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Sample records for normal mode response

  1. Normalized modes at selected points without normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausel, Eduardo

    2018-04-01

    As every textbook on linear algebra demonstrates, the eigenvectors for the general eigenvalue problem | K - λM | = 0 involving two real, symmetric, positive definite matrices K , M satisfy some well-defined orthogonality conditions. Equally well-known is the fact that those eigenvectors can be normalized so that their modal mass μ =ϕT Mϕ is unity: it suffices to divide each unscaled mode by the square root of the modal mass. Thus, the normalization is the result of an explicit calculation applied to the modes after they were obtained by some means. However, we show herein that the normalized modes are not merely convenient forms of scaling, but that they are actually intrinsic properties of the pair of matrices K , M, that is, the matrices already "know" about normalization even before the modes have been obtained. This means that we can obtain individual components of the normalized modes directly from the eigenvalue problem, and without needing to obtain either all of the modes or for that matter, any one complete mode. These results are achieved by means of the residue theorem of operational calculus, a finding that is rather remarkable inasmuch as the residues themselves do not make use of any orthogonality conditions or normalization in the first place. It appears that this obscure property connecting the general eigenvalue problem of modal analysis with the residue theorem of operational calculus may have been overlooked up until now, but which has in turn interesting theoretical implications.Á

  2. Normal modes of Bardeen discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdaguer, E.

    1983-01-01

    The short wavelength normal modes of self-gravitating rotating polytropic discs in the Bardeen approximation are studied. The discs' oscillations can be seen in terms of two types of modes: the p-modes whose driving forces are pressure forces and the r-modes driven by Coriolis forces. As a consequence of differential rotation coupling between the two takes place and some mixed modes appear, their properties can be studied under the assumption of weak coupling and it is seen that they avoid the crossing of the p- and r-modes. The short wavelength analysis provides a basis for the classification of the modes, which can be made by using the properties of their phase diagrams. The classification is applied to the large wavelength modes of differentially rotating discs with strong coupling and to a uniformly rotating sequence with no coupling, which have been calculated in previous papers. Many of the physical properties and qualitative features of these modes are revealed by the analysis. (author)

  3. Normal modes of weak colloidal gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsigmond; Swan, James W.

    2018-01-01

    The normal modes and relaxation rates of weak colloidal gels are investigated in calculations using different models of the hydrodynamic interactions between suspended particles. The relaxation spectrum is computed for freely draining, Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa, and accelerated Stokesian dynamics approximations of the hydrodynamic mobility in a normal mode analysis of a harmonic network representing several colloidal gels. We find that the density of states and spatial structure of the normal modes are fundamentally altered by long-ranged hydrodynamic coupling among the particles. Short-ranged coupling due to hydrodynamic lubrication affects only the relaxation rates of short-wavelength modes. Hydrodynamic models accounting for long-ranged coupling exhibit a microscopic relaxation rate for each normal mode, λ that scales as l-2, where l is the spatial correlation length of the normal mode. For the freely draining approximation, which neglects long-ranged coupling, the microscopic relaxation rate scales as l-γ, where γ varies between three and two with increasing particle volume fraction. A simple phenomenological model of the internal elastic response to normal mode fluctuations is developed, which shows that long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions play a central role in the viscoelasticity of the gel network. Dynamic simulations of hard spheres that gel in response to short-ranged depletion attractions are used to test the applicability of the density of states predictions. For particle concentrations up to 30% by volume, the power law decay of the relaxation modulus in simulations accounting for long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions agrees with predictions generated by the density of states of the corresponding harmonic networks as well as experimental measurements. For higher volume fractions, excluded volume interactions dominate the stress response, and the prediction from the harmonic network density of states fails. Analogous to the Zimm model in polymer

  4. Helicon normal modes in Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, P. A.; Caneses, J. F.; Green, D. L.; Goulding, R. H.; Lau, C.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Rapp, J.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2018-05-01

    The Proto-MPEX helicon source has been operating in a high electron density ‘helicon-mode’. Establishing plasma densities and magnetic field strengths under the antenna that allow for the formation of normal modes of the fast-wave are believed to be responsible for the ‘helicon-mode’. A 2D finite-element full-wave model of the helicon antenna on Proto-MPEX is used to identify the fast-wave normal modes responsible for the steady-state electron density profile produced by the source. We also show through the simulation that in the regions of operation in which core power deposition is maximum the slow-wave does not deposit significant power besides directly under the antenna. In the case of a simulation where a normal mode is not excited significant edge power is deposited in the mirror region. ).

  5. Normal modes and continuous spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmforth, N.J.; Morrison, P.J.

    1994-12-01

    The authors consider stability problems arising in fluids, plasmas and stellar systems that contain singularities resulting from wave-mean flow or wave-particle resonances. Such resonances lead to singularities in the differential equations determining the normal modes at the so-called critical points or layers. The locations of the singularities are determined by the eigenvalue of the problem, and as a result, the spectrum of eigenvalues forms a continuum. They outline a method to construct the singular eigenfunctions comprising the continuum for a variety of problems

  6. Anomalous normal mode oscillations in semiconductor microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Semiconductor microcavities as a composite exciton-cavity system can be characterized by two normal modes. Under an impulsive excitation by a short laser pulse, optical polarizations associated with the two normal modes have a {pi} phase difference. The total induced optical polarization is then expected to exhibit a sin{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like oscillation where 2{Omega} is the normal mode splitting, reflecting a coherent energy exchange between the exciton and cavity. In this paper the authors present experimental studies of normal mode oscillations using three-pulse transient four wave mixing (FWM). The result reveals surprisingly that when the cavity is tuned far below the exciton resonance, normal mode oscillation in the polarization is cos{sup 2}({Omega}t)-like, in contrast to what is expected form the simple normal mode model. This anomalous normal mode oscillation reflects the important role of virtual excitation of electronic states in semiconductor microcavities.

  7. On normal modes in classical Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Normal modes of Hamittonian systems that are even and of classical type are characterized as the critical points of a normalized kinetic energy functional on level sets of the potential energy functional. With the aid of this constrained variational formulation the existence of at least one family

  8. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. I. The normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comandi, G.L.; Chiofalo, M.L.; Toncelli, R.; Bramanti, D.; Polacco, E.; Nobili, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the equivalence principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration η between two test bodies-of different compositions, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass--if the measurement is made to the level of η≅10 -13 or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in a low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the 'Galileo Galilei on the ground' (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following articles (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation-in particular, its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)-can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining a quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus

  9. Sphalerons, deformed sphalerons and normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brihaye, Y.; Kunz, J.; Oldenburg Univ.

    1992-01-01

    Topological arguments suggest that tha Weinberg-Salam model posses unstable solutions, sphalerons, representing the top of energy barriers between inequivalent vacua of the gauge theory. In the limit of vanishing Weinberg angle, such unstable solutions are known: the sphaleron of Klinkhamer and Manton and at large values of the Higgs mass in addition the deformed sphalerons. Here a systematic study of the discrete normal modes about these sphalerons for the full range Higgs mass is presented. The emergence of deformed sphalerons at critical values of the Higgs mass is seem to be related to the crossing of zero of the eigenvalue of the particular normal modes about the sphaleron. 6 figs., 1 tab., 19 refs. (author)

  10. Normal mode analysis for linear resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerner, W.; Lerbinger, K.; Gruber, R.; Tsunematsu, T.

    1984-10-01

    The compressible, resistive MHD equations are linearized around an equilibrium with cylindrical symmetry and solved numerically as a complex eigenvalue problem. This normal mode code allows to solve for very small resistivity eta proportional 10 -10 . The scaling of growthrates and layer width agrees very well with analytical theory. Especially, both the influence of current and pressure on the instabilities is studied in detail; the effect of resistivity on the ideally unstable internal kink is analyzed. (orig.)

  11. Normal modes of vibration in nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgeneau, R J [Yale Univ., New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cordes, J [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dolling, G; Woods, A D B

    1964-07-01

    The frequency-wave-vector dispersion relation, {nu}(q), for the normal vibrations of a nickel single crystal at 296{sup o}K has been measured for the [{zeta}00], [{zeta}00], [{zeta}{zeta}{zeta}], and [0{zeta}1] symmetric directions using inelastic neutron scattering. The results can be described in terms of the Born-von Karman theory of lattice dynamics with interactions out to fourth-nearest neighbors. The shapes of the dispersion curves are very similar to those of copper, the normal mode frequencies in nickel being about 1.24 times the corresponding frequencies in copper. The fourth-neighbor model was used to calculate the frequency distribution function g({nu}) and related thermodynamic properties. (author)

  12. On normal modes and dispersive properties of plasma systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, J.

    1976-01-01

    The description of nonlinear wave phenomena in terms of normal modes contra that of electric fields is discussed. The possibility of defining higher order normal modes is pointed out and the field energy is expressed in terms of the normal mode and the electric field. (Auth.)

  13. Normal mode analysis and applications in biological physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Eric C; Sankey, Otto F

    2010-10-27

    Normal mode analysis has become a popular and often used theoretical tool in the study of functional motions in enzymes, viruses, and large protein assemblies. The use of normal modes in the study of these motions is often extremely fruitful since many of the functional motions of large proteins can be described using just a few normal modes which are intimately related to the overall structure of the protein. In this review, we present a broad overview of several popular methods used in the study of normal modes in biological physics including continuum elastic theory, the elastic network model, and a new all-atom method, recently developed, which is capable of computing a subset of the low frequency vibrational modes exactly. After a review of the various methods, we present several examples of applications of normal modes in the study of functional motions, with an emphasis on viral capsids.

  14. On normal modes of gas sheets and discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, L.O'C.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the reflection and transmission coefficients characterizing normal modes of the Goldreich-Lynden-Bell gas sheet. Two families of gas discs without self-gravity for which the normal modes can be found analytically are given and used to illustrate the validity of the sheet approximation. (author)

  15. WEBnm@: a web application for normal mode analyses of proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuter Nathalie

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal mode analysis (NMA has become the method of choice to investigate the slowest motions in macromolecular systems. NMA is especially useful for large biomolecular assemblies, such as transmembrane channels or virus capsids. NMA relies on the hypothesis that the vibrational normal modes having the lowest frequencies (also named soft modes describe the largest movements in a protein and are the ones that are functionally relevant. Results We developed a web-based server to perform normal modes calculations and different types of analyses. Starting from a structure file provided by the user in the PDB format, the server calculates the normal modes and subsequently offers the user a series of automated calculations; normalized squared atomic displacements, vector field representation and animation of the first six vibrational modes. Each analysis is performed independently from the others and results can be visualized using only a web browser. No additional plug-in or software is required. For users who would like to analyze the results with their favorite software, raw results can also be downloaded. The application is available on http://www.bioinfo.no/tools/normalmodes. We present here the underlying theory, the application architecture and an illustration of its features using a large transmembrane protein as an example. Conclusion We built an efficient and modular web application for normal mode analysis of proteins. Non specialists can easily and rapidly evaluate the degree of flexibility of multi-domain protein assemblies and characterize the large amplitude movements of their domains.

  16. On matrix superpotential and three-component normal modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, A.F. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Mello, E.R. Bezerra de; Bezerra, V.B. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mails: rafael@df.ufcg.edu.br; aerlima@df.ufcg.edu.br; emello@fisica.ufpb.br; valdir@fisica.ufpb.br

    2007-07-01

    We consider the supersymmetric quantum mechanics(SUSY QM) with three-component normal modes for the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states. An explicit form of the SUSY QM matrix superpotential is presented and the corresponding three-component bosonic zero-mode eigenfunction is investigated. (author)

  17. A Bloch mode expansion approach for analyzing quasi-normal modes in open nanophotonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for determining quasi-normal modes in open nanophotonic structures using a modal ex- pansion technique. The outgoing wave boundary condition of the quasi-normal modes is satisfied automatically without absorbing boundaries, representing a significant advantage compared...

  18. The energy spectrum of electromagnetic normal modes in dissipative media: modes between two metal half spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sernelius, Bo E

    2008-01-01

    The energy spectrum of electromagnetic normal modes plays a central role in the theory of the van der Waals and Casimir interaction. Here we study the modes in connection with the van der Waals interaction between two metal half spaces. Neglecting dissipation leads to distinct normal modes with real-valued frequencies. Including dissipation seems to have the effect that these distinct modes move away from the real axis into the complex frequency plane. The summation of the zero-point energies of these modes render a complex-valued result. Using the contour integration, resulting from the use of the generalized argument principle, gives a real-valued and different result. We resolve this contradiction and show that the spectrum of true normal modes forms a continuum with real frequencies

  19. Quasi-Normal Modes of Stars and Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokkotas Kostas

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations of stars and black holes have been one of the main topics of relativistic astrophysics for the last few decades. They are of particular importance today, because of their relevance to gravitational wave astronomy. In this review we present the theory of quasi-normal modes of compact objects from both the mathematical and astrophysical points of view. The discussion includes perturbations of black holes (Schwarzschild, Reissner-Nordström, Kerr and Kerr-Newman and relativistic stars (non-rotating and slowly-rotating. The properties of the various families of quasi-normal modes are described, and numerical techniques for calculating quasi-normal modes reviewed. The successes, as well as the limits, of perturbation theory are presented, and its role in the emerging era of numerical relativity and supercomputers is discussed.

  20. Normal mode-guided transition pathway generation in proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Ho Lee

    Full Text Available The biological function of proteins is closely related to its structural motion. For instance, structurally misfolded proteins do not function properly. Although we are able to experimentally obtain structural information on proteins, it is still challenging to capture their dynamics, such as transition processes. Therefore, we need a simulation method to predict the transition pathways of a protein in order to understand and study large functional deformations. Here, we present a new simulation method called normal mode-guided elastic network interpolation (NGENI that performs normal modes analysis iteratively to predict transition pathways of proteins. To be more specific, NGENI obtains displacement vectors that determine intermediate structures by interpolating the distance between two end-point conformations, similar to a morphing method called elastic network interpolation. However, the displacement vector is regarded as a linear combination of the normal mode vectors of each intermediate structure, in order to enhance the physical sense of the proposed pathways. As a result, we can generate more reasonable transition pathways geometrically and thermodynamically. By using not only all normal modes, but also in part using only the lowest normal modes, NGENI can still generate reasonable pathways for large deformations in proteins. This study shows that global protein transitions are dominated by collective motion, which means that a few lowest normal modes play an important role in this process. NGENI has considerable merit in terms of computational cost because it is possible to generate transition pathways by partial degrees of freedom, while conventional methods are not capable of this.

  1. Normal-Mode Splitting in a Weakly Coupled Optomechanical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Kralj, Nenad; Zippilli, Stefano; Natali, Riccardo; Borrielli, Antonio; Pandraud, Gregory; Serra, Enrico; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Vitali, David

    2018-02-01

    Normal-mode splitting is the most evident signature of strong coupling between two interacting subsystems. It occurs when two subsystems exchange energy between themselves faster than they dissipate it to the environment. Here we experimentally show that a weakly coupled optomechanical system at room temperature can manifest normal-mode splitting when the pump field fluctuations are antisquashed by a phase-sensitive feedback loop operating close to its instability threshold. Under these conditions the optical cavity exhibits an effectively reduced decay rate, so that the system is effectively promoted to the strong coupling regime.

  2. CASTOR: Normal-mode analysis of resistive MHD plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerner, W.; Goedbloed, J. P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Poedts, S.; Schwarz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The CASTOR (complex Alfven spectrum of toroidal plasmas) code computes the entire spectrum of normal-modes in resistive MHD for general tokamak configurations. The applied Galerkin method, in conjunction with a Fourier finite-element discretisation, leads to a large scale eigenvalue problem A (x)

  3. Quasi-normal modes from non-commutative matrix dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Francesco; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    We explore similarities between the process of relaxation in the BMN matrix model and the physics of black holes in AdS/CFT. Focusing on Dyson-fluid solutions of the matrix model, we perform numerical simulations of the real time dynamics of the system. By quenching the equilibrium distribution we study quasi-normal oscillations of scalar single trace observables, we isolate the lowest quasi-normal mode, and we determine its frequencies as function of the energy. Considering the BMN matrix model as a truncation of N=4 SYM, we also compute the frequencies of the quasi-normal modes of the dual scalar fields in the AdS5-Schwarzschild background. We compare the results, and we finda surprising similarity.

  4. NOLB: Nonlinear Rigid Block Normal Mode Analysis Method

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann , Alexandre; Grudinin , Sergei

    2017-01-01

    International audience; We present a new conceptually simple and computationally efficient method for nonlinear normal mode analysis called NOLB. It relies on the rotations-translations of blocks (RTB) theoretical basis developed by Y.-H. Sanejouand and colleagues. We demonstrate how to physically interpret the eigenvalues computed in the RTB basis in terms of angular and linear velocities applied to the rigid blocks and how to construct a nonlinear extrapolation of motion out of these veloci...

  5. Fast Eigensolver for Computing 3D Earth's Normal Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J.; De Hoop, M. V.; Li, R.; Xi, Y.; Saad, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel parallel computational approach to compute Earth's normal modes. We discretize Earth via an unstructured tetrahedral mesh and apply the continuous Galerkin finite element method to the elasto-gravitational system. To resolve the eigenvalue pollution issue, following the analysis separating the seismic point spectrum, we utilize explicitly a representation of the displacement for describing the oscillations of the non-seismic modes in the fluid outer core. Effectively, we separate out the essential spectrum which is naturally related to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. We introduce two Lanczos approaches with polynomial and rational filtering for solving this generalized eigenvalue problem in prescribed intervals. The polynomial filtering technique only accesses the matrix pair through matrix-vector products and is an ideal candidate for solving three-dimensional large-scale eigenvalue problems. The matrix-free scheme allows us to deal with fluid separation and self-gravitation in an efficient way, while the standard shift-and-invert method typically needs an explicit shifted matrix and its factorization. The rational filtering method converges much faster than the standard shift-and-invert procedure when computing all the eigenvalues inside an interval. Both two Lanczos approaches solve for the internal eigenvalues extremely accurately, comparing with the standard eigensolver. In our computational experiments, we compare our results with the radial earth model benchmark, and visualize the normal modes using vector plots to illustrate the properties of the displacements in different modes.

  6. Normal mode approach to modelling of feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.S.; Chance, M.S.; Okabayashi, M.; Glasser, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) of a plasma in a general feedback configuration is formulated in terms of the normal modes of the plasma-resistive wall system. The growth/damping rates and the eigenfunctions of the normal modes are determined by an extended energy principle for the plasma during its open (feedback) loop operation. A set of equations are derived for the time evolution of these normal modes with currents in the feedback coils. The dynamics of the feedback system is completed by the prescription of the feedback logic. The feasibility of the feedback is evaluated by using the Nyquist diagram method or by solving the characteristic equations. The elements of the characteristic equations are formed from the growth and damping rates of the normal modes, the sensor matrix of the perturbation fluxes detected by the sensor loops, the excitation matrix of the energy input to the normal modes by the external feedback coils, and the feedback logic. (The RWM is also predicted to be excited by an external error field to a large amplitude when it is close to marginal stability.) This formulation has been implemented numerically and applied to the DIII-D tokamak. It is found that feedback with poloidal sensors is much more effective than feedback with radial sensors. Using radial sensors, increasing the number of feedback coils from a central band on the outboard side to include an upper and a lower band can substantially increase the effectiveness of the feedback system. The strength of the RWM that can be stabilized is increased from γτ w = 1 to 30 (γ is the growth rate of the RWM in the absence of feedback and τ w is the resistive wall time constant) Using poloidal sensors, just one central band of feedback coils is sufficient for the stabilization of the RWM with γτ w = 30. (author)

  7. Vocal fold contact patterns based on normal modes of vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Simeon L; Titze, Ingo R

    2018-05-17

    The fluid-structure interaction and energy transfer from respiratory airflow to self-sustained vocal fold oscillation continues to be a topic of interest in vocal fold research. Vocal fold vibration is driven by pressures on the vocal fold surface, which are determined by the shape of the glottis and the contact between vocal folds. Characterization of three-dimensional glottal shapes and contact patterns can lead to increased understanding of normal and abnormal physiology of the voice, as well as to development of improved vocal fold models, but a large inventory of shapes has not been directly studied previously. This study aimed to take an initial step toward characterizing vocal fold contact patterns systematically. Vocal fold motion and contact was modeled based on normal mode vibration, as it has been shown that vocal fold vibration can be almost entirely described by only the few lowest order vibrational modes. Symmetric and asymmetric combinations of the four lowest normal modes of vibration were superimposed on left and right vocal fold medial surfaces, for each of three prephonatory glottal configurations, according to a surface wave approach. Contact patterns were generated from the interaction of modal shapes at 16 normalized phases during the vibratory cycle. Eight major contact patterns were identified and characterized by the shape of the flow channel, with the following descriptors assigned: convergent, divergent, convergent-divergent, uniform, split, merged, island, and multichannel. Each of the contact patterns and its variation are described, and future work and applications are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Wormhole potentials and throats from quasi-normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völkel, Sebastian H.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2018-05-01

    Exotic compact objects refer to a wide class of black hole alternatives or effective models to describe phenomenologically quantum gravitational effects on the horizon scale. In this work we show how the knowledge of the quasi-normal mode spectrum of non-rotating wormhole models can be used to reconstruct the effective potential that appears in perturbation equations. From this it is further possible to obtain the parameters that characterize the specific wormhole model, which in this paper was chosen to be the one by Damour and Solodukhin. We also address the question whether one can distinguish such type of wormholes from ultra compact stars, if only the quasi-normal mode spectrum is known. We have proven that this is not possible by using the trapped modes only, but requires additional information. The inverse method presented here is an extension of work that has previously been developed and applied to the oscillation spectra of ultra compact stars and gravastars. However, it is not limited to the study of exotic compact objects, but applicable to symmetric double barrier potentials that appear in one-dimensional wave equations. Therefore we think it can be of interest for other fields too.

  9. Normal Modes of Magnetized Finite Two-Dimensional Yukawa Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marleau, Gabriel-Dominique; Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The normal modes of a finite two-dimensional dusty plasma in an isotropic parabolic confinement, including the simultaneous effects of friction and an external magnetic field, are studied. The ground states are found from molecular dynamics simulations with simulated annealing, and the influence of screening, friction, and magnetic field on the mode frequencies is investigated in detail. The two-particle problem is solved analytically and the limiting cases of weak and strong magnetic fields are discussed.[4pt] [1] C. Henning, H. K"ahlert, P. Ludwig, A. Melzer, and M.Bonitz. J. Phys. A 42, 214023 (2009)[2] B. Farokhi, M. Shahmansouri, and P. K. Shukla. Phys.Plasmas 16, 063703 (2009)[3] L. Cândido, J.-P. Rino, N. Studart, and F. M. Peeters. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 10, 11627--11644 (1998)

  10. A New Normal Form for Multidimensional Mode Conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, E. R.; Richardson, A. S.; Kaufman, A. N.; Zobin, N.

    2007-01-01

    Linear conversion occurs when two wave types, with distinct polarization and dispersion characteristics, are locally resonant in a nonuniform plasma [1]. In recent work, we have shown how to incorporate a ray-based (WKB) approach to mode conversion in numerical algorithms [2,3]. The method uses the ray geometry in the conversion region to guide the reduction of the full NxN-system of wave equations to a 2x2 coupled pair which can be solved and matched to the incoming and outgoing WKB solutions. The algorithm in [2] assumes the ray geometry is hyperbolic and that, in ray phase space, there is an 'avoided crossing', which is the most common type of conversion. Here, we present a new formulation that can deal with more general types of conversion [4]. This formalism is based upon the fact (first proved in [5]) that it is always possible to put the 2x2 wave equation into a 'normal' form, such that the diagonal elements of the dispersion matrix Poisson-commute with the off-diagonals (at leading order). Therefore, if we use the diagonals (rather than the eigenvalues or the determinant) of the dispersion matrix as ray Hamiltonians, the off-diagonals will be conserved quantities. When cast into normal form, the 2x2 dispersion matrix has a very natural physical interpretation: the diagonals are the uncoupled ray hamiltonians and the off-diagonals are the coupling. We discuss how to incorporate the normal form into ray tracing algorithms

  11. [Raman, FTIR spectra and normal mode analysis of acetanilide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui-Qin; Tao, Ya-Ping; Han, Li-Gang; Han, Yun-Xia; Mo, Yu-Jun

    2012-10-01

    The Raman and FTIR spectra of acetanilide (ACN) were measured experimentally in the regions of 3 500-50 and 3 500-600 cm(-1) respectively. The equilibrium geometry and vibration frequencies of ACN were calculated based on density functional theory (DFT) method (B3LYP/6-311G(d, p)). The results showed that the theoretical calculation of molecular structure parameters are in good agreement with previous report and better than the ones calculated based on 6-31G(d), and the calculated frequencies agree well with the experimental ones. Potential energy distribution of each frequency was worked out by normal mode analysis, and based on this, a detailed and accurate vibration frequency assignment of ACN was obtained.

  12. Neutrino induced vorticity, Alfven waves and the normal modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Jitesh R. [Theory Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); George, Manu [Theory Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Ahmedabad (India)

    2017-08-15

    We consider a plasma consisting of electrons and ions in the presence of a background neutrino gas and develop the magnetohydrodynamic equations for the system. We show that the electron neutrino interaction can induce vorticity in the plasma even in the absence of any electromagnetic perturbations if the background neutrino density is left-right asymmetric. This induced vorticity supports a new kind of Alfven wave whose velocity depends on both the external magnetic field and on the neutrino asymmetry. The normal mode analysis show that in the presence of neutrino background the Alfven waves can have different velocities. We also discuss our results in the context of dense astrophysical plasma such as magnetars and show that the difference in the Alfven velocities can be used to explain the observed pulsar kick. We discuss also the relativistic generalisation of the electron fluid in presence of an asymmetric neutrino background. (orig.)

  13. A design of a mode converter for electron cyclotron heating by the method of normal mode expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Katsumichi; Kawashima, Hisato; Hata, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Takumi

    1983-09-01

    Mode conversion of electromagnetic wave propagating in the over-size circular waveguide is attained by giving a periodical perturbation in the guide wall. Mode coupling equation is expressed by ''generalized telegraphist's equations'' which are derived from the Maxwell's equations using a normal mode expansion. A computer code to solve the coupling equations is developed and mode amplitude, conversion efficiency, etc. of a particular type of mode converter for the 60 GHz electron cyclotron heating are obtained. (author)

  14. Effect of survey mode on response patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    .7%). Marital status, ethnic background and highest completed education were associated with non-response in both modes. Furthermore, sex and age were associated with non-response in the self-administered mode. No significant mode effects were observed for indicators related to use of health services......BACKGROUND: While face-to-face interviews are considered the gold standard of survey modes, self-administered questionnaires are often preferred for cost and convenience. This article examines response patterns in two general population health surveys carried out by face-to-face interview and self......-administered questionnaire, respectively. METHOD: Data derives from a health interview survey in the Region of Southern Denmark (face-to-face interview) and The Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010 (self-administered questionnaire). Identical questions were used in both surveys. Data on all individuals were obtained from...

  15. "Good Vibrations": A workshop on oscillations and normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Sara; Carpineti, Marina; Giliberti, Marco; Rigon, Enrico; Stellato, Marco; Tamborini, Marina

    2016-05-01

    We describe some theatrical strategies adopted in a two hour workshop in order to show some meaningful experiments and the underlying useful ideas to describe a secondary school path on oscillations, that develops from harmonic motion to normal modes of oscillations, and makes extensive use of video analysis, data logging, slow motions and applet simulations. Theatre is an extremely useful tool to stimulate motivation starting from positive emotions. That is the reason why the theatrical approach to the presentation of physical themes has been explored by the group "Lo spettacolo della Fisica" (http://spettacolo.fisica.unimi.it) of the Physics Department of University of Milano for the last ten years (Carpineti et al., JCOM, 10 (2011) 1; Nuovo Cimento B, 121 (2006) 901) and has been inserted also in the European FP7 Project TEMI (Teaching Enquiry with Mysteries Incorporated, see http://teachingmysteries.eu/en) which involves 13 different partners coming from 11 European countries, among which the Italian (Milan) group. According to the TEMI guidelines, this workshop has a written script based on emotionally engaging activities of presenting mysteries to be solved while participants have been involved in nice experiments following the developed path.

  16. Free and forced Rossby normal modes in a rectangular gulf of arbitrary orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, Federico

    2016-09-01

    A free Rossby normal mode in a rectangular gulf of arbitrary orientation is constructed by considering the reflection of a Rossby mode in a channel at the head of the gulf. Therefore, it is the superposition of four Rossby waves in an otherwise unbounded ocean with the same frequency and wavenumbers perpendicular to the gulf axis whose difference is equal to 2mπ/W, where m is a positive integer and W the gulf's width. The lower (or higher) modes with small m (or large m) are oscillatory (evanescent) in the coordinate along the gulf; these are elucidated geometrically. However for oceanographically realistic parameter values, most of the modes are evanescent. When the gulf is forced at the mouth with a single Fourier component, the response is in general an infinite sum of modes that are needed to match the value of the streamfunction at the gulf's entrance. The dominant mode of the response is the resonant one, which corresponds to forcing with a frequency ω and wavenumber normal to the gulf axis η appropriate to a gulf mode: η =- β sin α/(2ω) ± Mπ/W, where α is the angle between the gulf's axis and the eastern direction (+ve clockwise) and M the resonant's mode number. For zonal gulfs ω drops out of the resonance condition. For the special cases η = 0 in which the free surface goes up and down at the mouth with no flow through it, or a flow with a sinusoidal profile, resonant modes can get excited for very specific frequencies (only for non-zonal gulfs in the η = 0 case). The resonant mode is around the annual frequency for a wide range of gulf orientations α ∈ [40°, 130°] or α ∈ [220°, 310°] and gulf widths between 150 and 200 km; these include the Gulf of California and the Adriatic Sea. If η is imaginary, i.e. a flow with an exponential profile, there is no resonance. In general less modes get excited if the gulf is zonally oriented.

  17. Antidepressants normalize the default mode network in patients with dysthymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Jonathan; Hellerstein, David J; Gat, Inbal; Mechling, Anna; Klahr, Kristin; Wang, Zhishun; McGrath, Patrick J; Stewart, Jonathan W; Peterson, Bradley S

    2013-04-01

    The default mode network (DMN) is a collection of brain regions that reliably deactivate during goal-directed behaviors and is more active during a baseline, or so-called resting, condition. Coherence of neural activity, or functional connectivity, within the brain's DMN is increased in major depressive disorder relative to healthy control (HC) subjects; however, whether similar abnormalities are present in persons with dysthymic disorder (DD) is unknown. Moreover, the effect of antidepressant medications on DMN connectivity in patients with DD is also unknown. To use resting-state functional-connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study (1) the functional connectivity of the DMN in subjects with DD vs HC participants and (2) the effects of antidepressant therapy on DMN connectivity. After collecting baseline MRI scans from subjects with DD and HC participants, we enrolled the participants with DD into a 10-week prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of duloxetine and collected MRI scans again at the conclusion of the study. Enrollment occurred between 2007 and 2011. University research institute. Volunteer sample of 41 subjects with DD and 25 HC participants aged 18 to 53 years. Control subjects were group matched to patients with DD by age and sex. We used resting-state functional-connectivity MRI to measure the functional connectivity of the brain's DMN in persons with DD compared with HC subjects, and we examined the effects of treatment with duloxetine vs placebo on DMN connectivity. Of the 41 subjects with DD, 32 completed the clinical trial and MRI scans, along with the 25 HC participants. At baseline, we found that the coherence of neural activity within the brain's DMN was greater in persons with DD compared with HC subjects. Following a 10-week clinical trial, we found that treatment with duloxetine, but not placebo, normalized DMN connectivity. The baseline imaging findings are consistent with those found in patients with major

  18. A normal mode treatment of semi-diurnal body tides on an aspherical, rotating and anelastic Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Harriet C. P.; Yang, Hsin-Ying; Tromp, Jeroen; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Latychev, Konstantin; Al-Attar, David

    2015-08-01

    Normal mode treatments of the Earth's body tide response were developed in the 1980s to account for the effects of Earth rotation, ellipticity, anelasticity and resonant excitation within the diurnal band. Recent space-geodetic measurements of the Earth's crustal displacement in response to luni-solar tidal forcings have revealed geographical variations that are indicative of aspherical deep mantle structure, thus providing a novel data set for constraining deep mantle elastic and density structure. In light of this, we make use of advances in seismic free oscillation literature to develop a new, generalized normal mode theory for the tidal response within the semi-diurnal and long-period tidal band. Our theory involves a perturbation method that permits an efficient calculation of the impact of aspherical structure on the tidal response. In addition, we introduce a normal mode treatment of anelasticity that is distinct from both earlier work in body tides and the approach adopted in free oscillation seismology. We present several simple numerical applications of the new theory. First, we compute the tidal response of a spherically symmetric, non-rotating, elastic and isotropic Earth model and demonstrate that our predictions match those based on standard Love number theory. Second, we compute perturbations to this response associated with mantle anelasticity and demonstrate that the usual set of seismic modes adopted for this purpose must be augmented by a family of relaxation modes to accurately capture the full effect of anelasticity on the body tide response. Finally, we explore aspherical effects including rotation and we benchmark results from several illustrative case studies of aspherical Earth structure against independent finite-volume numerical calculations of the semi-diurnal body tide response. These tests confirm the accuracy of the normal mode methodology to at least the level of numerical error in the finite-volume predictions. They also demonstrate

  19. Comparative Study of Various Normal Mode Analysis Techniques Based on Partial Hessians

    OpenAIRE

    GHYSELS, AN; VAN SPEYBROECK, VERONIQUE; PAUWELS, EWALD; CATAK, SARON; BROOKS, BERNARD R.; VAN NECK, DIMITRI; WAROQUIER, MICHEL

    2010-01-01

    Standard normal mode analysis becomes problematic for complex molecular systems, as a result of both the high computational cost and the excessive amount of information when the full Hessian matrix is used. Several partial Hessian methods have been proposed in the literature, yielding approximate normal modes. These methods aim at reducing the computational load and/or calculating only the relevant normal modes of interest in a specific application. Each method has its own (dis)advantages and...

  20. Investigations on response time of magnetorheological elastomer under compression mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mi; Yu, Miao; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie

    2018-05-01

    For efficient fast control of vibration system with magnetorheological elastomer (MRE)-based smart device, the response time of MRE material is the key parameter which directly affects the control performance of the vibration system. For a step coil current excitation, this paper proposed a Maxwell behavior model with time constant λ to describe the normal force response of MRE, and the response time of MRE was extracted through the separation of coil response time. Besides, the transient responses of MRE under compression mode were experimentally investigated, and the effects of (i) applied current, (ii) particle distribution and (iii) compressive strain on the response time of MRE were addressed. The results revealed that the three factors can affect the response characteristic of MRE quite significantly. Besides the intrinsic importance for contributing to the response evaluation and effective design of MRE device, this study may conduce to the optimal design of controller for MRE control system.

  1. New method for computing ideal MHD normal modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysocki, F.; Grimm, R.C.

    1984-11-01

    Analytic elimination of the two magnetic surface components of the displacement vector permits the normal mode ideal MHD equations to be reduced to a scalar form. A Galerkin procedure, similar to that used in the PEST codes, is implemented to determine the normal modes computationally. The method retains the efficient stability capabilities of the PEST 2 energy principle code, while allowing computation of the normal mode frequencies and eigenfunctions, if desired. The procedure is illustrated by comparison with earlier various of PEST and by application to tilting modes in spheromaks, and to stable discrete Alfven waves in tokamak geometry

  2. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asafi, M S; Tekpinar, M; Yildirim, A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated. (paper)

  3. Nonlinear normal vibration modes in the dynamics of nonlinear elastic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhlin, Yu V; Perepelkin, N V; Klimenko, A A; Harutyunyan, E

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) are a generalization of the linear normal vibrations. By the Kauderer-Rosenberg concept in the regime of the NNM all position coordinates are single-values functions of some selected position coordinate. By the Shaw-Pierre concept, the NNM is such a regime when all generalized coordinates and velocities are univalent functions of a couple of dominant (active) phase variables. The NNMs approach is used in some applied problems. In particular, the Kauderer-Rosenberg NNMs are analyzed in the dynamics of some pendulum systems. The NNMs of forced vibrations are investigated in a rotor system with an isotropic-elastic shaft. A combination of the Shaw-Pierre NNMs and the Rauscher method is used to construct the forced NNMs and the frequency responses in the rotor dynamics.

  4. Normal Mode Derived Models of the Physical Properties of Earth's Outer Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, J. C. E.; Cottaar, S.; Lekic, V.; Wu, W.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's outer core, the largest reservoir of metal in our planet, is comprised of an iron alloy of an uncertain composition. Its dynamical behaviour is responsible for the generation of Earth's magnetic field, with convection driven both by thermal and chemical buoyancy fluxes. Existing models of the seismic velocity and density of the outer core exhibit some variation, and there are only a small number of models which aim to represent the outer core's density.It is therefore important that we develop a better understanding of the physical properties of the outer core. Though most of the outer core is likely to be well mixed, it is possible that the uppermost outer core is stably stratified: it may be enriched in light elements released during the growth of the solid, iron enriched, inner core; by elements dissolved from the mantle into the outer core; or by exsolution of compounds previously dissolved in the liquid metal which will eventually be swept into the mantle. The stratified layer may host MAC or Rossby waves and it could impede communication between the chemically differentiated mantle and outer core, including screening out some of the geodynamo's signal. We use normal mode center frequencies to estimate the physical properties of the outer core in a Bayesian framework. We estimate the mineral physical parameters needed to best produce velocity and density models of the outer core which are consistent with the normal mode observations. We require that our models satisfy realistic physical constraints. We create models of the outer core with and without a distinct uppermost layer and assess the importance of this region.Our normal mode-derived models are compared with observations of body waves which travel through the outer core. In particular, we consider SmKS waves which are especially sensitive to the uppermost outer core and are therefore an important way to understand the robustness of our models.

  5. SwarmDock and the Use of Normal Modes in Protein-Protein Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Bates

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Here is presented an investigation of the use of normal modes in protein-protein docking, both in theory and in practice. Upper limits of the ability of normal modes to capture the unbound to bound conformational change are calculated on a large test set, with particular focus on the binding interface, the subset of residues from which the binding energy is calculated. Further, the SwarmDock algorithm is presented, to demonstrate that the modelling of conformational change as a linear combination of normal modes is an effective method of modelling flexibility in protein-protein docking.

  6. From explicit to implicit normal mode initialization of a limited-area model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijlsma, S.J.

    2013-02-15

    In this note the implicit normal mode initialization of a limited-area model is discussed from a different point of view. To that end it is shown that the equations describing the explicit normal mode initialization applied to the shallow water equations in differentiated form on the sphere can readily be derived in normal mode space if the model equations are separable, but only in the case of stationary Rossby modes can be transformed into the implicit equations in physical space. This is a consequence of the simple relations between the components of the different modes in that case. In addition a simple eigenvalue problem is given for the frequencies of the gravity waves. (orig.)

  7. Comparative study of various normal mode analysis techniques based on partial Hessians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghysels, An; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Pauwels, Ewald; Catak, Saron; Brooks, Bernard R; Van Neck, Dimitri; Waroquier, Michel

    2010-04-15

    Standard normal mode analysis becomes problematic for complex molecular systems, as a result of both the high computational cost and the excessive amount of information when the full Hessian matrix is used. Several partial Hessian methods have been proposed in the literature, yielding approximate normal modes. These methods aim at reducing the computational load and/or calculating only the relevant normal modes of interest in a specific application. Each method has its own (dis)advantages and application field but guidelines for the most suitable choice are lacking. We have investigated several partial Hessian methods, including the Partial Hessian Vibrational Analysis (PHVA), the Mobile Block Hessian (MBH), and the Vibrational Subsystem Analysis (VSA). In this article, we focus on the benefits and drawbacks of these methods, in terms of the reproduction of localized modes, collective modes, and the performance in partially optimized structures. We find that the PHVA is suitable for describing localized modes, that the MBH not only reproduces localized and global modes but also serves as an analysis tool of the spectrum, and that the VSA is mostly useful for the reproduction of the low frequency spectrum. These guidelines are illustrated with the reproduction of the localized amine-stretch, the spectrum of quinine and a bis-cinchona derivative, and the low frequency modes of the LAO binding protein. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Extended Majorana zero modes in a topological superconducting-normal T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spånslätt, Christian; Ardonne, Eddy

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the sub gap properties of a three terminal Josephson T-junction composed of topologically superconducting wires connected by a normal metal region. This system naturally hosts zero energy Andreev bound states which are of self-conjugate Majorana nature and we show that they are, in contrast to ordinary Majorana zero modes, spatially extended in the normal metal region. If the T-junction respects time-reversal symmetry, we show that a zero mode is distributed only in two out of three arms in the junction and tuning the superconducting phases allows for transfer of the mode between the junction arms. We further provide tunneling conductance calculations showing that these features can be detected in experiments. Our findings suggest an experimental platform for studying the nature of spatially extended Majorana zero modes.

  9. Modal analysis of inter-area oscillations using the theory of normal modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt, R.J. [School of Electromechanical Engineering, University of Colima, Manzanillo, Col. 28860 (Mexico); Barocio, E. [CUCEI, University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jal. 44480 (Mexico); Messina, A.R. [Graduate Program in Electrical Engineering, Cinvestav, Guadalajara, Jal. 45015 (Mexico); Martinez, I. [State Autonomous University of Mexico, Toluca, Edo. Mex. 50110 (Mexico)

    2009-04-15

    Based on the notion of normal modes in mechanical systems, a method is proposed for the analysis and characterization of oscillatory processes in power systems. The method is based on the property of invariance of modal subspaces and can be used to represent complex power system modal behavior by a set of decoupled, two-degree-of-freedom nonlinear oscillator equations. Using techniques from nonlinear mechanics, a new approach is outlined, for determining the normal modes (NMs) of motion of a general n-degree-of-freedom nonlinear system. Equations relating the normal modes and the physical velocities and displacements are developed from the linearized system model and numerical issues associated with the application of the technique are discussed. In addition to qualitative insight, this method can be utilized in the study of nonlinear behavior and bifurcation analyses. The application of these procedures is illustrated on a planning model of the Mexican interconnected system using a quadratic nonlinear model. Specifically, the use of normal mode analysis as a basis for identifying modal parameters, including natural frequencies and damping ratios of general, linear systems with n degrees of freedom is discussed. Comparisons to conventional linear analysis techniques demonstrate the ability of the proposed technique to extract the different oscillation modes embedded in the oscillation. (author)

  10. A net normal dispersion all-fiber laser using a hybrid mode-locking mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Bo; Martinez, Amos; Yamashita, Shinji; Set, Sze Yun; Goh, Chee Seong

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an all-fiber, dispersion-mapped, erbium-doped fiber laser with net normal dispersion generating dissipative solitons. The laser is mode-locked by a hybrid mode-locking mechanism consisting of a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror and a carbon nanotube saturable absorber. We achieve self-starting, mode-locked operation generating 2.75 nJ pulses at a fundamental repetition rate of 10.22 MHz with remarkable long term stability. (letter)

  11. Conjugate gradient filtering of instantaneous normal modes, saddles on the energy landscape, and diffusion in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, J; Keyes, T

    2002-02-01

    Instantaneous normal modes (INM's) are calculated during a conjugate-gradient (CG) descent of the potential energy landscape, starting from an equilibrium configuration of a liquid or crystal. A small number (approximately equal to 4) of CG steps removes all the Im-omega modes in the crystal and leaves the liquid with diffusive Im-omega which accurately represent the self-diffusion constant D. Conjugate gradient filtering appears to be a promising method, applicable to any system, of obtaining diffusive modes and facilitating INM theory of D. The relation of the CG-step dependent INM quantities to the landscape and its saddles is discussed.

  12. Normal force of magnetorheological fluids with foam metal under oscillatory shear modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Xingyan, E-mail: yaoxingyan-jsj@163.com [Research Center of System Health Maintenance, Chongqing Technology and Business University, Chongqing 400067 (China); Chongqing Engineering Laboratory for Detection Control and Integrated System, Chongqing 400067 (China); Liu, Chuanwen; Liang, Huang; Qin, Huafeng [Chongqing Engineering Laboratory for Detection Control and Integrated System, Chongqing 400067 (China); Yu, Qibing; Li, Chuan [Research Center of System Health Maintenance, Chongqing Technology and Business University, Chongqing 400067 (China); Chongqing Engineering Laboratory for Detection Control and Integrated System, Chongqing 400067 (China)

    2016-04-01

    The normal force of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in porous foam metal was investigated in this paper. The dynamic repulsive normal force was studied using an advanced commercial rheometer under oscillatory shear modes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the influences of time, strain amplitude, frequency and shear rate on the normal force of MR fluids drawn from the porous foam metal were systematically analysed. The experimental results indicated that the magnetic field had the greatest effect on the normal force, and the effect increased incrementally with the magnetic field. Increasing the magnetic field produced a step-wise increase in the shear gap. However, other factors in the presence of a constant magnetic field only had weak effects on the normal force. This behaviour can be regarded as a magnetic field-enhanced normal force, as increases in the magnetic field resulted in more MR fluids being released from the porous foam metal, and the chain-like magnetic particles in the MR fluids becoming more elongated with aggregates spanning the gap between the shear plates. - Highlights: • Normal force of MR fluids with metal foam under oscillatory shear modes was studied. • The shear gap was step-wise increased with magnetic fields. • The magnetic field has a greater impact on the normal force.

  13. Normal force of magnetorheological fluids with foam metal under oscillatory shear modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Xingyan; Liu, Chuanwen; Liang, Huang; Qin, Huafeng; Yu, Qibing; Li, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The normal force of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in porous foam metal was investigated in this paper. The dynamic repulsive normal force was studied using an advanced commercial rheometer under oscillatory shear modes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the influences of time, strain amplitude, frequency and shear rate on the normal force of MR fluids drawn from the porous foam metal were systematically analysed. The experimental results indicated that the magnetic field had the greatest effect on the normal force, and the effect increased incrementally with the magnetic field. Increasing the magnetic field produced a step-wise increase in the shear gap. However, other factors in the presence of a constant magnetic field only had weak effects on the normal force. This behaviour can be regarded as a magnetic field-enhanced normal force, as increases in the magnetic field resulted in more MR fluids being released from the porous foam metal, and the chain-like magnetic particles in the MR fluids becoming more elongated with aggregates spanning the gap between the shear plates. - Highlights: • Normal force of MR fluids with metal foam under oscillatory shear modes was studied. • The shear gap was step-wise increased with magnetic fields. • The magnetic field has a greater impact on the normal force.

  14. Polaritonic normal-mode splitting and light localization in a one-dimensional nanoguide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haakh, Harald R.; Faez, Sanli; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the interaction of light and a collection of emitters in a subwavelength one-dimensional medium (nanoguide), where enhanced emitter-photon coupling leads to efficient multiple scattering of photons. We show that the spectrum of the transmitted light undergoes normal-mode

  15. Relation between Protein Intrinsic Normal Mode Weights and Pre-Existing Conformer Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Beytullah; Ozdemir, E Sila; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2017-04-20

    Intrinsic fluctuations of a protein enable it to sample a large repertoire of conformers including the open and closed forms. These distinct forms of the protein called conformational substates pre-exist together in equilibrium as an ensemble independent from its ligands. The role of ligand might be simply to alter the equilibrium toward the most appropriate form for binding. Normal mode analysis is proved to be useful in identifying the directions of conformational changes between substates. In this study, we demonstrate that the ratios of normalized weights of a few normal modes driving the protein between its substates can give insights about the ratios of kinetic conversion rates of the substates, although a direct relation between the eigenvalues and kinetic conversion rates or populations of each substate could not be observed. The correlation between the normalized mode weight ratios and the kinetic rate ratios is around 83% on a set of 11 non-enzyme proteins and around 59% on a set of 17 enzymes. The results are suggestive that mode motions carry intrinsic relations with thermodynamics and kinetics of the proteins.

  16. Quasi-normal modes of extremal BTZ black holes in TMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Hamid R.; Alishahiha, Mohsen; Mosaffa, Amir E.

    2010-08-01

    We study the spectrum of tensor perturbations on extremal BTZ black holes in topologically massive gravity for arbitrary values of the coefficient of the Chern-Simons term, μ. Imposing proper boundary conditions at the boundary of the space and at the horizon, we find that the spectrum contains quasi-normal modes.

  17. Basic mode of nonlinear spin-wave resonance in normally magnetized ferrite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyaev, Yu.V.; Zil'berman, P.E.; Timiryazev, A.G.; Tikhomirova, M.P.

    2000-01-01

    Modes of nonlinear and spin-wave resonance (SWR) in the normally magnetized ferrite films were studied both theoretically and experimentally. The particular emphasis was placed on the basic mode of SWR. One showed theoretically that with the growth of the precession amplitude the profile of the basic mode changed. The nonlinear shift of the resonance field depends on the parameters of fixing of the surface spins. Films of ferroyttrium garnet (FYG) with strong gradient of the single-axis anisotropy field along the film thickness, as well as, FYG films of the submicron thickness where investigated experimentally. With the intensification of Uhf-power one observed the sublinear shift of the basic mode resonance field following by the superlinear growth of the absorbed power. That kind of behaviour is explained by variation of the profile of the varying magnetization space distribution [ru

  18. An experimental randomized study of six different ventilatory modes in a piglet model with normal lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J B; Sjöstrand, U H; Henneberg, S W

    1991-01-01

    A randomized study of 6 ventilatory modes was made in 7 piglets with normal lungs. Using a Servo HFV 970 (prototype system) and a Servo ventilator 900 C the ventilatory modes examined were as follows: SV-20V, i.e. volume-controlled intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (IPPV); SV-20VIosc, i...... ventilatory modes. Also the mean airway pressures were lower with the HFV modes 8-9 cm H2O compared to 11-14 cm H2O for the other modes. The gas distribution was evaluated by N2 wash-out and a modified lung clearance index. All modes showed N2 wash-out according to a two-compartment model. The SV-20P mode had.......e. volume-controlled ventilation (IPPV) with superimposed inspiratory oscillations; and SV-20VEf, i.e. volume-controlled ventilation (IPPV) with expiratory flush of fresh gas; HFV-60 denotes low-compressive high-frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV) and HVF-20 denotes low-compressive volume...

  19. Contributions from the Second and Third Internal Gravity Modes for the Vertical Motion Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Buchmann

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In earlier papers of a series of real data integrations of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community ClimateModel with tropical heat anomalies display regions of pronounced subsidence and drying located several thousand kilometers westwardpoleward of the heating for cases of tropical Atlantic heating and tropical east Pacifi c heating. This highly predictable sinking responseis established within the fi rst fi ve days of these integrations. The normal-modes of a set of adiabatic primitive equations linearizedabout a basic state at rest are used to partition model response into gravity-inertia and Rossby modes. The most important contributionfor the vertical motion response comes from the gravity modes added for all vertical modes. The principal emphasis is given upon thecontributions of the second and third internal vertical modes (with equivalent depths on the order of a fews hundred meters for thevertical motion response.

  20. Vertical discretizations for compressible Euler equation atmospheric models giving optimal representation of normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuburn, J.; Woollings, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate representation of different kinds of wave motion is essential for numerical models of the atmosphere, but is sensitive to details of the discretization. In this paper, numerical dispersion relations are computed for different vertical discretizations of the compressible Euler equations and compared with the analytical dispersion relation. A height coordinate, an isentropic coordinate, and a terrain-following mass-based coordinate are considered, and, for each of these, different choices of prognostic variables and grid staggerings are considered. The discretizations are categorized according to whether their dispersion relations are optimal, are near optimal, have a single zero-frequency computational mode, or are problematic in other ways. Some general understanding of the factors that affect the numerical dispersion properties is obtained: heuristic arguments concerning the normal mode structures, and the amount of averaging and coarse differencing in the finite difference scheme, are shown to be useful guides to which configurations will be optimal; the number of degrees of freedom in the discretization is shown to be an accurate guide to the existence of computational modes; there is only minor sensitivity to whether the equations for thermodynamic variables are discretized in advective form or flux form; and an accurate representation of acoustic modes is found to be a prerequisite for accurate representation of inertia-gravity modes, which, in turn, is found to be a prerequisite for accurate representation of Rossby modes

  1. Bifurcations of the normal modes of the Ne...Br{sub 2} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blesa, Fernando [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Mahecha, Jorge [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia); Salas, J. Pablo [Area de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logrono (Spain); Inarrea, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.inarrea@unirioja.e [Area de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logrono (Spain)

    2009-12-28

    We study the classical dynamics of the rare gas-dihalogen Ne...Br{sub 2} complex in its ground electronic state. By considering the dihalogen bond frozen at its equilibrium distance, the system has two degrees of freedom and its potential energy surface presents linear and T-shape isomers. We find the nonlinear normal modes of both isomers that determine the phase space structure of the system. By means of surfaces of section and applying the numerical continuation of families of periodic orbits, we detect and identify the different bifurcations suffered by the normal modes as a function of the system energy. Finally, using the Orthogonal Fast Lyapunov Indicator (OFLI), we study the evolution of the fraction of the phase space volume occupied by regular motions.

  2. Perturbations and quasi-normal modes of black holes in Einstein-Aether theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplya, R.A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a new method for calculation of quasi-normal modes of black holes, when the effective potential, which governs black hole perturbations, is known only numerically in some region near the black hole. This method can be applied to perturbations of a wide class of numerical black hole solutions. We apply it to the black holes in the Einstein-Aether theory, a theory where general relativity is coupled to a unit time-like vector field, in order to observe local Lorentz symmetry violation. We found that in the non-reduced Einstein-Aether theory, real oscillation frequency and damping rate of quasi-normal modes are larger than those of Schwarzschild black holes in the Einstein theory

  3. Investigating Equations Used to Design a Very Small Normal-Mode Helical Antenna in Free Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Tien Dung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A normal-mode helical antenna (NMHA has been applied in some small devices such as tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS and radio frequency identification (RFID tags. Previously, electrical characteristics of NMHA were obtained through electromagnetic simulations. In practical design of NMHA, equational expressions for the main electrical characteristics are more convenient. Electrical performances of NMHA can be expressed by a combination of a short dipole and small loops. Applicability of equations for a short dipole and a small loop to very small normal-mode helical antennas such as antennas around 1/100 wavelengths was not clear. In this paper, accuracies of equations for input resistances, antenna efficiency, and axial ratios are verified by comparisons with electromagnetic simulation results by FEKO software at 402 MHz. In addition, the structure of the antenna equal to 0.021 λ is fabricated, and measurements are performed to confirm the design accuracy.

  4. Calculation of normal modes of the closed waveguides in general vector case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykh, M. D.; Sevastianov, L. A.; Tiutiunnik, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The article is devoted to the calculation of normal modes of the closed waveguides with an arbitrary filling ɛ, μ in the system of computer algebra Sage. Maxwell equations in the cylinder are reduced to the system of two bounded Helmholtz equations, the notion of weak solution of this system is given and then this system is investigated as a system of ordinary differential equations. The normal modes of this system are an eigenvectors of a matrix pencil. We suggest to calculate the matrix elements approximately and to truncate the matrix by usual way but further to solve the truncated eigenvalue problem exactly in the field of algebraic numbers. This approach allows to keep the symmetry of the initial problem and in particular the multiplicity of the eigenvalues. In the work would be presented some results of calculations.

  5. Optimization of hardening/softening behavior of plane frame structures using nonlinear normal modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Suguang; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    Devices that exploit essential nonlinear behavior such as hardening/softening and inter-modal coupling effects are increasingly used in engineering and fundamental studies. Based on nonlinear normal modes, we present a gradient-based structural optimization method for tailoring the hardening...... involving plane frame structures where the hardening/softening behavior is qualitatively and quantitatively tuned by simple changes in the geometry of the structures....

  6. A phylogenetic analysis of normal modes evolution in enzymes and its relationship to enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jason; Jin, Jing; Kubelka, Jan; Liberles, David A

    2012-09-21

    Since the dynamic nature of protein structures is essential for enzymatic function, it is expected that functional evolution can be inferred from the changes in protein dynamics. However, dynamics can also diverge neutrally with sequence substitution between enzymes without changes of function. In this study, a phylogenetic approach is implemented to explore the relationship between enzyme dynamics and function through evolutionary history. Protein dynamics are described by normal mode analysis based on a simplified harmonic potential force field applied to the reduced C(α) representation of the protein structure while enzymatic function is described by Enzyme Commission numbers. Similarity of the binding pocket dynamics at each branch of the protein family's phylogeny was analyzed in two ways: (1) explicitly by quantifying the normal mode overlap calculated for the reconstructed ancestral proteins at each end and (2) implicitly using a diffusion model to obtain the reconstructed lineage-specific changes in the normal modes. Both explicit and implicit ancestral reconstruction identified generally faster rates of change in dynamics compared with the expected change from neutral evolution at the branches of potential functional divergences for the α-amylase, D-isomer-specific 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase, and copper-containing amine oxidase protein families. Normal mode analysis added additional information over just comparing the RMSD of static structures. However, the branch-specific changes were not statistically significant compared to background function-independent neutral rates of change of dynamic properties and blind application of the analysis would not enable prediction of changes in enzyme specificity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Different Student Response Modes on Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Lee Sze; Chen, Chwen Jen

    2017-01-01

    Student response systems (SRSs) are wireless answering devices that enable students to provide simple real-time feedback to instructors. This study aims to evaluate the effects of different SRS interaction modes on elementary school students' science learning. Three interaction modes which include SRS Individual, SRS Collaborative, and Classroom…

  8. Normal modes and time evolution of a holographic superconductor after a quantum quench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xin; García-García, Antonio M.; Zeng, Hua Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    We employ holographic techniques to investigate the dynamics of the order parameter of a strongly coupled superconductor after a perturbation that drives the system out of equilibrium. The gravity dual that we employ is the AdS_5 Soliton background at zero temperature. We first analyze the normal modes associated to the superconducting order parameter which are purely real since the background has no horizon. We then study the full time evolution of the order parameter after a quench. For sufficiently a weak and slow perturbation we show that the order parameter undergoes simple undamped oscillations in time with a frequency that agrees with the lowest normal model computed previously. This is expected as the soliton background has no horizon and therefore, at least in the probe and large N limits considered, the system will never return to equilibrium. For stronger and more abrupt perturbations higher normal modes are excited and the pattern of oscillations becomes increasingly intricate. We identify a range of parameters for which the time evolution of the order parameter become quasi chaotic. The details of the chaotic evolution depend on the type of perturbation used. Therefore it is plausible to expect that it is possible to engineer a perturbation that leads to the almost complete destruction of the oscillating pattern and consequently to quasi equilibration induced by superposition of modes with different frequencies

  9. Effect of cobratoxin binding on the normal mode vibration within acetylcholine binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaccini, Edward J; Lindahl, Erik; Sixma, Titia; Trudell, James R

    2008-04-01

    Recent crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) have revealed surprisingly small structural alterations upon ligand binding. Here we investigate the extent to which ligand binding may affect receptor dynamics. AChBP is a homologue of the extracellular component of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs). We have previously used an elastic network normal-mode analysis to propose a gating mechanism for the LGICs and to suggest the effects of various ligands on such motions. However, the difficulties with elastic network methods lie in their inability to account for the modest effects of a small ligand or mutation on ion channel motion. Here, we report the successful application of an elastic network normal mode technique to measure the effects of large ligand binding on receptor dynamics. The present calculations demonstrate a clear alteration in the native symmetric motions of a protein due to the presence of large protein cobratoxin ligands. In particular, normal-mode analysis revealed that cobratoxin binding to this protein significantly dampened the axially symmetric motion of the AChBP that may be associated with channel gating in the full nAChR. The results suggest that alterations in receptor dynamics could be a general feature of ligand binding.

  10. Evaluation of diaphragmatic motion in normal and diaphragmatic paralyzed dogs using M-mode ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mihyun; Lee, Namsoon; Kim, Ahyoung; Keh, Seoyeon; Lee, Jinsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Choi, Mincheol

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis in dogs is currently based on fluoroscopic detection of unequal movement between the crura. Bilateral paralysis may be more difficult to confirm with fluoroscopy because diaphragmatic movement is sometimes produced by compensatory abdominal muscle contractions. The purpose of this study was to develop a new method to evaluate diaphragmatic movement using M-mode ultrasonography and to describe findings for normal and diaphragmatic paralyzed dogs. Fifty-five clinically normal dogs and two dogs with diaphragmatic paralysis were recruited. Thoracic radiographs were acquired for all dogs and fluoroscopy studies were also acquired for clinically affected dogs. Two observers independently measured diaphragmatic direction of motion and amplitude of excursion using M-mode ultrasonography for dogs meeting study inclusion criteria. Eight of the clinically normal dogs were excluded due to abnormal thoracic radiographic findings. For the remaining normal dogs, the lower limit values of diaphragmatic excursion were 2.85-2.98 mm during normal breathing. One dog with bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis showed paradoxical movement of both crura at the end of inspiration. One dog with unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis had diaphragmatic excursion values of 2.00 ± 0.42 mm on the left side and 4.05 ± 1.48 mm on the right side. The difference between left and right diaphragmatic excursion values was 55%. Findings indicated that M-mode ultrasonography is a relatively simple and objective method for measuring diaphragmatic movement in dogs. Future studies are needed in a larger number of dogs with diaphragmatic paralysis to determine the diagnostic sensitivity of this promising new technique. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  11. Identification of surface species by vibrational normal mode analysis. A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Jian; Genest, Alexander; Rösch, Notker

    2017-10-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is an important experimental tool for identifying molecular species adsorbed on a metal surface that can be used in situ. Often vibrational modes in such IR spectra of surface species are assigned and identified by comparison with vibrational spectra of related (molecular) compounds of known structure, e. g., an organometallic cluster analogue. To check the validity of this strategy, we carried out a computational study where we compared the normal modes of three C2Hx species (x = 3, 4) in two types of systems, as adsorbates on the Pt(111) surface and as ligands in an organometallic cluster compound. The results of our DFT calculations reproduce the experimental observed frequencies with deviations of at most 50 cm-1. However, the frequencies of the C2Hx species in both types of systems have to be interpreted with due caution if the coordination mode is unknown. The comparative identification strategy works satisfactorily when the coordination mode of the molecular species (ethylidyne) is similar on the surface and in the metal cluster. However, large shifts are encountered when the molecular species (vinyl) exhibits different coordination modes on both types of substrates.

  12. Quasi-normal frequencies: Semi-analytic results for highly damped modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skakala, Jozef; Visser, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Black hole highly-damped quasi-normal frequencies (QNFs) are very often of the form ω n = (offset) + in (gap). We have investigated the genericity of this phenomenon for the Schwarzschild-deSitter (SdS) black hole by considering a model potential that is piecewise Eckart (piecewise Poschl-Teller), and developing an analytic 'quantization condition' for the highly-damped quasi-normal frequencies. We find that the ω n = (offset) + in (gap) behaviour is common but not universal, with the controlling feature being whether or not the ratio of the surface gravities is a rational number. We furthermore observed that the relation between rational ratios of surface gravities and periodicity of QNFs is very generic, and also occurs within different analytic approaches applied to various types of black hole spacetimes. These observations are of direct relevance to any physical situation where highly-damped quasi-normal modes are important.

  13. Earth's Outer Core Properties Estimated Using Bayesian Inversion of Normal Mode Eigenfrequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, J. C. E.; Cottaar, S.; Lekic, V.

    2016-12-01

    The outer core is arguably Earth's most dynamic region, and consists of an iron-nickel liquid with an unknown combination of lighter alloying elements. Frequencies of Earth's normal modes provide the strongest constraints on the radial profiles of compressional wavespeed, VΦ, and density, ρ, in the outer core. Recent great earthquakes have yielded new normal mode measurements; however, mineral physics experiments and calculations are often compared to the Preliminary reference Earth model (PREM), which is 35 years old and does not provide uncertainties. Here we investigate the thermo-elastic properties of the outer core using Earth's free oscillations and a Bayesian framework. To estimate radial structure of the outer core and its uncertainties, we choose to exploit recent datasets of normal mode centre frequencies. Under the self-coupling approximation, centre frequencies are unaffected by lateral heterogeneities in the Earth, for example in the mantle. Normal modes are sensitive to both VΦ and ρ in the outer core, with each mode's specific sensitivity depending on its eigenfunctions. We include a priori bounds on outer core models that ensure compatibility with measurements of mass and moment of inertia. We use Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain techniques to explore different choices in parameterizing the outer core, each of which represents different a priori constraints. We test how results vary (1) assuming a smooth polynomial parametrization, (2) allowing for structure close to the outer core's boundaries, (3) assuming an Equation-of-State and adiabaticity and inverting directly for thermo-elastic parameters. In the second approach we recognize that the outer core may have distinct regions close to the core-mantle and inner core boundaries and investigate models which parameterize the well mixed outer core separately from these two layers. In the last approach we seek to map the uncertainties directly into thermo-elastic parameters including the bulk

  14. Scalar-gravitational perturbations and quasi normal modes in the five dimensional Schwarzschild black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose P.S.; Yoshida, Shijun

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the quasi normal modes (QNMs) for gravitational perturbations of the Schwarzschild black hole in the five dimensional (5D) spacetime with a continued fraction method. For all the types of perturbations (scalar-gravitational, vector-gravitational, and tensor-gravitational perturbations), the QNMs associated with l = 2, l 3, and l = 4 are calculated. Our numerical results are summarized as follows: (i) The three types of gravitational perturbations associated with the same angular quantum number l have a different set of the quasi normal (QN) frequencies; (ii) There is no purely imaginary frequency mode; (iii) The three types of gravitational perturbations have the same asymptotic behavior of the QNMs in the limit of the large imaginary frequencies, which are given by ωT H -1 → log 3+ 2πi(n+1/2) as n → ∞, where ω, T H , and n are the oscillation frequency, the Hawking temperature of the black hole, and the mode number, respectively. (author)

  15. Plantar fascia softening in plantar fasciitis with normal B-mode sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chueh-Hung; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2015-11-01

    To investigate plantar fascia elasticity in patients with typical clinical manifestations of plantar fasciitis but normal plantar fascia morphology on B-mode sonography. Twenty patients with plantar fasciitis (10 unilateral and 10 bilateral) and 30 healthy volunteers, all with normal plantar fascia morphology on B-mode sonography, were included in the study. Plantar fascia elasticity was evaluated by sonoelastographic examination. All sonoelastograms were quantitatively analyzed, and less red pixel intensity was representative of softer tissue. Pixel intensity was compared among unilateral plantar fasciitis patients, bilateral plantar fasciitis patients, and healthy volunteers by one-way ANOVA. A post hoc Scheffé's test was used to identify where the differences occurred. Compared to healthy participants (red pixel intensity: 146.9 ± 9.1), there was significantly less red pixel intensity in the asymptomatic sides of unilateral plantar fasciitis (140.4 ± 7.3, p = 0.01), symptomatic sides of unilateral plantar fasciitis (127.1 ± 7.4, p plantar fasciitis (129.4 ± 7.5, p plantar fascia thickness or green or blue pixel intensity among these groups. Sonoelastography revealed that the plantar fascia is softer in patients with typical clinical manifestations of plantar fasciitis, even if they exhibit no abnormalities on B-mode sonography.

  16. Accretion onto magnetized neutron stars: Normal mode analysis of the interchange instability at the magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arons, J.; Lea, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    We describe the results of a linearized hydromagnetic stability analysis of the magnetopause of an accreting neutron star. The magnetosphere is assumed to be slowly rotating, and the plasma just outside of the magnetopause is assumed to be weakly magnetized. The plasma layer is assumed to be bounded above by a shock wave, and to be thin compared with the radius of the magnetosphere. Under these circumstances, the growing modes are shown to be localized in the direction parallel to the zero-order magnetic field. The structure of the modes is still similar to the flute mode, however. The growth rate at each magnetic latitude is lambda given by γ 2 =g/sub n/kα/sub eff/(lambda) tanh [kz/sub s/(lambda)] where g/sub n/ is the magnitude of the gravitational acceleration normal to the surface, kapprox. =vertical-barmvertical-bar/R (lambda)cos lambda, vertical-barmvertical-bar is the azimuthal mode number, R (lambda) is the radius of the magnetosphere, z/sub s/ is the height of the shock above the magnetopause, and α/sub eff/(lambda) <1 is the effective Atwood number which embodies the stabilizing effects of favorable curvature and magnetic tension. We calculate α/sub eff/(lambda), and also discuss the stabilizing effects of viscosity and of aligned flow parallel to the magnetopause

  17. Time-dependent local-to-normal mode transition in triatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Hans; Bermúdez-Montaña, Marisol; Lemus, Renato

    2018-01-01

    Time-evolution of the vibrational states of two interacting harmonic oscillators in the local mode scheme is presented. A local-to-normal mode transition (LNT) is identified and studied from temporal perspective through time-dependent frequencies of the oscillators. The LNT is established as a polyad-breaking phenomenon from the local standpoint for the stretching degrees of freedom in a triatomic molecule. This study is carried out in the algebraic representation of bosonic operators. The dynamics of the states are determined via the solutions of the corresponding nonlinear Ermakov equation and a local time-dependent polyad is obtained as a tool to identify the LNT. Applications of this formalism to H2O, CO2, O3 and NO2 molecules in the adiabatic, sudden and linear regime are considered.

  18. A Box-Cox normal model for response times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Entink, R.H.; Fox, J.P.; Linden, W.J. van der

    2009-01-01

    The log-transform has been a convenient choice in response time modelling on test items. However, motivated by a dataset of the Medical College Admission Test where the lognormal model violated the normality assumption, the possibilities of the broader class of Box–Cox transformations for response

  19. Normal-mode-based analysis of electron plasma waves with second-order Hermitian formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, J. J.; White, R. L.

    2018-03-01

    The classic problem of the dynamic evolution and Landau damping of linear Langmuir electron waves in a collisionless plasma with Maxwellian background is cast as a second-order, self-adjoint problem with a continuum spectrum of real and positive squared frequencies. The corresponding complete basis of singular normal modes is obtained, along with their orthogonality relation. This yields easily the general expression of the time-reversal-invariant solution for any initial-value problem. Examples are given for specific initial conditions that illustrate different behaviors of the Landau-damped macroscopic moments of the perturbations.

  20. Twist–radial normal mode analysis in double-stranded DNA chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrellas, Germán; Maciá, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    We study the normal modes of a duplex DNA chain at low temperatures. We consider the coupling between the hydrogen-bond radial oscillations and the twisting motion of each base pair within the Peyrard–Bishop–Dauxois model. The coupling is mediated by the stacking interaction between adjacent base pairs along the helix. We explicitly consider different mass values for different nucleotides, extending previous works. We disclose several resonance conditions of interest, determined by the fine-tuning of certain model parameters. The role of these dynamical effects on the DNA chain charge transport properties is discussed.

  1. A Box-Cox normal model for response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein Entink, R H; van der Linden, W J; Fox, J-P

    2009-11-01

    The log-transform has been a convenient choice in response time modelling on test items. However, motivated by a dataset of the Medical College Admission Test where the lognormal model violated the normality assumption, the possibilities of the broader class of Box-Cox transformations for response time modelling are investigated. After an introduction and an outline of a broader framework for analysing responses and response times simultaneously, the performance of a Box-Cox normal model for describing response times is investigated using simulation studies and a real data example. A transformation-invariant implementation of the deviance information criterium (DIC) is developed that allows for comparing model fit between models with different transformation parameters. Showing an enhanced description of the shape of the response time distributions, its application in an educational measurement context is discussed at length.

  2. Normal Mode Analysis to a Poroelastic Half-Space Problem under Generalized Thermoelasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunbao Xiong

    Full Text Available Abstract The thermo-hydro-mechanical problems associated with a poroelastic half-space soil medium with variable properties under generalized thermoelasticity theory were investigated in this study. By remaining faithful to Biot’s theory of dynamic poroelasticity, we idealized the foundation material as a uniform, fully saturated, poroelastic half-space medium. We first subjected this medium to time harmonic loads consisting of normal or thermal loads, then investigated the differences between the coupled thermohydro-mechanical dynamic models and the thermo-elastic dynamic models. We used normal mode analysis to solve the resulting non-dimensional coupled equations, then investigated the effects that non-dimensional vertical displacement, excess pore water pressure, vertical stress, and temperature distribution exerted on the poroelastic half-space medium and represented them graphically.

  3. A Review Paper: Contributions from the Gravity and the Kelvin Modes for the Vertical Motion Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Buchmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In earlier papers of a series of real data integrations of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM with tropical heat anomalies display regions of pronounced subsidence and drying located several thousand kilometers westward poleward of the heating for cases of tropical Atlantic heating and tropical east Pacific heating. This highly predictable sinking response is established within the first five days of these integrations. The normal-modes of a set of nonlinear primitive equations for an atmosphere: Adiabatic, hydrostatic, incompressible, dry, without friction and viscosity are linearized about a basic state at rest and used to partition model response into gravity-inertia and Rossby modes. The emphasis of this review is given upon the contributions of the gravity and Kelvin modes for the vertical motion response.

  4. The signal of mantle anisotropy in the coupling of normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghein, Caroline; Resovsky, Joseph; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate whether the coupling of normal mode (NM) multiplets can help us constrain mantle anisotropy. We first derive explicit expressions of the generalized structure coefficients of coupled modes in terms of elastic coefficients, including the Love parameters describing radial anisotropy and the parameters describing azimuthal anisotropy (Jc, Js, Kc, Ks, Mc, Ms, Bc, Bs, Gc, Gs, Ec, Es, Hc, Hs, Dc and Ds). We detail the selection rules that describe which modes can couple together and which elastic parameters govern their coupling. We then focus on modes of type 0Sl - 0Tl+1 and determine whether they can be used to constrain mantle anisotropy. We show that they are sensitive to six elastic parameters describing azimuthal anisotropy, in addition to the two shear-wave elastic parameters L and N (i.e. VSV and VSH). We find that neither isotropic nor radially anisotropic mantle models can fully explain the observed degree two signal. We show that the NM signal that remains after correction for the effect of the crust and mantle radial anisotropy can be explained by the presence of azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle. Although the data favour locating azimuthal anisotropy below 400km, its depth extent and distribution is still not well constrained by the data. Consideration of NM coupling can thus help constrain azimuthal anisotropy in the mantle, but joint analyses with surface-wave phase velocities is needed to reduce the parameter trade-offs and improve our constraints on the individual elastic parameters and the depth location of the azimuthal anisotropy.

  5. Search for Long Period Solar Normal Modes in Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, R.; Pavlis, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    We search for evidence of solar free oscillations (normal modes) in long period seismic data through multitaper spectral analysis of array stacks. This analysis is similar to that of Thomson & Vernon (2015), who used data from the most quiet single stations of the global seismic network. Our approach is to use stacks of large arrays of noisier stations to reduce noise. Arrays have the added advantage of permitting the use of nonparametic statistics (jackknife errors) to provide objective error estimates. We used data from the Transportable Array, the broadband borehole array at Pinyon Flat, and the 3D broadband array in Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. The Homestake Mine array has 15 STS-2 sensors deployed in the mine that are extremely quiet at long periods due to stable temperatures and stable piers anchored to hard rock. The length of time series used ranged from 50 days to 85 days. We processed the data by low-pass filtering with a corner frequency of 10 mHz, followed by an autoregressive prewhitening filter and median stack. We elected to use the median instead of the mean in order to get a more robust stack. We then used G. Prieto's mtspec library to compute multitaper spectrum estimates on the data. We produce delete-one jackknife error estimates of the uncertainty at each frequency by computing median stacks of all data with one station removed. The results from the TA data show tentative evidence for several lines between 290 μHz and 400 μHz, including a recurring line near 379 μHz. This 379 μHz line is near the Earth mode 0T2 and the solar mode 5g5, suggesting that 5g5 could be coupling into the Earth mode. Current results suggest more statistically significant lines may be present in Pinyon Flat data, but additional processing of the data is underway to confirm this observation.

  6. Possibility of observation of polaron normal modes at the far-infrared spectrum of acetanilide and related organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalosakas, G.; Aubry, S.; Tsironis, G. P.

    1998-10-01

    We use a stationary and normal mode analysis of the semiclassical Holstein model in order to connect the low-frequency linear polaron modes to low-lying far-infrared lines of the acetanilide spectrum and through parameter fitting we comment on the validity of the polaron results in this system.

  7. Resonant and kinematical enhancement of He scattering from LiF(001) surface and pseudosurface vibrational normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, W.L.; Weare, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    One-phonon cross sections calculated from sagittally polarized vibrational normal modes account for most salient inelastic-scattering intensities seen in He-LiF(001) and measurements published by Brusdeylins, Doak, and Toennies. We have found that most inelastic intensities which cannot be attributed to potential resonances can be explained as kinematically enhanced scattering from both surface and pseudosurface bulk modes

  8. The characteristic response of whistler mode waves to interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, C.; Chen, L.; Bortnik, J.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Li, J.; An, X.; Zhou, C.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetospheric whistler mode waves play a key role in regulating the dynamics of the electron radiation belts. Recent satellite observations indicate a significant influence of interplanetary (IP) shocks on whistler mode wave power in the inner magnetosphere. In this study, we statistically investigate the response of whistler mode chorus and plasmaspheric hiss to IP shocks based on Van Allen Probes and THEMIS satellite observations. Immediately after the IP shock arrival, chorus wave power is usually intensified, often at dawn, while plasmaspheric hiss wave power predominantly decreases near the dayside but intensifies near the nightside. We conclude that chorus wave intensification outside the plasmasphere is probably associated with the suprathermal electron flux enhancement caused by the IP shock. On the other hand, the solar wind dynamic pressure increase changes the magnetic field configuration to favor ray penetration into the nightside and promote ray refraction away from the dayside, explaining the magnetic local time (MLT) dependent responses of plasmaspheric hiss waves following IP shock arrivals.

  9. Evaluation of normal tissue responses to high-LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halnan, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    Clinical results presented have been analysed to evaluate normal tissue responses to high-LET radiations. Damage to brain, spinal cord, gut, skin, connective tissue and bone has occurred. A high RBE is probable for brain and possible for spinal cord and gut but other reasons for damage are also discussed. A net gain seems likely. Random controlled trials are advocated. (author)

  10. Cognitive Complexity and Verbal Response Mode Use in Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Susan L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Uses William B. Stiles' discourse analysis system to determine whether there are general differences in the way individuals varying in construct system development use their utterances to establish understanding with each other. Finds that construct system development was positively correlated with edification and question response mode use, and…

  11. Evidence for Radial Anisotropy in Earth's Upper Inner Core from Normal Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lythgoe, K.; Deuss, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    The structure of the uppermost inner core is related to solidification of outer core material at the inner core boundary. Previous seismic studies using body waves indicate an isotropic upper inner core, although radial anisotropy has not been considered since it cannot be uniquely determined by body waves. Normal modes, however, do constrain radial anisotropy in the inner core. Centre frequency measurements indicate 2-5 % radial anisotropy in the upper 100 km of the inner core, with a fast direction radially outwards and a slow direction along the inner core boundary. This seismic structure provides constraints on solidification processes at the inner core boundary and appears consistent with texture predicted due to anisotropic inner core growth.

  12. On the sensitivity of protein data bank normal mode analysis: an application to GH10 xylanases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirion, Monique M.

    2015-12-01

    Protein data bank entries obtain distinct, reproducible flexibility characteristics determined by normal mode analyses of their three dimensional coordinate files. We study the effectiveness and sensitivity of this technique by analyzing the results on one class of glycosidases: family 10 xylanases. A conserved tryptophan that appears to affect access to the active site can be in one of two conformations according to x-ray crystallographic electron density data. The two alternate orientations of this active site tryptophan lead to distinct flexibility spectra, with one orientation thwarting the oscillations seen in the other. The particular orientation of this sidechain furthermore affects the appearance of the motility of a distant, C terminal region we term the mallet. The mallet region is known to separate members of this family of enzymes into two classes.

  13. On the sensitivity of protein data bank normal mode analysis: an application to GH10 xylanases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirion, Monique M

    2015-01-01

    Protein data bank entries obtain distinct, reproducible flexibility characteristics determined by normal mode analyses of their three dimensional coordinate files. We study the effectiveness and sensitivity of this technique by analyzing the results on one class of glycosidases: family 10 xylanases. A conserved tryptophan that appears to affect access to the active site can be in one of two conformations according to x-ray crystallographic electron density data. The two alternate orientations of this active site tryptophan lead to distinct flexibility spectra, with one orientation thwarting the oscillations seen in the other. The particular orientation of this sidechain furthermore affects the appearance of the motility of a distant, C terminal region we term the mallet. The mallet region is known to separate members of this family of enzymes into two classes. (paper)

  14. Low-emittance tuning of storage rings using normal mode beam position monitor calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wolski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new technique for low-emittance tuning of electron and positron storage rings. This technique is based on calibration of the beam position monitors (BPMs using excitation of the normal modes of the beam motion, and has benefits over conventional methods. It is relatively fast and straightforward to apply, it can be as easily applied to a large ring as to a small ring, and the tuning for low emittance becomes completely insensitive to BPM gain and alignment errors that can be difficult to determine accurately. We discuss the theory behind the technique, present some simulation results illustrating that it is highly effective and robust for low-emittance tuning, and describe the results of some initial experimental tests on the CesrTA storage ring.

  15. Low-emittance tuning of storage rings using normal mode beam position monitor calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolski, A.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Shanks, J.

    2011-07-01

    We describe a new technique for low-emittance tuning of electron and positron storage rings. This technique is based on calibration of the beam position monitors (BPMs) using excitation of the normal modes of the beam motion, and has benefits over conventional methods. It is relatively fast and straightforward to apply, it can be as easily applied to a large ring as to a small ring, and the tuning for low emittance becomes completely insensitive to BPM gain and alignment errors that can be difficult to determine accurately. We discuss the theory behind the technique, present some simulation results illustrating that it is highly effective and robust for low-emittance tuning, and describe the results of some initial experimental tests on the CesrTA storage ring.

  16. Normal Mode Analysis in Zeolites: Toward an Efficient Calculation of Adsorption Entropies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, Bart A; Ghysels, An; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Waroquier, Michel; Marin, Guy B

    2011-04-12

    An efficient procedure for normal-mode analysis of extended systems, such as zeolites, is developed and illustrated for the physisorption and chemisorption of n-octane and isobutene in H-ZSM-22 and H-FAU using periodic DFT calculations employing the Vienna Ab Initio Simulation Package. Physisorption and chemisorption entropies resulting from partial Hessian vibrational analysis (PHVA) differ at most 10 J mol(-1) K(-1) from those resulting from full Hessian vibrational analysis, even for PHVA schemes in which only a very limited number of atoms are considered free. To acquire a well-conditioned Hessian, much tighter optimization criteria than commonly used for electronic energy calculations in zeolites are required, i.e., at least an energy cutoff of 400 eV, maximum force of 0.02 eV/Å, and self-consistent field loop convergence criteria of 10(-8) eV. For loosely bonded complexes the mobile adsorbate method is applied, in which frequency contributions originating from translational or rotational motions of the adsorbate are removed from the total partition function and replaced by free translational and/or rotational contributions. The frequencies corresponding with these translational and rotational modes can be selected unambiguously based on a mobile block Hessian-PHVA calculation, allowing the prediction of physisorption entropies within an accuracy of 10-15 J mol(-1) K(-1) as compared to experimental values. The approach presented in this study is useful for studies on other extended catalytic systems.

  17. Normalization of cell responses in cat striate cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeger, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simple cells in the striate cortex have been depicted as half-wave-rectified linear operators. Complex cells have been depicted as energy mechanisms, constructed from the squared sum of the outputs of quadrature pairs of linear operators. However, the linear/energy model falls short of a complete explanation of striate cell responses. In this paper, a modified version of the linear/energy model is presented in which striate cells mutually inhibit one another, effectively normalizing their responses with respect to stimulus contrast. This paper reviews experimental measurements of striate cell responses, and shows that the new model explains a significantly larger body of physiological data.

  18. Causality analysis of leading singular value decomposition modes identifies rotor as the dominant driving normal mode in fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Yaacov; Rabinovitch, Avinoam; Braunstein, Doron; Aviram, Ira; Campbell, Katherine; Mironov, Sergey; Herron, Todd; Jalife, José; Berenfeld, Omer

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac fibrillation is a major clinical and societal burden. Rotors may drive fibrillation in many cases, but their role and patterns are often masked by complex propagation. We used Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), which ranks patterns of activation hierarchically, together with Wiener-Granger causality analysis (WGCA), which analyses direction of information among observations, to investigate the role of rotors in cardiac fibrillation. We hypothesized that combining SVD analysis with WGCA should reveal whether rotor activity is the dominant driving force of fibrillation even in cases of high complexity. Optical mapping experiments were conducted in neonatal rat cardiomyocyte monolayers (diameter, 35 mm), which were genetically modified to overexpress the delayed rectifier K+ channel IKr only in one half of the monolayer. Such monolayers have been shown previously to sustain fast rotors confined to the IKr overexpressing half and driving fibrillatory-like activity in the other half. SVD analysis of the optical mapping movies revealed a hierarchical pattern in which the primary modes corresponded to rotor activity in the IKr overexpressing region and the secondary modes corresponded to fibrillatory activity elsewhere. We then applied WGCA to evaluate the directionality of influence between modes in the entire monolayer using clear and noisy movies of activity. We demonstrated that the rotor modes influence the secondary fibrillatory modes, but influence was detected also in the opposite direction. To more specifically delineate the role of the rotor in fibrillation, we decomposed separately the respective SVD modes of the rotor and fibrillatory domains. In this case, WGCA yielded more information from the rotor to the fibrillatory domains than in the opposite direction. In conclusion, SVD analysis reveals that rotors can be the dominant modes of an experimental model of fibrillation. Wiener-Granger causality on modes of the rotor domains confirms their

  19. Measurement of human normal tissue and tumour responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.; Yarnold, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The scarcity of quantitative measures of normal tissue damage and tumour response in patients undergoing radiotherapy is an obstacle to the clinical evaluation of new treatment strategies. Retrospective studies of complications in critical normal tissues taught important lessons in the past concerning the potential dangers of hypofractionation. However, it is unethical to use serious complications as planned end-points in prospective studies. This paper reviews the desirable characteristics of clinical end-points required to compare alternative treatments employing radiotherapy, with emphasis on simple scales applied by clinicians or even the patients themselves

  20. Single-Phase Full-Wave Rectifier as an Effective Example to Teach Normalization, Conduction Modes, and Circuit Analysis Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Pejovic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of a single phase rectifier as an example in teaching circuit modeling, normalization, operating modes of nonlinear circuits, and circuit analysis methods is proposed.The rectifier supplied from a voltage source by an inductive impedance is analyzed in the discontinuous as well as in the continuous conduction mode. Completely analytical solution for the continuous conduction mode is derived. Appropriate numerical methods are proposed to obtain the circuit waveforms in both of the operating modes, and to compute the performance parameters. Source code of the program that performs such computation is provided.

  1. Mode of recording and modulation frequency effects of auditory steady state response thresholds

    OpenAIRE

    Jalaei, Bahram; Shaabani, Moslem; Zakaria, Mohd Normani

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The performance of auditory steady state response (ASSR) in threshold testing when recorded ipsilaterally and contralaterally, as well as at low and high modulation frequencies (MFs), has not been systematically studied. Objective To verify the influences of mode of recording (ipsilateral vs. contralateral) and modulation frequency (40 Hz vs. 90 Hz) on ASSR thresholds. Methods Fifteen female and 14 male subjects (aged 18–30 years) with normal hearing bilaterally were ...

  2. Normal mode splitting and ground state cooling in a Fabry—Perot optical cavity and transmission line resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hua-Jun; Mi Xian-Wu

    2011-01-01

    Optomechanical dynamics in two systems which are a transmission line resonator and Fabrya—Perot optical cavity via radiation—pressure are investigated by linearized quantum Langevin equation. We work in the resolved sideband regime where the oscillator resonance frequency exceeds the cavity linewidth. Normal mode splittings of the mechanical resonator as a pure result of the coupling interaction in the two optomechanical systems is studied, and we make a comparison of normal mode splitting of mechanical resonator between the two systems. In the optical cavity, the normal mode splitting of the movable mirror approaches the latest experiment very well. In addition, an approximation scheme is introduced to demonstrate the ground state cooling, and we make a comparison of cooling between the two systems dominated by two key factors, which are the initial bath temperature and the mechanical quality factor. Since both the normal mode splitting and cooling require working in the resolved sideband regime, whether the normal mode splitting influences the cooling of the mirror is considered. Considering the size of the mechanical resonator and precooling the system, the mechanical resonator in the transmission line resonator system is easier to achieve the ground state cooling than in optical cavity. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  3. Isometric exercise: cardiovascular responses in normal and cardiac populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, P; Nagle, F

    1987-05-01

    Isometric exercise produces a characteristic pressor increase in blood pressure which may be important in maintaining perfusion of muscle during sustained contraction. This response is mediated by combined central and peripheral afferent input to medullary cardiovascular centers. In normal individuals the increase in blood pressure is mediated by a rise in cardiac output with little or no change in systemic vascular resistance. However, the pressor response is also maintained during pharmacologic blockade or surgical denervation by increasing systemic vascular resistance. Left ventricular function is normally maintained or improves in normal subjects and cardiac patients with mild impairment of left ventricular contractility. Patients with poor left ventricular function may show deterioration during isometric exercise, although this pattern of response is difficult to predict from resting studies. Recent studies have shown that patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction can perform submaximum isometric exercise such as carrying weights in the range of 30 to 50 lb without difficulty or adverse responses. In addition, many patients who show ischemic ST depression or angina during dynamic exercise may have a reduced ischemic response during isometric or combined isometric and dynamic exercise. Isometric exercises are frequently encountered in activities of daily living and many occupational tasks. Cardiac patients should be gradually exposed to submaximum isometric training in supervised cardiac rehabilitation programs. Specific job tasks that require isometric or combined isometric and dynamic activities may be evaluated by work simulation studies. This approach to cardiac rehabilitation may facilitate patients who wish to return to a job requiring frequent isometric muscle contraction. Finally, there is a need for additional research on the long-term effects of isometric exercise training on left ventricular hypertrophy and performance. The vigorous training

  4. NOMAD-Ref: visualization, deformation and refinement of macromolecular structures based on all-atom normal mode analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Erik; Azuara, Cyril; Koehl, Patrice; Delarue, Marc

    2006-07-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) is an efficient way to study collective motions in biomolecules that bypasses the computational costs and many limitations associated with full dynamics simulations. The NOMAD-Ref web server presented here provides tools for online calculation of the normal modes of large molecules (up to 100,000 atoms) maintaining a full all-atom representation of their structures, as well as access to a number of programs that utilize these collective motions for deformation and refinement of biomolecular structures. Applications include the generation of sets of decoys with correct stereochemistry but arbitrary large amplitude movements, the quantification of the overlap between alternative conformations of a molecule, refinement of structures against experimental data, such as X-ray diffraction structure factors or Cryo-EM maps and optimization of docked complexes by modeling receptor/ligand flexibility through normal mode motions. The server can be accessed at the URL http://lorentz.immstr.pasteur.fr/nomad-ref.php.

  5. Plasma catecholamine responses to physiologic stimuli in normal human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, W M; Mujais, S K; Zinaman, M; Bravo, E L; Lindheimer, M D

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic response of the sympathoadrenal system was evaluated during and after pregnancy in 13 healthy women with a protocol that compared cardiovascular parameters and plasma catecholamine levels during the basal state, after postural maneuvers, and following isometric exercise. Plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were similar during and after gestation when the women rested on their sides, but heart rate was greater in pregnancy. Ten minutes of supine recumbency produced minimal changes, but attenuation of the anticipated increases in heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels during standing and isometric exercise were observed during pregnancy. In contrast, alterations in plasma epinephrine appeared unaffected by gestation. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels were, as expected, greater during pregnancy; however, increments in response to upright posture were similar in pregnant and postpartum women. To the extent that circulating catecholamines may be considered indices of sympathoadrenal function, these data suggest that normal pregnancy alters cardiovascular and sympathetic nervous system responses to physiologic stimuli.

  6. 'Good Vibrations': A workshop on oscillations and normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, Sara R.; Carpineti, Marina; Giliberti, Marco; Stellato, Marco; Rigon, Enrico; Tamborini, Marina

    2015-01-01

    We describe some theatrical strategies adopted in a two hour workshop in order to show some meaningful experiments and the underlying useful ideas to describe a secondary school path on oscillations, that develops from harmonic motion to normal modes of oscillations, and makes extensive use of video analysis, data logging, slow motions and applet simulations. Theatre is an extremely useful tool to stimulate motivation starting from positive emotions. That is the reason why the theatrical approach to the presentation of physical themes has been explored by the group 'Lo spettacolo della Fisica' (http://spettacolo.fisica.unimi.it) of the Physics Department of University of Milano for the last ten years (Carpineti et al., JCOM, 10 (2011) 1; Nuovo Cimento B, 121 (2006) 901) and has been inserted also in the European FP7 Project TEMI (Teaching Enquiry with Mysteries Incorporated, see http://teachingmysteries.eu/en) which involves 13 different partners coming from 11 European countries, among which the Italian (Milan) group. According to the TEMI guidelines, this workshop has a written script based on emotionally engaging activities of presenting mysteries to be solved while participants have been involved in nice experiments following the developed path.

  7. Theory of the normal modes of vibrations in the lanthanide type crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Roberto; Soto-Bubert, Andres

    2008-11-01

    For the lanthanide type crystals, a vast and rich, though incomplete amount of experimental data has been accumulated, from linear and non linear optics, during the last decades. The main goal of the current research work is to report a new methodology and strategy to put forward a more representative approach to account for the normal modes of vibrations for a complex N-body system. For illustrative purposes, the chloride lanthanide type crystals Cs2NaLnCl6 have been chosen and we develop new convergence tests as well as a criterion to deal with the details of the F-matrix (potential energy matrix). A novel and useful concept of natural potential energy distributions (NPED) is introduced and examined throughout the course of this work. The diagonal and non diagonal contributions to these NPED-values, are evaluated for a series of these crystals explicitly. Our model is based upon a total of seventy two internal coordinates and ninety eight internal Hooke type force constants. An optimization mathematical procedure is applied with reference to the series of chloride lanthanide crystals and it is shown that the strategy and model adopted is sound from both a chemical and a physical viewpoints. We can argue that the current model is able to accommodate a number of interactions and to provide us with a very useful physical insight. The limitations and advantages of the current model and the most likely sources for improvements are discussed in detail.

  8. Detecting atmospheric normal modes with periods less than 6 h by barometric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolenko, S. I.; Shved, G. M.; Jacobi, Ch.

    2018-04-01

    The theory of atmospheric normal modes (ANMs) predicts the existence of relatively short-period gravity-inertia ANMs. Simultaneous observations of surface air-pressure variations by barometers at distant stations of the Global Geodynamics Project network during an interval of 6 months were used to detect individual gravity-inertia ANMs with periods of ∼2-5 h. Evidence was found for five ANMs with a lifetime of ∼10 days. The data of the stations, which are close in both latitude and longitude, were utilized for deriving the phases of the detected ANMs. The phases revealed wave propagation to the west and increase of zonal wavenumbers with frequency. As all the detected gravity-inertia ANMs are westward propagating, they are suggested to be generated due to the breakdown of migrating solar tides and/or large-scale Rossby waves. The existence of an ANM background will complicate the detection of the translational motions of the Earth's inner core.

  9. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2013-11-28

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  10. Comparative analysis of guide mode of government - oriented industry guidance funds under china’s new normal of economic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunling; Cheng, Xuemei

    2017-11-01

    The government-oriented industry guidance Funds solve the problem of financing difficulty and high innovation under the background of China’s new normal. Through the provinces and cities of the policies and regulations of the collation and comparative analysis, it will be divided into three modes. And then compare among three modes and analyze applicability to guide the construction of provinces and cities.

  11. Modeling guided wave excitation in plates with surface mounted piezoelectric elements: coupled physics and normal mode expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2018-04-01

    Guided waves have been extensively studied and widely used for structural health monitoring because of their large volumetric coverage and good sensitivity to defects. Effectively and preferentially exciting a desired wave mode having good sensitivity to a certain defect is of great practical importance. Piezoelectric discs and plates are the most common types of surface-mounted transducers for guided wave excitation and reception. Their geometry strongly influences the proportioning between excited modes as well as the total power of the excited modes. It is highly desirable to predominantly excite the selected mode while the total transduction power is maximized. In this work, a fully coupled multi-physics finite element analysis, which incorporates the driving circuit, the piezoelectric element and the wave guide, is combined with the normal mode expansion method to study both the mode tuning and total wave power. The excitation of circular crested waves in an aluminum plate with circular piezoelectric discs is numerically studied for different disc and adhesive thicknesses. Additionally, the excitation of plane waves in an aluminum plate, using a stripe piezoelectric element is studied both numerically and experimentally. It is difficult to achieve predominant single mode excitation as well as maximum power transmission simultaneously, especially for higher order modes. However, guidelines for designing the geometry of piezoelectric elements for optimal mode excitation are recommended.

  12. T lymphocytes and normal tissue responses to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaue, Dörthe; McBride, William H.

    2012-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that lymphocytes are a recurring feature in radiation damaged normal tissues, but assessing their functional significance has proven difficult. Contradictory roles have been postulated in both tissue pathogenesis and protection, although these are not necessarily mutually exclusive as the immune system can display what may seem to be opposing faces at any one time. While the exact role of T lymphocytes in irradiated normal tissue responses may still be obscure, their accumulation after tissue damage suggests they may be critical targets for radiotherapeutic intervention and worthy of further study. This is accentuated by recent findings that pathologically damaged “self,” such as occurs after exposure to ionizing radiation, can generate danger signals with the ability to activate pathways similar to those that activate adoptive immunity to pathogens. In addition, the demonstration of T cell subsets with their recognition radars tuned to “self” moieties has revolutionized our ideas on how all immune responses are controlled and regulated. New concepts of autoimmunity have resulted based on the dissociation of immune functions between different subsets of immune cells. It is becoming axiomatic that the immune system has the power to regulate radiation-induced tissue damage, from failure of regeneration to fibrosis, to acute and chronic late effects, and even to carcinogenesis. Our understanding of the interplay between T lymphocytes and radiation-damaged tissue may still be rudimentary but this is a good time to re-examine their potential roles, their radiobiological and microenvironmental influences, and the possibilities for therapeutic manipulation. This review will discuss the yin and yang of T cell responses within the context of radiation exposures, how they might drive or protect against normal tissue side effects and what we may be able do about it.

  13. Normal mode analysis as a method to derive protein dynamics information from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Hiroshi; Endo, Shigeru

    2017-12-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) can facilitate quick and systematic investigation of protein dynamics using data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We developed an elastic network model-based NMA program using dihedral angles as independent variables. Compared to the NMA programs that use Cartesian coordinates as independent variables, key attributes of the proposed program are as follows: (1) chain connectivity related to the folding pattern of a polypeptide chain is naturally embedded in the model; (2) the full-atom system is acceptable, and owing to a considerably smaller number of independent variables, the PDB data can be used without further manipulation; (3) the number of variables can be easily reduced by some of the rotatable dihedral angles; (4) the PDB data for any molecule besides proteins can be considered without coarse-graining; and (5) individual motions of constituent subunits and ligand molecules can be easily decomposed into external and internal motions to examine their mutual and intrinsic motions. Its performance is illustrated with an example of a DNA-binding allosteric protein, a catabolite activator protein. In particular, the focus is on the conformational change upon cAMP and DNA binding, and on the communication between their binding sites remotely located from each other. In this illustration, NMA creates a vivid picture of the protein dynamics at various levels of the structures, i.e., atoms, residues, secondary structures, domains, subunits, and the complete system, including DNA and cAMP. Comparative studies of the specific protein in different states, e.g., apo- and holo-conformations, and free and complexed configurations, provide useful information for studying structurally and functionally important aspects of the protein.

  14. Normal mode analysis of macromolecular systems with the mobile block Hessian method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghysels, An; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van Neck, Dimitri; Waroquier, Michel; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, normal mode analysis (NMA) was limited to small proteins, not only because the required energy minimization is a computationally exhausting task, but also because NMA requires the expensive diagonalization of a 3N a ×3N a matrix with N a the number of atoms. A series of simplified models has been proposed, in particular the Rotation-Translation Blocks (RTB) method by Tama et al. for the simulation of proteins. It makes use of the concept that a peptide chain or protein can be seen as a subsequent set of rigid components, i.e. the peptide units. A peptide chain is thus divided into rigid blocks with six degrees of freedom each. Recently we developed the Mobile Block Hessian (MBH) method, which in a sense has similar features as the RTB method. The main difference is that MBH was developed to deal with partially optimized systems. The position/orientation of each block is optimized while the internal geometry is kept fixed at a plausible - but not necessarily optimized - geometry. This reduces the computational cost of the energy minimization. Applying the standard NMA on a partially optimized structure however results in spurious imaginary frequencies and unwanted coordinate dependence. The MBH avoids these unphysical effects by taking into account energy gradient corrections. Moreover the number of variables is reduced, which facilitates the diagonalization of the Hessian. In the original implementation of MBH, atoms could only be part of one rigid block. The MBH is now extended to the case where atoms can be part of two or more blocks. Two basic linkages can be realized: (1) blocks connected by one link atom, or (2) by two link atoms, where the latter is referred to as the hinge type connection. In this work we present the MBH concept and illustrate its performance with the crambin protein as an example

  15. Model-free methods of analyzing domain motions in proteins from simulation : A comparison of normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation of lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayward, S.; Kitao, A.; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    Model-free methods are introduced to determine quantities pertaining to protein domain motions from normal mode analyses and molecular dynamics simulations, For the normal mode analysis, the methods are based on the assumption that in low frequency modes, domain motions can be well approximated by

  16. Mathematical models of tumour and normal tissue response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Dale, R.G.; Charing Cross Group of Hospitals, London

    1999-01-01

    The historical application of mathematics in the natural sciences and in radiotherapy is compared. The various forms of mathematical models and their limitations are discussed. The Linear Quadratic (LQ) model can be modified to include (i) radiobiological parameter changes that occur during fractionated radiotherapy, (ii) situations such as focal forms of radiotherapy, (iii) normal tissue responses, and (iv) to allow for the process of optimization. The inclusion of a variable cell loss factor in the LQ model repopulation term produces a more flexible clonogenic doubling time, which can simulate the phenomenon of 'accelerated repopulation'. Differential calculus can be applied to the LQ model after elimination of the fraction number integers. The optimum dose per fraction (maximum cell kill relative to a given normal tissue fractionation sensitivity) is then estimated from the clonogen doubling times and the radiosensitivity parameters (or α/β ratios). Economic treatment optimization is described. Tumour volume studies during or following teletherapy are used to optimize brachytherapy. The radiation responses of both individual tumours and tumour populations (by random sampling 'Monte-Carlo' techniques from statistical ranges of radiobiological and physical parameters) can be estimated. Computerized preclinical trials can be used to guide choice of dose fractionation scheduling in clinical trials. The potential impact of gene and other biological therapies on the results of radical radiotherapy are testable. New and experimentally testable hypotheses are generated from limited clinical data by exploratory modelling exercises. (orig.)

  17. A randomised trial and economic evaluation of the effect of response mode on response rate, response bias, and item non-response in a survey of doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witt Julia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveys of doctors are an important data collection method in health services research. Ways to improve response rates, minimise survey response bias and item non-response, within a given budget, have not previously been addressed in the same study. The aim of this paper is to compare the effects and costs of three different modes of survey administration in a national survey of doctors. Methods A stratified random sample of 4.9% (2,702/54,160 of doctors undertaking clinical practice was drawn from a national directory of all doctors in Australia. Stratification was by four doctor types: general practitioners, specialists, specialists-in-training, and hospital non-specialists, and by six rural/remote categories. A three-arm parallel trial design with equal randomisation across arms was used. Doctors were randomly allocated to: online questionnaire (902; simultaneous mixed mode (a paper questionnaire and login details sent together (900; or, sequential mixed mode (online followed by a paper questionnaire with the reminder (900. Analysis was by intention to treat, as within each primary mode, doctors could choose either paper or online. Primary outcome measures were response rate, survey response bias, item non-response, and cost. Results The online mode had a response rate 12.95%, followed by the simultaneous mixed mode with 19.7%, and the sequential mixed mode with 20.7%. After adjusting for observed differences between the groups, the online mode had a 7 percentage point lower response rate compared to the simultaneous mixed mode, and a 7.7 percentage point lower response rate compared to sequential mixed mode. The difference in response rate between the sequential and simultaneous modes was not statistically significant. Both mixed modes showed evidence of response bias, whilst the characteristics of online respondents were similar to the population. However, the online mode had a higher rate of item non-response compared

  18. Memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition in normal aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Thapliyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concepts of aging-related cognitive changes have appeared to be a major challenge in the society. In this context, the present study was planned to find out the functioning of aging population on different neurocognitive measures. Aims: The aim of the study was to find out the neurocognitive functioning, namely memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition of normal aging population. Materials and Methods: Following purposive sampling technique, a total of 50 healthy subjects (30 males and 20 females in the age range of 60-70 years were recruited from Jaipur city of Rajasthan. Mini-mental state Examination, PGI memory scale, animal names test, and Stroop test were administered. Results: The findings reveal dysfunction in almost all the domains of memory, namely mental balance, attention and concentration, delayed recall, verbal retention for dissimilar pairs, visual retention and recognition, immediate recall, verbal retention for similar pairs, and visual retention. In domain of verbal fluency, all subjects gave low responses on the animal names test. In domain of response inhibition, all the subjects took less time in color test as compared to color word test on the Stroop task. Conclusions: Findings suggest that there are dysfunction in the area of memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition in persons aged 60-70 years. However, recent and remote memory were found to be intact.

  19. Canine tumor and normal tissue response to heat and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.; McChesney, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas of dogs were treated with either irradiation alone or combined with hyperthermia. Tumor control was assessed as no evidence of disease one year following treatment. Dogs were randomized to variable radiation doses which were given in ten fractions three times a week for three weeks. Heat was given three hours after the first and third radiation dose each week for seven treatments. The attempt was made to achieve a minimum tumor temperature of 42 0 C for thirty minutes with a maximum normal tissue temperature of 40 0 C. It was usually possible to selectively heat tumors. The TCD 50 for irradiation alone was about 400 rads greater than for heat plus irradiation. The dose response curve for heat plus radiation was much steeper than for radiation alone indicating less heterogeneity of tumor response. That also implies a much greater effectiveness of radiation combined with heat at higher tumor control probabilities. Early necrosis caused by heating healed with conservative management. No increase in late radiation necrosis was observed

  20. Structural improvement of unliganded simian immunodeficiency virus gp120 core by normal-mode-based X-ray crystallographic refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaorui; Lu, Mingyang; Poon, Billy K.; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2009-01-01

    The structural model of the unliganded and fully glycosylated simian immunodeficiency virus gp120 core determined to 4.0 Å resolution was substantially improved using a recently developed normal-mode-based anisotropic B-factor refinement method. The envelope protein gp120/gp41 of simian and human immunodeficiency viruses plays a critical role in viral entry into host cells. However, the extraordinarily high structural flexibility and heavy glycosylation of the protein have presented enormous difficulties in the pursuit of high-resolution structural investigation of some of its conformational states. An unliganded and fully glycosylated gp120 core structure was recently determined to 4.0 Å resolution. The rather low data-to-parameter ratio limited refinement efforts in the original structure determination. In this work, refinement of this gp120 core structure was carried out using a normal-mode-based refinement method that has been shown in previous studies to be effective in improving models of a supramolecular complex at 3.42 Å resolution and of a membrane protein at 3.2 Å resolution. By using only the first four nonzero lowest-frequency normal modes to construct the anisotropic thermal parameters, combined with manual adjustments and standard positional refinement using REFMAC5, the structural model of the gp120 core was significantly improved in many aspects, including substantial decreases in R factors, better fitting of several flexible regions in electron-density maps, the addition of five new sugar rings at four glycan chains and an excellent correlation of the B-factor distribution with known structural flexibility. These results further underscore the effectiveness of this normal-mode-based method in improving models of protein and nonprotein components in low-resolution X-ray structures

  1. Virtual screening for potential inhibitors of Mcl-1 conformations sampled by normal modes, molecular dynamics, and nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glantz-Gashai Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yitav Glantz-Gashai,* Tomer Meirson,* Eli Reuveni, Abraham O Samson Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar Ilan University, Safed, Israel *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1 is often overexpressed in human cancer and is an important target for developing antineoplastic drugs. In this study, a data set containing 2.3 million lead-like molecules and a data set of all the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drugs are virtually screened for potential Mcl-1 ligands using Protein Data Bank (PDB ID 2MHS. The potential Mcl-1 ligands are evaluated and computationally docked on to three conformation ensembles generated by normal mode analysis (NMA, molecular dynamics (MD, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, respectively. The evaluated potential Mcl-1 ligands are then compared with their clinical use. Remarkably, half of the top 30 potential drugs are used clinically to treat cancer, thus partially validating our virtual screen. The partial validation also favors the idea that the other half of the top 30 potential drugs could be used in the treatment of cancer. The normal mode-, MD-, and NMR-based conformation greatly expand the conformational sampling used herein for in silico identification of potential Mcl-1 inhibitors. Keywords: virtual screening, Mcl-1, molecular dynamics, NMR, normal modes

  2. On the structure and normal modes of hydrogenated Ti-fullerene compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tlahuice-Flores, Alfredo, E-mail: tlahuicef@yahoo.com [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Fisica (Mexico); Mejia-Rosales, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.mejiars@uanl.edu.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, CICFIM-Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, and Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia (Mexico); Galvan, Donald H., E-mail: donald@cnyn.unam.mx [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia-Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-08-15

    When titanium covers a C{sub 60} core, the metal atoms may suppress the fullerene's capacity of storing hydrogen, depending on the number of Ti atoms covering the C{sub 60} framework, the Ti-C binding energy, and diffusion barriers. In this article, we study the structural and vibrational properties of the C{sub 60}TiH{sub n} (n = 2, 4, 6, and 8) and C{sub 60}Ti{sub 6}H{sub 48} compounds. The IR spectra of C{sub 60}TiH{sub n} compounds have a maximum attributable to the Ti-H stretching mode, which shifts to lower values in the structures with n = 4, 8, while their Raman spectra show two peaks corresponding to the stretching modes of H{sub 2} molecules at apical and azimuthal positions. On the other hand, the IR spectrum of C{sub 60}Ti{sub 6}H{sub 48} shows an intense peak due to the Ti-H in-phase stretching mode, while its Raman spectrum has a maximum attributed to the pentagonal pinch of the C{sub 60} core. Finally, we have found that the presence of one apical H{sub 2} molecule enhances the pentagonal pinch mode, becoming the maximum in the Raman spectrum.Graphical Abstract.

  3. An experimental randomized study of six different ventilatory modes in a piglet model with normal lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J B; Sjöstrand, U H; Henneberg, S W

    1991-01-01

    -controlled intermittent positive-pressure ventilation; and SV-20P denotes pressure-controlled intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. With all modes of ventilation a PEEP of 7.5 cm H2O was used. In the abbreviations used, the number denotes the ventilatory frequency in breaths per minute (bpm). HFV indicates that all...

  4. Noise induced multidecadal variability in the North Atlantic: excitation of normal modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankcombe, L.M.; Dijkstra, H.A.; von der Heydt, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed that the stochastic excitation of a multidecadal internal ocean mode is at the origin of the multidecadal sea surface temperature variability in the North Atlantic. The excitation processes of the spatial sea surface temperature pattern associated with this multidecadal

  5. A Pictorial Visualization of Normal Mode Vibrations of the Fullerene (C[subscript 60]) Molecule in Terms of Vibrations of a Hollow Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Janette L.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the normal mode vibrations of a molecule is important in the analysis of vibrational spectra. However, the complicated 3D motion of large molecules can be difficult to interpret. We show how images of normal modes of the fullerene molecule C[subscript 60] can be made easier to understand by superimposing them on images of the normal…

  6. Probabilistic estimation of splitting coefficients of normal modes of the Earth, and their uncertainties, using an autoregressive technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachhai, S.; Masters, G.; Laske, G.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's normal-mode spectra are crucial to studying the long wavelength structure of the Earth. Such observations have been used extensively to estimate "splitting coefficients" which, in turn, can be used to determine the three-dimensional velocity and density structure. Most past studies apply a non-linear iterative inversion to estimate the splitting coefficients which requires that the earthquake source is known. However, it is challenging to know the source details, particularly for big events as used in normal-mode analyses. Additionally, the final solution of the non-linear inversion can depend on the choice of damping parameter and starting model. To circumvent the need to know the source, a two-step linear inversion has been developed and successfully applied to many mantle and core sensitive modes. The first step takes combinations of the data from a single event to produce spectra known as "receiver strips". The autoregressive nature of the receiver strips can then be used to estimate the structure coefficients without the need to know the source. Based on this approach, we recently employed a neighborhood algorithm to measure the splitting coefficients for an isolated inner-core sensitive mode (13S2). This approach explores the parameter space efficiently without any need of regularization and finds the structure coefficients which best fit the observed strips. Here, we implement a Bayesian approach to data collected for earthquakes from early 2000 and more recent. This approach combines the data (through likelihood) and prior information to provide rigorous parameter values and their uncertainties for both isolated and coupled modes. The likelihood function is derived from the inferred errors of the receiver strips which allows us to retrieve proper uncertainties. Finally, we apply model selection criteria that balance the trade-offs between fit (likelihood) and model complexity to investigate the degree and type of structure (elastic and anelastic

  7. Biochemical response of normal albino rats to the addition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the biochemical effect of Hibiscus cannabinus and Murraya koenigii extracts on normal albino rats using standard methods. Analyses carried out indicated that the aqueous leaf extract of H. cannabinus and M. koenigii exhibited significant hypolipideamic activity in normal rats.

  8. Endoscopic mode for three-dimensional CT display of normal and pathologic laryngeal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Yumoto, Eiji; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Ochi, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    The recent development of helical (spiral) computed tomography allows collection of volumetric data to obtain high quality three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed images. The authors applied the 3D CT endoscopic imaging technique to asses normal and pathologic laryngeal structures. The latter included trauma, vocal fold atrophy, cancer of the larynx and recurrent nerve palsy. This technique was able to show normal laryngeal structures and characteristic findings of each pathology. The 3D CT endoscopic images can be rotated around any axis, allowing optimal depiction of pathologic lesion. The use of 3D CT endoscopic technique provides the display of the location and extent of pathology and affords accurate therapeutic planning. (author)

  9. Pump induced normal mode splittings in phase conjugation in a Kerr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Phase conjugation in a Kerr nonlinear waveguide is studied with counter-propagating normally incident pumps and a probe beam at an arbitrary angle of incidence. Detailed numerical results for the specular and phase conjugated reflectivities are obtained with full account of pump depletion. For sufficient ...

  10. Robust Seismic Normal Modes Computation in Radial Earth Models and A Novel Classification Based on Intersection Points of Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J.; Shi, J.; De Hoop, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    We develop a robust algorithm to compute seismic normal modes in a spherically symmetric, non-rotating Earth. A well-known problem is the cross-contamination of modes near "intersections" of dispersion curves for separate waveguides. Our novel computational approach completely avoids artificial degeneracies by guaranteeing orthonormality among the eigenfunctions. We extend Wiggins' and Buland's work, and reformulate the Sturm-Liouville problem as a generalized eigenvalue problem with the Rayleigh-Ritz Galerkin method. A special projection operator incorporating the gravity terms proposed by de Hoop and a displacement/pressure formulation are utilized in the fluid outer core to project out the essential spectrum. Moreover, the weak variational form enables us to achieve high accuracy across the solid-fluid boundary, especially for Stoneley modes, which have exponentially decaying behavior. We also employ the mixed finite element technique to avoid spurious pressure modes arising from discretization schemes and a numerical inf-sup test is performed following Bathe's work. In addition, the self-gravitation terms are reformulated to avoid computations outside the Earth, thanks to the domain decomposition technique. Our package enables us to study the physical properties of intersection points of waveguides. According to Okal's classification theory, the group velocities should be continuous within a branch of the same mode family. However, we have found that there will be a small "bump" near intersection points, which is consistent with Miropol'sky's observation. In fact, we can loosely regard Earth's surface and the CMB as independent waveguides. For those modes that are far from the intersection points, their eigenfunctions are localized in the corresponding waveguides. However, those that are close to intersection points will have physical features of both waveguides, which means they cannot be classified in either family. Our results improve on Okal

  11. Nanomechanical inverse electromagnetically induced transparency and confinement of light in normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, G S; Huang, Sumei

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of the phenomenon of the inverse electromagnetically induced transparency (IEIT) in an opto mechanical system consisting of a nanomechanical mirror placed in an optical cavity. We show that two weak counter-propagating identical classical probe fields can be completely absorbed by the system in the presence of a strong coupling field so that the output probe fields are zero. The light is completely confined inside the cavity and the energy of the incoming probe fields is shared between the cavity field and creation of a coherent phonon and resides primarily in one of the polariton modes. The energy can be extracted by a perturbation of the external fields or by suddenly changing the Q of the cavity. (paper)

  12. Modes of supraglacial lake drainage and dynamic ice sheet response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S. B.; Behn, M. D.; Joughin, I. R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate modes of supraglacial lake drainage using geophysical, ground, and remote sensing observations over the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet. Lakes exhibit a characteristic life cycle defined by a pre-drainage, drainage, and post-drainage phase. In the pre-drainage phase winter snow fills pre-existing cracks and stream channels, efficiently blocking past drainage conduits. As temperatures increase in the spring, surface melting commences, initially saturating the snow pack and subsequently forming a surface network of streams that fills the lake basins. Basins continue to fill until lake drainage commences, which for individual lakes occurs at different times depending on the previous winter snow accumulation and summer temperatures. Three styles of drainage behavior have been observed: (1) no drainage, (2) slow drainage over the side into an adjacent pre-existing crack, and (3) rapid drainage through a new crack formed beneath the lake basin. Moreover, from year-to-year individual lakes exhibit different drainage behaviors. Lakes that drain slowly often utilize the same outflow channel for multiple years, creating dramatic canyons in the ice. Ultimately, these surface channels are advected out of the lake basin and a new channel forms. In the post-drainage phase, melt water continues to access the bed typically through a small conduit (e.g. moulin) formed near a local topographic minimum along the main drainage crack, draining the lake catchment throughout the remainder of the melt season. This melt water input to the bed leads to continued basal lubrication and enhanced ice flow compared to background velocities. Lakes that do not completely drain freeze over to form a surface ice layer that persists into the following year. Our results show that supraglacial lakes show a spectrum of drainage behaviors and that these styles of drainage lead to varying rates and timing of surface meltwater delivery to the bed resulting in different dynamic ice

  13. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS OF BIDIMENSIONAL MODE, M-MODE, AND DOPPLER OF CLINICALLY NORMAL BLACK-RUMPED AGOUTI (DASYPROCTA PRYMNOLOPHA, WAGLER 1831).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Anaemilia das Neves; Pessoa, Gerson Tavares; da Silva Moura, Laecio; de Sousa, André Braga; Sousa, Francisco das Chagas Araújo; de Sá Rodrigues, Renan Paraguassu; da Silva Barbosa, Maria Angélica Parente; de Almeida, Hatawa Melo; Freire, Larisse Danielle Silva; Sanches, Marina Pinto; Júnior, Antônio Augusto Nascimento Machado; Guerra, Porfírio Candanedo; Neves, Willams Costa; de Sousa, João Macedo; Bolfer, Luiz; Giglio, Robson Fortes; Alves, Flávio Ribeiro

    2017-06-01

    The black-rumped agouti ( Dasyprocta prymnolopha , Wagler 1831) is currently under intense ecologic pressure, which has resulted in its disappearance from some regions of Brazil. Echocardiography is widely used in veterinary medicine but it is not yet part of the clinical routine for wild animals. The objective of the present study was to assess the applicability of the echocardiographic exam in nonanesthetized agouti and to establish normal reference values for echocardiographic measurements in bidimensional mode (2D), M-mode, and Doppler for this species, and a lead II electrocardiogram was simultaneously recorded. Twenty agouti were used in this study. All the echocardiographic measurements were positively correlated with weight (P 0.05). Blood flow velocities in the pulmonary and aortic artery ranged from 67.32-71.28 cm/sec and 79.22-101.84 cm/sec, respectively. The isovolumic relaxation time was assessed in all the animals and ranged from 38.5 to 56.6 ms. The maximum value for the nonfused E and A waves and the Et and At waves was 158 beats/min for both. The results obtained for the morphologic and heart hemodynamic measurements can guide future studies and help in the clinical management of these animals in captivity.

  14. Extracting surface waves, hum and normal modes: time-scale phase-weighted stack and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventosa, Sergi; Schimmel, Martin; Stutzmann, Eleonore

    2017-10-01

    Stacks of ambient noise correlations are routinely used to extract empirical Green's functions (EGFs) between station pairs. The time-frequency phase-weighted stack (tf-PWS) is a physically intuitive nonlinear denoising method that uses the phase coherence to improve EGF convergence when the performance of conventional linear averaging methods is not sufficient. The high computational cost of a continuous approach to the time-frequency transformation is currently a main limitation in ambient noise studies. We introduce the time-scale phase-weighted stack (ts-PWS) as an alternative extension of the phase-weighted stack that uses complex frames of wavelets to build a time-frequency representation that is much more efficient and fast to compute and that preserve the performance and flexibility of the tf-PWS. In addition, we propose two strategies: the unbiased phase coherence and the two-stage ts-PWS methods to further improve noise attenuation, quality of the extracted signals and convergence speed. We demonstrate that these approaches enable to extract minor- and major-arc Rayleigh waves (up to the sixth Rayleigh wave train) from many years of data from the GEOSCOPE global network. Finally we also show that fundamental spheroidal modes can be extracted from these EGF.

  15. Coupling of Rayleigh-like waves with zero-sound modes in normal 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogacz, S.A.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Landau kinetic equation is solved in the collisionless regime for a sample of normal 3 He excited by a surface perturbation of arbitrary ω and k. The boundary condition for the nonequilibrium particle distribution is determined for the case of specular reflection of the elementary excitations at the interface. Using the above solution, the energy flux through the boundary is obtained as a function of the surface wave velocity ω/k. The absorption spectrum and its frequency derivative are calculated numerically for typical values of temperature and pressure. The spectrum displays a sharp, resonant-like maximum concentrated at the longitudinal sound velocity and a sharp maximum of the derivative concentrated at the transverse sound velocity. The energy transfer is cut off discontinuously below the Fermi velocity. An experimental measurement of the energy transfer spectrum would permit a determination of both zero-sound velocities and the Fermi velocity with spectroscopic precision

  16. Static contribution of the higher modes in the dynamic response of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, H.J.C.

    1982-03-01

    In the dynamic response of structures by the modal superposition method usually only the lower modes are taken into account and a procedure that could estimate the contribution due to the higher modes without calculating them would be useful. The technique which consists of assuming that the higher modes respond statically is discussed here. Structures subjected to support motion which are analysed by response spectra techniques are considered and some numerical results are presented. (Author) [pt

  17. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Kan; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Setzer, R. Woodrow

    2013-01-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in dose–response assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean ± standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the “hybrid” method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous dose–response datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates. - Highlights: • We investigate to what extent the distribution assumption can affect BMD estimates. • Both real data analysis and simulation study are conducted. • BMDs estimated using hybrid method are more

  18. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Kan, E-mail: Shao.Kan@epa.gov [ORISE Postdoctoral Fellow, National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gift, Jeffrey S. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Setzer, R. Woodrow [National Center for Computational Toxicology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in dose–response assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean ± standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the “hybrid” method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous dose–response datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates. - Highlights: • We investigate to what extent the distribution assumption can affect BMD estimates. • Both real data analysis and simulation study are conducted. • BMDs estimated using hybrid method are more

  19. Direct assignment of molecular vibrations via normal mode analysis of the neutron dynamic pair distribution function technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry-Petit, A. M.; Sheckelton, J. P.; McQueen, T. M.; Rebola, A. F.; Fennie, C. J.; Mourigal, M.; Valentine, M.; Drichko, N.

    2015-01-01

    For over a century, vibrational spectroscopy has enhanced the study of materials. Yet, assignment of particular molecular motions to vibrational excitations has relied on indirect methods. Here, we demonstrate that applying group theoretical methods to the dynamic pair distribution function analysis of neutron scattering data provides direct access to the individual atomic displacements responsible for these excitations. Applied to the molecule-based frustrated magnet with a potential magnetic valence-bond state, LiZn 2 Mo 3 O 8 , this approach allows direct assignment of the constrained rotational mode of Mo 3 O 13 clusters and internal modes of MoO 6 polyhedra. We anticipate that coupling this well known data analysis technique with dynamic pair distribution function analysis will have broad application in connecting structural dynamics to physical properties in a wide range of molecular and solid state systems

  20. Empathy, normality and responsiveness among street-level bureaucrats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Østergaard; Nielsen, Vibeke Lehmann

    2014-01-01

    Within the public sector it is a permanent dilemma that we on one hand – on the grounds of effectiveness and flexibility – want employees to have discretion and autonomy, but at the same time want to make sure that citizens and clients of the public sector are treated equally and independent of w...... this paper discusses and analyzes how perceptions of local target group’s problem portfolio (normality perceptions) conditions the behavioral effects of personal attributes/personality traits (differences in empathy)....

  1. Emotional and psychophysiological responses to tempo, mode, and percussiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, Marjolein; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; van den Broek, Egon

    People often listen to music to influence their emotional state. However, the specific musical characteristics which cause this process are not yet fully understood. We have investigated the influence of the musical characteristics of tempo, mode and percussiveness on our emotions. In a quest

  2. Mouse genetic approaches applied to the normal tissue radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haston, Christina K.

    2012-01-01

    The varying responses of inbred mouse models to radiation exposure present a unique opportunity to dissect the genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and tissue injury. Such studies are complementary to human association studies as they permit both the analysis of clinical features of disease, and of specific variants associated with its presentation, in a controlled environment. Herein I review how animal models are studied to identify specific genetic variants influencing predisposition to radiation-induced traits. Among these radiation-induced responses are documented strain differences in repair of DNA damage and in extent of tissue injury (in the lung, skin, and intestine) which form the base for genetic investigations. For example, radiation-induced DNA damage is consistently greater in tissues from BALB/cJ mice, than the levels in C57BL/6J mice, suggesting there may be an inherent DNA damage level per strain. Regarding tissue injury, strain specific inflammatory and fibrotic phenotypes have been documented for principally, C57BL/6 C3H and A/J mice but a correlation among responses such that knowledge of the radiation injury in one tissue informs of the response in another is not evident. Strategies to identify genetic differences contributing to a trait based on inbred strain differences, which include linkage analysis and the evaluation of recombinant congenic (RC) strains, are presented, with a focus on the lung response to irradiation which is the only radiation-induced tissue injury mapped to date. Such approaches are needed to reveal genetic differences in susceptibility to radiation injury, and also to provide a context for the effects of specific genetic variation uncovered in anticipated clinical association studies. In summary, mouse models can be studied to uncover heritable variation predisposing to specific radiation responses, and such variations may point to pathways of importance to phenotype development in the clinic.

  3. Experimental investigations of pulse shape control in passively mode-locked fiber lasers with net-normal dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L R; Han, D D

    2013-01-01

    Pulse shape control in passively mode-locked fiber lasers with net-normal dispersion is investigated experimentally. Three kinds of pulses with different spectral and temporal shapes are observed, and their pulse-shaping mechanisms are discussed. After a polarization-resolved system external to the cavity, the maximum intensity differences of the two polarization components for the rectangular-spectrum (RS), Gaussian-spectrum (GS), and super-broadband (SB) pulses are measured as ∼20 dB, ∼15 dB, and ∼1 dB, respectively. It is suggested that the equivalent saturable absorption effect plays an increasingly important role from the RS to GS and then to SB pulses in the pulse-shaping processes, while the spectral filtering effect declines. This work could help in systematically understanding pulse formation and proposing guidelines for the realization of pulses with better performance in fiber lasers. (paper)

  4. Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Garima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. Methods A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A the video group, and B the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Results Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

  5. Reliable before-fabrication forecasting of normal and touch mode MEMS capacitive pressure sensor: modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Sumit Kumar; Mahajan, Ankush; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev Kumar

    2017-10-01

    An analytical model and numerical simulation for the performance of MEMS capacitive pressure sensors in both normal and touch modes is required for expected behavior of the sensor prior to their fabrication. Obtaining such information should be based on a complete analysis of performance parameters such as deflection of diaphragm, change of capacitance when the diaphragm deflects, and sensitivity of the sensor. In the literature, limited work has been carried out on the above-stated issue; moreover, due to approximation factors of polynomials, a tolerance error cannot be overseen. Reliable before-fabrication forecasting requires exact mathematical calculation of the parameters involved. A second-order polynomial equation is calculated mathematically for key performance parameters of both modes. This eliminates the approximation factor, and an exact result can be studied, maintaining high accuracy. The elimination of approximation factors and an approach of exact results are based on a new design parameter (δ) that we propose. The design parameter gives an initial hint to the designers on how the sensor will behave once it is fabricated. The complete work is aided by extensive mathematical detailing of all the parameters involved. Next, we verified our claims using MATLAB® simulation. Since MATLAB® effectively provides the simulation theory for the design approach, more complicated finite element method is not used.

  6. All-atom normal-mode analysis reveals an RNA-induced allostery in a bacteriophage coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Eric C; Twarock, Reidun

    2010-03-01

    Assembly of the T=3 bacteriophage MS2 is initiated by the binding of a 19 nucleotide RNA stem loop from within the phage genome to a symmetric coat protein dimer. This binding event effects a folding of the FG loop in one of the protein subunits of the dimer and results in the formation of an asymmetric dimer. Since both the symmetric and asymmetric forms of the dimer are needed for the assembly of the protein container, this allosteric switch plays an important role in the life cycle of the phage. We provide here details of an all-atom normal-mode analysis of this allosteric effect. The results suggest that asymmetric contacts between the A -duplex RNA phosphodiester backbone of the stem loop with the EF loop in one coat protein subunit results in an increased dynamic behavior of its FG loop. The four lowest-frequency modes, which encompass motions predominantly on the FG loops, account for over 90% of the increased dynamic behavior due to a localization of the vibrational pattern on a single FG loop. Finally, we show that an analysis of the allosteric effect using an elastic network model fails to predict this localization effect, highlighting the importance of using an all-atom full force field method for this problem.

  7. Impact response analysis of cask for spent fuel by dimensional analysis and mode superposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. J.; Kim, W. T.; Lee, Y. S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Due to the potentiality of accidents, the transportation safety of radioactive material has become extremely important in these days. The most important means of accomplishing the safety in transportation for radioactive material is the integrity of cask. The cask for spent fuel consists of a cask body and two impact limiters generally. The impact limiters are attached at the upper and the lower of the cask body. The cask comprises general requirements and test requirements for normal transport conditions and hypothetical accident conditions in accordance with IAEA regulations. Among the test requirements for hypothetical accident conditions, the 9 m drop test of dropping the cask from 9 m height to unyielding surface to get maximum damage becomes very important requirement because it can affect the structural soundness of the cask. So far the impact response analysis for 9 m drop test has been obtained by finite element method with complex computational procedure. In this study, the empirical equations of the impact forces for 9 m drop test are formulated by dimensional analysis. And then using the empirical equations the characteristics of material used for impact limiters are analysed. Also the dynamic impact response of the cask body is analysed using the mode superposition method and the analysis method is proposed. The results are also validated by comparing with previous experimental results and finite element analysis results. The present method is simpler than finite element method and can be used to predict the impact response of the cask

  8. Rational Design Approach for Enhancing Higher-Mode Response of a Microcantilever in Vibro-Impacting Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Migliniene

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach for designing an efficient vibration energy harvester based on a vibro-impacting piezoelectric microcantilever with a geometric shape that has been rationally modified in accordance with results of dynamic optimization. The design goal is to increase the amplitudes of higher-order vibration modes induced during the vibro-impact response of the piezoelectric transducer, thereby providing a means to improve the energy conversion efficiency and power output. A rational configuration of the energy harvester is proposed and it is demonstrated that the new design retains essential modal characteristics of the optimal microcantilever structures, further providing the added benefit of less costly fabrication. The effects of structural dynamics associated with advantageous exploitation of higher vibration modes are analyzed experimentally by means of laser vibrometry as well as numerically via transient simulations of microcantilever response to random excitation. Electrical characterization results indicate that the proposed harvester outperforms its conventional counterpart (based on the microcantilever of the constant cross-section in terms of generated electrical output. Reported results may serve for the development of impact-type micropower generators with harvesting performance that is enhanced by virtue of self-excitation of large intensity higher-order mode responses when the piezoelectric transducer is subjected to relatively low-frequency excitation with strongly variable vibration magnitudes.

  9. Observations of the azimuthal dependence of normal mode coupling below 4 mHz at the South Pole and its nearby stations: Insights into the anisotropy beneath the Transantarctic Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Gang

    2016-08-01

    Normal mode coupling pair 0S26-0T26 and 0S27-0T27 are significantly present at the South Pole station QSPA after the 2011/03/11 Mw9.1 Tohoku earthquake. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms responsible for the coupling pairs, I first investigate mode observations at 43 stations distributed along the polar great-circle path for the earthquake and observations at 32 Antarctic stations. I rule out the effect of Earth's rotation as well as the effect of global large-scale lateral heterogeneity, but argue instead for the effect of small-scale local azimuthal anisotropy in a depth extent about 300 km. The presence of quasi-Love waveform in 2-5 mHz at QSPA and its nearby stations confirms the predication. Secondly, I analyze normal mode observations at the South Pole location after 28 large earthquakes from 1998 to 2015. The result indicates that the presence of the mode coupling is azimuthal dependent, which is related to event azimuths in -46° to -18°. I also make a comparison between the shear-wave splitting measurements of previous studies and the mode coupling observations of this study, suggesting that their difference can be explained by a case that the anisotropy responsible for the mode coupling is not just below the South Pole location but located below region close to the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Furthermore, more signals of local azimuthal anisotropy in normal-mode observations at QSPA and SBA, such as coupling of 0S12-0T11 and vertical polarization anomaly for 0T10, confirms the existence of deep anisotropy close to TAM, which may be caused by asthenospheric mantle flow and edge convection around cratonic keel of TAM.

  10. Radiogenic responses of normal cells induced by fractionated irradiation -a simulation study. Pt. 2. Late responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechting, W.; Ulmer, W.; Ginsberg, T.; Kikhounga-N'Got, O.; Saile, C.

    1995-01-01

    Based on controlled theory, a computed simulation model has been constructed which describes the time course of slowly responding normal cells after irradiation exposure. Subsequently, different clinical irradiation schemes are compared in regard to their delayed radiogenic responses referred to as late effects in radiological terminology. A cybernetic model of a paraenchymal tissue consisting of dominantly resting functional cells has been developed and transferred into a computer model. The radiation effects are considered by characteristic cell parameters as well as by the linear-quadratic model. Three kinds of tissue (brain and lung parenchym of the mouse, liver parenchym of rat) have been irradiated in the model according to standard-, super-, hyperfractionation and a single high dose per week. The simulation studies indicate that the late reaction of brain parenchym to hyperfractionation (3 x 1.5 Gy per day) and of lung parenchym tissue with regard to all fractionation schemes applied is particularly severe. The behavior of liver parenchym is not unique. A comparison of the simulation results basing to the survival of cell numbers with clinical experience and practice shows that the clinical reality can qualitatively be represented by the model. This opens the door for connecting side effects to normal tissue with the corresponding tumor efficacy (discussed in previous papers). The model is open to further refinement and to discussions referring to the phenomenon of late effects. (orig.) [de

  11. A heteroscedastic generalized linear model with a non-normal speed factor for responses and response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Dylan; Bolsinova, Maria

    2017-05-01

    In generalized linear modelling of responses and response times, the observed response time variables are commonly transformed to make their distribution approximately normal. A normal distribution for the transformed response times is desirable as it justifies the linearity and homoscedasticity assumptions in the underlying linear model. Past research has, however, shown that the transformed response times are not always normal. Models have been developed to accommodate this violation. In the present study, we propose a modelling approach for responses and response times to test and model non-normality in the transformed response times. Most importantly, we distinguish between non-normality due to heteroscedastic residual variances, and non-normality due to a skewed speed factor. In a simulation study, we establish parameter recovery and the power to separate both effects. In addition, we apply the model to a real data set. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  12. Impurity transport model for the normal confinement and high density H-mode discharges in Wendelstein 7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K; Burhenn, R; McCormick, K; Pasch, E; Yamada, H; Yoshinuma, M; Inagaki, S; Murakami, S; Osakabe, M; Liang, Y; Brakel, R; Ehmler, H; Giannone, L; Grigull, P; Knauer, J P; Maassberg, H; Weller, A

    2003-01-01

    An impurity transport model based on diffusivity and the radial convective velocity is proposed as a first approach to explain the differences in the time evolution of Al XII (0.776 nm), Al XI (55 nm) and Al X (33.3 nm) lines following Al-injection by laser blow-off between normal confinement discharges and high density H-mode (HDH) discharges. Both discharge types are in the collisional regime for impurities (central electron temperature is 0.4 keV and central density exceeds 10 20 m -3 ). In this model, the radial convective velocity is assumed to be determined by the radial electric field, as derived from the pressure gradient. The diffusivity coefficient is chosen to be constant in the plasma core but is significantly larger in the edge region, where it counteracts the high local values of the inward convective velocity. Under these conditions, the faster decay of aluminium in HDH discharges can be explained by the smaller negative electric field in the bulk plasma, and correspondingly smaller inward convective velocity, due to flattening of the density profiles

  13. Two Modes of the Axonal Interferon Response Limit Alphaherpesvirus Neuroinvasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV and pseudorabies virus (PRV, typically begins at epithelial surfaces and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to invasion of the PNS. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which includes the interferons (IFNs. The fundamental question is how do PNS cell bodies respond to these distant, potentially damaging events experienced by axons. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, we found that pretreating isolated axons with beta interferon (IFN-β or gamma interferon (IFN-γ significantly diminished the number of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and PRV particles moving in axons toward the cell bodies in a receptor-dependent manner. Exposing axons to IFN-β induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1 only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFN-γ induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated antiviral effects induced by IFN-γ, but not those induced by IFN-β. Proteomic analysis of IFN-β- or IFN-γ-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore, unlike treatment with IFN-γ, IFN-β induces a noncanonical, local antiviral response in axons. The activation of a local IFN response in axons represents a new paradigm for cytokine control of neuroinvasion.

  14. Numerical study of the mode selection in response spectrum analysis-condensed version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    For quality assurance of the dynamic response spectrum analysis, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recommends retaining all modes below the cutoff frequency at which the spectral acceleration (S/sub a/) returns to the peak zero period acceleration (ZPA). It also suggests that modes accounting for at least 90 percent of the structural masses be included in the analysis. A simple frame-type structure is generated as a baseline frame. Then groups of oscillators representing substructure are added onto the frame to study substructure behavior. A base case is established for each frame by including the specific number of modes used. The tests are conducted by incrementing the number of modes in the response spectrum analyses starting with one mode. The structural response of each modal increment is compared with the base case to identify the efficiency of mode selection method. All three methods are then applied to the MFTF-B Axicell Vacuum Vessel. The responses in critical components of the vessel, such as hangers and foundations, will be analyzed to confirm the accuracy of the selected method

  15. Individual differences in anxiety responses to stressful situations : A three-mode component analysis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mechelen, Iven; Kiers, Henk A.L.

    1999-01-01

    The three-mode component analysis model is discussed as a tool for a contextualized study of personality. When applied to person x situation x response data, the model includes sets of latent dimensions for persons, situations, and responses as well as a so-called core array, which may be considered

  16. Analysis of a Dynamic Viscoelastic Contact Problem with Normal Compliance, Normal Damped Response, and Nonmonotone Slip Rate Dependent Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Barboteu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a mathematical model which describes the dynamic evolution of a viscoelastic body in frictional contact with an obstacle. The contact is modelled with a combination of a normal compliance and a normal damped response law associated with a slip rate-dependent version of Coulomb’s law of dry friction. We derive a variational formulation and an existence and uniqueness result of the weak solution of the problem is presented. Next, we introduce a fully discrete approximation of the variational problem based on a finite element method and on an implicit time integration scheme. We study this fully discrete approximation schemes and bound the errors of the approximate solutions. Under regularity assumptions imposed on the exact solution, optimal order error estimates are derived for the fully discrete solution. Finally, after recalling the solution of the frictional contact problem, some numerical simulations are provided in order to illustrate both the behavior of the solution related to the frictional contact conditions and the theoretical error estimate result.

  17. Multiscale virtual particle based elastic network model (MVP-ENM) for normal mode analysis of large-sized biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin

    2017-12-20

    In this paper, a multiscale virtual particle based elastic network model (MVP-ENM) is proposed for the normal mode analysis of large-sized biomolecules. The multiscale virtual particle (MVP) model is proposed for the discretization of biomolecular density data. With this model, large-sized biomolecular structures can be coarse-grained into virtual particles such that a balance between model accuracy and computational cost can be achieved. An elastic network is constructed by assuming "connections" between virtual particles. The connection is described by a special harmonic potential function, which considers the influence from both the mass distributions and distance relations of the virtual particles. Two independent models, i.e., the multiscale virtual particle based Gaussian network model (MVP-GNM) and the multiscale virtual particle based anisotropic network model (MVP-ANM), are proposed. It has been found that in the Debye-Waller factor (B-factor) prediction, the results from our MVP-GNM with a high resolution are as good as the ones from GNM. Even with low resolutions, our MVP-GNM can still capture the global behavior of the B-factor very well with mismatches predominantly from the regions with large B-factor values. Further, it has been demonstrated that the low-frequency eigenmodes from our MVP-ANM are highly consistent with the ones from ANM even with very low resolutions and a coarse grid. Finally, the great advantage of MVP-ANM model for large-sized biomolecules has been demonstrated by using two poliovirus virus structures. The paper ends with a conclusion.

  18. A new method for evaluating the conformations and normal modes of macromolecule vibrations with a reduced force field. 2. Application to nonplanar distorted metal porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unger, E.; Beck, M.; Lipski, R.J.; Dreybrodt, W.; Medforth, C.J.; Smith, K.M.; Schweitzer-Stenner, R.

    1999-11-11

    The authors have developed a novel method for molecular mechanics calculations and normal-mode analysis. It is based on symmetry of local units that constitutes the given molecule. Compared with general valence force field calculations, the number of free parameters is reduced by 40--80% in the procedure. It was found to reproduce very well the vibrational frequencies and mode compositions of aromatic compounds and porphyrins, as shown by comparison with DFT calculations. A slightly altered force field obtained from Ni(II) porphin was then used to calculate the structure and the normal modes of several meso-substituted Ni(II) porphyrins which are known to be subject to significant ruffling and/or saddling distortions. This method satisfactorily reproduces their nonplanar structure and Raman band frequencies in the natural abundance and isotopic derivative spectra. The polarization properties of bands from out-of-plane modes are in accordance with the predicted nonplanar distortions. Moreover, some of the modes below 800 cm{sup {minus}1} which appear intense in the Raman spectra contain considerable contributions from both in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations, so that the conventional mode assignments become questionable. The authors also demonstrate that the intensity and polarization of some low-frequency Raman bands can be used as a (quantitative) marker to elucidate type and magnitude of out-of-plane distortions. These were recently shown to affect heme groups of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and, in particular, of cytochrome c.

  19. Probable neuro sexual mode of action of Casimiroa edulis seed extract versus [correction of verses] sildenafil citrate (Viagra(tm)) on mating behavior in normal male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Tabrez; Rakkah, Nabeeh I

    2008-01-01

    The present study deals with the aphrodisiac actions of the aqueous extract of the seeds of the hypotensive plant Casimiroa edulis on the sexual behavior of normal male rats. In this investigation 30 healthy male Wister strain white albino rats showing the brisk sexual activity age 15 weeks, weighing 400-450 grams were included. Female rats were artificially brought into estrous by hormonal treatment. Receptivity was checked by exposing them to the male rats and the most receptive females were selected for the stud The mating responses including Mounting Frequency (MF), Intromission Frequency (IF), Mounting Latency (ML), Intromission Latency (IL), Ejaculatory Latency in first and second series (EL1 and EL2) and Post Ejaculatory Interval (PEI) were recorded after treating the animals with 250 mg/kg casimiroa edulis extract (test reference) and 5 mg/kg sildenafil citrate (standard reference) respectively orally per day for 7 days. Both the groups exhibited a significant increase in Mounting Frequency, Intromission Frequency, and first and second ejaculatory latencies, where as Mounting and Intromission latencies and the Post Ejaculatory Interval showed a significant reduction than the controls. Although a similar pattern of mating behavior was observed among the test and the standard groups, however in all the cases as expected, sildenafil produced greater activity than the casimiroa edulis extract. These results suggest the possibility of a similar mode of action of casimiroa edulis and sildenafil citrate on mating behavior in these animals. Our work reported in this research thus provide preliminary evidence that the aqueous seed extract of casimiroa edulis possesses alphrodisiac activity and may be used as an alternative drug therapy to restore sexual functions probably via a neurogenic mode of action.

  20. Frictional response of simulated faults to normal stresses perturbations probed with ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreedharan, S.; Riviere, J.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    We report on a suite of laboratory friction experiments conducted on saw-cut Westerly Granite surfaces to probe frictional response to step changes in normal stress and loading rate. The experiments are conducted to illuminate the fundamental processes that yield friction rate and state dependence. We quantify the microphysical frictional response of the simulated fault surfaces to normal stress steps, in the range of 1% - 600% step increases and decreases from a nominal baseline normal stress. We measure directly the fault slip rate and account for changes in slip rate with changes in normal stress and complement mechanical data acquisition by continuously probing the faults with ultrasonic pulses. We conduct the experiments at room temperature and humidity conditions in a servo controlled biaxial testing apparatus in the double direct shear configuration. The samples are sheared over a range of velocities, from 0.02 - 100 μm/s. We report observations of a transient shear stress and friction evolution with step increases and decreases in normal stress. Specifically, we show that, at low shear velocities and small increases in normal stress ( 5% increases), the shear stress evolves immediately with normal stress. We show that the excursions in slip rate resulting from the changes in normal stress must be accounted for in order to predict fault strength evolution. Ultrasonic wave amplitudes which first increase immediately in response to normal stress steps, then decrease approximately linearly to a new steady state value, in part due to changes in fault slip rate. Previous descriptions of frictional state evolution during normal stress perturbations have not adequately accounted for the effect of large slip velocity excursions. Here, we attempt to do so by using the measured ultrasonic amplitudes as a proxy for frictional state during transient shear stress evolution. Our work aims to improve understanding of induced and triggered seismicity with focus on

  1. Tumor and normal tissue responses to fractioned non-uniform dose delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellman, P; Aegren, A; Brahme, A [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1996-08-01

    The volume dependence of the radiation response of a tumor is straight forward to quantify because it depends primarily on the eradication of all its clonogenic cells. A tumor therefore has a parallel organization as any surviving clonogen in principle can repopulate the tumor. The difficulty with the response of the tumor is instead to know the density and sensitivity distribution of the most resistant clonogenic cells. The increase in the 50% tumor control dose and the decrease in the maximum normalized slope of the dose response relation, {gamma}, in presence of small compartments of resistant tumor cells have therefore been quantified to describe their influence on the dose response relation. Injury to normal tissue is a much more complex and gradual process. It depends on earlier effects induced long before depletion of the differentiated and clonogenic cells that in addition may have a complex structural and functional organization. The volume dependence of the dose response relation of normal tissues is therefore described here by the relative seriality, s, of the infrastructure of the organ. The model can also be generalized to describe the response of heterogeneous tissues to non uniform dose distributions. The new model is compared with clinical and experimental data on normal tissue response, and shows good agreement both with regard to the shape of dose response relation and the volume dependence of the isoeffect dose. The response of tumors and normal tissues are quantified for arbitrary dose fractionations using the linear quadratic cell survival parameters {alpha} and {beta}. The parameters of the dose response relation are derived both for a constant dose per fraction and a constant number of dose fractions, thus in the latter case accounting also for non uniform dose delivery. (author). 26 refs, 4 figs.

  2. Soliton rains in a graphene-oxide passively mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser with all-normal dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S S; Yan, P G; Zhang, G L; Zhao, J Q; Li, H Q; Lin, R Y; Wang, Y G

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigated soliton rains in an ytterbium-doped fiber (YDF) laser with a net normal dispersion cavity using a graphene-oxide (GO) saturable absorber (SA). The 195 m-long-cavity, the fiber birefringence filter and the inserted 2.5 nm narrow bandwidth filter play important roles in the formation of the soliton rains. The soliton rain states can be changed by the effective gain bandwidth of the laser. The experimental results can be conducive to an understanding of dissipative soliton features and mode-locking dynamics in all-normal dispersion fiber lasers with GOSAs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of soliton rains in a GOSA passively mode-locked YDF laser with a net normal dispersion cavity. (letter)

  3. Responses of vibrissa-sensitive cortical neurons in normal and prenatally x-irradiated rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, M.; Kawabata, M.; Shoji, R.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were irradiated by 200 R of x ray on day 17 of gestation through the body wall of the mother. When they underwent the following electrophysiological tests at the age of 3 to 4 month, the somatosensory cortex showed a lack of layers II, III, IV, and Va. Spike responses to quick whisker deflections were recorded from single cells in the somatosenory cortex of normal and prenatally x-irradiated rats. For the irradiated rats the response latency was prolonged when compared to the normal controls. Cortical laminar analysis of field potentials revealed that there was no difference in the latency of these potentials between the two groups, suggesting that vibrissal sensory signals reach the cortical level normally even in the irradiated rats. The prolonged latency of the irradiated cortical neuronal response could thus be ascribed to an abnormal intracortical delay, which was most likely associated with the failure of development of layer IV stellate cells in these preparations

  4. Properties of a novel linear sulfur response mode in a multiple flame photometric detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adrian G; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2014-01-24

    A new linear sulfur response mode was established in the multiple flame photometric detector (mFPD) by monitoring HSO* emission in the red spectral region above 600nm. Optimal conditions for this mode were found by using a 750nm interference filter and oxygen flows to the worker flames of this device that were about 10mL/min larger than those used for monitoring quadratic S2* emission. By employing these parameters, this mode provided a linear response over about 4 orders of magnitude, with a detection limit near 5.8×10(-11)gS/s and a selectivity of sulfur over carbon of about 3.5×10(3). Specifically, the minimum detectable masses for 10 different sulfur analytes investigated ranged from 0.4 to 3.6ng for peak half-widths spanning 4-6s. The response toward ten different sulfur compounds was examined and produced an average reproducibility of 1.7% RSD (n=10) and an average equimolarity value of 1.0±0.1. In contrast to this, a conventional single flame S2* mode comparatively yielded respective values of 6.7% RSD (n=10) and 1.1±0.4. HSO* emission in the mFPD was also found to be relatively much less affected by response quenching due to hydrocarbons compared to a conventional single flame S2* emission mode. Results indicate that this new alternative linear mFPD response mode could be beneficial for sulfur monitoring applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Normal-Mode Analysis of Circular DNA at the Base-Pair Level. 2. Large-Scale Configurational Transformation of a Naturally Curved Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Atsushi; Tobias, Irwin; Olson, Wilma K

    2005-01-01

    Fine structural and energetic details embedded in the DNA base sequence, such as intrinsic curvature, are important to the packaging and processing of the genetic material. Here we investigate the internal dynamics of a 200 bp closed circular molecule with natural curvature using a newly developed normal-mode treatment of DNA in terms of neighboring base-pair "step" parameters. The intrinsic curvature of the DNA is described by a 10 bp repeating pattern of bending distortions at successive base-pair steps. We vary the degree of intrinsic curvature and the superhelical stress on the molecule and consider the normal-mode fluctuations of both the circle and the stable figure-8 configuration under conditions where the energies of the two states are similar. To extract the properties due solely to curvature, we ignore other important features of the double helix, such as the extensibility of the chain, the anisotropy of local bending, and the coupling of step parameters. We compare the computed normal modes of the curved DNA model with the corresponding dynamical features of a covalently closed duplex of the same chain length constructed from naturally straight DNA and with the theoretically predicted dynamical properties of a naturally circular, inextensible elastic rod, i.e., an O-ring. The cyclic molecules with intrinsic curvature are found to be more deformable under superhelical stress than rings formed from naturally straight DNA. As superhelical stress is accumulated in the DNA, the frequency, i.e., energy, of the dominant bending mode decreases in value, and if the imposed stress is sufficiently large, a global configurational rearrangement of the circle to the figure-8 form takes place. We combine energy minimization with normal-mode calculations of the two states to decipher the configurational pathway between the two states. We also describe and make use of a general analytical treatment of the thermal fluctuations of an elastic rod to characterize the

  6. Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahme, A [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1996-08-01

    Based on simple radiobiological models the effect of the distribution of absorbed dose in therapy beams on the radiation response of tumor and normal tissue volumes are investigated. Under the assumption that the dose variation in the treated volume is small it is shown that the response of the tissue to radiation is determined mainly by the mean dose to the tumor or normal tissue volume in question. Quantitative expressions are also given for the increased probability of normal tissue complications and the decreased probability of tumor control as a function of increasing dose variations around the mean dose level to these tissues. When the dose variations are large the minimum tumor dose (to cm{sup 3} size volumes) will generally be better related to tumor control and the highest dose to significant portions of normal tissue correlates best to complications. In order not to lose more than one out of 20 curable patients (95% of highest possible treatment outcome) the required accuracy in the dose distribution delivered to the target volume should be 2.5% (1{sigma}) for a mean dose response gradient {gamma} in the range 2 - 3. For more steeply responding tumors and normal tissues even stricter requirements may be desirable. (author). 15 refs, 6 figs.

  7. The influence of dose fractionation and dose rate on normal tissue responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of responses of a variety of normal tissues in animals to fractionated irradiations has been made with the aim of developing a formalism for the prediction of tolerance doses as a function of the dose per fraction and the overall treatment time. An important feature of the formalism is that it is directly based on radiological insights and therefore provides a logical concept to account for the diversity of tissue responses. (Auth.)

  8. Comparing web and mail responses in a mixed mode survey in college alcohol use research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; Diez, Alison; Boyd, Carol J.; Nelson, Toben F.; Weitzman, Elissa R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This exploratory study examined potential mode effects (web versus U.S. mail) in a mixed mode design survey of alcohol use at eight U.S. colleges. Methods Randomly selected students from eight U.S. colleges were invited to participate in a self-administered survey on their alcohol use in the spring of 2002. Data were collected initially by web survey (n =2619) and non-responders to this mode were mailed a hardcopy survey (n =628). Results College students who were male, living on-campus and under 21 years of age were significantly more likely to complete the initial web survey. Multivariate analyses revealed few substantive differences between survey modality and alcohol use measures. Conclusions The findings from this study provide preliminary evidence that web and mail surveys produce comparable estimates of alcohol use in a non-randomized mixed mode design. The results suggest that mixed mode survey designs could be effective at reaching certain college sub-populations and improving overall response rate while maintaining valid measurement of alcohol use. Web surveys are gaining popularity in survey research and more work is needed to examine whether these results can extend to web surveys generally or are specific to mixed mode designs. PMID:16460882

  9. Growth performance, innate immune responses and disease resistance of fingerling blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala adapted to different berberine-dietary feeding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Na; Chen, Dan-Hong; Chen, Qing-Qing; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2017-09-01

    A 8-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of different berberine-dietary feeding modes on growth, non-specific immune responses and disease resistance of blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala. Fish (average initial weight 4.70 ± 0.02 g) were fed two fat levels (5% and 10%) diets in three berberine-feeding modes (supplementing 50 mg/kg berberine continuously, two-week or four-week intervals) with four replicates, respectively. Then, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila and mortality was recorded for the next 96 h after feeding trial. The results showed that different feeding modes of berberine significantly influenced growth, innate immunity and antioxidant capability of fish. Fish fed normal diet with 50 mg/kg berberine at two-week interval mode reflected remarkably (P complement component 3 (C3) and complement component 4 (C4) concentrations were significantly (P feeding modes. Based on fish healthy improvement and feeding cost saving, blunt snout bream fed normal diet with 50 mg/kg berberine at two-week interval or fed high-fat diet with berberine at two-week or four-week intervals were optimal feeding mode, respectively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Response of two-band systems to a single-mode quantized field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z. C.; Shen, H. Z.; Wang, W.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-03-01

    The response of topological insulators (TIs) to an external weakly classical field can be expressed in terms of Kubo formula, which predicts quantized Hall conductivity of the quantum Hall family. The response of TIs to a single-mode quantized field, however, remains unexplored. In this work, we take the quantum nature of the external field into account and define a Hall conductance to characterize the linear response of a two-band system to the quantized field. The theory is then applied to topological insulators. Comparisons with the traditional Hall conductance are presented and discussed.

  11. Extraction of the mode shapes of a segmented ship model with a hydroelastic response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yooil Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mode shapes of a segmented hull model towed in a model basin were predicted using both the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD and cross random decrement technique. The proper orthogonal decomposition, which is also known as Karhunen-Loeve decomposition, is an emerging technology as a useful signal processing technique in structural dynamics. The technique is based on the fact that the eigenvectors of a spatial coherence matrix become the mode shapes of the system under free and randomly excited forced vibration conditions. Taking advantage of the sim-plicity of POD, efforts have been made to reveal the mode shapes of vibrating flexible hull under random wave ex-citation. First, the segmented hull model of a 400 K ore carrier with 3 flexible connections was towed in a model basin under different sea states and the time histories of the vertical bending moment at three different locations were meas-ured. The measured response time histories were processed using the proper orthogonal decomposition, eventually to obtain both the first and second vertical vibration modes of the flexible hull. A comparison of the obtained mode shapes with those obtained using the cross random decrement technique showed excellent correspondence between the two results.

  12. Implementing a finite-state off-normal and fault response system for disruption avoidance in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Choi, W.; Hahn, S. H.; Humphreys, D. A.; Sammuli, B. S.; Walker, M. L.

    2018-05-01

    A finite-state off-normal and fault response (ONFR) system is presented that provides the supervisory logic for comprehensive disruption avoidance and machine protection in tokamaks. Robust event handling is critical for ITER and future large tokamaks, where plasma parameters will necessarily approach stability limits and many systems will operate near their engineering limits. Events can be classified as off-normal plasmas events, e.g. neoclassical tearing modes or vertical displacements events, or faults, e.g. coil power supply failures. The ONFR system presented provides four critical features of a robust event handling system: sequential responses to cascading events, event recovery, simultaneous handling of multiple events and actuator prioritization. The finite-state logic is implemented in Matlab®/Stateflow® to allow rapid development and testing in an easily understood graphical format before automated export to the real-time plasma control system code. Experimental demonstrations of the ONFR algorithm on the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks are presented. In the most complex demonstration, the ONFR algorithm asynchronously applies ‘catch and subdue’ electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) injection scheme to suppress a virulent 2/1 neoclassical tearing mode, subsequently shuts down ECCD for machine protection when the plasma becomes over-dense, and enables rotating 3D field entrainment of the ensuing locked mode to allow a safe rampdown, all in the same discharge without user intervention. When multiple ONFR states are active simultaneously and requesting the same actuator (e.g. neutral beam injection or gyrotrons), actuator prioritization is accomplished by sorting the pre-assigned priority values of each active ONFR state and giving complete control of the actuator to the state with highest priority. This early experience makes evident that additional research is required to develop an improved actuator sharing protocol, as well as a methodology to

  13. Bioinspired Flexible and Highly Responsive Dual-Mode Strain/Magnetism Composite Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pei; Li, Yuan-Qing; Yu, Xiao-Guang; Zhu, Wei-Bin; Nie, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jin-Rui; Hu, Ning; Fu, Shao-Yun

    2018-04-04

    The mimicry of human skin to detect both oncoming and physical-contacting object is of great importance in the fields of manufacturing, artificial robots and vehicles, etc. Herein, a novel bioinspired flexible and highly responsive dual-mode strain/magnetism composite sensor, which works via both contact and contactless modes, is first fabricated by incorporating Fe 3 O 4 /silicone system into a carbon fiber aerogel (CFA). The distance dependence of magnetic field endorses the CFA/Fe 3 O 4 /silicone composite possible for spatial sensing due to the introduction of Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles. As a result, the as-prepared flexible sensor exhibits precise and real-time response not only to direct-contact compression as usual but also to contactless magnetic field in a wide frequency range from 0.1 to 10 Hz, achieving the maximum variance of 68% and 86% in relative electrical resistance, respectively. The contact and contactless sensing modes of the strain/magnetism sensor are clearly demonstrated by recording the speeds of bicycle riding and walking, respectively. Interestingly, this dual-mode composite sensor exhibits the capacity of identifying the contact and contactless state, which is the first report for flexible sensors. The current protocol is eco-friendly, facile, and thought-provoking for the fabrication of multifunctional sensors.

  14. High frequency switched-mode stimulation can evoke postsynaptic responses in cerebellar principal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Van Dongen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the efficacy of high frequency switched-mode neural stimulation. Instead of using a constant stimulation amplitude, the stimulus is switched on and off repeatedly with a high frequency (up to 100kHz duty cycled signal. By means of tissue modeling that includes the dynamic properties of both the tissue material as well as the axon membrane, it is first shown that switched-mode stimulation depolarizes the cell membrane in a similar way as classical constant amplitude stimulation.These findings are subsequently verified using in vitro experiments in which the response of a Purkinje cell is measured due to a stimulation signal in the molecular layer of the cerebellum of a mouse. For this purpose a stimulator circuit is developed that is able to produce a monophasic high frequency switched-mode stimulation signal. The results confirm the modeling by showing that switched-mode stimulation is able to induce similar responses in the Purkinje cell as classical stimulation using a constant current source. This conclusion opens up possibilities for novel stimulation designs that can improve the performance of the stimulator circuitry. Care has to be taken to avoid losses in the system due to the higher operating frequency.

  15. Accident and Off-Normal Response and Recovery from Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Processing Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALDERMAN, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    In the process of removing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the K Basins through its subsequent packaging, drymg, transportation and storage steps, the SNF Project must be able to respond to all anticipated or foreseeable off-normal and accident events that may occur. Response procedures and recovery plans need to be in place, personnel training established and implemented to ensure the project will be capable of appropriate actions. To establish suitable project planning, these events must first be identified and analyzed for their expected impact to the project. This document assesses all off-normal and accident events for their potential cross-facility or Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) process reversal impact. Table 1 provides the methodology for establishing the event planning level and these events are provided in Table 2 along with the general response and recovery planning. Accidents and off-normal events of the SNF Project have been evaluated and are identified in the appropriate facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) or in the transportation Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). Hazards and accidents are summarized from these safety analyses and listed in separate tables for each facility and the transportation system in Appendix A, along with identified off-normal events. The tables identify the general response time required to ensure a stable state after the event, governing response documents, and the events with potential cross-facility or SNF process reversal impacts. The event closure is predicated on stable state response time, impact to operations and the mitigated annual occurrence frequency of the event as developed in the hazard analysis process

  16. Ejection fraction response to exercise in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, R.L.; Lee, K.L.; Cobb, F.; Jones, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    In this study we describe the ejection fraction response to upright exercise using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in a group of 60 patients with chest pain, normal coronary ateriograms and normal resting ventricular function. A wide range of resting function (heart rate and ejection fraction) and exercise function (heart rate, ejection fraction, peak work load and estimated peak oxygen uptake) were measured. The ejection fraction response to exercise demonstrated wide variation, ranging from a decrease of 23% to an increase of 24%. Six of 22 clinical and radionuclide angiocardiographic variables (resting ejection fraction, peak work load, age, sex, body surface area and the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise) were significant univariate predictors of the ejection fraction response to exercise. Multivariable analysis identified resting ejection fraction, the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise and either sex or peak work load as variables that provided significant independent predictive information. These observations indicate that the ejection fraction response to exercise is a complex response that is influenced by multiple physiologic variables. The wide variation in this population suggests that the ejection fraction response to exercise is not a reliable test for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease because of its low specificity

  17. Frequency Response of the Sample Vibration Mode in Scanning Probe Acoustic Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya-Jun, Zhao; Qian, Cheng; Meng-Lu, Qian

    2010-01-01

    Based on the interaction mechanism between tip and sample in the contact mode of a scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM), an active mass of the sample is introduced in the mass-spring model. The tip motion and frequency response of the sample vibration mode in the SPAM are calculated by the Lagrange equation with dissipation function. For the silicon tip and glass assemblage in the SPAM the frequency response is simulated and it is in agreement with the experimental result. The living myoblast cells on the glass slide are imaged at resonance frequencies of the SPAM system, which are 20kHz, 30kHz and 120kHz. It is shown that good contrast of SPAM images could be obtained when the system is operated at the resonance frequencies of the system in high and low-frequency regions

  18. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors

  19. Plasma Catecholamines, Sweat Electrolytes and Physiological Responses of Exercised Normal, Partial Anhidrotic and Anhidrotic Horses

    OpenAIRE

    A. Bashir; A. Rasedee

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Malaysia imports horses from temperate countries to develop equine sports in the country. Several of these horses developed partial and complete anhidrosis. Approach: Normal, partial anhidrotic and anhidrotic horses were exercised to determine their sweating and physiological responses to exercise. The heart and respiratory rates, rectal temperature and blood samples were obtained before the horses were lunged at 10 km h-­1 for 1 h and at again at 15, 30, 45, 60 min and 24 ...

  20. Responses of some normal tissues to low doses of γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, H.R.

    1975-01-01

    The response of four normal tissues to low doses of γ-radiation was measured in mice using three indirect methods. The survival curves for cells of the tissues studied (colon, jejunum, testis and haemoleucopoietic system) may be exponential over an uncertain dose range (from zero to between 100 to 230 rad), the slope being about one third of that in the high-dose region. Some of the uncertainties in the data probably reflect variations in age-density distribution. (author)

  1. Phase space interrogation of the empirical response modes for seismically excited structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bibhas; George, Riya C.; Mishra, Sudib K.

    2017-07-01

    Conventional Phase Space Interrogation (PSI) for structural damage assessment relies on exciting the structure with low dimensional chaotic waveform, thereby, significantly limiting their applicability to large structures. The PSI technique is presently extended for structure subjected to seismic excitations. The high dimensionality of the phase space for seismic response(s) are overcome by the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), decomposing the responses to a number of intrinsic low dimensional oscillatory modes, referred as Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs). Along with their low dimensionality, a few IMFs, retain sufficient information of the system dynamics to reflect the damage induced changes. The mutually conflicting nature of low-dimensionality and the sufficiency of dynamic information are taken care by the optimal choice of the IMF(s), which is shown to be the third/fourth IMFs. The optimal IMF(s) are employed for the reconstruction of the Phase space attractor following Taken's embedding theorem. The widely referred Changes in Phase Space Topology (CPST) feature is then employed on these Phase portrait(s) to derive the damage sensitive feature, referred as the CPST of the IMFs (CPST-IMF). The legitimacy of the CPST-IMF is established as a damage sensitive feature by assessing its variation with a number of damage scenarios benchmarked in the IASC-ASCE building. The damage localization capability, remarkable tolerance to noise contamination and the robustness under different seismic excitations of the feature are demonstrated.

  2. Vibrational normal modes of diazo-dimedone: A comparative study by Fourier infrared/Raman spectroscopies and conformational analysis by MM/QM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez Soto, C. A.; Ramos, J. M.; Rianelli, R. S.; de Souza, M. C. B. V.; Ferreira, V. F.

    2007-07-01

    The 2-diazo-5,5-dimethyl-cyclohexane-1,3-dione ( 3) was synthesized and the FT-IR/Raman spectra were measured with the purpose of obtain a full assignment of the vibrational modes. Singular aspects concerning the -C dbnd N dbnd N oscillator are discussed in view of two strong bands observed in the region of 2300-2100 cm -1 in both, Infrared and Raman spectra. The density functional theory (DFT) was used to obtain the geometrical structure and for assisting in the vibrational assignment joint to the traditional normal coordinate analysis (NCA). The observed wavenumbers at 2145 (IR), 2144(R) are assigned as the coupled ν(N dbnd N) + ν(C dbnd N) vibrational mode with higher participation of the N dbnd N stretching. A 2188 cm -1 (IR) and at 2186 cm -1 (R) can be assigned as a overtone of one of ν(CC) normal mode or to a combination band of the fundamentals δ(CCH) found at 1169 cm -1 and the δ (CC dbnd N) found at 1017 cm -1 enhanced by Fermi resonance.

  3. Interactions of the Salience Network and Its Subsystems with the Default-Mode and the Central-Executive Networks in Normal Aging and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Ganesh B; Wu, Junjie; Hajjar, Ihab; Qiu, Deqiang

    2017-09-01

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) investigations suggest that the intrinsically organized large-scale networks and the interaction between them might be crucial for cognitive activities. A triple network model, which consists of the default-mode network, salience network, and central-executive network, has been recently used to understand the connectivity patterns of the cognitively normal brains versus the brains with disorders. This model suggests that the salience network dynamically controls the default-mode and central-executive networks in healthy young individuals. However, the patterns of interactions have remained largely unknown in healthy aging or those with cognitive decline. In this study, we assess the patterns of interactions between the three networks using dynamical causal modeling in resting state fMRI data and compare them between subjects with normal cognition and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In healthy elderly subjects, our analysis showed that the salience network, especially its dorsal subnetwork, modulates the interaction between the default-mode network and the central-executive network (Mann-Whitney U test; p control correlated significantly with lower overall cognitive performance measured by Montreal Cognitive Assessment (r = 0.295; p control, especially the dorsal salience network, over other networks provides a neuronal basis for cognitive decline and may be a candidate neuroimaging biomarker of cognitive impairment.

  4. A radioactive waste transportation package monitoring system for normal transport and accident emergency response conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.; Cashwell, J.W.; Apple, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses spent fuel and high level waste transportation history and prospects, discusses accident histories of radioactive material transport, discusses emergency responder needs and provides a general description of the Transportation Intelligent Monitoring System (TRANSIMS) design. The key objectives of the monitoring system are twofold: (1) to facilitate effective emergency response to accidents involving a radioactive waste transportation package, while minimizing risk to the public and emergency first-response personnel, and (2) to allow remote monitoring of transportation vehicle and payload conditions to enable research into radioactive material transportation for normal and accident conditions. (J.P.N.)

  5. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  6. Is a Responsive Default Mode Network Required for Successful Working Memory Task Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L.; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Seminowicz, David A.; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In studies of cognitive processing using tasks with externally directed attention, regions showing increased (external-task-positive) and decreased or “negative” [default-mode network (DMN)] fMRI responses during task performance are dynamically responsive to increasing task difficulty. Responsiveness (modulation of fMRI signal by increasing load) has been linked directly to successful cognitive task performance in external-task-positive regions but not in DMN regions. To investigate whether a responsive DMN is required for successful cognitive performance, we compared healthy human subjects (n = 23) with individuals shown to have decreased DMN engagement (chronic pain patients, n = 28). Subjects performed a multilevel working-memory task (N-back) during fMRI. If a responsive DMN is required for successful performance, patients having reduced DMN responsiveness should show worsened performance; if performance is not reduced, their brains should show compensatory activation in external-task-positive regions or elsewhere. All subjects showed decreased accuracy and increased reaction times with increasing task level, with no significant group differences on either measure at any level. Patients had significantly reduced negative fMRI response (deactivation) of DMN regions (posterior cingulate/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex). Controls showed expected modulation of DMN deactivation with increasing task difficulty. Patients showed significantly reduced modulation of DMN deactivation by task difficulty, despite their successful task performance. We found no evidence of compensatory neural recruitment in external-task-positive regions or elsewhere. Individual responsiveness of the external-task-positive ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, but not of DMN regions, correlated with task accuracy. These findings suggest that a responsive DMN may not be required for successful cognitive performance; a responsive external-task-positive network may be sufficient

  7. Is a Responsive Default Mode Network Required for Successful Working Memory Task Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Seminowicz, David A; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2015-08-19

    In studies of cognitive processing using tasks with externally directed attention, regions showing increased (external-task-positive) and decreased or "negative" [default-mode network (DMN)] fMRI responses during task performance are dynamically responsive to increasing task difficulty. Responsiveness (modulation of fMRI signal by increasing load) has been linked directly to successful cognitive task performance in external-task-positive regions but not in DMN regions. To investigate whether a responsive DMN is required for successful cognitive performance, we compared healthy human subjects (n = 23) with individuals shown to have decreased DMN engagement (chronic pain patients, n = 28). Subjects performed a multilevel working-memory task (N-back) during fMRI. If a responsive DMN is required for successful performance, patients having reduced DMN responsiveness should show worsened performance; if performance is not reduced, their brains should show compensatory activation in external-task-positive regions or elsewhere. All subjects showed decreased accuracy and increased reaction times with increasing task level, with no significant group differences on either measure at any level. Patients had significantly reduced negative fMRI response (deactivation) of DMN regions (posterior cingulate/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex). Controls showed expected modulation of DMN deactivation with increasing task difficulty. Patients showed significantly reduced modulation of DMN deactivation by task difficulty, despite their successful task performance. We found no evidence of compensatory neural recruitment in external-task-positive regions or elsewhere. Individual responsiveness of the external-task-positive ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, but not of DMN regions, correlated with task accuracy. These findings suggest that a responsive DMN may not be required for successful cognitive performance; a responsive external-task-positive network may be sufficient. We studied the

  8. Genomic instability: potential contributions to tumour and normal tissue response, and second tumours, after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, Jolyon H.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Induced genomic instability generally refers to a type of damage which is transmissible down cell generations, and which results in a persistently enhanced frequency of de novo mutations, chromosomal abnormalities or lethality in a significant fraction of the descendant cell population. The potential contribution of induced genomic instability to tumour and normal tissue response, and second tumours, after radiotherapy, is explored. Results: The phenomenon of spontaneous genomic instability is well known in some rare genetic diseases (e.g. Gorlin's syndrome), and there is evidence in such cases that it can lead to a greater propensity for carcinogenesis (with shortened latency) which is enhanced after irradiation. It is unclear what role induced genomic instability plays in the response of normal individuals, but persistent chromosomal instability has been detected in vivo in lymphocytes and keratinocytes from irradiated normal individuals. Such induced genomic instability might play some role in tumour response in a subset of tumours with specific defects in damage response genes, but again its contribution to radiocurability in the majority of cancer patients is unclear. In normal tissues, genomic instability induced in wild-type cells leading to delayed cell death might contribute to more severe or prolonged early reactions as a consequence of increased cell loss, a longer time required for recovery, and greater residual injury. In tumours, induced genomic instability reflected in delayed reductions in clonogenic capacity might contribute to the radiosensitivity of primary tumours, and also to a lower incidence, longer latency and slower growth rate of recurrences and metastases. Conclusions: The evidence which is reviewed shows that there is little information at present to support these propositions, but what exists is consistent with their expectations. Also, it is not yet clear to what extent mutations associated with genomic instability

  9. Responsiveness of cardiodynamics to exercise loading in normal subjects and in patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Yukie; Matsuda, Takeshi

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the responses of the left ventricular systolic function and diastolic function to exertion by cardiac blood pool scintigraphy using 99mTc in reference to changes with aging and changes in the cases of idiopathic cardiomyopathy. In order to study the functional response with aging to exertion, 38 normal subjects were divided by age. Subsequently, 28 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases (Group H), 13 dilated cardiomyopathy cases (Group D) and 14 normal cases (Group N) were studied. Ejection Fraction (EF) and Peak Ejection Rate (PER) were used as the indicators for the systolic function. Peak Filling Rate (PER), 1/3 Filling Rate (1/3FR) and Time to Peak Filling (TPF) were used as the indicators for the diastolic function. When comparison was made among the normal subjects by age, the systolic function and diastolic function at rest, varied as they were, showed no significant change with aging. The %delta EF and %delta PER tended to decrease linearly with aging (Y=-4E-X+28, p<0.0001; Y=-X+57, p<0.0001). As to the %delta PFR, %delta 1/3FR and %delta TPF, however, correlation with aging was not found. In comparing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy, Group D showed significantly lower values before exertion and after maximum exertion than the other two groups. A difference in the response of the systolic function and diastolic function to exertion was noted in both the comparative study on aging of the normal subjects and the study of cases of cardiomyopathy. The presence of the compensatory mechanism due to elevation of the left atrial pressure and an increase in the left atrial contractile power may be mentioned as a reservoir of blood and also as a booster pump. Particularly, the effect of the latter compensates for the decline in the left ventricular compliance, which may lead to the maintenance of the diastolic function. (K.H.)

  10. Ab initio calculation of transition state normal mode properties and rate constants for the H(T)+CH4(CD4) abstraction and exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, G.C.; Walch, S.P.; Wagner, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    We present ab initio (GVB--POL--CI) calculations for enough of the region about the abstraction and exchange saddle points for H(T)+CH 4 (CD 4 ) to perform a full normal mode analysis of the transition states. The resulting normal mode frequencies are compared to four other published surfaces: an ab initio UHF--SCF calculation by Carsky and Zahradnik, a semiempirical surface by Raff, and two semiempirical surfaces by Kurylo, Hollinden, and Timmons. Significant quantitative and qualitative differences exist between the POL--CI results and those of the other surfaces. Transition state theory rate constants and vibrationally adiabatic reaction threshold energies were computed for all surfaces and compared to available experimental values. For abstraction, the POL--CI rates are in good agreement with experimental rates and in better agreement than are the rates of any of the other surfaces. For exchange, uncertainties in the experimental values and in the importance of vibrationally nonadiabatic effects cloud the comparison of theory to experiment. Tentative conclusions are that the POL--CI barrier is too low by several kcal. Unless vibrationaly nonadiabatic effects are severe, the POL--CI surface is still in better agreement with experiment than are the other surfaces. The rates for a simple 3-atom transition state theory model (where CH 3 is treated as an atom) are compared to the rates for the full 6-atom model. The kinetic energy coupling of reaction coordinate modes to methyl group modes is identified as being of primary importance in determining the accuracy of the 3-atom model for this system. Substantial coupling in abstraction, but not exchange, causes the model to fail for abstraction but succeed for exchange

  11. Radiobiological predictors of tumor and acute normal tissue response in radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Skladowski, K.; Zajusz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of measurements of the potential doubling time (T pot. ) and of the survival fraction at 2.0 Gy (SF 2 ), and a method modifying acute radiation response of normal oral mucosa are discussed. Tumor clonogen repopulation accelerates around day 28 of the treatment, and the rate of repopulation is not constant but continuously increases from about 0.3 Gy/day to 1.0-1.3 Gy/day between day 28 and 65 of the treatment. This may suggest that T pot. values decrease correspondingly. The relevance of prior-to-treatment T pot. measurements to clinical situations is discussed. The SF 2 value reflects the intrinsic radiosensitivity of human tumors. The SF 2 values are expected to be valuable as predictors for tumor response to irradiation. Variations in the SF 2 values depending on tumor characteristics and assay methods are discussed in relation to the dose response and tumor cure probability. The effect of modifying the repopulation rate in the oral mucosa by stimulation with a 2% silver nitrate solution is discussed. Although these prognosticators are different in their nature, they might provide a rational basis for selecting patients into optimal irradiation treatment and might allow to modify the radiation response of dose-limiting normal tissues. (author). 5 figs., 1 tab., 28 refs

  12. Proprietary tomato extract improves metabolic response to high-fat meal in healthy normal weight subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Deplanque

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL oxidation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Lycopene and tomato-based products have been described as potent inhibitors of LDL oxidation. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of a 2-week supplementation with a carotenoid-rich tomato extract (CRTE standardized for a 1:1 ratio of lycopene and phytosterols, on post-prandial LDL oxidation after a high-fat meal. Design: In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-groups, placebo-controlled study, 146 healthy normal weight individuals were randomly assigned to a daily dose of CRTE standardized for tomato phytonutrients or placebo during 2 weeks. Oxidized LDL (OxLDL, glucose, insulin, and triglyceride (TG responses were measured for 8 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal before and at the end of intervention. Results: Plasma lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene were increased throughout the study period in the CRTE group compared to placebo. CRTE ingestion significantly improved changes in OxLDL response to high-fat meal compared to placebo after 2 weeks (p<0.0001. Changes observed in glucose, insulin, and TG responses were not statistically significant after 2 weeks of supplementation, although together they may suggest a trend of favorable effect on metabolic outcomes after a high-fat meal. Conclusions: Two-week supplementation with CRTE increased carotenoids levels in plasma and improved oxidized LDL response to a high-fat meal in healthy normal weight individuals.

  13. Influence of ventilation and hypocapnia on sympathetic nerve responses to hypoxia in normal humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, V K; Mark, A L; Zavala, D C; Abboud, F M

    1989-11-01

    The sympathetic response to hypoxia depends on the interaction between chemoreceptor stimulation (CRS) and the associated hyperventilation. We studied this interaction by measuring sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to muscle in 13 normal subjects, while breathing room air, 14% O2, 10% O2, and 10% O2 with added CO2 to maintain isocapnia. Minute ventilation (VE) and blood pressure (BP) increased significantly more during isocapnic hypoxia (IHO) than hypocapnic hypoxia (HHO). In contrast, SNA increased more during HHO [40 +/- 10% (SE)] than during IHO (25 +/- 19%, P less than 0.05). To determine the reason for the lesser increase in SNA with IHO, 11 subjects underwent voluntary apnea during HHO and IHO. Apnea potentiated the SNA responses to IHO more than to HHO. SNA responses to IHO were 17 +/- 7% during breathing and 173 +/- 47% during apnea whereas SNA responses to HHO were 35 +/- 8% during breathing and 126 +/- 28% during apnea. During ventilation, the sympathoexcitation of IHO (compared with HHO) is suppressed, possibly for two reasons: 1) because of the inhibitory influence of activation of pulmonary afferents as a result of a greater increase in VE, and 2) because of the inhibitory influence of baroreceptor activation due to a greater rise in BP. Thus in humans, the ventilatory response to chemoreceptor stimulation predominates and restrains the sympathetic response. The SNA response to chemoreceptor stimulation represents the net effect of the excitatory influence of the chemoreflex and the inhibitory influence of pulmonary afferents and baroreceptor afferents.

  14. Estimating Non-Normal Latent Trait Distributions within Item Response Theory Using True and Estimated Item Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, D. A.; Schmitt, T. A.; Walker, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    Item response theory (IRT) procedures have been used extensively to study normal latent trait distributions and have been shown to perform well; however, less is known concerning the performance of IRT with non-normal latent trait distributions. This study investigated the degree of latent trait estimation error under normal and non-normal…

  15. Coordenadas cartesianas moleculares a partir da geometria dos modos normais de vibração Molecular cartesian coordinates from vibrational normal modes geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emílio Borges

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple method to obtain molecular Cartesian coordinates as a function of vibrational normal modes is presented in this work. The method does not require the definition of special matrices, like the F and G of Wilson, neither of group theory. The Eckart's conditions together with the diagonalization of kinetic and potential energy are the only required expressions. This makes the present approach appropriate to be used as a preliminary study for more advanced concepts concerning vibrational analysis. Examples are given for diatomic and triatomic molecules.

  16. Effect of short-term fasting on lipolytic responsiveness in normal and obese human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.; Klein, S.; Holland, O.B.; Rosenblatt, J.; Gary, H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the rate of lipolysis (fatty acid and glycerol release into blood) has been quantified in both normal weight and obese volunteers after both 15 and 87 h of fasting. In each study, the basal rate and subsequent response to epinephrine infusion were determined. The rate of appearance (R/sub a/) of free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were quantified by infusion of [1- 13 C]palmitate and D-5-glycerol, respectively. Substrate flux rates per unit of body fat mass and lean body mass were calculated from total body water measurements using H 2 18 O dilution. In normal volunteers, the basal R/sub a/ FFA and R/sub a/ glycerol rose markedly with 87 h of fasting, whereas the increases were more modest in the obese subjects. However, the rate of mobilization of fat, in relation to the lean body mass, was higher in the obese subjects than in the normal subjects after 15 h of fasting, and the values were similar in both groups after 87 h of fasting. There was an increased lipolytic response to epinephrine after fasting in both groups. This increased sensitivity may have resulted from the enhancement of fatty acid-triglyceride substrate cycling that occurred after fasting

  17. On- and off-response ERGs elicited by sawtooth stimuli in normal subjects and glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangeni, Gobinda; Lämmer, Robert; Tornow, Ralf P; Horn, Folkert K; Kremers, Jan

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the on- and off-responses and their response asymmetries elicited by sawtooth stimuli in normal subjects and glaucoma patients. Furthermore, the correlation between the ERGs and other functional and structural parameters are investigated. Full-field stimuli were produced using a Ganzfeld bowl with Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) as light sources. On- and off-response ERGs were recorded from 17 healthy subjects, 12 pre-perimetric and 15 perimetric glaucoma patients using 4-Hz luminance rapid-on and rapid-off sawtooth stimuli (white light; mean luminance 55 cd/m(2)) at 100% contrast. The on- and off-responses were added to study response asymmetries. In addition, flash ERGs were elicited by red stimuli (200 cd/m(2)) on a blue background (10 cd/m(2)). The mean deviations (MD) of the visual field defects were obtained by standard automated perimetry. The retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT) was measured with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT). We studied the correlation between ERG response amplitudes, visual field mean deviation (MDs) and RNFLT values. The on-responses showed an initial negative (N-on) followed by a positive (P-on), a late positive (LP-on) and a late negative responses (LN-on). The off-responses showed an initial positive (P-off) a late positive (LP-off) and a late negative response (LN-off). The addition of on- and off-responses revealed an initial positive (P-add) and a late negative response (LN-add). The on-response components (N-on, P-on and LN-on) in the glaucoma patients were relatively similar to those of the control subjects. However, the LP-on was significantly elevated (p = 0.03) in perimetric patients. The LP-off was significantly elevated (p < 0.001), and the amplitude of LN-off was significantly reduced in perimetric patients (p = 0.02). The LN-add amplitude was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) and delayed (p = 0.03) in perimetric patients. The amplitudes of the LN-off and LN

  18. Conformational variability of the stationary phase survival protein E from Xylella fastidiosa revealed by X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering studies, and normal mode analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Agnes Thiane Pereira; Fonseca, Emanuella Maria Barreto; Reis, Marcelo Augusto Dos; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Santos, Clelton Aparecido Dos; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; Polikarpov, Igor; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Aparicio, Ricardo; Iulek, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that infects a wide variety of plants. Stationary phase survival protein E is classified as a nucleotidase, which is expressed when bacterial cells are in the stationary growth phase and subjected to environmental stresses. Here, we report four refined X-ray structures of this protein from X. fastidiosa in four different crystal forms in the presence and/or absence of the substrate 3'-AMP. In all chains, the conserved loop verified in family members assumes a closed conformation in either condition. Therefore, the enzymatic mechanism for the target protein might be different of its homologs. Two crystal forms exhibit two monomers whereas the other two show four monomers in the asymmetric unit. While the biological unit has been characterized as a tetramer, differences of their sizes and symmetry are remarkable. Four conformers identified by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in a ligand-free solution are related to the low frequency normal modes of the crystallographic structures associated with rigid body-like protomer arrangements responsible for the longitudinal and symmetric adjustments between tetramers. When the substrate is present in solution, only two conformers are selected. The most prominent conformer for each case is associated to a normal mode able to elongate the protein by moving apart two dimers. To our knowledge, this work was the first investigation based on the normal modes that analyzed the quaternary structure variability for an enzyme of the SurE family followed by crystallography and SAXS validation. The combined results raise new directions to study allosteric features of XfSurE protein. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Why a disaster is not just normal business ramped up: Disaster response among ED nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Karen S; Arbon, Paul; Gebbie, Kristine; Hutton, Alison

    2017-11-15

    The emergency department (ED) is a familiar place for the emergency nurse who spends their working days inside it. A disaster threatens that familiarity and creates changes that make working in the ED during a disaster response different from the everyday experience of working in the ED. This research reports on an aspect of the findings from a larger study about the experience of working as a nurse in the ED during a disaster response. Thirteen nurses from 8 different countries were interviewed about their experience. The findings from this research demonstrate that a disaster event leads to a chain reaction of changes in process, space and practice. Nurses' respond to the news of a disaster event with shock and disbelief. The ED may change as a result of the event requiring nurses to work in an altered environment or a completely different setting. These changes provoke nurses to alter their behaviour and practice and reflect on the experience after the response. Emergency nurses have a high likelihood of participating in disaster response and as such should be adequately prepared. This highlights how disaster response is different and leads to recommendations to enhance training for emergency nurses which will better prepare them Disasterresponse is not normal business ramped up. There are a number of challenges and changes that should be considered when preparing emergency nurses for the realities of disaster response. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. All rights reserved.

  20. Over-the-road tests of nuclear materials package response to normal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwinn, K.W.; Glass, R.E.; Edwards, K.R.

    1991-12-01

    In support of the development of American National Standards Institute standards for the transport of radioactive materials, Sandia has a program to characterize the normal transport environment. This program includes both analytical modeling of package and trailer responses, and over-the-road tests to measure those responses. This paper presents the results of a series of over-the-road tests performed using Chem-Nuclear equipment in the Barnwell, SC, area. The test events included a variety of road types such as rough concrete, shock events such as railroad grade crossings, and driver responses such as sharp turns. The response of the package and trailer to these events was measured with accelerometers at various locations to determine the inertial loads. Either load cells or strain gages were used to measure tiedown response. These accelerations and loads were measured on systems with flexible and ''rigid'' tiedowns. The results indicated that while significant accelerations occur on the trailer bed, these do not translate into equivalent loads in either the package or the tiedown system. This indicates that trailer-bed response should not be used in determining the load factor for fatigue calculations of the package components or in determining design loads for tiedowns

  1. Vibrational Spectra And Potential Energy Distributions of Normal Modes of N,N'-Etilenbis(P-Toluen sulfonamide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyar, S.

    2008-01-01

    N-substituted sulfonamides are well known for their diuretic, antidiabetic, antibacterial and antifungal, anticancer e.g., and are widely used in the therapy of patients. These important bioactive properties are strongly affected by the special features of -CH 2 -SO 2 -NR-linker and intramolecular motion Thus, the studies of energetic and spatial properties on N-substituted sulfonamides are of great importance to improve our understanding of their biological activities and enhance abilities to predict new drugs. Density Functional Theory B3LYP /6-31G(d,p) level has been applied to obtain the vibrational force field for the most stable conformation of N,N'-etilenbis(p-toluensulfonamit)(ptsen)having sulfonamide moiety. The results of these calculation have been compared with spectroscopic data to verify accuracy of calculation and applicability of the DFT approach to ptsen. Additionally, complete normal coordinate analyses with quantum mechanical scaling (SQM) were performed to derive the potential energy distributions (PE)

  2. Sex-related differences in the normal cardiac response to upright exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, M.B.; Morris, K.G.; Coleman, R.E.; Cobb, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory, it was found that approximately 30% of women with chest pain and normal coronary arteries demonstrated either a decrease in or a failure to increase radionuclide ejection fraction during exercise. To examine the hypothesis that this apparent abnormality in left ventricular function represents a physiologic difference between men and women, a prospective study was made of central and peripheral cardiovascular responses to exercise in 31 age-matched healthy volunteers (16 women and 15 men). A combination of quantitative radionuclide (technetium) angiography and expired-gas analysis was used to measure ejection fraction and relative changes in end-diastolic counts, stroke counts, count output, and arteriovenous oxygen difference during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. Normal male and female volunteers demonstrated comparable baseline left ventricular function and similar aerobic capacity, as determined by weight-adjusted peak oxygen consumption. However, their cardiac responses to exercise were significantly different. The ejection fraction increased by 5 points or more in 14 of 15 men, but in only seven of the 16 women. End-diastolic counts increased by 30% in women, but was unchanged in men. Because decreases in ejection fraction were matched by increases in end-diastolic counts, relative increases in stroke counts and count output were the same for men and women. These data demonstrate a basic difference between men and women with respect to the mechanism by which they achieve a normal response of stroke volume to exercise; these differences must be taken into account when measurements of cardiac function during exercise stress are used for diagnostic purposes

  3. Normalize the response of EPID in pursuit of linear accelerator dosimetry standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Goddu, S Murty; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Caruthers, Douglas; Wen, Jie; Noel, Camille; Mutic, Sasa; Sun, Baozhou

    2018-01-01

    Normalize the response of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is the first step toward an EPID-based standardization of Linear Accelerator (linac) dosimetry quality assurance. In this study, we described an approach to generate two-dimensional (2D) pixel sensitivity maps (PSM) for EPIDs response normalization utilizing an alternative beam and dark-field (ABDF) image acquisition technique and large overlapping field irradiations. The automated image acquisition was performed by XML-controlled machine operation and the PSM was generated based on a recursive calculation algorithm for Varian linacs equipped with aS1000 and aS1200 imager panels. Cross-comparisons of normalized beam profiles and 1.5%/1.5 mm 1D Gamma analysis was adopted to quantify the improvement of beam profile matching before and after PSM corrections. PSMs were derived for both photon (6, 10, 15 MV) and electron (6, 20 MeV) beams via proposed method. The PSM-corrected images reproduced a horn-shaped profile for photon beams and a relative uniform profiles for electrons. For dosimetrically matched linacs equipped with aS1000 panels, PSM-corrected images showed increased 1D-Gamma passing rates for all energies, with an average 10.5% improvement for crossline and 37% for inline beam profiles. Similar improvements in the phantom study were observed with a maximum improvement of 32% for 15 MV and 22% for 20 MeV. The PSM value showed no significant change for all energies over a 3-month period. In conclusion, the proposed approach correct EPID response for both aS1000 and aS1200 panels. This strategy enables the possibility to standardize linac dosimetry QA and to benchmark linac performance utilizing EPID as the common detector. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, W.A.; Wike, J.; Tucker, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediated plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when averaged high dose-rate SF2 values and telangiectasia scores were compared. There was no significant correlation between average SF2 values and acute responses or between individual SF2 measurements and either the acute or late clinical response. The results of this study suggest that the degree of late telangiectasia is at least partially dependent upon the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity of normal fibroblasts, but the relationship is not clear cut. Multiple replicate assays are necessary to obtain reliable estimates of fibroblast SF2 values using current techniques. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. A dynamic elastic-visco-plastic unilateral contact problem with normal damped response and Coulomb friction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eck, Ch.; Jarušek, Jiří; Sofonea, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2010), s. 229-251 ISSN 0956-7925 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : elastic-vosco plastic material * dynamic contact problem * normal damped response * unilateral constraint * Coulomb friction * weak solution * penalitazion * smoothing Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.480, year: 2010 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7675484&fileId=S0956792510000045

  6. Semi-analytical quasi-normal mode theory for the local density of states in coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    We present and validate a semi-analytical quasi-normal mode (QNM) theory for the local density of states (LDOS) in coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity-waveguide structures. By means of an expansion of the Green's function on one or a few QNMs, a closed-form expression for the LDOS is obtained, ......-trivial spectrum with a peak and a dip is found, which is reproduced only when including both the two relevant QNMs in the theory. In both cases, we find relative errors below 1% in the bandwidth of interest.......We present and validate a semi-analytical quasi-normal mode (QNM) theory for the local density of states (LDOS) in coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity-waveguide structures. By means of an expansion of the Green's function on one or a few QNMs, a closed-form expression for the LDOS is obtained......, and for two types of two-dimensional PhCs, with one and two cavities side-coupled to an extended waveguide, the theory is validated against numerically exact computations. For the single cavity, a slightly asymmetric spectrum is found, which the QNM theory reproduces, and for two cavities a non...

  7. Central leptin action on euglycemia restoration in type 1 diabetes: Restraining responses normally induced by fasting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Tong, Qingchun

    2017-07-01

    Leptin monotherapy is sufficient to restore euglycemia in insulinopenic type 1 diabetes (T1D), yet the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that the brain mediates the leptin action on euglycemia restoration. Here, we first review evidence supporting that symptoms in T1D resemble an uncontrolled response to fasting. Then, we discuss recent research progress on brain neurons and their neurotransmitters that potentially mediate the leptin action. Finally, peripheral effective pathways, which are normally involved in fasting responses and associated with leptin action on euglycemia restoration in T1D, will also be discussed. This summary complements several previous excellent reviews on this topic (Meek and Morton, 2016; Perry et al., 2016; Fujikawa and Coppari, 2015). A deep understanding of neurocircuitry and the peripheral effective pathways that mediate the leptin action on euglycemia restoration will likely lead to novel targets for an insulin-independent therapeutics against T1D. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The medical reshaping of disabled bodies as a response to stigma and a route to normality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Janice

    2017-12-01

    Disabled people are said to experience stigma because their embodied presence in the world does not fit with how others interact and use their bodies to be social participants. In response they can turn to medical procedures, such as surgery or physiotherapy, in order to reshape their bodies to more closely approximate norms of social interaction and embodiment. This paper explores how medicine plays a role in attempts to be recognised by others as normal and acceptable by minimising disability. It will do so via a focus on disabled young people, in order to explore how their emerging identities and aspirations for the future influence how they think about their bodies, what normality means and their participation in multiple activities that work on their bodies. The paper draws from an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) project that used a range of qualitative research methods with a group of disabled young people. The project explored ways in which participants actively worked on their bodies to be more normal and examined the disciplinary and agency dynamics involved in this work. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Biological responses of progestogen metabolites in normal and cancerous human breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Jorge R; Chetrite, Gérard S

    2010-12-01

    At present, more than 200 progestogen molecules are available, but their biological response is a function of various factors: affinity to progesterone or other receptors, their structure, the target tissues considered, biological response, experimental conditions, dose, method of administration and metabolic transformations. Metabolic transformation is of huge importance because in various biological processes the metabolic product(s) not only control the activity of the maternal hormone but also have an important activity of its own. In this regard, it was observed that the 20-dihydro derivative of the progestogen dydrogesterone (Duphaston®) is significantly more active than the parent compound in inhibiting sulfatase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in human breast cancer cells. Estrone sulfatase activity is also inhibited by norelgestromin, a norgestimate metabolite. Interesting information was obtained with a similar progestogen, tibolone, which is rapidly metabolized into the active 3α/3β-hydroxy and 4-ene metabolites. All these metabolites can inhibit sulfatase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and stimulate sulfotransferase in human breast cancer cells. Another attractive aspect is the metabolic transformation of progesterone itself in human breast tissues. In the normal breast progesterone is mainly converted to 4-ene derivatives, whereas in the tumor tissue it is converted mostly to 5α-pregnane derivatives. 20α-Dihydroprogesterone is found mainly in normal breast tissue and possesses antiproliferative properties as well as the ability to act as an anti-aromatase agent. Consequently, this progesterone metabolite could be involved in the control of estradiol production in the normal breast and therefore implicated in one of the multifactorial mechanisms of the breast carcinogenesis process. In conclusion, a better understanding of both natural and synthetic hormone metabolic transformations and their control could potentially provide

  10. Postprandial glucose response to selected tropical fruits in normal glucose-tolerant Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, A; Eregie, A; Adediran, O; Ohwovoriole, A; Ebengho, S

    2011-01-01

    The glycemic response to commonly eaten fruits in Nigeria has not been reported. Therefore, this study assessed the plasma glucose response to selected fruits in Nigeria. Ten normal glucose-tolerant subjects randomly consumed 50 g carbohydrate portions of three fruits: banana (Musa paradisiaca), pineapple (Ananus comosus), and pawpaw (Carica papaya), and a 50-g glucose load at 1-week intervals. Blood samples were collected in the fasting state and half-hourly over a 2-h period post-ingestion of the fruits or glucose. The samples were analyzed for plasma glucose concentrations. Plasma glucose responses were assessed by the peak plasma glucose concentration, maximum increase in plasma glucose, 2-h postprandial plasma glucose level, and incremental area under the glucose curve and glycemic index (GI). The results showed that the blood glucose response to these three fruits was similar in terms of their incremental areas under the glucose curve, maximum increase in plasma glucose, and glycemic indices (GIs). The 2-h postprandial plasma glucose level of banana was significantly higher than that of pineapple, P < 0.025. The mean ± SEM GI values were as follows: pawpaw; 86 ± 26.8%; banana, 75.1 ± 21.8%; pineapple, 64.5 ± 11.3%. The GI of glucose is taken as 100. The GI of pineapple was significantly lower than that of glucose (P < 0.05). Banana, pawpaw, and pineapple produced a similar postprandial glucose response. Measured portions of these fruits may be used as fruit exchanges with pineapple having the most favorable glycemic response.

  11. DESCRIPTION OF BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED RESPONSES (AIR AND BONE CONDUCTION IN CHILDREN WITH NORMAL HEARING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pashkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of hearing level in small children with conductive hearing loss associated with congenital craniofacial abnormalities, particularly with agenesis of external ear and external auditory meatus is a pressing issue. Conventional methods of assessing hearing in the first years of life, i. e. registration of brainstem auditory evoked responses to acoustic stimuli in the event of air conduction, does not give an indication of the auditory analyzer’s condition due to potential conductive hearing loss in these patients. This study was aimed at assessing potential of diagnosing the auditory analyzer’s function with registering brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs to acoustic stimuli transmitted by means of a bone vibrator. The study involved 17 children aged 3–10 years with normal hearing. We compared parameters of registering brainstem auditory evoked responses (peak V depending on the type of stimulus transmission (air/bone in children with normal hearing. The data on thresholds of the BAERs registered to acoustic stimuli in the event of air and bone conduction obtained in this study are comparable; hearing thresholds in the event of acoustic stimulation by means of a bone vibrator correlates with the results of the BAERs registered to the stimuli transmitted by means of air conduction earphones (r = 0.9. High correlation of thresholds of BAERs to the stimuli transmitted by means of a bone vibrator with thresholds of BAERs registered when air conduction earphones were used helps to assess auditory analyzer’s condition in patients with any form of conductive hearing loss.  

  12. An anisotropic shear velocity model of the Earth's mantle using normal modes, body waves, surface waves and long-period waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2014-12-01

    We use normal-mode splitting functions in addition to surface wave phase anomalies, body wave traveltimes and long-period waveforms to construct a 3-D model of anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modelling approach inverts for mantle velocity and anisotropy as well as transition-zone discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the non-linear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+M, is an update to the earlier model S362ANI, which did not include normal-mode splitting functions in its derivation. The new model has stronger isotropic velocity anomalies in the transition zone and slightly smaller anomalies in the lowermost mantle, as compared with S362ANI. The differences in the mid- to lowermost mantle are primarily restricted to features in the Southern Hemisphere. We compare the isotropic part of S362ANI+M with other recent global tomographic models and show that the level of agreement is higher now than in the earlier generation of models, especially in the transition zone and the lower mantle. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+M is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle and is similar to S362ANI. When radial anisotropy is allowed throughout the mantle, large-scale anisotropic patterns are observed in the lowermost mantle with vSV > vSH beneath Africa and South Pacific and vSH > vSV beneath several circum-Pacific regions. The transition zone exhibits localized anisotropic anomalies of ˜3 per cent vSH > vSV beneath North America and the Northwest Pacific and ˜2 per cent vSV > vSH beneath South America. However, small improvements in fits to the data on adding anisotropy at depth leave the question open on whether large-scale radial anisotropy is required in the transition zone and in the lower mantle. We demonstrate the potential of mode-splitting data in reducing the trade-offs between isotropic velocity and

  13. Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, William A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Geara, Fady B.; Wike, Jennifer; Peters, Lester J.; Turesson, Ingela; Nyman, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In the 1970s, a series of breast cancer patients was treated at the Department of Oncology in Gothenburg, Sweden with postoperative irradiation to the parasternal region. Patients were treated bilaterally using different fractionation schedules and doses to the right and left fields. Peak acute reactions were scored on a six-point scale, and skin erythema was measured by reflectance spectrophotometry. Telangiectasia was graded over time on a six-point scale. In April 1992, two small skin biopsies were obtained from 22 patients in two treatment groups (i.e., four dose-fractionation schedules) and, using either delayed or immediate plating, fibroblast radiosensitivity was measured in early passage cultures by clonogenic survival, after high and low dose-rate irradiations. Survival at 2.0 Gy (SF2) was calculated from complete survival curves. Results: To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediate plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when

  14. Evaluation of coupling terms between intra- and intermolecular vibrations in coarse-grained normal-mode analysis: Does a stronger acid make a stiffer hydrogen bond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houjou, Hirohiko

    2011-10-01

    Using theory of harmonic normal-mode vibration analysis, we developed a procedure for evaluating the anisotropic stiffness of intermolecular forces. Our scheme for coarse-graining of molecular motions is modified so as to account for intramolecular vibrations in addition to relative translational/rotational displacement. We applied this new analytical scheme to four carboxylic acid dimers, for which coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations is crucial for determining the apparent stiffness of the intermolecular double hydrogen bond. The apparent stiffness constant was analyzed on the basis of a conjunct spring model, which defines contributions from true intermolecular stiffness and molecular internal stiffness. Consequently, the true intermolecular stiffness was in the range of 43-48 N m-1 for all carboxylic acids studied, regardless of the molecules' acidity. We concluded that the difference in the apparent stiffness can be attributed to differences in the internal stiffness of the respective molecules.

  15. Abnormal Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR Findings in a Near-Normal Hearing Child with Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Jalaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noonan syndrome (NS is a heterogeneous genetic disease that affects many parts of the body. It was named after Dr. Jacqueline Anne Noonan, a paediatric cardiologist.Case Report: We report audiological tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR findings in a 5-year old Malay boy with NS. Despite showing the marked signs of NS, the child could only produce a few meaningful words. Audiological tests found him to have bilateral mild conductive hearing loss at low frequencies. In ABR testing, despite having good waveform morphology, the results were atypical. Absolute latency of wave V was normal but interpeak latencies of wave’s I-V, I-II, II-III were prolonged. Interestingly, interpeak latency of waves III-V was abnormally shorter.Conclusion:Abnormal ABR results are possibly due to abnormal anatomical condition of brainstem and might contribute to speech delay.

  16. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The DIII-D Team; The Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m  =  qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, ν \\text{ped}\\ast≤slant 0.4 : (a) a reduction of the global plasma density by up to 61 % and (b) a reduction of the energy loss associated with edge localised modes (ELMs) by a factor of up to 9. A comprehensive database of ELM mitigation pulses at low {ν\\ast} in ASDEX Upgrade shows that the degree of ELM mitigation correlates with the reduction of pedestal pressure which in turn is limited and defined by the onset of ELMs, i. e. a modification of the ELM stability limit by the magnetic perturbation.

  17. CT in normal pressure hydrocephalus. Correlation between CT and clinical response to shunting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, K.; Nogaki, H.; Noda, M.; Kusunoki, T.; Tamaki, N. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-02-01

    CT scans were obtained on 33 patients (age 73y. to 31y.) with the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus. In each case, the diagnosis was made on the basis of the symptoms, CT and cisternographic findings. Underlying diseases of normal pressure hydrocephalus are ruptured aneurysms (21 cases), arteriovenous malformations (2 cases), head trauma (1 case), cerebrovascular accidents (1 case) and idiopathie (8 cases). Sixteen of 33 patients showed marked improvement, five, moderate or minimal improvement, and twelve, no change. The results were compared with CT findings and clinical response to shunting. CT findings were classified into five types, bases on the degree of periventricular hypodensity (P.V.H.), the extent of brain damage by underlying diseases, and the degree of cortical atrophy. In 17 cases of type (I), CT shows the presence of P.V.H. with or without minimal frontal lobe damage and no cortical atrophy. The good surgical improvements were achieved in all cases of type (I) by shunting. In 4 cases of type (II), CT shows the presence of P.V.H. and severe brain damage without cortical atrophy. The fair clinical improvements were achieved in 2 cases (50%) by shunting. In one case of type (III), CT shows the absence of P.V.H. without brain damage nor cortical atrophy. No clinical improvement was obtained by shunting in this type. In 9 cases of type (IV) with mild cortical atrophy, the fair clinical improvement was achieved in two cases (22%) and no improvement in 7 cases. In 2 cases of type (V) with moderate or marked cortical atrophy, no clinical improvement was obtained by shunting. In conclusion, it appeared from the present study that there was a good correlation between the result of shunting and the type of CT, and clinical response to shunting operation might be predicted by classification of CT findings.

  18. Theory of magnetoelectric effect in multilayer nanocomposites on a substrate: Resonant bending-mode response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias C. Krantz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Resonant bending-mode magnetoelectric (ME coefficients of magnetostrictive-piezoelectric multilayer cantilevers are calculated analytically using a model developed for arbitrary multilayers on a substrate. Without quality factor effects the ME coefficient maxima in the four-dimensional parameter space of layer numbers, layer sequences, piezoelectric volume fractions, and substrate thicknesses are found to be essentially constant for nonzero substrate thickness. Global maxima occur for bilayers without substrates. Vanishing magnetoelectric response regions result from voltage cancellation in piezoelectric layers or absence of bending-mode excitation. They are determined by the neutral plane position in the multilayer stack. With Q-factor effects dominated by viscous air damping ME coefficients strongly increase with cantilever thickness primarily due to increasing resonance frequencies. The results yield a layer specific prediction of ME coefficients, resonance frequencies, and Q-factors in arbitrary multilayers and thus distinction of linear-coupling and Q-factor effects from exchange interaction, interface, or nonlinear ME effects.

  19. Pricing decisions from experience: the roles of information-acquisition and response modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Hagai; Ert, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    While pricing decisions that are based on experience are quite common, e.g., setting a selling price for a used car, this type of decision has been surprisingly overlooked in psychology and decision research. Previous studies have focused on either choice decisions from experience, or pricing decisions from description. Those studies revealed that pricing involves cognitive mechanisms other than choice, while experience-based decisions involve mechanisms that differ from description-based ones. Thus, the mutual effect of pricing and experience on decision-making remains unclear. To test this effect, we experimentally compared real-money pricing decisions from experience with those from description, and with choices from experience. The results show that the mode of acquiring information affects pricing: the tendency to underprice high-probability prospects and overprice low-probability ones is diminished when pricing is based on experience rather than description. The findings further reveal attenuation of the tendency to underweight rare events, which underlies choices from experience, in pricing decisions from experience. The difference occurs because the response mode affects the search effort and decision strategy in decisions from experience. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Inferring the Mode of Selection from the Transient Response to Demographic Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balick, Daniel; Do, Ron; Reich, David; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2014-03-01

    Despite substantial recent progress in theoretical population genetics, most models work under the assumption of a constant population size. Deviations from fixed population sizes are ubiquitous in natural populations, many of which experience population bottlenecks and re-expansions. The non-equilibrium dynamics introduced by a large perturbation in population size are generally viewed as a confounding factor. In the present work, we take advantage of the transient response to a population bottleneck to infer features of the mode of selection and the distribution of selective effects. We develop an analytic framework and a corresponding statistical test that qualitatively differentiates between alleles under additive and those under recessive or more general epistatic selection. This statistic can be used to bound the joint distribution of selective effects and dominance effects in any diploid sexual organism. We apply this technique to human population genetic data, and severely restrict the space of allowed selective coefficients in humans. Additionally, one can test a set of functionally or medically relevant alleles for the primary mode of selection, or determine the local regional variation in dominance coefficients along the genome.

  1. Zonally asymmetric response of the Southern Ocean mixed-layer depth to the Southern Annular Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallée, J. B.; Speer, K. G.; Rintoul, S. R.

    2010-04-01

    Interactions between the atmosphere and ocean are mediated by the mixed layer at the ocean surface. The depth of this layer is determined by wind forcing and heating from the atmosphere. Variations in mixed-layer depth affect the rate of exchange between the atmosphere and deeper ocean, the capacity of the ocean to store heat and carbon and the availability of light and nutrients to support the growth of phytoplankton. However, the response of the Southern Ocean mixed layer to changes in the atmosphere is not well known. Here we analyse temperature and salinity data from Argo profiling floats to show that the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), the dominant mode of atmospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere, leads to large-scale anomalies in mixed-layer depth that are zonally asymmetric. From a simple heat budget of the mixed layer we conclude that meridional winds associated with departures of the SAM from zonal symmetry cause anomalies in heat flux that can, in turn, explain the observed changes of mixed-layer depth and sea surface temperature. Our results suggest that changes in the SAM, including recent and projected trends attributed to human activity, drive variations in Southern Ocean mixed-layer depth, with consequences for air-sea exchange, ocean sequestration of heat and carbon, and biological productivity.

  2. Electroretinogram responses of the normal thoroughbred horse sedated with detomidine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Melanie L; Norman, Joanna C

    2012-09-01

    The main objective was to record electroretinogram (ERG) parameters of normal thoroughbred mares using the HMsERG, a mini-Ganzfeld electroretinographic unit, and a contact lens electrode. The second objective was to determine whether IV detomidine hydrochloride at 0.015 mg/kg is consistently an effective choice for sedation of horses undergoing this ERG protocol. The study population consisted of 30 normal thoroughbred mares. ERG data were harvested using a protocol that included three different light intensities (10, 3000, and 10,000 mcd s/m(2)) and a 30-Hz flicker at 3000 mcd s/m(2). Mean, median, standard deviation, and estimated normal ranges using the 5-95% of the data for a- and b-wave implicit times (IT), amplitudes (AMP), and b/a ratios were reported. Scotopic results at low intensity (10 mcd s/m(2)) had estimated ranges for b-wave IT of 41.8-72.9 ms and AMP of 19.8-173.3 μV. Middle intensity (3000 mcd s/m(2)) a-wave IT was 13.2-14.7 ms with a-wave AMP of 68.4-144 μV; the b-wave IT was 28.7-41.5 ms with b-wave AMP of 105.7-271.5 μV; and the b/a ratio was 0.95-2.71. The high-intensity (10,000 mcd s/m(2)) average recordings showed an a-wave IT of 13-14.9 ms, a-wave AMP of 85.7-186.8 μV; b-wave IT of 26.6-45.4 ms, b-wave AMP of 104.7-250.6 μV; and a b/a wave ratio of 0.7-2.0. The 30-Hz cone flicker showed an IT of 22.8-28.9 ms and AMP of 44.1-117.1 μV. Results of normal thoroughbred ERG responses are reported. The protocol proved to be simple and safe and provided consistent results. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  3. Impulse Response of a 36-Core Few-Mode Photonic Lantern Hybrid Spatial-Multiplexer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Mendinueta, José Manuel Delgado; Klaus, Werner

    2017-01-01

    multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) equalization, provided mode-dependent loss (MDL) is small [3]. Furthermore, mode scrambling at the transmitter improves tolerance to MDL and maximizes system capacity if all supported modes are used to transmit information [3]. Thus, the MDL and mode mixing properties...... significant mode mixing to take place at the multicore few-mode fiber splice. Furthermore, insertion loss and MDL of the system are further analyzed.......Space division multiplexing (SDM) using fibers with multiple cores and/or supporting multiple modes has become an essential technology to support Pbit/s transmissions in a single fiber [1,2]. Despite significant mode-mixing in few-mode fibers (FMF), the original signals can be recovered through...

  4. Ice dynamic response to two modes of surface lake drainage on the Greenland ice sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedesco, Marco; Alexander, Patrick; Willis, Ian C; Banwell, Alison F; Arnold, Neil S; Hoffman, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Supraglacial lake drainage on the Greenland ice sheet opens surface-to-bed connections, reduces basal friction, and temporarily increases ice flow velocities by up to an order of magnitude. Existing field-based observations of lake drainages and their impact on ice dynamics are limited, and focus on one specific draining mechanism. Here, we report and analyse global positioning system measurements of ice velocity and elevation made at five locations surrounding two lakes that drained by different mechanisms and produced different dynamic responses. For the lake that drained slowly (>24 h) by overtopping its basin, delivering water via a channel to a pre-existing moulin, speedup and uplift were less than half those associated with a lake that drained rapidly (∼2 h) through hydrofracturing and the creation of new moulins in the lake bottom. Our results suggest that the mode and associated rate of lake drainage govern the impact on ice dynamics. (letter)

  5. How different location modes influence responses in a Simon-like task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chunming; Proctor, Robert W

    2017-11-01

    Spatial information can be conveyed not only by stimulus position but by the meaning of a location word or direction of an arrow. We examined whether all the location-, arrow- and word-based Simon effects or some of them can be observed when a location word or an arrow is presented eccentrically and a left-right keypress is made to indicate its ink color. Results showed that only the location-based Simon effect was observed for location words, whereas an additional smaller arrow-based Simon effect, compared to the location-based Simon effect was observed, for arrows. These results showed spatial location, arrow direction, and location word stimulus dimensions affect response position codes in a spatial-to-verbal priority order, consistent with the possibility that they can activate mode-specific spatial representations.

  6. Ultradian rhythmicity of plasma cortisol is necessary for normal emotional and cognitive responses in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafatakis, K; Russell, G M; Harmer, C J; Munafo, M R; Marchant, N; Wilson, A; Brooks, J C; Durant, C; Thakrar, J; Murphy, P; Thai, N J; Lightman, S L

    2018-04-24

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are secreted in an ultradian, pulsatile pattern that emerges from delays in the feedforward-feedback interaction between the anterior pituitary and adrenal glands. Dynamic oscillations of GCs are critical for normal cognitive and metabolic function in the rat and have been shown to modulate the pattern of GC-sensitive gene expression, modify synaptic activity, and maintain stress responsiveness. In man, current cortisol replacement therapy does not reproduce physiological hormone pulses and is associated with psychopathological symptoms, especially apathy and attenuated motivation in engaging with daily activities. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that the pattern of GC dynamics in the brain is of crucial importance for regulating cognitive and behavioral processes. We provide evidence that exactly the same dose of cortisol administered in different patterns alters the neural processing underlying the response to emotional stimulation, the accuracy in recognition and attentional bias toward/away from emotional faces, the quality of sleep, and the working memory performance of healthy male volunteers. These data indicate that the pattern of the GC rhythm differentially impacts human cognition and behavior under physiological, nonstressful conditions and has major implications for the improvement of cortisol replacement therapy.

  7. DNA damage and the bystander response in tumor and normal cells exposed to X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhashree, M; Venkateswarlu, R; Karthik, K; Shangamithra, V; Venkatachalam, P

    2017-09-01

    Monolayer and suspension cultures of tumor (BMG-1, CCRF-CEM), normal (AG1522, HADF, lymphocytes) and ATM-mutant (GM4405) human cells were exposed to X-rays at doses used in radiotherapy (high dose and high dose-rate) or radiological imaging (low dose and low dose-rate). Radiation-induced DNA damage, its persistence, and possible bystander effects were evaluated, based on DNA damage markers (γ-H2AX, p53 ser15 ) and cell-cycle-specific cyclins (cyclin B1 and cyclin D1). Dose-dependent DNA damage and a dose-independent bystander response were seen after exposure to high dose and high dose-rate radiation. The level of induced damage (expression of p53 ser15 , γ-H2AX) depended on ATM status. However, low dose and dose-rate exposures neither increased expression of marker proteins nor induced a bystander response, except in the CCRF-CEM cells. Bystander effects after high-dose irradiation may contribute to stochastic and deterministic effects. Precautions to protect unexposed regions or to inhibit transmission of DNA damage signaling might reduce radiation risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Proteinase-activated receptors - mediators of early and delayed normal tissue radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer-Jensen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are G-protein coupled receptors that are activated by proteolytic exposure of a receptor-tethered ligand. The discovery of this receptor family represents one of the most intriguing recent developments in signal transduction. PARs are involved in the regulation of many normal and pathophysiological processes, notably inflammatory and fibroproliferative responses to injury. Preclinical studies performed in our laboratory suggest that proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays a critical role in the mechanism of chronicity of radiation fibrosis, while proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) may mediate important fibroproliferative responses in irradiated intestine. Specifically, activation of PAR-1 by thrombin, and PAR-2 by pancreatic trypsin and mast cell proteinases, appears to be involved in acute radiation-induced inflammation, as well as in subsequent extracellular matrix deposition, leading to the development of intestinal wall fibrosis and clinical complications. Pharmacological modulators of PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression or activation would be potentially useful as preventive or therapeutic agents in patients who receive radiation therapy, especially if blockade could be targeted to specific tissues or cellular compartments

  9. Atmospheric circulation response to anthropogenic forcings: from annular modes to storm tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Climate variability in mid and high latitudes is very complex due to numerous physical mechanisms implied. This climate variability can be decomposed into 2 components: the internal variability associated with internal processes and the forced variability linked to the external forcings which can be natural (volcanism, natural aerosols) or anthropogenic (greenhouse gases, anthropogenic aerosols). These external forcings play a crucial role on the climate and its variability. The challenge in the climate research is to understand their effects on the climate and their roles relatively with the internal variability. The objective of this thesis is a better understanding of the respective roles of internal variability and forced variability on the past and future atmospheric circulation in both hemispheres characterized by the annular mode and the synoptic activity associated using atmospheric reanalysis and experiments performed with the coupled climate model CNRM-CM5. First, we focus on the annular mode changes in both hemispheres, named the NAM (Northern Annular Mode) and the SAM (Southern Annular Mode). We show that the observed positive trend of the SAM in the 1960's in austral summer is well reproduced by the climate model. However, contrarily to other studies which suggest that this positive trend can be explained by only stratospheric ozone depletion, it is reproduced in the CNRM-CM5 model when the ozone depletion and greenhouse gases (GHG) increase are both prescribed. Then, we investigate the changes in the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. These are more complex than in the Southern Hemisphere. Indeed, the increase of GHG in the atmosphere causes a general global warming maximum in the tropical high troposphere and over the pole at the surface which is mainly explained by Arctic sea ice loss. So the understanding of the changes is very complex due to several physical processes and retroactions. Thus, we have conducted a protocol with the coupled

  10. Molecular Structures, Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Normal-Mode Analysis of M(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) Dimetallatetraynes. Observation of Strongly Mixed Metal-Metal and Metal-Ligand Vibrational Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kevin D.; Miskowski, Vincent M.; Vance, Michael A.; Dallinger, Richard F.; Wang, Louis C.; Geib, Steven J.; Hopkins, Michael D.

    1998-12-28

    The nature of the skeletal vibrational modes of complexes of the type M(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (M = Mo, W; R = H, Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) has been deduced. Metrical data from X-ray crystallographic studies of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (R = Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) and W(2)(C&tbd1;CMe)(4)(PMe(3))(4) reveal that the core bond distances and angles are within normal ranges and do not differ in a statistically significant way as a function of the alkynyl substituent, indicating that their associated force constants should be similarly invariant among these compounds. The crystal structures of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) and Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CBu(t)())(4)(PMe(3))(4) are complicated by 3-fold disorder of the Mo(2) unit within apparently ordered ligand arrays. Resonance-Raman spectra ((1)(delta-->delta) excitation, THF solution) of Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) and its isotopomers (PMe(3)-d(9), C&tbd1;CSiMe(3)-d(9), (13)C&tbd1;(13)CSiMe(3)) exhibit resonance-enhanced bands due to a(1)-symmetry fundamentals (nu(a) = 362, nu(b) = 397, nu(c) = 254 cm(-)(1) for the natural-abundance complex) and their overtones and combinations. The frequencies and relative intensities of the fundamentals are highly sensitive to isotopic substitution of the C&tbd1;CSiMe(3) ligands, but are insensitive to deuteration of the PMe(3) ligands. Nonresonance-Raman spectra (FT-Raman, 1064 nm excitation, crystalline samples) for the Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CSiMe(3))(4)(PMe(3))(4) compounds and for Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) (R = H, D, Me, Bu(t)(), SiMe(3)) and W(2)(C&tbd1;CMe)(4)(PMe(3))(4) exhibit nu(a), nu(b), and nu(c) and numerous bands due to alkynyl- and phosphine-localized modes, the latter of which are assigned by comparisons to FT-Raman spectra of Mo(2)X(4)L(4) (X = Cl, Br, I; L = PMe(3), PMe(3)-d(9))(4) and Mo(2)Cl(4)(AsMe(3))(4). Valence force-field normal-coordinate calculations on the model compound Mo(2)(C&tbd1;CH)(4)P(4), using core force constants transferred from a calculation

  11. Optimization of electrocoagulation process to treat grey wastewater in batch mode using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karichappan, Thirugnanasambandham; Venkatachalam, Sivakumar; Jeganathan, Prakash Maran

    2014-01-10

    Discharge of grey wastewater into the ecological system causes the negative impact effect on receiving water bodies. In this present study, electrocoagulation process (EC) was investigated to treat grey wastewater under different operating conditions such as initial pH (4-8), current density (10-30 mA/cm2), electrode distance (4-6 cm) and electrolysis time (5-25 min) by using stainless steel (SS) anode in batch mode. Four factors with five levels Box-Behnken response surface design (BBD) was employed to optimize and investigate the effect of process variables on the responses such as total solids (TS), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and fecal coliform (FC) removal. The process variables showed significant effect on the electrocoagulation treatment process. The results were analyzed by Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA) and second order polynomial models were developed in order to study the electrocoagulation process statistically. The optimal operating conditions were found to be: initial pH of 7, current density of 20 mA/cm2, electrode distance of 5 cm and electrolysis time of 20 min. These results indicated that EC process can be scale up in large scale level to treat grey wastewater with high removal efficiency of TS, COD and FC.

  12. Optimization of electrocoagulation process to treat grey wastewater in batch mode using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Discharge of grey wastewater into the ecological system causes the negative impact effect on receiving water bodies. Methods In this present study, electrocoagulation process (EC) was investigated to treat grey wastewater under different operating conditions such as initial pH (4–8), current density (10–30 mA/cm2), electrode distance (4–6 cm) and electrolysis time (5–25 min) by using stainless steel (SS) anode in batch mode. Four factors with five levels Box-Behnken response surface design (BBD) was employed to optimize and investigate the effect of process variables on the responses such as total solids (TS), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and fecal coliform (FC) removal. Results The process variables showed significant effect on the electrocoagulation treatment process. The results were analyzed by Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA) and second order polynomial models were developed in order to study the electrocoagulation process statistically. The optimal operating conditions were found to be: initial pH of 7, current density of 20 mA/cm2, electrode distance of 5 cm and electrolysis time of 20 min. Conclusion These results indicated that EC process can be scale up in large scale level to treat grey wastewater with high removal efficiency of TS, COD and FC. PMID:24410752

  13. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda ePletzer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret.Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection. During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  14. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN) activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret. Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs) and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs) matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection). During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  15. Responses of catecholestrogen metabolism to acute graded exercise in normal menstruating women before and after training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crée, C; Ball, P; Seidlitz, B; Van Kranenburg, G; Geurten, P; Keizer, H A

    1997-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that exercise-related hypo-estrogenemia occurs as a consequence of increased competition of catecholestrogens (CE) for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). This may result in higher norepinephrine (NE) concentrations, which could interfere with normal gonadotropin pulsatility. The present study investigates the effects of training on CE responses to acute exercise stress. Nine untrained eumenorrheic women (mean percentage of body fat +/-SD: 24.8 +/- 3.1%) volunteered for an intensive 5-day training program. Resting, submaximal, and maximal (tmax) exercise plasma CE, estrogen, and catecholamine responses were determined pre- and post training in both the follicular (FPh) and luteal phase (LPh). Acute exercise stress increased total primary estrogens (E) but had little effect on total 2-hydroxyestrogens (2-OHE) and 2-hydroxyestrogen-monomethylethers (2-MeOE) (= O-methylated CE after competition for catechol-O-methyltransferase). This pattern was not significantly changed by training. However, posttraining LPh mean (+/-SE) plasma E, 2-OHE, and 2-MeOE concentrations were significantly lower (P Training produced opposite effects on 2-OHE:E ratios (an estimation of CE formation) during acute exercise in the FPh (reduction) and LPh (increase). The 2-MeOE:2-OHE ratio (an estimation of CE activity) showed significantly higher values at tmax in both menstrual phases after training (FPh: +11%; LPh: +23%; P training, NE values were significantly higher (P training lowers absolute concentrations of plasma estrogens and CE; the acute exercise challenge altered plasma estrogens but had little effect on CE; estimation of the formation and activity of CE suggests that formation and O-methylation of CE proportionately increases. These findings may be of importance for NE-mediated effects on gonadotropin release.

  16. 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol response to single oral cholecalciferol loading in the normal weight, overweight, and obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camozzi, V; Frigo, A C; Zaninotto, M; Sanguin, F; Plebani, M; Boscaro, M; Schiavon, L; Luisetto, G

    2016-08-01

    After a single cholecalciferol load, peak serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD) is lower in individuals with a higher body mass index (BMI), probably due to it being distributed in a greater volume. Its subsequent disappearance from the serum is slower the higher the individual's BMI, probably due to the combination of a larger body volume and a slower release into the circulation of vitamin D stored in adipose tissue. The aim of the study is to examine 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD) response to a single oral load of cholecalciferol in the normal weight, overweight, and obese. We considered 55 healthy women aged from 25 to 67 years (mean ± SD, 50.8 ± 9.5) with a BMI ranging from 18.7 to 42 kg/m(2) (mean ± SD, 27.1 ± 6.0). The sample was divided into three groups by BMI: 20 were normal weight (BMI ≤ 25 kg/m(2)), 21 overweight (25.1 ≤ BMI ≤ 29.9 kg/ m(2)), and 14 obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Each subject was given 300,000 IU of cholecalciferol orally during lunch. A fasting blood test was obtained before cholecalciferol loading and then 7, 30, and 90 days afterwards to measure serum 25OHD, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25 (OH)2D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium (Ca), and phosphorus (P). Participants' absolute fat mass was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The fat mass of the normal weight subjects was significantly lower than that of the overweight, which in turn was lower than that of the obese participants. Serum 25OHD levels increased significantly in all groups, peaking 1 week after the cholecalciferol load. Peak serum 25OHD levels were lower the higher the individuals' BMI. After peaking, the 25OHD levels gradually decreased, following a significantly different trend in the three groups. The slope was similar for the overweight and obese, declining significantly more slowly than in the normal weight group. In the sample as a whole, there was a weakly significant negative correlation

  17. Normal postural responses preceding shoulder flexion: co-activation or asymmetric activation of transverse abdominis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, Sanaz; Maroufi, Nader; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Parnianpour, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that activation of the transverse abdominis muscle has a stabilizing effect on the lumbar spine by raising intra-abdominal pressure without added disc compression. However, its feedforward activity has remained a controversial issue. In addition, research regarding bilateral activation of trunk muscles during a unilateral arm movement is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate bilateral anticipatory activity of trunk muscles during unilateral arm flexion. Eighteen healthy subjects (aged 25 ± 3.96 years) participated in this study and performed 10 trials of rapid arm flexion in response to a visual stimulus. The electromyographic activity of the right anterior deltoid (AD) and bilateral trunk muscles including the transverse abdominis/internal oblique (TA/IO), superficial lumbar multifidus (SLM) and lumbar erector spine (LES) was recorded. The onset latency and anticipatory activity of the recorded trunk muscles were calculated. The first muscle activated in anticipation of the right arm flexion was the left TA/IO. The right TA/IO activated significantly later than all other trunk muscles (P 0.05). Healthy subjects showed no bilateral anticipatory co-activation of TA/IO in unilateral arm elevation. Further investigations are required to delineate normal muscle activation pattern in healthy subjects prior to prescribing bilateral activation training of transverse abdominis for subjects with chronic low back pain.

  18. Microvascular resistance in response to iodinated contrast media in normal and functionally impaired kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Takano, Masamichi; Uchiyama, Saori; Fukuizumi, Isamu; Shimura, Tetsuro; Matsushita, Masato; Komiyama, Hidenori; Inami, Toru; Murakami, Daisuke; Munakata, Ryo; Ohba, Takayoshi; Hata, Noritake; Seino, Yoshihiko; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-12-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is considered to result from intrarenal vasoconstriction, and occurs more frequently in impaired than in normal kidneys. It was hypothesized that iodinated contrast media would markedly change renal blood flow and vascular resistance in functionally impaired kidneys. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (32 men; mean age, 75.3 ± 7.6 years) undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and were divided into two groups based on the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of contrast media. The APV and the RI were positively and inversely correlated with the eGFR at baseline, respectively (APV, R = 0.545, P = 0.001; RI, R = -0.627, P contrast media administration in the non-CKD group, but not in the CKD group (APV, P = 0.258; RI, P = 0.707). Although renal arterial resistance was higher in patients with CKD, it was not affected by contrast media administration, suggesting that patients with CKD could have an attenuated response to contrast media. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology Published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Optical spectroscopy of radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy responses in normal rat skin shows vascular breakdown products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles de Andrade, Cintia; Nogueira, Marcelo S.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiotherapy are non-systemic cancer treatment options with different mechanisms of damage. So combining these techniques has been shown to have some synergy, and can mitigate their limitations such as low PDT light penetration or radiotherapy side effects. The present study monitored the induced tissue changes after PDT, radiotherapy, and a combination protocol in normal rat skin, using an optical spectroscopy system to track the observed biophysical changes. The Wistar rats were treated with one of the protocols: PDT followed by radiotherapy, PDT, radiotherapy and radiotherapy followed by PDT. Reflectance spectra were collected in order to observe the effects of these combined therapies, especially targeting vascular response. From the reflectance, information about oxygen saturation, met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentration, blood volume fraction (BVF) and vessel radius were extracted from model fitting of the spectra. The rats were monitored for 24 hours after treatment. Results showed that there was no significant variation in the vessel size or BVF after the treatments. However, the PDT caused a significant increase in the met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations, indicating an important blood breakdown. These results may provide an important clue on how the damage establishment takes place, helping to understand the effect of the combination of those techniques in order to verify the existence of a known synergistic effect.

  20. Normal mode analysis based on an elastic network model for biomolecules in the Protein Data Bank, which uses dihedral angles as independent variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Hiroshi; Endo, Shigeru

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a computer program, named PDBETA, that performs normal mode analysis (NMA) based on an elastic network model that uses dihedral angles as independent variables. Taking advantage of the relatively small number of degrees of freedom required to describe a molecular structure in dihedral angle space and a simple potential-energy function independent of atom types, we aimed to develop a program applicable to a full-atom system of any molecule in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The algorithm for NMA used in PDBETA is the same as the computer program FEDER/2, developed previously. Therefore, the main challenge in developing PDBETA was to find a method that can automatically convert PDB data into molecular structure information in dihedral angle space. Here, we illustrate the performance of PDBETA with a protein-DNA complex, a protein-tRNA complex, and some non-protein small molecules, and show that the atomic fluctuations calculated by PDBETA reproduce the temperature factor data of these molecules in the PDB. A comparison was also made with elastic-network-model based NMA in a Cartesian-coordinate system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Waveguide resonance mode response of stacked structures of metallic sub-wavelength slit arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yasunori; Takano, Keisuke; Sakaguchi, Koichiro; Kato, Kosaku; Nakajima, Makoto; Akiyama, Koichi

    2018-05-01

    Detailed measurements of the optical properties of two-tier systems composed of metallic plates perforated with periodic sub-wavelength slit patterns were carried out using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the transmission properties observed experimentally for various configurations can be reproduced successfully by simulations based on the finite-differential time-domain method. Fabry-Perot-like waveguide resonance mode behaviors specific to this quasi-dielectric system were then investigated. For structures with no lateral displacement between the slit-array plates, mode disappearance phenomena, which are caused by destructive interference between the odd-order mode and the blue- or red-shifted even-order modes, were observed experimentally. The uncommon behavior of the even-order modes was examined precisely to explain the slit-width dependence. For structures with half-pitched displacement between the plates, extraordinarily strong transmission was observed experimentally, even when the optical paths were shut off. This result was interpreted in terms of the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons through very thin and labyrinthine spacings that inevitably exist between the metallic plates. Furthermore, the optical mode disappearance phenomena are revealed to be characterized by anticrossing of the two mixing modes formed by even- and odd-order modes. These experimental observations that are supported theoretically are indispensable to the practical use of this type of artificial dielectric and are expected to encourage interest in optical mode behaviors that are not typically observed in conventional dielectric systems.

  2. An examination of the default mode network in individuals with autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen D; Katherine Fredborg, Beverley; Kornelsen, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a perceptual condition in which specific visual and auditory stimuli consistently trigger tingling sensations on the scalp and neck, sometimes spreading to the back and limbs. These triggering stimuli are often social, almost intimate, in nature (e.g., hearing whispering, or watching someone brush her hair), and often elicit a calm and positive emotional state. Surprisingly, despite its prevalence in the general population, no published study has examined the neural underpinnings of ASMR. In the current study, the default mode network (DMN) of 11 individuals with ASMR was contrasted to that of 11 matched controls. The results indicated that the DMN of individuals with ASMR showed significantly less functional connectivity than that of controls. The DMN of individuals with ASMR also demonstrated increased connectivity between regions in the occipital, frontal, and temporal cortices, suggesting that ASMR was associated with a blending of multiple resting-state networks. This atypical functional connectivity likely influences the unique sensory-emotional experiences associated with ASMR.

  3. Electromechanical response and failure modes of a dielectric elastomer tube actuator with boundary constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jianyou; Jiang, Liying; Khayat, Roger E

    2014-01-01

    As a widely used configuration for dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators, DE tube actuators (or cylindrical actuators) are also found to be susceptible to electromechanical instability (EMI), which may lead to a premature electrical breakdown (EB), and inhibit the potential actuation of DE actuators. This work investigates the electromechanical response of a DE tube actuator with and without boundary constraints to demonstrate an alternative to avoid EMI while achieving large actuation. Our simulation results based on the Gent strain energy model show that the EMI of a DE tube actuator can be eliminated, and larger actuation deformation can be achieved by applying boundary constraints. As a result of these constraints, consideration is also given to the possible mechanical buckling failure that may occur. Mechanisms of possible failure modes of constrained and unconstrained DE tube actuators, such as electromechanical instability, electrical breakdown and mechanical buckling, are elucidated. This paper should provide better theoretical guidance on how to improve the actuation performance of DE actuators, thus leading to the optimal design of DE-based devices. (paper)

  4. Neural responses to silent lipreading in normal hearing male and female subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruytjens, Liesbet; Albers, Frans; van Dijk, Pim; Wit, Hero; Willemsen, Antoon

    In the past, researchers investigated silent lipreading in normal hearing subjects with functional neuroimaging tools and showed how the brain processes visual stimuli that are normally accompanied by an auditory counterpart. Previously, we showed activation differences between males and females in

  5. Life cycle responses of the midge Chironomus riparius to compounds with different modes of action.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinkovic, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Nummerdor, G.A.; Jonker, M.J.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    Compounds with different modes of action may affect life cycles of biota differently. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the impact of four chemicals with different modes of action, including the essential metal copper, the nonessential metal cadmium, the organometal

  6. Life cycle responses of the midge Chironomus riparius to compounds with different modes of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinkovic, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Nummerdor, G.A.; Jonker, M.J.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    Compounds with different modes of action may affect life cycles of biota differently. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the impact of four chemicals with different modes of action, including the essential metal copper, the nonessential metal cadmium, the organometal

  7. Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after sub-lethal exposure to organic contaminants with different toxic modes of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, David M.; Celejewski, Magda A.; Alaee, Mehran; Simpson, Andre J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - based metabolomics has the potential to identify toxic responses of contaminants within a mixture in contaminated soil. This study evaluated the metabolic response of Eisenia fetida after exposure to an array of organic compounds to determine whether contaminant-specific responses could be identified. The compounds investigated in contact tests included: two pesticides (carbaryl and chlorpyrifos), three pharmaceuticals (carbamazephine, estrone and caffeine), two persistent organohalogens (Aroclor 1254 and PBDE 209) and two industrial compounds (nonylphenol and dimethyl phthalate). Control and contaminant-exposed metabolic profiles were distinguished using principal component analysis and potential contaminant-specific biomarkers of exposure were found for several contaminants. These results suggest that NMR-based metabolomics offers considerable promise for differentiating between the different toxic modes of action (MOA) associated with sub-lethal toxicity to earthworms. - Highlights: → NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the toxic mode of action of various environmental contaminants. → Organic chemicals with different toxic modes of action resulted in varied metabolomic responses for E. fetida. → NMR-based metabolomics differentiates between the different modes of action associated with sub-lethal toxicity. - 1 H NMR metabolomics was used to identify potential biomarkers of organic contaminant exposure in Eisenia fetida earthworms.

  8. Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after sub-lethal exposure to organic contaminants with different toxic modes of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, David M.; Celejewski, Magda A. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Alaee, Mehran [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - based metabolomics has the potential to identify toxic responses of contaminants within a mixture in contaminated soil. This study evaluated the metabolic response of Eisenia fetida after exposure to an array of organic compounds to determine whether contaminant-specific responses could be identified. The compounds investigated in contact tests included: two pesticides (carbaryl and chlorpyrifos), three pharmaceuticals (carbamazephine, estrone and caffeine), two persistent organohalogens (Aroclor 1254 and PBDE 209) and two industrial compounds (nonylphenol and dimethyl phthalate). Control and contaminant-exposed metabolic profiles were distinguished using principal component analysis and potential contaminant-specific biomarkers of exposure were found for several contaminants. These results suggest that NMR-based metabolomics offers considerable promise for differentiating between the different toxic modes of action (MOA) associated with sub-lethal toxicity to earthworms. - Highlights: > NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the toxic mode of action of various environmental contaminants. > Organic chemicals with different toxic modes of action resulted in varied metabolomic responses for E. fetida. > NMR-based metabolomics differentiates between the different modes of action associated with sub-lethal toxicity. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to identify potential biomarkers of organic contaminant exposure in Eisenia fetida earthworms.

  9. Correlations of Male College Students' Verbal Response Mode Use in Psychotherapy with Measures of Psychological Disturbance and Psychotherapy Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Susan H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Compared verbal response mode use by male students with measures of clients' psychological distress, disturbance, and change. Results indicated more distressed clients used a higher percentage of disclosures and lower percentage of edifications, clients who improved more participated more, no relationship between improvement in psychotherapy and…

  10. Normal mitogen-induced suppression of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) response and its deficiency in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrington, R.J.; Rutherford, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    A low-frequency suppressor-cell population in normal peripheral blood inhibits the B-cell CESS response to IL-6, following pokeweed mitogen stimulation. The suppression of IL-6 responsiveness is radiation sensitive, directed against CESS targets and not mediated by inhibition of IL-6 production, and associated with nonspecific cytotoxic activity against CESS targets. The generation of these cytolytic cells is also radiation sensitive. A correlation was found between PWM-induced cytotoxicity against CESS and the suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production. But cytotoxicity toward CESS targets is not responsible for this suppression because IL-2 induces equivalent or greater nonspecific cytotoxicity against CESS in the total absence of suppression of CESS-derived IgG production and suppression is also induced by mitogen-activated PBL separated from CESS targets by a cell-impermeable membrane. This suppression was not mediated by TNF alpha/beta or IFN-gamma. In systemic lupus erythematosus, suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production is impaired in patients with active disease (29.2 +/- 13.7%) compared to patients with inactive disease (70 +/- 19.5%) or normal controls (82.8 +/- 9.2%). There is also a defect in mitogen-induced nonspecific cytotoxicity in active SLE (specific lysis 15.1 +/- 3.5%, compared to 34 +/- 4% in normals). Pokeweed mitogen-activated PBL can therefore normally induce suppression of B-cell IL-6 responses and this response is deficient in lupus

  11. Plasma Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    This chapter explores several aspects of the linear electrostatic normal modes of oscillation for a single-species non-neutral plasma in a Penning trap. Linearized fluid equations of motion are developed, assuming the plasma is cold but collisionless, which allow derivation of the cold plasma dielectric tensor and the electrostatic wave equation. Upper hybrid and magnetized plasma waves in an infinite uniform plasma are described. The effect of the plasma surface in a bounded plasma system is considered, and the properties of surface plasma waves are characterized. The normal modes of a cylindrical plasma column are discussed, and finally, modes of spheroidal plasmas, and finite temperature effects on the modes, are briefly described.

  12. Ventral frontal satiation-mediated responses to food aromas in obese and normal-weight women123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiler, William JA; Dzemidzic, Mario; Case, K Rose; Armstrong, Cheryl LH; Mattes, Richard D; Cyders, Melissa A; Considine, Robert V; Kareken, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sensory properties of foods promote and guide consumption in hunger states, whereas satiation should dampen the sensory activation of ingestive behaviors. Such activation may be disordered in obese individuals. Objective: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we studied regional brain responses to food odor stimulation in the sated state in obese and normal-weight individuals targeting ventral frontal regions known to be involved in coding for stimulus reward value. Design: Forty-eight women (25 normal weight; 23 obese) participated in a 2-day (fed compared with fasting) fMRI study while smelling odors of 2 foods and an inedible, nonfood object. Analyses were conducted to permit an examination of both general and sensory-specific satiation (satiation effects specific to a given food). Results: Normal-weight subjects showed significant blood oxygen level–dependent responses in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) to food aromas compared with responses induced by the odor of an inedible object. Normal-weight subjects also showed general (but not sensory-specific) satiation effects in both the vmPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Obese subjects showed no differential response to the aromas of food and the inedible object when fasting. Within- and between-group differences in satiation were driven largely by changes in the response to the odor of the inedible stimulus. Responses to food aromas in the obese correlated with trait negative urgency, the tendency toward negative affect-provoked impulsivity. Conclusions: Ventral frontal signaling of reward value may be disordered in obesity, with negative urgency heightening responses to food aromas. The observed nature of responses to food and nonfood stimuli suggests that future research should independently quantify each to fully understand brain reward signaling in obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02041039. PMID:24695888

  13. A comparison of cytokine responses during prolonged cycling in normal and hot environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila M Cosio-Lima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ludmila M Cosio-Lima, Bhargav V Desai, Petra B Schuler, Lesley Keck, Logan ScheelerDepartment of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL, USAPurpose: Components of immune function are affected by physical activity in an adverse environment. The purpose of this study was to compare plasma differences in inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6, in addition to the stress hormone cortisol, during prolonged cycling under normal and hot environmental conditions in elite cyclists.Methods and design: Six trained elite male cyclists (27 ± 8 years; 75.5 ± 4 kg; maximum oxygen uptake [VO2max] = 66 ± 6 mL/kg/min, mean ± SD. The cyclists biked for 2.5 h at their prescribed 60% maximum exercise workload (Wmax or 75% VO2max either in an environmental chamber set at 15°C and 40% relative humidity (NEUTRAL or at 35°C and 40% relative humidity (HOT. The cyclists were given 4 mL of water/kg body weight every 15 min under both conditions.Results: Total cortisol concentrations were elevated (P < 0.05 immediately postexercise and 12 h postexercise in both the NEUTRAL and HOT conditions. TNF-α concentrations were only significantly (P = 0.045 elevated postexercise in HOT conditions. During the HOT conditions, a significant (P = 0.006 and 0.007, respectively difference in IL-6 was seen immediately after and 12 h postexercise. During the NEUTRAL condition, IL-6 was only significantly elevated postexercise (P < 0.05.Conclusions: Heat exposure during a long bout of exercise is sufficient to elicit stress response in elite cyclists. However, the degree of release of anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines might be related to several factors that include the athlete’s fitness level, hydration status, exercise intensity, and length of exposure to hot environments.Keywords: cytokines, inflammation, heat, exercise, performance 

  14. Fear on the move: predator hunting mode predicts variation in prey mortality and plasticity in prey spatial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer R B; Ament, Judith M; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2014-01-01

    Ecologists have long searched for a framework of a priori species traits to help predict predator-prey interactions in food webs. Empirical evidence has shown that predator hunting mode and predator and prey habitat domain are useful traits for explaining predator-prey interactions. Yet, individual experiments have yet to replicate predator hunting mode, calling into question whether predator impacts can be attributed to hunting mode or merely species identity. We tested the effects of spider predators with sit-and-wait, sit-and-pursue and active hunting modes on grasshopper habitat domain, activity and mortality in a grassland system. We replicated hunting mode by testing two spider predator species of each hunting mode on the same grasshopper prey species. We observed grasshoppers with and without each spider species in behavioural cages and measured their mortality rates, movements and habitat domains. We likewise measured the movements and habitat domains of spiders to characterize hunting modes. We found that predator hunting mode explained grasshopper mortality and spider and grasshopper movement activity and habitat domain size. Sit-and-wait spider predators covered small distances over a narrow domain space and killed fewer grasshoppers than sit-and-pursue and active predators, which ranged farther distances across broader domains and killed more grasshoppers, respectively. Prey adjusted their activity levels and horizontal habitat domains in response to predator presence and hunting mode: sedentary sit-and-wait predators with narrow domains caused grasshoppers to reduce activity in the same-sized domain space; more mobile sit-and-pursue predators with broader domains caused prey to reduce their activity within a contracted horizontal (but not vertical) domain space; and highly mobile active spiders led grasshoppers to increase their activity across the same domain area. All predators impacted prey activity, and sit-and-pursue predators generated strong

  15. Study of long-range orders of hard-core bosons coupled to cooperative normal modes in two-dimensional lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Yarlagadda, S.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the microscopic mechanism of coexisting long-range orders (such as lattice supersolidity) in strongly correlated systems is a subject of immense interest. We study the possible manifestations of long-range orders, including lattice-supersolid phases with differently broken symmetry, in a two-dimensional square lattice system of hard-core bosons (HCBs) coupled to archetypal cooperative/coherent normal-mode distortions such as those in perovskites. At strong HCB-phonon coupling, using a duality transformation to map the strong-coupling problem to a weak-coupling one, we obtain an effective Hamiltonian involving nearest-neighbor, next-nearest-neighbor, and next-to-next-nearest-neighbor hoppings and repulsions. Using stochastic series expansion quantum Monte Carlo, we construct the phase diagram of the system. As coupling strength is increased, we find that the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a checkerboard solid at half-filling and from a superfluid to a diagonal striped solid [with crystalline ordering wave vector Q ⃗=(2 π /3 ,2 π /3 ) or (2 π /3 ,4 π /3 )] at one-third filling without showing any evidence of supersolidity. On tuning the system away from these commensurate fillings, checkerboard supersolid is generated near half-filling whereas a rare diagonal striped supersolid is realized near one-third filling. Interestingly, there is an asymmetry in the extent of supersolidity about one-third filling. Within our framework, we also provide an explanation for the observed checkerboard and stripe formations in La2 -xSrxNiO4 at x =1 /2 and x =1 /3 .

  16. Normal-mode Magnetoseismology as a Virtual Instrument for the Plasma Mass Density in the Inner Magneotsphere: MMS Observations during Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, P. J.; Takahashi, K.; Denton, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the electric and magnetic field measurements on closed field lines can detect harmonic frequencies of field line resonance (FLR) and infer the plasma mass density distribution in the inner magnetosphere. This normal-mode magnetoseismology technique can act as a virtual instrument for spacecraft with a magnetometer and/or an electric field instrument, and it can convert the electromagnetic measurements to knowledge about the plasma mass, of which the dominant low-energy core is difficult to detect directly due to the spacecraft potential. The additional measurement of the upper hybrid frequency by the plasma wave instrument can well constrain the oxygen content in the plasma. In this study, we use field line resonance (FLR) frequencies observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites to estimate the plasma mass density during magnetic storms. At FLR frequencies, the phase difference between the azimuthal magnetic perturbation and the radial electric perturbation is approximately ±90°, which is consistent with the characteristic of standing waves. During the magnetic storm in October 2015, the FLR observations indicate a clear enhancement in the plasma mass density on the first day of the recovery phase, but the added plasma was quickly removed on the following day. We will compare with the FLR observations by other operating satellites such as the Van Allen Probes and GOES to examine the spatial variations of the plasma mass density in the magnetosphere. Also discussed are how the spacing in harmonic frequencies can infer the distribution of plasma mass density along the field line as well as its implications.

  17. The signaling pathway of dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) activation using normal mode analysis (NMA) and the construction of pharmacophore models for D2R ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Stein, Matthias; Yurtsever, Mine; Seeman, Philip; Erol, Ismail; Mestanoglu, Mert; Durdagi, Serdar

    2017-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are targets of more than 30% of marketed drugs. Investigation on the GPCRs may shed light on upcoming drug design studies. In the present study, we performed a combination of receptor- and ligand-based analysis targeting the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R). The signaling pathway of D2R activation and the construction of universal pharmacophore models for D2R ligands were also studied. The key amino acids, which contributed to the regular activation of the D2R, were in detail investigated by means of normal mode analysis (NMA). A derived cross-correlation matrix provided us an understanding of the degree of pair residue correlations. Although negative correlations were not observed in the case of the inactive D2R state, a high degree of correlation appeared between the residues in the active state. NMA results showed that the cytoplasmic side of the TM5 plays a significant role in promoting of residue-residue correlations in the active state of D2R. Tracing motions of the amino acids Arg219, Arg220, Val223, Asn224, Lys226, and Ser228 in the position of the TM5 are found to be critical in signal transduction. Complementing the receptor-based modeling, ligand-based modeling was also performed using known D2R ligands. The top-scored pharmacophore models were found as 5-sited (AADPR.671, AADRR.1398, AAPRR.3900, and ADHRR.2864) hypotheses from PHASE modeling from a pool consisting of more than 100 initial candidates. The constructed models using 38 D2R ligands (in the training set) were validated with 15 additional test set compounds. The resulting model correctly predicted the pIC 50 values of an additional test set compounds as true unknowns.

  18. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming, E-mail: dming@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-07

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  19. Thresholds of Tone Burst Auditory Brainstem Responses for Infants and Young Children with Normal Hearing in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yi Lee

    2007-10-01

    Conclusion: Based on the published research and our study, we suggest setting the normal criterion levels for infants and young children in Taiwan of the tone burst auditory brainstem response to air-conducted tones as 30 dB nHL for 500 and 1000 Hz, and 25 dB nHL for 2000 and 4000 Hz.

  20. Peek-a-What? Infants' Response to the Still-Face Task after Normal and Interrupted Peek-a-Boo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Ann E.; Best, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    Infants' sensitivity to the vitality or tension envelope within dyadic social exchanges was investigated by examining their responses following normal and interrupted games of peek-a-boo embedded in a Still-Face Task. Infants 5-6 months old engaged in two modified Still-Face Tasks with their mothers. In one task, the initial interaction ended with…

  1. Artichoke compound cynarin differentially affects the survival, growth and stress response of normal, immortalized and cancerous human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gezer, Ceren; Yücecan, Sevinç; Rattan, Suresh Inder Singh

    2015-01-01

    of CYN on the proliferative potential, survival, morphology, and stress response (SR) markers haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heat shock protein-70 (HSP70) in normal human skin fibroblasts (FSF-1), telomerase-immortalized mesenchymal stem cells (hTERT-MSC) and cervical cancer cells, HeLa. Effects of CYN...

  2. Response of the Higgs amplitude mode of superfluid Bose gases in a three-dimensional optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Kazuma; Takahashi, Yoshiro; Danshita, Ippei

    2018-04-01

    We study the Higgs mode of superfluid Bose gases in a three-dimensional optical lattice, which emerges near the quantum phase transition to the Mott insulator at commensurate fillings. Specifically, we consider responses of the Higgs mode to temporal modulations of the onsite interaction and the hopping energy. In order to calculate the response functions including the effects of quantum and thermal fluctuations, we map the Bose-Hubbard model onto an effective pseudospin-1 model and use a perturbative expansion based on the imaginary-time Green's function theory. We also include the effects of an inhomogeneous trapping potential by means of a local density approximation. We find that the response function for the hopping modulation is equal to that for the interaction modulation within our approximation. At the unit filling rate and in the absence of a trapping potential, we show that the Higgs mode can exist as a sharp resonance peak in the dynamical susceptibilities at typical temperatures. However, the resonance peak is significantly broadened due to the trapping potential when the modulations are applied globally to the entire system. We suggest that the Higgs mode can be detected as a sharp resonance peak by partial modulations around the trap center.

  3. Angiogenesis for tumor vascular normalization of Endostar on hepatoma 22 tumor-bearing mice is involved in the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingyu; Gu, Junfei; Lv, You; Yuan, Jiarui; Yang, Nan; Chen, Juan; Wang, Chunfei; Hou, Xuefeng; Jia, Xiaobin; Feng, Liang; Yin, Guowen

    2018-03-01

    Tumor vascular normalization involved in immune response is beneficial to the chemotherapy of tumors. Recombinant human endostatin (Endostar), an angiogenesis inhibitor, has been demonstrated to be effective in hepatocellular cancer (HCC). However, its vascular normalization in HCC and the role of the immune response in angiogenesis were unclear. In the present study, effects of Endostar on tumor vascular normalization were evaluated in hepatoma 22 (H22) tumor-bearing mice. Endostar was able to inhibit the proliferation and infiltration of tumor cells and improve α-fetoprotein, tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclic adenosine 5'-phosphate levels in the serum of H22-bearing mice, as well as the protein expression levels of the immune factors interferon-γ and cluster of differentiation (CD)86 in liver tissue. Endostar also exhibited more marked downregulation of the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, CD31, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and interleukin-17 during day 3-9 treatment, resulting in short-term normalization of tumor blood vessels. The period of vascular normalization was 3-9 days. The results of the present study demonstrated that Endostar was able to induce the period of vascular normalization, contributing to a more efficacious means of HCC treatment combined with other chemotherapy, and this effect was associated with the immune response. It may be concluded that Endostar inhibited immunity-associated angiogenesis behaviors of vascular endothelial cells in response to HCC. The results of the present study provided more reasonable possibility for the combination therapy of Endostar for the treatment of HCC.

  4. Analysis of the response dependence of Ebt3 radiochromic film with energy, dose rate, wavelength, scanning mode and humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon M, E. Y.; Camacho L, M. A.; Herrera G, J. A.; Garcia G, O. A.; Villarreal B, J. E.

    2016-10-01

    With the development of new modalities in radiotherapy treatments, the use of radiochromic films has increased considerably. Because the characteristics that presented, they are suitable for quality control and dose measurement. In this work and analysis of the dependence of the response of Ebt3 radiochromic films with energy, dose rate, wavelength, scan mode and humidity, for a dose range of 0-70 Gy is presented. According to the results, the response of Ebt3 radiochromic films has low dependence on energy, dose rate, scan mode and humidity. However, the sensitivity of the response Ebt3 radiochromic films has a high dependence on the wavelength of the optical system used for reading. (Author)

  5. Response of cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells to X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.C.; Stampfer, M.R.; Smith, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of X rays on the reproductive death of cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells was examined. Techniques were developed for isolating and culturing normal human mammary epithelial cells which provide sufficient cells at second passage for radiation studies, and an efficient clonogenic assay suitable for measuring radiation survival curves. It was found that the survival curves for epithelial cells from normal breast tissue were exponential and had D 0 values of about 109-148 rad for 225 kVp X rays. No consistent change in cell radiosensitivity with the age of donor was observed, and no sublethal damage repair in these cells could be detected with the split-dose technique

  6. Effect of dipole-quadrupole Robinson mode coupling upon the beam response to radio-frequency phase noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In an electron storage ring, coupling between dipole and quadrupole Robinson oscillations modifies the spectrum of longitudinal beam oscillations driven by radio-frequency (rf generator phase noise. In addition to the main peak at the resonant frequency of the coupled dipole Robinson mode, another peak occurs at the resonant frequency of the coupled quadrupole mode. To describe these peaks analytically for a quadratic synchrotron potential, we include the dipole and quadrupole modes when calculating the beam response to generator noise. We thereby obtain the transfer function from generator-noise phase modulation to beam phase modulation with and without phase feedback. For Robinson-stable bunches confined in a synchrotron potential with a single minimum, the calculated transfer function agrees with measurements at the Aladdin 800-MeV electron storage ring. The transfer function is useful in evaluating phase feedback that suppresses Robinson oscillations in order to obtain quiet operation of an infrared beam line.

  7. Absence of diurnal variation in visceromotor response to colorectal distention in normal Long Evans rats [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Botschuijver

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enhanced colorectal sensitivity (i.e. visceral hypersensitivity is thought to be a pathophysiological mechanism in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. In healthy men a circadian variation in rectal perception to colonic distention was described. Disturbed day and night rhythms, which occur in shift work and trans meridian flights, are associated with the prevalence of IBS. This raises the question whether disruptions of circadian control are responsible for the observed pathology in IBS. Prior to investigating altered rhythmicity in relation to visceral hypersensitivity in a rat model for IBS, it is relevant to establish whether normal rats display circadian variation similar to healthy men.  Methodology and findings: In rodents colorectal distension leads to reproducible contractions of abdominal musculature. We used quantification of this so called visceromotor response (VMR by electromyography (EMG to assess visceral sensitivity in rats. We assessed the VMR in normal male Long Evans rats at different time points of the light/dark cycle. Although a control experiment with male maternal separated rats confirmed that intentionally inflicted (i.e. stress induced changes in VMR can be detected, normal male Long Evans rats showed no variation in VMR along the light/dark cycle in response to colorectal distension. Conclusions: In the absence of a daily rhythm of colorectal sensitivity in normal control rats it is not possible to investigate possible aberrancies in our rat model for IBS.

  8. Using an APOS Framework to Understand Teachers' Responses to Questions on the Normal Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansilal, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This study is an exploration of teachers' engagement with concepts embedded in the normal distribution. The participants were a group of 290 in-service teachers enrolled in a teacher development program. The research instrument was an assessment task that can be described as an "unknown percentage" problem, which required the application…

  9. Differences in response to conventional vitamin D therapy among obese and normal weight children and adolescents in Qazvin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Saffari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D (Vit D deficiency is one of the major nutritional deficiencies in children. Obesity has inverse association with vitamin D levels. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in response to conventional treatment for Vit D deficiency and insufficiency in obese and normal weight children and adolescents.Methods: This nested case control study was conducted in 69 obese children and 133 normal weight matched control suffering from Vit D insufficiency or deficiency. Vit D deficiency was defined as serum 25(OH D

  10. Robust synchronization of drive-response chaotic systems via adaptive sliding mode control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.-L.; Chang, K.-M.

    2009-01-01

    A robust adaptive sliding control scheme is developed in this study to achieve synchronization for two identical chaotic systems in the presence of uncertain system parameters, external disturbances and nonlinear control inputs. An adaptation algorithm is given based on the Lyapunov stability theory. Using this adaptation technique to estimate the upper-bounds of parameter variation and external disturbance uncertainties, an adaptive sliding mode controller is then constructed without requiring the bounds of parameter and disturbance uncertainties to be known in advance. It is proven that the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller can maintain the existence of sliding mode in finite time in uncertain chaotic systems. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  11. Relative role of subinertial and superinertial modes in the coastal long wave response forced by the landfall of a tropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ziming; Yankovsky, Alexander E.

    2011-06-01

    A set of numerical experiments has been performed in order to analyze the long-wave response of the coastal ocean to a translating mesoscale atmospheric cyclone approaching the coastline at a normal angle. An idealized two-slope shelf topography is chosen. The model is forced by a radially symmetric atmospheric pressure perturbation with a corresponding gradient wind field. The cyclone's translation speed, radius, and the continental shelf width are considered as parameters whose impact on the long wave period, modal structure, and amplitude is studied. Subinertial continental shelf waves (CSW) dominate the response under typical forcing conditions and on the narrower shelves. They propagate in the downstream (in the sense of Kelvin wave propagation) direction. Superinertial edge wave modes have higher free surface amplitudes and faster phase speeds than the CSW modes. While potentially more dangerous, edge waves are not as common as subinertial shelf waves because their generation requires a wide, gently sloping shelf and a storm system translating at a relatively high (˜10 m s -1 or faster) speed. A relatively smaller size of an atmospheric cyclone also favors edge wave generation. Edge waves with the highest amplitude (up to 60% of the forced storm surge) propagate upstream. They are produced by a storm system with an Eulerian time scale equal to the period of a zero-mode edge wave with the wavelength of the storm spatial scale. Large amplitude edge waves were generated during Hurricane Wilma's landfall (2005) on the West Florida shelf with particularly severe flooding occurring upstream of the landfall site.

  12. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated with 60 Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response

  13. Comparisons of amino acids, body constituents and antioxidative response between long-time HD and normal HD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Akira; Sato, Emiko; Mori, Takefumi; Ieiri, Norio; Takahashi, Chika; Ishida, Yoko; Hotta, Osamu; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress is one of the main mediators of progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is the transcription factor of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes and related proteins which play an important role in cellular defense. Long-time hemodialysis (HD) therapy (8 hours) has been considered to be more beneficial compared to normal HD therapy (4 hours). We investigated oxidative response related to Nrf2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of long-time HD and normal HD patients. Methods Eight adult long-time HD therapy patients (44.5 ± 3.0 years) and 10 normal HD therapy patients (68.1 ± 2.7 years) were enrolled. PBMCs were isolated and processed for expression of Nrf2 and its related genes by qRT-PCR. Plasma indoxyl sulfate, amino acids, and body constituents were measured. Findings Plasma indoxyl sulfate was significantly low after long-time HD therapy compare to that of normal HD therapy. Although, skeletal muscle mass, lean body mass, mineral and protein were significantly decreased 2 months in normal HD patients, those in long-time HD patients were significantly increased after 2 months. Almost of amino acids were significantly decreased after HD therapy in both HD therapies. Plasma amino acids were significantly low in long-time HD patients compared to normal HD patients. In PBMCs, the expression of Nrf2 was significantly decreased and hemooxygenase-1 expression was significantly increased in long-time HD compared to normal HD. Conclusion These observations indicate the beneficial effects of in long-time HD in improving oxidative stress in patients. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  14. Batch versus column modes for the adsorption of radioactive metal onto rice husk waste: conditions optimization through response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausar, Abida; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Ashraf, Aisha

    2017-09-01

    Batch and column adsorption modes were compared for the adsorption of U(VI) ions using rice husk waste biomass (RHWB). Response surface methodology was employed for the optimization of process variables, i.e., (pH (A), adsorbent dose (B), initial ion concentration (C)) in batch mode. The B, C and C 2 affected the U(VI) adsorption significantly in batch mode. The developed quadratic model was found to be validated on the basis of regression coefficient as well as analysis of variance. The predicted and actual values were found to be correlated well, with negligible residual value, and B, C and C 2 were significant terms. The column study was performed considering bed height, flow rate and initial metal ion concentration, and adsorption efficiency was evaluated through breakthrough curves and bed depth service time and Thomas models. Adsorption was found to be dependent on bed height and initial U(VI) ion concentration, and flow rate decreased the adsorption capacity. Thomas models fitted well to the U(VI) adsorption onto RHWB. Results revealed that RHWB has potential to remove U(VI) ions and batch adsorption was found to be efficient versus column mode.

  15. Frustration-induced internal stresses are responsible for quasilocalized modes in structural glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Edan; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2018-03-01

    It has been recently shown [E. Lerner, G. Düring, and E. Bouchbinder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 035501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.035501] that the nonphononic vibrational modes of structural glasses at low frequencies ω are quasilocalized and follow a universal density of states D (ω ) ˜ω4 . Here we show that the gapless nature of the observed density of states depends on the existence of internal stresses that generically emerge in glasses due to frustration, thus elucidating a basic element underlying this universal behavior. Similarly to jammed particulate packings, low-frequency modes in structural glasses emerge from a balance between a local elasticity term and an internal stress term in the dynamical matrix, where the difference between them is orders of magnitude smaller than their typical magnitude. By artificially reducing the magnitude of internal stresses in a computer glass former in three dimensions, we show that a gap is formed in the density of states below which no vibrational modes exist, thus demonstrating the crucial importance of internal stresses. Finally, we show that while better annealing the glass upon cooling from the liquid state significantly reduces its internal stresses, the self-organizational processes during cooling render the gapless D (ω ) ˜ω4 density of state unaffected.

  16. "Good" Students and "Involved" Mothers: Latin@ Responses to Normalization Pressures in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuero, Kimberley Kennedy; Valdez, Veronica E.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from two in-depth qualitative studies, we used a sociocultural lens for a cross-case analysis examining how Latin@s' participation in schools is affected by ideological messages that subordinately position them in terms of their ethnicity, class, and immigrant status. We identified a range of dynamic responses to the school's normalization…

  17. Effect of retinol on the hyperthermal response of normal tissue in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.A.; Marigold, J.C.L.; Hume, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of prior administration of retinol, a membrane labilizer, on the in vivo hyperthermal response of lysosomes was investigated in the mouse spleen using a quantitative histochemical assay for the lysosomal enzyme acid phosphatase. A dose of retinol which had no effect when given alone enhanced the thermal response of the lysosome, causing an increase in lysosomal membrane permeability. In contrast, the same dose of retinol had no effect on the gross hyperthermal response of mouse intestine; a tissue which is relatively susceptible to hyperthermia. Thermal damage to intestine was assayed directly by crypt loss 1 day after treatment or assessed as thermal enhancement of x-ray damage by counting crypt microcolonies 4 days after a combined heat and x-ray treatment. Thus, although the hyperthermal response of the lysosome could be enhanced by the administration of retinol, thermal damage at a gross tissue level appeared to be unaffected, suggesting that lysosomal membrane injury is unlikely to be a primary event in hyperthermal cell killing

  18. Identification of sudden stiffness changes in the acceleration response of a bridge to moving loads using ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aied, H.; González, A.; Cantero, D.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of heavy traffic together with aggressive environmental loads poses a threat to the safety of an aging bridge stock. Often, damage is only detected via visual inspection at a point when repairing costs can be quite significant. Ideally, bridge managers would want to identify a stiffness change as soon as possible, i.e., as it is occurring, to plan for prompt measures before reaching a prohibitive cost. Recent developments in signal processing techniques such as wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) have aimed to address this need by identifying a stiffness change from a localised feature in the structural response to traffic. However, the effectiveness of these techniques is limited by the roughness of the road profile, the vehicle speed and the noise level. In this paper, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied by the first time to the acceleration response of a bridge model to a moving load with the purpose of capturing sudden stiffness changes. EEMD is more adaptive and appears to be better suited to non-linear signals than wavelets, and it reduces the mode mixing problem present in EMD. EEMD is tested in a variety of theoretical 3D vehicle-bridge interaction scenarios. Stiffness changes are successfully identified, even for small affected regions, relatively poor profiles, high vehicle speeds and significant noise. The latter is due to the ability of EEMD to separate high frequency components associated to sudden stiffness changes from other frequency components associated to the vehicle-bridge interaction system.

  19. Colorimetric and Fluorescent Dual Mode Sensing of Alcoholic Strength in Spirit Samples with Stimuli-Responsive Infinite Coordination Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jingjing; Ma, Wenjie; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-07-07

    This study demonstrates a new strategy for colorimetric and fluorescent dual mode sensing of alcoholic strength (AS) in spirit samples based on stimuli-responsive infinite coordination polymers (ICPs). The ICP supramolecular network is prepared with 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene (bix) as the ligand and Zn(2+) as the central metal ion in ethanol, in which rhodamine B (RhB) is encapsulated through self-adaptive chemistry. In pure ethanol solvent, the as-formed RhB/Zn(bix) is well dispersed and quite stable. However, the addition of water into the ethanol dispersion of RhB/Zn(bix) destroys Zn(bix) network structure, resulting in the release of RhB from ICP into the solvent. As a consequence, the solvent displays the color of released RhB and, at the meantime, turns on the fluorescence of RhB, which constitutes a new mechanism for colorimetric and fluorescent dual mode sensing of AS in commercial spirit samples. With the method developed here, we could distinguish the AS of different commercial spirit samples by the naked eye within a wide linear range from 20 to 100% vol and by monitoring the increase of fluorescent intensity of the released RhB. This study not only offers a new method for on-spot visible detection of AS in commercial spirit samples, but also provides a strategy for designing dual mode sensing mechanisms for different analytical purposes based on novel stimuli-responsive materials.

  20. Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Shetty, Sugandh D.; Heads, Larry; Bolin, Frank; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Sirls, Larry T., II; Schultz, Daniel; Cerny, Joseph C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

  1. Pros and cons of rotating ground motion records to fault-normal/parallel directions for response history analysis of buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2014-01-01

    According to the regulatory building codes in the United States (e.g., 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of building structures. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHAs should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here, for the first time, using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak values of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were computed for rotation angles ranging from 0 through 180° to quantify the difference between peak values of EDPs over all rotation angles and those due to FN/FP direction rotated motions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  2. Three Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Rocket-based Combined-cycle Engine Response During Mode Transition Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jack R.; McRae, D. Scott; Bond, Ryan B.; Steffan, Christopher (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The GTX program at NASA Glenn Research Center is designed to develop a launch vehicle concept based on rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion. Experimental testing, cycle analysis, and computational fluid dynamics modeling have all demonstrated the viability of the GTX concept, yet significant technical issues and challenges still remain. Our research effort develops a unique capability for dynamic CFD simulation of complete high-speed propulsion devices and focuses this technology toward analysis of the GTX response during critical mode transition events. Our principal attention is focused on Mode 1/Mode 2 operation, in which initial rocket propulsion is transitioned into thermal-throat ramjet propulsion. A critical element of the GTX concept is the use of an Independent Ramjet Stream (IRS) cycle to provide propulsion at Mach numbers less than 3. In the IRS cycle, rocket thrust is initially used for primary power, and the hot rocket plume is used as a flame-holding mechanism for hydrogen fuel injected into the secondary air stream. A critical aspect is the establishment of a thermal throat in the secondary stream through the combination of area reduction effects and combustion-induced heat release. This is a necessity to enable the power-down of the rocket and the eventual shift to ramjet mode. Our focus in this first year of the grant has been in three areas, each progressing directly toward the key initial goal of simulating thermal throat formation during the IRS cycle: CFD algorithm development; simulation of Mode 1 experiments conducted at Glenn's Rig 1 facility; and IRS cycle simulations. The remainder of this report discusses each of these efforts in detail and presents a plan of work for the next year.

  3. Factors influencing the vaccinia-specific cytotoxic response of thymocytes from normal and chimeric mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, P.C.; Schwartz, D.H.; Bennink, J.R.; Korngold, R.

    1981-01-01

    Following adoptive transfer into irradiated recipients, thymocytes can be induced to respond strongly to vaccinia virus. High levels of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity may be generated from thymus, but not from spleen, of 3-day-old mice. The capacity of thymocytes to differentiate into effector CTL tends to be lost with age. Some of this loss may reflect positive suppression: a single, low dose of cyclophosphamide allows the reemergence of responsiveness in at least one mouse strain. Thymocytes from [A leads to (A x B)F1] and [(A x B)F1 leads to A] chimeras show the response patterns that would by predicted from previous studies of lymph node and spleen cells. However, thymic function seems to be rapidly lost in the [A leads to (A x B)F1] Chimeras

  4. Cardiovascular autonomic responses to head-up tilt in gestational hypertension and normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Nonna; Saarelainen, Heli; Kärkkäinen, Henna; Valtonen, Pirjo; Lyyra-Laitinen, Tiina; Laitinen, Tomi; Vanninen, Esko; Heinonen, Seppo

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of gestational hypertension on hemodynamics and cardiovascular autonomic regulation at rest and their responses to head-up tilt (HUT). We prospectively studied 56 pregnant women (28 with gestational hypertension and 28 healthy pregnant women) during the third trimester of pregnancy and 3 months after pregnancy. In women with pregnancy-induced hypertension, compared with control women, there were significant differences in hemodynamics and in markers of cardiovascular regulation (p Postural change from the supine to the upright position was associated with significant changes in hemodynamic responses in both groups during pregnancy (from p pregnancies (p changes in autonomic nervous function in hypertensive women appeared to be a feature of gestational-induced hypertension.

  5. Normal spectrum of pulmonary parametric response map to differentiate lung collapsibility: distribution of densitometric classifications in healthy adult volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mario; Nemec, Stefan F.; Dufresne, Valerie; Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H.; Bankier, Alexander A.; Chamberlain, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary parametric response map (PRM) was proposed for quantitative densitometric phenotypization of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known about this technique in healthy subjects. The purpose of this study was to describe the normal spectrum of densitometric classification of pulmonary PRM in a group of healthy adults. 15 healthy volunteers underwent spirometrically monitored chest CT at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC). The paired CT scans were analyzed by PRM for voxel-by-voxel characterization of lung parenchyma according to 4 densitometric classifications: normal lung (TLC ≥ -950 HU, FRC ≥ -856 HU); expiratory low attenuation area (LAA) (TLC ≥ -950 HU, FRC < -856 HU); dual LAA (TLC<-950 HU, FRC < -856 HU); uncharacterized (TLC < -950 HU, FRC ≥ -856 HU). PRM spectrum was 78 % ± 10 % normal lung, 20 % ± 8 % expiratory LAA, and 1 % ± 1 % dual LAA. PRM was similar between genders, there was moderate correlation between dual LAA and spirometrically assessed TLC (R = 0.531; p = 0.042), and between expiratory LAA and Vol Exp/Insp ratio (R = -0.572; p = 0.026). PRM reflects the predominance of normal lung parenchyma in a group of healthy volunteers. However, PRM also confirms the presence of physiological expiratory LAA seemingly related to air trapping and a minimal amount of dual LAA likely reflecting emphysema. (orig.)

  6. Estimation of low-dose radiation-responsive proteins in the absence of genomic instability in normal human fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Ji-Hye; Yun, Jung Mi; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Cha Soon

    2017-11-01

    Low-dose radiation has various biological effects such as adaptive responses, low-dose hypersensitivity, as well as beneficial effects. However, little is known about the particular proteins involved in these effects. Here, we sought to identify low-dose radiation-responsive phosphoproteins in normal fibroblast cells. We assessed genomic instability and proliferation of fibroblast cells after γ-irradiation by γ-H2AX foci and micronucleus formation analyses and BrdU incorporation assay, respectively. We screened fibroblast cells 8 h after low-dose (0.05 Gy) γ-irradiation using Phospho Explorer Antibody Microarray and validated two differentially expressed phosphoproteins using Western blotting. Cell proliferation proceeded normally in the absence of genomic instability after low-dose γ-irradiation. Phospho antibody microarray analysis and Western blotting revealed increased expression of two phosphoproteins, phospho-NFκB (Ser536) and phospho-P70S6K (Ser418), 8 h after low-dose radiation. Our findings suggest that low-dose radiation of normal fibroblast cells activates the expression of phospho-NFκB (Ser536) and phospho-P70S6K (Ser418) in the absence of genomic instability. Therefore, these proteins may be involved in DNA damage repair processes.

  7. Estrogen Responsiveness of the TFIID Subunit TAF4B in the Normal Mouse Ovary and in Ovarian Tumors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Jennifer R.; Hodgkinson, Kendra M.; Binder, April K.; Seymour, Kimberly A.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Estrogen signaling in the ovary is a fundamental component of normal ovarian function, and evidence also indicates that excessive estrogen is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. We have previously demonstrated that the gonadally enriched TFIID subunit TAF4B, a paralog of the general transcription factor TAF4A, is required for fertility in mice and for the proliferation of ovarian granulosa cells following hormonal stimulation. However, the relationship between TAF4B and estrogen signaling in the normal ovary or during ovarian tumor initiation and progression has yet to be defined. Herein, we show that Taf4b mRNA and TAF4B protein, but not Taf4a mRNA or TAF4A protein, are increased in whole ovaries and granulosa cells of the ovary after exposure to 17beta-estradiol or the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol and that this response occurs within hours after stimulation. Furthermore, this increase occurs via nuclear estrogen receptors both in vivo and in a mouse granulosa cancer cell line, NT-1. We observe a significant increase in Taf4b mRNA in estrogen-supplemented mouse ovarian tumors, which correlates with diminished survival of these mice. These data highlight the novel response of the general transcription factor TAF4B to estrogen in the normal ovary and during ovarian tumor progression in the mouse, suggesting its potential role in regulating actions downstream of estrogen stimulation. PMID:24068106

  8. Estrogen responsiveness of the TFIID subunit TAF4B in the normal mouse ovary and in ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Jennifer R; Hodgkinson, Kendra M; Binder, April K; Seymour, Kimberly A; Korach, Kenneth S; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Freiman, Richard N

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen signaling in the ovary is a fundamental component of normal ovarian function, and evidence also indicates that excessive estrogen is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. We have previously demonstrated that the gonadally enriched TFIID subunit TAF4B, a paralog of the general transcription factor TAF4A, is required for fertility in mice and for the proliferation of ovarian granulosa cells following hormonal stimulation. However, the relationship between TAF4B and estrogen signaling in the normal ovary or during ovarian tumor initiation and progression has yet to be defined. Herein, we show that Taf4b mRNA and TAF4B protein, but not Taf4a mRNA or TAF4A protein, are increased in whole ovaries and granulosa cells of the ovary after exposure to 17beta-estradiol or the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol and that this response occurs within hours after stimulation. Furthermore, this increase occurs via nuclear estrogen receptors both in vivo and in a mouse granulosa cancer cell line, NT-1. We observe a significant increase in Taf4b mRNA in estrogen-supplemented mouse ovarian tumors, which correlates with diminished survival of these mice. These data highlight the novel response of the general transcription factor TAF4B to estrogen in the normal ovary and during ovarian tumor progression in the mouse, suggesting its potential role in regulating actions downstream of estrogen stimulation.

  9. Enhancing the radiation response of tumors but not early or late responding normal tissues using a vascular disrupting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) damage tumor vasculature and enhance tumor radiation response. In this pre-clinical study, we combined radiation with the leading VDA in clinical development, combretastatin A-4 phosphate (CA4P), and compared the effects seen in tumors and relevant...... normal tissues. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Radiation was applied locally to tissues in CDF1 mice to produce full radiation dose-response curves. CA4P (250 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected within 30 minutes after irradiating. Response of 200 mm3 foot implanted C3H mammary carcinomas was assessed......% increase in ventilation rate measured by plethysmography within 9 months). A Chi-squared test was used for statistical comparisons (significance level of p 4P. The radiation...

  10. Temporally distinct response of irradiated normal human fibroblasts and their bystander cells to energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Ni, Meinan; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects have been documented for a multitude of endpoints such as mutations, chromosome aberrations and cell death, which arise in nonirradiated bystander cells having received signals from directly irradiated cells; however, energetic heavy ion-induced bystander response is incompletely characterized. To address this, we employed precise microbeams of carbon and neon ions for targeting only a very small fraction of cells in confluent fibroblast cultures. Conventional broadfield irradiation was conducted in parallel to see the effects in irradiated cells. Exposure of 0.00026% of cells led to nearly 10% reductions in the clonogenic survival and twofold rises in the apoptotic incidence regardless of ion species. Whilst apoptotic frequency increased with time up to 72 h postirradiation in irradiated cells, its frequency escalated up to 24 h postirradiation but declined at 48 h postirradiation in bystander cells, indicating that bystander cells exhibit transient commitment to apoptosis. Carbon- and neon-ion microbeam irradiation similarly caused almost twofold increments in the levels of serine 15-phosphorylated p53 proteins, irrespective of whether 0.00026, 0.0013 or 0.0066% of cells were targeted. Whereas the levels of phosphorylated p53 were elevated and remained unchanged at 2 h and 6 h postirradiation in irradiated cells, its levels rose at 6 h postirradiation but not at 2 h postirradiation in bystander cells, suggesting that bystander cells manifest delayed p53 phosphorylation. Collectively, our results indicate that heavy ions inactivate clonogenic potential of bystander cells, and that the time course of the response to heavy ions differs between irradiated and bystander cells. These induced bystander responses could be a defensive mechanism that minimizes further expansion of aberrant cells

  11. Pituitary response to a dopamine antagonist at different times of the day in normal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-López, F R; González-Moreno, C M; Abós, M D; Andonegui, J A; Corvo, R H

    1982-08-01

    In order to determine whether or not pituitary responsiveness to the dopaminergic antagonist clebopride changes during the nyctohemeral cycle, 10 healthy women with regular cycles were given 1 mg of clebopride orally at 09.00 h and 24.00 h with at least a 5 day interval between each test. In addition, 5 of the women were given a placebo instead of clebopride at midnight to evaluate the spontaneous hormonal changes. During the 24.00 h test the women had significantly higher (P less than 0.05) mean TSH basal levels. Serum prolactin (Prl) increased significantly (P less than 0.001) after clebopride administration while these changes did not occur when placebo was used instead of clebopride at midnight. The Prl response to clebopride was qualitatively similar at 09.00 h and at 24.00 h. Clebopride given at midnight induced a significant increase (P less than 0.05) in serum TSH while this change did not occur when the drug was given at 09.00 h or when placebo was given at midnight. The administration of clebopride resulted in no discernible alternations in serum LH, FSH or GH in either the 09.00 h or the 24.00 h tests. Thus, Prl responses to clebopride were similar in the morning and at midnight, TSH significantly increased after clebopride at midnight whereas this did not occur when the drug was given in the morning, and no significant changes were induced in LH, FSH or GH at the times studied.

  12. The chondrogenic response to exercise in the proximal femur of normal and mdx mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nye David J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Submaximal exercise is used in the management of muscular dystrophy. The effects of mechanical stimulation on skeletal development are well understood, although its effects on cartilage growth have yet to be investigated in the dystrophic condition. The objective of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic response to voluntary exercise in dystrophin-deficient mice. Methods Control and dystrophin-deficient (mdx mice were divided into sedentary and exercise-treated groups and tested for chondral histomorphometric differences at the proximal femur. Results Control mice ran 7 km/week further than mdx mice on average, but this difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. However, exercised control mice exhibited significantly enlarged femur head diameter, articular cartilage thickness, articular cartilage tissue area, and area of calcified cartilage relative to sedentary controls and exercised mdx mice (P Conclusions Mdx mice exhibit a reduced chondrogenic response to increased mechanical stimulation relative to controls. However, no significant reduction in articular dimensions was found, indicating loss of chondral tissue may not be a clinical concern with dystrophinopathy.

  13. EEG responses to low-level chemicals in normals and cacosmics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, G E; Bell, I R; Dikman, Z V; Fernandez, M; Kline, J P; Peterson, J M; Wright, K P

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies from the University of Arizona indicate that normal subjects, both college students and the elderly, can register the presence of low-intensity odors in the electroencephalogram (EEG) in the absence of conscious awareness of the odors. The experimental paradigm involves subjects sniffing pairs of bottles, one containing an odorant (e.g. isoamyl acetate) dissolved in an odorless solvent (water or liquid silicone), the other containing just the solvent, while 19 channels of EEG are continuously recorded. For the low-intensity odor conditions, concentrations are adjusted downward (decreased) until subjects correctly identify the odor bottle at chance (50%). The order of odorants, concentrations, and hand holding the control bottle, are counterbalanced within and across subjects. Three previous experiments found that alpha activity (8-12 hz) decreased in midline and posterior regions when subjects sniffed the low-intensity odors. The most recent study suggests that decreased theta activity (4-8 hz) may reflect sensory registration and decreased alpha activity may reflect perceptual registration. In a just completed experiment involving college students who were selected based on combinations of high and low scores on a scale measuring cacosmia (chemical odor intolerance) and high and low scores on a scale measuring depression, cacosmic subjects (independent of depression) showed greater decreases in low-frequency alpha (8-10 hz) and greater increases in low-frequency beta (12-16 hz) to the solvent propylene glycol compared to an empty bottle. Topographic EEG mapping to low-intensity odorants may provide a useful tool for investigating possible increased sensitivity to specific chemicals in chemically sensitive individuals.

  14. The role of email addresses and email contact in encouraging web response in a mixed mode design

    OpenAIRE

    Cernat, Alexandru; Lynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether propensity to participate in a web-CAPI mixed-mode survey is influenced by being contacted by email in addition to mail. In panel surveys, researchers can ask at each wave for an email address, but there is little evidence regarding the value of doing so. Using data from a large sample with an experimental design (IP5) we find that using a respondent-supplied email address to send additional invites and reminders does not affect response rates compared to using mailed invit...

  15. Quantifying response to intracranial pressure normalization in idiopathic intracranial hypertension via dynamic neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lublinsky, Svetlana; Kesler, Anat; Friedman, Alon; Horev, Anat; Shelef, Ilan

    2018-04-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterized by elevated intracranial pressure without a clear cause. To investigate dynamic imaging findings in IIH and their relation to mechanisms underlying intracranial pressure normalization. Prospective. Eighteen IIH patients and 30 healthy controls. T 1 -weighted, venography, fluid attenuation inversion recovery, and apparent diffusion coefficients were acquired on 1.5T scanner. The dural sinus was measured before and after lumbar puncture (LP). The degree of sinus occlusion was evaluated, based on 95% confidence intervals of controls. We studied a number of neuroimaging biomarkers associated with IIH (sinus occlusion; optic nerve; distribution of cerebrospinal fluid into the subarachnoid space, sulci and lateral ventricles (LVs); Meckel's caves; arachnoid granulation; pituitary and choroid plexus), before and after LP, using a set of specially developed quantification techniques. Relationships among various biomarkers were investigated (Pearson correlation coefficient) and linked to long-term disease outcomes (logistic regression). The t-test and the Wilcoxon rank test were used to compare between controls and before and after LP data. As a result of LP, the following were found to be in good accordance with the opening pressure: relative compression of cerebrospinal fluid (R = -0.857, P < 0.001) and brain volumes (R = -0.576, P = 0.012), LV expansion (R = 0.772, P < 0.001) and venous volume (R = 0.696, P = 0.001), enlargement of the pituitary (R = 0.640, P = 0.023), and shrinkage of subarachnoid space (R = -0.887, P < 0.001). The only parameter that had an impact on long-term prognosis was cross-sectional size of supplemental drainage veins after LP (sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 20%, and area under the curve of 0.845, P < 0.001). We present an approach for quantitative characterization of the intracranial venous system and its implementation as a diagnostic assistance

  16. Dynamics of oligodendrocyte responses to anterograde axonal (Wallerian) and terminal degeneration in normal and TNF-transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drøjdahl, Nina; Fenger, Christina; Nielsen, Helle H

    2004-01-01

    degeneration and lesion-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in TNF-transgenic mice with the response in genetically normal mice. Transectioning of the entorhino-dentate perforant path axonal projection increased hippocampal TNF mRNA expression in both types of mice, but to significantly...... larger levels in the TNF-transgenics. At 5 days after axonal transection, numbers of oligodendrocytes and myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA expression in the denervated dentate gyrus in TNF-transgenic mice had increased to the same extent as in nontransgenic littermates. At this time, transgenics showed...

  17. New determinations of Q quality factors and eigenfrequencies for the whole set of singlets of the Earth's normal modes 0S 0, 0S 2, 0S 3 and 2S 1 using superconducting gravimeter data from the GGP network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roult, Geneviève; Rosat, Séverine; Clévédé, Eric; Millot-Langet, Raphaële; Hinderer, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    We present new modal Q measurements of the 0S 0 and 0S 2 modes, and first modal frequencies and Q measurements of 2S 1 and 0S 3 modes. The high quality of the GGP (Global Geodynamics Project) superconducting gravimeters (SGs) contributes to the clear observation of seismic normal modes at frequencies lower than 1 mHz and offers a good opportunity for studying the behaviour of these modes. The interest of scientists in the gravest normal modes is due to the fact that they do contribute to a better knowledge of the density profile in the Earth, helping to constrain Earth's models. These modes have been clearly identified after some large recent events recorded with superconducting gravimeters, particularly well-suited for low-frequency investigations. The Ms = 8.1 (Mw = 8.4) Peruvian earthquake of June 2001 and the Ms = 9.0 (Mw = 9.3) Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of December 2004 provide us with individual spectra which exhibit a clear splitting of the spheroidal modes 0S 2, 0S 3 and 2S 1, and a clear identification of each of the individual singlets, with a resolution never obtained from broad-band seismometers records. The Q quality factors have been determined from the apparent decrease of the amplitude of each singlet with time, according to a well-suited technique [Roult, G., Clévédé, E., 2000. New refinements in attenuation measurements from free-oscillation and surface-wave observations. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 121, 1-37]. The results are compared to the theoretical frequencies and Q quality factors computed for the PREM and 1066A models, taking into account both rotation and ellipticity effects of the Earth. The two observed datasets (frequencies and Q quality factors) exhibit a splitting on the observed values different from the predicted one. That seems to point out that some parameters as density or attenuation values used in the theoretical models do not explain the observations. A new dataset of frequencies and Q quality factors of the whole set of

  18. Effect of step function-like perturbation on intermittent contact mode sensors: a response analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokavecz, Janos; Heszler, Peter; Toth, Zsolt; Mechler, Adam

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the intermittent contact mode (ICM) probe was investigated. In the experimental study we applied a step function signal to the Z piezo drive and recorded the amplitude signal of the probe while the probe was engaged with the surface. Transient overshoots appear at the edges of the steps. These transients are absent from the control contact force measurements, that is, they are proper to the ICM operation. The phenomenon was investigated by numerical calculations, focused on the effect of change of the drive frequency and the quality factor. We concluded, that the low value of the quality factor results in small transients and short settling time, which are necessary for fast atomic force microscopic operation. Simultaneously, the interaction force increases. Our calculations indicate that the tip-sample force can be lowered by setting the drive frequency slightly below the resonance

  19. Modulation response, mixed-mode oscillations and chaotic spiking in quantum dot light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Husseini, Hussein B.; Al Naimee, Kais A.; Al Khursan, Amin H.; Abdalah, Sora F.; Khedir, Ali H.; Meucci, Riccardo; Arecchi, F. Tito

    2015-01-01

    In this work quantum dot light emitting diode (QD-LED) was modeled in a dimensionless rate equations system where it is not done earlier. The model was examined first under bias current without any external perturbation where it exhibits chaotic phenomena since the model has multi-degrees of freedom. Then, it is perturbed by both small signal and direct current modulations (DCM), separately. The system exhibits mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) under DCM. This behavior was reasoned to continuous states of two dimensional wetting layer (WL) which works as a reservoir to quantum dot (QD) states. QD capture was the dominant rate controlling the dynamic behavior in QD-LED. The nonlinear dynamic behavior of our model is compared very well to the experimental observations in the QD-LED

  20. Raman dispersion spectroscopy on the highly saddled nickel(II)-octaethyltetraphenylporphyrin reveals the symmetry of nonplanar distortions and the vibronic coupling strength of normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer-Stenner, R.; Stichternath, A.; Dreybrodt, W.; Jentzen, W.; Song, X.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Nielsen, O.F.; Medforth, C.J.; Smith, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the polarized Raman cross sections and depolarization ratios of 16 fundamental modes of nickel octaethyltetraphenylporphyrin in a CS 2 solution for 16 fundamental modes, i.e., the A 1g -type vibrations ν 1 , ν 2 , ν 3 , ν 4 , ν 5 , and φ 8 , the B 1g vibrations ν 11 and ν 14 , the B 2g vibrations ν 28 , ν 29 , and ν 30 and the antisymmetric A 2g modes ν 19 , ν 20 , ν 22 , and ν 23 as function of the excitation wavelength. The data cover the entire resonant regions of the Q- and B-bands. They were analyzed by use of a theory which describes intra- and intermolecular coupling in terms of a time-independent nonadiabatic perturbation theory [E. Unger, U. Bobinger, W. Dreybrodt, and R. Schweitzer-Stenner, J. Phys. Chem. 97, 9956 (1993)]. This approach explicitly accounts in a self-consistent way for multimode mixing with all Raman modes investigated. The vibronic coupling parameters obtained from this procedure were then used to successfully fit the vibronic side bands of the absorption spectrum and to calculate the resonance excitation profiles in absolute units. Our results show that the porphyrin macrocycle is subject to B 2u -(saddling) and B 1u -(ruffling) distortions which lower its symmetry to S 4 . Thus, evidence is provided that the porphyrin molecule maintains the nonplanar structure of its crystal phase in an organic solvent. The vibronic coupling parameters indicate a breakdown of the four-orbital model. This notion is corroborated by (ZINDO/S) calculations which reveal that significant configurational interaction occurs between the electronic transitions into |Q right-angle- and |1B right-angle-states and various porphyrin→porphyrin, metal→porphyrin, and porphyrin→metal transitions. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Seismic response of elastically restrained single bellows expansion joint in lateral mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameswara Rao, C.; Radhakrishna, M.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper attempts to derive an exact solution for the seismic response of U type of single bellows that are considered elastically restrained against rotation to classical fixed-fixed case considered by Morishita et al. (author)

  2. Mode of delivery affected questionnaire response rates in a birth cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Bray, I.; Noble, S.; Robinson, R.; Molloy, L.; Tilling, K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Cohort studies must collect data from their participants as economically as possible, while maintaining response rates. This randomized controlled trial investigated whether offering a choice of online or paper questionnaires resulted in improved response rates compared with offering online first. Study Design and Setting Eligible participants were young people in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) study (born April 1, 1991, to December 31, 1992, in the Av...

  3. Response of normal stem cells to ionizing radiation: A balance between homeostasis and genomic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfouche, G.; Martin, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells have been described in most adult tissues, where they play a key role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. As they self-renew throughout life, accumulating genetic anomalies can compromise their genomic integrity and potentially give rise to cancer. Stem cells (SCs) may thus be a major target of radiation carcinogenesis. In addition, unrepaired genotoxic damage may cause cell death and stem cell pool depletion, impairing lineage functionality and accelerating aging. Developments in SC biology enabled the characterization of the responses of stem cells to genotoxic stress and their role in tissue damage. We here examine how these cells react to ionizing radiation (IR), and more specifically their radiosensitivity, stress signaling and DNA repair. We first review embryonic SCs, as a paradigm of primitive pluri-potent cells, then three adult tissues, bone marrow, skin and intestine, capable of long-term regeneration and at high risk for acute radiation syndromes and long-term carcinogenesis. We discuss IR disruption of the fine balance between maintenance of tissue homeostasis and genomic stability. We show that stem cell radiosensitivity does not follow a unique model, but differs notably according to the turnover rates of the tissues. (authors)

  4. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B. T.; Si, S. S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  5. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B.T.; Si, S.S.; Deng, Z.G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The loading weight affects the RF tremendously. • Reducing the FCH can improve the stability of the maglev vehicle. • The Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the conventional PMG. • Pre-load is an effective way to enhance the dynamic characteristic of the HTS maglev vehicle. - Abstract: The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  6. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B. [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); Zheng, J., E-mail: jzheng@swjtu.cn [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); Che, T. [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); Zheng, B.T.; Si, S.S. [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); Deng, Z.G., E-mail: deng@swjtu.cn [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The loading weight affects the RF tremendously. • Reducing the FCH can improve the stability of the maglev vehicle. • The Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the conventional PMG. • Pre-load is an effective way to enhance the dynamic characteristic of the HTS maglev vehicle. - Abstract: The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  7. Brainstem auditory evoked response characteristics in normal-hearing subjects with chronic tinnitus and in non-tinnitus group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman Nemati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: While most of the people with tinnitus have some degrees of hearing impairment, a small percent of patients admitted to ear, nose and throat clinics or hearing evaluation centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. This study was performed to better understanding of the reasons of probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the auditory brainstem function in normal-hearing patients with chronic tinnitus.Methods: In this comparative cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study, 52 ears (26 with and 26 without tinnitus were examined. Components of the auditory brainstem response (ABR including wave latencies and wave amplitudes were determined in the two groups and analyzed using appropriate statistical methods.Results: The mean differences between the absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that was not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of waves I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only, the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly higher (p=0.04.Conclusion: The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the latter ones, can be considered as an indication of plastic changes in neuronal activity and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in normal-hearing patients.

  8. Microtubule array reorientation in response to hormones does not involve changes in microtubule nucleation modes at the periclinal cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Samantha; Kirik, Angela; Kirik, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Aligned microtubule arrays spatially organize cell division, trafficking, and determine the direction of cell expansion in plant cells. In response to changes in environmental and developmental signals, cells reorganize their microtubule arrays into new configurations. Here, we tested the role of microtubule nucleation during hormone-induced microtubule array reorientation. We have found that in the process of microtubule array reorientation the ratios between branching, parallel, and de-novo nucleations remained constant, suggesting that the microtubule reorientation mechanism does not involve changes in nucleation modes. In the ton2/fass mutant, which has reduced microtubule branching nucleation frequency and decreased nucleation activity of the γ-tubulin complexes, microtubule arrays were able to reorient. Presented data suggest that reorientation of microtubules into transverse arrays in response to hormones does not involve changes in microtubule nucleation at the periclinal cell surface PMID:25135522

  9. Benazepril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor: drug interaction with salbutamol and bronchial response to histamine in normal subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, K. G.; Brunel, P.; Nell, G.; Quinn, G.; Kaik, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Aims To investigate the effect of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, benazepril, on pulmonary function. Methods We investigated the influence of benazepril, on lung function and the interaction with inhaled salbutamol (0.1 to 6.6 mg) and histamine (0.03 to 30.69 g l−1 ) in normal subjects. Benazepril 20 mg, salbutamol 8 mg, propranolol 160 mg, and placebo were given orally once daily over 10 days. Results On day 8, there was no difference in the area under the salbutamol dose-response curves between benazepril, placebo and oral salbutamol (P >0.05), propranolol shifted the curves to the right (Pbenazepril 1.04 (0.99–1.08), salbutamol 1.19 (1.13–1.25), propranolol 0.57 (0.50–0.65). Conclusions Benazepril had no influence on baseline lung function, caused no interaction with inhaled salbutamol and the bronchial response to histamine was similar to placebo. However, our findings in normal subjects cannot be extrapolated automatically to asthmatics. PMID:9431834

  10. Autonomous parvoviruses neither stimulate nor are inhibited by the type I interferon response in human normal or cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglino, Justin C; Andres, Wells; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2014-05-01

    Members of the genus Parvovirus are small, nonenveloped single-stranded DNA viruses that are nonpathogenic in humans but have potential utility as cancer therapeutics. Because the innate immune response to parvoviruses has received relatively little attention, we compared the response to parvoviruses to that of several other types of viruses in human cells. In normal human glia, fibroblasts, or melanocytes, vesicular stomatitis virus evoked robust beta interferon (IFN-β) responses. Cytomegalovirus, pseudorabies virus, and Sindbis virus all evoked a 2-log-unit or greater upregulation of IFN-β in glia; in contrast, LuIII and MVMp parvoviruses did not evoke a detectable IFN-β or interferon-stimulated gene (ISG; MX1, oligoadenylate synthetase [OAS], IFIT-1) response in the same cell types. The lack of response raised the question of whether parvoviral infection can be attenuated by IFN; interestingly, we found that IFN did not decrease parvovirus (MVMp, LuIII, and H-1) infectivity in normal human glia, fibroblasts, or melanocytes. The same was true in human cancers, including glioma, sarcoma, and melanoma. Similarly, IFN failed to attenuate transduction by the dependovirus vector adeno-associated virus type 2. Progeny production of parvoviruses was also unimpaired by IFN in both glioma and melanoma, whereas vesicular stomatitis virus replication was blocked. Sarcoma cells with upregulated IFN signaling that show high levels of resistance to other viruses showed strong infection by LuIII. Unlike many other oncolytic viruses, we found no evidence that impairment of innate immunity in cancer cells plays a role in the oncoselectivity of parvoviruses in human cells. Parvoviral resistance to the effects of IFN in cancer cells may constitute an advantage in the virotherapy of some tumors. Understanding the interactions between oncolytic viruses and the innate immune system will facilitate employing these viruses as therapeutic agents in cancer patients. The cancer

  11. Theory of magnetoelectric effect in multilayer nanocomposites on a substrate: Static bending-mode response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias C. Krantz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoelectric (ME coefficients for bending excitation in static magnetic fields and the bending response of multilayer composites with alternating magnetostrictive (MS and piezoelectric (PE layers on a substrate are investigated systematically. Theory and closed-form analytic solutions for the static magnetoelectric and the bending response coefficients are presented. Results of systematic variation of layer numbers, layer sequences, PE volume fractions, substrate thicknesses, and four different material systems (employing FeCoBSi, Terfenol-D, AlN, PZT, and Si are given for a fixed total composite thickness of 5μm. Among more than 105 structures investigated the greatest static ME coefficient of 62.3 V/cmOe is predicted for all odd layer number FeCoBSi-AlN multilayer composites on a Si substrate at vanishing substrate thickness and a PE material fraction of 38%. Varying the substrate thickness from 0μm to 20μm and the PE fraction from 0% to 100%, broad parameter regions of high ME coefficients are found for odd and large layer number nanocomposites. These regions are further enhanced to narrow maxima at vanishing substrate thickness, which correspond to structures of vanishing static bending response. For bilayers and even layer number cases broad maxima of the ME coefficient are observed at nonzero substrates and bending response. The optimal layer sequence and PE fraction depend on the material system. Bending response maxima occur at zero Si substrate thickness and nonzero PE fractions for bilayers. For multilayers nonzero Si substrates and zero PE fractions are found to be optimal. Structures of even ME layer numbers of PE-MS...Sub layer sequence display regions of vanishing bending response with large ME coefficients, i.e., produced by longitudinal excitation.

  12. Functional brain response to food images in successful adolescent weight losers compared with normal-weight and overweight controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Chad D; Kirwan, C Brock

    2015-03-01

    Research conducted with adults suggests that successful weight losers demonstrate greater activation in brain regions associated with executive control in response to viewing high-energy foods. No previous studies have examined these associations in adolescents. Functional neuroimaging was used to assess brain response to food images among groups of overweight (OW), normal-weight (NW), and successful weight-losing (SWL) adolescents. Eleven SWL, 12 NW, and 11 OW participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while viewing images of high- and low-energy foods. When viewing high-energy food images, SWLs demonstrated greater activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) compared with OW and NW controls. Compared with NW and SWL groups, OW individuals demonstrated greater activation in the ventral striatum and anterior cingulate in response to food images. Adolescent SWLs demonstrated greater neural activation in the DLPFC compared with OW/NW controls when viewing high-energy food stimuli, which may indicate enhanced executive control. OW individuals' brain responses to food stimuli may indicate greater reward incentive processes than either SWL or NW groups. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  13. Normative "Sexual" Knowledge and Critique as a Mode of Resistance--A Response to Damien Riggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kellie

    2013-01-01

    In this response to Damien Riggs' analysis of sex education websites, the author draws on Foucault's understanding of knowledge, power and governmentality to understand how some forms of knowledge about sex and sexuality become normalised "official knowledge" that frame institutional policies and practices and shape everyday discourses. Foucault…

  14. The National Response Plan and the Problems in the Evaluation and Assessment of the Unconventional Modes of Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMone, David V.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Winston, John W. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    terrorism would include such acts as: assassination, kidnapping, hostage taking, non-nuclear explosive devices, etc. The two NRP categories of catastrophic events and oil and hazardous materials contain sections considered to be in the area of conventional terrorism. Of potentially greater immediate concern are the four major modes of unconventional terrorism that are recognized: cyber-, biological (including agro-), chemical, and nuclear. The problem is to arrive at a mutually agreed upon order of importance of both conventional and unconventional terrorism categories. Consequent ranking of these modes enables the prioritization of those areas in which our limited national human and financial resources are to be expended and allocated (funding of research and development, commitment and selection of personnel, costs distribution, operational time-frame, information distribution level, etc.). Ranking of the terror modes will at best be difficult because of a lack of understanding of the potential impacts of each mode as well as the inherent vested bureaucratic and non-bureaucratic interests and biases. All cases of radiation-related incidents may be considered to be manmade with a potentially significant majority of those incidents assigned to a terrorism origin. Man-made accidental occurrences would be handled with a similar NRP response as would be expected in the case of a terrorist event. Radiation-related devices include the RDDs (Radioactive Dispersal Devices) and nuclear fission and fusion weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Pragmatically, the most likely scenario to develop would involve RDD utilization. This conclusion would seem to be reasonable in view of the current apparent capabilities and sophistication required to construct, transport, and deliver a nuclear WMD. (authors)

  15. Respiratory, cardiovascular and metabolic responses during different modes of overground bionic ambulation in persons with motor-incomplete spinal cord injury: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kressler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of overground bionic ambulation with variable assistance on cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses in persons with motor-incomplete spinal cord injury. Design: Case series. Subjects: Four participants with chronic, motor-incomplete spinal cord injury. Methods: Subjects completed a maximal graded exercise test on an arm-ergometer and 3 6-min bouts of overground bionic ambulation using different modes of assistance, i.e. Maximal, Adaptive, Fixed. Cardiorespiratory (oxygen consumption and metabolic (caloric expenditure and substrate utilization measures were taken using a mobile metabolic cart at each overground bionic ambulation assistance. Results: Cardiorespiratory responses ranged from low (24% VO2peak for the least impaired and fittest individual to supramaximal (124% VO2peak for the participant with the largest impairments and the lowest level of fitness. Different overground bionic ambulation assistive modes elicited small (3–8% VO2peak differences in cardiorespiratory responses for 3 participants. One participant had a large (28% VO2peak difference in cardiorespiratory responses to different modes of overground bionic ambulation. Metabolic responses mostly tracked closely with cardiorespiratory responses. Total energy expenditure ranged from 1.39 to 7.17 kcal/min. Fat oxidation ranged from 0.00 to 0.17 g/min across participants and different overground bionic ambulation modes. Conclusion: Overground bionic ambulation with variable assistance can substantially increase cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses; however, these responses vary widely across participants and overground bionic ambulation modes.

  16. 99mTc-sestamibi muscle scintigraphy to assess the response to neuromuscular electrical stimulation of normal quadriceps femoris muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekindil, Y.; Sarikaya, A.; Birtane, M.; Pekindil, G.; Salan, A.

    2001-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is widely used for improving muscle strength by simultaneous contraction in the prevention of muscle atrophy. Although there exist many clinical methods for evaluating the therapeutic response of muscles, 99m Tc-sestamibi which is a skeletal muscle perfusion and metabolism agent has not previously been used for this purpose. The aim of our work was to ascertain whether 99m Tc-sestamibi muscle scintigraphy is useful in the monitoring of therapeutic response to NMES in healthy women. The study included 16 women aged between 21 and 45, with a mean age of 32.7±6.4. Both quadriceps femoris muscles (QFM) of each patient were studied. After randomization to remove the effect of the dominant side, one QFM of each patient was subjected to the NMES procedure for a period of 20 days. NMES was performed with an alternating biphasic rectangular current, from a computed electrical stimulator daily for 23 minutes. After measurement of skinfold thickness over the thigh, pre- and post-NMES girth measurements were assessed in centimeters. Sixty minutes after injections of 555 MBq 99m Tc-sestamibi, static images of the thigh were obtained for 5 minutes. The thigh-to-knee uptake ratio was calculated by semiquantitative analysis and normalized to body surface area (NUR=normalized uptake ratio). The difference between the pre and post NMES NUR values was significant (1.76±0.31 versus 2.25±0.38, p=0.0000). The percentage (%) increase in NUR values also well correlated with the % increase in thigh girth measurements (r=0.89, p=0.0000). These results indicated that 99m Tc-sestamibi muscle scintigraphy as a new tool may be useful in evaluating therapeutic response to NMES. (author)

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of tarsal bone response to axial loading in patients with hallux valgus and normal feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota; Ikeda, Yasutoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Teramoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takuma; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2017-02-01

    Patients with hallux valgus present a variety of symptoms that may be related to the type of deformity. Weightbearing affects the deformities, and the evaluation of the load response of tarsal bones has been mainly performed using two-dimensional plane radiography. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare structural changes in the medial foot arch between patients with hallux valgus and normal controls using a computer image analysis technique and weightbearing computed tomography data. Eleven patients with hallux valgus and eleven normal controls were included. Computed tomograms were obtained with and without simulated weightbearing using a compression device. Computed tomography data were transferred into a personal computer, and a three-dimensional bone model was created using image analysis software. The load responses of each tarsal bone in the medial foot arch were measured three-dimensionally and statistically compared between the two groups. Displacement of each tarsal bone under two weightbearing conditions was visually observed by creating three-dimensional bone models. At the first metatarsophalangeal joint, the proximal phalanges of the hallux valgus group showed significantly different displacements in multiple directions. Moreover, opposite responses to axial loading were also observed in both translation and rotation between the two groups. Weightbearing caused deterioration of the hallux valgus deformity three-dimensionally at the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Information from the computer image analysis was useful for understanding details of the pathology of foot disorders related to the deformities or instability and may contribute to the development of effective conservative and surgical treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inference and Biogeochemical Response of Vertical Velocities inside a Mode Water Eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló-Llull, B.; Pallas Sanz, E.; Sangrà, P.

    2016-02-01

    With the aim to study the modulation of the biogeochemical fluxes by the ageostrophic secondary circulation in anticyclonic mesoscale eddies, a typical eddy of the Canary Eddy Corridor was interdisciplinary surveyed on September 2014 in the framework of the PUMP project. The eddy was elliptical shaped, 4 month old, 110 km diameter and 400 m depth. It was an intrathermocline type often also referred as mode water eddy type. We inferred the mesoscale vertical velocity field resolving a generalized omega equation from the 3D density and ADCP velocity fields of a five-day sampled CTD-SeaSoar regular grid centred on the eddy. The grid transects where 10 nautical miles apart. Although complex, in average, the inferred omega velocity field (hereafter w) shows a dipolar structure with downwelling velocities upstream of the propagation path (west) and upwelling velocities downstream. The w at the eddy center was zero and maximum values were located at the periphery attaining ca. 6 m day-1. Coinciding with the occurrence of the vertical velocities cells a noticeable enhancement of phytoplankton biomass was observed at the eddy periphery respect to the far field. A corresponding upward diapycnal flux of nutrients was also observed at the periphery. As minimum velocities where reached at the eddy center, lineal Ekman pumping mechanism was discarded. Minimum values of phytoplankton biomass where also observed at the eddy center. The possible mechanisms for such dipolar w cell are still being investigated, but an analysis of the generalized omega equation forcing terms suggest that it may be a combination of horizontal deformation and advection of vorticity by the ageostrophic current (related to nonlinear Ekman pumping). As expected for Trades, the wind was rather constant and uniform with a speed of ca. 5 m s-1. Diagnosed nonlinear Ekman pumping leaded also to a dipolar cell that mirrors the omega w dipolar cell.

  19. Mode of delivery affected questionnaire response rates in a birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Isabelle; Noble, Sian; Robinson, Ross; Molloy, Lynn; Tilling, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Cohort studies must collect data from their participants as economically as possible, while maintaining response rates. This randomized controlled trial investigated whether offering a choice of online or paper questionnaires resulted in improved response rates compared with offering online first. Eligible participants were young people in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) study (born April 1, 1991, to December 31, 1992, in the Avon area). After exclusions, 8,795 participants were randomized. The "online first" group were invited to complete the questionnaire online. The "choice" group were also sent a paper questionnaire and offered a choice of completion method. The trial was embedded within routine data collection. The main outcome measure was the number of questionnaires returned. Data on costs were also collected. Those in the "online first" arm of the trial were less likely to return a questionnaire [adjusted odds ratio: 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82, 0.99]. The "choice" arm was more expensive (mean difference per participant £0.71; 95% CI: £0.65, £0.76). It cost an extra £47 to have one extra person to complete the questionnaire in the "choice" arm. Offering a choice of completion methods (paper or online) for questionnaires in ALSPAC increased response rates but was more expensive than offering online first. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  1. Charge and pairing dynamics in the attractive Hubbard model: Mode coupling and the validity of linear-response theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünemann, Jörg; Seibold, Götz

    2017-12-01

    Pump-probe experiments have turned out as a powerful tool in order to study the dynamics of competing orders in a large variety of materials. The corresponding analysis of the data often relies on standard linear-response theory generalized to nonequilibrium situations. Here we examine the validity of such an approach for the charge and pairing response of systems with charge-density wave and (or) superconducting (SC) order. Our investigations are based on the attractive Hubbard model which we study within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation. In particular, we calculate the quench and pump-probe dynamics for SC and charge order parameters in order to analyze the frequency spectra and the coupling of the probe field to the specific excitations. Our calculations reveal that the "linear-response assumption" is justified for small to moderate nonequilibrium situations (i.e., pump pulses) in the case of a purely charge-ordered ground state. However, the pump-probe dynamics on top of a superconducting ground state is determined by phase and amplitude modes which get coupled far from the equilibrium state indicating the failure of the linear-response assumption.

  2. Nonlinear response of dense colloidal suspensions under oscillatory shear: mode-coupling theory and Fourier transform rheology experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brader, J M; Siebenbürger, M; Ballauff, M; Reinheimer, K; Wilhelm, M; Frey, S J; Weysser, F; Fuchs, M

    2010-12-01

    Using a combination of theory, experiment, and simulation we investigate the nonlinear response of dense colloidal suspensions to large amplitude oscillatory shear flow. The time-dependent stress response is calculated using a recently developed schematic mode-coupling-type theory describing colloidal suspensions under externally applied flow. For finite strain amplitudes the theory generates a nonlinear response, characterized by significant higher harmonic contributions. An important feature of the theory is the prediction of an ideal glass transition at sufficiently strong coupling, which is accompanied by the discontinuous appearance of a dynamic yield stress. For the oscillatory shear flow under consideration we find that the yield stress plays an important role in determining the nonlinearity of the time-dependent stress response. Our theoretical findings are strongly supported by both large amplitude oscillatory experiments (with Fourier transform rheology analysis) on suspensions of thermosensitive core-shell particles dispersed in water and Brownian dynamics simulations performed on a two-dimensional binary hard-disk mixture. In particular, theory predicts nontrivial values of the exponents governing the final decay of the storage and loss moduli as a function of strain amplitude which are in good agreement with both simulation and experiment. A consistent set of parameters in the presented schematic model achieves to jointly describe linear moduli, nonlinear flow curves, and large amplitude oscillatory spectroscopy.

  3. Revisiting the slow force response: the role of the PKG signaling pathway in the normal and the ischemic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Ferreira, Ricardo; Neves, João Sérgio; Ladeiras-Lopes, Ricardo; Leite-Moreira, André M; Neiva-Sousa, Manuel; Almeida-Coelho, João; Ferreira-Martins, João; F Leite-Moreira, Adelino

    2014-09-01

    The myocardial response to acute stretch consists of a two-phase increase in contractility: an acute increase by the Frank-Starling mechanism and a gradual and time-dependent increase in force generated known as the slow force response (SFR). The SFR is actively modulated by different signaling pathways, but the role of protein kinase G (PKG) signaling is unknown. In this study we aim to characterize the role of the PKG signaling pathway in the SFR under normal and ischemic conditions. Rabbit papillary muscles were stretched from 92 to 100% of maximum length (Lmax) under basal conditions, in the absence (1) or presence of: a PKG agonist (2) and a PKG inhibitor (3); under ischemic conditions in the absence (4) or presence of: a PKG agonist (5); a nitric oxide (NO) donor (6) and a phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor (7). Under normoxia, the SFR was significantly attenuated by inhibition of PKG and remained unaltered with PKG activation. Ischemia induced a progressive decrease in myocardial contractility after stretch. Neither the PKG agonist nor the NO donor altered the myocardial response to stretch under ischemic conditions. However, the use of a PDE5 inhibitor in ischemia partially reversed the progressive deterioration in contractility. PKG activity is essential for the SFR. During ischemia, a progressive decline in the force is observed in response to acute myocardial stretch. This dysfunctional response can be partially reversed by the use of PDE5 inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of an engineered heterologous antimicrobial peptide in potato alters plant development and mitigates normal abiotic and biotic responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K Goyal

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs are ubiquitous small proteins used by living cells to defend against a wide spectrum of pathogens. Their amphipathic property helps their interaction with negatively charged cellular membrane of the pathogen causing cell lysis and death. AMPs also modulate signaling pathway(s and cellular processes in animal models; however, little is known of cellular processes other than the pathogen-lysis phenomenon modulated by AMPs in plants. An engineered heterologous AMP, msrA3, expressed in potato was previously shown to cause resistance of the transgenic plants against selected fungal and bacterial pathogens. These lines together with the wild type were studied for growth habits, and for inducible defense responses during challenge with biotic (necrotroph Fusarium solani and abiotic stressors (dark-induced senescence, wounding and temperature stress. msrA3-expression not only conferred protection against F. solani but also delayed development of floral buds and prolonged vegetative phase. Analysis of select gene transcript profiles showed that the transgenic potato plants were suppressed in the hypersensitive (HR and reactive oxygen species (ROS responses to both biotic and abiotic stressors. Also, the transgenic leaves accumulated lesser amounts of the defense hormone jasmonic acid upon wounding with only a slight change in salicylic acid as compared to the wild type. Thus, normal host defense responses to the pathogen and abiotic stressors were mitigated by msrA3 expression suggesting MSRA3 regulates a common step(s of these response pathways. The stemming of the pathogen growth and mitigating stress response pathways likely contributes to resource reallocation for higher tuber yield.

  5. A Dose-Response Strategy Reveals Differences between Normal-Weight and Obese Men in Their Metabolic and Inflammatory Responses to a High-Fat Meal123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwander, Flurina; Kopf-Bolanz, Katrin A.; Buri, Caroline; Portmann, Reto; Egger, Lotti; Chollet, Magali; McTernan, Philip G.; Piya, Milan K.; Gijs, Martin A. M.; Vionnet, Nathalie; Pralong, François; Laederach, Kurt; Vergères, Guy

    2014-01-01

    A dose-response strategy may not only allow investigation of the impact of foods and nutrients on human health but may also reveal differences in the response of individuals to food ingestion based on their metabolic health status. In a randomized crossover study, we challenged 19 normal-weight (BMI: 20–25 kg/m2) and 18 obese (BMI: >30 kg/m2) men with 500, 1000, and 1500 kcal of a high-fat (HF) meal (60.5% energy from fat). Blood was taken at baseline and up to 6 h postprandially and analyzed for a range of metabolic, inflammatory, and hormonal variables, including plasma glucose, lipids, and C-reactive protein and serum insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and endotoxin. Insulin was the only variable that could differentiate the postprandial response of normal-weight and obese participants at each of the 3 caloric doses. A significant response of the inflammatory marker IL-6 was only observed in the obese group after ingestion of the HF meal containing 1500 kcal [net incremental AUC (iAUC) = 22.9 ± 6.8 pg/mL × 6 h, P = 0.002]. Furthermore, the net iAUC for triglycerides significantly increased from the 1000 to the 1500 kcal meal in the obese group (5.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 6.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.015) but not in the normal-weight group (4.3 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 4.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.31). We propose that caloric dose-response studies may contribute to a better understanding of the metabolic impact of food on the human organism. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01446068. PMID:24812072

  6. A dose-response strategy reveals differences between normal-weight and obese men in their metabolic and inflammatory responses to a high-fat meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwander, Flurina; Kopf-Bolanz, Katrin A; Buri, Caroline; Portmann, Reto; Egger, Lotti; Chollet, Magali; McTernan, Philip G; Piya, Milan K; Gijs, Martin A M; Vionnet, Nathalie; Pralong, François; Laederach, Kurt; Vergères, Guy

    2014-10-01

    A dose-response strategy may not only allow investigation of the impact of foods and nutrients on human health but may also reveal differences in the response of individuals to food ingestion based on their metabolic health status. In a randomized crossover study, we challenged 19 normal-weight (BMI: 20-25 kg/m(2)) and 18 obese (BMI: >30 kg/m(2)) men with 500, 1000, and 1500 kcal of a high-fat (HF) meal (60.5% energy from fat). Blood was taken at baseline and up to 6 h postprandially and analyzed for a range of metabolic, inflammatory, and hormonal variables, including plasma glucose, lipids, and C-reactive protein and serum insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and endotoxin. Insulin was the only variable that could differentiate the postprandial response of normal-weight and obese participants at each of the 3 caloric doses. A significant response of the inflammatory marker IL-6 was only observed in the obese group after ingestion of the HF meal containing 1500 kcal [net incremental AUC (iAUC) = 22.9 ± 6.8 pg/mL × 6 h, P = 0.002]. Furthermore, the net iAUC for triglycerides significantly increased from the 1000 to the 1500 kcal meal in the obese group (5.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 6.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.015) but not in the normal-weight group (4.3 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 4.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.31). We propose that caloric dose-response studies may contribute to a better understanding of the metabolic impact of food on the human organism. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01446068. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. The Role of E-Mail Communications in Determining Response Rates and Mode of Participation in a Mixed-Mode Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernat, Alexandru; Lynn, Peter

    2018-01-01

    This article is concerned with the extent to which the propensity to participate in a web face-to-face sequential mixed-mode survey is influenced by the ability to communicate with sample members by e-mail in addition to mail. Researchers may be able to collect e-mail addresses for sample members and to use them subsequently to send survey…

  8. A novel mode of induction of the humoral innate immune response in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kenmoku

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila adults have been utilized as a genetically tractable model organism to decipher the molecular mechanisms of humoral innate immune responses. In an effort to promote the utility of Drosophila larvae as an additional model system, in this study, we describe a novel aspect of an induction mechanism for innate immunity in these larvae. By using a fine tungsten needle created for manipulating semi-conductor devices, larvae were subjected to septic injury. However, although Toll pathway mutants were susceptible to infection with Gram-positive bacteria as had been shown for Drosophila adults, microbe clearance was not affected in the mutants. In addition, Drosophila larvae were found to be sensitive to mechanical stimuli with respect to the activation of a sterile humoral response. In particular, pinching with forceps to a degree that might cause minor damage to larval tissues could induce the expression of the antifungal peptide gene Drosomycin; notably, this induction was partially independent of the Toll and immune deficiency pathways. We therefore propose that Drosophila larvae might serve as a useful model to analyze the infectious and non-infectious inflammation that underlies various inflammatory diseases such as ischemia, atherosclerosis and cancer.

  9. Numerical Study on Dynamic Response of a Horizontal Layered-Structure Rock Slope under a Normally Incident Sv Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifa Zhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Several post-earthquake investigations have indicated that the slope structure plays a leading role in the stability of rock slopes under dynamic loads. In this paper, the dynamic response of a horizontal layered-structure rock slope under harmonic Sv wave is studied by making use of the Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua method (FLAC. The suitability of FLAC for studying wave transmission across rock joints is validated through comparison with analytical solutions. After parametric studies on Sv wave transmission across the horizontal layered-structure rock slope, it is found that the acceleration amplification coefficient η, which is defined as the ratio of the acceleration at the monitoring point to the value at the toe, wavily increases with an increase of the height along the slope surface. Meanwhile, the fluctuation weakens with normalized joint stiffness K increasing and enhances with normalized joint spacing ξ increasing. The acceleration amplification coefficient of the slope crest ηcrest does not monotonously increase with the increase of ξ, but decreases with the increase of K. Additionally, ηcrest is more sensitive to ξ compared to K. From the contour figures, it can also be found that the contour figures of η take on rhythm, and the effects of ξ on the acceleration amplification coefficient are more obvious compared to the effects on K.

  10. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m =1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G ˜1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller ˜50μs is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G ˜10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  11. Focusing the HIV response through estimating the major modes of HIV transmission: a multi-country analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouws, Eleanor; Cuchi, Paloma

    2012-01-01

    Objective An increasing number of countries have been estimating the distribution of new adult HIV infections by modes of transmission (MOT) to help prioritise prevention efforts. We compare results from studies conducted between 2008 and 2012 and discuss their use for planning and responding to the HIV epidemic. Methods The UNAIDS recommended MOT model helps countries to estimate the proportion of new HIV infections that occur through key transmission modes including sex work, injecting drug use (IDU), men having sex with men (MSM), multiple sexual partnerships, stable relationships and medical interventions. The model typically forms part of a country-led process that includes a comprehensive review of epidemiological data. Recent revisions to the model are described. Results Modelling results from 25 countries show large variation between and within regions. In sub-Saharan Africa, new infections occur largely in the general heterosexual population because of multiple partnerships or in stable discordant relationships, while sex work contributes significantly to new infections in West Africa. IDU and sex work are the main contributors to new infections in the Middle East and North Africa, with MSM the main contributor in Latin America. Patterns vary substantially between countries in Eastern Europe and Asia in terms of the relative contribution of sex work, MSM, IDU and spousal transmission. Conclusions The MOT modelling results, comprehensive review and critical assessment of data in a country can contribute to a more strategically focused HIV response. To strengthen this type of research, improved epidemiological and behavioural data by risk population are needed. PMID:23172348

  12. Role of closely spaced modes in the seismic response of equipment and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, F.C.

    1975-01-01

    The genesis for this study was a need for an explanation of how to combine the peak accelerations, displacements, stresses, etc., which result from a response spectrum analysis of nuclear power plant structures and equipment. The explanation was intended to be comprehensive in the sense that it would be based on a general principle from which the absolute sum, square root of the sum of the squares (SRSS), and double-sum modal recombination rules could be extracted as special cases. The purpose of such a comprehensive explanation was to convince design engineers that these rules, in particular the recently proposed double-sum rule, were logical in their formulation and therefore sensible in their application

  13. Indentation induced mechanical and electrical response in ferroelectric crystal investigated by acoustic mode AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H. F.; Zeng, H. R.; Ma, X. D.; Chu, R. Q.; Li, G. R.; Luo, H. S.; Yin, Q. R.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical response of Pb (Mg1/3Nb2/3)- O3-PbTiO3 single crystals to micro-indentation are investigated using the newly developed low frequency scanning probe acoustic microscopy which is based on the atomic force microscope. There are three ways to release the stress produced by indentation. Plastic deformation emerged directly underneath the indentor and along the indentation diagonals. In addition, indentation-induced micro-cracks and new non-180° domain structures which are perpendicular to each other are also observed in the indented surface. Based on the experimental results, the relationship between the cracks and the domain patterns was discussed.

  14. Intrinsic pressure response of a single mode cyclo olefin polymer fiber bragg grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Kristian Mølgaard; Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    and relative humidity the pressure calibration is performed in a gas free environment with the FBG submerged in water. As a result of the incompressible nature of water no temperature effects due to rapid pressure changes are observed. We find a highly linear, hysteresis-free response with a sensitivity of 2.......982 ± 0.002 pm/bar. The corresponding fractional sensitivity is found to be 34.5·10-6 MPa-1 which is of the same order of magnitude as the results obtained for a multimode PMMA mPOF-FBG at 1562 nm previously reported in the literature. The resulting pressure resolution of our sensor is estimated to be 2...

  15. Rapid-Response or Repeat-Mode Topography from Aerial Structure from Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, E.; Johnson, K. L.; Fitzgerald, F. S.; Morgan, M.; White, J.

    2014-12-01

    This decade has seen a surge of interest in Structure-from-Motion (SfM) as a means of generating high-resolution topography and coregistered texture maps from stereo digital photographs. Using an unstructured set of overlapping photographs captured from multiple viewpoints and minimal GPS ground control, SfM solves simultaneously for scene topography and camera positions, orientations and lens parameters. The use of cheap unmanned aerial vehicles or tethered helium balloons as camera platforms expedites data collection and overcomes many of the cost, time and logistical limitations of LiDAR surveying, making it a potentially valuable tool for rapid response mapping and repeat monitoring applications. We begin this presentation by assessing what data resolutions and precisions are achievable using a simple aerial camera platform and commercial SfM software (we use the popular Agisoft Photoscan package). SfM point clouds generated at two small (~0.1 km2), sparsely-vegetated field sites in California compare favorably with overlapping airborne and terrestrial LiDAR surveys, with closest point distances of a few centimeters between the independent datasets. Next, we go on to explore the method in more challenging conditions, in response to a major landslide in Mesa County, Colorado, on 25th May 2014. Photographs collected from a small UAV were used to generate a high-resolution model of the 4.5 x 1 km landslide several days before an airborne LiDAR survey could be organized and flown. An initial estimate of the mass balance of the landslide could quickly be made by differencing this model against pre-event topography generated using stereo photographs collected in 2009 as part of the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP). This case study therefore demonstrates the rich potential offered by this technique, as well as some of the challenges, particularly with respect to the treatment of vegetation.

  16. Response mode, compatibility, and dual-processes in the evaluation of simple gambles: An eye-tracking investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Slovic

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We employed simple gambles to investigate information processing in relation to the compatibility effect. Subjects should be more likely to engage in a deliberative thinking strategy when completing a pricing task rather than a rating task. We used eye-tracking methodology to measure information acquisition and processing in order to test the above hypothesis as well as to show that losses and alternatives with uncertain outcomes are more likely than gains and alternatives with sure outcomes to be processed through a deliberative thinking process. Results showed that pupil dilations, fixation duration and number of fixations increased when subjects evaluated the gambles with a pricing task. Additionally, the number of fixations increased as the gamble outcome became increasingly negative and when the outcome was uncertain (vs. sure. Fixations were also predictive of subjects' final evaluations of the gambles. We discuss our results in light of the cognitive processes underlying different response modes in economic preferences.

  17. Urethane anesthesia depresses activities of thalamocortical neurons and alters its response to nociception in terms of dual firing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeowool eHuh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics are often used to characterize the activity of single neurons in-vivo for its advantages such as reduced noise level and convenience in noxious stimulations. Of the anesthetics, urethane had been widely used in some thalamic studies under the assumption that sensory signals are still relayed to the thalamus under urethane anesthesia and that thalamic response would therefore reflect the response of the awake state. We tested whether this assumption stands by comparing thalamic activity in terms of tonic and burst firing modes during ‘the awake state’ or under ‘urethane anesthesia’ utilizing the extracellular single unit recording technique. First we have tested how thalamic relay neurons respond to the introduction of urethane and then tested how urethane influences thalamic discharges under formalin-induced nociception. Urethane significantly depressed overall firing rates of thalamic relay neurons, which was sustained despite the delayed increase of burst activity over the 4 hour recording period. Thalamic response to nociception under anesthesia was also similar overall except for the slight and transient increase of burst activity. Overall, results demonstrated that urethane suppresses the activity of thalamic relay neurons and that, despite the slight fluctuation of burst firing, formalin-induced nociception cannot significantly change the firing pattern of thalamic relay neurons that was caused by urethane.

  18. Dark current studies on a normal-conducting high-brightness very-high-frequency electron gun operating in continuous wave mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on measurements and analysis of a field-emitted electron current in the very-high-frequency (VHF gun, a room temperature rf gun operating at high field and continuous wave (CW mode at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL. The VHF gun is the core of the Advanced Photo-injector Experiment (APEX at LBNL, geared toward the development of an injector for driving the next generation of high average power x-ray free electron lasers. High accelerating fields at the cathode are necessary for the high-brightness performance of an electron gun. When coupled with CW operation, such fields can generate a significant amount of field-emitted electrons that can be transported downstream the accelerator forming the so-called “dark current.” Elevated levels of a dark current can cause radiation damage, increase the heat load in the downstream cryogenic systems, and ultimately limit the overall performance and reliability of the facility. We performed systematic measurements that allowed us to characterize the field emission from the VHF gun, determine the location of the main emitters, and define an effective strategy to reduce and control the level of dark current at APEX. Furthermore, the energy spectra of isolated sources have been measured. A simple model for energy data analysis was developed that allows one to extract information on the emitter from a single energy distribution measurement.

  19. Engaging in an experiential processing mode increases positive emotional response during recall of pleasant autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadeikis, Darius; Bos, Nikita; Schweizer, Susanne; Murphy, Fionnuala; Dunn, Barnaby

    2017-05-01

    It is important to identify effective emotion regulation strategies to increase positive emotion experience in the general population and in clinical conditions characterized by anhedonia. There are indications that engaging in experiential processing (direct awareness of sensory and bodily experience) bolsters positive emotion experience but this has not been extensively tested during memory recall. To further test this notion, 99 community participants recalled two positive autobiographical memories. Prior to the second recall, participants either underwent an experiential, analytical, or distraction induction (n = 33 per condition). Subjective happiness and sadness ratings and heart rate variability (HRV) response were measured during each recall. Greater spontaneous use of experiential processing during the first memory was associated with greater happiness experience, but was unrelated to HRV and sadness experience. Inducing experiential processing increased happiness experience relative to both the analytical and distraction conditions (but had no impact on sadness experience). There was a significant difference in HRV between conditions. The experiential condition led to a trend-significant increase, and the other conditions a non-significant decrease, in HRV from the first to the second memory. These results suggest that engaging in experiential processing is an effective way to up-regulate positive emotion experience during positive memory recall. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations of higher mode effects on seismic inelastic response of reinforced concrete shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanirenani, Iman

    This thesis presents two experimental programs together with companion numerical studies that were carried out on reinforced concrete shear walls: static tests and dynamic (shake table) tests. The first series of experiments were monotonic and cyclic quasi-static testing on ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The tests were carried out on full-scale and 1:2.37 reduced scale wall specimens to evaluate the seismic design provisions and similitude law and determine the appropriate scaling factor that could be applied for further studies such as dynamic tests. The second series of experiments were shake table tests conducted on two identical 1:2.33 scaled, 8-storey moderately ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens to investigate the effects of higher modes on the inelastic response of slender walls under high frequency ground motions expected in Eastern North America. The walls were designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The objectives were to validate and understand the inelastic response and interaction of shear, flexure and axial loads in plastic hinge zones of the walls considering the higher mode effects and to investigate the formation of second hinge in upper part of the wall due to higher mode responses. Second mode response significantly affected the response of the walls. This caused inelastic flexural response to develop at the 6th level with approximately the same rotation ductility compared to that observed at the base. Dynamic amplification of the base shear forces was also observed in both walls. Numerical modeling of these two shake table tests was performed to evaluate the test results and validate current modeling approaches. Nonlinear time history analyses were carried out by the reinforced concrete fibre element (OpenSees program) and finite element (VecTor2 program

  1. Changes in phosphatidylcholine fatty acid composition are associated with altered skeletal muscle insulin responsiveness in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clore, J N; Harris, P A; Li, J; Azzam, A; Gill, R; Zuelzer, W; Rizzo, W B; Blackard, W G

    2000-02-01

    The fatty acid composition of skeletal muscle cell membrane phospholipids (PLs) is known to influence insulin responsiveness in man. We have recently shown that the fatty acid composition of phosphatidylcholine (PC), and not phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), from skeletal muscle membranes is of particular importance in this relationship. Efforts to alter the PL fatty acid composition in animal models have demonstrated induction of insulin resistance. However, it has been more difficult to determine if changes in insulin sensitivity are associated with changes in the skeletal muscle membrane fatty acid composition of PL in man. Using nicotinic acid (NA), an agent known to induce insulin resistance in man, 9 normal subjects were studied before and after treatment for 1 month. Skeletal muscle membrane fatty acid composition of PC and PE from biopsies of vastus lateralis was correlated with insulin responsiveness using a 3-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Treatment with NA was associated with a 25% increase in the half-maximal insulin concentration ([ED50] 52.0 +/- 7.5 to 64.6 +/- 9.0 microU/mL, P insulin sensitivity. Significant changes in the fatty acid composition of PC, but not PE, were also observed after NA administration. An increase in the percentage of 16:0 (21% +/- 0.3% to 21.7% +/- 0.4%, P insulin resistance with NA is associated with changes in the fatty acid composition of PC in man.

  2. Prolactin-sensitive neurons express estrogen receptor-α and depend on sex hormones for normal responsiveness to prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furigo, Isadora C; Kim, Ki Woo; Nagaishi, Vanessa S; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M; de Alencar, Amanda; Pedroso, João A B; Metzger, Martin; Donato, Jose

    2014-05-30

    Estrogens and prolactin share important target tissues, including the gonads, brain, liver, kidneys and some types of cancer cells. Herein, we sought anatomical and functional evidence of possible crosstalk between prolactin and estrogens in the mouse brain. First, we determined the distribution of prolactin-responsive neurons that express the estrogen receptor α (ERα). A large number of prolactin-induced pSTAT5-immunoreactive neurons expressing ERα mRNA were observed in several brain areas, including the anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventrolateral subdivision of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), medial nucleus of the amygdala and nucleus of the solitary tract. However, although the medial preoptic area, periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, retrochiasmatic area, dorsomedial subdivision of the VMH, lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus and ventral premammillary nucleus contained significant numbers of prolactin-responsive neurons, these areas showed very few pSTAT5-immunoreactive cells expressing ERα mRNA. Second, we evaluated prolactin sensitivity in ovariectomized mice and observed that sex hormones are required for a normal responsiveness to prolactin as ovariectomized mice showed a lower number of prolactin-induced pSTAT5 immunoreactive neurons in all analyzed brain nuclei compared to gonad-intact females. In addition, we performed hypothalamic gene expression analyses to determine possible post-ovariectomy changes in components of prolactin signaling. We observed no significant changes in the mRNA expression of prolactin receptor, STAT5a or STAT5b. In summary, sex hormones exert a permissive role in maintaining the brain's prolactin sensitivity, most likely through post-transcriptional mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The quest for predicting sustained shunt response in normal pressure hydrocephalus: an analysis of the callosal angle's utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahnke, Kurt; Jusue-Torres, Ignacio; Szujewski, Caroline; Joyce, Cara; Schneck, Michael; Prabhu, Vikram; Anderson, Douglas

    2018-04-30

    Diagnosing normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and selecting patients who will experience a sustained benefit from fluid diversion surgery remains challenging. This study seeks to evaluate the association between the callosal angle (CA) and the long-term post-operative response to ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) surgery in a different subgroup population than previously studied to assess its generalizability. We studied 73 patients with idiopathic NPH who underwent VPS surgery and had at least 18 months of follow-up between 2000-2016. We recorded their pre and postoperative symptoms according to the NPH Eide scale and their comorbidities with the Kiefer index. Their CA, as well as Evan's Index, ventricular height, and transependymal signal were measured. Multivariable statistical models were used to determine which factors were associated with postoperative improvement, while controlling for the presence of the NPH triad. Fifty-nine patients (82%) demonstrated a successful response to surgery at their first postoperative follow-up. However, this declined to 54 patients (75%) at one year and 45 (62.5%) patients at their last follow-up. When controlling for the presence of the triad of symptoms, the CA significantly predicted a good, sustained response to surgery; for every degree decrease in the CA, a patient is 4% more likely to experience benefit from surgery. The CA is a useful preoperative prognostic tool for predicting which patients will experience a sustained benefit from surgery. Further studies are required to clarify this disease in the context of old age, comorbidity, and possible concomitant neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypothalamic amenorrhea with normal body weight: ACTH, allopregnanolone and cortisol responses to corticotropin-releasing hormone test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meczekalski, B; Tonetti, A; Monteleone, P; Bernardi, F; Luisi, S; Stomati, M; Luisi, M; Petraglia, F; Genazzani, A R

    2000-03-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) is a functional disorder caused by disturbances in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulsatility. The mechanism by which stress alters GnRH release is not well known. Recently, the role of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and neurosteroids in the pathophysiology of HA has been considered. The aim of the present study was to explore further the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in HA. We included 8 patients (aged 23.16+/-1.72 years) suffering from hypothalamic stress-related amenorrhea with normal body weight and 8 age-matched healthy controls in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. We measured basal serum levels of FSH, LH, and estradiol and evaluated ACTH, allopregnanolone and cortisol responses to CRH test in both HA patients and healthy women. Serum basal levels of FSH, LH, and estradiol as well as basal levels of allopregnanolone were significantly lower in HA patients than in controls (P<0.001) while basal ACTH and cortisol levels were significantly higher in amenorrheic patients with respect to controls (P<0.001). The response (area under the curve) of ACTH, allopregnanolone and cortisol to CRH was significantly lower in amenorrheic women compared with controls (P<0.001, P<0.05, P<0.05 respectively). In conclusion, women with HA, despite the high ACTH and cortisol levels and, therefore, hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity, are characterized by low allopregnanolone basal levels, deriving from an impairment of both adrenal and ovarian synthesis. The blunted ACTH, allopregnanolone and cortisol responses to CRH indicate that, in hypothalamic amenorrhea, there is a reduced sensitivity and expression of CRH receptor. These results open new perspectives on the role of neurosteroids in the pathogenesis of hypothalamic amenorrhea.

  5. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin

    2015-01-01

    tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further...... increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed...... to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth....

  6. Implementation and analysis of list mode algorithm using tubes of response on a dedicated brain and breast PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner, L.; Correcher, C.; González, A. J.; Conde, P.; Hernández, L.; Orero, A.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M. J.; Sánchez, F.; Soriano, A.; Vidal, L. F.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2013-02-01

    In this work we present an innovative algorithm for the reconstruction of PET images based on the List-Mode (LM) technique which improves their spatial resolution compared to results obtained with current MLEM algorithms. This study appears as a part of a large project with the aim of improving diagnosis in early Alzheimer disease stages by means of a newly developed hybrid PET-MR insert. At the present, Alzheimer is the most relevant neurodegenerative disease and the best way to apply an effective treatment is its early diagnosis. The PET device will consist of several monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to SiPM detectors. Monolithic crystals can reduce scanner costs with the advantage to enable implementation of very small virtual pixels in their geometry. This is especially useful for LM reconstruction algorithms, since they do not need a pre-calculated system matrix. We have developed an LM algorithm which has been initially tested with a large aperture (186 mm) breast PET system. Such an algorithm instead of using the common lines of response, incorporates a novel calculation of tubes of response. The new approach improves the volumetric spatial resolution about a factor 2 at the border of the field of view when compared with traditionally used MLEM algorithm. Moreover, it has also shown to decrease the image noise, thus increasing the image quality.

  7. Implementation and analysis of list mode algorithm using tubes of response on a dedicated brain and breast PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moliner, L.; Correcher, C.; González, A.J.; Conde, P.; Hernández, L.; Orero, A.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M.J.; Sánchez, F.; Soriano, A.; Vidal, L.F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an innovative algorithm for the reconstruction of PET images based on the List-Mode (LM) technique which improves their spatial resolution compared to results obtained with current MLEM algorithms. This study appears as a part of a large project with the aim of improving diagnosis in early Alzheimer disease stages by means of a newly developed hybrid PET-MR insert. At the present, Alzheimer is the most relevant neurodegenerative disease and the best way to apply an effective treatment is its early diagnosis. The PET device will consist of several monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to SiPM detectors. Monolithic crystals can reduce scanner costs with the advantage to enable implementation of very small virtual pixels in their geometry. This is especially useful for LM reconstruction algorithms, since they do not need a pre-calculated system matrix. We have developed an LM algorithm which has been initially tested with a large aperture (186 mm) breast PET system. Such an algorithm instead of using the common lines of response, incorporates a novel calculation of tubes of response. The new approach improves the volumetric spatial resolution about a factor 2 at the border of the field of view when compared with traditionally used MLEM algorithm. Moreover, it has also shown to decrease the image noise, thus increasing the image quality

  8. MO-DE-303-03: Session on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S.

    2015-01-01

    This session will focus on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy. This is a technically challenging method to translate to practice in radiation therapy. In the new era of precision medicine, however, delivering the right treatment, to the right patient, and at the right time, can positively impact treatment choices and patient outcomes. Quantitative imaging provides the spatial sensitivity required by radiation therapy for precision medicine that is not available by other means. In this Joint ESTRO -AAPM Symposium, three leading-edge investigators will present specific motivations for quantitative imaging biomarkers in radiation therapy of esophageal, head and neck, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Experiences with the use of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion- weighted (DW) MRI, PET/CT, and SPECT/CT will be presented. Issues covered will include: response prediction, dose-painting, timing between therapy and imaging, within-therapy biomarkers, confounding effects, normal tissue sparing, dose-response modeling, and association with clinical biomarkers and outcomes. Current information will be presented from investigational studies and clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Learn motivations for the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of response to radiation therapy Review the potential areas of application in cancer therapy Examine the challenges for translation, including imaging confounds and paucity of evidence to date Compare exemplary examples of the current state of the art in DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging for assessment of response to radiation therapy Van der Heide: Research grants from the Dutch Cancer Society and the European Union (FP7) Bowen: RSNA Scholar grant

  9. MO-DE-303-03: Session on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, S. [University of Washington, School of Medicine: PET/CT and SPECT/CT for Lung and Liver Radiation Therapy Response Assessment of Tumor and Normal Tissue (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This session will focus on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy. This is a technically challenging method to translate to practice in radiation therapy. In the new era of precision medicine, however, delivering the right treatment, to the right patient, and at the right time, can positively impact treatment choices and patient outcomes. Quantitative imaging provides the spatial sensitivity required by radiation therapy for precision medicine that is not available by other means. In this Joint ESTRO -AAPM Symposium, three leading-edge investigators will present specific motivations for quantitative imaging biomarkers in radiation therapy of esophageal, head and neck, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Experiences with the use of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion- weighted (DW) MRI, PET/CT, and SPECT/CT will be presented. Issues covered will include: response prediction, dose-painting, timing between therapy and imaging, within-therapy biomarkers, confounding effects, normal tissue sparing, dose-response modeling, and association with clinical biomarkers and outcomes. Current information will be presented from investigational studies and clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Learn motivations for the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of response to radiation therapy Review the potential areas of application in cancer therapy Examine the challenges for translation, including imaging confounds and paucity of evidence to date Compare exemplary examples of the current state of the art in DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging for assessment of response to radiation therapy Van der Heide: Research grants from the Dutch Cancer Society and the European Union (FP7) Bowen: RSNA Scholar grant.

  10. Responses and mechanisms of positive electron affinity molecules in the N2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector and the electron-capture detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    Very little knowledge has been acquired in the past on the mechanistic pathway by which molecules respond in the N 2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector. An attempt is made here to elucidate the response mechanism of the detector. The basic response mechanisms are known for the electron capture detector, and an attempt is made to identify the certain mechanism by which selected molecules respond. The resonance electron capture rate constant has been believed to be temperature independent, and investigations of the temperature dependence of electron capture responses are presented. Mechanisms for the N 2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector have been proposed by examining the detector response to positive electron affinity molecules and by measurement of the ions produced by the detector. Electron capture mechanisms for selected molecules have been proposed by examining their temperature dependent responses in the electron capture detector and negative ion mass spectra of the samples. In studies of the resonance electron capture rate constant, the relative responses of selected positive electron affinity molecules and their temperature dependent responses were investigated. Positive electron affinity did not guarantee large responses in the N 2 mode thermionic ionization detector. High mass ions were measured following ionization of samples in the detector. Responses in the electron capture detector varied with temperature and electron affinity

  11. MO-DE-207A-09: Low-Dose CT Image Reconstruction Via Learning From Different Patient Normal-Dose Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, H; Xing, L [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Liang, Z [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel low-dose CT (LdCT) image reconstruction strategy for lung CT imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: The proposed approach consists of four steps: (1) use the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) method to reconstruct the LdCT image; (2) calculate structure similarity (SSIM) index between the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image and a set of normal-dose CT (NdCT) images, and select the NdCT image with the highest SSIM as the learning source; (3) segment the NdCT source image into lung and outside tissue regions via simple thresholding, and adopt multiple linear regression to learn high-order Markov random field (MRF) pattern for each tissue region in the NdCT source image; (4) segment the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image into lung and outside regions as well, and apply the learnt MRF prior in each tissue region for statistical iterative reconstruction of the LdCT image following the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) framework. Quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local binary pattern (LBP) and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) metrics. Results: It was observed that lung and outside tissue regions have different MRF patterns predicted from the NdCT. Visual inspection showed that our method obviously outperformed the traditional FBP method. Comparing with the region-smoothing PWLS method, our method has, in average, 13% increase in SNR, 15% decrease in LBP difference, and 12% decrease in HOG difference from reference standard for all regions of interest, which indicated the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of image resolution and texture preservation. Conclusion: We proposed a novel LdCT image reconstruction method by learning similar image characteristics from a set of NdCT images, and the to-be-learnt NdCT image does not need to be scans from the same subject. This approach is particularly important for enhancing image quality in radiation therapy.

  12. MO-DE-207A-09: Low-Dose CT Image Reconstruction Via Learning From Different Patient Normal-Dose Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H; Xing, L; Liang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a novel low-dose CT (LdCT) image reconstruction strategy for lung CT imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: The proposed approach consists of four steps: (1) use the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) method to reconstruct the LdCT image; (2) calculate structure similarity (SSIM) index between the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image and a set of normal-dose CT (NdCT) images, and select the NdCT image with the highest SSIM as the learning source; (3) segment the NdCT source image into lung and outside tissue regions via simple thresholding, and adopt multiple linear regression to learn high-order Markov random field (MRF) pattern for each tissue region in the NdCT source image; (4) segment the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image into lung and outside regions as well, and apply the learnt MRF prior in each tissue region for statistical iterative reconstruction of the LdCT image following the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) framework. Quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local binary pattern (LBP) and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) metrics. Results: It was observed that lung and outside tissue regions have different MRF patterns predicted from the NdCT. Visual inspection showed that our method obviously outperformed the traditional FBP method. Comparing with the region-smoothing PWLS method, our method has, in average, 13% increase in SNR, 15% decrease in LBP difference, and 12% decrease in HOG difference from reference standard for all regions of interest, which indicated the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of image resolution and texture preservation. Conclusion: We proposed a novel LdCT image reconstruction method by learning similar image characteristics from a set of NdCT images, and the to-be-learnt NdCT image does not need to be scans from the same subject. This approach is particularly important for enhancing image quality in radiation therapy.

  13. Attenuation of the pressor response to exogenous angiotensin by angiotensin receptor blockers and benazepril hydrochloride in clinically normal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Tiffany L; Coleman, Amanda E; Schmiedt, Chad W; Brown, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    To compare the attenuation of the angiotensin I-induced blood pressure response by once-daily oral administration of various doses of angiotensin receptor blockers (irbesartan, telmisartan, and losartan), benazepril hydrochloride, or lactose monohydrate (placebo) for 8 days in clinically normal cats. 6 healthy cats (approx 17 months old) with surgically implanted arterial telemetric blood pressure-measuring catheters. Cats were administered orally the placebo or each of the drug treatments (benazepril [2.5 mg/cat], irbesartan [6 and 10 mg/kg], telmisartan [0.5, 1, and 3 mg/kg], and losartan [2.5 mg/kg]) once daily for 8 days in a crossover study. Approximately 90 minutes after capsule administration on day 8, each cat was anesthetized and arterial blood pressure measurements were recorded before and after IV administration of each of 4 boluses of angiotensin I (20, 100, 500, and 1,000 ng/kg). This protocol was repeated 24 hours after benazepril treatment and telmisartan (3 mg/kg) treatment. Differences in the angiotensin I-induced change in systolic arterial blood pressure (ΔSBP) among treatments were determined. At 90 minutes after capsule administration, only losartan did not significantly reduce ΔSBP in response to the 3 higher angiotensin doses, compared with placebo. Among drug treatments, telmisartan (3 mg/kg dosage) attenuated ΔSBP to a significantly greater degree than benazepril and all other treatments. At 24 hours, telmisartan was more effective than benazepril (mean ± SEM ΔSBP, 15.7 ± 1.9 mm Hg vs 55.9 ± 12.42 mm Hg, respectively). Results indicated that telmisartan administration may have advantages over benazepril administration for cats with renal or cardiovascular disease.

  14. Ventromedial hypothalamic expression of Bdnf is required to establish normal patterns of afferent GABAergic connectivity and responses to hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kamitakahara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH controls energy and glucose homeostasis through direct connections to a distributed network of nuclei in the hypothalamus, midbrain, and hindbrain. Structural changes in VMH circuit morphology have the potential to alter VMH function throughout life, however, molecular signals responsible for specifying its neural connections are not fully defined. The VMH contains a high density of neurons that express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a potent neurodevelopmental effector known to regulate neuronal survival, growth, differentiation, and connectivity in a number of neural systems. In the current study, we examined whether BDNF impacts the afferent and efferent connections of the VMH, as well as energy homeostatic function. Methods: To determine if BDNF is required for VMH circuit formation, a transgenic mouse model was used to conditionally delete Bdnf from steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1 expressing neurons of the VMH prior to the onset of establishing neural connections with other regions. Projections of SF1 expressing neurons were visualized with a genetically targeted fluorescent label and immunofluorescence was used to measure the density of afferents to SF1 neurons in the absence of BDNF. Physiological changes in body weight and circulating blood glucose were also evaluated in the mutant mice. Results: Our findings suggest that BDNF is required to establish normal densities of GABAergic afferents onto SF1 neurons located in the ventrolateral part of the VMH. Furthermore, loss of BDNF from VMH SF1 neurons results in impaired physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that BDNF is required for formation and/or maintenance of inhibitory inputs to SF1 neurons, with enduring effects on glycemic control. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: Ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus

  15. The effect of palm oil, lard, and puff-pastry margarine on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in normal-weight and obese young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J; Bysted, A; Dawids, S; Hermansen, K; Hølmer, G

    1999-12-01

    Only a few studies have been published on the postprandial effects of different fatty acids in obese subjects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of three test meals containing palm oil (PO), lard (LD), or puff-pastry margarine (PPM), all normal dietary ingredients, on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in normal-weight and obese young women. The study was performed as a randomized, crossover design. The fats differed in the content of palmitic acid, stearic acid, and trans monounsaturated fatty acids allowing a dietary comparison of different 'solid' fatty acids. The obese women had significantly higher fasting concentrations and postprandial responses of plasma total triacylglycerol (TAG), chylomicron-TAG, and insulin compared with the normal-weight women but there was no significant difference in the postprandial responses between the three test meals. The obese women had fasting concentrations of leptin four times greater than the normal-weight women. There were no postprandial changes in the concentrations of leptin. The fasting concentrations of HDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in the obese women than in the normal-weight women, whereas there was no significant difference between the two groups in the concentrations of total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol. These results provide evidence that obese women have exaggerated lipid and hormone responses compared with normal-weight women but the different contents of saturated and trans monounsaturated fatty acids provided by PO, LD, and PPM have no effect in either group.

  16. Pentobarbital anesthesia and the response of tumor and normal tissue in the C3Hf/SED mouse to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.D.; Sedlacek, R.S.; Silver, G.; Dosoretz, D.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to assess the effect of sodium pentobarbital (NaPb) on the response of MCaIV, FSaII, and SCCVII using TCD50 and acute reaction of normal skin as end points. The TCD50 was lower or unchanged in the anesthetized than in the conscious mouse. There was no effect of NaPb on the acute reaction of skin. The ERs for NaPb on the TCD50 (ν = 1) for air breathing condition was essentially 1.0 for all three tumors. For the FSaII and SCCVII pentobarbital enhancement ratios were 1.29 and 1.34 for O/sub 2/3ATA conditions. For two dose (ν=2) irradiations ERs for the O/sub 2/3ATA were 1.46, 1.72 and 2.21 for MCaIV, FSaII and SCCVII respectively. For ν = 15, temperature 35 0 C ERs for O/sub 2/3ATA were 1.08 and 1.09 for MCaIV and FSaII but 1.22 for SCCVII

  17. Practice guideline: Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: Response to shunting and predictors of response: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, John J; Kurlan, Roger; Schwalb, Jason M; Cusimano, Michael D; Gronseth, Gary; Gloss, David

    2015-12-08

    We evaluated evidence for utility of shunting in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and for predictors of shunting effectiveness. We identified and classified relevant published studies according to 2004 and 2011 American Academy of Neurology methodology. Of 21 articles, we identified 3 Class I articles. Shunting is possibly effective in iNPH (96% chance subjective improvement, 83% chance improvement on timed walk test at 6 months) (3 Class III). Serious adverse event risk was 11% (1 Class III). Predictors of success included elevated Ro (1 Class I, multiple Class II), impaired cerebral blood flow reactivity to acetazolamide (by SPECT) (1 Class I), and positive response to either external lumbar drainage (1 Class III) or repeated lumbar punctures. Age may not be a prognostic factor (1 Class II). Data are insufficient to judge efficacy of radionuclide cisternography or aqueductal flow measurement by MRI. Clinicians may choose to offer shunting for subjective iNPH symptoms and gait (Level C). Because of significant adverse event risk, risks and benefits should be carefully weighed (Level B). Clinicians should inform patients with iNPH with elevated Ro and their families that they have an increased chance of responding to shunting compared with those without such elevation (Level B). Clinicians may counsel patients with iNPH and their families that (1) positive response to external lumbar drainage or to repeated lumbar punctures increases the chance of response to shunting, and (2) increasing age does not decrease the chance of shunting being successful (both Level C). © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. [Responses of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to precipitation changes on the grassland of Tibetan Plateau from 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi Peng; Zhang, Xian Zhou; He, Yong Tao; Li, Meng; Shi, Pei Li; Zu, Jia Xing; Niu, Ben

    2018-01-01

    Precipitation change is an important factor in the inter-annual variation of grassland growth on the Tibetan Plateau. The total amount, distribution pattern and concentration time are three basic characteristics of precipitation change. The temporal and spatial characteristics of precipitation change were analyzed based on climate data of 145 meteorological stations on the Tibetan Plateau and nearby areas from 2000 to 2015. The total precipitation amount was characterized by annual precipitation, distribution pattern of precipitation during the year was characterized by improved precipitation concentration index (PCI), and precipitation centroid (PC) was defined to indicate the change in precipitation concentrated time. To better illustrate the response of grassland to precipitation change, vegetation growth status was characterized by the maximum value of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI max ). Results indicated that the annual precipitation and PCI had an apparent gradient across the whole plateau and the latest PC occurred in the southern plateau. NDVI max of alpine shrub grassland was significantly correlated with the change of PCI,increased with even distribution of precipitation during growth period, and limited by the total annual precipitation. Alpine meadow did not show significantly correlations with these three indices. The inter-annual variability of NDVI max of steppe was controlled by both PCI and PC. NDVI max of alpine desert grassland was mainly controlled by annual precipitation. In addition to annual total amount of precipitation, the distribution characteristics of precipitation should be further considered when the influence of precipitation change on different types of vegetation on the Qinghai Tibet Plateau was studied.

  19. Mode of action and dose-response framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity : The aryl hydrocarbon receptor as a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budinsky, R. A.; Schrenk, D.; Simon, T.; Van Den Berg, M.; Reichard, J. F.; Silkworth, J. B.; Aylward, L. L.; Brix, A.; Gasiewicz, T.; Kaminski, N.; Perdew, G.; Starr, T. B.; Walker, N. J.; Rowlands, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds are tumor promoters that cause liver cancer in rats and mice. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has been implicated as a key component in this tumor promotion response. Despite extensive knowledge of the toxicology of dioxins, no mode of action (MOA) hypothesis

  20. Inhibitory Response Capacities of Bilateral Lower and Upper Extremities in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder in Endogenous and Exogenous Orienting Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Yu, Yi-Kai; Chen, Yung-Jung; Wu, Sheng-Kuang

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate separately the inhibitory response capacity and the lateralization effect in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) in the endogenous and exogenous modes of orienting attention. Children with DCD on the lower extremities (DCD-LEs), along with age-matched controls, completed four tasks that…

  1. Effects of short-term glucocorticoid deprivation on growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing peptide-6: Studies in normal men and in patients with adrenal insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Ana Claudia de Assis Rocha [UNIFESP; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus Régios [UNIFESP; Martins, Manoel R. [UNIFESP; Brunner, Elisa [UNIFESP; Lengyel, Ana Maria Judith [UNIFESP

    2000-01-01

    There are no data in the literature about the effects of glucocorticoid deprivation on GH-releasing peptide-g (GHRP-6)-induced GH release. the aims of this study were to evaluate GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 1) after metyrapone administration in normal men, and 2) in patients with chronic hypocortisolism after glucocorticoid withdrawal for 72 h. in normal subjects, metyrapone ingestion did not alter significantly GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 [n = 8; peak, 39.3 +/- 7.1 mu g/L; area under the cur...

  2. Comparison of incidences of normal tissue complications with tumor response in a phase III trial comparing heat plus radiation to radiation alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewhirst, M.W.; Sim, D.A.; Grochowski, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    The success of hyperthermia (/sup Δ/) as an adjuvant to radiation (XRT) will depend on whether the increase in tumor control is greater than that for normal tissue reactions. One hundred and thirty dogs and cats were stratified by histology and randomized to receive XRT (460 rads per fraction, two fractions per week, for eight fractions) or /sup Δ/ + XRT (30 min. at 44 +-2 0 C; one fraction per week, four fractions; immediately prior to XRT). Heat induced changes in tumor and normal tissue responses were made by comparing ratios of incidence for /sup Δ/ + XRT and XRT alone (TRR; Thermal Relative Risk). Change in tumor response duration was calculated from statistical analysis of response duration curves (RRR; Relative Relapse Rate). Heat increased early normal tissue reactions (moist desquamation and mucositis by a factor of 1.08. Tumor complete response, by comparison, was significantly improved (TRR = 2.12, p < .001). Late skin fibrosis was also increased (TRR = 1.51), but the prolongation in tumor response was greater (RRR 1.85). The degree of thermal enhancement for all tissues was dependent on the minimum temperature achieved on the first treatment, but the values for tumor were consistently greater than those achieved for normal tissues

  3. Normal mode calculations of trigonal selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; McMurry, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    The phonon dispersion relations for trigonal selenium have been calculated on the basis of a short range potential field model. Electrostatic long range forces have not been included. The force field is defined in terms of symmetrized coordinates which reflect partly the symmetry of the space group...

  4. Numerical Study of the Dynamic Response of Heat and Mass Transfer to Operation Mode Switching of a Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Xiao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge concerning the complicated changes of mass and heat transfer is desired to improve the performance and durability of unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs. In this study, a transient, non-isothermal, single-phase, and multi-physics mathematical model for a URFC based on the proton exchange membrane is generated to investigate transient responses in the process of operation mode switching from fuel cell (FC to electrolysis cell (EC. Various heat generation mechanisms, including Joule heat, reaction heat, and the heat attributed to activation polarizations, have been considered in the transient model coupled with electrochemical reaction and mass transfer in porous electrodes. The polarization curves of the steady-state models are validated by experimental data in the literatures. Numerical results reveal that current density, gas mass fractions, and temperature suddenly change with the sudden change of operating voltage in the mode switching process. The response time of temperature is longer than that of current density and gas mass fractions. In both FC and EC modes, the cell temperature and gradient of gas mass fraction in the oxygen side are larger than that in the hydrogen side. The temperature difference of the entire cell is less than 1.5 K. The highest temperature appears at oxygen-side catalyst layer under the FC mode and at membrane under a more stable EC mode. The cell is exothermic all the time. These dynamic responses and phenomena have important implications for heat analysis and provide proven guidelines for the improvement of URFCs mode switching.

  5. Serum LH and FSH Responses to Synthetic LH-RH in Normal Infants, Children and Patients With Turner's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Seizo; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) on LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release were studied in 26 normal children and six patients (from 1-to 14-years-old) with Turner's syndrome. (Author)

  6. The mode of lymphoblastoid cell death in response to gas phase cigarette smoke is dose-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltatzis George E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke (CS is the main cause in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the pathogenesis of which is related to an extended inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of low and high doses of gas phase cigarette smoke (GPS on cultured lymphocyte progenitor cells, using techniques to assess cell viability and to elucidate whether cells die of apoptosis or necrosis upon exposure to different doses of GPS. Methods In our approach we utilised a newly-established system of exposure of cells to GPS that is highly controlled, accurately reproducible and simulates CS dosage and kinetics that take place in the smokers' lung. This system was used to study the mode of cell death upon exposure to GPS in conjunction with a range of techniques widely used for cell death studies such as Annexin V staining, activation of caspase -3, cytoplasmic release of cytochrome C, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation. Results Low doses of GPS induced specific apoptotic indexes in CCRF-CEM cells. Specifically, cytochrome C release and cleaved caspase-3 were detected by immunofluorescence, upon treatment with 1-3 puffs GPS. At 4 h post-exposure, caspase-3 activation was observed in western blot analysis, showing a decreasing pattern as GPS doses increased. Concomitant with this behaviour, a dose-dependent change in Δψm depolarization was monitored by flow cytometry 2 h post-exposure, while at 4 h Δψm collapse was observed at the higher doses, indicative of a shift to a necrotic demise. A reduction in DNA fragmentation events produced by 5 puffs GPS as compared to those provoked by 3 puffs GPS, also pointed towards a necrotic response at the higher dose of GPS. Conclusion Collectively, our results support that at low doses gas phase cigarette smoke induces apoptosis in cultured T-lymphocytes, whereas at high doses GPS leads to necrotic death, by-passing the characteristic

  7. The response of normal and ataxia-telangiectasia human fibroblasts to the lethal effects of far, mid and near ultraviolet radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyse, S.M.; McAleer, M.A.; Davies, D.J.G.; Moss, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of two ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cell strains to the lethal effects of monochromatic far, mid and near ultraviolet radiations have been determined and compared with the responses of three normal human cell strains. The authors results confirm a previous observation that the A-T cell strain AT4BI is abnormally sensitive to the lethal effects of mid u.v. (313 nm) radiation. After far u.v. (254 nm) radiation the strain AT4BI exhibits a small but statistically significant increase in sensitivity compared to the normal strains. Of most interest, in terms of a mechanistic interpretation of the sensitivity of A-T strains, the survival responses of neither A-T strain tested to near u.v. (365 nm) radiation differed significantly from the mean response of the normal strains, although it is of interest that one normal strain (48BR) was found to be significantly more resistant to near u.v. radiation than any of the other strains tested. The results are discussed in terms of the possible induction of radiogenic lesions in DNA by ultraviolet radiations and the possible mechanisms of radiation sensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia. (author)

  8. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  9. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted

  10. Effect of luminance contrast on BOLD-fMRI response in deaf and normal occipital visual cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yanping; Zhai Renyou; Jiang Tao; Cui Yong; Zhou Tiangang; Rao Hengyi; Zhuo Yan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of luminance contrast stimulus by using blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) within deaf occipital visual cortex, and to compare the distribution, extent, and intensity of activated areas between deaf subjects and normal hearing subjects. Methods: Twelve deaf subjects (average age 16.5) and 15 normal hearing subjects (average age 23.7) were stimulated by 4 kinds of luminance contrast (0.7, 2.2, 50.0, 180.0 lm). The fMRI data were collected on GE 1.5 T Signa Horizon LX MRI system and analyzed by AFNI to generate the activation map. Results: Responding to all 4 kinds of stimulus luminance contrast, all deaf and normal subjects showed significant activations in occipital visual cortex. For both deaf and normal subjects, the number of activated pixels increased significantly with increasing luminance contrast (F normal = 4.27, P deaf = 6.41, P 0.05). The local mean activation level for all activated pixels remained constant with increasing luminance contrast. However, there was an increase in the mean activation level for those activated pixels common to all trials as the stimulus luminance contrast was increased, but no significant difference was found within them (F normal = 0.79, P > 0.05; F deaf = 1.6, P > 0.05). Conclusion: The effect of luminance contrast on occipital visual cortex of deaf is similar to but somewhat higher than that of normal hearing subjects. In addition, it also proved that fMRI is a feasible method in the study of the deaf visual cortex

  11. The use of biological isodoses ''IsobioGy 2'' for evaluation of tumour and normal tissues response for fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Skolyszewski, J.; Majewski, S.; Lobodziec, W.; Jedynak, T.; Slosarek, K.

    1988-01-01

    Divergences between physical and biological dose distributions were analysed using linear quadratic model. It was found that small variations in physical dose distribution and differences in normal tissue sensitivity for change in dose per fraction, expressed by a α/β value, can cause a high difference between physical and biological doses. This difference significantly increases when one field instead of two fields is daily treated. If there is no enough separation between treated fields, the biological dose may dramatically increase. The use of biological ''isobioGy 2'' isodoses, instead of physical isodoses, can provide an important information on biological effect in tumour or normal tissue and may diminish the risk of giving too high dose to normal tissue and too low dose to the tumour. 6 figs., 13 refs. (author)

  12. In vitro radiation response studies on bone marrow fibroblasts (CFU-F) obtained from normal and chronically irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.K.; Stitzel, K.A.; Greenberg, B.; Woo, L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation resistance of bone marrow fibroblasts as measured by their proliferative potential was evaluated in chronically irradiated dogs. Bone marrows were obtained from eight dogs that had been chronically irradiated beginning at 21 days of gestation or after birth and eight age-matched controls. Of these irradiated dogs, four were either preleukemic or exhibited frank acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The other four were clinically normal but demonstrated abnormalities in their marrow that could be attributed to radiation effects and/or other pathologic changes. Fibroblasts from six of the irradiated dogs were significantly more radioresistant than those of their controls. Five of these six dogs subsequently succumbed to hematopathologic disease, while the two irradiated dogs with normal fibroblasts remained clinically normal, suggesting that this observed radioresistance may be linked to the disease process. (author)

  13. DNA strand breaking and rejoining in response to ultraviolet light in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, C.W.; Kakunaga, T.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a reproducible technique for measuring DNA strand breaking and rejoining in cells after treatment with U.V.-light. Results obtained with normal human cells, xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XP, complementation group A) and XP variant cells suggested that all three of these cell-types can carry out single-strand incision with equal rapidity. However, the breaks so induced appeared to be only slowly rejoined in the XP variant cells and rejoined not at all in XP complementation group A cells. Furthermore, parental strand rejoining was inhibited by caffeine in XP variant cells but not in normal cells. (author)

  14. Response of growth hormone (GH), FFA, blood sugar and insulin to exercise in obese patients and normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, F.; Haar, D.J. ter; Riet, H.G. van; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1969-01-01

    Ergometer tests with a constant workload of 600 Kg./min. during 30 minutes were done on eight normal subjects, eight severely obese patients, and two women who had formerly been obese. Arterial blood was sampled three times before, four times during and three times after exercise. The incidence and

  15. SIMBIOS Normalized Water-Leaving Radiance Calibration and Validation: Sensor Response, Atmospheric Corrections, Stray Light and Sun Glint. Chapter 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, James L.

    2001-01-01

    This Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) contract supports acquisition of match up radiometric and bio-optical data for validation of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and other ocean color satellites, and evaluation of uncertainty budgets and protocols for in situ measurements of normalized water leaving radiances.

  16. The effect of palm oil, lard, and puff-pastry margarine on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in normal-weight and obese young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne J. Dyrsborg; Bysted, Anette; Dawids, Steen

    1999-01-01

    , on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in normal-weight and obese young women. The study was performed as a randomized, crossover design. The fats differed in the content of palmitic acid, stearic acid, and traits monounsaturated fatty acids allowing a dietary comparison of different 'solid' fatty acids......Only a few studies have been published on the postprandial effects of different fatty acids in obese subjects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of three test meals containing palm oil (PO), lard (LD), or puff-pastry margarine (PPM), all normal dietary ingredients...... acids provided by PO, LD, and PPM have no effect in either group....

  17. Separation of metabolic supply and demand: aerobic glycolysis as a normal physiological response to fluctuating energetic demands in the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Tamir; Xu, Liping; Gillies, Robert J; Gatenby, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells, and a variety of normal cells, exhibit aerobic glycolysis, high rates of glucose fermentation in the presence of normal oxygen concentrations, also known as the Warburg effect. This metabolism is considered abnormal because it violates the standard model of cellular energy production that assumes glucose metabolism is predominantly governed by oxygen concentrations and, therefore, fermentative glycolysis is an emergency back-up for periods of hypoxia. Though several hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of aerobic glycolysis, its biological basis in cancer and normal cells is still not well understood. We examined changes in glucose metabolism following perturbations in membrane activity in different normal and tumor cell lines and found that inhibition or activation of pumps on the cell membrane led to reduction or increase in glycolysis, respectively, while oxidative phosphorylation remained unchanged. Computational simulations demonstrated that these findings are consistent with a new model of normal physiological cellular metabolism in which efficient mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation supplies chronic energy demand primarily for macromolecule synthesis and glycolysis is necessary to supply rapid energy demands primarily to support membrane pumps. A specific model prediction was that the spatial distribution of ATP-producing enzymes in the glycolytic pathway must be primarily localized adjacent to the cell membrane, while mitochondria should be predominantly peri-nuclear. The predictions were confirmed experimentally. Our results show that glycolytic metabolism serves a critical physiological function under normoxic conditions by responding to rapid energetic demand, mainly from membrane transport activities, even in the presence of oxygen. This supports a new model for glucose metabolism in which glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation supply different types of energy demand. Cells use efficient but slow-responding aerobic metabolism

  18. Vesicles mimicking normal and cancer cell membranes exhibit differential responses to the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarwani, Bashiyar; Phambu, Esther Nzuzi; Alexander, Christopher; Nguyen, Ha Aimee T; Phambu, Nsoki; Sunda-Meya, Anderson

    2018-06-01

    The cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) Pep-1 presents a great potential in drug delivery due to its intrinsic property to cross plasma membrane. However, its mechanism of entry into the cell remains unresolved. In this study, we compare the selectivity of Pep-1 towards vesicles mimicking normal and cancer cell membranes. The interaction was performed in a wide range of peptide-to-lipid molar ratios using infrared (IR), fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. At low peptide concentration, fluorescence experiments show that lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) seems to enable Pep-1 translocation into cancer cell membrane as evidenced by the blue shift of its maximal emission wavelength. DSC data show that Pep-1 induces segregation of lipids. At high peptide concentration, IR data indicate that the interaction of Pep-1 is relatively stronger with normal cell membrane than with cancer cell membrane through the phosphate groups, while the interaction is weaker with normal cell membrane than with cancer cell membrane through the carbonyl groups. TGA and DSC data reveal that vesicles of normal cell membrane are thermally more stable than vesicles of cancer cell membrane. This suggests that the additional lipid PS included in cancer cell membrane has a destabilizing effect on the membrane structure. SEM images reveal that Pep-1 form superstructures including spherical particles and fibrils in the presence of both model membranes. PS seems to enhance peptide transport across cellular membranes. The biophysical techniques in this study provide valuable insights into the properties of CPPs in drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of endotoxin preparations (LPS) with irradiation decreased toxicity on the immune response of normal and irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elekes, E; Bertok, L [Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszsegugyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)

    1979-03-01

    A comparison of the immunostimulating effect of parent and radiodetoxified with 50, 100, 150 and 200 kGy (5, 10, 15 and 20 Mrad) /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays endotoxin preparations in normal and irradiated rats is given. By increasing the dose of irradiation the immunostimulating effect decreased. The preparations detoxified even with the highest (200 kGy) dose is characterized by a pronounced adjuvant effect in irradiated animals.

  20. The Effectiveness of a Mixed-Mode Survey on Domestic Violence in Curaçao: Response and Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Nikil; de Leeuw, Edith; de Bruijn, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    To collect reliable statistical data on domestic violence in Curaçao, we conducted a large-scale quantitative study (n = 816). To meet with the special needs of the population and topic, we designed a tailored mixed-mode survey to assess the prevalence of domestic violence in Curaçao and its health consequences. Great care was taken to reduce…

  1. Comparison of Nocturia Response to Desmopressin Treatment between Patients with Normal and High Nocturnal Bladder Capacity Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Hajdinjak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare efficacy of desmopressin for treatment of nocturia between patients with normal and high nocturnal bladder capacity index (NBCi. Methods. Retrospective analysis of adult patients treated with desmopressin for nocturia. Patients were analyzed according to high or normal NBCi value before treatment. Results. 55 patients were identified, aged 49–84, 47 males, 8 females, who started desmopressin 0.2 mg nocte between 2009 and 2011. Two groups (N: normal and H: high NBCi were similar regarding number, gender, age, 24 h urine volume, and nocturnal urine volume. On treatment, nocturnal volume decreased by mean of 364 mL. Number of nightly voids decreased in N group from 3.11 to 1.50, in H from 3.96 to 1.44. Nocturnal polyuria and nocturia indices also decreased significantly. NBCi remained the same in N group (0.56 on therapy and in H group decreased to mean 0.63. All on-treatment values were statistically similar in N and H groups. Pretreatment differences were abolished with treatment. NBCi was significantly correlated to nocturia reduction—larger reduction was observed in patients with higher NBCi. In 8/55 patients, hyponatremia was detected, but without clinical consequences. Conclusions. The results indicate that the effectiveness of desmopressin on nocturia is not dependent upon the patient's pretreatment NBCi.

  2. The Impact of Survey and Response Modes on Current Smoking Prevalence Estimates Using TUS-CPS: 1992-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Soulakova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study identified whether survey administration mode (telephone or in-person and respondent type (self or proxy result in discrepant prevalence of current smoking in the adult U.S. population, while controlling for key sociodemographic characteristics and longitudinal changes of smoking prevalence over the 11-year period from 1992-2003. We used a multiple logistic regression analysis with replicate weights to model the current smoking status logit as a function of a number of covariates. The final model included individual- and family-level sociodemographic characteristics, survey attributes, and multiple two-way interactions of survey mode and respondent type with other covariates. The respondent type is a significant predictor of current smoking prevalence and the magnitude of the difference depends on the age, sex, and education of the person whose smoking status is being reported. Furthermore, the survey mode has significant interactions with survey year, sex, and age. We conclude that using an overall unadjusted estimate of the current smoking prevalence may result in underestimating the current smoking rate when conducting proxy or telephone interviews especially for some sub-populations, such as young adults. We propose that estimates could be improved if more detailed information regarding the respondent type and survey administration mode characteristics were considered in addition to commonly used survey year and sociodemographic characteristics. This information is critical given that future surveillance is moving toward more complex designs. Thus, adjustment of estimates should be contemplated when comparing current smoking prevalence results within a given survey series with major changes in methodology over time and between different surveys using various modes and respondent types.

  3. "Normality of Residuals Is a Continuous Variable, and Does Seem to Influence the Trustworthiness of Confidence Intervals: A Response to, and Appreciation of, Williams, Grajales, and Kurkiewicz (2013"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W. Osborne

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Osborne and Waters (2002 focused on checking some of the assumptions of multiple linear.regression. In a critique of that paper, Williams, Grajales, and Kurkiewicz correctly clarify that.regression models estimated using ordinary least squares require the assumption of normally.distributed errors, but not the assumption of normally distributed response or predictor variables..They go on to discuss estimate bias and provide a helpful summary of the assumptions of multiple.regression when using ordinary least squares. While we were not as precise as we could have been.when discussing assumptions of normality, the critical issue of the 2002 paper remains -' researchers.often do not check on or report on the assumptions of their statistical methods. This response.expands on the points made by Williams, advocates a thorough examination of data prior to.reporting results, and provides an example of how incremental improvements in meeting the.assumption of normality of residuals incrementally improves the accuracy of confidence intervals.

  4. Bernstein modes in a non-neutral plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel; Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents theory and numerical calculations of electrostatic Bernstein modes in an inhomogeneous cylindrical plasma column. These modes rely on finite Larmor radius effects to propagate radially across the column until they are reflected when their frequency matches the upper hybrid frequency. This reflection sets up an internal normal mode on the column and also mode-couples to the electrostatic surface cyclotron wave (which allows the normal mode to be excited and observed using external electrodes). Numerical results predicting the mode spectra, using a novel linear Vlasov code on a cylindrical grid, are presented and compared to an analytical Wentzel Kramers Brillouin (WKB) theory. A previous version of the theory [D. H. E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 20(4), 042120 (2013)] expanded the plasma response in powers of 1/B, approximating the local upper hybrid frequency, and consequently, its frequency predictions are spuriously shifted with respect to the numerical results presented here. A new version of the WKB theory avoids this approximation using the exact cold fluid plasma response and does a better job of reproducing the numerical frequency spectrum. The effect of multiple ion species on the mode spectrum is also considered, to make contact with experiments that observe cyclotron modes in a multi-species pure ion plasma [M. Affolter et al., Phys. Plasmas 22(5), 055701 (2015)].

  5. Radiotherapy. Non-standard fractionated regimens improving cancer treatment. Part II. Response of normal tissues to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, A.; Hernandez, M.; Pera, J.; Cambray, M.; Villa, S.; Arnaiz, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The phenomena participating in the response of tissues to fractionated irradiation are analyzed with special emphasis on the most relevant points influencing the design of non-standard fractionated regimens. (Author)

  6. Response Pattern Based on the Amplitude of Ear Canal Recorded Cochlear Microphonic Waveforms across Acoustic Frequencies in Normal Hearing Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Low-frequency otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are often concealed by acoustic background noise such as those from a patient’s breathing and from the environment during recording in clinics. When using electrocochleaography (ECochG or ECoG), such as cochlear microphonics (CMs), acoustic background noise do not contaminate the recordings. Our objective is to study the response pattern of CM waveforms (CMWs) to explore an alternative approach in assessing cochlear functions. In response to a 14-mse...

  7. The effect of health, socio-economic position, and mode of data collection on non-response in health interview surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Ola; Gundgaard, Jens; Rasmussen, Niels K R

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the relationship between potential explanatory factors (socio-economic factors and health) and non-response in two general population health interview surveys (face-to-face and telephone), and to compare the effects of the two interview modes on non-response patterns. METHODS...... in health interview surveys, but the non-response rate is higher in lower socio-economic groups. Analyses of non-response should be performed to understand the implications of survey findings.......: Data derives from The Danish Health Interview Survey 2000 (face-to-face interview) and The Funen County Health Survey 2000/2001 (telephone interview). Data on all invited individuals were obtained from administrative registers and linked to survey data at individual level. Multiple logistic regression...

  8. The Spatial Musical Association of Response Codes does not depend on a normal visual experience: A study with early blind individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Rinaldi, Luca; Fantino, Micaela; Ferrari, Chiara; Merabet, Lotfi B; Vecchi, Tomaso

    2018-02-26

    Converging evidence suggests that the perception of auditory pitch exhibits a characteristic spatial organization. This pitch-space association can be demonstrated experimentally by the Spatial Musical Association of Response Codes (SMARC) effect. This is characterized by faster response times when a low-positioned key is pressed in response to a low-pitched tone, and a high-positioned key is pressed in response to a high-pitched tone. To investigate whether the development of this pitch-space association is mediated by normal visual experience, we tested a group of early blind individuals on a task that required them to discriminate the timbre of different instrument sounds with varying pitch. Results revealed a comparable pattern in the SMARC effect in both blind participants and sighted controls, suggesting that the lack of prior visual experience does not prevent the development of an association between pitch height and vertical space.

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopy can detect differences in vascular responsiveness to a hyperglycaemic challenge in individuals with obesity compared to normal-weight individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rogério Nogueira; Reimer, Raylene A; Alenezi, Zaid; Doyle-Baker, Patricia K; Murias, Juan Manuel

    2018-01-01

    To examine whether the near-infrared spectroscopy combined with vascular occlusion test technique could detect differences in vascular responsiveness during hyperglycaemia between normal-weight individuals and individuals with obesity. A total of 16 normal-weight individuals (body mass index, 21.3 ± 1.7 kg/m 2 ) and 13 individuals with obesity (body mass index, 34.4 ± 2.0 kg/m 2 ) were submitted to five vascular occlusion tests (Pre, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after glucose challenge). Vascular responsiveness was determined by the Slope 2 (Slope 2 StO 2 ) and the area under the curve (StO 2AUC ) of oxygen saturation derived from near-infrared spectroscopy-vascular occlusion test. The Slope 2 StO 2 increased from 1.07 ± 0.16%/s (Pre) to 1.53 ± 0.21%/s at 90 min ( p obese it increased from 0.71 ± 0.09%/s (Pre) to 0.92 ± 0.14%/s at 60 min ( p obesity. Near-infrared spectroscopy-vascular occlusion test technique was capable of detecting differences in vascular responsiveness during hyperglycaemia between normal-weight individuals and individuals with obesity.

  10. Qualitative dose response of the normal canine head to epithermal neutron irradiation with and without boron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHaan, C.E.; Gavin, P.R.; Kraft, S.L.; Wheeler, F.J.; Atkinson, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is being re-evaluated for the treatment of intracranial tumors. Prior to human clinical trials, determination of normal tissue tolerance is critical. Dogs were chosen as a large animal model for the following reasons. Dogs can be evaluated with advanced imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Dogs are amenable to detailed neurologic examination and subtle behavioral changes are easily detected. Specifically, Labrador retrievers were chosen for their large body and head size. The dogs received varying doses of epithermal neutron irradiation and boron neutron capture irradiation using an epithermal neutron source. The dogs were closely monitored for up to one year post irradiation

  11. Auditory brainstem response latency in forward masking, a marker of sensory deficits in listeners with normal hearing thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehraei, Golbarg; Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2017-01-01

    -spontaneous rate fibers results in a faster recovery of wave-V latency as the slow contribution of these fibers is reduced. Results showed that in young audiometrically normal listeners, a larger change in wave-V latency with increasing masker-to-probe interval was related to a greater effect of a preceding masker......-V latency changes with increasing masker-to-probe intervals. In the same listeners, behavioral forward masking detection thresholds were measured. We hypothesized that 1) auditory nerve fiber deafferentation increases forward masking thresholds and increases wave-V latency and 2) a preferential loss of low...

  12. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid is required for normal alcohol response behaviors in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Raabe

    Full Text Available Alcohol addiction is a widespread societal problem, for which there are few treatments. There are significant genetic and environmental influences on abuse liability, and understanding these factors will be important for the identification of susceptible individuals and the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, the level of response to alcohol is strongly predictive of subsequent alcohol abuse. Level of response is a combination of counteracting responses to alcohol, the level of sensitivity to the drug and the degree to which tolerance develops during the drug exposure, called acute functional tolerance. We use the simple and well-characterized nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans to model the acute behavioral effects of ethanol to identify genetic and environmental factors that influence level of response to ethanol. Given the strong molecular conservation between the neurobiological machinery of worms and humans, cellular-level effects of ethanol are likely to be conserved. Increasingly, variation in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels has been implicated in complex neurobiological phenotypes in humans, and we recently found that fatty acid levels modify ethanol responses in worms. Here, we report that 1 eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is required for the development of acute functional tolerance, 2 dietary supplementation of eicosapentaenoic acid is sufficient for acute tolerance, and 3 dietary eicosapentaenoic acid can alter the wild-type response to ethanol. These results suggest that genetic variation influencing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels may be important abuse liability loci, and that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may be an important environmental modulator of the behavioral response to ethanol.

  13. Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  14. Apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukaemia: normal responses by progenitor cells to growth factor deprivation, X-irradiation and glucocorticoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, T.A.S.; Lewis, J.L.; Grand, F.H.; Gooding, R.P.; Goldman, J.M.; Gordon, M.Y. [Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis (genetically programmed active cell death) by p210 BCR-ABL expression is a mechanism that might contribute to clonal expansion in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Since cell death following exposure to ionizing radiation and many chemotherapeutic agents can occur by the apoptotic pathway, inhibition of apoptosis would be expected to confer a relative resistance to these treatments. Similarly, cells deprived of growth factors in vitro die by apoptosis, and inhibition of apoptosis would therefore be expected to allow cells to survive better in growth factor-deprived conditions. We found that the survival of normal and CML myeloid progenitors was the same after in vitro incubation in deprived conditions and after treatment with X-irradiation or glucocorticoids. We also found that mature cells in colonies produced by CML progenitors (CFU-GM) did not survive better than those produced by normal progenitor cells. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide-stained cells provided a direct indication that the degree of apoptosis may correspond to the degree of deprivation. These results suggest that inhibition of apoptosis may not be the primary mechanism whereby BCR-ABL influences the expansion of the malignant clone in CML. (Author).

  15. The radiobiology of laser-driven particle beams: focus on sub-lethal responses of normal human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manti, L.; Perozziello, F.M.; Romagnani, L.; Borghesi, M.; Doria, D.; Candiano, G.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Leanza, R.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Chaudhary, P.; Gwynne, D.; Prise, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated proton beams have become increasingly common for treating cancer. The need for cost and size reduction of particle accelerating machines has led to the pioneering investigation of optical ion acceleration techniques based on laser-plasma interactions as a possible alternative. Laser-matter interaction can produce extremely pulsed particle bursts of ultra-high dose rates (≥ 10 9 Gy/s), largely exceeding those currently used in conventional proton therapy. Since biological effects of ionizing radiation are strongly affected by the spatio-temporal distribution of DNA-damaging events, the unprecedented physical features of such beams may modify cellular and tissue radiosensitivity to unexplored extents. Hence, clinical applications of laser-generated particles need thorough assessment of their radiobiological effectiveness. To date, the majority of studies have either used rodent cell lines or have focussed on cancer cell killing being local tumour control the main objective of radiotherapy. Conversely, very little data exist on sub-lethal cellular effects, of relevance to normal tissue integrity and secondary cancers, such as premature cellular senescence. Here, we discuss ultra-high dose rate radiobiology and present preliminary data obtained in normal human cells following irradiation by laser-accelerated protons at the LULI PICO2000 facility at Laser Lab Europe, France.

  16. Apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukaemia: normal responses by progenitor cells to growth factor deprivation, X-irradiation and glucocorticoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, T.A.S.; Lewis, J.L.; Grand, F.H.; Gooding, R.P.; Goldman, J.M.; Gordon, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis (genetically programmed active cell death) by p210 BCR-ABL expression is a mechanism that might contribute to clonal expansion in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Since cell death following exposure to ionizing radiation and many chemotherapeutic agents can occur by the apoptotic pathway, inhibition of apoptosis would be expected to confer a relative resistance to these treatments. Similarly, cells deprived of growth factors in vitro die by apoptosis, and inhibition of apoptosis would therefore be expected to allow cells to survive better in growth factor-deprived conditions. We found that the survival of normal and CML myeloid progenitors was the same after in vitro incubation in deprived conditions and after treatment with X-irradiation or glucocorticoids. We also found that mature cells in colonies produced by CML progenitors (CFU-GM) did not survive better than those produced by normal progenitor cells. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide-stained cells provided a direct indication that the degree of apoptosis may correspond to the degree of deprivation. These results suggest that inhibition of apoptosis may not be the primary mechanism whereby BCR-ABL influences the expansion of the malignant clone in CML. (Author)

  17. Clarifying Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Confusion exists among database textbooks as to the goal of normalization as well as to which normal form a designer should aspire. This article discusses such discrepancies with the intention of simplifying normalization for both teacher and student. This author's industry and classroom experiences indicate such simplification yields quicker…

  18. Response of normal children to influenza A/New Jersey/76 virus vaccine administered by jet injector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, K; Orr, I; Andersen, M; Arthur, J H; Blakeman, G J

    1977-12-01

    Ninety-seven children six to 10 years old received monovalent influenza A/New Jersey/76 virus vaccine by jet injector. Comparison with groups receiving vaccine intramuscularly revealed that local reactions (tenderness and erythema) were more frequent and more severe in the group vaccinated by jet injector. Antibody response, however, was similar for all groups.

  19. Spatial and seasonal responses of precipitation in the Ganges and Brahmaputra river basins to ENSO and Indian Ocean dipole modes: implications for flooding and drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, M. S.; Henebry, G. M.

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the spatial and temporal responses of precipitation in the basins as modulated by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean (IO) dipole modes using observed precipitation records at 43 stations across the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins from 1982 to 2010. Daily observed precipitation records were extracted from Global Surface Summary of the Day dataset and spatial and monthly anomalies were computed. The anomalies were averaged for the years influenced by climate modes combinations. Occurrences of El Niño alone significantly reduced (60% and 88% of baseline in the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins, respectively) precipitation during the monsoon months in the northwestern and central Ganges basin and across the Brahmaputra basin. In contrast, co-occurrence of La Niña and a positive IO dipole mode significantly enhanced (135% and 160% of baseline, respectively) precipitation across both basins. During the co-occurrence of neutral phases in both climate modes (occurring 13 out of 28 yr), precipitation remained below average to average in the agriculturally extensive areas of Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, eastern Nepal, and the Rajshahi district in Bangladesh in the Ganges basin and northern Bangladesh, Meghalaya, Assam, and Arunachal Pradesh in the Brahmaputra basin. This pattern implies that a regular water deficit is likely in these areas with implications for the agriculture sector due to its reliance on consistent rainfall for successful production. Major flooding and drought occurred as a consequence of the interactive effects of the ENSO and IO dipole modes, with the sole exception of extreme precipitation and flooding during El Niño events. This observational analysis will facilitate well informed decision making in minimizing natural hazard risks and climate impacts on agriculture, and supports development of strategies ensuring optimized use of water resources in best management practice under changing climate.

  20. Normal and sublethally irradiated stem and granulocyte progenitor cell regeneration in an in vivo culture system. The cellular response to humoral factors released through the action of cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacVittie, T.

    1977-01-01

    The in vivo diffusion chamber (DC) method of marrow culture was used to determine if the injection of host mice with cyclophosphamide (CY) caused, through its cytoxic action, the release of a humoral factor(s) capable of initiating stem cell (CFU-s) and granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell (CFU-c) proliferation. Host mice were injected with CY 1-4 days prior to 800 rad of 60 Co WBI and implantation of DCs containing normal or 400 rad sublethally irradiated (SLI) marrow cells. The greatest proliferative response within CFU-s and CFU-c populations occurred in those mice injected with CY 3 days prior to implant. The marked CFU-s and CFU-c regeneration was initiated during the initial 24 hr of culture in both normal and SLI marrow cells. Thereafter growth rates were approximately the same. SLI marrow, however, showed a greater response to the humoral effects of CY injection than did normal marrow. These data provided evidence that CY induced the release of a diffusible factor(s) capable of accelerating regeneration of normal and sublethally irradiated CFU-s and CFU-c, the magnitude of which was dependent upon the time elapsed between CY injected and implantation of DCs. The marked proliferative response of the SLI stem and progenitor cells to the humoral stimulation may be indicative of the heterogeneity of both CFU-s and CFU-c populations surviving sublethal radiation exposure. The target cells may have possessed a differential sensitivity to the factor(s) initiating cell proliferation

  1. Pyroelectric response mechanism of barium strontium titanate ceramics in dielectric bolometer mode: The underlying essence of the enhancing effect of direct current bias field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Chaoliang; Cao, Sheng; Yan, Shiguang; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Wang, Genshui; Dong, Xianlin; Hu, Xu; Yang, Chunli

    2013-01-01

    Pyroelectric response mechanism of Ba 0.70 Sr 0.30 TiO 3 ceramics under dielectric bolometer (DB) mode was investigated by dielectric and pyroelectric properties measurement. The variations of total, intrinsic, and induced pyroelectric coefficients (p tot , p int , p ind ) with temperatures and bias fields were analyzed. p int plays the dominant role to p tot through most of the temperature range and p ind will be slightly higher than p int above T 0 . The essence of the enhancing effect of DC bias field on pyroelectric coefficient can be attributed to the high value of p int . This mechanism is useful for the pyroelectric materials (DB mode) applications.

  2. Blood leukocyte responses to extracorporeal circulation. 3. Long term extracorporeal circulation without and with irradiation in normal and splenectomized dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, P.; Fliedner, T.M. (Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Klinische Physiologie)

    1983-01-01

    Long term (12-48 h) extracorporeal circulation without and with irradiation of the blood was performed in normal and splenectomized dogs in order to observe the effect of these procedures on blood leukocyte counts including CFU-C. A transient granulocytopenia and a decrease of lymphocyte count were observed. The blood CFU-C level diminished to a very low level and remained low for the whole time of the experiments. There was no significant difference between the results of procedures with or without irradiation. The similar effect of a shortened tubing system on the blood leukocyte count is also reported. Heparin infusion alone did not decrease the peripheral CFU-C concentration. The possible explanations for the observed phenomena are discussed.

  3. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71

  4. Gut microbiota and glucometabolic alterations in response to recurrent partial sleep deprivation in normal-weight young individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Christian; Vogel, Heike; Jonas, Wenke; Woting, Anni; Blaut, Michael; Schürmann, Annette; Cedernaes, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Changes to the microbial community in the human gut have been proposed to promote metabolic disturbances that also occur after short periods of sleep loss (including insulin resistance). However, whether sleep loss affects the gut microbiota remains unknown. In a randomized within-subject crossover study utilizing a standardized in-lab protocol (with fixed meal times and exercise schedules), we studied nine normal-weight men at two occasions: after two nights of partial sleep deprivation (PSD; sleep opportunity 02:45-07:00 h), and after two nights of normal sleep (NS; sleep opportunity 22:30-07:00 h). Fecal samples were collected within 24 h before, and after two in-lab nights, of either NS or PSD. In addition, participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test following each sleep intervention. Microbiota composition analysis (V4 16S rRNA gene sequencing) revealed that after two days of PSD vs. after two days of NS, individuals exhibited an increased Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio, higher abundances of the families Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae, and lower abundance of Tenericutes (all P < 0.05) - previously all associated with metabolic perturbations in animal or human models. However, no PSD vs. NS effect on beta diversity or on fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations was found. Fasting and postprandial insulin sensitivity decreased after PSD vs. NS (all P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that short-term sleep loss induces subtle effects on human microbiota. To what extent the observed changes to the microbial community contribute to metabolic consequences of sleep loss warrants further investigations in larger and more prolonged sleep studies, to also assess how sleep loss impacts the microbiota in individuals who already are metabolically compromised.

  5. Responses of human normal osteoblast cells and osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63 cells, to pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttatip Kamolmatyakul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this in vitro study is to investigate the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF on cellular proliferation and osteocalcin production of osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63 cells, and human normal osteoblast cells (NHOC obtained from surgical bone specimens. The cells were placed in 24-well culture plates in the amount of 3x104 cell/wells with 2 ml αMEM media supplemented with 10% FBS. The experimental plates were placed between a pair of Helmoltz coils powered by a pulse generator (PEMF, 50 Hz, 1.5 mV/cm in the upper compartment of a dual incubator (Forma. The control plates were placed in the lower compartment of the incubator without Helmotz coils. After three days, the cell proliferation was measured by the method modified from Mossman (J. Immunol Methods 1983; 65: 55-63. Other sets of plates were used for osteocalcin production assessment. Media from these sets were collected after 6 days and assessed for osteocalcin production using ELISA kits. The data were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. The results showed that MG-63 cells from the experimental group proliferated significantly more than those from the control group (20% increase, p<0.05. No significant difference in osteocalcin production was detected between the two groups. On the other hand, NHOC from the experimental group produced larger amount of osteocalcin (25% increase, p<0.05 and proliferated significantly more than those from the control group (100% increase, p<0.05. In conclusion, PEMF effect on osteoblasts might depend on their cell type of origin. For osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63 cells, PEMF increased proliferation rate but not osteocalcin production of the cells. However, PEMF stimulation effect on human normal osteoblast cells was most likely associated with enhancement of both osteocalcin production and cell proliferation.

  6. Research socially responsible: may we speak of a Mode 3 knowledge production? - DOI: 10.3395/reciis.v2i1.145en

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Jiménez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A collateral effect of the globalization of the economy is the “globalization of science”, in the sense that part of it works at the service of the global economy. Part of the scientific production thus appears to be linked to the needs of the global markets. However, in the past 20 years, new alternative ways of “doing science” have emerged throughout the world whose most important characteristic is their intimate relationship with the solution of felt problems linked to local or regional communities. Although they share some of the characteristics of “Mode 2” research, as defined by GIBBONS et al (1994, they differ drastically in the sense that they really are socially responsible. These new forms are a response to the need to make scientific research more participative, more closely linked to the groups that would be affected by its results, incorporating thus in the decision-making process, not only the researchers themselves, but also those agents that would be directly affected by its products. This paper reflects upon an experience that currently takes place in Mexico, where research is intimately linked to the learning function, and is strongly rooted into the New Information and Communication Technologies (NICT. This form of doing “research in the service of humanity” is consistent with an alternative definition of development that is not necessarily linked to “growth”, as traditionally reflected in economic statistics. Development is not a question of what one has, but of what one can do with what one has. Development is the ability and desire to use what is available to continuously improve one’s quality of life (ACKOFF, 1974. Projects like the one described here provide a sense of progress in the right direction, in the direction of true development. We call this way of knowledge generation “Mode 3”, to differentiate it from Mertonian (Mode 1 and Gibbons’ (Mode 2 way of doing science. Mode 3 is a mode of

  7. Comparison of response rates and cost-effectiveness for a community-based survey: postal, internet and telephone modes with generic or personalised recruitment approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological research often requires collection of data from a representative sample of the community or recruitment of specific groups through broad community approaches. The population coverage of traditional survey methods such as mail-outs to residential addresses, and telephone contact via public directories or random-digit-dialing is declining and survey response rates are falling. There is a need to explore new sampling frames and consider multiple response modes including those offered by changes in telecommunications and internet technology. Methods We evaluated response rates and cost-effectiveness for three modes of survey administration (postal invitation/postal survey, postal invitation/internet survey and postal invitation/telephone survey) and two styles of contact approach (personalised and generic) in a community survey of greywater use. Potential respondents were contacted only once, with no follow up of non-responders. Results The telephone survey produced the highest adjusted response rate (30.2%), followed by the personalised postal survey (10.5%), generic postal survey (7.5%) and then the internet survey (4.7% for the personalised approach and 2.2% for the generic approach). There were some differences in household characteristics and greywater use rates between respondents to different survey modes, and between respondents to personalised and generic approaches. These may be attributable to the differing levels of motivations needed for a response, and varying levels of interest in the survey topic among greywater users and non-users. The generic postal survey had the lowest costs per valid survey received (Australian $22.93), followed by the personalised postal survey ($24.75). Conclusions Our findings suggest that postal surveys currently remain the most economic option for population-based studies, with similar costs for personalised and generic approaches. Internet surveys may be effective for specialised groups where email

  8. Possession of ATM Sequence Variants as Predictor for Late Normal Tissue Responses in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Alice Y.; Fan, Grace; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Iyengar, Preetha B.A.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The ATM gene product is a central component of cell cycle regulation and genomic surveillance. We hypothesized that DNA sequence alterations in ATM predict for adverse effects after external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 patients with a minimum of 2 years follow-up who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were screened for sequence alterations in ATM using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Genetic variants were identified using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring schemes for skin and subcutaneous tissues were applied to quantify the radiation-induced effects. Results: Of the 131 patients, 51 possessed ATM sequence alterations located within exons or in short intron regions flanking each exon that encompass putative splice site regions. Of these 51 patients, 21 (41%) exhibited a minimum of a Grade 2 late radiation response. In contrast, of the 80 patients without an ATM sequence variation, only 18 (23%) had radiation-induced adverse responses, for an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2). Fifteen patients were heterozygous for the G→A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which causes substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein. Of these 15 patients, 8 (53%) exhibited a Grade 2-4 late response compared with 31 (27%) of the 116 patients without this alteration, for an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.4). Conclusion: Sequence variants located in the ATM gene, in particular the 5557 G→A polymorphism, may predict for late adverse radiation responses in breast cancer patients

  9. Effects of exercise mode on the peak oxygen uptake and blood lactate response in boys aged 11-12 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Andrade Machado

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of exercise mode (running x cycling on the indexesrelated to aerobic fitness (VO2peak and blood lactate response to exercise in children. Participated of this study 20 active boys apparently healthy (age = 11.48 + 0.41 yr.; body mass = 41.38 + 10.45 kg; stature = 147.45 + 6.56 cm, with sexual maturational level 1 and 2 (pubic hair, which performed two incremental tests, with stages of 3 minutes until voluntary exhaustion, in treadmill (TR and cycle ergometer (CE, to the determination of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak and lactate threshold (LT. The VO2peak was determined through the higher value obtained at intervals of 15 seconds. The LT was determined as the exercise intensity where the first and sustained increase of blood lactate above rest level occurred. The VO2peak (45.16 + 5.98 x 42.93 + 7.51 ml/kg/min, maximal heart rate (196.5 + 6.98 x 187.3 + 9.27 bpm, VO2 at LL (31.82 + 10.09 x 25.19 + 7.36 ml/kg/min and HR at LL (150.5 + 17.75 x 131.3 + 12.98 bpm were significantly higher in TR than CE, respectively. Thus, similar to adults, boys of 11 to 12 years present higher aerobic indexes (submaximal and maximal in running than cycling, which can haveimportant implications for healthy professionals that utilize exercise for the healthy promotion, rehabilitation and experimental designs. RESUMO O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os efeitos do modo de exercício (corrida x ciclismo sobre os índices relacionados com a aptidão aeróbia (VO2pico e resposta de lactato ao exercício em crianças. Participaram doestudo 20 meninos, aparentemente saudáveis e ativos (idade = 11,48 + 0,41 anos; massa corporal = 41,38 + 10,45 kg; estatura = 147,45 + 6,56 cm, com níveis de maturação sexual 1 e 2 (pilosidade pubiana, que realizaram dois testes incrementais, com estágios de 3 minutos até a exaustão voluntária, em esteira rolante (ER e bicicleta ergométrica (BE, para a determinação do pico do

  10. Gut microbiota and glucometabolic alterations in response to recurrent partial sleep deprivation in normal-weight young individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Benedict

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes to the microbial community in the human gut have been proposed to promote metabolic disturbances that also occur after short periods of sleep loss (including insulin resistance. However, whether sleep loss affects the gut microbiota remains unknown. Methods: In a randomized within-subject crossover study utilizing a standardized in-lab protocol (with fixed meal times and exercise schedules, we studied nine normal-weight men at two occasions: after two nights of partial sleep deprivation (PSD; sleep opportunity 02:45–07:00 h, and after two nights of normal sleep (NS; sleep opportunity 22:30–07:00 h. Fecal samples were collected within 24 h before, and after two in-lab nights, of either NS or PSD. In addition, participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test following each sleep intervention. Results: Microbiota composition analysis (V4 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that after two days of PSD vs. after two days of NS, individuals exhibited an increased Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio, higher abundances of the families Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae, and lower abundance of Tenericutes (all P < 0.05 – previously all associated with metabolic perturbations in animal or human models. However, no PSD vs. NS effect on beta diversity or on fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations was found. Fasting and postprandial insulin sensitivity decreased after PSD vs. NS (all P < 0.05. Discussion: Our findings demonstrate that short-term sleep loss induces subtle effects on human microbiota. To what extent the observed changes to the microbial community contribute to metabolic consequences of sleep loss warrants further investigations in larger and more prolonged sleep studies, to also assess how sleep loss impacts the microbiota in individuals who already are metabolically compromised. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Insulin resistance

  11. A Comparison of Web-Based and Paper-Based Survey Methods: Testing Assumptions of Survey Mode and Response Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Corey; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys have become more prevalent in areas such as evaluation, research, and marketing research to name a few. The proliferation of these online surveys raises the question, how do response rates compare with traditional surveys and at what cost? This research explored response rates and costs for Web-based surveys, paper surveys, and…

  12. Associations between postprandial insulin and blood glucose responses, appetite sensations and energy intake in normal weight and overweight individuals: a meta-analysis of test meal studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flint, Anne; Gregersen, Nikolaj T.; Gluud, Lise L.

    2007-01-01

    is unclear whether postprandial blood glucose or insulin exerts a regulatory function in short-term appetite regulation in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate, by use of meta-analysis, the role of blood glucose and insulin in short-term appetite sensation and energy intake (EI......) in normal weight and overweight participants. Data from seven test meal studies were used, including 136 healthy participants (ALL) (92 normal weight (NW) and 44 overweight or obese (OW)). All meals were served as breakfasts after an overnight fast, and appetite sensations and blood samples were obtained...... frequently in the postprandial period. Finally, an ad libitum lunch was served. Data were analysed by fixed effects study level (SL) meta-regression analysis and individual participant data (IPD) regression analysis, using STATA software. In SL analysis, postprandial insulin response was associated...

  13. Comparison of Dose Response Models for Predicting Normal Tissue Complications from Cancer Radiotherapy: Application in Rat Spinal Cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamus-Górka, Magdalena; Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: panayiotis.mavroidis@ki.se; Lind, Bengt K.; Brahme, Anders [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm S-17176 (Sweden)

    2011-05-18

    Seven different radiobiological dose-response models have been compared with regard to their ability to describe experimental data. The first four models, namely the critical volume, the relative seriality, the inverse tumor and the critical element models are mainly based on cell survival biology. The other three models: the Lyman (Gaussian distribution), the parallel architecture and the Weibull distribution models are semi-empirical and rather based on statistical distributions. The maximum likelihood estimation was used to fit the models to experimental data and the χ{sup 2}-distribution, AIC criterion and F-test were applied to compare the goodness-of-fit of the models. The comparison was performed using experimental data for rat spinal cord injury. Both the shape of the dose-response curve and the ability of handling the volume dependence were separately compared for each model. All the models were found to be acceptable in describing the present experimental dataset (p > 0.05). For the white matter necrosis dataset, the Weibull and Lyman models were clearly superior to the other models, whereas for the vascular damage case, the Relative Seriality model seems to have the best performance although the Critical volume, Inverse tumor, Critical element and Parallel architecture models gave similar results. Although the differences between many of the investigated models are rather small, they still may be of importance in indicating the advantages and limitations of each particular model. It appears that most of the models have favorable properties for describing dose-response data, which indicates that they may be suitable to be used in biologically optimized intensity modulated radiation therapy planning, provided a proper estimation of their radiobiological parameters had been performed for every tissue and clinical endpoint.

  14. Comparison of Dose Response Models for Predicting Normal Tissue Complications from Cancer Radiotherapy: Application in Rat Spinal Cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamus-Górka, Magdalena; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Lind, Bengt K.; Brahme, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Seven different radiobiological dose-response models have been compared with regard to their ability to describe experimental data. The first four models, namely the critical volume, the relative seriality, the inverse tumor and the critical element models are mainly based on cell survival biology. The other three models: the Lyman (Gaussian distribution), the parallel architecture and the Weibull distribution models are semi-empirical and rather based on statistical distributions. The maximum likelihood estimation was used to fit the models to experimental data and the χ 2 -distribution, AIC criterion and F-test were applied to compare the goodness-of-fit of the models. The comparison was performed using experimental data for rat spinal cord injury. Both the shape of the dose-response curve and the ability of handling the volume dependence were separately compared for each model. All the models were found to be acceptable in describing the present experimental dataset (p > 0.05). For the white matter necrosis dataset, the Weibull and Lyman models were clearly superior to the other models, whereas for the vascular damage case, the Relative Seriality model seems to have the best performance although the Critical volume, Inverse tumor, Critical element and Parallel architecture models gave similar results. Although the differences between many of the investigated models are rather small, they still may be of importance in indicating the advantages and limitations of each particular model. It appears that most of the models have favorable properties for describing dose-response data, which indicates that they may be suitable to be used in biologically optimized intensity modulated radiation therapy planning, provided a proper estimation of their radiobiological parameters had been performed for every tissue and clinical endpoint

  15. Nitric oxide is involved in light-specific responses of tomato during germination under normal and osmotic stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Hofman, Jakub; Turecková, Veronika; Novák, Ondrej; Petrivalsky, Marek; Fellner, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the signalling and regulation of plant growth and development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The photoperiod-sensitive mutant 7B-1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) showing abscisic acid (ABA) overproduction and blue light (BL)-specific tolerance to osmotic stress represents a valuable model to study the interaction between light, hormones and stress signalling. The role of NO as a regulator of seed germination and ABA-dependent responses to osmotic stress was explored in wild-type and 7B-1 tomato under white light (WL) and BL. Germination data were obtained from the incubation of seeds on germinating media of different composition. Histochemical analysis of NO production in germinating seeds was performed by fluorescence microscopy using a cell-permeable NO probe, and endogenous ABA was analysed by mass spectrometry. The NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione stimulated seed germination, whereas the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) had an inhibitory effect. Under WL in both genotypes, PTIO strongly suppressed germination stimulated by fluridone, an ABA inhibitor. The stimulatory effect of the NO donor was also observed under osmotic stress for 7B-1 seeds under WL and BL. Seed germination inhibited by osmotic stress was restored by fluridone under WL, but less so under BL, in both genotypes. This effect of fluridone was further modulated by the NO donor and NO scavenger, but only to a minor extent. Fluorescence microscopy using the cell-permeable NO probe DAF-FM DA (4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate) revealed a higher level of NO in stressed 7B-1 compared with wild-type seeds. As well as defective BL signalling, the differential NO-dependent responses of the 7B-1 mutant are probably associated with its high endogenous ABA concentration and related impact on hormonal cross-talk in germinating seeds. These data confirm that light-controlled seed germination and

  16. Effects of dietary fructooligosaccharide levels and feeding modes on growth, immune responses, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Nuan; Li, Xiang-Fei; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Tian, Hong-Yan; Li, Jun-Yi; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) levels and its feeding modes on growth, immune response, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala). Fish (12.5 ± 0.5 g) were subjected to three FOS levels (0, 0.4% and 0.8%) and two feeding modes (supplementing FOS continuously and supplementing FOS two days interval 5 days) according to a 3 × 2 factorial design. At the end of 8-week feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila with concentration of 1 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1) and mortality was recorded for the next 96 h. Fish fed 0.4% FOS continuously (D2) and fish fed the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days (D5) showed admirable growth performance. The highest plasma lysozyme, acid phosphatase and myeloperoxidase activities as well as complement component 3, total protein and immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels were all observed in fish fed D5. They were significantly higher (P 0.05) with that of fish fed D2. A similar trend was also observed in antioxidant capability as well as the expression of Leap-I and Leap-Ⅱ. Mortality showed an opposite trend with the immune response with the lowest rate observed in fish fed D5. The results indicated that diet supplementing FOS in appropriate levels and feeding modes could improve the growth, immune response and antioxidant capability of fish, as might consequently lead to enhanced disease resistance. It can be speculated that the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days was most suitable for blunt snout bream. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - A potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Nielsen, Morten; Brink, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Background: Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose. Methods: A total of 665 CBCTs in 65 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT/VMAT to 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. For each patient, CBCT lung density changes during the treatment course were related to the locally delivered dose. Results: A dose response is observed for the patient population at the end of the treatment course. However, the observed dose response is highly variable among patients. Density changes at 10th and 20th fraction are clearly correlated to those observed at the end of the treatment course. Conclusions: CBCT density changes in healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy correlate with the locally delivered dose and can be detected relatively early during the treatment. If these density changes are correlated to subsequent clinical toxicity this assay could form the basis for biological adaptive radiotherapy.

  18. Immunoregulatory activities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins: Effect of HIV recombinant and synthetic peptides on immunoglobulin synthesis and proliferative responses by normal lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, M.P.N.; Pottathil, R.; Heimer, E.P.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant and synthetic peptides corresponding to envelope proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were examined for their effects on the activities of lymphocytes from normal donors in vitro. Although lymphocytes cultured with env-gag peptides produced significant amounts of IgG, addition of env-gag peptides to a pokeweed mitogen-induced B-cell activation system resulted in suppression of immunoglobulin synthesis by normal lymphocytes. Recombinant antigens, env-gag and env-80 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), produced a substantial proliferative response by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as determined by [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation. PBMC precultured with HIV synthetic peptide env 578-608 also manifested significant proliferative responses as compared to control cultures. CD3 + lymphocytes precultured with recombinant HIV antigens, env-gag and env-80 DHFR, and synthetic HIV peptide, env 487-511, showed moderate but significant proliferative responses. Both recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides also produced a dose-dependent stimulatory effect on proliferation by CD3 - lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that recombinant and synthetic peptides of the HIV genome express immunoregulatory T- and B-cell epitopes. Identification of unique HIV epitopes with immunogenic and immunoregulatory activities is necessary for the development of an effective vaccine against HIV infection

  19. Estimation of Extreme Response and Failure Probability of Wind Turbines under Normal Operation using Probability Density Evolution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Liu, W. F.

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of extreme response and failure probability of structures subjected to ultimate design loads is essential for structural design of wind turbines according to the new standard IEC61400-1. This task is focused on in the present paper in virtue of probability density evolution method (PDEM......), which underlies the schemes of random vibration analysis and structural reliability assessment. The short-term rare failure probability of 5-mega-watt wind turbines, for illustrative purposes, in case of given mean wind speeds and turbulence levels is investigated through the scheme of extreme value...... distribution instead of any other approximate schemes of fitted distribution currently used in statistical extrapolation techniques. Besides, the comparative studies against the classical fitted distributions and the standard Monte Carlo techniques are carried out. Numerical results indicate that PDEM exhibits...

  20. Auditory brainstem response latency in forward masking, a marker of sensory deficits in listeners with normal hearing thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehraei, Golbarg; Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2017-01-01

    In rodent models, acoustic exposure too modest to elevate hearing thresholds can nonetheless cause auditory nerve fiber deafferentation, interfering with the coding of supra-threshold sound. Low-spontaneous rate nerve fibers, important for encoding acoustic information at supra-threshold levels...... and in noise, are more susceptible to degeneration than high-spontaneous rate fibers. The change in auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave-V latency with noise level has been shown to be associated with auditory nerve deafferentation. Here, we measured ABR in a forward masking paradigm and evaluated wave......-V latency changes with increasing masker-to-probe intervals. In the same listeners, behavioral forward masking detection thresholds were measured. We hypothesized that 1) auditory nerve fiber deafferentation increases forward masking thresholds and increases wave-V latency and 2) a preferential loss of low...

  1. Vascular response to ischemia in the feet of falanga torture victims and normal controls--color and spectral Doppler findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Amris, Kirstine; Holm, Christian Cato

    2009-01-01

    to controls. On color Doppler this would be seen as less color after ischemia and on spectral Doppler as elevated resistive index (RI). METHODS: Ten male torture victims from the Middle East and nine age, sex and ethnically matched controls underwent Doppler examination of the abductor hallucis and flexor...... digitorum brevis muscles before and after two minutes ischemia induced with a pressure cuff over the malleoli. The color Doppler findings were quantified with the color fraction (CF) before and after ischemia. On spectral Doppler the resistive index was measured once before and three consecutive times after....... However, the trend in RI still supports the hypothesis. The negative findings may be due to inadequate design where the CF and RI were measured in one setting, perhaps resulting in both methods being applied imperfectly. The response to ischemia seems short-lived and we suggest that the Doppler methods...

  2. Ordinary mode reflectometry. Modification of the scattering and cut-off responses due to the shape of localized density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanack, C.; Boucher, I.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.; Clairet, F.; Zou, X.L.

    1996-01-01

    Ordinary wave reflectometry in a plasma containing a localized density perturbation is studied with a 1-D model. The phase response is studied as a function of the wavenumber and position of the perturbation. It is shown that it strongly depends upon the perturbation shape and size. For a small perturbation wavenumber, the response is due to the oscillation of the cut-off layer. For larger wavenumbers, two regimes are found: for a broad perturbation, the phase response is an image of the perturbation itself; for a narrow perturbation, it is rather an image of the Fourier transform. For tokamak plasmas it turns out that, for the fluctuation spectra usually observed, the phase response comes primarily from those fluctuations that are localized at the cut-off. Results of a 2-D numerical model show that geometry effects are negligible for the scattering by radial fluctuations. (author)

  3. Birkhoff normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Birkhoff normal form procedure is a widely used tool for approximating a Hamiltonian systems by a simpler one. This chapter starts out with an introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics, followed by an explanation of the Birkhoff normal form procedure. Finally we discuss several algorithms for

  4. Cigarette smoke induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in normal and malignant human lung cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although lung cancer is among the few malignancies for which we know the primary etiological agent (i.e., cigarette smoke, a precise understanding of the temporal sequence of events that drive tumor progression remains elusive. In addition to finding that cigarette smoke (CS impacts the functioning of key pathways with significant roles in redox homeostasis, xenobiotic detoxification, cell cycle control, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER functioning, our data highlighted a defensive role for the unfolded protein response (UPR program. The UPR promotes cell survival by reducing the accumulation of aberrantly folded proteins through translation arrest, production of chaperone proteins, and increased degradation. Importance of the UPR in maintaining tissue health is evidenced by the fact that a chronic increase in defective protein structures plays a pathogenic role in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's syndromes, and cancer. Methods Gene and protein expression changes in CS exposed human cell cultures were monitored by high-density microarrays and Western blot analysis. Tissue arrays containing samples from 110 lung cancers were probed with antibodies to proteins of interest using immunohistochemistry. Results We show that: 1 CS induces ER stress and activates components of the UPR; 2 reactive species in CS that promote oxidative stress are primarily responsible for UPR activation; 3 CS exposure results in increased expression of several genes with significant roles in attenuating oxidative stress; and 4 several major UPR regulators are increased either in expression (i.e., BiP and eIF2α or phosphorylation (i.e., phospho-eIF2α in a majority of human lung cancers. Conclusion These data indicate that chronic ER stress and recruitment of one or more UPR effector arms upon exposure to CS may play a pivotal role in the etiology or progression of lung cancers, and that phospho-eIF2α and BiP may have

  5. Spermine modulation of the glutamateNMDA receptors is differentially responsive to conantokins in normal and alzheimer disease human cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnarsson, L.; Dodd, P.R.; Lewis, R.; University of Queensland, QLD

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The pharmacological characteristics of human N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors were examined in 12 control and 6 pathologically confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) cases in six different brain areas, by studying their responses to MK-801, glutamate, spermine, and the NMDA receptor antagonists Ala(7)-conantokinG and Lys(7)-conantokinG. [ 3 H]MK801 binding assays performed by standard protocols on well-washed synoptic plasma membranes showed little variation in k D in all six brain areas, including comparisons between control and matched AD cases. b MAX values showed regional differences within control and AD cases, but there was no significant difference between groups in any of the brain regions. Maximal glutamate-enhanced [ 3 H]MK801 binding did not vary much between the brain regions or between control and AD cases, whereas maximal spermine-enhanced [ 3 H]MK-801 binding differed significantly between certain brain regions and between control and AD cases. In absolute terms in the control cases, the activation values were much lower in the spared regions, occipital and motor cortex, than in other areas; further, areas which are susceptible to damage showed reduced spermine activation in AD cases. These regional differences in the efficacy of spermine activation might be the result of local variations in the subunit composition of the NMDA receptor. Ala(7)-conantokinG and Lys(7)-conantokinG showed slight differences in potency, with the Ala(7) compound as the more potent. Both peptides produced 100% inhibition of spermine-enhanced [ 3 H]MK-801 binding in all brain areas, ana both gave lower IC 50 values in AD cases than in control cases. The significant differences in the inhibition of spermine-enhanced [ 3 H]MK-801 binding by the peptides between control and AD cases suggest that AD cases have a particular receptor subunit composition that is responsive to polyamines and which might make them more susceptible to excitotoxic damage. The spermine site

  6. Assessment of Adaptive Rate Response Provided by Accelerometer, Minute Ventilation and Dual Sensor Compared with Normal Sinus Rhythm During Exercise: A Self-controlled Study in Chronotropically Competent Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual sensor (DS for rate adaption was supposed to be more physiological. To evaluate its superiority, the DS (accelerometer [ACC] and minute ventilation [MV] and normal sinus rate response were compared in a self-controlled way during exercise treadmill testing. Methods: This self-controlled study was performed in atrioventricular block patients with normal sinus function who met the indications of pacemaker implant. Twenty-one patients came to the 1-month follow-up visit. Patients performed a treadmill test 1-month post implant while programmed in DDDR and sensor passive mode. For these patients, sensor response factors were left at default settings (ACC = 8, MV = 3 and sensor indicated rates (SIRs for DS, ACC and MV sensor were retrieved from the pacemaker memories, along with measured sinus node (SN rates from the beginning to 1-minute after the end of the treadmill test, and compared among study groups. Repeated measures analysis of variance and profile analysis, as well as variance analysis of randomized block designs, were used for statistical analysis. Results: Fifteen patients (15/21 were determined to be chronotropically competent. The mean differences between DS SIRs and intrinsic sinus rates during treadmill testing were smaller than those for ACC and MV sensor (mean difference between SIR and SN rate: ACC vs. SN, MV vs. SN, DS vs. SN, respectively, 34.84, 17.60, 16.15 beats/min, though no sensors could mimic sinus rates under the default settings for sensor response factor (ACC vs. SN P-adjusted < 0.001; MV vs. SN P-adjusted = 0.002; DS vs. SN P-adjusted = 0.005. However, both in the range of 1 st minute and first 3 minutes of exercise, only the DS SIR profile did not differ from sinus rates (P-adjusted = 0.09, 0.90, respectively. Conclusions: The DS under default settings provides more physiological rate response during physical activity than the corresponding single sensors (ACC or MV sensor. Further study is needed to

  7. Single Cell Chemical Cytometry of Akt Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Normal Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes in Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainz, Emilie R; Serafin, D Stephen; Nguyen, Tuong T; Tarrant, Teresa K; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2016-08-02

    The etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is poorly understood, and 30% of patients are unresponsive to established treatments targeting tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Akt kinase is implicated in TNFα signaling and may act as a barometer of patient responses to biologic therapies. Fluorescent peptide sensors and chemical cytometry were employed to directly measure Akt activity as well as proteolytic activity in individual fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from RA and normal subjects. The specificity of the peptide reporter was evaluated and shown to be a valid measure of Akt activity in single cells. The effect of TNFα treatment on Akt activity was highly heterogeneous between normal and RA subjects, which was not observable in bulk analyses. In 2 RA subjects, a bimodal distribution of Akt activity was observed, primarily due to a subpopulation (21.7%: RA Subject 5; 23.8%: RA Subject 6) of cells in which >60% of the reporter was phosphorylated. These subjects also possessed statistically elevated proteolytic cleavage of the reporter relative to normal subjects, suggesting heterogeneity in Akt and protease activity that may play a role in the RA-affected joint. We expect that chemical cytometry studies pairing peptide reporters with capillary electrophoresis will provide valuable data regarding aberrant kinase activity from small samples of clinical interest.

  8. Comparison of blue-green response between transmission-mode GaAsP- and GaAs-based photocathodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang-Cheng, Jiao; Zheng-Tang, Liu; Hui, Guo; Yi-Jun, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    In order to develop the photodetector for effective blue-green response, the 18-mm-diameter vacuum image tube combined with the transmission-mode Al0.7Ga0.3As0.9 P 0.1/GaAs0.9 P 0.1 photocathode grown by molecular beam epitaxy is tentatively fabricated. A comparison of photoelectric property, spectral characteristic and performance parameter between the transmission-mode GaAsP-based and blue-extended GaAs-based photocathodes shows that the GaAsP-based photocathode possesses better absorption and higher quantum efficiency in the blue-green waveband, combined with a larger surface electron escape probability. Especially, the quantum efficiency at 532 nm for the GaAsP-based photocathode achieves as high as 59%, nearly twice that for the blue-extended GaAs-based one, which would be more conducive to the underwater range-gated imaging based on laser illumination. Moreover, the simulation results show that the favorable blue-green response can be achieved by optimizing the emission-layer thickness in a range of 0.4 μm-0.6 μm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61301023) and the Science and Technology on Low-Light-Level Night Vision Laboratory Foundation, China (Grant No. BJ2014001).

  9. Strontium-Doped Calcium Phosphate and Hydroxyapatite Granules Promote Different Inflammatory and Bone Remodelling Responses in Normal and Ovariectomised Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Emanuelsson, Lena; Norlindh, Birgitta; Omar, Omar; Thomsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The healing of bone defects may be hindered by systemic conditions such as osteoporosis. Calcium phosphates, with or without ion substitutions, may provide advantages for bone augmentation. However, the mechanism of bone formation with these materials is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing process in bone defects implanted with hydroxyapatite (HA) or strontium-doped calcium phosphate (SCP) granules, in non-ovariectomised (non-OVX) and ovariectomised (OVX) rats. After 0 (baseline), six and 28d, bone samples were harvested for gene expression analysis, histology and histomorphometry. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), at six days, was higher in the HA, in non-OVX and OVX, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6), at six and 28d, was higher in SCP, but only in non-OVX. Both materials produced a similar expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Higher expression of osteoclastic markers, calcitonin receptor (CR) and cathepsin K (CatK), were detected in the HA group, irrespective of non-OVX or OVX. The overall bone formation was comparable between HA and SCP, but with topological differences. The bone area was higher in the defect centre of the HA group, mainly in the OVX, and in the defect periphery of the SCP group, in both non-OVX and OVX. It is concluded that HA and SCP granules result in comparable bone formation in trabecular bone defects. As judged by gene expression and histological analyses, the two materials induced different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses. The modulatory effects are associated with differences in the spatial distribution of the newly formed bone. PMID:24376855

  10. A lower dose threshold for the in vivo protective adaptive response to radiation. Tumorigenesis in chronically exposed normal and Trp53 heterozygous C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Burchart, P.; Wyatt, H.

    2008-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation to cells and animals may induce adaptive responses that reduce the risk of cancer. However, there are upper dose thresholds above which these protective adaptive responses do not occur. We have now tested the hypothesis that there are similar lower dose thresholds that must be exceeded in order to induce protective effects in vivo. We examined the effects of low dose/low dose rate fractionated exposures on cancer formation in Trp53 normal or cancer-prone Trp53 heterozygous female C57BL/6 mice. Beginning at 6 weeks of age, mice were exposed 5 days/week to single daily doses (0.33 mGy, 0.7 mGy/h) totaling 48, 97 or 146 mGy over 30, 60 or 90 weeks. The exposures for shorter times (up to 60 weeks) appeared to be below the level necessary to induce overall protective adaptive responses in Trp53 normal mice, and detrimental effects (shortened lifespan, increased frequency) evident for only specific tumor types (B- and T-cell lymphomas), were produced. Only when the exposures were continued for 90 weeks did the dose become sufficient to induce protective adaptive responses, balancing the detrimental effects for these specific cancers, and reducing the risk level back to that of the unexposed animals. Detrimental effects were not seen for other tumor types, and a protective effect was seen for sarcomas after 60 weeks of exposure, which was then lost when the exposure continued for 90 weeks. As previously shown for the upper dose threshold for protection by low doses, the lower dose boundary between protection and harm was influenced by Trp53 functionality. Neither protection nor harm was observed in exposed Trp53 heterozygous mice, indicating that reduced Trp53 function raises the lower dose/dose rate threshold for both detrimental and protective tumorigenic effects. (author)

  11. Comparison of simulated and measured response of load rejection on A hydro power plant model with mixed mode nonlinear controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babunski, Darko; Tuneski, Atanasko; Zaev, Emil [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, ' Ss. Cyril and Methodius' University, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Revised Hydro Power Plant model of the IEEE working group recommended converted to state space model is used for simulation of transient response of hydro turbine, and verification was made using measurements of transients from real Hydro Power Plant (HPP). Nonlinear mixed model controller was designed and implemented into complete HPP simulation model and compared with PID with real parameters used in HPP, and with adjusted PID parameters with consideration of smallest frequency error. Verification of performance of the model was made comparing model response with measured load rejection, which is worst case of HPP operation. (Author)

  12. Specificity of tumor necrosis factor toxicity for human mammary carcinomas relative to normal mammary epithelium and correlation with response to doxorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollbaum, C.; Creasey, A.A.; Dairkee, S.H.; Hiller, A.J.; Rudolph, A.R.; Lin, L.; Vitt, C.; Smith, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    By using a unique short-term culture system capable of growing both normal and malignant breast epithelial tissue, human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) showed preferential cytotoxicity to malignant cells as compared to the corresponding nonmalignant cells. Most of the malignant specimens were sensitive to TNF with 13 of 18 specimens showing 90% inhibition of clonal growth (ID 90 ). In contrast, all 13 nonmalignant specimens tested clustered at the resistant end of the TNF response spectrum. This differential sensitivity to TNF was seen in three cases in which malignant and nonmalignant breast epithelial tissues from the same patient were studied. To investigate the mechanism of resistance to TNF by normal cells, the presence of receptors for TNF was determined. Five of six cultures showed specific binding of 125 I-labeled TNF and there was no relationship between the degree of resistance and the degree of specific binding. Simultaneous comparison of tumor responsiveness to doxorubicin and TNF revealed a positive correlation in ID 90 values; these results may have important implications for the clinical use of TNF in cancer patients heavily pretreated with doxorubicin

  13. Distinct regimes of elastic response and deformation modes of cross-linked cytoskeletal and semiflexible polymer networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Head, D.A.; Levine, A.M.; Mac Kintosh, F.C.

    2003-01-01

    Semiflexible polymers such as filamentous actin (F-actin) play a vital role in the mechanical behavior of cells, yet the basic properties of cross-linked F-actin networks remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we have performed numerical studies of the linear response of homogeneous and

  14. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: A cross-Disciplinary Mode-of-Action Based Approach to Examining Does-Response and Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ILSI Research Foundation conveded a cross-disciplinary working group to examine current approaches for assessing dose-response and identifying safe levels of intake or exposure for four categoreis of bioactive agents: food allergens, nutrients, pathogenic microorganisms, and ...

  15. {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi muscle scintigraphy to assess the response to neuromuscular electrical stimulation of normal quadriceps femoris muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekindil, Y.; Sarikaya, A.; Birtane, M.; Pekindil, G.; Salan, A. [Trakya Univ., Edirne (Turkey). Hospital

    2001-08-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is widely used for improving muscle strength by simultaneous contraction in the prevention of muscle atrophy. Although there exist many clinical methods for evaluating the therapeutic response of muscles, {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi which is a skeletal muscle perfusion and metabolism agent has not previously been used for this purpose. The aim of our work was to ascertain whether {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi muscle scintigraphy is useful in the monitoring of therapeutic response to NMES in healthy women. The study included 16 women aged between 21 and 45, with a mean age of 32.7{+-}6.4. Both quadriceps femoris muscles (QFM) of each patient were studied. After randomization to remove the effect of the dominant side, one QFM of each patient was subjected to the NMES procedure for a period of 20 days. NMES was performed with an alternating biphasic rectangular current, from a computed electrical stimulator daily for 23 minutes. After measurement of skinfold thickness over the thigh, pre- and post-NMES girth measurements were assessed in centimeters. Sixty minutes after injections of 555 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, static images of the thigh were obtained for 5 minutes. The thigh-to-knee uptake ratio was calculated by semiquantitative analysis and normalized to body surface area (NUR=normalized uptake ratio). The difference between the pre and post NMES NUR values was significant (1.76{+-}0.31 versus 2.25{+-}0.38, p=0.0000). The percentage (%) increase in NUR values also well correlated with the % increase in thigh girth measurements (r=0.89, p=0.0000). These results indicated that {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi muscle scintigraphy as a new tool may be useful in evaluating therapeutic response to NMES. (author)

  16. Response of right ventricular size, function, and pressure to supine exercise: a comparison of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slutsky, R; Hooper, W; Ackerman, W; Moser, K

    1982-12-01

    The response of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and right ventricular end-diastolic volume (RVEDV) to exercise was studied in 11 patients with severe (FEV/sub 25/sub(%)sub(-)/sub 75/sub(%)=0.32+-0.13, mean+-SD) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using gated radionuclide cardiac blood pool imaging techniques, the response of the patients with COPD was compared with that of 15 control subjects. Arterial blood gases, pulmonary arterial pressures, wedge pressure, and right ventricular pressures also were monitored in patients with COPD. The resting RVEF was lower and the resting RVEDV was higher in patients with COPD than in normals (both, P<0.01). Two of the 11 COPD patients had a RVEF during rest that was below lower limits, while 10 of 11 patients had RV dilation. Right ventricular end-diastolic pressure, measured during rest in patients with COPD, was normal (6.1+-2.1 mm Hg) and cardiac index was within normal limits (3.55+-0.82 l/min/m/sup 2/). With exercise this cardiac index rose to 5.52+-1.7/min/m/sup 2/(P<0.01) due to the increase in heart rate (83+-18 to 125+-25 beats/min; P<0.01) while stroke volume did not significantly change. During exercise, normal subjects showed an increase in RVEF while RVEDV did not change; in patients with COPD, the RVEF fell and the RVEDV increased. In the patients with COPD, mild resting arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnia were both exaggerated during exercise; and mild resting pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAm=24.3+-7.65 mm Hg) also worsened with exercise (PAm=41+-19 mm Hg, P<0.01). Correlation between change in RVEF and PAm was -0.58, and between change in RVEDV and PAm was 0.63. We conclude that patients with severe COPD often have right ventricular dilation at rest and commonly respond to supine exercise with a fall in FV ejection fraction and further dilation of the right ventricle.

  17. Parâmetros ecocardiográficos em modo unidimensional de cães da raça Poodle miniatura, clinicamente sadios Echocardiographic parameters in unidimensional mode from clinically normal miniature Poodle dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Jun Yamato

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, a população canina da raça Poodle, principalmente a variação miniatura, cresce em progressão geométrica, sendo esta raça freqüentemente acometida por cardiopatias congênitas e adquiridas. O escopo deste estudo foi padronizar e avaliar os parâmetros ecocardiográficos em modo unidimensional (M de cães da raça Poodle miniatura, devido ao aumento populacional da mesma, a variação existente destes parâmetros entre as raças caninas e as diversas cardiopatias às quais os Poodles são predispostos. Foram utilizados 30 cães, da referida raça, sendo 09 machos e 21 fêmeas com idades entre 2 a 7 anos (3,87±1,55 e peso corpóreo variando de 2,0 a 8,7 quilos (4,49±1,38. Os cães incluídos neste estudo foram considerados sadios, após terem sido submetidos aos exames físico, laboratoriais, eletrocardiográfico, radiográfico e à mensuração da pressão arterial. Após a realização do exame ecocardiográfico e a análise dos resultados, foi possível obter os valores de referência do exame ecocardiográfico, em modo M, para os cães da raça Poodle miniatura e, ainda, sugerir que o peso corpóreo e altura podem exercer influência sobre os parâmetros ecocardiográficos.In Brazil, the canine population of the Poodle, mainly the Miniature variation, grows in geometric progression, beeing this breed frequently affected by congenital and adquired cardiopathies. The main objective of this study was the standardization and evaluation of the echocardiographic parameters in unidimensional (M mode, from clinically normal Miniature Poodle dogs. Thirthy Miniature Poodle dogs, 09 males and 21 females ageing between 2 and 7 years old (3.87±1.55, and weight varying from 2.0 to 8.7 kilogram (4.49±1.38 were studied. To be included in this study, physical exam, hemogram, biochemical profile, urinalysis, detection of circulating microfilaries as well as ELISA test for Dirofilaria immitis, electrocardiographic, radiographic exams and

  18. Evaluation of humoral and cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhao; Juan, Long; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of effective therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is finding a method for the specific inhibition of the inflammatory disease processes without the induction of generalized immunosuppression. Of note, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters that may restore immunological tolerance remains a high priority. pcDNA-CCOL2A1 is a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen(CCII). This vaccine was developed by our laboratory and has been shown to exhibit efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard" treatment, methotrexate (MTX). Here, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with anti-CII IgG antibodies, quantified the expression levels of Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, and performed flow cytometric analyses of different T-cell subsets, including Th1, Th2, Th17, Tc, Ts, Treg, and CD4(+)CD29(+)T cells to systemically evaluate humoral and cellular immune responses to pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal rats. Similar to our observations at maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, vaccination of normal rats with 300 μg/kg pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine did not induce the production of anti-CII IgG. Furthermore, no significant changes were observed in the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12(IL-23p40), monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in vaccinated normal rats relative to that in controls(P > 0.05). However, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were significantly increased on days 10 and 14, while interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were significantly decreased on days 28 and 35 after vaccination(P 0.05), with the exception of Treg cells, which were significantly

  19. Characterization of the cell death modes and the associated changes in cellular energy supply in response to AIPcS4-PDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesslich, T.; Plaetzer, K.; Oberdanner, C.; Krammer, B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can result in apoptosis and/or necrosis. Several steps in the apoptotic program depend on ATP and the intracellular ATP level is one determinant in the decision between apoptosis and necrosis. Therefore, photochemical damage of cellular targets involved in energy supply might play a crucial role for the mode of cell death being executed. The present study aimed at the characterization of changes in cellular energy supply and the associated cell death modes in response to PDT. Using the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431 and aluminum (III) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (2.5 μM) as a photosensitizer, we studied the changes in mitochondrial function and intracellular ATP-level after irradiation with different light doses. Employing assays for caspase-3 activation and nuclear fragmentation, 50 % of the cells were found to undergo apoptosis after irradiation with light doses between 2.5 to 3.5 J.cm -2 . At light doses above 6 J.cm -2 cells died exclusively by necrosis, indicated by rapid and complete loss of ATP and mitochondrial function and an absence of caspase activation and nuclear fragmentation. With apoptotic cell populations the ATP-level was maintained at near control levels for up to eight hours which was far beyond the onset of morphological changes. These data suggest that necrosis as well as apoptosis can be induced with AIPcS4 mediated PDT and that photo damage in energy supplying cellular targets may influence the mode of cell death. Further, it is speculated that cells undergoing apoptosis after PDT maintain high ATP levels long enough to complete the apoptotic program. (author)

  20. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include

  1. Brain development in mice after prenatal irradiation: Modes of effect manifestation; dose-response-relationships and the RBE of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konermann, G.

    1986-01-01

    Postnatal effect manifestation in the CNS after exposures during advanced prenatal stages of development is due to both the prolonged period of neurogenesis and its complexity. Apart from acute proliferative effects, examples of two types of long-term effects in the brains of prenatally exposed mice are represented. Namely, persistent structural damage, and, fluctuating responses during the histochemical and biochemical brain maturation. Structural effects following X-ray exposure are quantified on the basis of data for diameter diminution of the cortical plate, corpus callosum and fimbria hippocampi. The studies include computerized micro-videoanalysis of neuronal branching defects. Continuous extension of exposure levels to doses as low as 0.05 Gy give evidence for the existence of thresholds for these types of structural damage in the vicinity of exposures to 0.1 Gy. The effects following X-ray exposures are partly compared with corresponding effects after neutron exposures. Our studies on postnatal maturation disturbances include proliferative responses, myelin formation, as well as the determination of different biochemical parameters (ATP, myelin-proteins, Na + /K + -balance). From our experimental findings we are able to stress the special significance of neurogenetical long-term effects for risk estimates in man. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of the regional climate response in Australia to large-scale climate modes in the historical NARCliM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fita, L.; Evans, J. P.; Argüeso, D.; King, A.; Liu, Y.

    2017-10-01

    NARCliM (New South Wales (NSW)/Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Regional Climate Modelling project) is a regional climate modeling project for the Australian area. It is providing a comprehensive dynamically downscaled climate dataset for the CORDEX-AustralAsia region at 50-km resolution, and south-East Australia at a resolution of 10 km. The first phase of NARCliM produced 60-year long reanalysis driven regional simulations to allow evaluation of the regional model performance. This long control period (1950-2009) was used so that the model ability to capture the impact of large scale climate modes on Australian climate could be examined. Simulations are evaluated using a gridded observational dataset. Results show that using model independence as a criteria for choosing atmospheric model configuration from different possible sets of parameterizations may contribute to the regional climate models having different overall biases. The regional models generally capture the regional climate response to large-scale modes better than the driving reanalysis, though no regional model improves on all aspects of the simulated climate.

  3. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing and the Hypothetical Cold Response Mode of Saussurea involucrata in Extreme Cold Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Liu, Hailiang; Xia, Wenwen; Mu, Jianqiang; Feng, Yujie; Liu, Ruina; Yan, Panyao; Wang, Aiying; Lin, Zhongping; Guo, Yong; Zhu, Jianbo; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-06-07

    Saussurea involucrata grows in high mountain areas covered by snow throughout the year. The temperature of this habitat can change drastically in one day. To gain a better understanding of the cold response signaling pathways and molecular metabolic reactions involved in cold stress tolerance, genome-wide transcriptional analyses were performed using RNA-Seq technologies. A total of 199,758 transcripts were assembled, producing 138,540 unigenes with 46.8 Gb clean data. Overall, 184,416 (92.32%) transcripts were successfully annotated. The 365 transcription factors identified (292 unigenes) belonged to 49 transcription factor families associated with cold stress responses. A total of 343 transcripts on the signal transduction (132 upregulated and 212 downregulated in at least any one of the conditions) were strongly affected by cold temperature, such as the CBL-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase ( CIPKs ), receptor-like protein kinases , and protein kinases . The circadian rhythm pathway was activated by cold adaptation, which was necessary to endure the severe temperature changes within a day. There were 346 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to transport, of which 138 were upregulated and 22 were downregulated in at least any one of the conditions. Under cold stress conditions, transcriptional regulation, molecular transport, and signal transduction were involved in the adaptation to low temperature in S. involucrata . These findings contribute to our understanding of the adaptation of plants to harsh environments and the survival traits of S. involucrata . In addition, the present study provides insight into the molecular mechanisms of chilling and freezing tolerance.

  4. Neural circuits of eye movements during performance of the visual exploration task, which is similar to the responsive search score task, in schizophrenia patients and normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Yasundo; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Masato

    2004-01-01

    Abnormal exploratory eye movements have been studied as a biological marker for schizophrenia. Using functional MRI (fMRI), we investigated brain activations of 12 healthy and 8 schizophrenic subjects during performance of a visual exploration task that is similar to the responsive search score task to clarify the neural basis of the abnormal exploratory eye movement. Performance data, such as the number of eye movements, the reaction time, and the percentage of correct answers showed no significant differences between the two groups. Only the normal subjects showed activations at the bilateral thalamus and the left anterior medial frontal cortex during the visual exploration tasks. In contrast, only the schizophrenic subjects showed activations at the right anterior cingulate gyms during the same tasks. The activation at the different locations between the two groups, the left anterior medial frontal cortex in normal subjects and the right anterior cingulate gyrus in schizophrenia subjects, was explained by the feature of the visual tasks. Hypoactivation at the bilateral thalamus supports a dysfunctional filtering theory of schizophrenia. (author)

  5. Studies on the response of resistive-wall modes to applied magnetic perturbations in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoratto, D.; Drake, J. R.; Yadikin, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Paccagnella, R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Bolzonella, T.; Marchiori, G.; Cecconello, M.

    2005-09-01

    Arrays of magnetic coils and sensors in the EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43 1457 (2001)] reversed-field pinch have been used to investigate the plasma response to an applied resonant magnetic perturbation in the range of the resistive-wall modes (RWMs). Measured RWM growth rates agree with predictions of a cylindrical ideal-plasma model. The linear growth of low-n marginally stable RWMs is related to the so-called resonant-field amplification due to a dominant ∣n∣=2 machine error field of about 2 G. The dynamics of the m =1 RWMs interacting with the applied field produced by the coils can be accurately described by a two-pole system. Estimated poles and residues are given with sufficient accuracy by the cylindrical model with a thin continuous wall.

  6. Novel UV-Visible Photodetector in Photovoltaic Mode with Fast Response and Ultrahigh Photosensitivity Employing Se/TiO2 Nanotubes Heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingxia; Hu, Kai; Teng, Feng; Fang, Xiaosheng

    2017-02-01

    A feasible strategy for hybrid photodetector by integrating an array of self-ordered TiO 2 nanotubes (NTs) and selenium is demonstrated to break the compromise between the responsivity and response speed. Novel heterojunction between the TiO 2 NTs and Se in combination with the surface trap states at TiO 2 help regulate the electron transport and facilitate the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs under photovoltaic mode (at zero bias), leading to a high responsivity of ≈100 mA W -1 at 620 nm light illumination and the ultrashort rise/decay time (1.4/7.8 ms). The implanting of intrinsic p-type Se into TiO 2 NTs broadens the detection range to UV-visible (280-700 nm) with a large detectivity of over 10 12 Jones and a high linear dynamic range of over 80 dB. In addition, a maximum photocurrent of ≈10 7 A is achieved at 450 nm light illumination and an ultrahigh photosensitivity (on/off ratio up to 10 4 ) under zero bias upon UV and visible light illumination is readily achieved. The concept of employing novel heterojunction geometry holds great potential to pave a new way to realize high performance and energy-efficient optoelectronic devices for practical applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Filaggrin silencing by shRNA directly impairs the skin barrier function of normal human epidermal keratinocytes and then induces an immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, N.N. [Department of Dermatology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Pang, S.G. [Department of Endocrinology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Song, H.Y. [Department of Dermatology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); An, L.G. [College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Ma, X.L. [Central Laboratory, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province (China)

    2014-11-14

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether a single defect in skin barrier function simulated by filaggrin silencing could induce Th2-predominant inflammation. Filaggrin gene expression was silenced in cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) using small hairpin RNA (shRNA, GTTGGCTCAAGCATATTATTT). The efficacy of silencing was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. Filaggrin-silenced cells (LV group), shRNA control cells (NC group), and noninfected cells (Blank group) were evaluated. The expression of cornified cell envelope-related proteins, including cytokeratin (CK)-5, -10, -14, loricrin, involucrin, and transglutaminase (TGM)-1, was detected by Western blotting. Interleukins (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-12p70, IL-13, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After filaggrin was successfully silenced by shRNA, the expressions of CK-5, -10, -14, involucrin, and TGM-1 in NHEKs were significantly downregulated compared to the Blank and NC groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01); only loricrin expression was markedly upregulated (P<0.01). Filaggrin silencing also resulted in significant increases of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 (P<0.05 or P<0.01), and significant decreases of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ (P<0.01) compared with cells in the Blank and NC groups. Filaggrin silencing impaired normal skin barrier function mainly by targeting the cornified cell envelope. The immune response after filaggrin silencing was characterized by Th2 cells, mainly because of the inhibition of IFN-γ expression. Lack of filaggrin may directly impair skin barrier function and then further induce the immune response.

  8. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: a cross-disciplinary mode-of-action based approach to examining dose-response and thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Elizabeth; Boobis, Alan R; Olin, Stephen S

    2009-09-01

    The ILSI Research Foundation convened a cross-disciplinary working group to examine current approaches for assessing dose-response and identifying safe levels of intake or exposure for four categories of bioactive agents-food allergens, nutrients, pathogenic microorganisms, and environmental chemicals. This effort generated a common analytical framework-the Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF)-for systematically examining key events that occur between the initial dose of a bioactive agent and the effect of concern. Individual key events are considered with regard to factors that influence the dose-response relationship and factors that underlie variability in that relationship. This approach illuminates the connection between the processes occurring at the level of fundamental biology and the outcomes observed at the individual and population levels. Thus, it promotes an evidence-based approach for using mechanistic data to reduce reliance on default assumptions, to quantify variability, and to better characterize biological thresholds. This paper provides an overview of the KEDRF and introduces a series of four companion papers that illustrate initial application of the approach to a range of bioactive agents.

  9. Malware Normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Christodorescu, Mihai; Kinder, Johannes; Jha, Somesh; Katzenbeisser, Stefan; Veith, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Malware is code designed for a malicious purpose, such as obtaining root privilege on a host. A malware detector identifies malware and thus prevents it from adversely affecting a host. In order to evade detection by malware detectors, malware writers use various obfuscation techniques to transform their malware. There is strong evidence that commercial malware detectors are susceptible to these evasion tactics. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a malware normalizer ...

  10. Exercise training normalizes renal blood flow responses to acute hypoxia in experimental heart failure: role of the α1-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pügge, Carolin; Mediratta, Jai; Marcus, Noah J; Schultz, Harold D; Schiller, Alicia M; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-02-01

    Recent data suggest that exercise training (ExT) is beneficial in chronic heart failure (CHF) because it improves autonomic and peripheral vascular function. In this study, we hypothesized that ExT in the CHF state ameliorates the renal vasoconstrictor responses to hypoxia and that this beneficial effect is mediated by changes in α1-adrenergic receptor activation. CHF was induced in rabbits. Renal blood flow (RBF) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) responses to 6 min of 5% isocapnic hypoxia were assessed in the conscious state in sedentary (SED) and ExT rabbits with CHF with and without α1-adrenergic blockade. α1-adrenergic receptor expression in the kidney cortex was also evaluated. A significant decline in baseline RBF and RVC and an exaggerated renal vasoconstriction during acute hypoxia occurred in CHF-SED rabbits compared with the prepaced state (P renal denervation (DnX) blocked the hypoxia-induced renal vasoconstriction in CHF-SED rabbits. α1-adrenergic protein in the renal cortex of animals with CHF was increased in SED animals and normalized after ExT. These data provide evidence that the acute decline in RBF during hypoxia is caused entirely by the renal nerves but is only partially mediated by α1-adrenergic receptors. Nonetheless, α1-adrenergic receptors play an important role in the beneficial effects of ExT in the kidney. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. HPA axis response to social stress is attenuated in schizophrenia but normal in depression: evidence from a meta-analysis of existing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Simone; Dazzan, Paola; Kempton, Matthew J; Pariante, Carmine; Mondelli, Valeria

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the HPA axis response to social stress in studies that used the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), or comparable distressing paradigms, in individuals with either depression or schizophrenia. Sample size-adjusted effect sizes (Hedge's g statistic) were calculated to estimate the HPA axis stress response to social stress. We used a meta-regression model to take into account the moderating effect of the baseline cortisol level. Participants with depression show an activation pattern to social stress similar to that of healthy controls. Despite a normal cortisol production rate, individuals with schizophrenia have lower cortisol levels than controls both in anticipation and after exposure to social stress. Participants with depression and higher cortisol levels before the task have an increased cortisol production and reached higher cortisol levels during the task. This may be explained by the presence of an impaired negative feedback. The activation pattern present in schizophrenia may explain the reduced ability to appropriately contextualize past experiences shown by individuals with psychosis in social stressful situation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of Sine Shaped High-Frequency Rhythmic Visual Stimuli Patterns for SSVEP Response Analysis and Fatigue Rate Evaluation in Normal Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Keihani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent EEG-SSVEP signal based BCI studies have used high frequency square pulse visual stimuli to reduce subjective fatigue. However, the effect of total harmonic distortion (THD has not been considered. Compared to CRT and LCD monitors, LED screen displays high-frequency wave with better refresh rate. In this study, we present high frequency sine wave simple and rhythmic patterns with low THD rate by LED to analyze SSVEP responses and evaluate subjective fatigue in normal subjects.Materials and Methods: We used patterns of 3-sequence high-frequency sine waves (25, 30, and 35 Hz to design our visual stimuli. Nine stimuli patterns, 3 simple (repetition of each of above 3 frequencies e.g., P25-25-25 and 6 rhythmic (all of the frequencies in 6 different sequences e.g., P25-30-35 were chosen. A hardware setup with low THD rate (<0.1% was designed to present these patterns on LED. Twenty two normal subjects (aged 23–30 (25 ± 2.1 yrs were enrolled. Visual analog scale (VAS was used for subjective fatigue evaluation after presentation of each stimulus pattern. PSD, CCA, and LASSO methods were employed to analyze SSVEP responses. The data including SSVEP features and fatigue rate for different visual stimuli patterns were statistically evaluated.Results: All 9 visual stimuli patterns elicited SSVEP responses. Overall, obtained accuracy rates were 88.35% for PSD and > 90% for CCA and LASSO (for TWs > 1 s. High frequency rhythmic patterns group with low THD rate showed higher accuracy rate (99.24% than simple patterns group (98.48%. Repeated measure ANOVA showed significant difference between rhythmic pattern features (P < 0.0005. Overall, there was no significant difference between the VAS of rhythmic [3.85 ± 2.13] compared to the simple patterns group [3.96 ± 2.21], (P = 0.63. Rhythmic group had lower within group VAS variation (min = P25-30-35 [2.90 ± 2.45], max = P35-25-30 [4.81 ± 2.65] as well as least individual pattern VAS (P25

  13. Dipole Correlation of the Electronic Structures of theConformations of Water Molecule Evolving Through theNormal Modes of Vibrations Between Angular (C2v to Linear(D∝h Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Chakraborty

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to settle the issue of equivalence or non-equivalence of the two lone pairsof electrons on oxygen atom in water molecule, a quantum chemical study of the dipolecorrelation of the electronic structure of the molecule as a function of conformationsgenerated following the normal modes of vibrations between the two extremeconformations, C2v (∠HOH at 90o and D∝h (∠HOH at 180o, including the equilibrium one,has been performed. The study invokes quantum mechanical partitioning of moleculardipoles into bond moment and lone pair moment and localization of delocalized canonicalmolecular orbitals, CMO’s into localized molecular orbitals, LMO’s. An earlier suggestion,on the basis of photoelectron spectroscopy, that one lone pair is in p-type and the other is ins-type orbital of O atom of water molecule at its equilibrium shape, and also the qualitative“Squirrel Ears” structure are brought under serious scrutiny. A large number ofconformations are generated and the charge density matrix, dipole moment of eachconformation is computed in terms of the generated canonical molecular orbitals, CMO’sand then Sinanoğlu’s localization method is invoked to localize the CMO’s of eachconformation and the quantum mechanical hybridizations of all the bonds and lone pairs onO center are evaluated in terms of the localized molecular orbitals. Computed datademonstrate that the electronic structures i.e. two bond pairs and two lone pairs and itshybridization status of all conformations of water molecule are straightforward in terms ofthe LMO’s. It is further revealed that the pattern of orbital hybridization changescontinuously as a function of evolution of molecular shape. The close analysis of thegenerated LMO’s reveals that one lone pair is accommodated in a pure p orbital and anotherlone pair is in a hybrid

  14. Differences in Normal Tissue Response in the Esophagus Between Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using In Vivo Imaging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S; Yang, Jinzhong; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Stingo, Francesco; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R; Martel, Mary K; Briere, Tina M; Court, Laurence E

    2017-11-15

    To determine whether there exists any significant difference in normal tissue toxicity between intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. A total of 134 study patients (n=49 treated with proton therapy, n=85 with IMRT) treated in a randomized trial had a previously validated esophageal toxicity imaging biomarker, esophageal expansion, quantified during radiation therapy, as well as esophagitis grade (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0), on a weekly basis during treatment. Differences between the 2 modalities were statically analyzed using the imaging biomarker metric value (Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance), as well as the incidence and severity of esophagitis grade (χ 2 and Fisher exact tests, respectively). The dose-response of the imaging biomarker was also compared between modalities using esophageal equivalent uniform dose, as well as delivered dose to an isotropic esophageal subvolume. No statistically significant difference in the distribution of esophagitis grade, the incidence of grade ≥3 esophagitis (15 and 11 patients treated with IMRT and proton therapy, respectively), or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker between cohorts (P>.05) was found. The distribution of imaging biomarker metric values had similar distributions between treatment arms, despite a slightly higher dose volume in the proton arm (P>.05). Imaging biomarker dose-response was similar between modalities for dose quantified as esophageal equivalent uniform dose and delivered esophageal subvolume dose. Regardless of treatment modality, there was high variability in imaging biomarker response, as well as esophagitis grade, for similar esophageal doses between patients. There was no significant difference in esophageal toxicity from either proton- or photon-based radiation therapy as quantified by esophagitis grade or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  15. The Use of Sparse Direct Solver in Vector Finite Element Modeling for Calculating Two Dimensional (2-D) Magnetotelluric Responses in Transverse Electric (TE) Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yihaa Roodhiyah, Lisa’; Tjong, Tiffany; Nurhasan; Sutarno, D.

    2018-04-01

    The late research, linear matrices of vector finite element in two dimensional(2-D) magnetotelluric (MT) responses modeling was solved by non-sparse direct solver in TE mode. Nevertheless, there is some weakness which have to be improved especially accuracy in the low frequency (10-3 Hz-10-5 Hz) which is not achieved yet and high cost computation in dense mesh. In this work, the solver which is used is sparse direct solver instead of non-sparse direct solverto overcome the weaknesses of solving linear matrices of vector finite element metod using non-sparse direct solver. Sparse direct solver will be advantageous in solving linear matrices of vector finite element method because of the matrix properties which is symmetrical and sparse. The validation of sparse direct solver in solving linear matrices of vector finite element has been done for a homogen half-space model and vertical contact model by analytical solution. Thevalidation result of sparse direct solver in solving linear matrices of vector finite element shows that sparse direct solver is more stable than non-sparse direct solver in computing linear problem of vector finite element method especially in low frequency. In the end, the accuracy of 2D MT responses modelling in low frequency (10-3 Hz-10-5 Hz) has been reached out under the efficient allocation memory of array and less computational time consuming.

  16. The effect of a slow mode of BMP-2 delivery on the inflammatory response provoked by bone-defect-filling polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Yuelian; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Hunziker, Ernst Bruno

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the inflammatory response to, and the osteoinductive efficacies of, four polymers (collagen, Ethisorb, PLGA and Polyactive) that bore either an adsorbed (fast-release kinetics) or a calcium-phosphate-coating-incorporated (slow-release kinetics) depot of BMP-2. Titanium-plate-supported discs of each polymer (n = 6 per group) were implanted at an ectopic (subcutaneous) ossification site in rats (n = 48). Five weeks later, they were retrieved for a histomorphometric analysis of the volumes of ectopic bone and foreign-body giant cells (a gauge of inflammatory reactivity), and the degree of polymer degradation. For each polymer, the osteoinductive efficacy of BMP-2 was higher when it was incorporated into a coating than when it was directly adsorbed onto the material. This mode of BMP-2 carriage was consistently associated with an attenuation of the inflammatory response. For coated materials, the volume density of foreign-body giant cells was inversely correlated with the volume density of bone (r(2) = 0.96), and the volume density of bone was directly proportional to the surface-area density of the polymer (r(2) = 0.97). Following coating degradation, other competitive factors, such as the biocompatibility and the biodegradability of the polymer itself, came into play. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tacoma mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.; Wang, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The name Tacoma refers to the Tacoma Narrows Bridge which collapsed on November 8, 1940 due to massive oscillations caused by high winds. One of the destructive modes was a torsion mode which was excited by transverse wind, a dipole force, and continued until the bridge collapsed. The name is used to refer to a coherent mode of oscillation of a spectrum of oscillators in which the amplitude vs frequency graph contains one node, where the node occurs near the driving frequency and a ω is not symmetric about zero. When this result is applied to vertical instabilities in coasting beams, it implies the existence of a coherent skew quadrupole moment, Q/sub xy/, whenever a coherent dipole oscillation exists

  18. Tacoma mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.; Wang, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The name Tacoma refers to the Tacoma Narrows Bridge which collapsed on November 8, 1940 due to massive oscillations caused by high winds. One of the destructive modes was a torsion mode which was excited by transverse wind, a dipole force, and continued until the bridge collapsed. The name is used to refer to a coherent mode of oscillation of a spectrum of oscillators in which the amplitude vs frequency graph contains one node, where the node occurs near the driving frequency and a(ω) is not symmetric about zero. When this result is applied to vertical instabilities in coasting beams, it implies the existence of a coherent skew quadrupole moment, whenever a coherent dipole oscillation exists

  19. Immune Modulation in Normal Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) (Lymphocytes) in Response to Benzofuran-2-Carboxylic Acid Derivative KMEG during Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Elvis; Mann, Vivek; Ellis, Ivory; Mansoor, Elvedina; Olamigoke, Loretta; Marriott, Karla Sue; Denkins, Pamela; Williams, Willie; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2017-08-01

    Microgravity and radiation exposure during space flight have been widely reported to induce the suppression of normal immune system function, and increase the risk of cancer development in humans. These findings pose a serious risk to manned space missions. Interestingly, recent studies have shown that benzofuran-2-carboxylic acid derivatives can inhibit the progression of some of these devastating effects on earth and in modeled microgravity. However, these studies had not assessed the impacts of benzofuran-2- carboxylic acid and its derivatives on global gene expression under spaceflight conditions. In this study, the ability of a specific benzofuran-2-carboxylic acid derivative (KMEG) to confer protection from radiation and restore normal immune function was investigated following exposure to space flight conditions on the ISS. Normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (lymphocytes) treated with 10 µ g/ml of KMEG together with untreated control samples were flown on Nanoracks hardware on Spacex-3 flight. The Samples were returned one month later and gene expression was analyzed. A 1g-ground control experiment was performed in parallel at the Kennedy spaceflight center. The first overall subtractive unrestricted analysis revealed 78 genes, which were differentially expressed in space flight KMEG, untreated lymphocytes as compared to the corresponding ground controls. However, in KMEG-treated space flight lymphocytes, there was an increased expression of a group of genes that mediate increased transcription, translation and innate immune system mediating functions of lymphocytes as compared to KMEG-untreated samples. Analysis of genes related to T cell proliferation in spaceflight KMEG-treated lymphocytes compared to 1g-ground KMEG- treated lymphocytes revealed six T cell proliferation and signaling genes to be significantly upregulated (p trafficking, promote early response, mediating C-myc related proliferation, promote antiapoptotic activity and protects

  20. Normal accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrow, C.

    1989-01-01

    The author has chosen numerous concrete examples to illustrate the hazardousness inherent in high-risk technologies. Starting with the TMI reactor accident in 1979, he shows that it is not only the nuclear energy sector that bears the risk of 'normal accidents', but also quite a number of other technologies and industrial sectors, or research fields. The author refers to the petrochemical industry, shipping, air traffic, large dams, mining activities, and genetic engineering, showing that due to the complexity of the systems and their manifold, rapidly interacting processes, accidents happen that cannot be thoroughly calculated, and hence are unavoidable. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained s...

  2. Pancreatic beta-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia V; Deacon, Carolyn F; Hare, Kristine; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2010-02-25

    This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood glucose (BG) using insulin (mean diurnal BG: 6.4+/-0.3 mmol/l; HbA(1)c: 6.6+/-0.3%). Nine matched healthy subjects acted as controls. In controls, area-under-curve (AUC) for amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin were higher with GLP-1 than saline (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratio was similar on both days, while AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio was higher with GLP-1 (P=0.02). In the patients, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin AUCs were unaltered by near-normoglycaemia per se. Proinsulin responses to GLP-1 were unchanged, but amylin and C-peptide AUCs increased (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratios rose to control levels. Near-normoglycaemia tended to reduce AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, which was significant (P=0.04) with GLP-1, but still higher than with saline (P=0.004). In conclusion, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin responses to glucose were unaffected by four weeks of near-normoglycaemia, whereas GLP-1 increased amylin and C-peptide secretion and amylin/C-peptide ratio. Near-normoglycaemia reduced proinsulin/C-peptide ratio during stimulation with GLP-1, suggesting that strict glycaemic control might ameliorate some of the disturbances in beta-cell function characterizing T2DM. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reconstructing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Fristed, Peter Billeskov

    2012-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is an area of priority for the Danish Government. As the field expands, this calls for increased knowledge about mental health nursing practice, as this is part of the forensic psychiatry treatment offered. However, only sparse research exists in this area. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the characteristics of forensic mental health nursing staff interaction with forensic mental health inpatients and to explore how staff give meaning to these interactions. The project included 32 forensic mental health staff members, with over 307 hours of participant observations, 48 informal....... The intention is to establish a trusting relationship to form behaviour and perceptual-corrective care, which is characterized by staff's endeavours to change, halt, or support the patient's behaviour or perception in relation to staff's perception of normality. The intention is to support and teach the patient...

  4. Pursuing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Louise Sofia; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    implying an influence on whether to participate in cancer survivorship care programs. Because of "pursuing normality," 8 of 9 participants opted out of cancer survivorship care programming due to prospects of "being cured" and perceptions of cancer survivorship care as "a continuation of the disease......BACKGROUND: The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study...... was to understand the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors to aid the future planning of cancer survivorship care and overcome barriers to participation. METHODS: Data were generated in a hematological ward during 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation and 46...

  5. Pancreatic beta-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia V; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2010-01-01

    glucose (BG) using insulin (mean diurnal BG: 6.4+/-0.3 mmol/l; HbA(1)c: 6.6+/-0.3%). Nine matched healthy subjects acted as controls. In controls, area-under-curve (AUC) for amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin were higher with GLP-1 than saline (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratio was similar on both......This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood...... amylin/C-peptide ratios rose to control levels. Near-normoglycaemia tended to reduce AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, which was significant (P=0.04) with GLP-1, but still higher than with saline (P=0.004). In conclusion, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin responses to glucose were unaffected by four weeks...

  6. Pancreatic ß-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia; Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2010-01-01

    glucose (BG) using insulin (mean diurnal BG: 6.4+/-0.3 mmol/l; HbA(1)c: 6.6+/-0.3%). Nine matched healthy subjects acted as controls. In controls, area-under-curve (AUC) for amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin were higher with GLP-1 than saline (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratio was similar on both......This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood...... amylin/C-peptide ratios rose to control levels. Near-normoglycaemia tended to reduce AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, which was significant (P=0.04) with GLP-1, but still higher than with saline (P=0.004). In conclusion, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin responses to glucose were unaffected by four weeks...

  7. Plasma ceramide levels are altered in low and normal birth weight men in response to short-term high-fat overfeeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel-Madsen, Amalie; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2018-01-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) individuals have an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes compared with normal birth weight (NBW) individuals. We hypothesised that LBW individuals exhibit an increased fatty acid flux into lipogenesis in non-adipose tissue with a resulting...... accumulation of lipotoxic lipids, including ceramides, in the blood. Therefore, we measured fasting plasma levels of 27 ceramides in 18 young, healthy, LBW men and 25 NBW controls after an isocaloric control diet and a 5-day high-fat, high-calorie diet by HPLC-HRMS. LBW men did not show elevated plasma......:0–18:1/d18:1–18:0 and d18:1–24:2/d18:2–24:1 levels and increased the d18:0–24:1a level in response to overfeeding. Plasma d18:0–24:1a and total ceramide levels were positively associated with the fasting blood glucose level and endogenous glucose production after the control diet, and the total ceramide...

  8. Propagating annular modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, A.; Plumb, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The leading "annular mode", defined as the dominant EOF of surface pressure or of zonal mean zonal wind variability, appears as a dipolar structure straddling the mean midlatitude jet and thus seems to describe north-south wobbling of the jet latitude. However, extratropical zonal wind anomalies frequently tend to migrate poleward. This behavior can be described by the first two EOFs, the first (AM1) being the dipolar structure, and the second (AM2) having a tripolar structure centered on the mean jet. Taken in isolation, AM1 thus describes a north-south wobbling of the jet position, while AM2 describes a strengthening and narrowing of the jet. However, despite the fact that they are spatially orthogonal, and their corresponding time series temporally orthogonal, AM1 and AM2 are not independent, but show significant lag-correlations which reveal the propagation. The EOFs are not modes of the underlying dynamical system governing the zonal flow evolution. The true modes can be estimated using principal oscillation pattern (POP) analysis. In the troposphere, the leading POPs manifest themselves as a pair of complex conjugate structures with conjugate eigenvalues thus, in reality, constituting a single, complex, mode that describes propagating anomalies. Even though the principal components associated with the two leading EOFs decay at different rates, each decays faster than the true mode. These facts have implications for eddy feedback and the susceptibility of the mode to external perturbations. If one interprets the annular modes as the modes of the system, then simple theory predicts that the response to steady forcing will usually be dominated by AM1 (with the longest time scale). However, such arguments should really be applied to the true modes. Experiments with a simplified GCM show that climate response to perturbations do not necessarily have AM1 structures. Implications of these results for stratosphere-troposphere interactions are explored. The POP

  9. Assessing the usefulness of B-mode and colour Doppler sonography, and measurements of circulating progesterone concentrations for determining ovarian responses in superovulated ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Mef; Ribeiro, I F; Rodriguez, Mgk; Maciel, G S; Fonseca, J F; Brandão, F Z; Bartlewski, P M

    2018-06-01

    The main goal of this study was to assess the usefulness of two imaging modalities, namely the B-mode and colour Doppler sonography, and serum progesterone (P 4 ) concentrations for determining the ovarian response in superovulated ewes. Twenty-four sexually mature Santa Inês ewes underwent the superovulatory treatment consisting of eight injections of porcine FSH (total dose of 200 or 133 or 100 mg; n = 8 ewes/total dose) given at 12-hr intervals and initiated 48 hr before CIDR ® (Pfizer Inc., Auckland, New Zealand) removal. Six days after natural mating, the ovaries of all donor ewes were visualized and examined with transrectal ultrasonography and then with videolaparoscopy to identify and enumerate corpora lutea (CL) and luteinized unovulated follicles (LUFs). Jugular blood samples were collected just prior to ovarian examinations. The total number of CL (r = .78 and 0.83, p ewes. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Role of Stroma-Derived Extracellular Matrix in Regulation of Growth and Hormonal Responsiveness of Normal and Cancerous Human Breast Epithelium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woodward, Terry

    1997-01-01

    Specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and their cellular receptors (integrins) are required for normal mammary gland morphogenesis and differentiation, while their expression is dramatically altered during tumorigenesis...

  11. Role of the normal gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandhyala, Sai Manasa; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Subramanyam, Chivkula; Vuyyuru, Harish; Sasikala, Mitnala; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2015-08-07

    Relation between the gut microbiota and human health is being increasingly recognised. It is now well established that a healthy gut flora is largely responsible for overall health of the host. The normal human gut microbiota comprises of two major phyla, namely Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Though the gut microbiota in an infant appears haphazard, it starts resembling the adult flora by the age of 3 years. Nevertheless, there exist temporal and spatial variations in the microbial distribution from esophagus to the rectum all along the individual's life span. Developments in genome sequencing technologies and bioinformatics have now enabled scientists to study these microorganisms and their function and microbe-host interactions in an elaborate manner both in health and disease. The normal gut microbiota imparts specific function in host nutrient metabolism, xenobiotic and drug metabolism, maintenance of structural integrity of the gut mucosal barrier, immunomodulation, and protection against pathogens. Several factors play a role in shaping the normal gut microbiota. They include (1) the mode of delivery (vaginal or caesarean); (2) diet during infancy (breast milk or formula feeds) and adulthood (vegan based or meat based); and (3) use of antibiotics or antibiotic like molecules that are derived from the environment or the gut commensal community. A major concern of antibiotic use is the long-term alteration of the normal healthy gut microbiota and horizontal transfer of resistance genes that could result in reservoir of organisms with a multidrug resistant gene pool.

  12. Use of Sine Shaped High-Frequency Rhythmic Visual Stimuli Patterns for SSVEP Response Analysis and Fatigue Rate Evaluation in Normal Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihani, Ahmadreza; Shirzhiyan, Zahra; Farahi, Morteza; Shamsi, Elham; Mahnam, Amin; Makkiabadi, Bahador; Haidari, Mohsen R; Jafari, Amir H

    2018-01-01

    Background: Recent EEG-SSVEP signal based BCI studies have used high frequency square pulse visual stimuli to reduce subjective fatigue. However, the effect of total harmonic distortion (THD) has not been considered. Compared to CRT and LCD monitors, LED screen displays high-frequency wave with better refresh rate. In this study, we present high frequency sine wave simple and rhythmic patterns with low THD rate by LED to analyze SSVEP responses and evaluate subjective fatigue in normal subjects. Materials and Methods: We used patterns of 3-sequence high-frequency sine waves (25, 30, and 35 Hz) to design our visual stimuli. Nine stimuli patterns, 3 simple (repetition of each of above 3 frequencies e.g., P25-25-25) and 6 rhythmic (all of the frequencies in 6 different sequences e.g., P25-30-35) were chosen. A hardware setup with low THD rate ( 90% for CCA and LASSO (for TWs > 1 s). High frequency rhythmic patterns group with low THD rate showed higher accuracy rate (99.24%) than simple patterns group (98.48%). Repeated measure ANOVA showed significant difference between rhythmic pattern features ( P rhythmic [3.85 ± 2.13] compared to the simple patterns group [3.96 ± 2.21], ( P = 0.63). Rhythmic group had lower within group VAS variation (min = P25-30-35 [2.90 ± 2.45], max = P35-25-30 [4.81 ± 2.65]) as well as least individual pattern VAS (P25-30-35). Discussion and Conclusion: Overall, rhythmic and simple pattern groups had higher and similar accuracy rates. Rhythmic stimuli patterns showed insignificantly lower fatigue rate than simple patterns. We conclude that both rhythmic and simple visual high frequency sine wave stimuli require further research for human subject SSVEP-BCI studies.

  13. Neural responses to visual food stimuli after a normal vs. higher protein breakfast in breakfast-skipping teens: a pilot fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidy, Heather J; Lepping, Rebecca J; Savage, Cary R; Harris, Corey T

    2011-10-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) pilot study identified whether breakfast consumption would alter the neural activity in brain regions associated with food motivation and reward in overweight "breakfast skipping" (BS) adolescent girls and examined whether increased protein at breakfast would lead to additional alterations. Ten girls (Age: 15 ± 1 years; BMI percentile 93 ± 1%; BS 5 ± 1×/week) completed 3 testing days. Following the BS day, the participants were provided with, in randomized order, normal protein (NP; 18 ± 1 g protein) or higher protein (HP; 50 ± 1 g protein) breakfast meals to consume at home for 6 days. On day 7 of each pattern, the participants came to the laboratory to consume their respective breakfast followed by appetite questionnaires and an fMRI brain scan to identify brain activation responses to viewing food vs. nonfood images prior to lunch. Breakfast consumption led to enduring (i.e., 3-h post breakfast) reductions in neural activation in the hippocampus, amygdala, cingulate, and parahippocampus vs. BS. HP led to enduring reductions in insula and middle prefrontal cortex activation vs. NP. Hippocampal, amygdala, cingulate, and insular activations were correlated with appetite and inversely correlated with satiety. In summary, the addition of breakfast led to alterations in brain activation in regions previously associated with food motivation and reward with additional alterations following the higher-protein breakfast. These data suggest that increased dietary protein at breakfast might be a beneficial strategy to reduce reward-driven eating behavior in overweight teen girls. Due to the small sample size, caution is warranted when interpreting these preliminary findings.

  14. Spin modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaarde, C.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of spectra of (p,n) reactions showed that they were very selective in exciting spin modes. Charge exchange reactions at intermediate energies give important new understanding of the M1-type of excitations and of the spin structure of continuum p spectra in general. In this paper, the author discusses three charge exchange reactions: (p,n); ( 3 H,t); and (d,2p) at several targets. Low-lying states and the Δ region are discussed separately. Finally, the charge exchange reaction with heavy ion beams is briefly discussed. (G.J.P./Auth.)

  15. Evaluation of mode equivalence of the MSKCC Bowel Function Instrument, LASA Quality of Life, and Subjective Significance Questionnaire items administered by Web, interactive voice response system (IVRS), and paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Antonia V; Keenoy, Kathleen; Shouery, Marwan; Basch, Ethan; Temple, Larissa K

    2016-05-01

    To assess the equivalence of patient-reported outcome (PRO) survey responses across Web, interactive voice response system (IVRS), and paper modes of administration. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients with home Web/e-mail and phone were randomly assigned to one of the eight study groups: Groups 1-6 completed the survey via Web, IVRS, and paper, in one of the six possible orders; Groups 7-8 completed the survey twice, either by Web or by IVRS. The 20-item survey, including the MSKCC Bowel Function Instrument (BFI), the LASA Quality of Life (QOL) scale, and the Subjective Significance Questionnaire (SSQ) adapted to bowel function, was completed from home on consecutive days. Mode equivalence was assessed by comparison of mean scores across modes and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and was compared to the test-retest reliability of Web and IVRS. Of 170 patients, 157 completed at least one survey and were included in analysis. Patients had mean age 56 (SD = 11), 53% were male, 81% white, 53% colon, and 47% rectal cancer; 78% completed all assigned surveys. Mean scores for BFI total score, BFI subscale scores, LASA QOL, and adapted SSQ varied by mode by less than one-third of a score point. ICCs across mode were: BFI total score (Web-paper = 0.96, Web-IVRS = 0.97, paper-IVRS = 0.97); BFI subscales (range = 0.88-0.98); LASA QOL (Web-paper = 0.98, Web-IVRS = 0.78, paper-IVRS = 0.80); and SSQ (Web-paper = 0.92, Web-IVRS = 0.86, paper-IVRS = 0.79). Mode equivalence was demonstrated for the BFI total score, BFI subscales, LASA QOL, and adapted SSQ, supporting the use of multiple modes of PRO data capture in clinical trials.

  16. Microtearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Mourgues, F.; Samain, A.; Zou, X.

    1990-01-01

    A serious degradation of confinement with additional heating is commonly observed on most tokamaks. The microtearing modes could provide an explanation for this experimental fact. They are driven linearly unstable by diamagnetism in collisional regimes, but it may be shown that the collisions in non linear regimes provide a small diffusion coefficient which can be only significant at the plasme edge. In the bulk of the plasma, the microtearing turbulence could play a basic role if it is unstable in the collisionless regime. While it is linearly stable without collisions, it could be driven unstable in realistic regimes by the radial diffusion it induces. To study this effect, we have used a model where the non linear action of the modes on a given helicity component is represented by a diffusion operator. They are found unstable for reasonable β p =2μ o nT/B 2 p , with a special radial profile of the potential vector A. The problem arises the validity of this model where non linearities in the trajectories behaviour are replaced by the diffusion which broadens resonances. To test this procedure, we calculate the actual electron distribution function when it is determined by the ergodicity of the field lines. We compute the correlations of the distribution function with the magnetic perturbation and compare them with the analytical expressions derived from the resonance broadening model. (author) 3 refs., 2 figs

  17. Using the ovarian sensitivity index to define poor, normal, and high response after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in the long gonadotropin-releasing hormone-agonist protocol: suggestions for a new principle to solve an old problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Malin; Hadziosmanovic, Nermin; Berglund, Lars; Holte, Jan

    2013-11-01

    To explore the utility of using the ratio between oocyte yield and total dose of FSH, i.e., the ovarian sensitivity index (OSI), to define ovarian response patterns. Retrospective cross-sectional study. University-affiliated private center. The entire unselected cohort of 7,520 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatments (oocyte pick-ups [OPUs]) during an 8-year period (long GnRH agonist-recombinant FSH protocol). None. The distribution of the OSI (oocytes recovered × 1,000/total dose of FSH), the cutoff levels for poor and high response, set at ±1 SD, and the relationship between OSI and treatment outcome. OSI showed a log-normal distribution with cutoff levels for poor and high response at 1.697/IU and 10.07/IU, respectively. A nomogram is presented. Live-birth rates per OPU were 10.5 ± 0.1%, 26.9 ± 0.6%, and 36.0 ± 1.4% for poor, normal, and high response treatments, respectively. The predictive power (C-statistic) for OSI to predict live birth was superior to that of oocyte yield. The OSI improves the definition of ovarian response patterns because it takes into account the degree of stimulation. The nomogram presents evidence-based cutoff levels for poor, normal, and high response and could be used for unifying study designs involving ovarian response patterns. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Final clinical indications and etiology in 1,023 enucleations. Descriptive databank evaluation with SPSS software in variable response mode with dummy variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, H; Bialasiewicz, A A; Schaudig, U; Schäfer, H; von Domarus, D

    2002-05-01

    A new data bank developed for ophthalmopathology using a computer-generated, multidigital data code is expected to be able to accomplish complex clinicopathologic correlations of diagnoses and signs, as provided by (multiple) clinical events and histopathologically proven etiologies, and to facilitate the documentation of new data. In the ophthalmopathology laboratory 2890 eyes were examined between January 20, 1975 and December 12, 1996. The main diagnoses and patient data from this 22-year period were recorded. To facilitate the presentation of data, a 10-year period with eyes of 976 patients enucleated from December, 1986 to December, 1996 was chosen. Principal and secondary diagnoses served for establishing the data bank. The frequencies of successive histologic and clinical diagnoses were evaluated by a descriptive computing program using an SPSS-multi-response mode with dummy variables and a categorical variable listing of the software (SPSS version 10.0) classified as (a) non-filtered random, (b) filtered by multiple etiologies, and (c) filtered by multiple events. The principal groups (e.g., histologic diagnoses concerning etiology) and subgroups (e.g., trauma, neoplasia, surgery, systemic diseases, and inflammations) were defined and correlated with 798 separate diagnoses. From 11 diagnoses/events ascribed to the clinical cases, 11,198 namings resulted. Thus, a comparative study of complex etiologies and events leading to enucleation in different hospitals of a specific area may be performed using this electronic ophthalmopathologic data bank system. The complexity of rare disease and integration into a superimposed structure can be managed with this custom-made data bank. A chronologically and demographically oriented consideration of reasons for enucleation is thus feasible.

  19. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. II. The rejection of common mode forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comandi, G.L.; Toncelli, R.; Chiofalo, M.L.; Bramanti, D.; Nobili, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    'Galileo Galilei on the ground' (GGG) is a fast rotating differential accelerometer designed to test the equivalence principle (EP). Its sensitivity to differential effects, such as the effect of an EP violation, depends crucially on the capability of the accelerometer to reject all effects acting in common mode. By applying the theoretical and simulation methods reported in Part I of this work, and tested therein against experimental data, we predict the occurrence of an enhanced common mode rejection of the GGG accelerometer. We demonstrate that the best rejection of common mode disturbances can be tuned in a controlled way by varying the spin frequency of the GGG rotor

  20. Linear stability of tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.; Hahm, T.S.

    1986-05-01

    This paper examines the stability of tearing modes in a sheared slab when the width of the tearing layer is much smaller than the ion Larmor radius. The ion response is nonlocal, and the quasineutrality retains its full integal form. An expansion procedure is introduced to solve the quasineutrality equation in powers of the width of the tearing layer over the ion Larmor radius. The expansion procedure is applied to the collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes. The first order terms in the expansion we find to be strongly stabilizing. The physics of the mode and of the stabilization is discussed. Tearing modes are observed in experiments even though the slab theory predicts stability. It is proposed that these modes grow from an equilibrium with islands at the rational surfaces. If the equilibrium islands are wider than the ion Larmor radius, the mode is unstable when Δ' is positive

  1. River profile response to normal fault growth and linkage: an example from the Hellenic forearc of south-central Crete, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallen, Sean F.; Wegmann, Karl W.

    2017-02-01

    Topography is a reflection of the tectonic and geodynamic processes that act to uplift the Earth's surface and the erosional processes that work to return it to base level. Numerous studies have shown that topography is a sensitive recorder of tectonic signals. A quasi-physical understanding of the relationship between river incision and rock uplift has made the analysis of fluvial topography a popular technique for deciphering relative, and some argue absolute, histories of rock uplift. Here we present results from a study of the fluvial topography from south-central Crete, demonstrating that river longitudinal profiles indeed record the relative history of uplift, but several other processes make it difficult to recover quantitative uplift histories. Prior research demonstrates that the south-central coastline of Crete is bound by a large ( ˜ 100 km long) E-W striking composite normal fault system. Marine terraces reveal that it is uplifting between 0.1 and 1.0 mm yr-1. These studies suggest that two normal fault systems, the offshore Ptolemy and onshore South-Central Crete faults, linked together in the recent geologic past (ca. 0.4-1 My BP). Fault mechanics predict that when adjacent faults link into a single fault the uplift rate in footwalls of the linkage zone will increase rapidly. We use this natural experiment to assess the response of river profiles to a temporal jump in uplift rate and to assess the applicability of the stream power incision model to this setting. Using river profile analysis we show that rivers in south-central Crete record the relative uplift history of fault growth and linkage as theory predicts that they should. Calibration of the commonly used stream power incision model shows that the slope exponent, n, is ˜ 0.5, contrary to most studies that find n ≥ 1. Analysis of fluvial knickpoints shows that migration distances are not proportional to upstream contributing drainage area, as predicted by the stream power incision model

  2. Homogeneous modes of cosmological instantons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratton, Steven; Turok, Neil

    2001-06-15

    We discuss the O(4) invariant perturbation modes of cosmological instantons. These modes are spatially homogeneous in Lorentzian spacetime and thus not relevant to density perturbations. But their properties are important in establishing the meaning of the Euclidean path integral. If negative modes are present, the Euclidean path integral is not well defined, but may nevertheless be useful in an approximate description of the decay of an unstable state. When gravitational dynamics is included, counting negative modes requires a careful treatment of the conformal factor problem. We demonstrate that for an appropriate choice of coordinate on phase space, the second order Euclidean action is bounded below for normalized perturbations and has a finite number of negative modes. We prove that there is a negative mode for many gravitational instantons of the Hawking-Moss or Col