activity. These results suggest that human prostatic carcinoma cells produce a factor that stimulates the calcification of the human osteoblasts. Results have also suggested that PAP is a requisite for osteogenesis provided that its substrates are abundant in the medium.

  11. Bioenergetic and antiapoptotic properties of mitochondria from cultured human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexander; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA) the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca²⁺ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP) when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca²⁺-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca²⁺. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia.

  12. Bioenergetic and antiapoptotic properties of mitochondria from cultured human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Panov

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC, metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ. Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca²⁺ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca²⁺-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca²⁺. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia.

  13. Bioenergetic and Antiapoptotic Properties of Mitochondria from Cultured Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexander; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA) the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca2+ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP) when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca2+-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca2+. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia. PMID:23951286

  14. An affinity matured minibody for PET imaging of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-expressing tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepin, Eric J.; Leyton, Jeffrey V.; Olafsen, Tove; Salazar, Felix B.; McCabe, Katelyn E.; Wu, Anna M. [University of California, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zhou, Yu; Marks, James D. [University of California, Department of Anesthesia, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hahm, Scott; Reiter, Robert E. [University of California, Department of Urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a cell surface glycoprotein expressed in normal human prostate and bladder, is over-expressed in the majority of localized prostate cancer and most bone metastases. We have previously shown that the hu1G8 minibody, a humanized anti-PSCA antibody fragment (single-chain Fv-C{sub H}3 dimer, 80 kDa), can localize specifically and image PSCA-expressing xenografts at 21 h post-injection. However, the humanization and antibody fragment reformatting decreased its apparent affinity. Here, we sought to evaluate PET imaging contrast with affinity matured minibodies. Yeast scFv display, involving four rounds of selection, was used to generate the three affinity matured antibody fragments (A2, A11, and C5) that were reformatted into minibodies. These three affinity matured anti-PSCA minibodies were characterized in vitro, and following radiolabeling with {sup 124}I were evaluated in vivo for microPET imaging of PSCA-expressing tumors. The A2, A11, and C5 minibody variants all demonstrated improved affinity compared to the parental (P) minibody and were ranked as follows: A2 > A11 > C5 > P. The {sup 124}I-labeled A11 minibody demonstrated higher immunoreactivity than the parental minibody and also achieved the best microPET imaging contrast in two xenograft models, LAPC-9 (prostate cancer) and Capan-1 (pancreatic cancer), when evaluated in vivo. Of the affinity variant minibodies tested, the A11 minibody that ranked second in affinity was selected as the best immunoPET tracer to image PSCA-expressing xenografts. This candidate is currently under development for evaluation in a pilot clinical imaging study. (orig.)

  15. Designed modulation of sex steroid signaling inhibits telomerase activity and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Siddharth; Bishnoi, Ajay Kumar [Division of Medicinal and Process Chemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Chandra, Vishal; Maikhuri, J.P.; Dwivedi, Anila [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Kumar, Atul [Division of Medicinal and Process Chemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The predominant estrogen-receptor (ER)-β signaling in normal prostate is countered by increased ER-α signaling in prostate cancer (CaP), which in association with androgen-receptor (AR) signaling results in pathogenesis of the disease. However CaP treatments mostly target AR signaling which is initially effective but eventually leads to androgen resistance, hence simultaneous targeting of ERs has been proposed. A novel series of molecules were designed with multiple sex-steroid receptor modulating capabilities by coalescing the pharmacophores of known anti-CaP molecules that act via modulation of ER(α/β) and/or AR, viz. 3,3′diindolylmethane (DIM), mifepristone, toremifene, tamoxifen and raloxifene. N,N-diethyl-4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl) aniline (DIMA) was identified as the most promising structure of this new series. DIMA increased annexin-V labelling, cell-cycle arrest and caspase-3 activity, and decreased expression of AR and prostate specific antigen in LNCaP cells, in vitro. Concurrently, DIMA increased ER-β, p21 and p27 protein levels in LNCaP cells and exhibited ∼ 5 times more selective binding for ER-β than ER-α, in comparison to raloxifene. DIMA exhibited a dose-dependent ER-β agonism and ER-α antagonism in classical gene reporter assay and decreased hTERT (catalytic subunit of telomerase) transcript levels in LNCaP at 3.0 μM (P < 0.05). DIMA also dose-dependently decreased telomerase enzyme activity in prostate cancer cells. It is thus concluded that DIMA acts as a multi-steroid receptor modulator and effectively inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells through ER-β mediated telomerase inhibition, by countering actions of ER-α and AR. Its unique molecular design can serve as a lead structure for generation of potent agents against endocrine malignancies like the CaP.

  16. Convergent Effects of Resveratrol and PYK2 on Prostate Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Andrea; Kisslinger, Annamaria; Procaccini, Claudio; Paladino, Simona; Oliviero, Olimpia; de Amicis, Francesca; Faicchia, Deriggio; Fasano, Dominga; Caputo, Marilena; Matarese, Giuseppe; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Tramontano, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a dietary polyphenol, is under consideration as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for several diseases, including cancer. However, its mechanisms of action and its effects on non-tumor cells, fundamental to understand its real efficacy as chemopreventive agent, remain largely unknown. Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), a non-receptor tyrosine kinase acting as signaling mediator of different stimuli, behaves as tumor-suppressor in prostate. Since, PYK2 and RSV share several fields of interaction, including oxidative stress, we have investigated their functional relationship in human non-transformed prostate EPN cells and in their tumor-prone counterpart EPN-PKM, expressing a PYK2 dead-kinase mutant. We show that RSV has a strong biological activity in both cell lines, decreasing ROS production, inducing morphological changes and reversible growth arrest, and activating autophagy but not apoptosis. Interestingly, the PYK2 mutant increases basal ROS and autophagy levels, and modulates the intensity of RSV effects. In particular, the anti-oxidant effect of RSV is more potent in EPN than in EPN-PKM, whereas its anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effects are more significant in EPN-PKM. Consistently, PYK2 depletion by RNAi replicates the effects of the PKM mutant. Taken together, our results reveal that PYK2 and RSV act on common cellular pathways and suggest that RSV effects on prostate cells may depend on mutational-state or expression levels of PYK2 that emerges as a possible mediator of RSV mechanisms of action. Moreover, the observation that resveratrol effects are reversible and not associated to apoptosis in tumor-prone EPN-PKM cells suggests caution for its use in humans. PMID:27649143

  17. Loss of androgen receptor-dependent growth suppression by prostate cancer cells can occur independently from acquiring oncogenic addiction to androgen receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M D'Antonio

    Full Text Available The conversion of androgen receptor (AR signaling as a mechanism of growth suppression of normal prostate epithelial cells to that of growth stimulation in prostate cancer cells is often associated with AR mutation, amplification and over-expression. Thus, down-regulation of AR signaling is commonly therapeutic for prostate cancer. The E006AA cell line was established from a hormone naïve, localized prostate cancer. E006AA cells are genetically aneuploid and grow equally well when xenografted into either intact or castrated male NOG but not nude mice. These cells exhibit: 1 X chromosome duplication and AR gene amplification, although paradoxically not coupled with increased AR expression, and 2 somatic, dominant-negative Serine-599-Glycine loss-of-function mutation within the dimerization surface of the DNA binding domain of the AR gene. No effect on the growth of E006AA cells is observed using targeted knockdown of endogenous mutant AR, ectopic expression of wild-type AR, or treatment with androgens or anti-androgens. E006AA cells represent a prototype for a newly identified subtype of prostate cancer cells that exhibit a dominant-negative AR loss-of-function in a hormonally naïve patient. Such loss-of-function eliminates AR-mediated growth suppression normally induced by normal physiological levels of androgens, thus producing a selective growth advantage for these malignant cells in hormonally naïve patients. These data highlight that loss of AR-mediated growth suppression is an independent process, and that, without additional changes, is insufficient for acquiring oncogene addiction to AR signaling. Thus, patients with prostate cancer cells harboring such AR loss-of-function mutations will not benefit from aggressive hormone or anti-AR therapies even though they express AR protein.

  18. Activin Receptor Signaling Regulates Prostatic Epithelial Cell Adhesion and Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Simon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutational changes coupled with endocrine, paracrine, and/or autocrine signals regulate cell division during carcinogenesis. The hormone signals remain undefined, although the absolute requirement in vitro for fetal serum indicates the necessity for a fetal serum factor(s in cell proliferation. Using prostatic cancer cell (PCC lines as a model of cancer cell proliferation, we have identified the fetal serum component activin A and its signaling through the activin receptor type II (ActRII, as necessary, although not sufficient, for PCC proliferation. Activin A induced Smad2 phosphorylation and PCC proliferation, but only in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS. Conversely, activin A antibodies and inhibin A suppressed FBS-induced PCC proliferation confirming activin A as one of multiple serum components required for PCC proliferation. Basic fibroblast growth factor was subsequently shown to synergize activin A-induced PCC proliferation. Inhibition of ActRII signaling using a blocking antibody or antisense-P decreased mature ActRII expression, Smad2 phosphorylation, and the apparent viability of PCCs and neuroblastoma cells grown in FBS. Suppression of ActRII signaling in PCC and neuroblastoma cells did not induce apoptosis as indicated by the ratio of active/inactive caspase 3 but did correlate with increased cell detachment and ADAM-15 expression, a disintegrin whose expression is strongly correlated with prostatic metastasis. These findings indicate that ActRII signaling is required for PCC and neuroblastoma cell viability, with ActRII mediating cell fate via the regulation of cell adhesion. That ActRII signaling governs both cell viability and cell adhesion has important implications for developing therapeutic strategies to regulate cancer growth and metastasis.

  19. Altered Expression of Connexin-43 and Impaired Capacity of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Yifei; XIAO Yajun; ZENG FuQing; ZHAO Jun; XIAO Chuanguo; XIONG Ping; FENG Wei

    2007-01-01

    Connexin-43 (Cx43) expression in prostate cancer (PCa) cells and the potency of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in the cells were investigated, with an attempt to elucidate the reason why the so-called "bystander effect" mediated by thymidine kinase (TK) suicide gene therapy on PCa cells is not of significance and to explore the role of GJIC in PCa carcinogenesis.mRNA and protein expression of Cx43 in a PCa cell line PC-3m was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and strapt-avidin-biotin-enzyme complex (SABC) immunohistochemical staining, and inherent GJIC of PC-3m cells was assayed by scrape-loading and dye transfer (SLDT) assay. The expression of Cx43 in human normal and malignant prostate tissues was determined by SABC immunohistochemistry as well. It was found that Cx43 mRNA and protein expression in PC-3m cells was slightly reduced as compared with positive controls and the location of Cx43 protein was aberrant in cytoplasm rather than on membrane. Assessment of paraffin sections demonstrated that the expression of Cx43 protein in PCa cells was abnormally located and markedly diminished as compared with normal prostatic epithelial ones, displaying a negative correlation to the pathological grade (χ2=4.025, P<0.05). Additionally, capacity of inherent GJIC in PC-3m cells was disrupted, which was semi-quantified as (+) or (-). It was indicated that both down-regulated expression of Cx43 mRNA and aberrant location of Cx43 protein participated in the mechanisms leading to deficient GJIC in PC-3m cells. Lack of efficient GJIC is a molecular event, which may contribute not only to limited extent of "bystander effect", but also to initiation and progression of prostatic neoplasm.

  20. Ginger phytochemicals exhibit synergy to inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmbhatt, Meera; Gundala, Sushma R; Asif, Ghazia; Shamsi, Shahab A; Aneja, Ritu

    2013-01-01

    Dietary phytochemicals offer nontoxic therapeutic management as well as chemopreventive intervention for slow-growing prostate cancers. However, the limited success of several single-agent clinical trials suggest a paradigm shift that the health benefits of fruits and vegetables are not ascribable to individual phytochemicals, rather may be ascribed to synergistic interactions among them. We recently reported growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing properties of ginger extract (GE) in in vitro and in vivo prostate cancer models. Nevertheless, the nature of interactions among the constituent ginger biophenolics, viz. 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, and 6-shogoal, remains elusive. Here we show antiproliferative efficacy of the most-active GE biophenolics as single-agents and in binary combinations, and investigate the nature of their interactions using the Chou-Talalay combination index (CI) method. Our data demonstrate that binary combinations of ginger phytochemicals synergistically inhibit proliferation of PC-3 cells with CI values ranging from 0.03 to 0.88. To appreciate synergy among phytochemicals present in GE, the natural abundance of ginger biophenolics was quantitated using LC-UV/MS. Interestingly, combining GE with its constituents (in particular, 6-gingerol) resulted in significant augmentation of GE's antiproliferative activity. These data generate compelling grounds for further preclinical evaluation of GE alone and in combination with individual ginger biophenols for prostate cancer management.

  1. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Christopher J; Park, Jong-In; Nakakura, Eric K; Bova, G Steven; Isaacs, John T; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2006-08-01

    We show here that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a known regulator of migration in neuronal development, plays an important role in prostate cancer motility and metastasis. P35, an activator of CDK5 that is indicative of its activity, is expressed in a panel of human and rat prostate cancer cell lines, and is also expressed in 87.5% of the human metastatic prostate cancers we examined. Blocking of CDK5 activity with a dominant-negative CDK5 construct, small interfering RNA, or roscovitine resulted in changes in the microtubule cytoskeleton, loss of cellular polarity, and loss of motility. Expression of a dominant-negative CDK5 in the highly metastatic Dunning AT6.3 prostate cancer cell line also greatly impaired invasive capacity. CDK5 activity was important for spontaneous metastasis in vivo; xenografts of AT6.3 cells expressing dominant-negative CDK5 had less than one-fourth the number of lung metastases exhibited by AT6.3 cells expressing the empty vector. These results show that CDK5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential in prostate cancer.

  2. High fat diet promotes prostatic basal-to-luminal differentiation and accelerates initiation of prostate epithelial hyperplasia originated from basal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh-Joon Kwon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent lineage tracing studies showed that the prostate basal and luminal cells in adult mice are two independent lineages under the physiological condition, but basal cells are capable of generating luminal progenies during bacterial infection-induced prostatitis. Because acute bacterial infection in human prostate tissues is relatively rare, the disease relevance of the bacterial infection-induced basal-to-luminal differentiation is uncertain. Herein we employ a high fat diet-induced sterile prostate inflammation model to determine whether basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by inflammation irrespective of the underlying etiologies. A K14-CreER model and a fluorescent report line are utilized to specifically label basal cells with the green fluorescent protein. We show that high fat diet promotes immune cell infiltration into the prostate tissues and basal-to-luminal differentiation. Increased cell proliferation accompanies basal-to-luminal differentiation, suggesting a concurrent regulation of basal cell proliferation and differentiation. This study demonstrates that basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by different types of prostate inflammation evolved with distinct etiologies. Finally, high fat diet also accelerates initiation and progression of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia that are originated from basal cells with loss-of-function of the tumor suppressor Pten. Because prostate cancer originated from basal cells tends to be invasive, our study also provides an alternative explanation for the association between obesity and aggressive prostate cancer.

  3. DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induced by safranal in human prostate cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Samarghandian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Apoptosis, an important mechanism that contributes to cell growth reduction, is reported to be induced by Crocus sativus (Saffron in different cancer types. However, limited effort has been made to correlate these effects to the active ingredients of saffron. The present study was designed to elucidate cytotoxic and apoptosis induction by safranal, the major coloring compound in saffron, in a human prostate cancer cell line (PC-3. Materials and Methods: PC-3 and human fetal lung fibroblast (MRC-5 cells were cultured and exposed to safranal (5, 10, 15, and 20 μg/ml. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was performed to assess cytotoxicity. DNA fragmentation was assessed by gel electrophoresis. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of safranal, and cell morphologic changes and apoptosis were determined by the normal inverted microscope, Annexin V, and propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Results: MTT assay revealed a remarkable and concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of safranal on PC-3 cells in comparison with non-malignant cell line. The morphologic alterations of the cells confirmed the MTT results. The IC 50 values against PC-3 cells were found to be 13.0 ΁ 0.07 and 6.4 ΁ 0.09 μg/ml at 48 and 72 h, respectively. Safranal induced an early and late apoptosis in the flow cytometry histogram of treated cells, indicating apoptosis is involved in this toxicity. DNA analysis revealed typical ladders as early as 48 and 72 h after treatment, indicative of apoptosis. Conclusions: Our preclinical study demonstrated a prostate cancer cell line to be highly sensitive to safranal-mediated growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death. Although the molecular mechanisms of safranal action are not clearly understood, it appears to have potential as a therapeutic agent.

  4. Loss of somatostatin receptor subtype 2 in prostate cancer is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype, high tumor cell proliferation and predicts early metastatic and biochemical relapse.

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    Jan K Hennigs

    Full Text Available Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2 is the most frequently expressed SSTR subtype in normal human tissues. SSTR2 expression is differentially regulated in various tumor types and therapeutic somatostatin analogs binding to SSTR2 are in clinical use. In prostate cancers highly contradictory results in terms of SSTR2 expression and its consequences have been published over the past years. The aim of this study was to clarify prevalence and clinical significance of SSTR2 expression in prostate cancer. Therefore, quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC using a tissue microarray containing samples from 3,261 prostate cancer patients with extensive clinical and molecular cancer characteristics and oncological follow-up data was performed. IHC data was compared to publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus datasets of human prostate cancer gene expression arrays. While membranous SSTR2 staining was always seen in normal prostate epithelium, SSTR2 staining was absent in more than half (56.1% of 2,195 interpretable prostate cancer samples. About 13% of all analyzed prostate cancers showed moderate to strong cytoplasmic and membranous SSTR2 staining. Staining intensities were inversely correlated with high Gleason grade, advanced pT category, high tumor cell proliferation (p<0.0001 each, high pre-operative PSA levels, (p = 0.0011 and positive surgical margins (p = 0.006. In silico analysis confirmed lower SSTR2 gene expression in prostate cancers vs. normal adjacent tissue (p = 0.0424, prostate cancer metastases vs. primary cancers (p = 0.0011 and recurrent vs. non-recurrent prostate cancers (p = 0.0438. PSA-free survival gradually declined with SSTR2 staining intensity (p<0.0001. SSTR2-negative cancers were more likely to develop metastases over time (p<0.05. In conclusion, most prostate cancers are indeed SSTR2-negative and loss of SSTR2 strongly predicts an unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis. Therefore, SSTR2

  5. Can a Cancer Cell Turn into a Normal Cell?

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    Ranan Gülhan Aktas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available HepG2 cells, a human liver cancer cell line (hepatocellular carcinoma, are being considered as a future model for bioartificial liver studies. They have the ability to differentiate and demonstrate some features of normal liver cells. Our previous studies focused on examination of the morphological and functional properties of these cells under different extracellular environmental conditions. We have created a culture model that these cells demonstrate remarkable changes after 30 days. These changes include an increase in the cytoplasmic organelles, formation of bile canaliculi, occurrence of junctional complexes between the adjacent cells, existence of microvilli on the apical surfaces, accumulation of glycogen particles in the cytoplasm, an increase at the density of albumin labeled areas and a rise at the Na-K ATPase level on cellular membranes.

  6. Influence of polyphenol extract from evening primrose (Oenothera paradoxa) seeds on human prostate and breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Urszula; Owczarek, Katarzyna; Szewczyk, Karolina; Podsędek, Anna; Koziołkiewicz, Maria; Hrabec, Elżbieta

    2014-02-03

    There is growing interest in plant polyphenols which exhibit pleiotropic biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. The objective of our study was to evaluate the influence of an evening primrose extract (EPE) from defatted seeds on viability and invasiveness of three human cell lines: PNT1A (normal prostate cells), DU145 (prostate cancer cells) and MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cells). The results revealed that after 72 h of incubation the tested extract reduced the viability of DU 145 and MDA-MB-231 with IC50 equal to 14.5 μg/mL for both cell lines. In contrast, EPE did not inhibit the viability of normal prostate cells. Furthermore, EPE reduced PNT1A and MDA-MB-231 cell invasiveness; at the concentration of 21.75 μg/mL the suppression of invasion reached 92% and 47%, respectively (versus control). Additionally, zymographic analysis revealed that after 48 h of incubation EPE inhibited metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activities in a dose-dependent manner. For PNT1A the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 decreased 4- and 2-fold, respectively, at EPE concentration of 29 μg/mL. In the case of MDA-MB-231 and DU 145 the decrease in MMP-9 activity at EPE concentration of 29 μg/mL was 5.5-fold and almost 1.9-fold, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests that EPE may exhibit antimigratory, anti-invasive and antimetastatic potential towards prostate and breast cancer cell lines.

  7. Influence of polyphenol extract from evening primrose (Oenothera paradoxa seeds on human prostate and breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Lewandowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in plant polyphenols which exhibit pleiotropic biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. The objective of our study was to evaluate the influence of an evening primrose extract (EPE from defatted seeds on viability and invasiveness of three human cell lines: PNT1A (normal prostate cells, DU145 (prostate cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cells. The results revealed that after 72 h of incubation the tested extract reduced the viability of DU 145 and MDA-MB-231 with IC50 equal to 14.5 μg/mL for both cell lines. In contrast, EPE did not inhibit the viability of normal prostate cells. Furthermore, EPE reduced PNT1A and MDA-MB-231 cell invasiveness; at the concentration of 21.75 μg/mL the suppression of invasion reached 92% and 47%, respectively (versus control. Additionally, zymographic analysis revealed that after 48 h of incubation EPE inhibited metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 activities in a dose-dependent manner. For PNT1A the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 decreased 4- and 2-fold, respectively, at EPE concentration of 29 μg/mL. In the case of MDA-MB-231 and DU 145 the decrease in MMP-9 activity at EPE concentration of 29 μg/mL was 5.5-fold and almost 1.9-fold, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests that EPE may exhibit antimigratory, anti-invasive and antimetastatic potential towards prostate and breast cancer cell lines.

  8. The calcimimetic R-568 induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells

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    Cheng Guangming

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH was found in metastatic prostate cancers. Calcimimetic R-568 was reported to reduce PTH expression, to suppress cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis in parathyroid cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-568 on cellular survival of prostate cancer cells. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were used in this study. Cellular survival was determined with MTT, trypan blue exclusion and fluorescent Live/Death assays. Western blot assay was utilized to assess apoptotic events induced by R-568 treatment. JC-1 staining was used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential. Results In cultured prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells, R-568 treatment significantly reduced cellular survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. R-568-induced cell death was an apoptotic event, as evidenced by caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage, as well as JC-1 color change in mitochondria. Knocking down calcium sensing receptor (CaSR significantly reduced R-568-induced cytotoxicity. Enforced expression of Bcl-xL gene abolished R-568-induced cell death, while loss of Bcl-xL expression led to increased cell death in R-568-treated LNCaP cells,. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrated that calcimimetic R-568 triggers an intrinsic mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway, which is dependent on the CaSR and is modulated by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic pathway.

  9. 3p21.3 tumor suppressor gene RBM5 inhibits growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells through apoptosis

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    Zhao Lijing

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have indicated that the nuclear RNA-binding protein RBM5 has the ability to modulate apoptosis and suppress tumor growth. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of RBM5 in human prostate cancer and its mechanism of tumor suppression. Methods The expression of RBM5 protein in cancerous prostatic tissues and normal tissues was examined by IHC. PC-3 cell line was used to determine the apoptotic function of RBM5 in vitro. PC-3 cells were transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-RBM5. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Rhodamine 123 staining and Annexin V analysis were performed to observe the apoptotic activity of PC-3 cells overexpressing RBM5. Expression of apoptosis-related genes was assessed by western blot. Results The expression of RBM5 protein was significantly decreased in cancerous prostatic tissues compared to the normal tissues. PC-3 cells overexpressing RBM5 showed not only significant growth inhibition compared with the vector controls, but also dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased apoptotic activity. To further define RBM5 function in apoptotic pathways, we investigated differential expression profiles of various BH3-only proteins including Bid, Bad, and Bim, and apoptosis regulatory proteins include P53, cleaved caspase9, and cleaved caspase3. We found that the expression of both BH3-only proteins and apoptosis regulatory proteins was increased in RBM5 transfected cells. Conclusion The expression of RBM5 protein was significantly decreased in cancerous prostatic tissues, which suggests that RBM5 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. RBM5 may induce the apoptosis of prostate cancer PC-3 cells by modulating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and thus RBM5 might be a promising target for gene therapy on prostate cancer.

  10. Chemopreventive effect of PSP through targeting of prostate cancer stem cell-like population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Sze-Ue; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Liu, Ji; Lee, Davy Tak-Wing; Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Ma, Stephanie; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Chan, Franky Leung; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested that prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSC) are responsible for cancer initiation as well as disease progression. Unfortunately, conventional therapies are only effective in targeting the more differentiated cancer cells and spare the CSCs. Here, we report that PSP, an active component extracted from the mushroom Turkey tail (also known as Coriolus versicolor), is effective in targeting prostate CSCs. We found that treatment of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3 with PSP led to the down-regulation of CSC markers (CD133 and CD44) in a time and dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, PSP treatment not only suppressed the ability of PC-3 cells to form prostaspheres under non-adherent culture conditions, but also inhibited their tumorigenicity in vivo, further proving that PSP can suppress prostate CSC properties. To investigate if the anti-CSC effect of PSP may lead to prostate cancer chemoprevention, transgenic mice (TgMAP) that spontaneously develop prostate tumors were orally fed with PSP for 20 weeks. Whereas 100% of the mice that fed with water only developed prostate tumors at the end of experiment, no tumors could be found in any of the mice fed with PSP, suggesting that PSP treatment can completely inhibit prostate tumor formation. Our results not only demonstrated the intriguing anti-CSC effect of PSP, but also revealed, for the first time, the surprising chemopreventive property of oral PSP consumption against prostate cancer.

  11. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  12. Inflammatory response of a prostate stromal cell line induced by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, S J; Han, I H; Kim, J H; Gu, N Y; Seo, M Y; Chung, Y H; Ryu, J S

    2016-04-01

    While Trichomonas vaginalis, a cause of sexually transmitted infection, is known as a surface-dwelling protozoa, trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissue from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis by immunoperoxidase assay or PCR. However, the immune response of prostate stromal cells infected with T. vaginalis has not been investigated. Our objective was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce an inflammatory response in prostate stromal cells. Incubation of a human prostate stromal myofibroblast cells (WPMY-1) with live T. vaginalis T016 increased expression of the inflammatory chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2. In addition, TLR4, ROS, MAPK and NF-κB expression increased, while inhibitors of TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB reduced CXCL8 and CCL2 production. Medium conditioned by incubation of WPMY-1 cells with T. vaginalis stimulated the migration of human neutrophils and monocytes (THP-1 cells). We conclude that T. vaginalis increases CXCL8 and CCL2 production by human prostate stromal cells by activating TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB, and this in turn attracts neutrophils and monocytes and leads to an inflammatory response. This study is the first attempt to demonstrate an inflammatory reaction in prostate stromal cells caused by T. vaginalis.

  13. Argentatin B Inhibits Proliferation of Prostate and Colon Cancer Cells by Inducing Cell Senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ela Alcántara-Flores; Alicia Enriqueta Brechú-Franco; Patricia García-López; Leticia Rocha-Zavaleta; Rebeca López-Marure; Mariano Martínez-Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Argentatin B has been shown to inhibit the growth of colon HCT-15, and prostate PC-3 cancer cells. However, the mechanism by which argentatin B inhibits cell proliferation is still unknown. We aimed to investigate the mechanism by which argentatin B inhibits cell proliferation. The cell cycle was studied by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin-V-Fluos, and Hoechst 33342 dye staining. Cell senescence was evaluated by proliferation tests, and staining for SA-β-galactosidase. Senes...

  14. MYC overexpression induces prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and loss of Nkx3.1 in mouse luminal epithelial cells.

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    Tsuyoshi Iwata

    Full Text Available Lo-MYC and Hi-MYC mice develop prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN and prostatic adenocarcinoma as a result of MYC overexpression in the mouse prostate. However, prior studies have not determined precisely when, and in which cell types, MYC is induced. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC to localize MYC expression in Lo-MYC transgenic mice, we show that morphological and molecular alterations characteristic of high grade PIN arise in luminal epithelial cells as soon as MYC overexpression is detected. These changes include increased nuclear and nucleolar size and large scale chromatin remodeling. Mouse PIN cells retained a columnar architecture and abundant cytoplasm and appeared as either a single layer of neoplastic cells or as pseudo-stratified/multilayered structures with open glandular lumina-features highly analogous to human high grade PIN. Also using IHC, we show that the onset of MYC overexpression and PIN development coincided precisely with decreased expression of the homeodomain transcription factor and tumor suppressor, Nkx3.1. Virtually all normal appearing prostate luminal cells expressed high levels of Nkx3.1, but all cells expressing MYC in PIN lesions showed marked reductions in Nkx3.1, implicating MYC as a key factor that represses Nkx3.1 in PIN lesions. To determine the effects of less pronounced overexpression of MYC we generated a new line of mice expressing MYC in the prostate under the transcriptional control of the mouse Nkx3.1 control region. These "Super-Lo-MYC" mice also developed PIN, albeit a less aggressive form. We also identified a histologically defined intermediate step in the progression of mouse PIN into invasive adenocarcinoma. These lesions are characterized by a loss of cell polarity, multi-layering, and cribriform formation, and by a "paradoxical" increase in Nkx3.1 protein. Similar histopathological changes occurred in Hi-MYC mice, albeit with accelerated kinetics. Our results using IHC provide novel

  15. Jagged1 upregulation in prostate epithelial cells promotes formation of reactive stroma in the Pten null mouse model for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qingtai; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Dang, Truong; Rowley, David; Ittmann, Michael; Xin, Li

    2016-01-01

    The role of Notch signaling in prostate cancer has not been defined definitively. Several large scale tissue microarray studies revealed that the expression of some Notch signaling components including the Jagged1 ligand are upregulated in advanced human prostate cancer specimens. Jagged1 expressed by tumor cells may activate Notch signaling in both adjacent tumor cells and cells in tumor microenvironment. However, it remains undetermined whether increased Jagged1 expression reflects a cause for or a consequence of tumor progression in vivo. To address this question, we generated a novel R26-LSL-JAG1 mouse model that enables spatiotemporal Jagged1 expression. Prostate specific upregulation of Jagged1 neither interferes with prostate epithelial homeostasis nor significantly accelerates tumor initiation or progression in the prostate-specific Pten deletion mouse model for prostate cancer. However, Jagged1 upregulation results in increased inflammatory foci in tumors and incidence of intracystic adenocarcinoma. In addition, Jagged1 overexpression upregulates Tgfβ signaling in prostate stromal cells and promotes progression of a reactive stromal microenvironment in the Pten null prostate cancer model. Collectively, Jagged1 overexpression does not significantly accelerate prostate cancer initiation and progression in the context of loss-of-function of Pten, but alters tumor histopathology and microenvironment. Our study also highlights an understudied role of Notch signaling in regulating prostatic stromal homeostasis. PMID:27345403

  16. Tumour-initiating stem-like cells in human prostate cancer exhibit increased NF-κB signalling

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Androgen depletion is a key strategy for treating human prostate cancer, but the presence of hormone-independent cells escaping treatment remains a major therapeutic challenge. Here, we identify a minor subset of stem-like human prostate tumour-initiating cells (TICs) that do not express prostate cancer markers, such as androgen receptor or prostate specific antigen. These TICs possess stem cell characteristics and multipotency as demonstrated by in vitro sphere-formation and in vivo tumour-i...

  17. Genistein cooperates with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat to induce cell death in prostate cancer cells

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    Phillip Cornel J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among American men, prostate cancer is the most common, non-cutaneous malignancy that accounted for an estimated 241,000 new cases and 34,000 deaths in 2011. Previous studies have suggested that Wnt pathway inhibitory genes are silenced by CpG hypermethylation, and other studies have suggested that genistein can demethylate hypermethylated DNA. Genistein is a soy isoflavone with diverse effects on cellular proliferation, survival, and gene expression that suggest it could be a potential therapeutic agent for prostate cancer. We undertook the present study to investigate the effects of genistein on the epigenome of prostate cancer cells and to discover novel combination approaches of other compounds with genistein that might be of translational utility. Here, we have investigated the effects of genistein on several prostate cancer cell lines, including the ARCaP-E/ARCaP-M model of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, to analyze effects on their epigenetic state. In addition, we investigated the effects of combined treatment of genistein with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat on survival in prostate cancer cells. Methods Using whole genome expression profiling and whole genome methylation profiling, we have determined the genome-wide differences in genetic and epigenetic responses to genistein in prostate cancer cells before and after undergoing the EMT. Also, cells were treated with genistein, vorinostat, and combination treatment, where cell death and cell proliferation was determined. Results Contrary to earlier reports, genistein did not have an effect on CpG methylation at 20 μM, but it did affect histone H3K9 acetylation and induced increased expression of histone acetyltransferase 1 (HAT1. In addition, genistein also had differential effects on survival and cooperated with the histone deacteylase inhibitor vorinostat to induce cell death and inhibit proliferation. Conclusion Our results suggest that

  18. Small-Cell Carcinoma of Prostate: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Chun-lin Chen; Rong-jian Chen; Ai-e Liu; Ling Ding; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2010-01-01

    One case of small-cell carcinoma(SCC)of prostate was identified at Shangyu people's hospital.This 70-year-old male had a prior diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma when he was first admitted to the hospital and received anti-androgen treatment.9 months later,he was readmitted to the hospital and was diagnosed as SCC through biopsy.The article was written to evaluate the clinical and pathological characteristics and treatment of SCC of prostate.

  19. Regulation of bombesin-stimulated cyclooxygenase-2 expression in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ives Kirk; Chao Celia; Wen Xiaodong; Hellmich Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the bombesin (BBS)-like peptide, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), have been implicated in the progression of hormone-refractory prostate cancer; however, a mechanistic link between the bioactive peptide and COX-2 expression in prostate cells has not been made. Results We report that BBS stimulates COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, and the release of prostaglandin E2 from the GRP receptor (GRPR)-positive, androgen-insensitive prostate cancer ce...

  20. Small-Cell Carcinoma of Prostate: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Chun-lin Chen; Rong-jian Chen; Ai-e Liu; Ling Ding; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2011-01-01

    One case of small-cell carcinoma(SCC) of prostate was identified at Shangyu people's hospital.This 70-year-old male had a prior diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma when he was first admitted to the hospital and received anti-androgen treatment.9 months later,he was readmitted to the hospital and was diagnosed as SCC through biopsy.The article was written to evaluate the clinical and pathological characteristics and treatment of SCC of prostate.

  1. SLUG promotes prostate cancer cell migration and invasion via CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

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    Uygur Berna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SLUG is a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Snail/Slug zinc-finger family that plays a role in migration and invasion of tumor cells. Mechanisms by which SLUG promotes migration and invasion in prostate cancers remain elusive. Methods Expression level of CXCR4 and CXCL12 was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. Forced expression of SLUG was mediated by retroviruses, and SLUG and CXCL12 was downregulated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Migration and invasion of prostate cancer were measured by scratch-wound assay and invasion assay, respectively. Research We demonstrated that forced expression of SLUG elevated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, 22RV1, and LNCaP; conversely, reduced expression of SLUG by shRNA downregulated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression at RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SLUG increased MMP9 expression and activity in PC3, 22RV1, and DU-145 cells, and SLUG knockdown by shRNA downregulated MMP9 expression. We showed that CXCL12 is required for SLUG-mediated MMP9 expression in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we found that migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells was increased by ectopic expression of SLUG and decreased by SLUG knockdown. Notably, knockdown of CXCL12 by shRNA impaired SLUG-mediated migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. Lastly, our data suggest that CXCL12 and SLUG regulate migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells independent of cell growth. Conclusion We provide the first compelling evidence that upregulation of autocrine CXCL12 is a major mechanism underlying SLUG-mediated migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CXCL12 is a therapeutic target for prostate cancer metastasis.

  2. Impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations depends strongly on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069–1077–1998) was used to characterize the edema evolutions observed previously during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose (BED), taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not taken into account appropriately, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life for radioactive decay and decreasing energy of the photons energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days

  3. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    (Jay Chen, Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations strongly depends on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al (1998 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41 1069-77) was used to characterize the edema evolutions previously observed during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose, taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not appropriately taken into account, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The magnitude of an edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life of radioactive decay and decreasing photon energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days) is longer than

  4. Muscadine grape skin extract reverts snail-mediated epithelial mesenchymal transition via superoxide species in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Liza J; Barnett, Petrina; Smith, Basil; Arnold, Rebecca S; Hudson, Tamaro; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Odero-Marah, Valerie A

    2014-03-12

    Snail transcription factor can induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), associated with decreased cell adhesion-associated molecules like E-cadherin, increased mesenchymal markers like vimentin, leading to increased motility, invasion and metastasis. Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. We investigated novel molecular mechanisms by which Snail promotes EMT in prostate cancer cells via Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and whether it can be antagonized by MSKE. ARCaP and LNCaP cells overexpressing Snail were utilized to examine levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically, superoxide, in vitro using Dihydroethidium (DHE) or HydroCy3 dyes. Mitosox staining was performed to determine whether the source of ROS was mitochondrial in origin. We also investigated the effect of Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) on EMT marker expression by western blot analysis. Migration and cell viability using MTS proliferation assay was performed following MSKE treatments. Snail overexpression in ARCaP and LNCaP cells was associated with increased concentration of mitochondrial superoxide, in vitro. Interestingly, MSKE decreased superoxide levels in ARCaP and LNCaP cells. Additionally, MSKE and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) reverted EMT as evidenced by decreased vimentin levels and re-induction of E-cadherin expression in ARCaP-Snail cells after 3 days, concomitant with reduced cell migration. MSKE also decreased Stat-3 activity in ARCaP-Snail cells. This study shows that superoxide species may play a role in Snail transcription factor-mediated EMT. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail with various antioxidants such as MSKE may prove beneficial in abrogating EMT and ROS-mediated tumor progression in human prostate cancer.

  5. Muscadine grape skin extract reverts snail-mediated epithelial mesenchymal transition via superoxide species in human prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Snail transcription factor can induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), associated with decreased cell adhesion-associated molecules like E-cadherin, increased mesenchymal markers like vimentin, leading to increased motility, invasion and metastasis. Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. We investigated novel molecular mechanisms by which Snail promotes EMT in prostate cancer cells via Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and whether it can be antagonized by MSKE. Methods ARCaP and LNCaP cells overexpressing Snail were utilized to examine levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically, superoxide, in vitro using Dihydroethidium (DHE) or HydroCy3 dyes. Mitosox staining was performed to determine whether the source of ROS was mitochondrial in origin. We also investigated the effect of Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) on EMT marker expression by western blot analysis. Migration and cell viability using MTS proliferation assay was performed following MSKE treatments. Results Snail overexpression in ARCaP and LNCaP cells was associated with increased concentration of mitochondrial superoxide, in vitro. Interestingly, MSKE decreased superoxide levels in ARCaP and LNCaP cells. Additionally, MSKE and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) reverted EMT as evidenced by decreased vimentin levels and re-induction of E-cadherin expression in ARCaP-Snail cells after 3 days, concomitant with reduced cell migration. MSKE also decreased Stat-3 activity in ARCaP-Snail cells. Conclusions This study shows that superoxide species may play a role in Snail transcription factor-mediated EMT. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail with various antioxidants such as MSKE may prove beneficial in abrogating EMT and ROS-mediated tumor progression in human prostate cancer. PMID:24617993

  6. Vitamin D3 regulates the formation and degradation of gap junctions in androgen-responsive human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kelsey

    Full Text Available 1α-25(OH2 vitamin D3 (1-25D, an active hormonal form of Vitamin D3, is a well-known chemopreventive and pro-differentiating agent. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of several prostate cancer cell lines. Gap junctions, formed of proteins called connexins (Cx, are ensembles of cell-cell channels, which permit the exchange of small growth regulatory molecules between adjoining cells. Cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctional channels is an important homeostatic control mechanism for regulating cell growth and differentiation. We have investigated the effect of 1-25D on the formation and degradation of gap junctions in an androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, which expresses retrovirally-introduced Cx32. Connexin32 is expressed by the luminal and well-differentiated cells of normal prostate and prostate tumors. Our results document that 1-25D enhances the expression of Cx32 and its subsequent assembly into gap junctions. Our results further show that 1-25D prevents androgen-regulated degradation of Cx32, post-translationally, independent of androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling. Finally, our findings document that formation of gap junctions sensitizes Cx32-expressing LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of 1-25D and alters their morphology. These findings suggest that the growth-inhibitory effects of 1-25D in LNCaP cells may be related to its ability to modulate the assembly of Cx32 into gap junctions.

  7. Rescuing High Avidity T Cells for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    relevance of our study is further increased by two important factors . First, utilization of spontaneous prostate cancer model will allow us to build a solid...Zheng et al. Eur. J. Immunol. 2004. 34: 3126-3134 A. Gated Vph B AD, WIT7-1 T vr, i A WITA TRAMftl)qI TRA MI 1RANP CC4 -A-l TgTIT.RAM flII 25 -’g-%T] 15...thymic 21 Gao, E. K., Lo, D. and Sprent, J., Strong T cell tolerance in medulla: factors in self- tolerance and autoimmunity. Curr. Opin. parent-F1

  8. Role of Human Polyomavirus Bkv in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    been surgically removed due to prostate cancer diagnosis . A normal prostate is defined as prostate that has been removed either during autopsy or by...immunosuppressed transplant patients, in whom it is associated with haemorrhagic cystitis and polyomavirus nephropathy (5, 35, 58, 70). BKV transforms rodent cells...cystoprostatectomy specimens from bladder cancer patients with the diagnosis of muscle invasive high grade urothelial carcinoma, with no prostate cancer histology

  9. Specific detection of prostate cancer cells in urine by multiplex immunofluorescence cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazutoshi; Pavlovich, Christian P; Netto, George J; Konishi, Yuko; Isaacs, William B; Ali, Syed; De Marzo, Angelo; Meeker, Alan K

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer biomarkers are enriched in urine after prostatic manipulation, suggesting that whole cells might also be detectable for diagnosis. We tested multiplex staining of urinary sediments as a minimally invasive method to detect prostate cancer. Urine samples were collected from 35 men who had prostatic massage (attentive digital rectal examination) in a urology clinic and from 15 control men without urologic disease and without massage, for a total of 50 specimens (27 cancer-positive cases and 23 cancer-negative cases). LNCaP prostate cancer cells spiked into urine were used for initial marker optimization. Urine sediments were cytospun onto glass slides and stained. Multiplex urine cytology was compared with conventional urine cytology for cancer detection; anti-alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase antibody was used as a marker of prostate cancer cells, anti-Nkx3.1 as a marker of prostate epithelial cells, anti-nucleolin as a marker of nucleoli, and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole to highlight nuclei. Prostate cancer cells were successfully visualized by combined staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, Nkx3.1, and nucleolin. Of the 25 informative cases with biopsy-proven prostate cancer, 9 were diagnosed as suspicious or positive by multiplex immunofluorescence urine cytology, but only 4 were similarly judged by conventional cytology. All cases without cancer were read as negative by both methods. The multiplex cytology sensitivity for cancer detection in informative cases was 36% (9/25), and specificity was 100% (8/8). In conclusion, we have successfully achieved multiple staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, Nkx3.1, nucleolin, and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole to detect prostate cancer cells in urine. Further refinements in marker selection and technique may increase sensitivity and applicability for prostate cancer diagnosis.

  10. Comprehensive gene expression microarray analysis of Ets-1 blockade in PC3 prostate cancer cells and correlations with prostate cancer tissues: Insights into genes involved in the metastatic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Lindstrot, Andreas; Langer, Berit; Buettner, Reinhard; Wernert, Nicolas

    2011-06-01

    Ets-1 is the prototype of the ETS family of transcription factors and is suggested to play an important role in the malignant progression of prostatic carcinomas. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effect of blocking Ets-1 in PC3 prostate cancer cells on genes involved in the metastatic cascade, and correlated these findings with prostate cancer tissues. Two stable PC3 cell cultures were established by transfection with either an Ets-1 inverse antisense expression vector or a mock control vector. The effect of blocking Ets-1 on genes involved in the metastatic cascade was assessed by a comprehensive gene expression microarray analysis of Ets-1 inverse and mock control cells. Correlating the sets of genes found in the PC3 microarray data with prostate cancer tissues was performed by verifying the genes in a comprehensive gene expression microarray analysis of RNA extracted from laser microdissected normal prostate glands and from carcinoma glands taken from prostate cancer patients. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of Ets-1 in mock cells and its absence in Ets-1 inverse cells. In the Ets-1 blockade microarray, many differentially expressed genes were found; however, only genes with a greater than 10-fold up- or down-regulation between the Ets-1 blockade and mock control were considered significant. The genes were placed into four groups that play a role in the so-called metastatic cascade based on their known functions in proliferation, apoptosis, migration and angiogenesis. The genes found in the Ets-1 blockade microarray analysis were verified for their presence in the microarray analysis of prostate cancer tissues. Genes found in the microarray analysis of prostate cancer tissues with an >2-fold change and a p-value tissues, we identified 16 genes that are up- or down-regulated in healthy compared to tumor prostate glands. Further investigation revealed that 4 out of the 16 genes have been reported to be regulated by members of the ETS

  11. Radiosensitization of Prostate Cells by Prenyltransferase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    response. 16th CERRO meeting of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. , Les Menuires, France. March 5, 2001 Farnesyltransferases...and Samid, D. Increased useful adjuvants for radiotherapy. radioresistance of Ebras-transformed human osteosarcoma cells and its modulation by thus...Radiation Research Society 1997-present Associate Member European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 1998-present Member American Association

  12. Embelin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Prostate Cancer Cells Is Mediated through Modulation of Akt and β-Catenin Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahee Park

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that embelin, an active component of Embelia ribes, induces apoptosis in human cancer cells, but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we have investigated the effect of embelin on the growth of human prostate cancer cells. Embelin strongly inhibited cell growth especially in human prostate cancer cell lines, including PC3, DU145, LNCaP-LN3 and normal prostate epithelial cell, RWPE-1 compared to breast cancer (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and T47D, hepatoma (HepG2, Hep3B, and HuH-7, or choriocarcinoma (JEG-3. We observed that embelin induced apoptosis of PC3 cells in a time-dependent manner correlated with decreased expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1, increased translocation of Bax into mitochondria, and a reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, embelin induced voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC 1 expression and oligomerization, which may promote cytochrome c and AIF release. Because embelin was able to inhibit Akt activation and cyclooxygenase-2 expression, the effects on Wnt/ β-catenin signaling were determined. Embelin activated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3β by preventing phosphorylation and suppressed β-catenin expression. Attenuation of β-catenin-mediated TCF transcriptional activity and gene transcription, such as cyclin D1, c-myc, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7, were shown in embelin-treated cells. The changes in β-catenin levels in response to embelin were blocked by lithium chloride, a GSK-3 inhibitor, indicating that embelin may decrease β-catenin expression via GSK-3β activation. Furthermore, exposure of PC3 cells to embelin resulted in a significant decrease in cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, these findings suggest that inhibition of Akt signaling and activation of GSK-3β partially contributes to the pro-apoptotic effect of embelin in prostate cancer cells.

  13. Modulators of prostate cancer cell proliferation and viability identified by short-hairpin RNA library screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Brown Dahlman

    Full Text Available There is significant need to identify novel prostate cancer drug targets because current hormone therapies eventually fail, leading to a drug-resistant and fatal disease termed castration-resistant prostate cancer. To functionally identify genes that, when silenced, decrease prostate cancer cell proliferation or induce cell death in combination with antiandrogens, we employed an RNA interference-based short hairpin RNA barcode screen in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. We identified and validated four candidate genes (AKT1, PSMC1, STRADA, and TTK that impaired growth when silenced in androgen receptor positive prostate cancer cells and enhanced the antiproliferative effects of antiandrogens. Inhibition of AKT with a pharmacologic inhibitor also induced apoptosis when combined with antiandrogens, consistent with recent evidence for PI3K and AR pathway crosstalk in prostate cancer cells. Recovery of hairpins targeting a known prostate cancer pathway validates the utility of shRNA library screening in prostate cancer as a broad strategy to identify new candidate drug targets.

  14. Modulators of prostate cancer cell proliferation and viability identified by short-hairpin RNA library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlman, Kimberly Brown; Parker, Joel S; Shamu, Tambudzai; Hieronymus, Haley; Chapinski, Caren; Carver, Brett; Chang, Kenneth; Hannon, Gregory J; Sawyers, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    There is significant need to identify novel prostate cancer drug targets because current hormone therapies eventually fail, leading to a drug-resistant and fatal disease termed castration-resistant prostate cancer. To functionally identify genes that, when silenced, decrease prostate cancer cell proliferation or induce cell death in combination with antiandrogens, we employed an RNA interference-based short hairpin RNA barcode screen in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. We identified and validated four candidate genes (AKT1, PSMC1, STRADA, and TTK) that impaired growth when silenced in androgen receptor positive prostate cancer cells and enhanced the antiproliferative effects of antiandrogens. Inhibition of AKT with a pharmacologic inhibitor also induced apoptosis when combined with antiandrogens, consistent with recent evidence for PI3K and AR pathway crosstalk in prostate cancer cells. Recovery of hairpins targeting a known prostate cancer pathway validates the utility of shRNA library screening in prostate cancer as a broad strategy to identify new candidate drug targets.

  15. Studying depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangda; Gu, Zhengqin; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  16. WNT signaling regulates self-renewal and differentiation of prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabelle Bisson; David M Prowse

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics were identified in human prostate cancer cell lines by their abil-ity to form from single cells self-renewing prostaspheres in non-adherent cultures. Prostaspheres exhibited heteroge-neous expression of proliferation, differentiation and stem cell-associated makers CD44, ABCG2 and CD133. Treat-ment with WNT inhibitors reduced both prostasphere size and self-renewal, In contrast, addition of Wnt3a caused increased prostasphere size and self-renewal, which was associated with a significant increase in nuclear β-catenin, keratin 18, CD133 and CD44 expression. As a high proportion of LNCaP and C4-2B cancer cells express androgen receptor we determined the effect of the androgen receptor antagonist bicalutamide. Androgen receptor inhibition reduced prostasphere size and expression of PSA, but did not inhibit prostasphere formation. These effects are con-sistent with the androgen-independent self-renewal of cells with stem cell characteristics and the androgen-dependent proliferation of transit amplifying cells. As the canonical WNT signaling effector β-catenin can also associate with the androgen receptor, we propose a model for tumour propagation involving a balance between WNT and androgen re-ceptor activity. That would affect the self-renewal of a cancer cell with stem cell characteristics and drive transit am-plifying cell proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that WNT activity regulates the self-renewal of prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics independently of androgen receptor activity. Inhibition of WNT signaling therefore has the potential to reduce the self-renewal of prostate cancer cells with stem cell charac-teristics and improve the therapeutic outcome.

  17. Role of canine basal cells in postnatal prostatic development, induction of hyperplasia, and sex hormone-stimulated growth; and the ductal origin of carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leav, I; Schelling, K H; Adams, J Y; Merk, F B; Alroy, J

    2001-08-01

    The canine prostate has often been proposed as a model for abnormal growth of the human gland. Hyperplasia of the prostate is common in aging men and has been estimated to be present in 100% of old intact dogs. While prostatic carcinoma is common in older men, it appears to be rare in dogs and unlike the disease in humans, it occurs with relatively high frequency in castrated animals. Since basal cells are thought to be key participants in normal and abnormal growth of the human gland, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the role that they may play in canine prostatic development, the evolution of hyperplasia and carcinoma, and the effects of sex hormones on these cells. Prostate specimens were obtained at autopsy from seven sexually immature dogs, autopsy and biopsy samples from 14 sexually mature intact animals, from four castrates, and from19 dogs with prostatic carcinoma. In addition, we also studied the prostates from two intact dogs treated with 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) for 6 months and two castrated dogs that were subsequently treated with 5alpha-androstane-3alpha diol and estradiol-17alpha, as well as specimens from two sexually ablated animals given DHT for 2 weeks. All specimens were immunostained for high molecular weight cytokeratin (HMC), pancytokeratin, androgen receptor (AR), and the proliferative marker KI-67. We find that basal cells are the major proliferative cell type in the neonatal and adult canine prostate and that the expression of HMC staining, which defines these cells, may be regulated by androgens. In the adult gland, ductal basal cells formed a contiguous layer, whereas those lining acini were discontinuous. Populations of both basal cell types were variably AR positive, but while HMC immunostaining was abolished in acinar cells following long-term castration, staining remained in ductal cell counterparts. Paralleling the histological development of hyperplasia, the acinar basal cell population increased with age and

  18. Androgen Depletion Induces Senescence in Prostate Cancer Cells through Down-regulation of Skp2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Pernicová

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the induction of senescence in cancer cells is a potent mechanism of tumor suppression, senescent cells remain metabolically active and may secrete a broad spectrum of factors that promote tumorigenicity in neighboring malignant cells. Here we show that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, a widely used treatment for advanced prostate cancer, induces a senescence-associated secretory phenotype in prostate cancer epithelial cells, indicated by increases in senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, heterochromatin protein 1β foci, and expression of cathepsin B and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3. Interestingly, ADT also induced high levels of vimentin expression in prostate cancer cell lines in vitro and in human prostate tumors in vivo. The induction of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype by androgen depletion was mediated, at least in part, by down-regulation of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2, whereas the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells was under separate control. These data demonstrate a previously unrecognized link between inhibition of androgen receptor signaling, down-regulation of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2, and the appearance of secretory, tumor-promoting senescent cells in prostate tumors. We propose that ADT may contribute to the development of androgen-independent prostate cancer through modulation of the tissue microenvironment by senescent cells.

  19. Mitigation of arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in prostate cancer stem cells by miR-143 restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngalame, Ntube N O; Makia, Ngome L; Waalkes, Michael P; Tokar, Erik J

    2016-12-01

    Inorganic arsenic, an environmental contaminant and a human carcinogen is associated with prostate cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the driving force of carcinogenesis. Chronic arsenic exposure malignantly transforms the human normal prostate stem/progenitor cell (SC) line, WPE-stem to arsenic-cancer SCs (As-CSCs), through unknown mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. In prior work, miR-143 was markedly downregulated in As-CSCs, suggesting a role in arsenic-induced malignant transformation. In the present study, we investigated whether loss of miR-143 expression is important in arsenic-induced transformation of prostate SCs. Restoration of miR-143 in As-CSCs was achieved by lentivirus-mediated miR-143 overexpression. Cells were assessed bi-weekly for up to 30weeks to examine mitigation of cancer phenotype. Secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was increased by arsenic-induced malignant transformation, but miR-143 restoration decreased secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzyme activities compared with scramble controls. Increased cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, two hallmarks of cancer, were decreased upon miR-143 restoration. Increased apoptosis was associated with decreased BCL2 and BCL-XL expression. miR-143 restoration dysregulated the expression of SC/CSC self-renewal genes including NOTCH-1, BMI-1, OCT4 and ABCG2. The anticancer effects of miR-143 overexpression appeared to be mediated by targeting and inhibiting LIMK1 protein, and the phosphorylation of cofilin, a LIMK1 substrate. These findings clearly show that miR-143 restoration mitigated multiple cancer characteristics in the As-CSCs, suggesting a potential role in arsenic-induced transformation of prostate SCs. Thus, miR-143 is a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for arsenic-induced prostate cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Suppression of DHT-induced paracrine stimulation of endothelial cell growth by estrogens via prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Juan; Zhao, Yuan; Li, Jinghe; Weng, Chunyan; Cai, Jingjing; Yang, Kan; Yuan, Hong; Imperato-McGinley, Julianne; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2013-07-01

    Androgen modulation of angiogenesis in prostate cancer may be not directly mediated by androgen receptor (AR) as AR is not detected in the prostatic endothelial cells. We examined the paracrine stimulation of cell proliferation by prostate tumor cells and its modulation by androgen and estrogens in a murine endothelial cell line (MEC) that does not express AR. Tumor cell conditioned media (TCM) collected from LAPC-4 or LNCaP prostatic tumor cells produced a time- and concentration-dependent induction of cell growth in MECs, which was parallel to the VEGF concentration in the TCM. This TCM-induced cell growth in MECs was enhanced by the treatment of prostatic tumor cells with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Both the TCM-stimulation and DHT-enhancement effects in MECs were completely blocked by SU5416, a specific VEGF receptor antagonist. Co-administration of 17α-estradiol or 17β-estradiol with DHT in prostatic tumor cells completely inhibited the DHT-enhancement effect while treatment with DHT, 17α-estradiol or 17β-estradiol did not produce any significant direct effect in MECs. Moreover, administration of 17α-estradiol or 17β-estradiol in xenograft animals with LAPC-4 or LNCaP prostate tumor significantly decreased the microvessel number in the tumor tissues. Our study indicated that prostate tumor cells regulate endothelial cell growth through a paracrine mechanism, which is mainly mediated by VEGF; and DHT is able to modulate endothelial cell growth via tumor cells, which is inhibited by 17α-estradiol and 17β-estradiol. Thus, both17α-estradiol and 17β-estradiol are potential agents for anti-angiogenesis therapy in androgen-responsive prostate cancer. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Natural killer cells suppress enzalutamide resistance and cell invasion in the castration resistant prostate cancer via targeting the androgen receptor splicing variant 7 (ARv7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Chou, Fu-Ju; Li, Lei; Lin, Chang-Yi; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2017-07-10

    Despite the success of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with the newly developed anti-androgen enzalutamide (Enz, also known as MDV3100) to suppress castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in extending patient survival by an extra 4.8 months, eventually patients die with the development of Enz resistance that may involve the induction of the androgen receptor (AR) splicing variant ARv7. Here we identify an unrecognized role of Natural Killer (NK) cells in the prostate tumor microenvironment that can be better recruited to the CRPC cells to suppress ARv7 expression resulting in suppressing the Enz resistant CRPC cell growth and invasion. Mechanism dissection revealed that CRPC cells, compared to normal prostate epithelial cells, could recruit more NK cells that might then lead to alterations of the microRNA-34 and microRNA-449 to suppress both ARv7 expression and ARv7-induced EZH2 expression to suppress CRPC cell invasion. Together, these results identify a new potential therapy using recruited NK cells to better suppress the Enz resistance and cell invasion in CRPC at the later enzalutamide resistant stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Akt- and CREB-Mediated Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation Inhibition by Nexrutine, a Phellodendron amurense Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen E. Garcia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that plant-based diets can reduce the risk of prostate cancer. However, very little information is available concerning the use of botanicals in preventing prostate cancer. As a first step toward developing botanicals as prostate cancer preventives, we examined the effect of Nexrutine on human prostate cancer cells. Nexrutine is a herbal extract developed from Phellodendron amurense. Phellodendron extracts have been used traditionally in Chinese medicine for hundreds of years as an antidiarrheal, astringent, and anti-inflammatory agent. The present study investigated its potential antitumor effect on human prostate cancer cells. Our results suggest that it inhibits tumor cell proliferation through apoptosis induction and inhibition of cell survival signaling. The results of the present study indicate that Nexrutine treatment 1 inhibits the proliferation of both androgenresponsive and androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells through induction of apoptosis; 2 reduces levels of pAkt, phosphorylated cAMP response-binding protein (pCREB, and CREB DNA-binding activity; and 3 induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells stably overexpressing Bcl-2. Further Akt kinase activity was reduced in cells treated with Nexrutine, and ectopic expression of myristoylated Akt protected from Nexrutine induced inhibition of proliferation, implicating a role for Akt signaling.

  3. SFMBT2 (Scm-like with four mbt domains 2) negatively regulates cell migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Jungsug; Shin, Jee Yoon; Lee, Kwanghyun; Hong, Soon Ki; Oh, Sangtaek; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Won Sun; Ju, Bong Gun

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men. In this study, we found that expression level of SFMBT2 is altered during prostate cancer progression and has been associated with the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. The expression level of SFMBT2 is high in poorly metastatic prostate cancer cells compared to highly metastatic prostate cancer cells. We also found that SFMBT2 knockdown elevates MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-26 expression, leading to increased cell migration and invasion in LNCaP and VCaP cells. SFMBT2 interacts with YY1, RNF2, N-CoR and HDAC1/3, as well as repressive histone marks such as H3K9me2, H4K20me2, and H2AK119Ub which are associated with transcriptional repression. In addition, SFMBT2 knockdown decreased KAI1 gene expression through up-regulation of N-CoR gene expression. Expression of SFMBT2 in prostate cancer was strongly associated with clinicopathological features. Patients having higher Gleason score (≥ 8) had substantially lower SFMBT2 expression than patients with lower Gleason score. Moreover, tail vein or intraprostatic injection of SFMBT2 knockdown LNCaP cells induced metastasis. Taken together, our findings suggest that regulation of SFMBT2 may provide a new therapeutic strategy to control prostate cancer metastasis as well as being a potential biomarker of metastatic prostate cancer.

  4. Suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin via induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyprianou, N; Benning, C M

    2000-08-15

    Recent evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin induced apoptosis in prostate epithelial and smooth muscle cells in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH; J. Urol., 159: 1810-1815, 1998; J. Urol., 161: 2002-2007, 1999). In this study, we investigated the biological action of three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin, terazosin, and tamsulosin, against prostate cancer cell growth. The antigrowth effect of the three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists was examined in two human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, and a prostate smooth muscle cell primary culture, SMC-1, on the basis of: (a) cell viability assay; (b) rate of DNA synthesis; and (c) induction of apoptosis. Our results indicate that treatment of prostate cancer cells with doxazosin or terazosin results in a significant loss of cell viability, via induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, whereas tamsulosin had no effect on prostate cell growth. Neither doxazosin nor terazosin exerted a significant effect on the rate of cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. Exposure to phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible inhibitor of alpha1-adrenoceptors, does not abrogate the apoptotic effect of doxazosin or terazosin against human prostate cancer or smooth muscle cells. This suggests that the apoptotic activity of doxazosin and terazosin against prostate cells is independent of their capacity to antagonize alpha1-adrenoceptors. Furthermore, an in vivo efficacy trial demonstrated that doxazosin administration (at tolerated pharmacologically relevant doses) in SCID mice bearing PC-3 prostate cancer xenografts resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. These findings demonstrate the ability of doxazosin and terazosin (but not tamsulosin) to suppress prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation. This evidence provides the rationale for targeting both

  5. Dentatin Induces Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells via Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Survivin Downregulation, Caspase-9, -3/7 Activation, and NF-κB Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Adam Arbab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was set to investigate antiproliferative potential of dentatin (a natural coumarin isolated from Clausena excavata Burm. F against prostate cancer and to delineate the underlying mechanism of action. Treatment with dentatin dose-dependently inhibited cell growth of PC-3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines, whereas it showed less cytotoxic effects on normal prostate epithelial cell line (RWPE-1. The inhibitory effect of dentatin on prostate cancer cell growth was due to induction of apoptosis as evidenced by Annexin V staining and cell shrinkage. We found that dentatin-mediated accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and downregulated expression levels of antiapoptotic molecules (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Survivin, leading to disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, cell membrane permeability, and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. These effects were associated with induction of caspase-9, -3/7 activities, and subsequent DNA fragmentation. In addition, we found that dentatin inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of p65, suggesting dentatin as a potential NF-κB inhibitor. Thus, we suggest that dentatin may have therapeutic value in prostate cancer treatment worthy of further development.

  6. Prostate Cancer Cell Telomere Length Variability and Stromal Cell Telomere Length as Prognostic Markers for Metastasis and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Christopher M.; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Lee, Thomas K.; Giovannucci, Edward; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Kenfield, Stacey A.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Hicks, Jessica L.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Meeker, Alan K.

    2013-01-01

    Current prognostic indicators are imperfect predictors of outcome in men with clinicallylocalized prostate cancer. Thus, tissue-based markers are urgently needed to improve treatment and surveillance decision-making. Given that shortened telomeres enhance chromosomal instability and such instability is a hallmark of metastatic lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in telomere length in the primary cancer would predict risk of progression to metastasis and prostate cancer death. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 596 surgically treated men who participated in the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men who had the combination of more variable telomere length among prostate cancer cells (cell-to-cell) and shorter telomere length in prostate cancer-associated stromal cells were substantially more likely to progress to metastasis or die of their prostate cancer. These findings point to the translational potential of this telomere biomarker for prognostication and risk stratification for individualized therapeutic and surveillance strategies. PMID:23779129

  7. Effects of Kangquan Recipe(康泉方) on Sex Steroids and Cell Proliferation in Rats with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄源鹏; 杜建; 洪振丰; 陈治卿; 吴锦发; 赵锦燕

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of Kangquan Recipe(康泉方,KQR)on sex steroids and cell proliferation in an experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia(BPH)model in rats.Methods:Seventy-two SD rats were randomly divided into six groups:the normal group,the model group,the finasteride group,and the low-, middle-,and high-dose KQR groups,12 in each group.Except those in the normal group,the rats were injected with testosterone after castration for the establishment of BPH model and then given respectively w...

  8. Mucin (MUC1) Expression and Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    antiadhesive and inhibits cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions in both normal, e.g., embryo implantation , and pathological, e.g...1998 Society for the Study of Reproduction Program Organizing Committee, 1997 Chairman, Serono Symposium on Embryo Implantation : Cellular, Molecular...Interactions at the Cell Surface of Mouse Uterine Epithelial Cells and Periimplantation -Stage Embryos. Trophoblast Res., 4:211-241, 1990. 37. Dutt

  9. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate excitatory sympathetic neurotransmission in guinea pig prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang-ping; Ding, Guo-fu; Wang, Qin-zhang

    2013-06-01

    Morphological and functional studies have confirmed that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are involved in many enteric motor neurotransmission pathways. Recent investigations have demonstrated that human and guinea pig prostate glands possess a distinct cell type with morphological and immunological similarities to ICCs. These prostate ICCs have a close relationship with nerve bundles and smooth muscle cells. Prostate smooth muscle tone is largely induced by stimulation from the sympathetic nervous system, which releases excitatory norepinephrine (NE) to act on the α1-adrenoceptor. We have performed morphological and functional experiments to determine the role of ICCs in sympathetic neurotransmission in the guinea pig prostate based on the hypothesis that prostate ICCs act as mediators of sympathetic neurotransmission. Immunohistochemistry revealed many close points of contact between ICCs and sympathetic nerve bundles and smooth muscle cells. Double-labeled sections revealed that α1-adrenoceptor and the gap junction protein connexin 43 were expressed in prostate ICCs. Surprisingly, prostate ICCs co-expressed tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase, two markers of sympathetic neurons. Functionally, the application of NE evoked a large single inward current in isolated prostate ICCs in a dose-dependent manner. The inward current evoked by NE was mediated via the activation of α1-adrenoceptors, because it was abolished by the non-specific α-adrenoceptor antagonist, phentolamine and the specific α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin. Thus, ICCs in the guinea pig prostate are target cells for prostate sympathetic nerves and possess the morphological and functional characteristics required to mediate sympathetic signals.

  10. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    to determine the density and compressibility of individual cells enables the prediction and alteration of the separation outcome for a given cell mixture. We apply the method on white blood cells (WBCs) and DU145 prostate cancer cells (DUCs) aiming to improve isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood......We present a novel method for the determination of density and compressibility of individual particles and cells undergoing microchannel acoustophoresis in an arbitrary 2D acoustic field. Our method is a critical advancement within acoustophoretic separation of biological cells, as the ability......, an emerging tool in the monitoring and characterizing of metastatic cancer....

  11. Androgens regulate Hedgehog signalling and proliferation in androgen-dependent prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirab, Nanor; Terry, Stéphane; Giton, Frank; Caradec, Josselin; Chimingqi, Mihelaiti; Moutereau, Stéphane; Vacherot, Francis; de la Taille, Alexandre; Kouyoumdjian, Jean-Claude; Loric, Sylvain

    2012-09-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen sensitive in its development and progression to metastatic disease. Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation is important in the initiation and growth of various carcinomas including PCa. We and others have observed aberrations of Hh pathway during the progression of PCa to the castration-resistant state. The involvement of androgen signalling in Hh pathway activation, however, remains largely elusive. Here we investigate the direct role of androgen signalling on Hh pathway. We examined the effect of Dihydrosterone (DHT), antiandrogen, bicalutamide, and Hh pathway inhibitor, KAAD-cyclopamine in four human prostate cell lines (two cancerous: LNCaP, VCaP, and two normal: PNT2 and PNT2-ARm which harbours a mutant version of androgen receptor (AR) that is commonly found in LNCaP). Cell proliferation as well as Hh pathway members (SHH, IHH, DHH, GLI, PTCH) mRNA expression levels were assessed. We showed that KAAD-cyclopamine decreased cell proliferation of DHT-stimulated LNCaP, VCaP and PNT2-ARm cells. SHH expression was found to be downregulated by DHT in all AR posititve cells. The negative effect of DHT on SHH expression was counteracted when cells were treated by bicalutamide. Importantly, KAAD-cyclopamine treatment seemed to inhibit AR activity. Moreover, bicalutamide as well as KAAD-cyclopamine treatments induced GLI and PTCH expression in VCaP and PNT2-ARm. Our results suggest that Hh pathway activity can be regulated by androgen signalling. Specifically, we show that the DHT-induced inhibition of Hh pathway is AR dependent. The mutual interaction between these two pathways might be important in the regulation of cell proliferation in PCa.

  12. Phenotypic characterization of prostate cancer LNCaP cells cultured within a bioengineered microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieh, Shirly; Taubenberger, Anna V; Rizzi, Simone C; Sadowski, Martin; Lehman, Melanie L; Rockstroh, Anja; An, Jiyuan; Clements, Judith A; Nelson, Colleen C; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2012-01-01

    Biophysical and biochemical properties of the microenvironment regulate cellular responses such as growth, differentiation, morphogenesis and migration in normal and cancer cells. Since two-dimensional (2D) cultures lack the essential characteristics of the native cellular microenvironment, three-dimensional (3D) cultures have been developed to better mimic the natural extracellular matrix. To date, 3D culture systems have relied mostly on collagen and Matrigel™ hydrogels, allowing only limited control over matrix stiffness, proteolytic degradability, and ligand density. In contrast, bioengineered hydrogels allow us to independently tune and systematically investigate the influence of these parameters on cell growth and differentiation. In this study, polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels, functionalized with the Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motifs, common cell-binding motifs in extracellular matrix proteins, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) cleavage sites, were characterized regarding their stiffness, diffusive properties, and ability to support growth of androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We found that the mechanical properties modulated the growth kinetics of LNCaP cells in the PEG hydrogel. At culture periods of 28 days, LNCaP cells underwent morphogenic changes, forming tumor-like structures in 3D culture, with hypoxic and apoptotic cores. We further compared protein and gene expression levels between 3D and 2D cultures upon stimulation with the synthetic androgen R1881. Interestingly, the kinetics of R1881 stimulated androgen receptor (AR) nuclear translocation differed between 2D and 3D cultures when observed by immunofluorescent staining. Furthermore, microarray studies revealed that changes in expression levels of androgen responsive genes upon R1881 treatment differed greatly between 2D and 3D cultures. Taken together, culturing LNCaP cells in the tunable PEG hydrogels reveals differences in the cellular responses to androgen

  13. Phenotypic characterization of prostate cancer LNCaP cells cultured within a bioengineered microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirly Sieh

    Full Text Available Biophysical and biochemical properties of the microenvironment regulate cellular responses such as growth, differentiation, morphogenesis and migration in normal and cancer cells. Since two-dimensional (2D cultures lack the essential characteristics of the native cellular microenvironment, three-dimensional (3D cultures have been developed to better mimic the natural extracellular matrix. To date, 3D culture systems have relied mostly on collagen and Matrigel™ hydrogels, allowing only limited control over matrix stiffness, proteolytic degradability, and ligand density. In contrast, bioengineered hydrogels allow us to independently tune and systematically investigate the influence of these parameters on cell growth and differentiation. In this study, polyethylene glycol (PEG hydrogels, functionalized with the Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD motifs, common cell-binding motifs in extracellular matrix proteins, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP cleavage sites, were characterized regarding their stiffness, diffusive properties, and ability to support growth of androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We found that the mechanical properties modulated the growth kinetics of LNCaP cells in the PEG hydrogel. At culture periods of 28 days, LNCaP cells underwent morphogenic changes, forming tumor-like structures in 3D culture, with hypoxic and apoptotic cores. We further compared protein and gene expression levels between 3D and 2D cultures upon stimulation with the synthetic androgen R1881. Interestingly, the kinetics of R1881 stimulated androgen receptor (AR nuclear translocation differed between 2D and 3D cultures when observed by immunofluorescent staining. Furthermore, microarray studies revealed that changes in expression levels of androgen responsive genes upon R1881 treatment differed greatly between 2D and 3D cultures. Taken together, culturing LNCaP cells in the tunable PEG hydrogels reveals differences in the cellular responses to

  14. Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor and Metastasis Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0461 TITLE: Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor - and Metastasis-Initiating Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daotai...29 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor - and Metastasis-Initiating Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...the c-MYC oncogene. POU5F1B is a pseudogene of embryonic Oct4 (POU5F1). A recent study found that tumor Oct4 found in prostate cancer cells is due

  15. Antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of extracts from Cistus incanus L. and Cistus monspeliensis L. on human prostate cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Federica; Pennisi, Giuseppa; Attaguile, Giuseppa; Savoca, Francesca; Tita, Beatrice

    2011-02-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) is a common condition in elderly men that impairs quality of life and leads to a number of medical complications. The use of phytotherapeutic compounds in patients with relatively moderate BPH symptoms has been growing steadily. In the present study, acute toxicity of lyophilised aqueous extracts of Cistus incanus L. and Cistus monspeliensis L., collected in Sicily, was evaluated on the shrimp (Artemia salina L.) lethality assay, an alternative test to determine the toxicity of natural products. The cytotoxic and growth inhibitory effects were studied on normal human prostate cells (PZ-HPV-7 and PNT1A) and on a lung fibroblast cell line (V79-4). Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT and SRB assays. Cytotoxicity was measured using the Trypan blue exclusion assay. Cistus extract treatment on prostate cell lines resulted in an almost identical growth inhibitory response and in a significant decrease in an cell viability. These findings indicate the biologically relevant effect of polyphenolic compounds present in Cistus extracts, and suggest that these substances may prove beneficial in BPH treatment.

  16. Arsenic trioxide enhances the radiation sensitivity of androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wen Chiu

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men. In the present study, LNCaP (androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells and PC-3 cells (androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells were used to investigate the anti-cancer effects of ionizing radiation (IR combined with arsenic trioxide (ATO and to determine the underlying mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. We found that IR combined with ATO increases the therapeutic efficacy compared to individual treatments in LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In addition, combined treatment showed enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation compared to treatment with ATO or IR alone in PC-3 cells. Combined treatment induced autophagy and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, and mainly induced autophagy in PC-3 cells. The cell death that was induced by the combined treatment was primarily the result of inhibition of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, we found that the combined treatment of cells pre-treated with 3-MA resulted in a significant change in AO-positive cells and cytotoxicity. In an in vivo study, the combination treatment had anti-tumor growth effects. These novel findings suggest that combined treatment is a potential therapeutic strategy not only for androgen-dependent prostate cancer but also for androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  17. Expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen in lung cancer cells and tumor neovasculature endothelial cells and its clinical significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-long Wang

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA has been found in tumor neovasculature endothelial cells (NECs of non-prostate cancers and may become the most promising target for anti-tumor therapy. To study the value of PSMA as a potential new target for lung cancer treatment, PSMA expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and small cell lung cancer (SCLC tissues and its relationship with clinicopathology were investigated in the current study.Immunohistochemistry was used to detect PSMA expression in a total of 150 lung specimens of patients with lung cancer. The data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistical analyses.The percentages of NSCLC patients who had PSMA (+ tumor cells and PSMA (+ NECs were 54.02% and 85.06%, respectively. The percentage of patients younger than 60 years old who had PSMA (+ tumor cells was 69.05%, which was significantly greater than the percentage of patients aged 60 years or older (40.00%, p<0.05. A significant difference was observed in the percentage of NSCLC patients with PMSA (+ NECs and stage I or II cancer (92.98% and those patients with stage III or IV cancer (76.77%. In the SCLC tissues, NEC PSMA expression (70.00% did not differ significantly from NSCLC. SCLC tumor cells and normal lung tissues cells were all negative. There was no significant correlation between the presence of PSMA (+ NECs in SCLC patients and the observed clinicopathological parameters.PSMA is expressed not only in NECs of NSCLC and SCLC but also in tumor cells of most NSCLC patients. The presence of PSMA (+ tumor cells and PSMA (+ NECs in NSCLC was negatively correlated with age and the clinicopathological stage of the patients, respectively.

  18. Bioenergetics of Stromal Cells as a Predictor of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0255 TITLE: BIOENERGETICS OF STROMAL CELLS AS A PREDICTOR OF AGGRESSIVE PROSTATE CANCER PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...CONTRACT NUMBER Bioenergetics Of Stromal Cells As A Predictor Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0255 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...oncobioenergetic profile of a cancer cell, which increases significantly upon transformation into localized premalignant form and rapidly falls below the

  19. Changes of collagen and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in human cancerous and normal prostate tissues studied using native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Tang, Guichen; Alfano, Robert R.

    2010-07-01

    The fluorescence spectra of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues obtained by the selective excitation wavelength of 340 nm were measured. The contributions of principle biochemical components to tissue fluorescence spectra were investigated using the method of multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares. The results show that there is a reduced contribution from the emission of collagen and increased contribution from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in cancerous tissues as compared with normal tissue. This difference is attributed to the changes of relative contents of NADH and collagen during cancer development. This research may present a potential native biomarker for prostate cancer detection.

  20. Primary cilia are lost in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia B Hassounah

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Little is known about the role of primary cilia in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. However, reduced cilia expression has been observed in human cancers including pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and melanoma. The aim of this study was to characterize primary cilia expression in preinvasive and invasive human prostate cancer, and to investigate the correlation between primary cilia and the Wnt signaling pathway. Human prostate tissues representative of stages of prostate cancer formation (normal prostate, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, and invasive prostate cancer (including perineural invasion were stained for ciliary proteins. The frequency of primary cilia was determined. A decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells in PIN, invasive cancer and perineural invasion lesions was observed when compared to normal. Cilia lengths were also measured to indirectly test functionality. Cilia were shorter in PIN, cancer, and perineural invasion lesions, suggesting dysfunction. Primary cilia have been shown to suppress the Wnt pathway. Increased Wnt signaling has been implicated in prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated a correlation between loss of primary cilia and increased Wnt signaling in normal prostate and in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. To investigate Wnt signaling in our cohort, serial tissue sections were stained for β-catenin as a measure of Wnt signaling. Nuclear β-catenin was analyzed and Wnt signaling was found to be higher in un-ciliated cells in the normal prostate, PIN, a subset of invasive cancers, and perineural invasion. Our results suggest that cilia normally function to suppress the Wnt signaling pathway in epithelial cells and that cilia loss may play a role in increased Wnt signaling in some prostate cancers. These results suggest that cilia are dysfunctional in human

  1. Propionibacterium acnes inhibits FOXM1 and induces cell cycle alterations in human primary prostate cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayanjali, Behnam; Christensen, Gitte J M; Al-Zeer, Munir A;

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has been detected in diseased human prostate tissue, and cell culture experiments suggest that the bacterium can establish a low-grade inflammation. Here, we investigated its impact on human primary prostate epithelial cells. Microarray analysis confirmed the inflammation......-inducing capability of P. acnes but also showed deregulation of genes involved in the cell cycle. qPCR experiments showed that viable P. acnes downregulates a master regulator of cell cycle progression, FOXM1. Flow cytometry experiments revealed that P. acnes increases the number of cells in S-phase. We tested...... the hypothesis that a P. acnes-produced berninamycin-like thiopeptide is responsible for this effect, since it is related to the FOXM1 inhibitor siomycin. The thiopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster was strongly expressed; it is present in subtype IB of P. acnes, but absent from type IA, which is most abundant...

  2. Normal corneal endothelial cell density in Nigerians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewete T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Temitope Ewete,1 Efeoghene Uchenna Ani,2 Adegboyega Sunday Alabi1 1MeCure Eye Center, Lagos, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria Aim: The aim of the study was to describe the corneal endothelial cell density of adults at the MeCure Eye Center and to determine the relationship between age, sex, and corneal endothelial cell density. Methods: This study was a retrospective study looking at those records of individuals who had undergone specular microscopy or corneal endothelial cell count measurement at the MeCure Eye Center. Results: The endothelial cell characteristics of 359 healthy eyes of 201 volunteers were studied. The mean corneal endothelial cell density (MCD was 2,610.26±371.87 cells/mm2 (range, 1,484–3,571 cells/mm2. The MCD decreased from 2,860.70 cells/mm2 in the 20–30-year age group to 2,493.06 cells/mm2 in the >70-year age group, and there was a statistically significant relationship between age and MCD with a P-value of <0.001. There was no statistically significant correlation between sex and corneal endothelial cell density (P=0.45. Conclusion: This study shows that endothelial cell density in Nigerian eyes is less than that reported in the Japanese, American, and Chinese eyes, and is comparable to that seen in Indian and Malaysian eyes. Keywords: corneal, endothelial cell density, Nigerian

  3. Regulation of prostaglandin metabolism by calcitriol attenuates growth stimulation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jacqueline; Krishnan, Aruna V; Swami, Srilatha; Nonn, Larisa; Peehl, Donna M; Feldman, David

    2005-09-01

    Calcitriol exhibits antiproliferative and pro-differentiation effects in prostate cancer. Our goal is to further define the mechanisms underlying these actions. We studied established human prostate cancer cell lines and primary prostatic epithelial cells and showed that calcitriol regulated the expression of genes involved in the metabolism of prostaglandins (PGs), known stimulators of prostate cell growth. Calcitriol significantly repressed the mRNA and protein expression of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase/cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the key PG synthesis enzyme. Calcitriol also up-regulated the expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, the enzyme initiating PG catabolism. This dual action was associated with decreased prostaglandin E2 secretion into the conditioned media of prostate cancer cells exposed to calcitriol. Calcitriol also repressed the mRNA expression of the PG receptors EP2 and FP, providing a potential additional mechanism of suppression of the biological activity of PGs. Calcitriol treatment attenuated PG-mediated functional responses, including the stimulation of prostate cancer cell growth. The combination of calcitriol with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) synergistically acted to achieve significant prostate cancer cell growth inhibition at approximately 2 to 10 times lower concentrations of the drugs than when used alone. In conclusion, the regulation of PG metabolism and biological actions constitutes a novel pathway of calcitriol action that may contribute to its antiproliferative effects in prostate cells. We propose that a combination of calcitriol and nonselective NSAIDs might be a useful chemopreventive and/or therapeutic strategy in men with prostate cancer, as it would allow the use of lower concentrations of both drugs, thereby reducing their toxic side effects.

  4. MicroRNA-613 represses prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion through targeting Frizzled7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei [Medical College of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an 710061 (China); Department of Urology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Li, Chan [Department of Ophthalmology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Duan, Wanli; Du, Shuangkuan; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Jiancheng [Department of Urology, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710068 (China); Xing, Junping, E-mail: junpingxing@163.com [Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A growing number of studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may serve as potential therapeutic tools for cancer therapy. Frizzled7 (Fzd7), the most important receptor of the Wnt signaling pathway, is extensively involved in cancer development and progression. However, the role of Fzd7 in prostate cancer remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the expression of Fzd7 in prostate cancer and test whether modulating Fzd7 expression by miR-613 would have an impact on prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We found that Fzd7 was highly expressed in prostate cancer cell lines. Through bioinformatics analysis, Fzd7 was predicted as a target gene of miR-613, which was validated by dual-luciferase reporter assays, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. By gain of function experiments, we showed that overexpression of miR-613 significantly suppressed prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore, miR-613 overexpression markedly downregulated the Wnt signaling pathway. Through a rescue experiment, we showed that overexpression of Fzd7 could abrogate the inhibitory effect of miR-613 on cell proliferation and invasion as well as Wnt signaling. Additionally, these results were further strengthened by data showing that miR-613 was significantly downregulated in prostate cancer tissues, exhibiting an inverse correlation with Fzd7 expression. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR-613 functions as a tumor suppressor, partially through targeting Fzd7, and is a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. - Highlights: • Fzd7 was highly expressed in prostate cancer. • Fzd7 was predicted as a target gene of miR-613. • MiR-613 negatively regulated prostate cancer by Fzd7. • MiR-613 inversely correlated with Fzd7 in prostate cancer.

  5. PARK2, a Large Common Fragile Site Gene, is Part of a Stress Response Network in Normal Cells that is Disrupted During the Development of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    primary prostate tumor tissues. Top row RORA; Bottom row Actin. C. Ovary cancer cell lines, Lane 1 normal ovarian epithelium control (OSE); Lane 2...Liu D, Tang X, El-Naggar A, Hong WK, Mao L. Loss of Fhit expression is a predictor of poor outcome in tongue cancer. Cancer Res 2001: 61: 837-841. 7

  6. Wnt-11 promotes neuroendocrine-like differentiation, survival and migration of prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diez Soraya

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wnt-11 is a secreted protein that modulates cell growth, differentiation and morphogenesis during development. We previously reported that Wnt-11 expression is elevated in hormone-independent prostate cancer and that the progression of prostate cancer from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent proliferation correlates with a loss of mutual inhibition between Wnt-11- and androgen receptor-dependent signals. However, the prevalence of increased expression of Wnt-11 in patient tumours and the functions of Wnt-11 in prostate cancer cells were not known. Results Wnt-11 protein levels in prostate tumours were determined by immunohistochemical analysis of prostate tumour tissue arrays. Wnt-11 protein was elevated in 77/117 of tumours when compared with 27 benign prostatic hypertrophy specimens and was present in 4/4 bone metastases. In addition, there was a positive correlation between Wnt-11 expression and PSA levels above 10 ng/ml. Androgen-depleted LNCaP prostate cancer cells form neurites and express genes associated with neuroendocrine-like differentiation (NED, a feature of prostate tumours that have a poor prognosis. Since androgen-depletion increases expression of Wnt-11, we examined the role of Wnt-11 in NED. Ectopic expression of Wnt-11 induced expression of NSE and ASCL1, which are markers of NED, and this was prevented by inhibitors of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, consistent with the known role of this kinase in NED. In contrast, Wnt-11 did not induce NSE expression in RWPE-1 cells, which are derived from benign prostate, suggesting that the role of Wnt-11 in NED is specific to prostate cancer. In addition, silencing of Wnt-11 expression in androgen-depleted LNCaP cells prevented NED and resulted in apoptosis. Silencing of Wnt-11 gene expression in androgen-independent PC3 cells also reduced expression of NSE and increased apoptosis. Finally, silencing of Wnt-11 reduced PC3 cell migration and ectopic

  7. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR, a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi. Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR, and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold. Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications.

  8. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China

    OpenAIRE

    J. Zhang; Ma, M.; Nan,X.; Sheng,B.

    2016-01-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC)] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on se...

  9. Fisetin, a novel dietary flavonoid, causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh; Syed, Deeba N.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    Novel dietary agents for prevention and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa) are desired. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of fisetin, a tetrahydroxyflavone, on inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis in human PCa cells. Treatment of fisetin (10–60 μM, 48 h) was found to result in a decrease in the viability of LNCaP, CWR22Rυ1 and PC-3 cells but had only minimal effects on normal prostate epithelial cells as assessed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazoliumbromide assay. Treatment of LNCaP cells with fisetin also resulted in G1-phase arrest that was associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of cyclins D1, D2 and E and their activating partner cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 with concomitant induction of WAF1/p21 and KIP1/p27. Fisetin treatment also resulted in induction of apoptosis, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, modulation in the expressions of Bcl-2 family proteins, inhibition of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase and phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and Thr308. There was also induction of mitochondrial release of cytochrome c into cytosol, downregulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and upregulation of second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase/direct inhibitor of apoptosis-binding protein with low pI on treatment of cells with fisetin. Treatment of cells with fisetin also resulted in significant activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9. Pretreatment of cells with caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced activation of caspases. These data provide the first evidence that fisetin could be developed as an agent against PCa. PMID:18359761

  10. Muscadine grape skin extract can antagonize Snail-cathepsin L-mediated invasion, migration and osteoclastogenesis in prostate and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Liza J; Smith, Basil A; Smith, Bethany N; Loyd, Quentin; Nagappan, Peri; McKeithen, Danielle; Wilder, Catera L; Platt, Manu O; Hudson, Tamaro; Odero-Marah, Valerie A

    2015-09-01

    To develop new and effective chemopreventive agents against bone metastasis, we assessed the effects of muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE), whose main bioactive component is anthocyanin, on bone turnover, using prostate and breast cancer cell models overexpressing Snail transcription factor. MSKE has been shown previously to promote apoptosis in prostate cancer cells without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. Snail is overexpressed in prostate and breast cancer, and is associated with increased invasion, migration and bone turnover/osteoclastogenesis. Cathepsin L (CatL) is a cysteine cathepsin protease that is overexpressed in cancer and involved in bone turnover. Snail overexpression in prostate (LNCaP, ARCaP-E) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells led to increased CatL expression/activity and phosphorylated STAT-3 (pSTAT-3), compared to Neo vector controls, while the reverse was observed in C4-2 (the aggressive subline of LNCaP) cells with Snail knockdown. Moreover, CatL expression was higher in prostate and breast tumor tissue compared to normal tissue. MSKE decreased Snail and pSTAT3 expression, and abrogated Snail-mediated CatL activity, migration and invasion. Additionally, Snail overexpression promoted osteoclastogenesis, which was significantly inhibited by the MSKE as effectively as Z-FY-CHO, a CatL-specific inhibitor, or osteoprotegerin, a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) antagonist. Overall, these novel findings suggest that Snail regulation of CatL may occur via STAT-3 signaling and can be antagonized by MSKE, leading to decreased cell invasion, migration and bone turnover. Therefore, inhibition using a natural product such as MSKE could potentially be a promising bioactive compound for bone metastatic cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Androgen-independent effects of Serenoa repens extract (Prostasan®) on prostatic epithelial cell proliferation and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias-Gato, Diego; Carsten, Tober; Vesterlund, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Extracts from Serenoa repens are widely used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and traditionally for prostatitis. In the present study we evaluated the biological effects of Serenoa repens extract (Prostasan®) on prostate cells beyond its known antiandrogenic actions. Prosta...

  12. THE TMEFF2 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR MODULATES INTEGRIN EXPRESSION, RHOA ACTIVATION AND MIGRATION OF PROSTATE CANCER CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Corbin, Joshua M.; Tipton, Greg J.; Yang, Li V.; Asch, Adam S.; Ruiz-Echevarría, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration play important roles in physiological and pathological states, including embryonic development and cancer invasion and metastasis. The type I transmembrane protein with epidermal growth factor and two follistatin motifs 2 (TMEFF2) is expressed mainly in brain and prostate and its expression is deregulated in prostate cancer. We have previously shown that TMEFF2 can function as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell migration and invasion of prostate cells. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this inhibition are not clear. In this study we demonstrate that TMEFF2 affects cell adhesion and migration of prostate cancer cells and that this effect correlates with changes in integrin expression and RhoA activation. Deletion of a 13 basic-rich amino acid region in the cytoplasmic domain of TMEFF2 prevented these effects. Overexpression of TMEFF2 reduced cell attachment and migration on vitronectin and caused a concomitant decrease in RhoA activation, stress fiber formation and expression of αv, β1 and β3 integrin subunits. Conversely, TMEFF2 interference in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells resulted in increased integrin expression. Results obtained with a double TRAMP/TMEFF2 transgenic mouse also indicated that TMEFF2 expression reduced integrin expression in the mouse prostate. In summary, the data presented here indicate an important role of TMEFF2 in regulating cell adhesion and migration that involves integrin signaling and is mediated by its cytoplasmic domain. PMID:24632071

  13. Cytotoxic effects of the novel isoflavone, phenoxodiol, on prostate cancer cell lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Simon Mahoney; Frank Arfuso; Pierra Rogers; Susan Hisheh; David Brown; Michael Millward; Arun Dharmarajan

    2012-03-01

    Phenoxodiol is an isoflavone derivative that has been shown to elicit cytotoxic effects against a broad range of human cancers. We examined the effect of phenoxodiol on cell death pathways on the prostate cell lines LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, representative of different stages of prostate cancer, and its effects on cell death pathways in these cell lines. Cell proliferation assays demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of cell proliferation after 48 h exposure to phenoxodiol (10 and 30 M). FACS analysis and 3′-end labelling indicated that all three prostate cancer cell lines underwent substantial levels of cell death 48 h after treatment. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization, indicative of early-stage cell death signalling, using JC-1 detection, was also apparent in all cell lines after exposure to phenoxodiol in the absence of caspase-3 activation. Caspase inhibition assays indicated that phenoxodiol operates through a caspase-independent cell death pathway. These data demonstrate that phenoxodiol elicits anti-cancer effects in prostate cancer cell lines representative of early and later stages of development through an as-yet-unknown cell death mechanism. These data warrant the further investigation of phenoxodiol as a potential treatment for prostate cancer.

  14. Epigenetic regulation of CpG promoter methylation in invasive prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrar William L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, much attention has been focused on gaining a better understanding of the different populations of cells within a tumor and their contribution to cancer progression. One of the most commonly used methods to isolate a more aggressive sub-population of cells utilizes cell sorting based on expression of certain cell adhesion molecules. A recently established method we developed is to isolate these more aggressive cells based on their properties of increased invasive ability. These more invasive cells have been previously characterized as tumor initiating cells (TICs that have a stem-like genomic signature and express a number of stem cell genes including Oct3/4 and Nanog and are more tumorigenic compared to their 'non-invasive' counterpart. They also have a profile reminiscent of cells undergoing a classic pattern of epithelial to mesenchymal transition or EMT. Using this model of invasion, we sought to investigate which genes are under epigenetic control in this rare population of cells. Epigenetic modifications, specifically DNA methylation, are key events regulating the process of normal human development. To determine the specific methylation pattern in these invasive prostate cells, and if any developmental genes were being differentially regulated, we analyzed differences in global CpG promoter methylation. Results Differentially methylated genes were determined and select genes were chosen for additional analyses. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase BMX and transcription factor SOX1 were found to play a significant role in invasion. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed the methylated gene list frequently displayed genes from the IL-6/STAT3 pathway. Cells which have decreased levels of the targets BMX and SOX1 also display loss of STAT3 activity. Finally, using Oncomine, it was determined that more aggressive metastatic prostate cancers in humans also have higher levels of both Stat3 and Sox1. Conclusions Using this

  15. Interpatient variation in normal peripheral zone apparent diffusion coefficient: effect on the prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litjens, G.J.S.; Hambrock, T.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Huisman, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the interpatient variability of prostate peripheral zone (PZ) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and its effect on the assessment of prostate cancer aggressiveness. Materials and Methods: The requirement for institutional review board approval was waived. Intra- and

  16. Inflammatory Responses in a Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Line (BPH-1) Infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Su; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Ik-Hwan; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissues from prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer. Chronic prostatic inflammation is known as a risk factor for prostate enlargement, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and acute urinary retention. Our aim was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce inflammatory responses in cells of a benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cell line (BPH-1). When BPH-1 cells were infected with T. vaginalis, the protein and mRNA of inflammatory cytokines, such as CXCL8, CCL2, IL-1β, and IL-6, were increased. The activities of TLR4, ROS, MAPK, JAK2/STAT3, and NF-κB were also increased, whereas inhibitors of ROS, MAPK, PI3K, NF-κB, and anti-TLR4 antibody decreased the production of the 4 cytokines although the extent of inhibition differed. However, a JAK2 inhibitor inhibited only IL-6 production. Culture supernatants of the BPH-1 cells that had been incubated with live T. vaginalis (trichomonad-conditioned medium, TCM) contained the 4 cytokines and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cells) and mast cells (HMC-1 cells). TCM conditioned by BPH-1 cells pretreated with NF-κB inhibitor showed decreased levels of cytokines and induced less migration. Therefore, it is suggested that these cytokines are involved in migration of inflammatory cells. These results suggest that T. vaginalis infection of BPH patients may cause inflammation, which may induce lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

  17. Sarcosine induces increase in HER2/neu expression in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Malin; Bouchelouche, Pierre; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    epithelial cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of sarcosine on HER2/neu expression in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP (androgen dependent), PC-3 and DU145 (both androgen independent). Relative amounts of HER2/neu and androgen receptor (AR) transcripts were determined using RT......Increasing evidence suggests that Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) is involved in progression of prostate cancer. Recently, sarcosine was reported to be highly increased during prostate cancer progression, and exogenous sarcosine induces an invasive phenotype in benign prostate......-qPCR. Total expression of HER2/neu was confirmed by Western blot (WB). HER2/neu protein on the surface of living LNCaP cells was visualized by confocal microscopy using a HER2/neu-specific fluorescent probe. Exposure of LNCaP cells to 50 µM sarcosine for 24 h resulted in a 58% increase of the HER2/neu m...

  18. Sarcosine induces increase in HER2/neu expression in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Malin; Bouchelouche, Pierre; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    epithelial cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of sarcosine on HER2/neu expression in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP (androgen dependent), PC-3 and DU145 (both androgen independent). Relative amounts of HER2/neu and androgen receptor (AR) transcripts were determined using RT......Increasing evidence suggests that Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) is involved in progression of prostate cancer. Recently, sarcosine was reported to be highly increased during prostate cancer progression, and exogenous sarcosine induces an invasive phenotype in benign prostate......-qPCR. Total expression of HER2/neu was confirmed by Western blot (WB). HER2/neu protein on the surface of living LNCaP cells was visualized by confocal microscopy using a HER2/neu-specific fluorescent probe. Exposure of LNCaP cells to 50 μM sarcosine for 24 h resulted in a 58% increase of the HER2/neu m...

  19. Neoplastic transformation of a human prostate epithelial cell line by the v-Ki-ras oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parda, D S; Thraves, P J; Kuettel, M R; Lee, M S; Arnstein, P; Kaighn, M E; Rhim, J S; Dritschilo, A

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of mechanisms of human prostate carcinogenesis are limited by the unavailability of a suitable in vitro model system. We have demonstrated that an immortal, but nontumorigenic, human epithelial cell line (267B1) established from fetal prostate tissue can be malignantly transformed by a biological carcinogen, and can serve as a useful model for investigations of the progression steps of carcinogenesis. Activated Ki-ras was introduced into 267B1 cells by infection with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. Morphological alterations and anchorage-independent growth were observed; when cells were injected into nude mice, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas developed. These findings represent the first evidence of malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in culture, and support a role for Ki-ras activation in a multistep process for prostate neoplastic transformation.

  20. Is it really an abscess? An unusual case of metastatic stromal cell sarcoma of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehan Wickramasinghe

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The preferred treatment for prostatic stromal cell sarcoma is surgery by radical prostatectomy or cystoprostatectomy. There is currently not enough literature on the topic to elucidate the role of chemo- or radiotherapy in loco-regional or distant spread.

  1. Sulforaphane and TRAIL induce a synergistic elimination of advanced prostate cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labsch, Sabrina; Liu, Li; Bauer, Nathalie; Zhang, Yiyao; Aleksandrowicz, Ewa; Gladkich, Jury; Schönsiegel, Frank; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-05-01

    Advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. Apoptosis-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in AIPC and are not eliminated by current therapeutics. Novel therapeutic options, which are currently being evaluated in patient studies, include TRAIL and the broccoli-derived isothiocyanate sulforaphane. Although neither agent targets normal cells, TRAIL induces apoptosis in most cancer cells, and sulforaphane eliminates CSCs. In this study, the established AIPC cell lines DU145 and PC3, with enriched CSC features, and primary patient-derived prostate CSCs were treated with sulforaphane and recombinant soluble TRAIL. We examined the effects of these drugs on NF-κB activity, self-renewal and differentiation potential, and stem cell signaling via spheroid- and colony-forming assays, FACS and western blot analyses, immunohistochemistry, and an antibody protein array in vitro and after xenotransplantation. We largely found a stronger effect of sulforaphane on CSC properties compared to TRAIL, though the agents acted synergistically when applied in combination. This was associated with the inhibition of TRAIL-induced NF-κB binding; CXCR4, Jagged1, Notch 1, SOX 2, and Nanog expression; ALDH1 activity inhibition; and the elimination of differentiation and self-renewal potential. In vivo, tumor engraftment and tumor growth were strongly inhibited, without the induction of liver necrosis or other obvious side effects. These findings suggest that sulforaphane shifts the balance from TRAIL-induced survival signals to apoptosis and thus explains the observed synergistic effect. A nutritional strategy for high sulforaphane intake may target the cancer-specific activity of TRAIL in CSCs.

  2. Senescence-Induced Alterations of Laminin Chain Expression Modulate Tumorigenicity of Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C.T. Sprenger

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is an age-associated epithelial cancer, and as such, it contributes significantly to the mortality of the elderly. Senescence is one possible mechanism by which the body defends itself against various epithelial cancers. Senescent cells alter the microenvironment, in part, through changes to the extracellular matrix. Laminins (LMs are extracellular proteins important to both the structure and function of the microenvironment. Overexpression of the senescence-associated gene mac25 in human prostate cancer cells resulted in increased mRNA levels of the LM α4 and β2 chains compared to empty vector control cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of these senescence-induced LM chains on tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells. We created stable M12 human prostate cancer lines overexpressing either the LM α4 or β2 chain or both chains. Increased expression of either the LM α4 or β2 chain resulted in increased in vitro migration and in vivo tumorigenicity of those cells, whereas high expression of both chains led to decreased in vitro proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity compared to M12 control cells. This study demonstrates that senescent prostate epithelial cells can alter the microenvironment and that these changes modulate progression of prostate cancer.

  3. Expression of nucleostemin in prostate cancer and its effect on the proliferation of PC-3 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Nucleostemin is essential for the proliferation and survival of stem and cancer cells,but it is unknown whether this newly identified molecule is involved in prostate cancer pathogenesis.Methods Total RNA and protein were extracted from prostate cancer tissues and PC-3,LNCap and DU145 cell lines.The nucleostemin mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot.Immunohistochemistry was also used to detect the nucleostemin protein expression in prostate cancer tissues and PC-3 cells.A nucleostemin specific,short hairpin RNA,expression plasmid was used to transfect PC-3 cells.The changes of nucleostemin gene were detected and the proliferative capacity of the cells was determined.Results Nucleostemin was highly expressed in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines.Nucleostemin expression level in the silencer group PC-3 cells remarkably reduced.The proliferation rate of silencer group PC-3 cells decreased and the percentage of G1 stage cells increased.The neoplasm forming capacity in nude mice of the silencer group PC-3 cells decreased significantly.Conclusions Nucleostemin is highly expressed in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines.The proliferative capacity of PC-3 cells is remarkably reduced after silencing nucleostemin gene expression.

  4. Luminal cells are favored as the cell of origin for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu A.; Toivanen, Roxanne; Bergren, Sarah K.; Chambon, Pierre; Shen, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of cell types of origin for cancer has important implications for tumor stratification and personalized treatment. For prostate cancer, the cell of origin has been intensively studied, but it has remained unclear whether basal or luminal epithelial cells, or both, represent cells of origin under physiological conditions in vivo. Here, we use a novel lineage-tracing strategy to assess the cell of origin in a diverse range of mouse models, including Nkx3.1+/–; Pten+/–, Pten+/–, Hi-Myc, and TRAMP mice, as well as a hormonal carcinogenesis model. Our results show that luminal cells are consistently the observed cell of origin for each model in situ; however, explanted basal cells from these mice can generate tumors in grafts. Consequently, we propose that luminal cells are favored as cells of origin in many contexts, whereas basal cells only give rise to tumors after differentiation into luminal cells. PMID:25176651

  5. Influence of free fatty acids on glucose uptake in prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntalkumar

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on the interaction between glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) in malignant human prostate cancer cell lines by an in vitro observation of uptake of fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and acetate.......The study focuses on the interaction between glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) in malignant human prostate cancer cell lines by an in vitro observation of uptake of fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and acetate....

  6. Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and Androgen Receptor Antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0340 TITLE: Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and Androgen...COVERED 1 Aug 2014 - 21 Jul 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and... oxidative stress . Five classes of hybrid drugs have been designed and synthesized, i.e. Enz-PL (e.g. compd 28), Enz-catechol (e.g., compds 29, 30), Enz

  7. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem Cells with Alpha-Particle Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceder, Jens; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    Modern molecular and radiopharmaceutical development has brought the promise of tumor-selective delivery of antibody–drug conjugates to tumor cells for the diagnosis and treatment of primary and disseminated tumor disease. The classical mode of discourse regarding targeted therapy has been that the antigen targeted must be highly and homogenously expressed in the tumor cell population, and at the same time exhibit low expression in healthy tissue. However, there is increasing evidence that the reason cancer patients are not cured by current protocols is that there exist subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional therapy including radioresistance and that these cells express other target antigens than the bulk of the tumor cells. These types of cells are often referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSCs are tumorigenic and have the ability to give rise to all types of cells found in a cancerous disease through the processes of self-renewal and differentiation. If the CSCs are not eradicated, the cancer is likely to recur after therapy. Due to some of the characteristics of alpha particles, such as short path length and high density of energy depositions per distance traveled in tissue, they are especially well suited for use in targeted therapies against microscopic cancerous disease. The characteristics of alpha particles further make it possible to minimize the irradiation of non-targeted surrounding healthy tissue, but most importantly, make it possible to deliver high-absorbed doses locally and therefore eradicating small tumor cell clusters on the submillimeter level, or even single tumor cells. When alpha particles pass through a cell, they cause severe damage to the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus, including double-strand breaks of DNA that are very difficult to repair for the cell. This means that very few hits to a cell by alpha particles are needed in order to cause cell death, enabling killing of cells, such as CSCs

  8. Activation of NF-kappa B signaling promotes growth of prostate cancer cells in bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renjie Jin

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced prostate cancer almost invariably develop osseous metastasis. Although many studies indicate that the activation of NF-κB signaling appears to be correlated with advanced cancer and promotes tumor metastasis by influencing tumor cell migration and angiogenesis, the influence of altered NF-κB signaling in prostate cancer cells within boney metastatic lesions is not clearly understood. While C4-2B and PC3 prostate cancer cells grow well in the bone, LNCaP cells are difficult to grow in murine bone following intraskeletal injection. Our studies show that when compared to LNCaP, NF-κB activity is significantly higher in C4-2B and PC3, and that the activation of NF-κB signaling in prostate cancer cells resulted in the increased expression of the osteoclast inducing genes PTHrP and RANKL. Further, conditioned medium derived from NF-κB activated LNCaP cells induce osteoclast differentiation. In addition, inactivation of NF-κB signaling in prostate cancer cells inhibited tumor formation in the bone, both in the osteolytic PC3 and osteoblastic/osteoclastic mixed C4-2B cells; while the activation of NF-κB signaling in LNCaP cells promoted tumor establishment and proliferation in the bone. The activation of NF-κB in LNCaP cells resulted in the formation of an osteoblastic/osteoclastic mixed tumor with increased osteoclasts surrounding the new formed bone, similar to metastases commonly seen in patients with prostate cancer. These results indicate that osteoclastic reaction is required even in the osteoblastic cancer cells and the activation of NF-κB signaling in prostate cancer cells increases osteoclastogenesis by up-regulating osteoclastogenic genes, thereby contributing to bone metastatic formation.

  9. Mechanisms of Radiosensitization by the Neurotensin Receptor Antagonist SR48692 in Prostate Cancer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    normal prostate gland , regulating prostatic growth, differentiation and secretion. However, clusters of NE-like cells are also found in most prostate...factors, including parathyroid hormone-related peptides, serotonin, calcitonin, bombesin- related peptide, and neurotensin, that enhance DNA synthesis...adrenal gland or within the tumor itself (autocrine stimulation). The relationship between NT, androgen, and their respective receptors is complex

  10. HDR monotherapy for prostate cancer: A simulation study to determine the effect of catheter displacement on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina); M.A. Roos (Martin); S. Aluwini (Shafak)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the effect of catheter displacements both on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in fractionated high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, using a simulation study, and to define tolerances for catheter displacemen

  11. Single Cell Characterization of Prostate Cancer-Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    al., 2010). In addition, there were a significant number of cell cycle and mitosis associated transcripts in the highly expressed gene set including...red blood cell lysis with 10 volumes of 16 PharmLyse (BD Biosciences) for 15 minutes at room temperature . Remaining cells were pelleted at 4uC for 15...processes (23%, GO:0008152) or the cell cycle (10%, GO:0007049), consistent with mitotically active cells (Fig. 4C). Cell cycle and mitosis associated

  12. Apoptotic death of prostate cancer cells by a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-II antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi Park

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I has attracted strong attention as a hormonal therapeutic tool, particularly for androgen-dependent prostate cancer patients. However, the androgen-independency of the cancer in advanced stages has spurred researchers to look for new medical treatments. In previous reports, we developed the GnRH-II antagonist Trp-1 to inhibit proliferation and stimulate the autophagic death of various prostate cancer cells, including androgen-independent cells. We further screened many GnRH-II antagonists to identify molecules with higher efficiency. Here, we investigated the effect of SN09-2 on the growth of PC3 prostate cancer cells. SN09-2 reduced the growth of prostate cancer cells but had no effect on cells derived from other tissues. Compared with Trp-1, SN09-2 conspicuously inhibited prostate cancer cell growth, even at low concentrations. SN09-2-induced PC3 cell growth inhibition was associated with decreased membrane potential in mitochondria where the antagonist was accumulated, and increased mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species. SN09-2 induced lactate dehydrogenase release into the media and annexin V-staining on the PC3 cell surface, suggesting that the antagonist stimulated prostate cancer cell death by activating apoptotic signaling pathways. Furthermore, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol and caspase-3 activation occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SN09-2 also inhibited the growth of PC3 cells xenotransplanted into nude mice. These results demonstrate that SN09-2 directly induces mitochondrial dysfunction and the consequent ROS generation, leading to not only growth inhibition but also apoptosis of prostate cancer cells.

  13. Characterization of Laminin Binding Integrin Internalization in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Lipsa; Anderson, Todd A; Gard, Jaime M C; Sroka, Isis C; Strautman, Stephanie R; Nagle, Raymond B; Morrissey, Colm; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Cress, Anne E

    2017-05-01

    Laminin binding integrins α6 (CD49f) and α3 (CD49c) are persistently but differentially expressed in prostate cancer (PCa). Integrin internalization is an important determinant of their cell surface expression and function. Using flow cytometry, and first order kinetic modeling, we quantitated the intrinsic internalization rates of integrin subunits in a single cycle of internalization. In PCa cell line DU145, α6 integrin internalized with a rate constant (kactual ) of 3.25 min(-1) , threefold faster than α3 integrin (1.0 min(-1) ), 1.5-fold faster than the vitronectin binding αv integrin (CD51) (2.2 min(-1) ), and significantly slower than the unrelated transferrin receptor (CD71) (15 min(-1) ). Silencing of α3 integrin protein expression in DU145, PC3, and PC3B1 cells resulted in up to a 1.71-fold increase in kactual for α6 integrin. The internalized α6 integrin was targeted to early endosomes but not to lamp1 vesicles. Depletion of α3 integrin expression resulted in redistribution of α6β4 integrin to an observed cell-cell staining pattern that is consistent with a suprabasal distribution observed in epidermis and early PIN lesions in PCa. Depletion of α3 integrin increased cell migration by 1.8-fold, which was dependent on α6β1 integrin. Silencing of α6 integrin expression however, had no significant effect on the kactual of α3 integrin or its distribution in early endosomes. These results indicate that α3 and α6 integrins have significantly different internalization kinetics and that coordination exists between them for internalization. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1038-1049, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The effects of telomerase inhibition on prostate tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Calin O; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2010-07-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men, and patients with metastatic disease have poor outcome even with the most advanced therapeutic approaches. Most cancer therapies target the bulk tumor cells, but may leave intact a small population of tumor-initiating cells (TICs), which are believed to be responsible for the subsequent relapse and metastasis. Using specific surface markers (CD44, integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and CD133), Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion, and holoclone formation, we isolated TICs from a panel of prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, C4-2 and LNCaP). We have found that prostate TICs have significant telomerase activity which is inhibited by imetelstat sodium (GRN163L), a new telomerase antagonist that is currently in Phase I/II clinical trials for several hematological and solid tumor malignancies. Prostate TICs telomeres were of similar average length to the telomeres of the main population of cells and significant telomere shortening was detected in prostate TICs as a result of imetelstat treatment. These findings suggest that telomerase inhibition therapy may be able to efficiently target the prostate TICs in addition to the bulk tumor cells, providing new opportunities for combination therapies.

  15. Analysis of autophagic flux in response to sulforaphane in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Palomera-Sanchez, Zoraya; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope The phytochemical sulforaphane has been shown to decrease prostate cancer metastases in a genetic mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis, though the mechanism of action is not fully known. Sulforaphane has been reported to stimulate autophagy, and modulation of autophagy has been proposed to influence sulforaphane cytotoxicity; however, no conclusions about autophagy can be drawn without assessing autophagic flux, which has not been characterized in prostate cancer cells following sulforaphane treatment. Methods and Results We conducted an investigation to assess the impact of sulforaphane on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines at a concentration shown to decrease metastasis in vivo. Autophagic flux was assessed by multiple autophagy related proteins and substrates. We found that sulforaphane can stimulate autophagic flux and cell death only at high concentrations, above what has been observed in vivo. Conclusion These results suggest that sulforaphane does not directly stimulate autophagy or cell death in metastatic prostate cancer cells under physiologically relevant conditions, but instead supports the involvement of in vivo factors as important effectors of sulforaphane- mediated prostate cancer suppression. PMID:26108801

  16. Mast cell numbers in normal and glaucomatous canine eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louden, C; Render, J A; Carlton, W W

    1990-05-01

    Numbers of mast cells in the cornea, sclera, choroid, ciliary body, iris, and retina of sections of globes from 35 clinically normal dogs and 34 dogs with secondary glaucoma was determined. Fixed globes were trimmed along a vertical midsagittal plane and embedded in paraffin. Tissue sections, approximately 6 microns thick, were stained with toluidine blue for identification of mast cells. In normal globes, most of the mast cells were observed in the anterior portion of the uvea, and fewer mast cells were seen in the choroid and sclera. Mast cells were not observed in the retina and were seldom observed in the cornea of dogs with or without glaucoma. In sections of glaucomatous globes, mast cells were distributed evenly in the uvea and sclera, and fewer mast cells were present than in normal globes, regardless of the cause of glaucoma.

  17. Shared signaling pathways in normal and breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam K Malhotra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology have led to the identification of a subpopulation of cells within tumors that appear to be responsible for initiating and propagating the cancer. These tumor initiating cells are not only unique in their ability to generate tumors, but also share many similarities with elements of normal adult tissue stem cells, and have therefore been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. These CSCs often inappropriately use many of the same signaling pathways utilized by their normal stem cell counterparts which may present a challenge to the development of CSC specific therapies. Here, we discuss three major stem cell signaling pathways (Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog; with a focus on their function in normal mammary gland development and their misuse in breast cancer stem cell fate determination.

  18. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Regulation of CXCR4-Mediated Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells is Dependent on Cellular Oxidative State

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    Brent Young

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: CXCL12, acting via one of its G protein-coupled receptors, CXCR4, is a chemoattractant for a broad range of cell types, including several types of cancer cells. Elevated expression of CXCR4, and its ligand CXCL12, play important roles in promoting cancer metastasis. Cancer cells have the potential for rapid and unlimited growth in an area that may have restricted blood supply, as oxidative stress is a common feature of solid tumors. Recent studies have reported that enhanced expression of cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD1, a critical enzyme responsible for regulation of superoxide radicals, may increase the aggressive and invasive potential of malignant cells in some cancers. Methods: We used a variety of biochemical approaches and a prostate cancer cell line to study the effects of SOD1 on CXCR4 signaling. Results: Here, we report a direct interaction between SOD1 and CXCR4. We showed that SOD1 interacts directly with the first intracellular loop (ICL1 of CXCR4 and that the CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated regulation of AKT activation, apoptosis and cell migration in prostate cancer (PCa cells is differentially modulated under normal versus hypoxic conditions when SOD1 is present. Conclusions: This study highlights a potential new regulatory mechanism by which a sensor of the oxidative environment could directly regulate signal transduction of a receptor involved in cancer cell survival and migration.

  19. Growth inhibiting effects of terazosin on androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许克新; 王向红; 凌明达; 王云川

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, terazosin on the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145.Methods Two androgen independent cell lines, PC-3 and DU145, were used to determine cell viability, colony-forming ability, as well as cell cycle distribution, after exposure to terazosin. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of p21WAF1 and p27KIP1.Results This study shows that terazosin inhibits not only prostate cancer cell growth but also its colony forming ability, both of which are main targets of clinical treatment. In addition, terazosin is shown to inhibit cell growth through G1 phase cell cycle arrest and the up-regulation of p27KIP1.Conclusion This study provides evidence that the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer.

  20. Differential Utilization of Dietary Fatty Acids in Benign and Malignant Cells of the Prostate.

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    Andrea Dueregger

    Full Text Available Tumor cells adapt via metabolic reprogramming to meet elevated energy demands due to continuous proliferation, for example by switching to alternative energy sources. Nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, ketone bodies and amino acids may be utilized as preferred substrates to fulfill increased energy requirements. In this study we investigated the metabolic characteristics of benign and cancer cells of the prostate with respect to their utilization of medium chain (MCTs and long chain triglycerides (LCTs under standard and glucose-starved culture conditions by assessing cell viability, glycolytic activity, mitochondrial respiration, the expression of genes encoding key metabolic enzymes as well as mitochondrial mass and mtDNA content. We report that BE prostate cells (RWPE-1 have a higher competence to utilize fatty acids as energy source than PCa cells (LNCaP, ABL, PC3 as shown not only by increased cell viability upon fatty acid supplementation but also by an increased ß-oxidation of fatty acids, although the base-line respiration was 2-fold higher in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, BE RWPE-1 cells were found to compensate for glucose starvation in the presence of fatty acids. Of notice, these findings were confirmed in vivo by showing that PCa tissue has a lower capacity in oxidizing fatty acids than benign prostate. Collectively, these metabolic differences between benign and prostate cancer cells and especially their differential utilization of fatty acids could be exploited to establish novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  1. Flaxseed reduces epithelial proliferation but does not affect basal cells in induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorim Ribeiro, Ilma Cely; da Costa, Carlos Alberto Soares; da Silva, Vivian Alves Pereira; Côrrea, Lanna Beatriz Neves Silva; Boaventura, Gilson Teles; Chagas, Mauricio Alves

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the effects of a flaxseed-based diet on the histoarchitecture of the prostate of normal Wistar rats and of rats with induced BPH. The study included four experimental groups of ten animals each: casein control group (CCG), who were fed a casein-based diet; flaxseed control group (FCG), who were fed a flaxseed-based diet; hyperplasia-induced casein group (HICG), who were fed a casein-based diet; and hyperplasia-induced flaxseed group (HIFG), who were fed a flaxseed-based diet. Hyperplasia was induced by the subcutaneous implantation of silicone pellets containing testosterone propionate. After 20 weeks, the rats were euthanized and their prostate fixed in buffered formalin. Tissue sections were stained with HE, picrosirius red and immunostained for nuclear antigen p63. Histomorphometric analysis evaluated the epithelial thickness, epithelial area, individual luminal area, and total area of prostatic alveoli. The mean epithelial thickness obtained for HIFG and HICG was 16.52 ± 1.65 and 20.58 ± 2.86 µm, respectively. The mean epithelial thickness in HICG was greater than that in the other groups tested. HIFG had a smaller epithelial thickness and lower percentage of papillary projections in the prostatic alveoli. No significant difference was observed between CCG and FCG. The total area and mean alveolar area showed no significant differences between the groups. The number of cells immunostained for p63 was not significantly different between the groups evaluated. These results suggest that flaxseed has a protective effect on the prostate epithelium in BPH-induced animals.

  2. Discovery of CTCF-sensitive Cis-spliced fusion RNAs between adjacent genes in human prostate cells.

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    Fujun Qin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genes or their encoded products are not expected to mingle with each other unless in some disease situations. In cancer, a frequent mechanism that can produce gene fusions is chromosomal rearrangement. However, recent discoveries of RNA trans-splicing and cis-splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe support for other mechanisms in generating fusion RNAs. In our transcriptome analyses of 28 prostate normal and cancer samples, 30% fusion RNAs on average are the transcripts that contain exons belonging to same-strand neighboring genes. These fusion RNAs may be the products of cis-SAGe, which was previously thought to be rare. To validate this finding and to better understand the phenomenon, we used LNCaP, a prostate cell line as a model, and identified 16 additional cis-SAGe events by silencing transcription factor CTCF and paired-end RNA sequencing. About half of the fusions are expressed at a significant level compared to their parental genes. Silencing one of the in-frame fusions resulted in reduced cell motility. Most out-of-frame fusions are likely to function as non-coding RNAs. The majority of the 16 fusions are also detected in other prostate cell lines, as well as in the 14 clinical prostate normal and cancer pairs. By studying the features associated with these fusions, we developed a set of rules: 1 the parental genes are same-strand-neighboring genes; 2 the distance between the genes is within 30kb; 3 the 5' genes are actively transcribing; and 4 the chimeras tend to have the second-to-last exon in the 5' genes joined to the second exon in the 3' genes. We then randomly selected 20 neighboring genes in the genome, and detected four fusion events using these rules in prostate cancer and non-cancerous cells. These results suggest that splicing between neighboring gene transcripts is a rather frequent phenomenon, and it is not a feature unique to cancer cells.

  3. Phosphorylation and sulfation of arylsulfatase A accompanies biosynthesis of the enzyme in normal and carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, A; van Etten, R L

    1985-10-30

    Arylsulfatase A (arylsulfate sulfohydrolase, EC 3.1.6.1), a mammalian lysosomal enzyme, is initially synthesized as a 69, 67 and 64 kDa precursor polypeptide in a prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3SF12, in HeLa cells and in a normal human embryonic lung cell line WI-38, respectively. These precursor polypeptides are secreted into the medium or processed to mature enzymes of apparent molecular mass 66, 64 or 62 kDa in PC-3SF12, HeLa or WI-38 cells, respectively. The precursor and mature polypeptides in WI-38 cells are phosphorylated, and the phosphate is lost upon treatment with endo-beta-hexosaminidase H. Arylsulfatase A is also shown to be sulfated in WI-38 cells. The presence of castanospermine, an inhibitor of sulfation of the second N-acetylglucosamine residue of the chitobiose core, does not reduce the extent of sulfation of arylsulfatase A, suggesting that either terminal sugars or the protein is sulfated. Sulfation may have a protective function similar to that of terminal sialic acid residues in glycoproteins. Although the subcellular location of arylsulfatase A is identical in PC-3SF12 and in WI-38 cells, pulse-chase experiments indicate that arylsulfatase A protein has a slower turnover in the prostate carcinoma cell line than it does in the normal human lung cell line. The differences in the apparent molecular weights of arylsulfatase A in the normal and carcinoma cell lines are shown to be due to variations in the carbohydrate content of the enzyme. The apparent molecular mass of the polypeptide chain obtained after endo-beta-hexosaminidase H treatment is 59 kDa, a value which is identical for all three cell lines studied here. These results suggest the possibility of an enhanced activity of terminal glucosyltransferase enzymes in carcinoma cell lines and in tumor tissues. Arylsulfatase A may be a useful marker for studying transformation-related processes in human cell lines.

  4. Role of the Phospholipase A2 Receptor in Liposome Drug Delivery in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1) is a member of the C-type lectin superfamily and can internalize secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) via endocytosis in non-cancer cells. sPLA2 itself was recently shown to be overexpressed in prostate tumors and to be a possible mediator of metastasis; however, little is known about the expression of PLA2R1 or its function in prostate cancers. Thus, we examined PLA2R1 expression in primary prostate cells (PCS-440-010) and human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3), and we determined the effect of PLA2R1 knockdown on cytotoxicity induced by free or liposome-encapsulated chemotherapeutics. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the expression of PLA2R1 was higher in prostate cancer cells compared to that in primary prostate cells. Knockdown of PLA2R1 expression in PC-3 cells using shRNA increased cell proliferation and did not affect the toxicity of cisplatin, doxorubicin (Dox), and docetaxel. In contrast, PLA2R1 knockdown increased the in vitro toxicity of Dox encapsulated in sPLA2 responsive liposomes (SPRL) and correlated with increased Dox and SPRL uptake. Knockdown of PLA2R1 also increased the expression of Group IIA and X sPLA2. These data show the novel findings that PLA2R1 is expressed in prostate cancer cells, that PLA2R1 expression alters cell proliferation, and that PLA2R1 modulates the behavior of liposome-based nanoparticles. Furthermore, these studies suggest that PLA2R1 may represent a novel molecular target for controlling tumor growth or modulating delivery of lipid-based nanomedicines. PMID:25189995

  5. Canine Prostate Cancer Cell Line (Probasco) Produces Osteoblastic Metastases In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jessica K.; Dirksen, Wessel P.; Hildreth, Blake E.; Dorr, Carlee; Williams, Christina; Thomas, Rachael; Breen, Matthew; Toribio, Ramiro E.; Rosol, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2012, over 240,000 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer and over 28,000 died from the disease. Animal models of prostate cancer are vital to understanding its pathogenesis and developing therapeutics. Canine models in particular are useful due to their similarities to late-stage, castration-resistant human disease with osteoblastic bone metastases. This study established and characterized a novel canine prostate cancer cell line that will contribute to the understanding of prostate cancer pathogenesis. METHODS A novel cell line (Probasco) was derived from a mixed breed dog that had spontaneous prostate cancer. Cell proliferation and motility were analyzed in vitro. Tumor growth in vivo was studied by subcutaneous, intratibial, and intracardiac injection of Probasco cells into nude mice. Tumors were evaluated by bioluminescent imaging, Faxitron radiography, µCT, and histology. RT-PCR and genome-wide DNA copy number profiling were used to characterize the cell line. RESULTS The Probasco cells grew in vitro (over 75 passages) and were tumorigenic in nude mice. Probasco cells expressed high levels of BMP2, CDH1, MYOF, FOLH1, RUNX2, and SMAD5 modest CXCL12, SLUG, and BMP, and no PTHrP mRNA. Following intracardiac injection, Probasco cells metastasized primarily to the appendicular skeleton, and both intratibial and intracardiac injections produced osteoblastic tumors in bone. Comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated numerous DNA copy number aberrations throughout the genome, including large losses and gains in multiple chromosomes. CONCLUSIONS The Probasco prostate cancer cell line will be a valuable model to investigate the mechanisms of prostate cancer pathogenesis and osteoblastic bone metastases. PMID:25043424

  6. Small cell carcinoma of prostate presenting with Cushing′s syndrome

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    Selahattin Çaliskan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of prostate (SCPCa was initially described by Wenk et al. in 1977. SCPCa is a very rare cancer that accounts for only 0.5-2% of all prostate carcinomas. Although, this pathology is usually accompanied with prostate adenocarcinomas, there are a few hypotheses about the origin of SCPCa. Poorly differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma must be distinguished from SCPCa in histopathological examination. These patients may present with different paraneoplastic syndromes. Early diagnosis is very important because of the aggressive tumor behavior. Here, we report a patient who presented with Cushing syndrome and thereafter diagnosed with SCPCa.

  7. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest

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    Han Jin Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker, cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC.

  8. Calprotectin induces cell death in human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) through survivin protein alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Mina; Pazhang, Yaghub; Imani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Calprotectin (CP), an abundant heterodimeric cytosolic protein of neutrophils, conveys a variety of functions such as tumor cell growth arrest and antimicrobial activity. We investigated CP activity and its possible apoptosis-inducing mechanism of action against an antiandrogen therapy-resistance prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Cell viability and Annexin V FITC assays were performed in order to investigate its cell death activity and apoptosis, respectively. In order to address cell death inducing mechanism(s), immunocytochemistry and immunobloting analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) measurements were performed. The effective concentration of CP against LNCaP promoting LNCaP cell death was 200 µg/mL. ROS and NO levels of cells remarkably were enhanced following treatment with 50 and 100 µg/mL of CP, respectively. Protein expression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin was significantly decreased after administration of tumor cells with CP. Our data indicate that CP regulates the LNCaP cells viability via survivin-mediated pathway and ROS and NO enhancement. Thus, inhibition of survivin expression, enhancement of ROS and NO level by CP or other similar pharmaceutical agents might be effective in lowering the malignant proliferation of human prostate cancer cells.

  9. Change of the cell cycle after flutamide treatment in prostate cancer cells and its molecular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wang; Wei-Jun Qin; He Wang; Guo-Xing Shao; Chen Shao; Chang-Hong Shi; Lei Zhang; Hong-Hong Yue; Peng-Fei Wang; Bo Yang; Yun-Tao Zhang; Fan Liu

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of androgen receptor (AR) on the expression of the cell cycle-related genes, such as CDKN1A and BTG1, in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Methods: After AR antagonist flutamide treatment and confirmation of its effect by phase contrast microscope and flow cytometry, the differential expression of the cell cycle-related genes was analyzed by a cDNA microarray. The flutamide treated cells were set as the experimental group and the LNCaP cells as the control. We labeled cDNA probes of the experimental group and control group with Cy5 and Cy3 dyes, respectively, through reverse transcription. Then we hybridized the cDNA probes with cDNA microarrays, which contained 8 126 unique human cDNA sequences and the chip was scanned to get the fluorescent values of Cy5 and Cy3 on each spot. After primary analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) tests were carried out to confirm the results of the chips. Results:After AR antagonist flutamide treatment,three hundred and twenty-six genes (3.93 %) expressed differentially, 97 down-regulated and 219 up-regulated.Among them, eight up-regulated genes might be cell cycle-related, namely CDC10, NRAS, BTG1, Weel, CLK3,DKFZP564A122, CDKN1A and BTG2. The CDKN1A and BTG1 gene mRNA expression was confirmed to be higher in the experimental group by RT-PCR, whilep53 mRNA expression had no significant changes. Conclusion: Flutamide treatment might up-regulate CDKN1A and BTG1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The protein expressions of CDKN1A and BTG1 play an important role in inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. CDKN1A has a great impact on the cell cycle of prostate cancer cells and may play a role in the cancer cells in a p53-independent pathway. The prostate cancer cells might affect the cell cycle-related genes by activating AR and thus break the cell cycle control.

  10. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

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    Oorschot, Bregje van, E-mail: b.vanoorschot@amc.uva.nl [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hovingh, Suzanne E. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Moerland, Perry D. [Bioinformatics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Franken, Nicolaas A.P. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  11. Cell Adhesion Regulates Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Coregulators in Different Prostate Cancer Cells

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    Sheng Li

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer cells adhere to a tumor basement membrane, while secretoryepithelial cells reside in a suprabasal cell compartment. Since tumor cells are derived fromsuprabasal epithelial cells, they experience de-novo substratum adhesion in the context ofoncogenesis. We therefore analyzed whether cell-matrix adhesion could affect the proteinexpression and activity of the AR. In this study, AR protein expression declined uponsuspension of BPH-1-AR cells, but not in PC-3-AR cells shown by Western blot. In a timecourse study, BPH-1 cell lost AR expression within 6 hours, and the synthetic androgen,R1881 reduced the loss of AR expression. We further explored the mechanism of AR loss insuspended BPH-1 cells. BPH-1-AR cells underwent apoptosis (anoikis when suspended for2 - 5 hours. Suspension did not induce significant apoptosis or decreasing of AR expressionin PC-3 cells. Inhibition of apoptosis in suspended BPH-1-AR cells, either by expression ofBcl-2 or Bcl-xl or by treatment with Z-VAD, a caspase inhibitor, prevented loss of ARprotein. In contrast, the calpain protease inhibitor , ALLN, accelerated the loss of AR proteinexpression. Additionally, cell-matrix adhesion changed the expression of coregulators of ARin the mRNA level of prostate cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that AR proteinexpression was reduced through activation of cell death pathways, and thus indirectly through cell suspension in BPH-AR cells. The activity of AR can also be regulated by adhesion in PC-3-AR and LNCaP cells through affecting the coregulators level.

  12. Comparison of telomerase activity in prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and benign prostatic hyperplasia

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    Soleiman Mahjoub

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase enzyme that synthesizes telomeric DNA on chromosome ends. The enzyme is important for the immortalization of cancer cells because it maintains the telomeres. METHODS: Telomerase activity (TA was measured by fluorescence-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (FTRAP assay in prostate carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. RESULTS: TA was present in 91.4% of 70 prostate cancers, 68.8% of 16 prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, 43.3% of 30 BPH*, 21.4% of 14 atrophy and 20% of 15 normal samples adjacent to tumor. There was not any significant correlation between TA, histopathological tumor stage or gleason score. In contrast to high TA in the BPH* tissue from the cancer-bearing gland, only 6.3% of 32 BPH specimens from patients only diagnosed with BPH were telomerase activity-positive. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that TA is present in most prostate cancers. The high rate of TA in tissue adjacent to tumor may be attributed either to early molecular alteration of cancer that was histologically unapparent, or to the presence of occult cancer cells. Our findings suggest that the re-expression of telomerase activity could be one step in the transformation of BPH to PIN. KEY WORDS: Telomerase activity, prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  13. Silencing of HMGA2 promotes apoptosis and inhibits migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhan Shi; Ding Wu; Run Tang; Xiang Li; Renfu Chen; Song Xue; Chengjing Zhang; Xiaoqing Sun

    2016-06-01

    The high mobility group protein A2 (HMGA2) has been demonstrated as an architectural transcription factor that is associated with pathogenesis of many malignant cancers, however, its role in prostate cancer cells remains largely unknown. To explore whether HMGA2 participates in the development and progression of prostate cancer, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted on human HMGA2 was transfected to suppress the HMGA2 expression in prostate cancer PC3 and DU145 cells, and then we examined the cellular biology changes after decreased the expression of HMGA2. Our results showed that knockdown of HMGA2 markedly inhibited cell proliferation, this reduced cell proliferation was due to the promotion of cell apoptosis as the Bcl-xl was decreased, whereas Bax was up-regulated. In addition, we found that HMGA2 knockdown resulted in reduction of cell migration and invasion, as well as repressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and affected the occurrence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both cell types. We further found that decreased HMGA2 expression inhibited the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling pathway in cancer cells. In conclusion, our data indicated that HMGA2 was associated with apoptosis, migration and invasion of prostate cancer, which might be a promising therapeutic target for prostate cancer.

  14. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

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    Briana Jill Williams

    Full Text Available Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells. To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ. Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Briana Jill; Bhatia, Shilpa; Adams, Lisa K; Boling, Susan; Carroll, Jennifer L; Li, Xiao-Lin; Rogers, Donna L; Korokhov, Nikolay; Kovesdi, Imre; Pereboev, Alexander V; Curiel, David T; Mathis, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs) with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells). To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ). Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Microfluidic channel for characterizing normal and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    TruongVo, T. N.; Kennedy, R. M.; Chen, H.; Chen, A.; Berndt, A.; Agarwal, M.; Zhu, L.; Nakshatri, H.; Wallace, J.; Na, S.; Yokota, H.; Ryu, J. E.

    2017-03-01

    A microfluidic channel was designed and fabricated for the investigation of behaviors of normal and cancer cells in a narrow channel. A specific question addressed in this study was whether it is possible to distinguish normal versus cancer cells by detecting their stationary and passing behaviors through a narrow channel. We hypothesized that due to higher deformability, softer cancer cells will pass through the channel further and quicker than normal cells. Two cell lines, employed herein, were non-tumor breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A; 11.2  ±  2.4 µm in diameter) and triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231; 12.4  ±  2.1 µm in diameter). The microfluidic channel was 300 µm long and linearly tapered with a width of 30 µm at an inlet to 5 µm at an outlet. The result revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells entered and stuck further toward the outlet than MCF-10A cells in response to a slow flow (2 µl min‑1). Further, in response to a fast flow (5 µl min‑1), the passage time (mean  ±  s.d.) was 26.6  ±  43.9 s for normal cells (N  =  158), and 1.9  ±  1.4 s for cancer cells (N  =  128). The measurement of stiffness by atomic force microscopy as well as model-based predictions pointed out that MDA-MB-231 cells are significantly softer than MCF-10A cells. Collectively, the result in this study suggests that analysis of an individual cell’s behavior through a narrow channel can characterize deformable cancer cells from normal ones, supporting the possibility of enriching circulating tumor cells using novel microfluidics-based analysis.

  17. Metabolomic analysis of normal and sickle cell erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darghouth, D; Koehl, B; Junot, C; Roméo, P-H

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic signatures of specialized circulating hematopoietic cells in physiological or human hematological diseases start to be described. We use a simple and highly reproductive extraction method of erythrocytes metabolites coupled with a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolites profiling method to determine metabolomes of normal and sickle cell erythrocytes. Sickle cell erythrocytes and normal erythrocytes metabolomes display major differences in glycolysis, in glutathione, in ascorbate metabolisms and in metabolites associated to membranes turnover. In addition, the amounts of metabolites derived from urea cycle and NO metabolism that partly take place within erythrocyte were different between normal and sickle cell erythrocytes. These results show that metabolic profiling of red blood cell diseases can now be determined and might indicate new biomarkers that can be used for the follow-up of sickle cell patients.

  18. Furano diterpenes from Pterodon pubescens Benth with selective in vitro anticancer activity for prostate cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindola, Humberto M.; Carvalho, Joao E. de; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T.G.; Rodrigues, Rodney A. F.; Denny, Carina; Sousa, Ilza M. de Oliveira; Foglio, Mary Ann [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro Pluridisciplinar de Pesquisas Quimicas, Biologicas e Agricolas (CPQBA)]. E-mail: foglioma@cpqba.unicamp.br; Tamashiro, Jorge Y. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    2009-07-01

    Activity guided fractionation of Pterodon pubescens Benth. methylene chloride-soluble fraction afforded novel 6{alpha}-acetoxi 7{beta}-hydroxy-vouacapan 1 and four known diterpene furans 2, 3, 4, 5. The compounds were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activities against human normal cells and tumour cell lines UACC-62 (melanoma), MCF-7 (breast), NCI-H460 (lung, non-small cells), OVCAR-03 (ovarian), PC-3 (prostate), HT-29 (colon), 786-0 (renal), K562 (leukemia) and NCI-ADR/RES (ovarian expressing phenotype multiple drugs resistance). Results were expressed by three concentration dependent parameters GI{sub 50} (concentration that produces 50% growth inhibition), TGI (concentration that produces total growth inhibition or cytostatic effect) and LC{sub 50} (concentration that produces .50% growth, a cytotoxicity parameter). Also, in vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated against 3T3 cell line (mouse embryonic fibroblasts). Antiproliferative properties of compounds 1, 4 and 5 are herein reported for the first time. These compounds showed selectivity in a concentration-dependent way against human PC-3. Compound 1 demonstrated selectivity 26 fold more potent than the positive control, doxorubicin, for PC-3 (prostrate) cell line based on GI{sub 50} values, causing cytostatic effect (TGI value) at a concentration fifteen times less than positive control. Moreover comparison of 50% lethal concentration (LC{sub 50} value) with positive control (doxorubicin) suggested that compound 1 was less toxic. (author)

  19. A comparative analysis of lncRNAs in prostate cancer exosomes and their parental cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ahadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cancer in men world-wide. Due to its heterogeneous nature, a considerable amount of research effort has been dedicated in identifying effective clinical biomarkers with a focus on proteins, messenger RNA and microRNAs [1]. However, there is limited data on the role and expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in prostate cancer exosomes [2]. This array dataset which is linked to our publication describes the profiling of human lncRNAs in prostate cancer and their exosomes from five different cell lines [3]. From this dataset, we identified a list of statistically significant prostate cancer lncRNAs which are differentially expressed in the exosomes compared to their parent cell lines. This dataset has been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GSE81034.

  20. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yanxi [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); College of Life Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China); Wu, Bo [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Cao, Qiuhui [Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada); Wu, Lingyun [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Department of Pharmacology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Yang, Guangdong, E-mail: gyang@lakeheadu.ca [The School of Kinesiology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H{sub 2}S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H{sub 2}S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H{sub 2}S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H{sub 2}S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H{sub 2}S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H{sub 2}S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H{sub 2}S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H{sub 2}S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of H{sub 2}S is released from sulforaphane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}S mediates the anti-survival effect of

  2. Inhibiting Vimentin or beta 1-integrin Reverts Prostate Tumor Cells in IrECM and Reduces Tumor Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V.; Ware, Joy L.; Bissell, Mina J.; Zehner, Zendra E.

    2009-07-27

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphological changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional (3D) lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the parental prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin or {alpha}6-, {beta}4- and {beta}1-integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via siRNA interference or {beta}1-integrin expression by the addition of the blocking antibody, AIIB2, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by subcutaneous injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in 3D lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1-integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acini in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis.

  3. Reduced expression of NGEP is associated with high-grade prostate cancers: a tissue microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenzadegan, Monireh; Madjd, Zahra; Asgari, Mojgan; Abolhasani, Maryam; Shekarabi, Mehdi; Taeb, Jaleh; Shariftabrizi, Ahmad

    2013-10-01

    New gene expressed in prostate (NGEP) is a newly diagnosed prostate-specific gene that is expressed only in normal prostate and prostate cancer cells. Discovery of tissue-specific markers may promote the development of novel targets for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. In the present study, the staining pattern and clinical significance of NGEP were evaluated in a series of prostate tissues composed of 123 prostate cancer, 19 high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and 44 samples of benign prostate tissue included in tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry. Our study demonstrated that NGEP localized mainly in the apical and lateral membranes and was also partially distributed in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of normal prostate tissue. All of the examined pr