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Sample records for normal fuel flow

  1. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  2. Estimating the Heading Direction Using Normal Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    understood (Faugeras and Maybank 1990), 3 Kinetic Stabilization under the assumption that optic flow or correspon- dence is known with some uncertainty...accelerometers can achieve very It can easily be shown (Koenderink and van Doom high accuracy, the same is not true for inexpensive 1975; Maybank 1985... Maybank . ’Motion from point matches: Multi- just don’t compute normal flow there (see Section 6). plicity of solutions". Int’l J. Computer Vision 4

  3. CANFLEX fuel bundle cross-flow endurance test (test report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the normal refuelling sequence of CANDU nuclear reactor, both new and irradiated bundles can be parked in the cross-flow region of the liner tubes. This situation occurs normally for a few minutes. The fuel bundle which is subjected to the cross-flow should be capable of withstanding the consequences of cross flow for normal periods, and maintain its mechanical integrity. The cross-flow endurance test was conducted for CANFLEX bundle, latest developed nuclear fuel, at CANDU-Hot Test Loop. The test was carried out during 4 hours at the inlet cross-flow region. After the test, the bundle successfully met all acceptance criteria after the 4 hours cross-flow test. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs

  4. CANFLEX fuel bundle cross-flow endurance test (test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the normal refuelling sequence of CANDU nuclear reactor, both new and irradiated bundles can be parked in the cross-flow region of the liner tubes. This situation occurs normally for a few minutes. The fuel bundle which is subjected to the cross-flow should be capable of withstanding the consequences of cross flow for normal periods, and maintain its mechanical integrity. The cross-flow endurance test was conducted for CANFLEX bundle, latest developed nuclear fuel, at CANDU-Hot Test Loop. The test was carried out during 4 hours at the inlet cross-flow region. After the test, the bundle successfully met all acceptance criteria after the 4 hours cross-flow test. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Ocular Blood Flow and Normal Tension Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal tension glaucoma (NTG is known as a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and glaucomatous visual field loss, even though the intraocular pressure (IOP does not exceed the normal range. The pathophysiology of NTG remains largely undetermined. It is hypothesized that the abnormal ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. A number of evidences suggested that the vascular factors played a significant role in the development of NTG. In recent years, the new imaging techniques, fluorescein angiography, color Doppler imaging (CDI, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG, have been used to evaluate the ocular blood flow and blood vessels, and the impaired vascular autoregulation was found in patients with NTG. Previous studies showed that NTG was associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including migraine, Alzheimer’s disease, primary vascular dysregulation, and Flammer syndrome. The vascular factors were involved in these diseases. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal ocular blood flow in NTG are still not clear, but the risk factors for glaucomatous optic neuropathy likely included oxidative stress, vasospasm, and endothelial dysfunction.

  6. Cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamo, H.L.; Meric, P.C.; Ponsin, J.C.; Rey, A.C.; Luft, A.G.; Seylaz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A xenon-133 method was used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Preliminary results suggested that shunting should be performed on patients whose CBF increased after CSF removal. There was a significant increase in CBF in patients with NPH, which was confirmed by the favorable outcome of 88% of patients shunted. The majority of patients with senile and presenile dementia showed a decrease or no change in CBF after CSF removal. It is suggested that although changes in CBF and clinical symptoms of NPH may have the same cause, i.e., changes in the cerebral intraparenchymal pressure, there is no simple direct relation between these two events. The mechanism underlying the loss of autoregulation observed in NPH is also discussed

  7. Off-normal performance of EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor] driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Batte, G.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Fryer, R.M.; Koenig, J.F.; Hofman, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    The off-normal performance of EBR-II Mark-II driver fuel has been more than satisfactory as demonstrated by robust reliability under repeated transient overpower and undercooled loss-of-flow tests, by benign run-beyond-cladding-breach behavior, and by forgiving response to fabrication defects including lack of bond. Test results have verified that the metallic driver fuel is very tolerant of off-normal events. This behavior has allowed EBR-II to operate in a combined steady-state and transient mode to provide test capability without limitation from the metallic driver fuel

  8. Experimental loop for fast neutron fuels under normal, abnormal, transient and emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, M.; Colomez, G.; Marfaing, R.J.; Mourain, M.

    1976-01-01

    Within the scope of safety experiments on power reactor fuels, an experimental loop is described which can, by reduction of the flow, flush the sodium joint of vented mixed carbide fuel elements and allow the study of the resulting phenomena. With the help of the annex laboratories at OSIRIS, the control test can be analyzed and followed, with special attention to the study of the migration of fission products inside and outside the fuel. This apparatus can, of course, also be used for testing the fuels under normal and abnormal working conditions [fr

  9. Results of tests under normal and abnormal operating conditions concerning LMFBR fuel element behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Languille, A.; Bergeonneau, P.; Essig, C.; Guerin, Y.

    1985-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to improve the knowledge on LMFBR fuel element behaviour during protected and unprotected transients in RAPSODIE and PHENIX reactors in order to evaluate its reliability. The range of the tests performed in these reactors is sufficiently large to cover normal and also extreme off normal conditions such as fuel melting. Results of such tests allow to better establish transient design limits for reactor structural components in particular for fuel pin cladding which play a lead role in controlling the accident sequence. Three main topics are emphasized in this paper: fuel melting during slow over-power excursions; influence of the fuel element geometrical evolution on reactivity feedback effects and reactor dynamic behaviour; clad damage evaluation during a transient (essentially very severe loss of flow)

  10. Fuel Rod Flow-Induced Vibration Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Hee; Kang, Heung Seok; Kim, Hyung Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    To ensure fuel design safety and structural integrity requires the response prediction of fuel rod to reactor coolant flow excitation. However, there are many obstacles in predicting the response as described. Even if the response can be predicted, the design criteria on wear failure, including correlation with the vibration, may be difficult to establish because of a variety of related parameters, such as material, surface condition and environmental factors. Thus, a prototype test for each new fuel assembly design, i.e. a long-term endurance test, is performed for design validation with respect to flow-induced vibration (FIV) and wear. There are still needs of theoretical prediction methods for the response and anticipated failure. This paper revisits the general aspect on the response prediction, mathematical description, analysis procedure and wear correlation aspect of fuel rod's FIV

  11. Fluid flow test for KMRR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Yang, Sun Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan; Chun, See Young; Song, Chul Hha; Jun, Hyung Gil; Chung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yeun; Cho, Young Rho; Kim, Bok Deuk

    1991-01-01

    Hydraulic and velocity measurment tests were carried out for the KMRR fuel assembly. Two types of the KMRR fuel assembly are consist of longitudinally finned rods. Experimental data of the pressure drops and friction factors for the KMRR fuel assemlby were produced. The measurement technique for the turbulent flow structure in subchannels using the LDV was obtained. The measurement of the experimental constant of the thermal hydraulic analysis code was investigated. The results in this study are used as the basic data for the development of an analysis code. The measurement technique acquired in this study can be applied to the KMRR thermal hydraulic commissioning test and development of the domestic KMRR fuel fabrication. (Author)

  12. Analysis of WWER-440 fuel performance under normal operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, Oe; Koese, S; Akbas, T [Atomenerjisi Komisyonu, Ankara (Turkey); Colak, Ue [Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center (Turkey)

    1994-12-31

    FRAPCON-2 code originally developed for LWR fuel behaviour simulation is used to analyse the WWER-440 fuel rod behaviour at normal operational conditions. The code is capable of utilizing different models for mechanical analysis and gas release calculations. Heat transfer calculations are accomplished through a collocation technique by the method of weighted residuals. Temperature and burnup element properties are evaluated using MATPRO package. As the material properties of Zr-1%Nb used as cladding in WWER-440s are not provided in the code, Zircaloy-4 is used as a substitute for Zr-1%Nb. Mac-Donald-Weisman model is used for gas release calculation. FRACAS-1 and FRACAS-2 models are used in the mechanical calculations. It is assumed that the reactor was operated for 920 days (three consecutive cycles), the burnup being 42000 Mwd/t U. Results of the fuel rod behaviour analysis are given for three axial nodes: bottom node, central node and top node. The variations of the following characteristic fuel rod parameters are studied through the prescribed power history: unmoved gap thickness, gap heat transfer coefficient, fuel axial elongation, cladding axial elongation, fuel centerline temperature and ZrO-thickness at cladding surface. The value of each parameter is calculated as a function of the effective power days for the three nodes by using FRACAS-1 and FRACAS-2 codes for comparison.The results show that calculations with deformable pellet approximation with FRACAS-II model could provide better information for the behaviour of a typical fuel rod. Calculations indicate that fuel rod failure is not observed during the operation. All fuel rod parameters investigated are found to be within the safety limits. It is concluded, however, that for better assessment of reactor safety these calculations should be extended for transient conditions such as LOCA. 1 tab., 10 figs., 4 refs.

  13. 40 CFR 1065.220 - Fuel flow meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... follows: (1) Use the actual value of calculated raw exhaust flow rate in the following cases: (i) For... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.220 Fuel flow meter. (a) Application. You may use fuel flow in combination with a chemical balance of carbon (or oxygen...

  14. Fuel bundle movement due to reverse flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahba, N N; Akalin, O [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    When a break occurs in the inlet feeder or inlet header, the rapid depressurization will cause the channel flow to reverse forcing the string of bundles to accelerate and impact with upstream shield plug. A model has been developed to predict the bundle motion due to the channel flow reversal. The model accounts for various forces acting on the bundle. A series of five reverse flow, bundle acceleration experiments have been conducted simulating a break in the inlet feeder of a CANDU fuel channel. The model has been validated against the experiments. The predicted impact velocities are in good agreement with the measured values. It is demonstrated that the model may be successfully used in predicting bundle relocation timing following a large LOCA (loss of coolant). (author). 7 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  15. Fuel damage during off-normal transients in metal-fueled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.M.; Bauer, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    Fuel damage during off-normal transients is a key issue in the safety of fast reactors because the fuel pin cladding provides the primary barrier to the release of radioactive materials. Part of the Safety Task of the Integral Fast Reactor Program is to provide assessments of the damage and margins to failure for metallic fuels over the wide range of transients that must be considered in safety analyses. This paper reviews the current status of the analytical and experimental programs that are providing the bases for these assessments. 13 refs., 2 figs

  16. Stress Analysis of Fuel Rod under Axial Coolant Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hai Lan; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, Hyun Seung [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Num Kyu; Jeon, Kyung Rok [Kerea Nuclear Fuel., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    A pressurized water reactor(PWR) fuel assembly, is a typical bundle structure, which uses light water as a coolant in most commercial nuclear power plants. Fuel rods that have a very slender and long clad are supported by fuel assembly which consists of several spacer grids. A coolant is a fluid which flows through device to prevent its overheating, transferring the heat produced by the device to other devices that use or dissipate it. But at the same time, the coolant flow will bring out the fluid induced vibration(FIV) of fuel rods and even damaged the fuel rod. This study has been conducted to investigate the flow characteristics and nuclear reactor fuel rod stress under effect of coolant. Fluid structure interaction(FSI) analysis on nuclear reactor fuel rod was performed. Fluid analysis of the coolant which flow along the axial direction and structural analysis under effect of flow velocity were carried out under different output flow velocity conditions

  17. Stress Analysis of Fuel Rod under Axial Coolant Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hai Lan; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, Hyun Seung; Park, Num Kyu; Jeon, Kyung Rok

    2010-01-01

    A pressurized water reactor(PWR) fuel assembly, is a typical bundle structure, which uses light water as a coolant in most commercial nuclear power plants. Fuel rods that have a very slender and long clad are supported by fuel assembly which consists of several spacer grids. A coolant is a fluid which flows through device to prevent its overheating, transferring the heat produced by the device to other devices that use or dissipate it. But at the same time, the coolant flow will bring out the fluid induced vibration(FIV) of fuel rods and even damaged the fuel rod. This study has been conducted to investigate the flow characteristics and nuclear reactor fuel rod stress under effect of coolant. Fluid structure interaction(FSI) analysis on nuclear reactor fuel rod was performed. Fluid analysis of the coolant which flow along the axial direction and structural analysis under effect of flow velocity were carried out under different output flow velocity conditions

  18. Upgrade of Dhruva fuel channel flow instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadgil, Kaustubh; Awale, P.K.; Sengupta, C.; Sumanth, P.; Roy, Kallol

    2014-01-01

    Dhruva, a 100 MW Heavy Water moderated and cooled, vertical tank-type Research Reactor, using metallic natural Uranium fuel has flow instrumentation for all the 144 fuel channels, consisting of venturi and triplicate DP gauges for each fuel channel. These gauges provide contacts for generation of reactor trip on low flow through fuel channel. These DP gauges were facing numerous generic and ageing related failures over the years and was also difficult to maintain owing to obsolescence. While considering an upgrade for these DP gauges, it was also planned to replace the existing Coolant Low Flow Trip (CLFT) system with a computer based Reactor Trip Logic System (RTLS). Being a retrofit job, the existing panels for mounting the gauges, cable layout, impulse tubing layout, etc. were retained, thereby simplifying the site execution, reducing reactor down time and also reducing person-milli-Sievert consumption. A customized Electronic DP Indicating Switch (EDPIS) was conceptualized for achieving these objectives. Such a design, utilizing a standard DP transmitter with customized electronic circuitry, was developed, evaluated and finalized after a series of factory trials, field trials and prototyping. The instrument design included contact input for existing CLFT system and also provision for 4-20 mA current output for the proposed computer based RTLS. The display and form factor of the instrument remained identical to older one and ensures familiarity of O and M personnel. Since EDPIS is classified as Safety Class IA, stringent type tests, hardware FMEA and V and V of the micro-controller software were carried out as per the requirements laid down by relevant standards for qualification of these instruments. Being a customized instrument, the manufacturing process was closely monitored and was followed by stringent QA plan and acceptance tests. A total of 396 gauges were replaced in a phased manner during scheduled fuelling outages and thereby did not affect reactor

  19. Sodium flow distribution in test fuel assembly P-23B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.P.S.

    1978-08-01

    Relatively large cladding diametral increases in the exterior fuel pins of HEDL's test fuel subassembly P-23B were successfully explained by a thermal-hydraulic/solid mechanics analysis. This analysis indicates that while at power, the subassembly flow was less than planned and that the fuel pins were considerably displaced and bowed from their nominal position. In accomplishing this analysis, a method was developed to estimate the sodium flow distribution and pin distortions in a fuel subassembly at power

  20. Correlation of Normal Gravity Mixed Convection Blowoff Limits with Microgravity Forced Flow Blowoff Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Jeremy W.; Olson, Sandra L.; Ferkul, Paul V.

    2016-01-01

    The axisymmetric rod geometry in upward axial stagnation flow provides a simple way to measure normal gravity blowoff limits to compare with microgravity Burning and Suppression of Solids - II (BASS-II) results recently obtained aboard the International Space Station. This testing utilized the same BASS-II concurrent rod geometry, but with the addition of normal gravity buoyant flow. Cast polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rods of diameters ranging from 0.635 cm to 3.81 cm were burned at oxygen concentrations ranging from 14 to 18% by volume. The forced flow velocity where blowoff occurred was determined for each rod size and oxygen concentration. These blowoff limits compare favorably with the BASS-II results when the buoyant stretch is included and the flow is corrected by considering the blockage factor of the fuel. From these results, the normal gravity blowoff boundary for this axisymmetric rod geometry is determined to be linear, with oxygen concentration directly proportional to flow speed. We describe a new normal gravity 'upward flame spread test' method which extrapolates the linear blowoff boundary to the zero stretch limit in order to resolve microgravity flammability limits-something current methods cannot do. This new test method can improve spacecraft fire safety for future exploration missions by providing a tractable way to obtain good estimates of material flammability in low gravity.

  1. Sequential flow membraneless microfluidic fuel cell with porous electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Kamil S.; Posner, Jonathan D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106 (United States); Hayes, Joel R.; Friesen, Cody A. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-8706 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    A novel convective flow membraneless microfluidic fuel cell with porous disk electrodes is described. In this fuel cell design, the fuel flows radially outward through a thin disk shaped anode and across a gap to a ring shaped cathode. An oxidant is introduced into the gap between anode and cathode and advects radially outward to the cathode. This fuel cell differs from previous membraneless designs in that the fuel and the oxidant flow in series, rather than in parallel, enabling independent control over the fuel and oxidant flow rate and the electrode areas. The cell uses formic acid as a fuel and potassium permanganate as the oxidant, both contained in a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The flow velocity field is examined using microscale particle image velocimetry and shown to be nearly axisymmetric and steady. The results show that increasing the electrolyte concentration reduces the cell Ohmic resistance, resulting in larger maximum currents and peak power densities. Increasing the flow rate delays the onset of mass transport and reduces Ohmic losses resulting in larger maximum currents and peak power densities. An average open circuit potential of 1.2 V is obtained with maximum current and power densities of 5.35 mA cm{sup -2} and 2.8 mW cm{sup -2}, respectively (cell electrode area of 4.3 cm{sup 2}). At a flow rate of 100 {mu}L min{sup -1} a fuel utilization of 58% is obtained. (author)

  2. Complete Flow Blockage of a Fuel Channel for Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Park, Suki

    2015-01-01

    The CHF correlation suitable for narrow rectangular channels are implemented in RELAP5/MOD3.3 code for the analyses, and the behavior of fuel temperatures and MCHFR(minimum critical heat flux ratio) are compared between the original and modified codes. The complete flow blockage of fuel channel for research reactor is analyzed using original and modified RELAP5/MOD3.3 and the results are compared each other. The Sudo-Kaminaga CHF correlation is implemented into RELAP5/MOD3.3 for analyzing the behavior of fuel adjacent to the blocked channel. A flow blockage of fuel channels can be postulated by a foreign object blocking cooling channels of fuels. Since a research reactor with plate type fuel has isolated fuel channels, a complete flow blockage of one fuel channel can cause a failure of adjacent fuel plates by the loss of cooling capability. Although research reactor systems are designed to prevent foreign materials from entering into the core, partial flow blockage accidents and following fuel failures are reported in some old research reactors. In this report, an analysis of complete flow blockage accident is presented for a 15MW pool-type research reactor with plate type fuels. The fuel surface experience different heat transfer regime in the results from original and modified RELAP5/MOD3.3. By the discrepancy in heat transfer mode of two cases, a fuel melting is expected by the modified RELAP5/MOD3.3, whereas the fuel integrity is ensured by the original code

  3. Design verification of the CANFLEX fuel bundle - quality assurance requirements for mechanical flow testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, P.; Oldaker, I.E.; Chung, C.H.; Suk, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the design verification program for the new fuel bundle, a series of out-reactor tests was conducted on the CANFLEX 43-element fuel bundle design. These tests simulated current CANDU 6 reactor normal operating conditions of flow, temperature and pressure. This paper describes the Quality Assurance (QA) Program implemented for the tests that were run at the testing laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Korea Atomic energy Research Institute (KAERI). (author)

  4. Cerebral blood flow in normal and abnormal sleep and dreaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hata, T.; Karacan, I.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of regional or local cerebral blood flow (CBF) by the xenon-133 inhalation method and stable xenon computerized tomography CBF (CTCBF) method were made during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of REM and non-REM sleep in normal age-matched volunteers, narcoleptics, and sleep apneics. In the awake state, CBF values were reduced in both narcoleptics and sleep apneics in the brainstem and cerebellar regions. During sleep onset, whether REM or stage I-II, CBF values were paradoxically increased in narcoleptics but decreased severely in sleep apneics, while in normal volunteers they became diffusely but more moderately decreased. In REM sleep and dreaming CBF values greatly increased, particularly in right temporo-parietal regions in subjects experiencing both visual and auditory dreaming

  5. Experimental program on fuel rod behaviour under off-normal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Languille, A.; Cecchi, P.

    1985-01-01

    During LMFBR plant operation, fuel developments are primarily concerned with the fuel pin irradiation behaviour under steady-state conditions up to high burn-up levels. But additional studies under off-normal conditions are necessary in order to assess fuel pin performance and to define operational limits. (author)

  6. Flow-induced plastic collapse of stacked fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, D C; Scarton, H A

    1985-03-01

    Flow-induced plastic collapse of stacked fuel plate assemblies was first noted in experimental reactors such as the ORNL High Flux Reactor Assembly and the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). The ETR assembly is a stack of 19 thin flat rectangular fuel plates separated by narrow channels through which a coolant flows to remove the heat generated by fission of the fuel within the plates. The uranium alloyed plates have been noted to buckle laterally and plastically collapse at the system design coolant flow rate of 10.7 m/s, thus restricting the coolant flow through adjacent channels. A methodology and criterion are developed for predicting the plastic collapse of ETR fuel plates. The criterion is compared to some experimental results and the Miller critical velocity theory.

  7. Molar exergy and flow exergy of pure chemical fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanchini, Enzo; Terlizzese, Tiziano

    2009-01-01

    Expressions of the molar exergy and of the molar flow exergy of a pure chemical fuel are deduced rigorously from the basic principles of thermodynamics. It is shown that molar exergy and molar flow exergy coincide when the temperature T and the pressure p of the fuel are equal to the temperature T B and the pressure p B of the environment; a general relation between exergy and flow exergy is proved as a consequence. The deduction of the expression of the molar exergy of a chemical fuel for non-standard values of T B and p B is clarified. For hydrogen, carbon dioxide and several hydrocarbons, tables are reported to allow a simple calculation of the molar exergy of the fuel for any value of the temperature T B and the relative humidity φ B of the environment, in the range 268.15 K ≤ T B ≤ 313.15 K and 0.1 ≤ φ B ≤ 1, with reference to the standard atmospheric pressure. Additional tables are provided to evaluate the difference between the exergy or the flow exergy of the fuel in its given initial state and the exergy at T = T B and p = p B . In these tables, it is assumed that fuel and environment have the same temperature and that the fuel pressure varies in the range 1.01325 bar ≤ p ≤ 200 bar; the fuel may be gas or liquid.

  8. CFD Analysis on a Core Outlet Flow through the Fuel Alignment Plant of SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. I.; Bae, Y. M.; Kim, K. K.

    2014-01-01

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations were performed to confirm the core flow distribution for SMART, which acquired standard design approval in 2012. In this paper, CFD simulation is also used to calculate the pressure distribution of a core outlet, a Fuel Alignment Plate (FAP), for SMART. In SMART, the fluid discharged from the Steam Generator comes into a Flow Mixing Header Assembly (FMHA), and is rearranged and split into a very fine size. The FMHA is greatly important for enhancing the flow distribution of a downcomer during a normal operation, transient, and even accidents. Then, the fluid discharged from the FMHA flows into the core upstream through flow skirt holes. The Low Core Support Plate (LCSP) reallocates the flow introducing into the inlet core from the core upstream. The deviation of flow distribution becomes smaller or almost disappears by LCSP holes having relatively large loss coefficient compared to the downstream flow deviation. In an open core, the flow deviation at the core inlet region is diminished by cross flow as it goes upward. Near the core outlet, the flow distribution can be distorted by the influence of a Fuel Alignment Plate (FAP) installed above the fuels. In this paper, the effect of the core outlet flow structure such as the FAP holes of SMART is investigated. Before the calculation, the influences of mesh size and turbulence models are inspected. CFD simulations were performed to investigate the effect of FAP flow holes on the core outlet flow of SMART. As a preliminary study, the dependency of the mesh size and turbulence models was tested; a fine grid was applied, the effect of which is negligible, and the core outlet flow is not sensitive to the turbulence models. In brief, the flow resistance of FAP is less than 15% of that of the fuel assemblies. The flow resistance deviation between two flow path patterns is less than 1% of that of active core. Even two flow path patterns located at the downstream location of the

  9. The development of flow test technology for PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Cha, Chong Hee; Chung, Chang Hwan; Chun, Se Young; Song, Chul Hwa; Chung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yeun; Cho, Yeong Rho; Kim, Bok Deuk

    1988-05-01

    KAERI has an extensive program to develope PWR fuel assembly. In relation to the program, development of flow test technology is needed to evaluate the thermal hydraulic compactibility and mechanical integrity of domestically fabricated nuclear fuels. A high-pressure and high-temperature flow test facility was designed to test domestically fabricated fuel assembly. The test section of the facility has capacity of a 6x6 full length PWR fuel assembly. A flow test rig was designed and installed at Cold Test Loop to carry out model experiments with 5x5 rod assembly under atmosphere pressure to get information about the characteristics of pressure loss of spacer grids and velocity distribution in the subchannels. LDV measuring technology was established using TSI's Laser Dopper Velocimeter 9100-3 System

  10. Modeling two-phase flow in PEM fuel cell channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun; Basu, Suman; Wang, Chao-Yang [Electrochemical Engine Center (ECEC), and Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the simultaneous flow of liquid water and gaseous reactants in mini-channels of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Envisaging the mini-channels as structured and ordered porous media, we develop a continuum model of two-phase channel flow based on two-phase Darcy's law and the M{sup 2} formalism, which allow estimate of the parameters key to fuel cell operation such as overall pressure drop and liquid saturation profiles along the axial flow direction. Analytical solutions of liquid water saturation and species concentrations along the channel are derived to explore the dependences of these physical variables vital to cell performance on operating parameters such as flow stoichiometric ratio and relative humility. The two-phase channel model is further implemented for three-dimensional numerical simulations of two-phase, multi-component transport in a single fuel-cell channel. Three issues critical to optimizing channel design and mitigating channel flooding in PEM fuel cells are fully discussed: liquid water buildup towards the fuel cell outlet, saturation spike in the vicinity of flow cross-sectional heterogeneity, and two-phase pressure drop. Both the two-phase model and analytical solutions presented in this paper may be applicable to more general two-phase flow phenomena through mini- and micro-channels. (author)

  11. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating heavy water moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to safeguard against a flow excursion in one of more of these parallel channels. During-full-power operation, limits safeguarded against a boiling flow excursion. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increased beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of the limiting power for previous long-term reactor operations

  12. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating heavy water moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to safeguard against a flow excursion in one of more of these parallel channels. During-full-power operation, limits safeguarded against a boiling flow excursion. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increased beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of the limiting power for previous long-term reactor operations.

  13. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to prevent a flow excursion from occurring in one or more of these parallel channels. During full-power operation, limits prevented a boiling flow excursion from taking place. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increases beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of historical levels

  14. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurau, Bogdan [Nuvant Systems Inc., Crown Point, IN (United States)

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  15. Maximum Solutions of Normalized Ricci Flow on 4-Manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fuquan; Zhang, Yuguang; Zhang, Zhenlei

    2008-10-01

    We consider the maximum solution g( t), t ∈ [0, + ∞), to the normalized Ricci flow. Among other things, we prove that, if ( M, ω) is a smooth compact symplectic 4-manifold such that {b_2^+(M) > 1} and let g( t), t ∈ [0, ∞), be a solution to (1.3) on M whose Ricci curvature satisfies that |Ric( g( t))| ≤ 3 and additionally χ( M) = 3τ ( M) > 0, then there exists an {min mathbb{N}} , and a sequence of points { x j, k ∈ M}, j = 1, . . . , m, satisfying that, by passing to a subsequence, {{(M, g(tk+t), x_{1,k},ldots, x_{m,k})stackrel{d_{GH}}longrightarrow ({\\coprod limitsm_{j=1}} N_j , g_{infty}, x_{1,infty}, ldots, x_{m,infty}),}} t ∈ [0, ∞), in the m-pointed Gromov-Hausdorff sense for any sequence t k → ∞, where ( N j , g ∞), j = 1, . . . , m, are complete complex hyperbolic orbifolds of complex dimension 2 with at most finitely many isolated orbifold points. Moreover, the convergence is C ∞ in the non-singular part of {\\coprod _1^m Nj} and {text{Vol}_{g0}(M)=sum_{j=1}mtext{Vol}_{g_{infty}}(Nj)} , where χ( M) (resp. τ( M)) is the Euler characteristic (resp. signature) of M.

  16. Nozzle flow and atomization characteristics of ethanol blended biodiesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Han; Suh, Hyun Kyu; Lee, Chang Sik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea)

    2010-01-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the injection and atomization characteristics of biodiesel-ethanol blended fuel. The injection performance of biodiesel-ethanol blended fuel was analyzed from the injection rate characteristics using the injection rate measuring system, and the effective injection velocity and effective spray diameter using the nozzle flow model. Moreover, the atomization characteristics, such as local and overall SMD distributions, overall axial velocity and droplet arrival time were analyzed and compared with these from diesel and biodiesel fuels to obtain the atomization characteristics of biodiesel-ethanol blended fuel. It was revealed that ethanol fuel affects the decrease of the peak injection rate and the shortening of the injection delay due to the decrease of fuel properties, such as fuel density and dynamic viscosity. In addition, the ethanol addition improved the atomization performance of biodiesel fuel, because the ethanol blended fuel has a low kinematic viscosity and surface tension, then that has more active interaction with the ambient gas, compared to BD100. (author)

  17. Experimental investigation two phase flow in direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat, M. D.; Kaplan, Y.; Celik, S.; Oeztural, A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) have received many attentions specifically for portable electronic applications since it utilize methanol which is in liquid form in atmospheric condition and high energy density of the methanol. Thus it eliminates the storage problem of hydrogen. It also eliminates humidification requirement of polymeric membrane which is a problem in PEM fuel cells. Some electronic companies introduced DMFC prototypes for portable electronic applications. Presence of carbon dioxide gases due to electrochemical reactions in anode makes the problem a two phase problem. A two phase flow may occur at cathode specifically at high current densities due to the excess water. Presence of gas phase in anode region and liquid phase in cathode region prevents diffusion of fuel and oxygen to the reaction sites thus reduces the performance of the system. Uncontrolled pressure buildup in anode region increases methanol crossover through membrane and adversely effect the performance. Two phase flow in both anode and cathode region is very effective in the performance of DMYC system and a detailed understanding of two phase flow for high performance DMFC systems. Although there are many theoretical and experimental studies available on the DMFC systems in the literature, only few studies consider problem as a two-phase flow problem. In this study, an experimental set up is developed and species distributions on system are measured with a gas chromatograph. System performance characteristics (V-I curves) is measured depending on the process parameters (temperature, fuel ad oxidant flow rates, methanol concentration etc)

  18. Role of endothelial function in coronary slow-flow phenomenon with angiographically normal coronaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Nathani

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Coronary slow flow phenomenon is a marker of atherosclerosis (as documented by carotid intima media thickness and our study has also shown that endothelial function is significantly impaired in patients with coronary slow flow (as documented by impaired endothelial dependent vasodilatation than that of patients with normal epicardial coronaries with normal flow.

  19. 16 x 16 Vantage+ Fuel Assembly Flow Vibrational Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, Martin; Kurincic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) has experienced leaking fuel after increasing the cycle duration to 18 months. The leaking fuel mechanism has predominantly been consistent over multiple cycles and is typically observed in highly irradiated Fuel Assemblies (FA) after around 4 years of continuous operation that were located at the core periphery (baffle). The cause of the leaking fuel is due to Grid-To-Rod-Fretting (GRTF) and occasional debris fretting. NEK utilises a 16x16 Vantage+ FA design with all Inconel structural mixing vane grids (8 in total), Zirlo thimbles, Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA) rods with enriched ZrB2, enriched Annular Blanket, Debris Filter Bottom Nozzle (DFBN), Removable Top Nozzle (RTN) and Zirlo fuel cladding material with a high burnup capability of 60 GWD/MTU. Numerous design and operational changes are thought to have reduced the original 16x16 FA design margin to fretting resistance of either vibration or its wear work rate, such as significant power uprate (spring force loss, rod creep down...), operational cycle duration increase from 12 to 18 months (increasing residence time as well as lead FA and fuel rod burnup values), Reactor Coolant System flow increase (increased vibration), removal of Thimble Plugs (increased bypass flow, increased vibration) and Zirc-4 to Zirlo cladding change (decreasing wear work rate). The fuel rod to grid spring as well as dimple contact areas are relatively smaller than other FA designs that exhibit good in-reactor fretting performance. A FA design change project to address the small rod to dimple / spring contact area and utilise fuel cladding oxide coating is currently being pursued with the fuel supplier. The FA vibrational properties are very important to the in-reactor FA performance and reliability. The 16x16 Vantage+ vibrational testing was performed with a full size FA in the Fuel Assembly Compatibility Testing (FACTS) loop that is able to provide full flow rates at elevated temperature

  20. Flow analysis of tubular fuel assembly using CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Park, C.; Chae, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the experiences of HANARO, a new research reactor is under conceptual design preparing for future needs of research reactor. Considering various aspects such as nuclear physics, thermal-hydraulics, mechanical structure and the applicability of HANARO technology, a tubular type fuel has been considered as that of a new research reactor. Tubular type fuel has several circular fuel layers, and each layer consists of 3 curved fuel plates arranged with constant small gap to build up cooling channels. In the thermal-hydraulic point, it is very important to maintain each channel flow velocity be equal as much as possible, because the small gaps between curved thin fuel plates independently forms separate coolant channels, which may cause a thermal-hydraulic problem in certain conditions. In this study, commercial CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) code, Fluent, has been used to investigate flow characteristics of tubular type fuel assembly. According to the computation results for the preliminary conceptual design, there is a serious lack of uniformity of average velocity on the each coolant channel. Some changes for initial conceptual design were done to improve the balance of velocity distribution, and analysis was done again, too. The results for the revised design showed that the uniformity of each channel velocity was improved significantly. The influence of outermost channel gap width on the velocity distribution was also examined

  1. Experimental study of water flow in nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Lorena Escriche; Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de; Barros Filho, Jose Afonso; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to develop an experimental methodology for investigating the water flow through rod bundles after spacer grids of nuclear fuel elements of PWR type reactors. Speed profiles, with the device LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), and the pressure drop between two sockets located before and after the spacer grid, using pressure transducers were measured

  2. Cooling flow measurement in fuel elements of the RA-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brollo, F; Silin, N

    2009-01-01

    Under the UBERA6 project for the core change and power increase of the RA-6 reactor, the total coolant flow was increased to meet the requirements imposed by the new operating conditions. The flow through the fuel elements is an important parameter and is difficult to determine due to the geometric complexity of the core. To ensure safe operation of the reactor, adequate safety margins must be kept for all operating conditions. In the present work we performed the direct measurement of the cooling flow rate of a fuel in the reactor core, for which we used a turbine flowmeter built specifically for this use. This helped to confirm previous results obtained during the launch, made by an indirect method based on measuring the pressure difference of the core. The turbine flowmeter was chosen due to its robustness, ease of operation and low disturbance of the input stream to the fuel. We describe the calibration of this instrument and the results of flow measurements made on some of the RA6 reactor fuel elements under conditions of zero power. [es

  3. Numerical Simulation for Flow Distribution in ACE7 Fuel Assemblies affected by a Spacer Grid Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jongpil; Jeong, Ji Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In spite of various efforts to understand hydraulic phenomena in a rod bundle containing deformed rods due to swelling and/or ballooning of clad, the studies for flow blockage due to spacer grid deformation have been limited. In the present work, 3D CFD analysis for flow blockage was performed to evaluate coolant flow within ACE7 fuel assemblies (FAs) containing a FA affected by a spacer grid deformation. The real geometry except for inner grids was used in the simulation and the region including inner grid was replaced by porous media. In the present work, the numerical simulation was performed to predict coolant flow within ACE7 FAs affected by a Mid grid deformation. The 3D CFD result shows that approximately 60 subchannel hydraulic diameter is required to fully recover coolant flow under normal operating condition.

  4. Laboratory determination of normal operating flow rates with enlarged outlet fittings -- BDF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, E.D.

    1960-02-02

    Experiments have been conducted in the Hydraulics Laboratory, at the request of IPD`s Mechanical Development-A Operation, to determine the energy losses of various enlarged outlet fitting combinations. These experiments were conducted an steady state runs and allow the determination of the normal operating point (flow rate) of a reactor process channel under selected conditions of front header pressure and fuel charge. No attempt is made to make a mechanical or economic evaluation of the particular fitting combinations, although observations were noted which might bear on this evaluation. It is very important for the reader to bear in mind that changing outlet fittings will definitely affect the reactor tube power limits and outlet vater temperature limits. The size of the outlet fittings largely determines the present outlet temperature limits of the old reactors. The flow characteristics of these present fittings cause some degree of pressurization to suppress boiling on the fuel charge and also cause dual Panellit trip protection for certain flow changes and for power surges. Enlargement of the outlet fittings may actually reduce the allowable outlet coolant temperature limits. Since these effects cannot be determined on the apparatus used in these experiments, a complete discussion of this point is not included in this report. However, the seriousness of these effects should be known and carefully analyzed before a final selection of enlarged outlet fittings in made. This report will be one of a series. New reports in the series will be issued as data are obtained for other such outlet fitting combinations or for new concepts of outlet fitting assemblies such as the new nozzle being developed by C. E. Trantz for use on F-reactor stuck gunbarrel tubes.

  5. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: flow field for efficient air operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechi, F N; Tsukada, A; Haas, O; Scherer, G G [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A new flow field was designed for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack with an active area of 200 cm{sup 2} for operation at low air stoichiometry and low air over pressure. Optimum of gas flow and channel dimensions were calculated based on the required pressure drop in the fluid. Single cells and a bi-cell stack with the new flow field show an improved current/voltage characteristic when operated at low air stoichiometries as compared to that of the previous non optimized design. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  6. Mechanical stress analysis for a fuel rod under normal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Giovedi, Claudia; Serra, Andre da Silva; Abe, Alfredo Y.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear reactor fuel elements consist mainly in a system of a nuclear fuel encapsulated by a cladding material subject to high fluxes of energetic neutrons, high operating temperatures, pressure systems, thermal gradients, heat fluxes and with chemical compatibility with the reactor coolant. The design of a nuclear reactor requires, among a set of activities, the evaluation of the structural integrity of the fuel rod submitted to different loads acting on the fuel rod and the specific properties (dimensions and mechanical and thermal properties) of the cladding material and coolant, including thermal and pressure gradients produced inside the rod due to the fuel burnup. In this work were evaluated the structural mechanical stresses of a fuel rod using stainless steel as cladding material and UO 2 with a low degree of enrichment as fuel pellet on a PWR (pressurized water reactor) under normal operating conditions. In this sense, tangential, radial and axial stress on internal and external cladding surfaces considering the orientations of 0 deg, 90 deg and 180 deg were considered. The obtained values were compared with the limit values for stress to the studied material. From the obtained results, it was possible to conclude that, under the expected normal reactor operation conditions, the integrity of the fuel rod can be maintained. (author)

  7. Forward coronary flow normally seen in systole is the result of both forward and concealed back flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, J. A.; Breuls, N. P.; Laird, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Normally systolic coronary blood flow is almost entirely forward. As perfusion pressure was lowered through the autoregulatory range in open-chest dogs, net systolic back flow appeared at approximately 70 mm Hg. Imposing a series resistance (Rs), which impedes both forward and back flow, abolished

  8. Mass Flow Data Comparison for Comprehensive Fuel Cycle Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Wigeland, R.A.; Dixon, B.W.; Gehin, J.C.; Todosow, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key objectives stated in the United States Department of Energy, Nuclear Energy R and D road-map is the development of sustainable nuclear fuel cycles that improve natural resource utilisation and provide adequate capability and capacity to manage wastes produced by the fuel cycle. In order to inform this objective, an evaluation and screening of nuclear fuel cycle options has been conducted. As part of that effort, the entire fuel cycle options space was represented by 40 Evaluation Groups (EGs), and mass flow information for each of the EGs was provided by using an Analysis Example (AE). In this paper, the mass flow data of the 40 AEs are compared to inform on trends in the natural resource utilisation and nuclear waste generation. For the AEs that need enriched uranium support, the natural uranium required is high and the natural resource utilisation is generally lower than 2% regardless of the fuel cycle strategy (i.e., once-through, limited recycle, or continuous recycle). However, the utilisation could be improved by avoiding enriched uranium fuel support. The natural resource utilisation increases to more than 80% by recycling the nuclear fuel continuously without enriched uranium support. The combined mass of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW), i.e., SNF+HLW mass, is lower by using a continuous recycle option compared to a once-through fuel cycle option, because SNF mass is converted to mass of recycled products and only fission products and other process losses need to be disposed. The combined disposed mass of depleted uranium (DU), recovered uranium (RU) and thorium (RTh), i.e. DU+RU+RTh mass, has a similar trend to the uranium utilisation. For the AEs that need enriched uranium fuel, the DU and RU are the major fraction by mass of the DU+RU+RTh, which are two orders of magnitude higher in mass compared to those for the AEs that do not need enriched uranium fuel. (authors)

  9. Induced dusty flow due to normal oscillation of wavy wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kannan

    2001-01-01

    wall. Solutions are obtained in terms of a series expansion with respect to small amplitude by a regular perturbation method. Graphs of velocity components, both for outer flow and inner flow for various values of mass concentration of dust particles are drawn. The inner and outer solutions are matched by the matching process. An interested application of present result to mechanical engineering may be the possibility of the fluid and dust transportation without an external pressure.

  10. Bruce B fuelling-with-flow operations: fuel damage investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzer, A.M. [CANTECH Associates Ltd., Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Morikawa, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Hains, A.J.; Cichowlas, W.M. [Nuclear Safety Solutions Limited, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Roberts, J.G.; Wylie, J. [Bruce Power, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This paper summarizes the fuel bundle damage characterization done by Nuclear Safety Solutions Limited (NSS) and the out-reactor flow visualization tests done at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to reproduce the damage observed on irradiated fuel bundles. The bearing pad damage mechanism was identified and the tests showed that a minor change to the fuelling sequence would eliminate the mechanical interaction. The change was implemented in January 2005. Since then, the bearing pad damage appears to have been greatly reduced based on the small number of discharged bundles inspected to date. (author)

  11. Bruce B fuelling-with-flow operations: fuel damage investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzer, A.M.; Morikawa, D.; Hains, A.J.; Cichowlas, W.M.; Roberts, J.G.; Wylie, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the fuel bundle damage characterization done by Nuclear Safety Solutions Limited (NSS) and the out-reactor flow visualization tests done at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to reproduce the damage observed on irradiated fuel bundles. The bearing pad damage mechanism was identified and the tests showed that a minor change to the fuelling sequence would eliminate the mechanical interaction. The change was implemented in January 2005. Since then, the bearing pad damage appears to have been greatly reduced based on the small number of discharged bundles inspected to date. (author)

  12. On the fission gas release from oxide fuels during normal grain growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, M.C.; Paraschiv, A.; Glodeanu, F.

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical formalism for calculating the fission gas release from oxide fuels considering an arbitrary distribution of fuel grain size with only zero boundary condition for gas diffusion at the grain boundary is proposed. It has also been proved that it becomes unnecessary to consider the grain volume distribution function for fission products diffusion when the grain boundary gas resolution is considered, if thermodynamic forces on grain boundaries are only time dependent. In order to highlight the effect of the normal grain growth on fission gas release from oxide fuels Hillert's and Lifshitz and Slyozov's theories have been selected. The last one was used to give an adequate treatment of normal grain growth for the diffusion-controlled grain boundary movement in oxide fuels. It has been shown that during the fuel irradiation, the asymptotic form of the grain volume distribution functions given by Hillert and Lifshitz and Slyozov models can be maintained but the grain growth rate constant becomes time dependent itself. Experimental results have been used to correlate the two theoretical models of normal grain growth to the fission gas release from oxide fuels. (orig.)

  13. Intermediate flow mixing nonsupport grid for BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    An intermediate flow mixing nonsupport grid is described for use in a nuclear reactor fuel assembly containing an array of elongated fuel rods. The grid comprises: (a) interleaved inner straps arranged in an egg-crate configuration to define inner cell openings for receiving respective ones of the fuel rods. The inner straps have outer terminal end portions; (b) an outer peripheral strap attached to the respective terminal end portions of the inner straps to define perimeter cell openings for receiving other ones of the fuel rods. The inner straps and outer strap together have opposite upstream and downstream sides; (c) a first group of mixing vanes disposed at the downstream side and being attached on portions of the outer strap and on respective portions of the inner straps. Together with the outer strap portions, they define the perimeter cell openings. Each of the mixing vanes of the first group extend generally in a downstream direction and inwardly toward the perimeter cell openings for deflecting coolant flowing; and (d) a second group of mixing vanes disposed at the downstream side and being attached on other portions of the inner straps. Together with the respective portions, they define the inner cell openings. Each of the mixing vanes of the second group extend generally in a downstream direction and inwardly toward the inner cell openings for deflecting coolant flowing therethrough; (e) the mixing vanes of the second group are substantially smaller in size than the mixing vanes of the first group so as to generate substantially less turbulence in the portions of the coolant flowing through the inner cell openings than in the portions of the coolant flowing through the perimeter cell openings

  14. CFD modeling of secondary flows in fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglietto, Emilio; Ninokata, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    An optimized non-linear eddy viscosity model is introduced, for calculations of detailed coolant velocity distribution in a tight lattice fuel bundle. The low Reynolds formulation has been optimized based on DNS data for channel flow. The non-linear stress-strain relationship has been modified in the coefficients to model the flow anisotropy, which causes the formation of turbulence driven secondary flows inside the bundle subchannels. Predictions of the model are first compared to experimental measurements of secondary flows in a triangularly arrayed rod bundle with p/d=1.3. Subsequently wall shear stress and velocity predictions are compared with different experimental data for a rod bundle with p/d=1.17. The model shows to be able to correctly reproduce the scale of the secondary motion, and to accurately reproduce both wall shear stress and velocity distributions inside the rod bundle subchannels. (author)

  15. A computer model to predict temperatures and gas flows during AGR fuel handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, D.C.; Bowler, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes the development of a comprehensive computer model (HOSTAGE) that has been developed for the Heysham II/Torness AGRs to predict temperature transients for all the important components during normal and fault conditions. It models not only the charge and discharge or fuel from an on-load reactor but also follows the fuel down the rest of the fuel route until it is dismantled. The main features of the physical model of gas and heat flow are described. Experimental results are used where appropriate and an indication will be given of how the predictions by HOSTAGE correlate with operating AGR reactors. The role of HOSTAGE in the Heysham II/Torness safety case is briefly discussed. (author)

  16. FREC-4A: a computer program to predict fuel rod performance under normal reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Izumi, Fumio

    1981-10-01

    The program FREC-4A (Fuel Reliability Evaluation Code-version 4A) is used for predicting fuel rod performance in normal reactor operation. The performance is calculated in accordance with the irradiation history of fuel rods. Emphasis is placed on the prediction of the axial elongation of claddings induced by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, including the influence of initially preloaded springs inserted in fuel rod lower plenums. In the FREC-4A, an fuel rod is divided into axial segments. In each segment, it is assumed that the temperature, stress and strain are axi-symmetrical, and the axial strain in constant in fuel pellets and in a cladding, though the values in the pellets and in the cladding are different. The calculation of the contact load and the clearance along the length of a fuel rod and the stress and strain in each segment is explained. The method adopted in the FREC-4A is simple, and suitable to predict the deformation of fuel rods over their full length. This report is described on the outline of the program, the method of solving the stiffness equations, the calculation models, the input data such as irradiation history, output distribution, material properties and pores, the printing-out of input data and calculated results. (Kako, I.)

  17. Dynamics of nuclear fuel assemblies in vertical flow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    DYNMOD is a computer program designed to predict the dynamic behaviour of nuclear fuel assemblies in axial flow. The calculations performed by DYNMOD and the input data required by the program are described in this report. Examples of DYNMOD usage and a brief assessment of the accuracy of the dynamic model are also presented. It is intended that the report will be used as a reference manual by users of DYNMOD

  18. Doppler Flow Wire Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow Reserve in Hypertensive Patients with Normal Renal Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beregi, Jean-Paul; Mounier-Vehier, Claire; Devos, Patrick; Gautier, Corinne; Libersa, Christian; McFadden, Eugene P.; Carre, Alain

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the vasomotor responses of the renal microcirculation in patients with essential hypertension.Methods: We studied the reactivity of the renal microcirculation to papaverine, with intraarterial Doppler and quantitative arteriography, in 34 renal arteries of 19 hypertensive patients without significant renal artery stenosis. Isosorbide dinitrate was given to maximally dilate proximal renal arteries. APV (average peak blood flow velocity) was used as an index of renal blood flow.Results: Kidneys could be divided into two distinct subgroups based on their response to papaverine. An increase in APV of up to 55% occurred in 21 kidneys, an increase > 55% in 13 kidneys. Within each group the values were normally distributed. Both baseline APV and the effect of papaverine on mean velocity differed significantly between groups.Conclusion: There seems to be a subgroup of patients with essential hypertension that has an impaired reactivity to papaverine, consistent with a functional impairment of the renal microcirculation. Further studies are required to determine whether this abnormality contributes to or results from elevated blood pressure

  19. Vibration mechanism of fuel rod in axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Song, Kee Nam

    1998-08-01

    This is a review on the previous researches for the vibration of fuel rod induced by axial flow. The analysis methods are classified into three categories accordingly as the researchers postulate the vibration to be self-excited, forced and parametric; the self-excited mechanism by Burgreen and Quinn, the forced one by Reavis, Gorman, kanazawa, and S. Chen, and the parametric one by Y. Chen. Quinn supposed that the centrifugal force by flow exaggerated the natural bow in the cylinder, and the flexural force by it diminished the bow by turns; this interactive motion leaded cylinder to vibration. The supporters to the forced mechanism considered the forces arising from pressure perturbation within the boundary layers as vibrating sources. Y. Chen insisted that the cylinder could only be excited to vibration in resonance by the small oscillation of mean flow velocity. The previous studies were based on the simple boundary conditions such as hinged-hinged or fixed-fixed single span. Therefore, for the more accurate prediction of the fuel rod vibration in reactor, the further studies need to reflect the actual boundary conditions of the fuel rod like axial force and continuous supports by grids. (author). 25 refs

  20. Effect of induced cross flow on flow pattern and performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Kui; Bachman, John; Zhou, Yibo; Park, Jae Wan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D numerical works to study the effect of cross flow on the PEMFC performance. • The cross flow ensure more evenly distributed water and oxygen in the CL. • The optimal net power output can be identified by controlling the back pressure. • Results confirm that present design is effective in improving performance. - Abstract: The cross flow in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) plays an important role in changing the transport pattern and performance. In this study, three-dimensional numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of induced cross flow on the flow pattern and performance of a PEMFC with a previously proposed and experimentally studied novel parallel flow channel design. The numerical results indicate that the liquid water and oxygen become more evenly distributed in the catalyst layer (CL) as the pressure difference between the low-pressure and high-pressure flow channels increases. It has been found that, in the low-pressure channels, the cross flow drives a convective flow from the CL to the flow channel resulting in improved liquid water removal. The optimal net power output can be identified by controlling the back pressure on the high-pressure flow channels. The numerical results confirm that this novel parallel flow channel design is effective in improving PEMFC performance

  1. Review of the Effects of Normal Conditions of Transport on Spent Fuel Integrity in Transportation Casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junggoo; Yoo, Youngik; Lee, Seongki; Lim, Chaejoon [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Spent fuel(SF) storage capacity of each domestic nuclear power plant will reach a saturated state in the near future. Although there are several methods of SF disposal, interim storage is suggested as the most realistic and promising alternative. SF integrity evaluation is a regulatory requirement that is described in Part 71 of Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 of the U..S. NRC licensing requirement. In this paper, the report is reviewed written by EPRI in US and it is helpful to a development of domestic SF integrity evaluation technology. EPRI report about integrity evaluation method on normal conditions of high burn-up spent fuel transport is reviewed. First, dynamic forces occurred in one-foot side drop are calculated. And deformation patterns and fuel rods responses by dynamic forces calculated from spent fuel and cask model are analyzed. It is shown that the damage of fuel rods is not occurred by the dynamic forces on normal conditions. Assembly distortion is not predicted, by virtue of the facts that the spacer grids do not experience significant permanent deformation. Axial forces, bending moments and pinch forces of fuel rods are calculated and compared with the results under the hypothetical accident conditions. No occurrence of transverse tearing mode that is the most serious damage mode in side drop case is predicted. Till now, in Korea, regulatory requirements related with structural integrity of spent fuel are not specified such as 10CFR71. To establish own regulation standards, producing and analyzing sufficient experimental data must be performed preferentially. Based on this, failure analysis and criteria establishment are necessary through modeling and analyzing of spent fuel.

  2. 3-D flow analyses for design of nuclear fuel spacer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karouta, Z. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); GU, Chun-Yuan [ABB Corporate Research, Vaesteras (Sweden); Schoelin, B. [ABB Atom AB, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1995-09-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, CFDS-FLOW3D, was used to develop improved fuel designs for PWR cores. It was used primarily to understand the fluid dynamics of grid spacers, the mass transfer between subchannels caused by spacers and in the long term to develop two-phase models which enable prediction of critical heat flux in PWR fuel. A single subchannel of one grid span was modeled. In this model different spacer designs with mixing devices were analyzed. A special treatment of the boundary condition was developed making use of flow symmetry to model the mass transfer between different subchannels and minimize the size of the computational model. This reduced the computational model to a fraction of a subchannel using traditional periodic boundary conditions. The Navier-Stokes equation was solved for the liquid and the flow turbulence was modeled by k-{xi} turbulence model. The spacer and mixing device were treated as infinite thin surfaces in the model and a zero velocity condition and turbulent wall function were applied on each side of the thin surfaces. This approach simulated the swirl from the mixing devices well, but had the drawback of not predicting pressure drop accurately since the wake behind the plates and the acceleration effect of the spacers were ignored. CFDS-FLOW3D models with mixing devices were applied in the single-phase flow regime. Velocity profiles from the CFDS-FLOW3D models were compared to Laser Doppler Velocimeter measurements taken from the flow field downstream of spaces in a full scale, cold water test loop. The predicted axial and lateral velocity profiles were in good agreement with the measurements. The evaluation of the performance of different spacer devices was made by comparing the swirl ratio downstream of the grid spacers. It is planned to evaluate heat transfer coefficient downstream of the spaces, to implement two-phase flow models, and to model the superheated boundary layer on the surface of the fuel rod.

  3. Lateral Flow Field Behavior Downstream of Mixing Vanes In a Simulated Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, Michael E.; Smith, L. David III; Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the fuel assembly performance of PWR nuclear fuel assemblies, average subchannel flow values are used in design analyses. However, for this highly complex flow, it is known that local conditions around fuel rods vary dependent upon the location of the fuel rod in the fuel assembly and upon the support grid design that maintains the fuel rod pitch. To investigate the local flow in a simulated nuclear fuel rod bundle, a testing technique has been employed to measure the lateral flow field in a 5 x 5 rod bundle. Particle Image Velocimetry was used to measure the lateral flow field downstream of a support grid with mixing vanes for four unique subchannels in the 5 x 5 bundle. The dominant lateral flow structures for each subchannel are compared in this paper including the decay of these flow structures. (authors)

  4. CFD analysis of multiphase coolant flow through fuel rod bundles in advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, A.; Turcu, I.; Prisecaru, I.; Dupleac, D.; Danila, N.

    2010-01-01

    The key component of a pressure tube nuclear reactor core is pressure tube filled with a stream of fuel bundles. This feature makes them suitable for CFD thermal-hydraulic analysis. A methodology for CFD analysis applied to pressure tube nuclear reactors is presented in this paper, which is focused on advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors. The complex flow conditions inside pressure tube are analysed by using the Eulerian multiphase model implemented in FLUENT CFD computer code. Fuel rods in these channels are superheated but the liquid is under high pressure, so it is sub-cooled in normal operating conditions on most of pressure tube length. In the second half of pressure tube length, the onset of boiling occurs, so the flow consists of a gas liquid mixture, with the volume of gas increasing along the length of the channel in the direction of the flow. Limited computer resources enforced us to use CFD analysis for segments of pressure tube. Significant local geometries (junctions, spacers) were simulated. Main results of this work are: prediction of main thermal-hydraulic parameters along pressure tube including CHF evaluation through fuel assemblies. (authors)

  5. Normal reference values for vertebral artery flow volume by color Doppler sonography in Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Cha, Jang Gyu; Park, Seong Jin; Joh, Joon Hee; Park, Jai Soung; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Ahn, Hyun Cheol [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    Vertebrobasilar ischemia has been attributed to a reduction of net vertebral artery flow volume. This study was to establish the reference values for the flow volume of the vertebral artery using color Doppler sonography in the normal Korea adults. Thirty five normal Korea adults without any underlying disease including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, heart disease, obesity (body mas index>30), or carotid artery stenosis was included. There were 17 males and 18 females, age ranged from 20 to 53 years (average=32.86 years). Flow velocities and vessel diameters were recorded in the intertransverse (V2) segment, usually at C5-6 level, bilaterally. The flow volume (Q) was calculated. (Q=time averaged mean velocity x cross sectional area of vessel) A lower Flow velocity and smaller vessel diameter were measured on the right side compared to those of the left side, resulting in a lower flow volume. The calculated flow volumes using the equation were 77.0 +- 39.7 ml/min for the right side and 127.6 +- 71.0 ml/min for the left side (p=0.0001) while the net vertebral artery flow volume was 204.6 +- 81.8 ml/min. Decrease in the vertebral artery flow volume was statistically significant with advanced age. (r=-0.36, p=0.032). Vertebral artery blood flow volume was 191.20 +- 59.19 ml/min in male, and 217.28 +- 98.67 ml/min in female (p=0.6). The normal range for the net vertebral artery flow volume defined by the 5th to 95th percentiles was between 110.06 and 364.1 ml/min. The normal range for the net vertebral artery flow volume was between 110.06 and 364.1 ml/min. Vertebral artery flow volume decreased with the increase of age. However, gender did not affect the blood flow volume.

  6. Fuel flow distribution in SOFC stacks revealed by impedance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbæk, Rasmus Rode; Hjelm, Johan; Barfod, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    As SOFC technology is moving closer to a commercial break through, methods to measure the “state-of-health” of operating stacks are becoming of increasing interest. This requires application of advanced methods for detailed electrical and electrochemical characterization during operation. An oper......As SOFC technology is moving closer to a commercial break through, methods to measure the “state-of-health” of operating stacks are becoming of increasing interest. This requires application of advanced methods for detailed electrical and electrochemical characterization during operation...... utilizations. The fuel flow distribution provides important information about the operating limits of the stack when high electrical efficiency is required....

  7. Spent fuel transport cask thermal evaluation under normal and accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, G. [Department of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, no 2-56126 Pisa (Italy); Lo Frano, R., E-mail: rosa.lofrano@ing.unipi.i [Department of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, no 2-56126 Pisa (Italy); Forasassi, G. [Department of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, no 2-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    The casks used for transport of nuclear materials, especially the spent fuel element (SPE), must be designed according to rigorous acceptance criteria and standards requirements, e.g. the International Atomic Energy Agency ones, in order to provide protection to people and environment against radiation exposure particularly in a severe accident scenario. The aim of this work was the evaluation of the integrity of a spent fuel cask under both normal and accident scenarios transport conditions, such as impact and rigorous fire events, in according to the IAEA accident test requirements. The thermal behaviour and the temperatures distribution of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel transport cask are presented in this paper, especially with reference to the Italian cask designed by AGN, which was characterized by a cylindrical body, with water or air inside the internal cavity, and two lateral shock absorbers. Using the finite element code ANSYS a series of thermal analyses (steady-state and transient thermal analyses) were carried out in order to obtain the maximum fuel temperature and the temperatures field in the body of the cask, both in normal and in accidents scenario, considering all the heat transfer modes between the cask and the external environment (fire in the test or air in the normal conditions) as well as inside the cask itself. In order to follow the standards requirements, the thermal analyses in accidents scenarios were also performed adopting a deformed shape of the shock absorbers to simulate the mechanical effects of a previous IAEA 9 m drop test event. Impact tests on scale models of the shock absorbers have already been conducted in the past at the Department of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering, University of Pisa, in the '80s. The obtained results, used for possible new licensing approval purposes by the Italian competent Authority of the cask for PWR spent fuel cask transport by the Italian competent Authority, are

  8. Pressure data for various flow channels in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Son Ah; Lee, Pil Hyong; Han, Sang Seok; Hwang, Sang Soon

    2008-01-01

    Micro flow channels in flow plates of fuel cells have become much narrower and longer to improve reactant flow distribution leading to increase of pumping power. Therefore it is very important to minimize the pressure drops in the flow channel because increased pumping power reduces overall efficiency. We investigated pressure drops in a micro flow channel at the anode and cathode compared to pressure losses for cold flow in straight, bended and serpentine channels. The results show that friction factors for cold flow channels could be used for parallel and bended flow channel designs for fuel cells. Pressure drop in the serpentine flow channel is the lowest among all flow channels due to bypass flow across the gas diffusion layer under reactive flow condition, although its pressure drop is highest for a cold flow condition. So the effect of bypass flow for serpentine flow channels should be considered when designing flow channels

  9. Spent nuclear fuel system dynamic stability under normal conditions of transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John, E-mail: wangja@ornl.gov

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A conformational potential effect of fuel assembly contact interaction induced transient shock. • Complex vibration modes and vibration load intensity were observed from fuel assembly system. • The project was able to link the periodic transient shock to spent fuel fatigue strength reduction. - Abstract: In a horizontal layout of a spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly under normal conditions of transportation (NCT), the fuel assembly’s skeleton formed by guide tubes and spacer grids is the primary load bearing structure for carrying and transferring the vibration loads within an SNF assembly. Therefore, the integrity of guide tubes and spacer grids will dictate the vibration amplitude/intensity of the fuel assembly during transport, and must be considered when designing multipurpose purpose canister (MPC) for safe SNF transport. This paper investigates the SNF assembly deformation dynamics during normal vibration mode, as well as the transient shock mode inside the cask during NCT. Dynamic analyses were performed in the frequency domain to study frequency characteristic of the fuel assembly system and in the time domain to simulate the transient dynamic response of the fuel assembly. To further evaluate the intensity of contact interaction induced by the local contacts’ impact loading at the spacer grid, detailed models of the actual spring and dimples of the spacer grids were created. The impacts between the fuel rod and springs and dimples were simulated with a 20 g transient shock load. The associated contact interaction intensities, in terms of reaction forces, were estimated from the finite element analyses (FEA) results. The bending moment estimated from the resultant stress on the clad under 20 g transient shock can be used to define the loading in cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) vibration testing for the equivalent condition. To estimate the damage potential of the transient shock to the SNF vibration

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid flow and production in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus studied by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    An interleaved velocity-sensitised fast low-angle shot pulse sequence was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, and supratentorial CSF production in 9 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 9 healthy volunteers. The peak aqueduct CSF flow, both caudal...

  11. Evaluation of gap heat transfer model in ELESTRES for CANDU fuel element under normal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Moon; Ohn, Myung Ryong; Im, Hong Sik; Choi, Jong Hoh; Hwang, Soon Taek

    1995-01-01

    The gap conductance between the fuel and the sheath depends strongly on the gap width and has a significant influence on the amount of initial stored energy. The modified Ross and Stoute gap conductance model in ELESTRES is based on a simplified thermal deformation model for steady-state fuel temperature calculations. A review on a series of experiments reveals that fuel pellets crack, relocate, and are eccentrically positioned within the sheath rather than solid concentric cylinders. In this paper, the two recently-proposed gap conductance models (offset gap model and relocated gap model) are described and are applied to calculate the fuel-sheath gap conductances under experimental conditions and normal operating conditions in CANDU reactors. The good agreement between the experimentally-inferred and calculated gap conductance values demonstrates that the modified Ross and Stoute model was implemented correctly in ELESTRES. The predictions of the modified Ross and Stoute model provide conservative values for gap heat transfer and fuel surface temperature compared to the offset gap and relocated gap models for a limiting power envelope. 13 figs., 3 tabs., 16 refs. (Author)

  12. Low stoichiometry operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A multiphase fuel cell model based on computational fluid dynamics is used to investigate the possibility of operating a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at low stoichiometric flow ratios (ξ gases. A case study...

  13. Experiment studies of fuel rod vibration in coolant flow for substantiation of vibration stability of fuel rods with no fretting-wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu. V.; Afanasiev, A. V.; Makarov, V. V.; Matvienko, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    wear absence. 2) Within the framework of the first stage of work on substantiation of vibration stability studies were performed of vibration of the full-scale model TVS-KVADRAT of LiV design in the coolant flow with thermal-hydraulic parameters close to the parameters of PWR reactor normal operation. 3) Parameters of fuel rod vibrations at the second stage of tests – life vibration tests of TVS-KVADRAT models – were determined by the results of the performed studies

  14. Investigation of gas flow characteristics in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwac, Lee Ku; Kim, Hong Gun

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of electrochemical behavior of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is performed by using a single-phase two-dimensional finite element analysis. Equations of current balance, mass balance, and momentum balance are implemented to simulate the behavior of PEMFC. The analysis results for the co-flow and counterflow mode of gas flow direction are examined in detail in order to compare how the gas flow direction affects quantitatively. The characteristics of internal properties, such as gas velocity distribution, mass fraction of the reactants, fraction of water and current density distribution in PEMFC are illustrated in the electrode and GDL (gas diffusion layer). It is found that the dry reactant gases can be well internally humidified and maintain high performance in the case of the counter-flow mode without external humidification while it is not advantageous for highly humidified or saturated reactant gases. It is also found that the co-flow mode improves the current density distribution with humidified normal condition compared to the counter-flow mode

  15. Installation, test and non-linear vibratory analysis of an experiment with four fuel assembly models under axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The present study is in the scope of pressurized water reactors (PWR) core response to earthquakes. The goal of this thesis is to measure the coupling between fuel assemblies caused an axial water flow. The design, production and installation a new test facility named ICARE EXPERIMENTAL are presented. ICARE EXPERIMENTAL was built in order to measure simultaneously the vibrations of four fuel assemblies (2 x 2) under an axial flow. Vibrations are produced by imposing the dynamic of one of the fuel assemblies and the displacements of the three others, induced by the fluid, are measured in the horizontal plane at grids level. A new data analysis method combining time-frequency analysis and orthogonal mode decomposition (POD) is described. This method, named Sliding Window POD (SWPOD), allows analysing multicomponent data, of which spatial repartition of energy and frequency content are time dependent. In the case of mechanical systems (linear and nonlinear), the link between the proper orthogonal modes obtained through SWPOD and the normal modes (linear and nonlinear) is studied. The SWPOD is applied to experimental tests of a steam generators U-tube, showing the appearance of internal resonances. The method is also applied to dynamic experimental tests of a fuel assembly under axial flow, the evolution of its normal modes is obtained as a function of the fluid velocity. The measures acquired with the ICARE EXPERIMENTAL installation are analysed using the SWPOD. The first results show characteristic behavior of the free fuel assemblies at their resonances. The coupling between fuel assemblies, induced by the fluid, is reproduced by simulations performed using the COEUR3D code. This code is based on a porous media model in order to simulate a fuel assemblies network under axial flow. (author) [fr

  16. BWR fuel assembly bottom nozzle with one-way coolant flow valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor having a flow of coolant/moderator fluid therein, at least one fuel assembly installed in the fluid flow, the fuel assembly is described comprising in combination: a bundle of elongated fuel rods disposed in side-by-side relationship so as to form an array of spaced fuel rods; an outer tubular flow channel surrounding the fuel rods so as to direct the flow of coolant/moderator fluid along the fuel rods; bottom and top nozzles mounted at opposite ends of the flow channel and having an inlet and outlet respectively for allowing entry and exit of the flow of coolant/moderator fluid into and from the flow channel and along the fuel rods therein; and a coolant flow direction control device operatively disposed in the bottom nozzle so as to open the inlet thereof to the flow of coolant/moderator fluid in an inflow direction into the flow channel through the bottom nozzle inlet but close the inlet to the flow of coolant/moderator fluid from the flow channel through the bottom nozzle inlet upon reversal of coolant/moderator fluid flow from the inflow direction

  17. Effect of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on coronary flow in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Fuminobu; Beppu, Shintaro; Ueda, Hiroaki; Nehra, Ajay; Khandheria, Bijoy K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on coronary function in normal subjects. The study assessed mean blood pressure, left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) flow, and echocardiographic variables before and 30 and 60 minutes after taking 50 mg of sildenafil citrate. The mean velocity of LAD flow was assessed with Doppler flow imaging. The study subjects were 6 healthy male volunteers (mean age 37 years). The mean velocity of LAD flow increased 60 minutes after taking sildenafil citrate, but there were no other changes. Two volunteers felt mild flashing and one had mild headache during the study. Sildenafil citrate caused vasodilatation in a normal coronary artery without systemic pressure drops. These results suggest that the agent itself did not have negative effects on the heart in normal subjects.

  18. Carpooling and Driver Responses to Fuel Price Changes: Evidence from Traffic Flows in Los Angeles

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio M. Bento; Jonathan E. Hughes; Daniel T. Kaffine

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how drivers respond to fuel price changes has important implications for highway congestion, accidents, carbon policy, local air pollution and taxation. We examine the underexplored relationship between fuel prices and carpooling. Using a simple theoretical model we show that traffic flows in mainline lanes decrease when fuel prices increase. However in carpool (HOV) lanes, flow can either increase or decrease. Traffic flows in mainline lanes are shown to be more responsive to p...

  19. Noise and DC balanced outlet temperature signals for monitoring coolant flow in LMFBR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, M.

    1977-01-01

    Local cooling disturbances in LMFBR fuel elements may have serious safety implications for the whole reactor core. They have to be detected reliably in an early stage of their formation therefore. This can be accomplished in principle by individual monitoring of the coolant flow rate or the coolant outlet temperature of the sub-assemblies with high precision. In this paper a method is proposed to increase the sensitivity of outlet temperature signals to cooling disturbances. Using balanced temperature signals provides a means for eliminating the normal variations from the original signals which limit the sensitivity and speed of response to cooling disturbances. It is shown that a balanced signal can be derived easily from the original temperature signal by subtracting an inlet temperature and a neutron detector signal with appropriate time shift. The method was tested with tape-recorded noise signals of the KNK I reactor at Karlsruhe. The experimental results confirm the theoretical predictions. A significant reduction of the uncertainty of measured outlet temperatures was achieved. This enables very sensitive and fast response monitoring of coolant flow. Furthermore, it was found that minimizing the variance of the balanced signal offers the possibility for a rough determination of the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel rods during normal reactor operation at power. (author)

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations of BWR fuel bundle inlet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoashi, E; Morooka, S; Ishitori, T; Komita, H; Endo, T; Honda, H; Yamamoto, T; Kato, T; Kawamura, S

    2009-01-01

    We have been studying the mechanism of the flow pattern near the fuel bundle inlet of BWR using both flow visualization test and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. In the visualization test, both single- and multi-bundle test sections were used. The former test section includes only a corner orifice facing two support beams and the latter simulates 16 bundles surrounded by four beams. An observation window is set on the side of the walls imitating the support beams upstream of the orifices in both test sections. In the CFD simulation, as well as the visualization test, the single-bundle model is composed of one bundle with a corner orifice and the multi-bundle model is a 1/4 cut of the test section that includes 4 bundles with the following four orifices: a corner orifice facing the corner of the two neighboring support beams, a center orifice at the opposite side from the corner orifice, and two side orifices. Twin-vortices were observed just upstream of the corner orifice in the multi-bundle test as well as the single-bundle test. A single-vortex and a vortex filament were observed at the side orifice inlet and no vortex was observed at the center orifice. These flow patterns were also predicted in the CFD simulation using Reynolds Stress Model as a turbulent model and the results were in good agreement with the test results mentioned above. (author)

  1. Flow blurring atomization for combustion of viscous (bio)fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Bouma, Wilmer; Ratering, Martijn; Brem, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve efficient combustion of liquid fuel a proper atomization of the fuel is needed. In case of many biomass fuels the atomization process is obstructed and hindered by high viscosity of the fuel. Preheating to reduce the viscosity in many cases is not possible because of fuel

  2. The differential radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the light-water reactor fuel cycle: effluent discharges during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouville, A.; Guetat, P.; Jones, J.A.; Kelly, G.N.; Legrand, J.; White, I.F.

    1980-01-01

    The radiological impact of a light-water reactor fuel cycle utilizing enriched uranium fuel may be altered by the recycle of plutonium. Differences in impact may arise during various operations in the fuel cycle: those which arise from effluents discharged during normal operation of the various installations comprising the fuel cycle are evaluated in this study. The differential radiological impact on the population of the European Communities (EC) of effluents discharged during the recycling of 10 tonnes of fissile plutonium metal is evaluated. The contributions from each stage of the fuel cycle, i.e. fuel fabrication, reactor operation and fuel reprocessing and conversion, are identified. Separate consideration is given to airborne and liquid effluents and account is taken of a wide range of environmental conditions, representative of the EC, in estimating the radiological impact. The recycle of plutonium is estimated to result in a reduction in the radiological impact from effluents of about 30% of that when using enriched uranium fuel

  3. Measurement of cerebral blood flow in normal subjects by phase contrast MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimada, Akio; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Mamiya, Toshio; Takahashi, Taku; Kamano, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Yusuke; Osada, Hisato

    1994-01-01

    Global cerebral blood flow (CBF) was quantitatively measured with a two-dimensional phase contrast cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique in 24 normal subjects (mean age, 38.6 years; range, 12-70 years). Cine transverse images of the upper cervical region (32 phases/cardiac cycle) were acquired with a 1.5 Tesla MR imaging unit. In five subjects, measurement of CBF was performed before and after intravenous administration of acetazolamide (DIAMOX, 15 mg/kg). Inter- and intra-observer variations in flow volume measurement were small (r=0.970, standard error of the estimate (SEE)=2.9 ml/min, n=8; r=0.963, SEE=4.6 ml/min, n=40, respectively). In measuring flow velocity, they were inferior to those of flow volume measurement. On a visually determined setting of region of interest (ROI), reproducibility of the measurement of flow velocity was not satisfactory in this study. Thus only the results of flow volume measurement are presented. Mean summed vertebral flow volume (171 ml/min, SD=40.6) was significantly less than mean summed internal carotid flow volume (523 ml/min, SD=111). Total blood flow volume showed a significant decline with age (r=-0.45, p<0.05). The mean proportions of carotid and vertebral flow volume to total flow volume were 75.3% and 24.7%, respectively, and showed no significant change with age. The left-to-right ratio of vertebral flow volume (1.39) was significantly higher than that of internal carotid flow volume (0.99, r=0.05). After DIAMOX i.v., the mean rate of increase in total flow volume was 157%. Mean rates of increase in carotid and vertebral flow volume were 154% and 166%, respectively, which were not significantly different. In conclusion, this method is useful for estimating carotid and vertebral flow volume. (author)

  4. Normal reference values for vertebral artery flow volume by color Doppler sonography in Korean adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Cha, Jang Gyu; Park, Seong Jin; Joh, Joon Hee; Park, Jai Soung; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Ahn, Hyun Cheol

    2003-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar ischemia has been attributed to a reduction of net vertebral artery flow volume. This study was to establish the reference values for the flow volume of the vertebral artery using color Doppler sonography in the normal Korea adults. Thirty five normal Korea adults without any underlying disease including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, heart disease, obesity (body mas index>30), or carotid artery stenosis was included. There were 17 males and 18 females, age ranged from 20 to 53 years (average=32.86 years). Flow velocities and vessel diameters were recorded in the intertransverse (V2) segment, usually at C5-6 level, bilaterally. The flow volume (Q) was calculated. (Q=time averaged mean velocity x cross sectional area of vessel) A lower Flow velocity and smaller vessel diameter were measured on the right side compared to those of the left side, resulting in a lower flow volume. The calculated flow volumes using the equation were 77.0 ± 39.7 ml/min for the right side and 127.6 ± 71.0 ml/min for the left side (p=0.0001) while the net vertebral artery flow volume was 204.6 ± 81.8 ml/min. Decrease in the vertebral artery flow volume was statistically significant with advanced age. (r=-0.36, p=0.032). Vertebral artery blood flow volume was 191.20 ± 59.19 ml/min in male, and 217.28 ± 98.67 ml/min in female (p=0.6). The normal range for the net vertebral artery flow volume defined by the 5th to 95th percentiles was between 110.06 and 364.1 ml/min. The normal range for the net vertebral artery flow volume was between 110.06 and 364.1 ml/min. Vertebral artery flow volume decreased with the increase of age. However, gender did not affect the blood flow volume.

  5. Normalization of thyroid blood flow in Graves' hyperthyroidism following radioactive iodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, D.C.S.; Woodcock, J.P.; Shedden, E.J.; Lazarus, J.H.; Wheeler, M.H.; McGregor, A.M. (University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (UK). Medical Physics Dept.)

    1990-05-01

    In a group of 12 patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism, administration of 514 {plus minus} 43 (mean {plus minus} SD) MBq iodine-131 was associated with a fall of superior thyroid artery (STA) blood flow in two at 6 months and in eight at 11 months. The reduction in time-averaged velocity at 11 months correlated with the reduction in FT4 and in FT3 at this time. In four patients who had persistent elevated STA blood flow, two were still hyperthyroid. The diameter of the STA was unchanged at 6 months and only half the patients had reduction of their STA size at 11 months after radioiodine (RAI) therapy. These data indicate that normalization of STA blood flow precedes normalization of STA size in patients treated with RAI. Further work is required to determine whether STA blood flow measurements are of predictive value in treatment outcome. (author).

  6. Cerebral blood flow and red cell delivery in normal subjects and in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swank, R.L.; Roth, J.G.; Woody, D.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined in 77 normal females and 53 normal males of different ages and in 26 men and 45 women with multiple sclerosis by the inhalation of radioactive Xe133 method. In the normal subjects the CBF was relatively high in the teens and fell, at first rapidly and then slowly in both sexes with age. During adult life the flow in females was significantly higher than in males. The delivery of packed red cells (RCD) was determined by multiplying the CBF by the percentage concentration of red cells (HCT). The RCD for both sexes was nearly the same. In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease

  7. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  8. Current status of the FASTGRASS/PARAGRASS models for fission product release from LWR fuel during normal and accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.; Zawadski, S.A.; Piasecka, M.

    1983-10-01

    The theoretical FASTGRASS model for the prediction of the behavior of the gaseous and volatile fission products in nuclear fuels under normal and transient conditions has undergone substantial improvements. The major improvements have been in the atomistic and bubble diffusive flow models, in the models for the behavior of gas bubbles on grain surfaces, and in the models for the behavior of the volatile fission products iodine and cesium. The thoery has received extensive verification over a wide range of fuel operating conditions, and can be regarded as a state-of-the-art model based on our current level of understanding of fission product behavior. PARAGRASS is an extremely efficient, mechanistic computer code with the capability of modeling steady-state and transient fission-product behavior. The models in PARAGRASS are based on the more detailed ones in FASTGRASS. PARAGRASS updates for the FRAPCON (PNL), FRAP-T (INEL), and SCDAP (INEL) codes have recently been completed and implemented. Results from an extensive FASTGRASS verification are presented and discussed for steady-state and transient conditions. In addition, FASTGRASS predictions for fission product release rate constants are compared with those in NUREG-0772. 21 references, 13 figures

  9. Radionuclide investigation of the blood flow in tumor and normal rat tissues in induced hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istomin, Yu.P.; Shitikov, B.D.; Markova, L.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography was performed in rats with transplantable tumors. Induced hyperglycemia was shown to result in blood flow inhibition in tumor and normal tissues of tumor-bearing rats. Some differences were revealed in a degree of reversibility of blood flow disorders in tissues of the above strains. The results obtained confirmed the advisability of radiation therapy at the height of a decrease in tumor blood

  10. Performance Characteristics of a PEM Fuel Cell with Parallel Flow Channels at Different Cathode Relative Humidity Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soon Hwang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In fuel cells flow configuration and operating conditions such as cell temperature, humidity at each electrode and stoichiometric number are very crucial for improving performance. Too many flow channels could enhance the performance but result in high parasite loss. Therefore a trade-off between pressure drop and efficiency of a fuel cell should be considered for optimum design. This work focused on numerical simulation of the effects of operating conditions, especially cathode humidity, with simple micro parallel flow channels. It is known that the humidity at the cathode flow channel becomes very important for enhancing the ion conductivity of polymer membrane because fully humidified condition was normally set at anode. To investigate the effect of humidity on the performance of a fuel cell, in this study humidification was set to 100% at the anode flow channel and was changed by 0–100% at the cathode flow channel. Results showed that the maximum power density could be obtained under 60% humidified condition at the cathode where oxygen concentration was moderately high while maintaining high ion conductivity at a membrane.

  11. Buckling resistance calculation of Guide Thimbles for the mechanical design of fuel assembly type PWR under normal reactor operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, C.B.L.

    1990-01-01

    The calculations demonstrate the fulfillment of one of the mechanical design criteria for the Fuel Assembly Structure under normal reactor operating conditions. The calculations of stresses in the Guide Thimbles are performed with the aid of the program ANSYS. This paper contains program parameters and modelling of a typical Fuel Assembly for a Reactor similar to ANGRA II. (author)

  12. Parameter study on the influence of prepressurization on LWR fuel rod behaviour during normal operation and hypothetical LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.P.; Brzoska, B.; Depisch, F.; Sauermann, W.

    1978-01-01

    To analyse the influence of prepressurization on fuel rod behaviour, a parametric study has been performed considering the effects of the as-fabricated fuel rod internal prepressure on the normal operation and postulated LOCA red behaviour of a 1300 MWe1 KWU standard nuclear power plant pressurized water reactor. A reduction of prepressurization in the analysed range results in a negligible worsened normal operation behaviour whereas the LOCA behaviour is improved significantly. (author)

  13. Surrogate fuel assembly multi-axis shaker tests to simulate normal conditions of rail and truck transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, Greg John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grey, Carissa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelhardt, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This report describes the third set of tests (the “DCLa shaker tests”) of an instrumented surrogate PWR fuel assembly. The purpose of this set of tests was to measure strains and accelerations on Zircaloy-4 fuel rods when the PWR assembly was subjected to rail and truck loadings simulating normal conditions of transport when affixed to a multi-axis shaker. This is the first set of tests of the assembly simulating rail normal conditions of transport.

  14. Surrogate fuel assembly multi-axis shaker tests to simulate normal conditions of rail and truck transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, Greg John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grey, Carissa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelhardt, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-12

    This report describes the third set of tests (the “DCLa shaker tests”) of an instrumented surrogate PWR fuel assembly. The purpose of this set of tests was to measure strains and accelerations on Zircaloy-4 fuel rods when the PWR assembly was subjected to rail and truck loadings simulating normal conditions of transport when affixed to a multi-axis shaker. This is the first set of tests of the assembly simulating rail normal conditions of transport.

  15. Normal evolution of a spent fuel repository at the candidate sites in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawford, M.B.; Wilmot, R.D.

    1998-12-01

    The Finnish disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel envisages burial of the fuel in a repository excavated at a depth of around 500 m in crystalline bedrock. Since 1983, a programme has been underway in Finland to select a potential site for such a repository. The programme is now in the final stages of selecting one site for further detailed characterisation from a list of four candidate sites at Kivetty, Romuvaara, Olkiluoto, and Haestholmen. Each stage of the site selection process has been supported by a major performance assessment (PA) exercise. The aim of this report is to describe the normal evolution of a repository system at the four candidate Finnish sites as input to development of the next PA, known as TILA-99. The report summarises the disposal concept and the present-day characteristics of each candidate site, and considers the most likely future changes in both the natural environment and the engineered components of the disposal system. The description concentrates on the key features, events and processes (FEPs) controlling behaviour and evolution of the disposal system. It is assumed that all the canisters are intact following emplacement and repository closure. FEPs that occur but which do not significantly affect system behaviour and evolution are only briefly described. FEPs with a low probability of occurrence are mentioned as appropriate. The report provides a map to the key Finnish reports and other work that underlies and supports the description of normal evolution. Differences between the four candidate sites in terms of their expected normal evolution are summarised. None of the differences are sufficient to prevent each site from behaving as a 'normal' site, the evolution of which is summarised over time in the final section of the report. (author)

  16. Normal evolution of a spent fuel repository at the candidate sites in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grawford, M.B.; Wilmot, R.D. [Galson Sciences Limited, Rutland (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    The Finnish disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel envisages burial of the fuel in a repository excavated at a depth of around 500 m in crystalline bedrock. Since 1983, a programme has been underway in Finland to select a potential site for such a repository. The programme is now in the final stages of selecting one site for further detailed characterisation from a list of four candidate sites at Kivetty, Romuvaara, Olkiluoto, and Haestholmen. Each stage of the site selection process has been supported by a major performance assessment (PA) exercise. The aim of this report is to describe the normal evolution of a repository system at the four candidate Finnish sites as input to development of the next PA, known as TILA-99. The report summarises the disposal concept and the present-day characteristics of each candidate site, and considers the most likely future changes in both the natural environment and the engineered components of the disposal system. The description concentrates on the key features, events and processes (FEPs) controlling behaviour and evolution of the disposal system. It is assumed that all the canisters are intact following emplacement and repository closure. FEPs that occur but which do not significantly affect system behaviour and evolution are only briefly described. FEPs with a low probability of occurrence are mentioned as appropriate. The report provides a map to the key Finnish reports and other work that underlies and supports the description of normal evolution. Differences between the four candidate sites in terms of their expected normal evolution are summarised. None of the differences are sufficient to prevent each site from behaving as a `normal` site, the evolution of which is summarised over time in the final section of the report. (author) 155 refs.

  17. A new modified-serpentine flow field for application in high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singdeo, Debanand; Dey, Tapobrata; Gaikwad, Shrihari

    2017-01-01

    field design is proposed and its usefulness for the fuel cell applications are evaluated in a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell. The proposed geometry retains some of the features of serpentine flow field such as multiple bends, while modifications are made in its in-plane flow path...

  18. Fluid flow and fuel-air mixing in a motored two-dimensional Wankel rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Stegeman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming was employed to obtain numerical solutions to the conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and energy to study the unsteady, multidimensional flow and mixing of fuel and air inside the combustion chambers of a two-dimensional Wankel rotary engine under motored conditions. The effects of the following engine design and operating parameters on fluid flow and fuel-air mixing during the intake and compression cycles were studied: engine speed, angle of gaseous fuel injection during compression cycle, and speed of the fuel leaving fuel injector.

  19. Transport of volatile fission products in the fuel-to-sheath gap of defective fuel elements during normal and reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Bonin, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical treatment has been used to model the vapour transport of radioactive fission products released into the fuel-to-sheath gap of defective nuclear fuel elements. The model accounts for both diffusive and bulk-convective transport. Convective transport becomes important as a result of a significant release of gaseous fission products into the gap during a high-temperature reactor accident. However, during normal reactor operation, diffusion is shown to be the dominant process of transport. The model is based on an analysis of several in-reactor tests with operating defective fuel elements, and high-temperature annealing experiments with irradiated fuel specimens. ((orig.))

  20. Pellet cladding interaction (PCI) fuel duty during normal operation of ASEA-ATOM BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaernild, O.; Olsson, S.

    1983-01-01

    Local power changes may under special conditions cause PCI fuel failures in a power reactor. By restricting the local power increase rate in certain situations it is possible to prevent PCI failures. Fine motion control rod drives, large operating range of the main recirculation pumps and an advanced burnable absorber design have minimized the impact of the PCI restrictions. With current ICFM schemes the power of an assembly is due to the burnup of the gadolinia gradually increasing during the first cycle of operation. After this the power is essentially decreasing monotonously during the remaining life of the assembly. Some assemblies are for short burnup intervals operated at very low power in control cells. The control rods in these cells may however be withdrawn without restrictions leading to energy production losses. Base load operation would in the normal case lead to very minor PCI loads on the fuel regardless of any PCI related operating restrictions. At the return to full power after a short shutdown or in connection with load follow operation, the xenon transient may cause PCI loads on the fuel. To avoid this a few hoursholdtime before going back to full power is recommended. (author)

  1. Pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) fuel duty during normal operation of ASEA-ATOM BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaernild, O.; Olsson, S.

    1985-01-01

    Local power changes may, under special conditions, cause PCI fuel failures in a power reactor. By restricting the local power increase rate in certain situations it is possible to prevent PCI failures. Fine motion control rod drives, large operating range of the main recirculation pumps and an advanced burnable absorber design have minimized the impact of the PCI restrictions. With current ICFM schemes the power of an assembly is due to the burnup of the gadolinia gradually increasing during the first cycle of operation. After this the power is essentially decreasing monotonously during the remaining life of the assembly. Some assemblies are for short burnup intervals operated at very low power in control cells. The control rods in these cells may, however, be withdrawn without restrictions leading to energy production losses. Base load operation would in the normal case lead to very minor PCI loads on the fuel regardless of any PCI-related operating restrictions. At the return to full power after a short shutdown or in connection with load follow operation, the xenon transient may cause PCI loads on the fuel. To avoid this a few hours hold-time before going back to full power is recommended. (author)

  2. TREAT experimental data base regarding fuel dispersals in LMFBR loss-of-flow accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, R.; Fink, C.L.; Stanford, G.S.; Regis, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    The reactivity feedback from fuel relocation is a central issue in the analysis of loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents in LMFBRs. Fuel relocation has been studied in a number of LOF simulations in the TREAT reactor. In this paper the results of these tests are analyzed, using, as the principal figure of merit, the changes in equivalent fuel worth associated with the fuel motion. The equivalent fuel worth was calculated from the measured axial fuel distributions by weighting the data with a typical LMFBR fuel-worth function. At nominal power, the initial fuel relocation resulted in increases in equivalent fuel worth. Above nominal power the fuel motion was dispersive, but the dispersive driving forces could not unequivocally be identified from the experimental data

  3. Study on flow-induced vibration of the fuel rod in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki

    1988-03-01

    This study was performed in order to investigate flow-induced vibration characteristics of a fuel rod in HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor) from both an experiment and a numerical simulation. Two kinds of fuel rods were used in this experiment: one was a graphite rod which simulated a specification of the HTTR's fuel rod and the other was an aluminum rod whose weight was a half of the graphite one. The experiment was carried out up to Re = 31000 using air at room temperature and pressure. Air flowed downstream in an annular passage which consisted of the fuel rod and the graphite channel. Numerical simulations by fluid and frequency equations were also carried out. Numerical and experimental results were then compared. The following conclusions were drived: (1) The fuel rod amplitudes increase with the flow rate and with a decrease of the fuel rod weight. (2) The fuel rod amplitudes are obtained by δ/De = 2.22 x 10 -10 Re 1.43 , 9000 ≤ Re ≤ 31000, where δ is a vibration amplitude, De is a hydraulic diameter and Reis Reynolds number. (3) The fuel rod frequencies shift from lower natural frequency to higher as the flow rate increases. (4) The flow-induced vibration behavior of the fuel rod can simulate well by simultaneous equations which used the turbulence model for fluid and the mass model for vibration of the fuel rod. (author)

  4. Prediction for the flow distribution and the pressure drop of a plate type fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hark; Jo, Dea Sung; Chae, Hee Taek; Lee, Byung Chul

    2011-01-01

    A plate type fuel assembly widely used in many research reactors does not allow the coolant to mix with neighboring fuel channels due to the completely separated flow channels. If there is a serious inequality of coolant distribution among channels, it can reduce thermal-hydraulic safety margin, as well as it can cause a deformation of fuel plates by the pressure difference between neighboring channels, thus the flow uniformity in the fuel assembly should be confirmed. When designing a primary cooling system (PCS), the pressure drop through a reactor core is a dominant value to determine the PCS pump size. The major portion of reactor core pressure drop is caused by the fuel assemblies. However it is not easy to get a reasonable estimation of pressure drop due to the geometric complexity of the fuel assembly and the thin gaps between fuel assemblies. The flow rate through the gap is important part to determine the total flow rate of PCS, so it should be estimated as reasonable as possible. It requires complex and difficult jobs to get useful data. In this study CFD analysis to predict the flow distribution and the pressure drop were conducted on the plate type fuel assembly, which results would be used to be preliminary data to determine the PCS flow rate and to improve the design of a fuel assembly

  5. Design of the Flow Plates for a Dual Cooled Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yong; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Lee, Young Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Hyung Kyu

    2009-01-01

    In a dual cooled fuel assembly, the array and position of fuels are changed from those of a conventional PWR fuel assembly to achieve a power uprating. The flow plate provides flow holes to direct the heated coolant into/out of the fuel assembly and structural intensity to insure that the fuel rod is axially restrained within the spacer grids. So, flow plates of top/bottom end pieces (TEP/BEP) have to be modified into proper shape. Because the flow holes' area of a flow plate affects pressure drop, the flow holes' area must be larger than/equal to that of conventional flow plates. And design criterion of the TEP/BEP says that the flow plate should withstand a 22.241 kN axial load during handling lest a calculated stress intensity should exceed the Condition I allowable stress. In this paper, newly designed flow plates of a TEP/BEP are suggested and stress analysis is conducted to evaluate strength robustness of the flow plates for the dual cooled fuel assembly

  6. Experimental study of flow induced vibration of the planar fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinhua; Bo Hanliang; Jiang Shengyao; Jia Haijun; Zheng Wenxiang; Min Gang; Qu Xinxing

    2005-01-01

    The paper studied the flow-induced vibration of the planar fuel assembly under scour of coolant through experiments, the study includes: the characteristics of the inherent vibration, the response to the flow-induced vibration in rating condition and the confirmation of the critical flow velocity's scope of the flow flexible instability. The velocity distributions in different flow channels formed by fuel plates in the assembly were measured, and the velocity distribution in the same flow channel was also measured. The experimental conclusions includes: the inherent vibration frequency of the planar fuel assembly is different for a little in each direction. The damp ratio corresponding to the assembly each rank's inherent frequency is small, and the damp ratio decreased with the increase of the corresponding inherent frequency. The velocity in different flow channels decreased from outside to inside, and the velocity in the middle channel was the least; the velocity in the same channel decreased from inside to outside, and the velocity in the middle position was the most. The vibration swing of the fuel assembly was small at rating condition, and the vibration swing of the fuel plates was larger than side plates. The vibration of the fuel assembly increased with the increase of the velocity, the vibration of the middle fuel plate were larger than the border fuel plate, and the vibration of the border fuel plate was larger than the side plate. The large scale vibration of the flow flexible instability didn't occur in the velocity scope of 0-18.8 m/s in the experiment, so the critical flow velocity of the flow flexible instability was not in the flow velocity scope of the experiment. (authors)

  7. Flow Effects on the Flammability Diagrams of Solid Fuels: Microgravity Influence on Ignition Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, J. L.; Walther, D. C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Steinhaus, T.; Torero, J. L.; Quintere, J. G.; Ross, H. D.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of an accidental fire in space-based facilities is a primary concern of space exploration programs. Spacecraft environments generally present low velocity air currents produced by ventilation and heating systems (of the order of 0.1 m/s), and fluctuating oxygen concentrations around that of air due to CO2 removal systems. Recent experiments of flame spread in microgravity show the spread rate to be faster and the limiting oxygen concentration lower than in normal-gravity. To date, there is not a material flammability-testing protocol that specifically addresses issues related to microgravity conditions. The present project (FIST) aims to establish a testing methodology that is suitable for the specific conditions of reduced gravity. The concepts underlying the operation of the LIFT apparatus, ASTM-E 1321-93, have been used to develop the Forced-flow Ignition and flame-Spread Test (FIST). As in the LIFT, the FIST is used to obtain the flammability diagrams of the material, i.e., graphs of ignition delay time and flame spread rate as a function of the externally applied radiant flux, but under forced flow rather than natural convection conditions, and for different oxygen concentrations. Although the flammability diagrams are similar, the flammability properties obtained with the FIST are found to depend on the flow characteristics. A research program is currently underway with the purpose of implementing the FIST as a protocol to characterize the flammability performance of solid materials to be used in microgravity facilities. To this point, tests have been performed with the FIST apparatus in both normal-gravity and microgravity conditions to determine the effects of oxidizer flow characteristics on the flammability diagrams of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) fuel samples. The experiments are conducted at reduced gravity in a KC- 135 aircraft following a parabolic flight trajectory that provides up to 25 seconds of low gravity. The objective of the

  8. CSF Flow in the Brain in the Context of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, W G

    2015-05-01

    CSF normally flows back and forth through the aqueduct during the cardiac cycle. During systole, the brain and intracranial vasculature expand and compress the lateral and third ventricles, forcing CSF craniocaudad. During diastole, they contract and flow through the aqueduct reverses. Hyperdynamic CSF flow through the aqueduct is seen when there is ventricular enlargement without cerebral atrophy. Therefore, patients presenting with clinical normal pressure hydrocephalus who have hyperdynamic CSF flow have been found to respond better to ventriculoperitoneal shunting than those with normal or decreased CSF flow. Patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus have also been found to have larger intracranial volumes than sex-matched controls, suggesting that they may have had benign external hydrocephalus as infants. While their arachnoidal granulations clearly have decreased CSF resorptive capacity, it now appears that this is fixed and that the arachnoidal granulations are not merely immature. Such patients appear to develop a parallel pathway for CSF to exit the ventricles through the extracellular space of the brain and the venous side of the glymphatic system. This pathway remains functional until late adulthood when the patient develops deep white matter ischemia, which is characterized histologically by myelin pallor (ie, loss of lipid). The attraction between the bare myelin protein and the CSF increases resistance to the extracellular outflow of CSF, causing it to back up, resulting in hydrocephalus. Thus idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus appears to be a "2 hit" disease: benign external hydrocephalus in infancy followed by deep white matter ischemia in late adulthood. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Comparative study of Newtonian physiological blood flow through normal and stenosed carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Matiur; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Mamun, Khairuzzaman; Akhter, Most. Nasrin

    2017-06-01

    A numerical simulation is performed to investigate Newtonian physiological flows behavior on three dimensional idealized carotid artery (CA) and single stenosed (75% by area) carotid artery(SCA). The wall vessel is set as rigid during simulation. Bifurcated blood vessel are simulated by using three-dimensional flow analysis. Physiological and parabolic velocity profiles are set out to fix the conditions of inlet boundaries of artery. In other hand, physiological waveform is an important part of compilation and it is successfully done by utilization of Fourier series having sixteen harmonics. The investigation has a Reynolds number range of 94 to 1120. Low Reynolds number k — ω model has been used as governing equation. The investigation has been carried out to characterize the flow behavior of blood in two geometry, namely, (i) Normal carotid artery (CA) and (ii) Stenosed carotid artery (SCA). The Newtonian model has been used to study the physics of fluid. The findings of the two models are thoroughly compared in order to observe there behavioral sequence of flows. The numerical results were presented in terms of velocity, pressure, wall shear stress distributions and cross sectional velocities as well as the streamlines contour. Stenosis disturbs the normal pattern of blood flow through the artery as reduced area. At stenosis region velocity and peak Reynolds number rapidly increase and Reynolds number reach transitional and turbulent region. These flow fluctuation and turbulence have bad effect to the blood vessel which makes to accelerate the progress of stenosis.

  10. Coronary flow reserve/diastolic function relationship in angina-suffering patients with normal coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchisi, Chiara; Marti, Giuliano; Bellacosa, Ilaria; Mary, David; Vacca, Giovanni; Marino, Paolo; Grossini, Elena

    2017-05-01

    Coronary blood flow and diastolic function are well known to interfere with each other through mechanical and metabolic mechanisms. We aimed to assess the relationship between coronary flow reserve (CFR) and diastolic dysfunction in patients suffering from angina but with normal coronary angiography. In 16 patients with chest pain and angiographically normal coronary arteries, CFR was measured using transthoracic echo-Doppler by inducing hyperemia through dipyridamole infusion. Diastolic function (E/A, deceleration time, isovolumetric relaxation time [IVRT], propagation velocity [Vp]) and left ventricular mass were evaluated by means of two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. The patients were initially divided into two groups on the grounds of CFR only (ACFR: altered CFR, n = 9; NACFR: unaltered CFR, n = 7). Thereafter they were divided into four groups on the grounds of CFR and diastolic function (NN: normal; AA: altered CFR/diastole; AN: altered CFR/normal diastole; NA: normal CFR/altered diastole). Most of the subjects were scheduled in AA (n = 8) or NA (n = 5) groups, which were taken into consideration for further analysis. Patients were not different regarding various risk factors. ACFR and AA patients were older with normal body weight in comparison with NACFR and NA patients (P relationship between altered CFR and diastole.

  11. Experimental Study and Comparison of Various Designs of Gas Flow Fields to PEM Fuel Cells and Cell Stack Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hong; Li, Peiwen; Juarez-Robles, Daniel; Wang, Kai; Hernandez-Guerrero, Abel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a significant number of experimental tests to proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells were conducted to investigate the effect of gas flow fields on fuel cell performance. Graphite plates with various flow field or flow channel designs, from literature survey and also novel designs by the authors, were used for the PEM fuel cell assembly. The fabricated fuel cells have an effective membrane area of 23.5 cm 2 . The results showed that the serpentine flow channel design is still favorable, giving the best single fuel cell performance amongst all the studied flow channel designs. A novel symmetric serpentine flow field was proposed for a relatively large sized fuel cell application. Four fuel cell stacks each including four cells were assembled using different designs of serpentine flow channels. The output power performances of fuel cell stacks were compared and the novel symmetric serpentine flow field design is recommended for its very good performance.

  12. Normality test for determining the correction factor of isotopic composition in PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Shin, H. S.; Noh, S. K.; Seo, K. S.

    2001-01-01

    Normality test has been carried out for the ratios of the measured-to-calculated isotopic compositions in PWR spent fuel, using Shapiro-Wilk W, Lilliefors D, Cramer-von Mises and Anderson-Darling. All 38 istopices have been evaluated by means of the 1.5xIQR rule and then outliers have been discarded. As result, it seems that only 20 nuclides are satisfied with the normality at significance level 5 %. 18 Nuclides(samples) including U-235 have higher significance probability(p-value) than 25 % in W-test and p-values obtained by other three tests exceed the upper limit. Besides, in 6 nuclides including Pu-239, it seems that the p-values are between 5 % and 25 % in W test. From these results, in order to predict the isotopic compositions in the conservative point of view, it is decided that the correction factors for the nuclides are determined at the 95/95 probability and confidence level by using tolerance limit-methods with the assumption that only 18 nuclides are satisfied with thr normality

  13. Experimental study on the start-up with dry gases from normal cell temperatures in self-humidified proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Im Mo; Jung, Aeri; Kim, Beom Jun; Baik, Kyung Don; Kim, Min Soo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the start-up characteristics of PEMFCs (proton exchange membrane fuel cells) was investigated with dry gases from normal cell temperatures above 0 °C. Firstly, the effects of flow arrangements (co-flow and counter-flow) were evaluated at a starting cell temperature of 25 °C. Then, the start-up was successful in both arrangements, but it showed better performance with counter-flow. In addition, the hydrogen concentration was measured and it showed that hydrogen crossover contributes to the membrane hydration and the first phase of dry start-up. However, although the cell temperature rose above 45 °C after start-up form 25 °C with counter-flow arrangement, the restart-up after shut-down failed at a starting cell temperature of 45 °C regardless of flow arrangements. Considering the needs of restart-up, the available starting cell temperature should be improved. For this, after first sub-step of start-up process, relatively low flow rates were maintained to retain produced water without purge so that the membrane can be hydrated sufficiently. With this modified process, denominated as WSP (water storage process) in this study, the dry start-up became successful at a starting cell temperature of 45 °C and the cell performance was remarkably improved especially with counter-flow arrangement. - Highlights: • Start-up with dry gases from normal cell temperatures was investigated. • Counter-flow arrangement showed better performance over co-flow arrangement. • Water is produced by hydrogen crossover and its direct reaction with oxygen at cathode side. • It prevents the membrane dehydration and helps the start-up during the first phase of the process. • Available starting cell temperature and cell performance could be improved with WSP.

  14. Development of a flow restrictor for CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, F.; Antonaccio, C.; Masciotra, H.; Klink, A.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the creep and neutron growth phenomena experienced by the components inside the reactor during operation of CNE it is expected that both the fuel channels and the Liquid Injection lances increase their permanent deformation. One of the deformation types that these two components experiment is the SAG, which is what happens with any beam supported on their extremes to which a load is applied, except for this case that due to creep and neutronic effect growth, part of the deformation is not elastic and increases with time To solve or avoid this condition, two solutions exist, one is to replace the pressure tubes, forcing the calandria tube to recover to a near to original position or to design a device that permits defueling of the channel without modifying the pressure drop and in this way not to affect the distribution of coolant in the core. In some channels it was decided to replace the pressure tube and in others it was decided to defuel them proposing a design for a flow restrictor. (author

  15. Fuel density effect on near nozzle flow field in small laminar coflow diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Flow characteristics in small coflow diffusion flames were investigated with a particular focus on the near-nozzle region and on the buoyancy force exerted on fuels with densities lighter and heavier than air (methane, ethylene, propane, and n-butane). The flow-fields were visualized through the trajectories of seed particles. The particle image velocimetry technique was also adopted for quantitative velocity field measurements. The results showed that the buoyancy force exerted on the fuel as well as on burnt gas significantly distorted the near-nozzle flow-fields. In the fuels with densities heavier than air, recirculation zones were formed very close to the nozzle, emphasizing the importance of the relative density of the fuel to that of the air on the flow-field. Nozzle heating influenced the near-nozzle flow-field particularly among lighter fuels (methane and ethylene). Numerical simulations were also conducted, focusing specifically on the effect of specifying inlet boundary conditions for fuel. The results showed that a fuel inlet boundary with a fully developed velocity profile for cases with long tubes should be specified inside the fuel tube to permit satisfactory prediction of the flow-field. The calculated temperature fields also indicated the importance of the selection of the location of the inlet boundary, especially in testing various combustion models that include soot in small coflow diffusion flames. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  16. Viscous flow features in scaled-up physical models of normal and pathological vocal phonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erath, Byron D., E-mail: berath@purdue.ed [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Plesniak, Michael W., E-mail: plesniak@gwu.ed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, 801 22nd Street NW, Suite 739, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis results when the recurrent laryngeal nerve, which innervates the muscles of the vocal folds becomes damaged. The loss of muscle and tension control to the damaged vocal fold renders it ineffectual. The mucosal wave disappears during phonation, and the vocal fold becomes largely immobile. The influence of unilateral vocal fold paralysis on the viscous flow development, which impacts speech quality within the glottis during phonation was investigated. Driven, scaled-up vocal fold models were employed to replicate both normal and pathological patterns of vocal fold motion. Spatial and temporal velocity fields were captured using particle image velocimetry, and laser Doppler velocimetry. Flow parameters were scaled to match the physiological values associated with human speech. Loss of motion in one vocal fold resulted in a suppression of typical glottal flow fields, including decreased spatial variability in the location of the flow separation point throughout the phonatory cycle, as well as a decrease in the vorticity magnitude.

  17. Viscous flow features in scaled-up physical models of normal and pathological vocal phonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis results when the recurrent laryngeal nerve, which innervates the muscles of the vocal folds becomes damaged. The loss of muscle and tension control to the damaged vocal fold renders it ineffectual. The mucosal wave disappears during phonation, and the vocal fold becomes largely immobile. The influence of unilateral vocal fold paralysis on the viscous flow development, which impacts speech quality within the glottis during phonation was investigated. Driven, scaled-up vocal fold models were employed to replicate both normal and pathological patterns of vocal fold motion. Spatial and temporal velocity fields were captured using particle image velocimetry, and laser Doppler velocimetry. Flow parameters were scaled to match the physiological values associated with human speech. Loss of motion in one vocal fold resulted in a suppression of typical glottal flow fields, including decreased spatial variability in the location of the flow separation point throughout the phonatory cycle, as well as a decrease in the vorticity magnitude.

  18. Probabilistic modeling using bivariate normal distributions for identification of flow and displacement intervals in longwall overburden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacan, C.O.; Goodman, G.V.R. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Off Mine Safety & Health Research

    2011-01-15

    Gob gas ventholes (GGV) are used to control methane emissions in longwall mines by capturing it within the overlying fractured strata before it enters the work environment. In order for GGVs to effectively capture more methane and less mine air, the length of the slotted sections and their proximity to top of the coal bed should be designed based on the potential gas sources and their locations, as well as the displacements in the overburden that will create potential flow paths for the gas. In this paper, an approach to determine the conditional probabilities of depth-displacement, depth-flow percentage, depth-formation and depth-gas content of the formations was developed using bivariate normal distributions. The flow percentage, displacement and formation data as a function of distance from coal bed used in this study were obtained from a series of borehole experiments contracted by the former US Bureau of Mines as part of a research project. Each of these parameters was tested for normality and was modeled using bivariate normal distributions to determine all tail probabilities. In addition, the probability of coal bed gas content as a function of depth was determined using the same techniques. The tail probabilities at various depths were used to calculate conditional probabilities for each of the parameters. The conditional probabilities predicted for various values of the critical parameters can be used with the measurements of flow and methane percentage at gob gas ventholes to optimize their performance.

  19. Fuel dynamics loss-of-flow test L3. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, A.K.; Lo, R.K.; Barts, E.W.

    1976-06-01

    The behavior of FTR-type, mixed-oxide, preirradiated, ''intermediate-power-structure'' fuel during a simulation of an FTR loss-of-flow accident was studied in the Mark-IIA integral TREAT loop. Analysis of the data reported here leads to a postulated scenario (sequence and timing) of events in the test. This scenario is presented, together with the calculated timing of events obtained by use of the SAS code. The initial fuel motion, starting during the preheat phase, consisted of coherent motion of the entire intact fuel bundle toward the pump. Incoherence developed as temperature rose. The fuel motion was mostly upward, and the greatest was in the top third of the fuel column. Fuel fragments formed against the pump side of the fluted tube near the original fuel midplane. A penetration of fluted tube occurred. A sudden voiding of the central region of the fuel column occurred at 29.75 s and was largely completed within 150 ms. The lower steel blockage of the fuel elements occurred in the vicinity of the lower insulator pellets. The upper steel blockage just above the tops of the original fuel pins appeared to have channels through it. Cladding and spacer wires melted away in the fuel section. Fuel pellets were only evident at and above the top and at the bottom of the original fuel column, where a large mass of melted fuel was present. Over the length of the fuel column, most of the fluted tube had melted away

  20. Measurement of Quasi-periodic Oscillating Flow Motion in Simulated Dual-cooled Annular Fuel Bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chi Young; Shin, Chang Hwan; Park, Ju Yong; Oh, Dong Seok; Chun, Tae Hyun; In, Wang Kee

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase a significant amount of reactor power in OPR1000, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been developing a dual-cooled annular fuel. The dual-cooled annular fuel is simultaneously cooled by the water flow through the inner and the outer channels. KAERI proposed the 12x12 dual-cooled annular fuel array which was designed to be structurally compatible with the 16x16 cylindrical solid fuel array by maintaining the same array size and the guide tubes in the same locations, as shown in Fig. 1. In such a case, due to larger outer diameter of dual-cooled annular fuel than conventional solid fuel, a P/D (Pitch-to-Diameter ratio) of dual cooled annular fuel assembly becomes smaller than that of cylindrical solid fuel. A change in P/D of fuel bundle can cause a difference in the flow mixing phenomena between the dual-cooled annular and conventional cylindrical solid fuel assemblies. In this study, the rod bundle flow motion appearing in a small P/D case is investigated preliminarily using PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) for dual-cooled annular fuel application

  1. Use of multi-functional flexible micro-sensors for in situ measurement of temperature, voltage and fuel flow in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Chan, Pin-Cheng; Lee, Chung-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Temperature, voltage and fuel flow distribution all contribute considerably to fuel cell performance. Conventional methods cannot accurately determine parameter changes inside a fuel cell. This investigation developed flexible and multi-functional micro sensors on a 40 μm-thick stainless steel foil substrate by using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and embedded them in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) to measure the temperature, voltage and flow. Users can monitor and control in situ the temperature, voltage and fuel flow distribution in the cell. Thereby, both fuel cell performance and lifetime can be increased.

  2. Quantitative measurement of normal and hydrocephalic cerebrospinal fluid flow using phase contrast cine MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Shinji; Asari, Shoji; Ohmoto, Takashi

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow using phase contrast cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed on a phantom, 12 normal subjects and 20 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The phantom study demonstrated the applicability of phase contrast in quantitative measurement of the slow flow. The CSF flows of the normal subjects showed a consistent pattern with a to-and-fro movement of the flow in the anterior subarachnoid space at the C2/3 level, and they were dependent on the cardiac cycle in all subjects. However, the patients with NPH showed variable patterns of the CSF pulsatile flow and these patterns could be divided into four types according to velocity and amplitude. The amplitudes of each type were as follows: type 0 (n=1), 87.6 mm; type I (n=2), 58.2 mm (mean); type II (n=6), 48.0±5.0 mm (mean±SEM); and type III (n=11), 19.9±1.8 mm (mean±SEM). The decrease of the amplitudes correlated to a worsening of the clinical symptoms. After the shunting operation, the amplitude of to-and-fro movement of the CSF increased again in the patients with NPH who improved clinically. Some of the type III cases were reclassified type II, I and 0 and also one of the type II cases changed type I after the shunting operation. We conclude that the phase contrast cine MR imaging is a practically and clinically applicable technique for the quantitative measurement of the CSF flow. (author)

  3. On the role of radiation and dimensionality in predicting flow opposed flame spread over thin fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Chenthil; Kumar, Amit

    2012-06-01

    In this work a flame-spread model is formulated in three dimensions to simulate opposed flow flame spread over thin solid fuels. The flame-spread model is coupled to a three-dimensional gas radiation model. The experiments [1] on downward spread and zero gravity quiescent spread over finite width thin fuel are simulated by flame-spread models in both two and three dimensions to assess the role of radiation and effect of dimensionality on the prediction of the flame-spread phenomena. It is observed that while radiation plays only a minor role in normal gravity downward spread, in zero gravity quiescent spread surface radiation loss holds the key to correct prediction of low oxygen flame spread rate and quenching limit. The present three-dimensional simulations show that even in zero gravity gas radiation affects flame spread rate only moderately (as much as 20% at 100% oxygen) as the heat feedback effect exceeds the radiation loss effect only moderately. However, the two-dimensional model with the gas radiation model badly over-predicts the zero gravity flame spread rate due to under estimation of gas radiation loss to the ambient surrounding. The two-dimensional model was also found to be inadequate for predicting the zero gravity flame attributes, like the flame length and the flame width, correctly. The need for a three-dimensional model was found to be indispensable for consistently describing the zero gravity flame-spread experiments [1] (including flame spread rate and flame size) especially at high oxygen levels (>30%). On the other hand it was observed that for the normal gravity downward flame spread for oxygen levels up to 60%, the two-dimensional model was sufficient to predict flame spread rate and flame size reasonably well. Gas radiation is seen to increase the three-dimensional effect especially at elevated oxygen levels (>30% for zero gravity and >60% for normal gravity flames).

  4. Opposed-Flow Flame Spread over Thin Solid Fuels in a Narrow Channel under Different Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Yu, Yong; Wan, Shixin; Wei, Minggang; Hu, Wen-Rui

    Flame spread over solid surface is critical in combustion science due to its importance in fire safety in both ground and manned spacecraft. Eliminating potential fuels from materials is the basic method to protect spacecraft from fire. The criterion of material screening is its flamma-bility [1]. Since gas flow speed has strong effect on flame spread, the combustion behaviors of materials in normal and microgravity will be different due to their different natural convec-tion. To evaluate the flammability of materials used in the manned spacecraft, tests should be performed under microgravity. Nevertheless, the cost is high, so apparatus to simulate mi-crogravity combustion under normal gravity was developed. The narrow channel is such an apparatus in which the buoyant flow is restricted effectively [2, 3]. The experimental results of the horizontal narrow channel are consistent qualitatively with those of Mir Space Station. Quantitatively, there still are obvious differences. However, the effect of the channel size on flame spread has only attracted little attention, in which concurrent-flow flame spread over thin solid in microgravity is numerically studied[4], while the similarity of flame spread in different gravity is still an open question. In addition, the flame spread experiments under microgravity are generally carried out in large wind tunnels without considering the effects of the tunnel size [5]. Actually, the materials are always used in finite space. Therefore, the flammability given by experiments using large wind tunnels will not correctly predict the flammability of materials in the real environment. In the present paper, the effect of the channel size on opposed-flow flame spread over thin solid fuels in both normal and microgravity was investigated and compared. In the horizontal narrow channel, the flame spread rate increased before decreased as forced flow speed increased. In low speed gas flows, flame spread appeared the same trend as that in

  5. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Gregg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Jy-An [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanborn, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spears, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klymyshyn, Nick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  6. Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

    2006-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

  7. A microfluidic-structured flow field for passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with highly concentrated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q X; Zhao, T S; Chen, R; Yang, W W

    2010-01-01

    Conventional direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have to operate with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and its detrimental consequences. Operation with such diluted methanol solutions not only results in a significant penalty in the specific energy of the power pack, limiting the runtime of this type of fuel cell, but also lowers the cell performance and operating stability. In this paper, a microfluidic-structured anode flow field for passive DMFCs with neither liquid pumps nor gas compressors/blowers is developed. This flow field consists of plural micro flow passages. Taking advantage of the liquid methanol and gas CO 2 two-phase counter flow, the unique fluidic structure enables the formation of a liquid–gas meniscus in each flow passage. The evaporation from the small meniscus in each flow passage can lead to an extremely large interfacial mass-transfer resistance, creating a bottleneck of methanol delivery to the anode CL. The fuel cell tests show that the innovative flow field allows passive DMFCs to achieve good cell performance with a methanol concentration as high as 18.0 M, increasing the specific energy of the DMFC system by about five times compared with conventional designs.

  8. Methodology for local verification of flow regimes in fuel assemblies charts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor, Sharaevsky; Elena, Sharaevskaya; Domashev, E.D.; Alexander, Arkhypov; Vladimir, Kolochko

    2003-01-01

    The best estimate thermal hydraulic codes describe adequately two-phase flows in nuclear energy facilities if there is proper system of closed relations. It could be obtained from the reliable information on structure forms of two-phase flows, its boundaries and reliable regime charts. In the paper the methodology of automatic recognition of the boundaries of the main types of two phase flows for rod fuel assemblies is presented. The methodology is based on definition of thermal hydraulic parameters distribution in experimental fuel assembly. The measurements were carried out using ASD signals of acoustic noise. In the paper data on two-phase flow regimes boundaries recognition especially low boundaries of bubble flow are summarized for experimental fuel assembly. The methodology of flow regimes charts applied to recognition of upper boundaries of boiling crisis regime was verificated. The satisfactory coincidence with experimental results have been shown. (author)

  9. Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Normal and Systemic Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanadani, Fabio N; Figueiredo, Carlos R; Miranda, Rafaela Morais; Cunha, Patricia Lt; M Kanadani, Tereza Cristina; Dorairaj, Syril

    2015-01-01

    Glaucomatous neuropathy can be a consequence of insufficient blood supply, increase in intraocular pressure (IOP), or other risk factors that diminish the ocular blood flow. To determine the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in normal and systemic hypertensive patients. One hundred and twenty-one patients were enrolled in this prospective and comparative study and underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including slit lamp examination, Goldmann applanation tonometry, stereoscopic fundus examination, and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) measurements. The OPP was calculated as being the medium systemic arterial pressure (MAP) less the IOP. Only right eye values were considered for calculations using Student's t-test. The mean age of the patients was 57.5 years (36-78), and 68.5% were women. There was a statistically significant difference in the OPP of the normal and systemic hypertensive patients (p cite this article: Kanadani FN, Figueiredo CR, Miranda RM, Cunha PLT, Kanadani TCM, Dorairaj S. Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Normal and Systemic Hypertensive Patients. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):16-19.

  10. Axial flow velocity patterns in a normal human pulmonary artery model: pulsatile in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, H W; Yoganathan, A P

    1990-01-01

    It has been clinically observed that the flow velocity patterns in the pulmonary artery are directly modified by disease. The present study addresses the hypothesis that altered velocity patterns relate to the severity of various diseases in the pulmonary artery. This paper lays a foundation for that analysis by providing a detailed description of flow velocity patterns in the normal pulmonary artery, using flow visualization and laser Doppler anemometry techniques. The studies were conducted in an in vitro rigid model in a right heart pulse duplicator system. In the main pulmonary artery, a broad central flow field was observed throughout systole. The maximum axial velocity (150 cm s-1) was measured at peak systole. In the left pulmonary artery, the axial velocities were approximately evenly distributed in the perpendicular plane. However, in the bifurcation plane, they were slightly skewed toward the inner wall at peak systole and during the deceleration phase. In the right pulmonary artery, the axial velocity in the perpendicular plane had a very marked M-shaped profile at peak systole and during the deceleration phase, due to a pair of strong secondary flows. In the bifurcation plane, higher axial velocities were observed along the inner wall, while lower axial velocities were observed along the outer wall and in the center. Overall, relatively low levels of turbulence were observed in all the branches during systole. The maximum turbulence intensity measured was at the boundary of the broad central flow field in the main pulmonary artery at peak systole.

  11. Frequency analyses of CSF flow on cine MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Koshida, Kichiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Onoguchi, Masahisa [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80, Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan); Mase, Mitsuhito; Yamada, Kazuo [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya City University Medical School, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8602 (Japan); Banno, Tatsuo [Department of Central Radiology, Nagoya City University Hospital, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8602 (Japan); Fujita, Hiroshi [Department of Information Science, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Our objective was to clarify intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics in normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with phase-contrast cine MRI were performed. The CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients (n=51) with NPH, brain atrophy or asymptomatic ventricular dilation (VD), and in healthy volunteers (control group; n=25). The changes in CSF flow spectra were also analyzed after intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed. These values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude in the NPH group was significantly larger than that in the VD or control group because of a decrease in compliance. The phase in the NPH group was significantly different from that in either the VD or the control group, but no difference was found between the VD and control groups. The amplitude increased in all groups after acetazolamide injection. The PTF in the NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF and PVR. Frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine MRI make it possible to noninvasively obtain a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH. (orig.)

  12. Numerical predictions and measurements of Reynolds normal stresses in turbulent pipe flow of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resende, P.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, DEMEGI, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: resende@fe.up.pt; Escudier, M.P. [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: escudier@liv.ac.uk; Presti, F [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, DEM, Universidade do Minho Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal)]. E-mail: fpinho@dem.uminho.pt; Cruz, D.O.A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Para-UFPa Campus Universitario do Guama, 66075-900 Belem, Para (Brazil)]. E-mail: doac@ufpa.br

    2006-04-15

    An anisotropic low Reynolds number k-{epsilon} turbulence model has been developed and its performance compared with experimental data for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow of four different polymer solutions. Although the predictions of friction factor, mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy show only slight improvements over those of a previous isotropic model [Cruz, D.O.A., Pinho, F.T., Resende, P.R., 2004. Modeling the new stress for improved drag reduction predictions of viscoelastic pipe flow. J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. 121, 127-141], the new turbulence model is capable of predicting the enhanced anisotropy of the Reynolds normal stresses that accompanies polymer drag reduction in turbulent flow.

  13. Numerical predictions and measurements of Reynolds normal stresses in turbulent pipe flow of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resende, P.R.; Escudier, M.P.; Presti, F; Pinho, F.T.; Cruz, D.O.A.

    2006-01-01

    An anisotropic low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence model has been developed and its performance compared with experimental data for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow of four different polymer solutions. Although the predictions of friction factor, mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy show only slight improvements over those of a previous isotropic model [Cruz, D.O.A., Pinho, F.T., Resende, P.R., 2004. Modeling the new stress for improved drag reduction predictions of viscoelastic pipe flow. J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. 121, 127-141], the new turbulence model is capable of predicting the enhanced anisotropy of the Reynolds normal stresses that accompanies polymer drag reduction in turbulent flow

  14. A Network Flow-based Analysis of Cognitive Reserve in Normal Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wook Yoo, Sang; Han, Cheol E; Shin, Joseph S; Won Seo, Sang; Na, Duk L; Kaiser, Marcus; Jeong, Yong; Seong, Joon-Kyung

    2015-05-20

    Cognitive reserve is the ability to sustain cognitive function even with a certain amount of brain damages. Here we investigate the neural compensation mechanism of cognitive reserve from the perspective of structural brain connectivity. Our goal was to show that normal people with high education levels (i.e., cognitive reserve) maintain abundant pathways connecting any two brain regions, providing better compensation or resilience after brain damage. Accordingly, patients with high education levels show more deterioration in structural brain connectivity than those with low education levels before symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) become apparent. To test this hypothesis, we use network flow measuring the number of alternative paths between two brain regions in the brain network. The experimental results show that for normal aging, education strengthens network reliability, as measured through flow values, in a subnetwork centered at the supramarginal gyrus. For AD, a subnetwork centered at the left middle frontal gyrus shows a negative correlation between flow and education, which implies more collapse in structural brain connectivity for highly educated patients. We conclude that cognitive reserve may come from the ability of network reorganization to secure the information flow within the brain network, therefore making it more resistant to disease progress.

  15. Thermodynamic bounds for existence of normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO COLLE

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of the normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes, in the lights of the pioneering works of Lord Rayleigh and G. Fanno. The theory of normal shock in pipes is currently presented in terms of the Rayleigh and Fanno curves, which are shown to cross each other in two points, one corresponding to a subsonic flow and the other corresponding to a supersonic flow. It is proposed in this paper a novel differential identity, which relates the energy flux density, the linear momentum flux density, and the entropy, for constant mass flow density. The identity so obtained is used to establish a theorem, which shows that Rayleigh and Fanno curves become tangent to each other at a single sonic point. At the sonic point the entropy reaches a maximum, either as a function of the pressure and the energy density flux or as a function of the pressure and the linear momentum density flux. A Second Law analysis is also presented, which is fully independent of the Second Law analysis based on the Rankine-Hugoniot adiabatic carried out by Landau and Lifshitz (1959.

  16. Pressure-flow characteristics of normal and disordered esophageal motor patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singendonk, Maartje M J; Kritas, Stamatiki; Cock, Charles; Ferris, Lara F; McCall, Lisa; Rommel, Nathalie; van Wijk, Michiel P; Benninga, Marc A; Moore, David; Omari, Taher I

    2015-03-01

    To perform pressure-flow analysis (PFA) in a cohort of pediatric patients who were referred for diagnostic manometric investigation. PFA was performed using purpose designed Matlab-based software. The pressure-flow index (PFI), a composite measure of bolus pressurization relative to flow and the impedance ratio, a measure of the extent of bolus clearance failure were calculated. Tracings of 76 pediatric patients (32 males; 9.1 ± 0.7 years) and 25 healthy adult controls (7 males; 36.1 ± 2.2 years) were analyzed. Patients mostly had normal motility (50%) or a category 4 disorder and usually weak peristalsis (31.5%) according to the Chicago Classification. PFA of healthy controls defined reference ranges for PFI ≤142 and impedance ratio ≤0.49. Pediatric patients with pressure-flow (PF) characteristics within these limits had normal motility (62%), most patients with PF characteristics outside these limits also had an abnormal Chicago Classification (61%). Patients with high PFI and disordered motor patterns all had esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Disordered PF characteristics are associated with disordered esophageal motor patterns. By defining the degree of over-pressurization and/or extent of clearance failure, PFA may be a useful adjunct to esophageal pressure topography-based classification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Padé approximant for normal stress differences in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poungthong, P.; Saengow, C.; Giacomin, A. J.; Kolitawong, C.; Merger, D.; Wilhelm, M.

    2018-04-01

    Analytical solutions for the normal stress differences in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow (LAOS), for continuum or molecular models, normally take the inexact form of the first few terms of a series expansion in the shear rate amplitude. Here, we improve the accuracy of these truncated expansions by replacing them with rational functions called Padé approximants. The recent advent of exact solutions in LAOS presents an opportunity to identify accurate and useful Padé approximants. For this identification, we replace the truncated expansion for the corotational Jeffreys fluid with its Padé approximants for the normal stress differences. We uncover the most accurate and useful approximant, the [3,4] approximant, and then test its accuracy against the exact solution [C. Saengow and A. J. Giacomin, "Normal stress differences from Oldroyd 8-constant framework: Exact analytical solution for large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow," Phys. Fluids 29, 121601 (2017)]. We use Ewoldt grids to show the stunning accuracy of our [3,4] approximant in LAOS. We quantify this accuracy with an objective function and then map it onto the Pipkin space. Our two applications illustrate how to use our new approximant reliably. For this, we use the Spriggs relations to generalize our best approximant to multimode, and then, we compare with measurements on molten high-density polyethylene and on dissolved polyisobutylene in isobutylene oligomer.

  18. The PDF of fluid particle acceleration in turbulent flow with underlying normal distribution of velocity fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aringazin, A.K.; Mazhitov, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a formal procedure to obtain and specify the general form of a marginal distribution for the Lagrangian acceleration of fluid particle in developed turbulent flow using Langevin type equation and the assumption that velocity fluctuation u follows a normal distribution with zero mean, in accord to the Heisenberg-Yaglom picture. For a particular representation, β=exp[u], of the fluctuating parameter β, we reproduce the underlying log-normal distribution and the associated marginal distribution, which was found to be in a very good agreement with the new experimental data by Crawford, Mordant, and Bodenschatz on the acceleration statistics. We discuss on arising possibilities to make refinements of the log-normal model

  19. Fiber Optic Mass Flow Gauge for Liquid Cryogenic Fuel Facilities Monitoring and Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a fiber optic mass flow gauge that will aid in managing liquid hydrogen and oxygen fuel storage and transport. The increasing...

  20. Development of a detailed core flow analysis code for prismatic fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The detailed analysis of the core flow distribution in prismatic fuel reactors is of interest for modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) design and safety analyses. Such analyses involve the steady-state flow of helium through highly cross-connected flow paths in and around the prismatic fuel elements. Several computer codes have been developed for this purpose. However, since they are proprietary codes, they are not generally available for independent MHTGR design confirmation. The previously developed codes do not consider the exchange or diversion of flow between individual bypass gaps with much detail. Such a capability could be important in the analysis of potential fuel block motion, such as occurred in the Fort St. Vrain reactor, or for the analysis of the conditions around a flow blockage or misloaded fuel block. This work develops a computer code with fairly general-purpose capabilities for modeling the flow in regions of prismatic fuel cores. The code, called BYPASS solves a finite difference control volume formulation of the compressible, steady-state fluid flow in highly cross-connected flow paths typical of the MHTGR

  1. Flow field bipolar plates in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Analysis & modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahraman, Huseyin; Orhan, Mehmet F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Covers a comprehensive review of available flow field channel configurations. • Examines the main design considerations and limitations for a flow field network. • Explores the common materials and material properties used for flow field plates. • Presents a case study of step-by-step modeling for an optimum flow field design. - Abstract: This study investigates flow fields and flow field plates (bipolar plates) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. In this regard, the main design considerations and limitations for a flow field network have been examined, along with a comprehensive review of currently available flow field channel configurations. Also, the common materials and material properties used for flow field plates have been explored. Furthermore, a case study of step-by-step modeling for an optimum flow field design has been presented in-details. Finally, a parametric study has been conducted with respect to many design and performance parameters in a flow field plate.

  2. Modeling two-phase flow in three-dimensional complex flow-fields of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyong; Luo, Gang; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2017-10-01

    3D fine-mesh flow-fields recently developed by Toyota Mirai improved water management and mass transport in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks, suggesting their potential value for robust and high-power PEM fuel cell stack performance. In such complex flow-fields, Forchheimer's inertial effect is dominant at high current density. In this work, a two-phase flow model of 3D complex flow-fields of PEMFCs is developed by accounting for Forchheimer's inertial effect, for the first time, to elucidate the underlying mechanism of liquid water behavior and mass transport inside 3D complex flow-fields and their adjacent gas diffusion layers (GDL). It is found that Forchheimer's inertial effect enhances liquid water removal from flow-fields and adds additional flow resistance around baffles, which improves interfacial liquid water and mass transport. As a result, substantial improvements in high current density cell performance and operational stability are expected in PEMFCs with 3D complex flow-fields, compared to PEMFCs with conventional flow-fields. Higher current density operation required to further reduce PEMFC stack cost per kW in the future will necessitate optimizing complex flow-field designs using the present model, in order to efficiently remove a large amount of product water and hence minimize the mass transport voltage loss.

  3. Analysis of nuclear material flow for experimental DUPIC fuel fabrication process at DFDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.; Baik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.

    1999-08-01

    This report describes facilities necessary for manufacturing experiment for DUPIC fuel, manufacturing process and equipment. Nuclear material flows among facilities, in PIEF and IMEF, for irradiation test, for post examination of DUPIC fuel, for quality control, for chemical analysis and for treatment of radioactive waste have been analyzed in details. This may be helpful for DUPIC project participants and facility engineers working in related facilities to understand overall flow for nuclear material and radioactive waste. (Author). 14 refs., 15 tabs., 41 figs

  4. Analysis of nuclear material flow for experimental DUPIC fuel fabrication process at DFDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.; Baik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P

    1999-08-01

    This report describes facilities necessary for manufacturing experiment for DUPIC fuel, manufacturing process and equipment. Nuclear material flows among facilities, in PIEF and IMEF, for irradiation test, for post examination of DUPIC fuel, for quality control, for chemical analysis and for treatment of radioactive waste have been analyzed in details. This may be helpful for DUPIC project participants and facility engineers working in related facilities to understand overall flow for nuclear material and radioactive waste. (Author). 14 refs., 15 tabs., 41 figs.

  5. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2015-01-01

    In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a three dimensional laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limitin...

  6. Molten Fuel Mass Assessment for Channel Flow Blockage Event in CANDU6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Hoon; Park, Dong Hwan

    2011-01-01

    In CANDU6, a fuel channel flow blockage causes a sudden reduction of flow through the blocked channel. Depending on the severity of the blockage, the reduced flow through the channel can result in severe heat up of the fuel, hence possibly leading to pressure tube and calandria tube failure. If the calandria tube does not fail the fuel and sheath would continue to heat up, and ultimately melting could occur. Eventually, molten material runs down onto the pressure tube. Even a thin layer of molten material in contact with the pressure tube causes the pressure tube and calandreia tube to heat up rapidly. The thermal transient is so rapid that failure temperatures are reached quickly. After channel failure, the contents of the channel, consisting of superheated coolant, fission products and possibly overheated of molten fuel, are rapidly discharged into the moderator. Fuel discharged into the moderator is quenched and cooled. The rapid discharge of hot fuel and coolant into the calandria causes the moderator pressure and temperature to increase, which may cause damage to some in-core components. Thus, the assessment results of molten fuel mass are inputs to the in-core damage analysis. In this paper, the analysis methodology and results of molten fuel mass assessment for the channel flow blockage event are presented

  7. RESULTS OF AIRPLANE TU-204-300 OPERATED BY "VLADIVOSTOK AVIA" COMPANY FUEL FLOW MONITIRING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Maslennikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the results obtained from continuous monitoring of fuel flow on the airplanes Tu-204-300, operated by the aircompany "Vladivostok Avia". The reasons for the change in the cost of each copy of airplane and changes in fuel characteristics due to pilots manner of flying.

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus: diagnostic and prognostic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, A.; Bergh, A.C.; Bilting, M.; Aerlig, AA.; Jacobsson, L.; Stephensen, H.; Wikkelsoe, C.

    1994-01-01

    Relative regional cerebral blood flow (rrCBF) was measured by SPET using 99m Tc-HMPAO as flow tracer, in 23 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). 1000 MBq 99m Tc-HMPAO was given intravenously and the rrCBF calculated as regional/cerebellar count level ratios. The patients were examined before and 3-12 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. rrCBF was also determined in ten healthy aged matched volunteers who served as controls. The NPH patients had decreased rrCBF in the hippocampal regions and in the frontal and parietal white matter as compared to the controls. The frontal/parietal rrCBF ratio correlated with both psychiatric disability and the preoperative degree of incontinence. Decreased flow in frontal white matter, frontoparietal and hippocampal grey matter and a low frontalparietal grey matter flow ratio preoperatively correlated with improvement in both Mini Mental State score and psychiatric disability after shunt surgery. After shunt surgery the rrCBF increased in the mesencephalon, frontal grey and white matter, parietal white matter and hippocampus. The flow increase in hippocampal regions and frontal white matter correlated with improvement in psychiatric symptomatology. The results of this study regarding the frontal and hippocampal rrCBF patterns, and the clinical correlation, support the hypothesis that CBF changes in these regions are of patohphysiological and prognostic importance in NPH. (orig./MG)

  9. A CFD numerical model for the flow distribution in a MTR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Delvonei Alves de; Santos, Pedro Henrique Di Giovanni; Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de; Torres, Walmir Maximo; Umbehaun, Pedro Ernesto; Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de; Belchior Junior, Antonio; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Prado, Adelk de Carvalho; Angelo, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Previously, an instrumented dummy fuel element (DMPV-01), with the same geometric characteristics of a MTR fuel element, was designed and constructed for pressure drop and flow distribution measurement experiments at the IEA-R1 reactor core. This dummy element was also used to measure the flow distribution among the rectangular flow channels formed by element fuel plates. A CFD numerical model was developed to complement the studies. This work presents the proposed CFD model as well as a comparison between numerical and experimental results of flow rate distribution among the internal flow channels. Numerical results show that the model reproduces the experiments very well and can be used for the studies as a more convenient and complementary tool. (author)

  10. A CFD numerical model for the flow distribution in a MTR fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Delvonei Alves de; Santos, Pedro Henrique Di Giovanni; Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de; Torres, Walmir Maximo; Umbehaun, Pedro Ernesto; Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de; Belchior Junior, Antonio; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Prado, Adelk de Carvalho, E-mail: acprado@ipen.br, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br, E-mail: dpedro_digiovanni_s@hotmail.com, E-mail: fabio@ipen.br, E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br, E-mail: jasouza@ipen.br, E-mail: abelchior@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear; Angelo, Edvaldo, E-mail: eangelo@mackenzie.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelo, Gabriel, E-mail: gangelo@fei.edu.br [Fundacao Educacional Inaciana (FEI), Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Previously, an instrumented dummy fuel element (DMPV-01), with the same geometric characteristics of a MTR fuel element, was designed and constructed for pressure drop and flow distribution measurement experiments at the IEA-R1 reactor core. This dummy element was also used to measure the flow distribution among the rectangular flow channels formed by element fuel plates. A CFD numerical model was developed to complement the studies. This work presents the proposed CFD model as well as a comparison between numerical and experimental results of flow rate distribution among the internal flow channels. Numerical results show that the model reproduces the experiments very well and can be used for the studies as a more convenient and complementary tool. (author)

  11. Development of a detailed core flow analysis code for prismatic fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a computer code for the analysis of the detailed flow of helium in prismatic fuel reactors is reported. The code, called BYPASS, solves, a finite difference control volume formulation of the compressible, steady state fluid flow in highly cross-connected flow paths typical of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The discretization of the flow in a core region typically considers the main coolant flow paths, the bypass gap flow paths, and the crossflow connections between them. 16 refs., 5 figs

  12. Dynamic lymph flow scintigraphy in lymphoedema: Description of a new procedure and normal and abnormal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, K.; Hamad, M.M.; Sadek, S.; Awdeh, M.; Eklof, B.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    A dynamic study of lymphatic flow was performed in 23 patients complaining of lymphoedema of the lower limbs. All were injected intradermally with 1 mCi (37 MBq) of 99 Tcsup(m)-labelled human serum albumin (HSA) in the medial web on the dorsum of each foot. Image acquisition for the lower pelvis and both thighs was started within 5 min. A GE 500A gamma camera with an extra-large field of view and a low energy, all purpose collimator interfaced with a GE Star computer was used. Images were acquired in the dynamic mode with a 128x128 matrix every minute up to 40 min. Delayed images for the same region and for both legs were taken at 90 min. Time-activity curves for equal regions of interest over the inguinal regions on both sides were generated. Three patterns were recognized. (1) Normal flow (12 patients) with symmetrical or slightly increased or decreased flow on one side compared with the other, characterized by early appearance of medial bands and inguinal and pelvic lymph nodes in the early and delayed images. (2) An obstructed pattern (5 patients) characterized by subcutaneous pooling, absent medial bands in the dynamic part of the study, a flat curve on the affected side representing background activity, and absent inguinal and pelvic nodes in the delayed images. Occasionally the obstruction was incomplete and there was a delayed appearance of the nodes, which were less in number and smaller in size than on the normal side. (3) An enhanced pattern (6 patients) characterized by fast flow of lymph through the dilated lymphatics, occasionally subcutaneous pooling and an increase in the number and size of inguinal and pelvic lymph nodes on the affected side. The authors conclude that intradermal injection of 99 Tcsup(m)-HSA can be used to study the pathophysiology of lymphatic flow in the most difficult group of patients suffering from chronic lymphoedema of the lower limbs

  13. Low Density Lipoprotein and Non-Newtonian Oscillating Flow Biomechanical Parameters for Normal Human Aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulis, Johannes V; Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Lampri, Olga P; Giannoglou, George D

    2016-04-01

    The temporal variation of the hemodynamic mechanical parameters during cardiac pulse wave is considered as an important atherogenic factor. Applying non-Newtonian blood molecular viscosity simulation is crucial for hemodynamic analysis. Understanding low density lipoprotein (LDL) distribution in relation to flow parameters will possibly spot the prone to atherosclerosis aorta regions. The biomechanical parameters tested were averaged wall shear stress (AWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI) and relative residence time (RRT) in relation to the LDL concentration. Four non-Newtonian molecular viscosity models and the Newtonian one were tested for the normal human aorta under oscillating flow. The analysis was performed via computational fluid dynamic. Tested viscosity blood flow models for the biomechanical parameters yield a consistent aorta pattern. High OSI and low AWSS develop at the concave aorta regions. This is most noticeable in downstream flow region of the left subclavian artery and at concave ascending aorta. Concave aorta regions exhibit high RRT and elevated LDL. For the concave aorta site, the peak LDL value is 35.0% higher than its entrance value. For the convex site, it is 18.0%. High LDL endothelium regions located at the aorta concave site are well predicted with high RRT. We are in favor of using the non-Newtonian power law model for analysis. It satisfactorily approximates the molecular viscosity, WSS, OSI, RRT and LDL distribution. Concave regions are mostly prone to atherosclerosis. The flow biomechanical factor RRT is a relatively useful tool for identifying the localization of the atheromatic plaques of the normal human aorta.

  14. Evaluation of early systolic flow pattern in left ventricle by tagging cine MRI in normal volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakura, Kazuyoshi; Anno, Naoko; Kondo, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    The tagging method is a new technique, which permits to apply discretionary lines (tags) on MR images. To evaluate intra left ventricular (LV) flow pattern, we performed ECG-gated gradient field echo cine MRI using tagging method in five normal male volunteers, aged 22-42 years. The horizontal long axis view of LV was imaged by multiphasic field echo pulse sequence. The three parallel tags (basal, middle and apical portion) were established on the horizontal long axis view of LV just after the triggered QRS waves. And the initial two images (70 ms and 120 ms after the triggered QRS waves) were analyzed. On the two tags (middle and apical portion) of these three tags, we measured the distance of displacement of the tags on three points (the near site of IVS, middle portion and the near site of free wall) respectively. At 70 ms after the trigger point, the only tagged blood at the near site of free wall flowed toward the apex. At 120 ms after the trigger point, all the tagged blood flowed toward the outflow tract of LV. And the maximum blood flow velocity was observed at the near site of IVS on middle portion of LV (166.0 mm/s). These results coincided with earlier studies by Doppler echocardiography. But we could not observe intra LV blood flow patterns throughout one cardiac cycle in this pulse sequence, because the tags had flowed out from LV and had become unclear due to spin relaxation and mixing. We concluded that the tagging method was useful to evaluate intra left ventricular blood flow patterns in early systolic phase. (author)

  15. Numerical analysis of injector flow and spray characteristics from diesel injectors using fossil and biodiesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistoni, Michele; Grimaldi, Carlo Nazareno

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fluid-dynamic simulation of injection process with biodiesel and diesel fuel. ► Coupling of Eulerian and Lagrangian spray CFD simulations. ► Effects of hole shaping: conical versus cylindrical and edge rounding effects. ► Prediction of spray characteristics improved using inner nozzle flow data. ► Explanation of mass flow differences depending on hole shape and fuel type. -- Abstract: The aim of the paper is the comparison of the injection process with two fuels, a standard diesel fuel and a pure biodiesel, methyl ester of soybean oil. Multiphase cavitating flows inside injector nozzles are calculated by means of unsteady CFD simulations on moving grids from needle opening to closure, using an Eulerian–Eulerian two-fluid approach which takes into account bubble dynamics. Afterward, spray evolutions are also evaluated in a Lagrangian framework using results of the first computing step, mapped onto the hole exit area, for the initialization of the primary breakup model. Two nozzles with cylindrical and conical holes are studied and their behaviors are discussed in relation to fuel properties. Nozzle flow simulations highlighted that the extent of cavitation regions is not much affected by the fuel type, whereas it is strongly dependent on the nozzle shape. Biodiesel provides a slightly higher mass flow in highly cavitating nozzles. On the contrary using hole shaped nozzles (to reduce cavitation) diesel provides similar or slightly higher mass flow. Comparing the two fuels, the effects of different viscosities and densities play main role which explains these behaviors. Simulations of the spray evolution are also discussed highlighting the differences between the use of fossil and biodiesel fuels in terms of spray penetration, atomization and cone-angle. Usage of diesel fuel in the conical convergent nozzle gives higher liquid penetration.

  16. ESBWR enhanced flow distribution with optimized orificing and related fuel cycle performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, G. J.; Karve, A. A.; Fawcett, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) is GEH's latest Generation III+ reactor design with natural circulation coolant flow and passive safety features. Reliance on natural circulation as the sole means of core coolant driving force results in increased power-to-flow ratio and places increased importance on the efficient distribution of core flow in order to achieve optimum thermal margins and improved fuel cycle efficiency. In addition, the large core size of the ESBWR, containing 1132 bundles, greatly benefits from a more targeted distribution of flow, directing a higher fraction of flow to high power bundles in the 'ring of fire' region of typical BWR loading patterns and a lower fraction of flow to low power bundles on and near the core periphery. Desirable flow distributions can be achieved by modifying the hydraulic resistance of the inlet orifices to preferentially force flow to the targeted region. The inlet orifice is a feature that is incorporated into the fuel support piece of a typical BWR design. The majority of existing forced circulation BWR's rely on only two orifice types - a peripheral orifice located along the outermost row and a central orifice in all other locations. A more optimum distribution of core flow is achievable with the introduction of multiple inlet orifice types. Multi-zone orifice layouts comprised of two, three and four types have been evaluated for the ESBWR. An efficient radial distribution of flow can have a direct beneficial effect on the Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR). An improved multi-zone orifice layout in the ESBWR has the potential of significantly increasing active flow in high power bundles. On average, this flow increase corresponds to a noteworthy MCPR improvement. Additional MCPR margin may be used to enhance operating flexibility and to achieve reduced fuel cycle costs over the plant lifetime. Combined with GNF's latest high performance fuel design for the ESBWR, GNF2E, and improved loading

  17. An experimental and analytical study of fluid flow and critical heat flux in PWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowditch, F.H.; Mogford, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes experiments that have been carried out at the Winfrith Establishment of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority to determine the critical heat flux characteristics of pressurized water reactor fuel elements over an unusually wide range of coolant flow conditions that are relevant to both normal and fault conditions of reactor operation. The experiments were carried out in the TITAN loop using an electrically heated bundle of 25 rods of 9.5 mm diameter on a 12.7 mm pitch fitted with plain grids in order to provide a generic base for code validation. The fully tabulated experimental data for critical heat flux, pressure drop and sub-channel mixing are encompassed by ranges of pressure between 20 and 160 Bar, coolant flow between 150 and 3600 Kg/m 2 s, and coolant inlet temperature between 150 and 320 0 C. The results of the experiments are compared with predicted data based upon several established critical heat flux correlations. It is concluded that the extrapolation of some correlations to conditions beyond their intended range of application can lead to dangerous over estimates of critical heat flux, but the Winfrith WSC-2 and the EPRI NP-2609 correlations perform well over the whole data range and correlate all data with RMS errors of 9% and 6% respectively. (author)

  18. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, Brianne, T.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the rover s hotel loads. This work represents the first attempt at a ground demonstration of this new technology aboard a mobile test platform. Development and demonstration were supported by the Office of the Chief Technologist s Space Power Systems Project and the Advanced Exploration System Modular Power Systems Project.

  19. The GC computer code for flow sheet simulation of pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.

    1996-01-01

    The GC computer code has been developed for flow sheet simulation of pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel. It utilizes a robust algorithm SLG for analyzing simultaneous chemical reactions between species distributed across many phases. Models have been developed for analysis of the oxide fuel reduction process, salt recovery by electrochemical decomposition of lithium oxide, uranium separation from the reduced fuel by electrorefining, and extraction of fission products into liquid cadmium. The versatility of GC is demonstrated by applying the code to a flow sheet of current interest

  20. Water reactor fuel behaviour and fission products release in off-normal and accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The present meeting was scheduled by the International Atomic Energy Agency upon the proposal of the Members of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology and held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 10 to 13 November 1986. Thirty participants from 17 countries and an international organization attended the meeting. Eighteen papers were presented from 13 countries and one international organization. The meeting was composed of four sessions and covered subjects related to: physico-chemical properties of core materials under off-normal conditions, and their interactions up to and after melt-down (5 papers); core materials deformation, relocation and core coolability under (severe) accident conditions (4 papers); fission products release: including experience, mechanisms and modelling (5 papers); power plant experience (4 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 18 papers. Four working groups covering the above-mentioned topics were held to discuss the present status of the knowledge and to develop recommendations for future activities in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Experimental study of two-phase flow in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell in short-term microgravity condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hang; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Jian Fu; Ye, Fang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-phase flow in PEMFC cathode channels is observed in different gravity environments. • The PEMFC shows different operating behavior in normal and microgravity conditions. • Water tends can be removed in microgravity conditions at high water production regime. • Liquid aggregation occurs in microgravity conditions at low water production regime. • Effect of gravity on performance and two-phase flow at two operating regimes is studied. - Abstract: Water management is important for improving the performance and stability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) for space applications. An in situ visual observation was conducted on the gas–liquid two-phase flow in the cathode channels of a PEMFC in short-term microgravity condition. The microgravity environment was supplied by a drop tower. A single serpentine flow channel with a depth of 2 mm and a width of 2 mm was applied as the cathode flow field. A membrane electrode assembly comprising of a Nafion 112 membrane sandwiched between gas diffusion layers was used. The anode and cathode were loaded with 1 mg cm −2 platinum. The PEMFC shows a distinct operating behavior in microgravity because of the effect of gravity on the two-phase flow. At a high water production regime, cell performance is enhanced by 4.6% and the accumulated liquid water in the flow channel tends can be removed in microgravity conditions to alleviate flooding. At a low water production regime, cell performance deteriorates by 6.6% and liquid aggregation occurs in the flow channel because of the coalescence of dispersed water droplets in microgravity conditions, thus squeezing the flow channel. The operating behavior of PEMFC in microgravity conditions is different from that in normal gravity conditions. Further studies are needed on PEMFC operating characteristics and liquid management for space applications

  2. CFD prediction of flow and phase distribution in fuel assemblies with spacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglart, H.; Nylund, O. [ABB Atom AB, Vasteras (Switzerland); Kurul, N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling and computation of multi-dimensional two-phase flows in BWR fuel assemblies. The modeling principles are presented based on using a two-fluid model in which lateral interfacial effects are accounted for. This model has been used to evaluate the velocity fields of both vapor and liquid phases, as well as phase distribution, between fuel elements in geometries similar to BWR fuel bundles. Furthermore, this model has been used to predict, in a detailed mechanistic manner, the effects of spacers on flow and phase distribution between, and pressure drop along, fuel elements. The related numerical simulations have been performed using a CFD computer code, CFDS-FLOW3D.

  3. Theoretical investigations of the gas flow in ballooning LWR-fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaballah, I.

    1978-09-01

    A theory is developed for the calculation of gas flow in a fuel rod simulator or in a fuel rod with round- or cracked pellets. The fundamental equations are formulated, simplified, reformed, and then numerically solved. The numerical investigations show, that a quasi steady incompressible flow model can be used without great error. The effect of the deformation form is studied. A uniform deformation along the whole length causes small pressure difference. A power profile and rod spacers cause non-uniform clad deformation of the fuel rod simulator or the fuel rod. This deformation leads to greater pressure differences. Finally the effect of the cracked pellets is studied. The cracked pellets cause great pressure differences along the fuel rod. (orig.) 891 HP [de

  4. The Effect of Fuel Mass Fraction on the Combustion and Fluid Flow in a Sulfur Recovery Unit Thermal Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lang Yeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur recovery unit (SRU thermal reactors are negatively affected by high temperature operation. In this paper, the effect of the fuel mass fraction on the combustion and fluid flow in a SRU thermal reactor is investigated numerically. Practical operating conditions for a petrochemical corporation in Taiwan are used as the design conditions for the discussion. The simulation results show that the present design condition is a fuel-rich (or air-lean condition and gives acceptable sulfur recovery, hydrogen sulfide (H2S destruction, sulfur dioxide (SO2 emissions and thermal reactor temperature for an oxygen-normal operation. However, for an oxygen-rich operation, the local maximum temperature exceeds the suggested maximum service temperature, although the average temperature is acceptable. The high temperature region must be inspected very carefully during the annual maintenance period if there are oxygen-rich operations. If the fuel mass fraction to the zone ahead of the choke ring (zone 1 is 0.0625 or 0.125, the average temperature in the zone behind the choke ring (zone 2 is higher than the zone 1 average temperature, which can damage the downstream heat exchanger tubes. If the zone 1 fuel mass fraction is reduced to ensure a lower zone 1 temperature, the temperature in zone 2 and the heat exchanger section must be monitored closely and the zone 2 wall and heat exchanger tubes must be inspected very carefully during the annual maintenance period. To determine a suitable fuel mass fraction for operation, a detailed numerical simulation should be performed first to find the stoichiometric fuel mass fraction which produces the most complete combustion and the highest temperature. This stoichiometric fuel mass fraction should be avoided because the high temperature could damage the zone 1 corner or the choke ring. A higher fuel mass fraction (i.e., fuel-rich or air-lean condition is more suitable because it can avoid deteriorations of both zone 1

  5. Regional cerebral blood flow and anxiety: a correlation study in neurologically normal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Cogorno, P.; Gris, A.; Marenco, S.; Mesiti, C.; Nobili, F.; Rosadini, G.

    1989-01-01

    Regional CBF (rCBF) was evaluated by the 133 Xe inhalation method in 60 neurologically normal patients (30 men and 30 women) and hemispheric and regional values were correlated with anxiety measurements collected by a self-rating questionnaire before and after the examination. Statistically significant negative correlations between rCBF and anxiety measures were found. rCBF reduction for high anxiety levels is in line with results previously reported by others and could be related to lower performance levels for moderately high anxiety scores as those reported in the present population. This could perhaps be explained by rearrangement of flow from cortical zones to deeper areas of the brain, classically known to be implicated in the control of emotions. However, these results should be interpreted cautiously, since they were obtained in patients and not in normal subjects

  6. Pore size determination using normalized J-function for different hydraulic flow units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abedini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pore size determination of hydrocarbon reservoirs is one of the main challenging areas in reservoir studies. Precise estimation of this parameter leads to enhance the reservoir simulation, process evaluation, and further forecasting of reservoir behavior. Hence, it is of great importance to estimate the pore size of reservoir rocks with an appropriate accuracy. In the present study, a modified J-function was developed and applied to determine the pore radius in one of the hydrocarbon reservoir rocks located in the Middle East. The capillary pressure data vs. water saturation (Pc–Sw as well as routine reservoir core analysis include porosity (φ and permeability (k were used to develop the J-function. First, the normalized porosity (φz, the rock quality index (RQI, and the flow zone indicator (FZI concepts were used to categorize all data into discrete hydraulic flow units (HFU containing unique pore geometry and bedding characteristics. Thereafter, the modified J-function was used to normalize all capillary pressure curves corresponding to each of predetermined HFU. The results showed that the reservoir rock was classified into five separate rock types with the definite HFU and reservoir pore geometry. Eventually, the pore radius for each of these HFUs was determined using a developed equation obtained by normalized J-function corresponding to each HFU. The proposed equation is a function of reservoir rock characteristics including φz, FZI, lithology index (J*, and pore size distribution index (ɛ. This methodology used, the reservoir under study was classified into five discrete HFU with unique equations for permeability, normalized J-function and pore size. The proposed technique is able to apply on any reservoir to determine the pore size of the reservoir rock, specially the one with high range of heterogeneity in the reservoir rock properties.

  7. Study of visualized simulation and analysis of nuclear fuel cycle system based on multilevel flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingquan; Yoshikawa, H.; Zhou Yangping

    2005-01-01

    Complex energy and environment system, especially nuclear fuel cycle system recently raised social concerns about the issues of economic competitiveness, environmental effect and nuclear proliferation. Only under the condition that those conflicting issues are gotten a consensus between stakeholders with different knowledge background, can nuclear power industry be continuingly developed. In this paper, a new analysis platform has been developed to help stakeholders to recognize and analyze various socio-technical issues in the nuclear fuel cycle sys- tem based on the functional modeling method named Multilevel Flow Models (MFM) according to the cognition theory of human being, Its character is that MFM models define a set of mass, energy and information flow structures on multiple levels of abstraction to describe the functional structure of a process system and its graphical symbol representation and the means-end and part-whole hierarchical flow structure to make the represented process easy to be understood. Based upon this methodology, a micro-process and a macro-process of nuclear fuel cycle system were selected to be simulated and some analysis processes such as economics analysis, environmental analysis and energy balance analysis related to those flows were also integrated to help stakeholders to understand the process of decision-making with the introduction of some new functions for the improved Multilevel Flow Models Studio, and finally the simple simulation such as spent fuel management process simulation and money flow of nuclear fuel cycle and its levelised cost analysis will be represented as feasible examples. (authors)

  8. Study of visualized simulation and analysis of nuclear fuel cycle system based on multilevel flow model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing-Quan; YOSHIKAWA Hidekazu; ZHOU Yang-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Complex energy and environment system, especially nuclear fuel cycle system recently raised social concerns about the issues of economic competitiveness, environmental effect and nuclear proliferation. Only under the condition that those conflicting issues are gotten a consensus between stakeholders with different knowledge background, can nuclear power industry be continuingly developed. In this paper, a new analysis platform has been developed to help stakeholders to recognize and analyze various socio-technical issues in the nuclear fuel cycle system based on the functional modeling method named Multilevel Flow Models (MFM) according to the cognition theory of human being. Its character is that MFM models define a set of mass, energy and information flow structures on multiple levels of abstraction to describe the functional structure of a process system and its graphical symbol representation and the means-end and part-whole hierarchical flow structure to make the represented process easy to be understood. Based upon this methodology, a micro-process and a macro-process of nuclear fuel cycle system were selected to be simulated and some analysis processes such as economics analysis, environmental analysis and energy balance analysis related to those flows were also integrated to help stakeholders to understand the process of decision-making with the introduction of some new functions for the improved Multilevel Flow Models Studio, and finally the simple simulation such as spent fuel management process simulation and money flow of nuclear fuel cycle and its levelised cost analysis will be represented as feasible examples.

  9. Measurement and analysis of vibrational behaviour of an SNR-fuel element in sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, B.F.H.; Ruppert, E.; Schmidt, H.; Vinzens, K.

    1975-01-01

    Within the framework of SNR-300 fuel element development programme a complete full size fuel element dummy has been tested thoroughly for nearly 3000 hours at 650 0 C system temperature in the AKB sodium loop at Interatom, Bensberg. Investigations of the hydraulic characteristics by measurements of specific pressure losses, flow velocities, leakage flow through the piston rings and investigations of its vibrational behaviour were part of this endurance test at elevated temperatures. The pressure drop versus flow and the leakage measurement are mentioned briefly to confirm the correctness of the test hydraulics. The vibrational behaviour of the element and the approach to analysis is the main object of this report. (Auth.)

  10. Combustor with two stage primary fuel tube with concentric members and flow regulating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David Marchant; Whidden, Graydon Lane; Zolyomi, Wendel

    1999-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having a centrally located fuel nozzle and inner, middle and outer concentric cylindrical liners, the inner liner enclosing a primary combustion zone. The combustor has an air inlet that forms two passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air to be supplied to the primary combustion zone. Each of the pre-mixing passages has a circumferential array of swirl vanes. A plurality of primary fuel tube assemblies extend through both pre-mixing passages, with each primary fuel tube assembly located between a pair of swirl vanes. Each primary fuel tube assembly is comprised of two tubular members. The first member supplies fuel to the first pre-mixing passage, while the second member, which extends through the first member, supplies fuel to the second pre-mixing passage. An annular fuel manifold is divided into first and second chambers by a circumferentially extending baffle. The proximal end of the first member is attached to the manifold itself while the proximal end of the second member is attached to the baffle. The distal end of the first member is attached directly to the second member at around its mid-point. The inlets of the first and second members are in flow communication with the first and second manifold chambers, respectively. Control valves separately regulate the flow of fuel to the two chambers and, therefore, to the two members of the fuel tube assemblies, thereby allowing the flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages to be separately controlled.

  11. Experimental studies of flow induced vibrations of the fuel assembly for the PEC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitimada, D.; Presaghi, M.; Tampone, O.; Cesari, F.

    1977-01-01

    The vibration behaviour of an assembly of seven mock-up fuel bundles of PEC reactor has been investigated. The assembly was excited by a parallel flow of water simulating sodium. The motion of the group (or of a single bundle in the group) has been measured in transverse sections detecting two orthogonal components of displacement. During the experiences the following parameters were varied: bundle foot and pads restraints, flow rate condition, coolant flow outlet conditions at the head of fuel bundles. Experimental data were processed in order to obtain: trajectories of three points of fuel bundle axis, power density spectra of measured vibration amplitudes, correlations between coolant flow rate and vibration amplitude R.M.S. (author)

  12. Parallel two-phase-flow-induced vibrations in fuel pin model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio; Yamashita, Tadashi

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of vibrations of a fuel pin model -herein meaning the essential form of a fuel pin from the standpoint of vibration- in a parallel air-and-water two-phase flow. The essential part of the experimental apparatus consisted of a flat elastic strip made of stainless steel, both ends of which were firmly supported in a circular channel conveying the two-phase fluid. Vibrational strain of the fuel pin model, pressure fluctuation of the two-phase flow and two-phase-flow void signals were measured. Statistical measures such as power spectral density, variance and correlation function were calculated. The authors obtained (1) the relation between variance of vibrational strain and two-phase-flow velocity, (2) the relation between variance of vibrational strain and two-phase-flow pressure fluctuation, (3) frequency characteristics of variance of vibrational strain against the dominant frequency of the two-phase-flow pressure fluctuation, and (4) frequency characteristics of variance of vibrational strain against the dominant frequency of two-phase-flow void signals. The authors conclude that there exist two kinds of excitation mechanisms in vibrations of a fuel pin model inserted in a parallel air-and-water two-phase flow; namely, (1) parametric excitation, which occurs when the fundamental natural frequency of the fuel pin model is related to the dominant travelling frequency of water slugs in the two-phase flow by the ratio 1/2, 1/1, 3/2 and so on; and (2) vibrational resonance, which occurs when the fundamental frequency coincides with the dominant frequency of the two-phase-flow pressure fluctuation. (auth.)

  13. Changes in regional blood flow of normal and tumor tissues following hyperthermia and combined X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    1986-01-01

    Hyperthermia and X-ray irradiation were given to Ehrlich tumors, which were induced in the ventrum of the right hind foot of ICR mice, and to the normal tissues. Their effects on regional blood flow were examined using Xe-133 local clearance method. Blood flow of the normal tissues remained unchanged by heating at 41 deg C for 30 minutes, and increased by heating at 43 deg C and 45 deg C for 30 minutes. On the contrary, blood flow of the tumors decreased with an increase in temperature. When hypertermia (43 deg C for 30 minutes) was combined with irradiation of 30 Gy, decrease in blood flow of the tumors was greater than the normal tissues at 24 hours. Blood flow of the tumors depended on tumor size. The decreased amount of blood flow by hyperthermia was more for tumors > 250 mm 3 than tumors 3 . Blood flow ratios of tumor to normal tissues were also smaller in tumors > 250 mm 3 than tumors 3 . In the case of tumors 3 , blood flow tended to return to normal at 3 hr after heating at 43 deg C for 30 min. However, this was not seen in tumors > 250 mm 3 . (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Pressure drop and flow distribution characteristics of single and parallel serpentine flow fields for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Man; Kim, Charn Jung; Jeon, Dong Hyup; Nam, Jin Hyun

    2012-01-01

    This study numerically investigates pressure drop and flow distribution characteristics of serpentine flow fields (SFFs) that are designed for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, which consider the Poiseuille flow with secondary pressure drop in the gas channel (GC) and the Darcy flow in the porous gas diffusion layer (GDL). The numerical results for a conventional SFF agreed well with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations, thus proving the validity of the present flow network model. This model is employed to characterize various single and parallel SFFs, including multi-pass serpentine flow fields (MPSFFs). Findings reveal that under rib convection (convective flow through GDL under an interconnector rib) is an important transport process for conventional SFFs, with its intensity being significantly enhanced as GDL permeability increases. The results also indicate that under rib convection can be significantly improved by employing MPSFFs as the reactant flow field, because of the closely interlaced structure of GC regions that have different path lengths from the inlet. However, reactant flow rate through GCs proportionally decreases as under rib convection intensity increases, suggesting that proper optimization is required between the flow velocity in GCs and the under rib convection intensity in GDLs

  15. Effects of cigarette smoking on cerebral blood flow in normal adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Takao [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    To elucidate the pharmacological effects of cigarette smoking on cerebral function and blood flow in normal adults, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in 10 right-handed male healthy volunteers with a smoking habit after 12-hour abstinence. By the oxygen-15 intravenous injection method, quantitative CBF was measured repeatedly 6 times; during normal breathing (baseline), 5% CO{sub 2} inhalation and cigarette smoking. Sham smoking was performed during baseline and CO{sub 2} inhalation. To eliminate the effects from PaCO{sub 2}, CBF was adjusted based on the vascular reactivity to CO{sub 2} and PaCO{sub 2} during smoking. Pulse rate, systemic blood pressure and arterial nicotine level were increased during smoking. In the overall comparison, there was no significant change in the mean CBF during smoking as compared with baseline. Out of 19 sessions, CBF increased significantly in 7 sessions, while CBF decreased in 7 sessions and was unchanged in 5 sessions. The arterial concentration of nicotine correlated inversely with CBF. When the baseline CBF was relatively low, CBF increased during smoking, while it decreased when the baseline value was high. In the 3-dimensional statistical analysis of normalized CBF, a significant increase was seen in the nucleus accumbens, which is assumed to be related to the drug habits or addiction in previous studies. In the first smoking after abstinence, CBF increased in the orbitofrontal gyri, and this can be linked to reward or relaxation. By contrast, a significant decrease was observed in the occipital lobes and paracentral areas. (author)

  16. Effects of cigarette smoking on cerebral blood flow in normal adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Takao

    1997-01-01

    To elucidate the pharmacological effects of cigarette smoking on cerebral function and blood flow in normal adults, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in 10 right-handed male healthy volunteers with a smoking habit after 12-hour abstinence. By the oxygen-15 intravenous injection method, quantitative CBF was measured repeatedly 6 times; during normal breathing (baseline), 5% CO 2 inhalation and cigarette smoking. Sham smoking was performed during baseline and CO 2 inhalation. To eliminate the effects from PaCO 2 , CBF was adjusted based on the vascular reactivity to CO 2 and PaCO 2 during smoking. Pulse rate, systemic blood pressure and arterial nicotine level were increased during smoking. In the overall comparison, there was no significant change in the mean CBF during smoking as compared with baseline. Out of 19 sessions, CBF increased significantly in 7 sessions, while CBF decreased in 7 sessions and was unchanged in 5 sessions. The arterial concentration of nicotine correlated inversely with CBF. When the baseline CBF was relatively low, CBF increased during smoking, while it decreased when the baseline value was high. In the 3-dimensional statistical analysis of normalized CBF, a significant increase was seen in the nucleus accumbens, which is assumed to be related to the drug habits or addiction in previous studies. In the first smoking after abstinence, CBF increased in the orbitofrontal gyri, and this can be linked to reward or relaxation. By contrast, a significant decrease was observed in the occipital lobes and paracentral areas. (author)

  17. Fuel Cooling in Absence of Forced Flow at Shutdown Condition with PHTS Partially Drained

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parasca, L.; Pecheanu, D.L., E-mail: laurentiu.parasca@cne.ro, E-mail: doru.pecheanu@cne.ro [Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Cernavoda (Romania)

    2014-09-15

    During the plant outage for maintenance on primary side (e.g. for the main Heat Transport System pumps maintenance, the Steam Generators inspection), there are situations which require the primary heat transport system (HTS) drainage to a certain level for opening the circuit. The primary fuel heat sink for this configuration is provided by the shutdown cooling system (SDCS). In case of losing the forced cooling (e.g. due to the loss of SDCS, design basis earthquake-DBE), flow conditions in the reactor core may become stagnant. Inside the fuel channels, natural circulation phenomena known as Intermittent Buoyancy Induced Flow (IBIF) will initiate, providing an alternate heat sink mechanism for the fuel. However, this heat sink is effective only for a limited period of time (recall time). The recall time is defined as the elapsed time until the water temperature in the HTS headers exceeds a certain limit. Until then, compensatory measures need to be taken (e.g. by re-establishing the forced flow or initiate Emergency Core Cooling system injection) to preclude fuel failures. The present paper briefly presents the results of an analysis performed to demonstrate that fuel temperature remains within acceptable limits during IBIF transient. One of the objectives of this analysis was to determine the earliest moment since the reactor shut down when maintenance activities on the HTS can be started such that IBIF is effective in case of losing the forced circulation. The resulting peak fuel sheath and pressure tube temperatures due to fuel heat up shall be within the acceptable limits to preclude fuel defect or fuel channel defects.Thermalhydraulic circuit conditions were obtained using a CATHENA model for the primary side of HTS (drained to a certain level), an ECC system model and a system model for SDCS. A single channel model was developed in GOTHIC code for the fuel assessment analysis. (author)

  18. Frequency analysis of CSF flow on cine-MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Imai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Mase, Mitsuhito; Itikawa, Katuhiro

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the flow dynamics of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with an ECG-gated phase contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The amplitude and phase in the CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients with NPH after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH-NPH group, n=26), an idiopathic NPH (I-NPH group, n=4), an asymptomatic ventricular dilation or a brain atrophy (VD group, n=21), and in healthy volunteers (control group, n=25). The changes of CSF flow spectra were also analyzed 5 and 15 minutes after an intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed in patients with SAH-NPH and control groups before and after acetazolamide injection. There values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude of the 1st-3rd harmonics in the SAH-NPH or I-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control or VD group because of a decrease in compliance (increase in PVR). The phase of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly different from that in the control or VD group, but no difference was found between the control and VD groups. The amplitude of the 0-3rd harmonics increased, and the phase of the 1st harmonic changed in all groups after an acetazolamide injection. An evaluation of the time course of the direct current of CSF flow provided further information about the compensatory faculty of the cerebrospinal cavity. A PTF of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF of the 1st harmonic and PVR. In conclusion, frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine-MRI make it possible to obtain noninvasively a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH and of changes in intracranial

  19. Frequency analysis of CSF flow on cine-MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Imai, Hiroshi [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Fujita, Hiroshi; Mase, Mitsuhito; Itikawa, Katuhiro

    2001-09-01

    To clarify the flow dynamics of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with an ECG-gated phase contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The amplitude and phase in the CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients with NPH after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH-NPH group, n=26), an idiopathic NPH (I-NPH group, n=4), an asymptomatic ventricular dilation or a brain atrophy (VD group, n=21), and in healthy volunteers (control group, n=25). The changes of CSF flow spectra were also analyzed 5 and 15 minutes after an intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed in patients with SAH-NPH and control groups before and after acetazolamide injection. There values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude of the 1st-3rd harmonics in the SAH-NPH or I-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control or VD group because of a decrease in compliance (increase in PVR). The phase of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly different from that in the control or VD group, but no difference was found between the control and VD groups. The amplitude of the 0-3rd harmonics increased, and the phase of the 1st harmonic changed in all groups after an acetazolamide injection. An evaluation of the time course of the direct current of CSF flow provided further information about the compensatory faculty of the cerebrospinal cavity. A PTF of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF of the 1st harmonic and PVR. In conclusion, frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine-MRI make it possible to obtain noninvasively a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH and of changes in intracranial

  20. Fuel bundle impact velocities due to reverse flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahba, N.N.; Locke, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    If a break should occur in the inlet feeder or inlet header of a CANDU reactor, the rapid depressurization will cause the channel flow(s) to reverse. Depending on the gap between the upstream bundle and shield plug, the string of bundles will accelerate in the reverse direction and impact with the upstream shield plug. The reverse flow impact velocities have been calculated for various operating states for the Bruce NGS A reactors. The sensitivity to several analysis assumptions has been determined. (author)

  1. Normalized Urinary Flow at Puberty after Tubularized Incised Plate Urethroplasty for Hypospadias in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Marie; Doroszkiewicz, Monika; Arfwidsson, Charlotte; Abrahamsson, Kate; Sillén, Ulla; Holmdahl, Gundela

    2015-11-01

    An obstructive urinary flow pattern is frequently seen after tubularized incised plate urethroplasty for hypospadias. However, the significance of this finding has not been determined and long-term results are few. We describe postoperative long-term uroflowmetry results after puberty in males who underwent tubularized incised plate urethroplasty in childhood. A total of 126 boys underwent tubularized incised plate urethroplasty for distal penile to mid shaft hypospadias at Queen Silvia Children's Hospital in Gothenburg between 1999 and 2003. Of the patients 48 were toilet trained at surgery. We report on 40 patients who had data available at 2 and 12 months postoperatively, 7 years postoperatively and at puberty (median age 15.0 years, range 13.7 to 17.1). Of the patients 31 had distal and 9 had mid penile hypospadias. Clinical examination, urinary medical history, uroflowmetry and ultrasound measuring residual urine were performed. Maximum urinary flow was correlated to age and voided volume, using Miskolc nomograms for comparison of percentiles. At 1 year postoperatively 15 boys (37.5%) had normal urinary flow (above 25th percentile), compared to 16 (40%) at 7 years and 38 (95%) at puberty (p puberty for boys with hypospadias treated with tubularized incised plate urethroplasty. Unless symptoms occur, a conservative approach seems preferable. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of vascular normalization on interstitial flow and delivery of liposomes in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Deniz; Yonucu, Sirin; Yilmaz, Defne; Unlu, Mehmet Burcin

    2015-01-01

    Elevated interstitial fluid pressure is one of the barriers of drug delivery in solid tumors. Recent studies have shown that normalization of tumor vasculature by anti-angiogenic factors may improve the delivery of conventional cytotoxic drugs, possibly by increasing blood flow, decreasing interstitial fluid pressure, and enhancing the convective transvascular transport of drug molecules. Delivery of large therapeutic agents such as nanoparticles and liposomes might also benefit from normalization therapy since their transport depends primarily on convection. In this study, a mathematical model is presented to provide supporting evidence that normalization therapy may improve the delivery of 100 nm liposomes into solid tumors, by both increasing the total drug extravasation and providing a more homogeneous drug distribution within the tumor. However these beneficial effects largely depend on tumor size and are stronger for tumors within a certain size range. It is shown that this size effect may persist under different microenvironmental conditions and for tumors with irregular margins or heterogeneous blood supply. (paper)

  3. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in normal pressure hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Taki, Waro; Kobayashi, Akira; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1989-05-01

    To clarify the pathophysiology of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) after subarachnoid hemorrhage, the authors measured cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen metabolic rates (CMRO{sub 2}), the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV) in eight normal volunteers, six SAH patients with NPH, and seven patients without NPH by {sup 15}O-labeled gas and positron emission tomography (PET). In the NPH group, PET revealed a decrease in CBF in the lower regions of the cerebral cortex and a diffuse decrease in CMRO{sub 2}. The decrease in CBF in the lower frontal, temporal, and occipital cortices was significantly greater in the NPH than in the non-NPH group. Reduction of CMRO{sub 2} was also more extensive in the NPH group, and both CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were more markedly decreased in the lower frontal region. OEF was increased in all areas in both of the patient groups, but the increase was not significant in most areas. CBF, CMRO{sub 2} and OEF did not significantly differ between the non-NPH group and the normal volunteers. There was no significant difference in CBV among the three groups. These results indicate that NPH involves impairment of cerebral oxygen metabolism in the lower regions of the cerebral cortex, particularly in the lower frontal region. (author).

  4. REFCO83, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Cost Economics Using Discounted Cash Flow Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Hermann, O.W.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: REFCO83 utilizes a discounted cash flow (DCF) analysis procedure to calculate batch, cycle, and lifetime levelized average nuclear fuel cycle costs. The DCF analysis establishes an energy 'cost' associated with the fuel by requiring that the revenues from the sale of energy be adequate to pay the required return on outstanding capital, to pay all expenses including taxes, and to retire the outstanding investment to zero by the end of the economic life of the set of fuel investments. The program uses reactor mass flow information together with individual fuel cost parameters and utility capital structure and money costs to calculate levelized costs cumulatively through any batch or cycle. 2 - Method of solution: A fuel cycle cost component is considered to be any fuel material purchase, processing cost, or discharge material credit in the complete fuel cycle. The costs for each individual component, i.e. uranium, enrichment, etc., may either be expensed or capitalized for tax purposes or, in the case of waste disposal, the cost may also be made proportional to power production. To properly account for the effect of income taxes, all calculations in REFCO83 are done using 'then' current dollars, including price escalations caused by inflation. The database used for the default values for REFCO83 was taken from the Nuclear Energy Cost Data Base. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of fuel batches is 120

  5. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of transport phenomena in fuel cells and flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ao; Shyy, Wei; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-06-01

    Fuel cells and flow batteries are promising technologies to address climate change and air pollution problems. An understanding of the complex multiscale and multiphysics transport phenomena occurring in these electrochemical systems requires powerful numerical tools. Over the past decades, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has attracted broad interest in the computational fluid dynamics and the numerical heat transfer communities, primarily due to its kinetic nature making it appropriate for modeling complex multiphase transport phenomena. More importantly, the LB method fits well with parallel computing due to its locality feature, which is required for large-scale engineering applications. In this article, we review the LB method for gas-liquid two-phase flows, coupled fluid flow and mass transport in porous media, and particulate flows. Examples of applications are provided in fuel cells and flow batteries. Further developments of the LB method are also outlined.

  6. Code package to analyse behavior of the WWER fuel rods in normal operation: TOPRA's code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the code package intended for analysis of WWER fuel rod characteristics. The package includes two computer codes: TOPRA-1 and TOPRA-2 for full-scale fuel rod analyses; MRZ and MKK codes for analyzing the separate sections of fuel rods in r-z and r-j geometry. The TOPRA's codes are developed on the base of PIN-mod2 version and verified against experimental results obtained in MR, MIR and Halden research reactors (in the framework of SOFIT, FGR-2 and FUMEX experimental programs). Comparative analysis of calculation results and results from post-reactor examination of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 fuel rod are also made as additional verification of these codes. To avoid the enlarging of uncertainties in fuel behavior prediction as a result of simplifying of the fuel geometry, MKK and MRZ codes are developed on the basis of the finite element method with use of the three nodal finite elements. Results obtained in the course of the code verification indicate the possibility for application of the method and TOPRA's code for simplified engineering calculations of WWER fuel rods thermal-physical parameters. An analysis of maximum relative errors for predicting of the fuel rod characteristics in the range of the accepted parameter values is also presented in the paper

  7. Internal Nozzle Flow Simulations of Gasoline-Like Fuels under Diesel Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torelli, R.; Som, S.; Pei, Y.; Zhang, Yu; Traver, Michael

    2017-05-15

    Spray formation in internal combustion engines with direct injection is strictly correlated with internal nozzle flow characteristics, which are in turn influenced by fuel physical properties and injector needle motion. This paper pre-sents a series of 3D simulations that model the in-nozzle flow in a 5-hole mini-sac diesel injector. Two gasoline-like naphtha fuels, namely full-range and light naphtha, were tested under operating conditions typical of diesel applica-tions and were compared with n-dodecane, selected from a palette used as diesel surrogates. Validated methodolo-gies from our previous work were employed to account for realistic needle motion. The multi-phase nature of the problem was described by the mixture model assumption with the Volume of Fluid method. Cavitation effects were included by means of the Homogeneous Relaxation Model and turbulence closure was achieved with the Standard k-ε model in an Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes formulation. The results revealed that injector perfor-mance and propensity to cavitation are influenced by the fuel properties. Analyses of several physical quantities were carried out to highlight the fuel-to-fuel differences in terms of mass flow rate, discharge coefficients, and fuel vapor volume fraction inside the orifices. A series of parametric investigations was also performed to assess the fuel response to varied fuel injection temperature, injection pressure, and cross-sectional orifice area. For all cases, the strict correlation between cavitation magnitude and saturation pressure was confirmed. Owing to their higher volatil-ity, the two gasoline-like fuels were characterized by higher cavitation across all the simulated conditions. Occur-rence of cavitation was mostly found at the needle seat and at the orifice inlets during the injection event’s transient, when very small gaps exist between the needle and its seat. This behavior tended to disappear at maximum needle lift, where cavitation was

  8. An assessment of the energetic flows in a commercial PEM fuel-cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovan, Vladimir; Perne, Matija; Petrovcic, Janko

    2010-01-01

    Some primary issues have not yet been fully investigated on the way towards the commercialization of fuel-cell-based systems (FCS), e.g., their actual efficiency, reliability, safety, degradation, maintainability, etc. This article deals with an estimation of the real energetic flows and the corresponding electrical efficiency of a commercial proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell hydrogen-fed generator set (PEMFCS). The fuel-cell power system considered here is planned to be the source of both electrical and thermal energy in a mobile dwelling container unit with in-built fuel-cell-based cogeneration system, and for the design of a cogeneration unit the actual amount of disposable energy from the PEMFC unit should be estimated. The assessment of the actual energetic flows, the disposable energy and the consequent electrical efficiency of the case-study PEMFCS is carried out using commercial technical data for the PEMFCS.

  9. Longitudinal changes of ocular blood flow using laser speckle flowgraphy during normal pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Sato

    Full Text Available Innovative laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG enables noninvasive evaluation of retinal microcirculation and the usefulness has been reported in the field of ophthalmology. LSFG has allowed us to measure the real time changes of retinal blood flow without pupillary dilatations and contrast media. Herein, we investigated the change of retinal blood flow in normal pregnant women during gestation using LSFG.A prospective cohort study was conducted in 53 pregnant women who visited our institution between January, 2013 and July, 2014. Finally, a total of 41 participants without any obstetric complications were available for evaluation. Retinal blood flow was measured with LSFG in a total of 4 times during pregnancy (T1. 11-13 weeks, T2. 19-21 weeks, T3. 28-30 weeks, T4. 34-36 weeks and mean blur rate (MBR, blowout score (BOS, flow acceleration index (FAI, and resistive index (RI are analyzed from these measurements. Relations between LSFG parameters and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP are determined throughout pregnancy.MBR showed no significant changes throughout pregnancy. BOS showed a tendency to increase in the 3rd trimester. FAI values showed a slight increase from the 1st to 2nd trimester while a significant decrease was noted in the 3rd trimester. RI exhibited no changes between the 1st and 2nd trimesters, values decreased significantly after the 3rd trimester. MAP was positively correlated with BOS, and negatively correlated with FAI and RI.The present study clearly demonstrated that profiles of LSFG parameters demonstrated a decrease of resistance in retinal blood vessels. These changes in indices provide a highly sensitive reflection of physiological changes in vascular resistance due to pregnancy. Thus, LSFG may be useful, as a non-invasive, diagnostic tool to detect pregnancy related disorders such as preeclampsia.

  10. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) flow field plate: design, materials and characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, P.J.; Pollet, B.G. [PEM Fuel Cell Research Group, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This review describes some recent developments in the area of flow field plates (FFPs) for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The function, parameters and design of FFPs in PEM fuel cells are outlined and considered in light of their performance. FFP materials and manufacturing methods are discussed and current in situ and ex situ characterisation techniques are described. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Analysis of coolant flow in central tube of WWER-440 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsiros, G.; Toth, S.; Attila Aszodi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensional computational fluid dynamics model has been built to investigate the coolant flow in the central tube of the WWER-440 fuel assemblies. The model was verified based on measured data of the Kurchatov Institute. With the model calculations were performed for two fuel assemblies used in PAKS NPP. One of them has symmetrical and another has inclined pin power profile. Ratios of the outlet mass fluxes of the central tube to the inlet mass fluxes of the rod bundle were determined. Heat up ratios of the tube and rod bundle flows were calculated too. Sensitivity of the results on the assembly power distribution, inlet temperature and mass flow rate was investigated. The results of these simulations can be used as boundary conditions of central tube in studies of coolant mixing in fuel assembly heads. (Authors)

  12. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating oxide fuel crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the crust stability and heat transfer behavior in the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten oxide fuel at approx. 160 0 K above its freezing temperature was impinged normally upon stainless steel plates initially at 300 and 385 K. The major issue is the existence of nonexistence of a stable solidified layer of fuel, or crust, interstitial to the flowing hot fuel and the steel substrate, tending to insulate the steel from the hot molten fuel. A computer model was developed to predict the heatup of thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the surface of the plate for both of the cases in which a stable crust is assumed to be either present or absent during the impingement phase. Comparison of the model calculations with the measured thermocouple temperatures indicates that a protective crust was present over nearly all of the plate surface area throughout the impingement process precluding major melting of the plate steel. However, the experiments also show evidence for very localized and isolated steel melting as revealed by localized and isolated pitting of the steel surface and the response of thermocouples located within the pitted region

  13. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; hide

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  14. Identification and Characterization of Plasma Cells in Normal Human Bone Marrow by High-Resolution Flow Cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Johnsen, Steen; Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.; Loken, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The low frequency of plasma cells and the lack of specific cell surface markers has been a major obstacle for a detailed characterization of plasma cells in normal human bone marrow. Multiparameter flow cytometry enabled the identification of plasma cells in normal bone marrow aspirates. The plasma

  15. The Test for Flow Characteristics of Tubular Fuel Assembly(II) - Experimental results and CFD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hark; Chae, H. T.; Park, C.; Kim, H.

    2006-12-01

    A test facility had been established for the experiment of velocity distribution and pressure drop in a tubular fuel. A basic test had been conducted to examine the performance of the test loop and to verify the accuracy of measurement by pitot-tube. In this report, test results and CFD analysis for the hydraulic characteristics of a tubular fuel, following the previous tests, are described. Coolant velocities in all channels were measured using pitot-tube and the effect of flow rate change on the velocity distribution was also examined. The pressure drop through the tubular fuel was measured for various flow rates in range of 1 kg/s to 21 kg/s to obtain a correlation of pressure drop with variation of flow rate. In addition, a CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis was also done to find out the hydraulic characteristics of tubular fuel such as velocity distribution and pressure drop. As the results of CFD analysis can give us a detail insight on coolant flow in the tubular fuel, the CFD method is a very useful tool to understand the flow structure and phenomena induced by fluid flow. The CFX-10, a commercial CFD code, was used in this study. The two results by the experiment and the CFD analysis were investigated and compared with each other. Overall trend of velocity distribution by CFD analysis was somewhat different from that of experiment, but it would be reasonable considering measurement uncertainties. The CFD prediction for pressure drop of a tubular fuel shows a tolerably good agreement with experiment within 8% difference

  16. Loss-of-flow transient characterization in carbide-fueled LMFBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothrock, R.B.; Morgan, M.M.; Baars, R.E.; Elson, J.S.; Wray, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    One of the benefits derived from the use of carbide fuel in advanced Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) is a decreased vulnerability to certain accidents. This can be achieved through the combination of advanced fuel performance with the enhanced reactivity feedback effects and passive shutdown cooling systems characteristic of the current 'inherently safe' plant concepts. The calculated core response to an unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) accident has frequently been used as a benchmark test of these designs, and the advantages of a high-conductivity fuel in relation to this type of transient have been noted in previous analyses. To evaluate this benefit in carbide-fueled LMFBRs incorporating representative current plant design features, limited calculations have been made of a ULOF transient in a small ('modular') carbide-fueled LMFBR

  17. Calculation of local characteristics of velocity field in turbulent coolant flow in fast reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, P.

    1981-08-01

    Experience is described gained with the application of computer code VELASCO in calculating the velocity field in fast reactor fuel assemblies taking into account configuration disturbances due to fuel pin displacement. Theoretical results are compared with the results of experiments conducted by UJV on aerodynamic models HEM-1 (model of the fuel assembly central part) and HEM-2 (model of the fuel assembly peripheral part). The results are reported of calculating the distribution of shear stress in wetted rod surfaces and in the assembly wall (model HEM-2) and the corresponding experimental results are shown. The shear stress distribution in wetted surfaces obtained using the VELASCO code allowed forming an opinion on the code capability of comprising local parameters of turbulent flow through a fuel rod bundle. The applicability was also tested of the code for calculating mean velocities in the individual zones, eg., in elementary cells. (B.S.)

  18. Heat transfer and fluid flow aspects of fuel--coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.

    1978-09-01

    A major portion of the safety analysis effort for the LMFBR is involved in assessing the consequences of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA). The thermal interaction of the hot fuel and the sodium coolant during the HCDA is investigated in two areas. A postulated loss of flow transient may produce a two-phase fuel at high pressures. The thermal interaction phenomena between fuel and coolant as the fuel is ejected into the upper plenum are investigated. A postulated transient overpower accident may produce molten fuel being released into sodium coolant in the core region. An energetic coolant vapor explosion for these reactor materials does not seem likely. However, experiments using other materials (e.g., Freon/water, tin/water) have demonstrated the possibility of this phenomenon

  19. CFD Simulation of Heat and Fluid Flow for Spent Fuel in a Dry Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wangkee; Kwack, Youngkyun; Kook, Donghak; Koo, Yanghyun

    2014-01-01

    A dry storage system is used for the interim storage of spent fuel prior to permanent depository and/or recycling. The spent fuel is initially stored in a water pool for more than 5 years at least after dispatch from the reactor core and is transported to dry storage. The dry cask contains a multiple number of spent fuel assemblies, which are cooled down in the spent fuel pool. The dry cask is usually filled up with helium gas for increasing the heat transfer to the environment outside the cask. The dry storage system has been used for more than a decade in United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU). Korea is also developing a dry storage system since its spent fuel pool is anticipated to be full within 10 years. The spent fuel will be stored in a dry cask for more than 40 years. The integrity and safety of spent fuel are important for long-term dry storage. The long-term storage will experience the degradation of spent fuel such as the embrittlement of fuel cladding, thermal creep and hydride reorientation. High burn-up fuel may expedite the material degradation. It is known that the cladding temperature has a strong influence on the material degradation. Hence, it is necessary to accurately predict the local distribution of the cladding temperature using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. The objective of this study is to apply the CFD method for predicting the three-dimensional distribution of fuel temperature in a dry cask. This CFD study simulated the dry cask for containing the 21 fuel assemblies under development in Korea. This paper presents the fluid velocity and temperature distribution as well as the fuel temperature. A two-step CFD approach was applied to simulate the heat and fluid flow in a dry storage of 21 spent fuel assemblies. The first CFD analysis predicted the helium flow and temperature in a dry cask by a assuming porous body of the spent fuel. The second CFD analysis was to simulate a spent fuel assembly in the

  20. Normal Myocardial Flow Reserve in HIV-Infected Patients on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Christensen, Thomas E; Ghotbi, Adam Ali

    2015-01-01

    . The HIV-infected patients had a mean age of 53 years (range 37-68 years) with 23% active smokers. The controls had a mean age of 52 years (range 36-68 years) and 26% active smokers. In the HIV-infected group 73% had a normal MFR, 17% borderline, and 10% low values of MFR. Among controls these values were...... 71%, 19%, and 10%, respectively (P = 0.99). However, the HIV-infected group had lower values of stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) (2.63 ± 0.09 mL/g/min vs 2.99 ± 0.14 mL/g/min; P = 0.03). We found no evidence of decreased MFR as assessed by 82Rb PET among HIV-infected patients on stable ART...

  1. Numerical simulations of helium flow through prismatic fuel elements of very high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Felipe Lopes; Pinto, Joao Pedro C.T.A.

    2013-01-01

    The 4 th generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) most popular concept uses a graphite-moderated and helium cooled core with an outlet gas temperature of approximately 1000 deg C. The high output temperature allows the use of the process heat and the production of hydrogen through the thermochemical iodine-sulfur process as well as highly efficient electricity generation. There are two concepts of VHTR core: the prismatic block and the pebble bed core. The prismatic block core has two popular concepts for the fuel element: multihole and annular. In the multi-hole fuel element, prismatic graphite blocks contain cylindrical flow channels where the helium coolant flows removing heat from cylindrical fuel rods positioned in the graphite. In the other hand, the annular type fuel element has annular channels around the fuel. This paper shows the numerical evaluations of prismatic multi-hole and annular VHTR fuel elements and does a comparison between the results of these assembly reactors. In this study the analysis were performed using the CFD code ANSYS CFX 14.0. The simulations were made in 1/12 fuel element models. A numerical validation was performed through the energy balance, where the theoretical and the numerical generated heat were compared for each model. (author)

  2. Stress Linearization and Strength Evaluation of the BEP's Flow Plates for a Dual Cooled Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yong; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kang, Heung Seok; Lee, Young Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Hyung Kyu

    2009-01-01

    A fuel assembly is composed of 5 major components, such as a top end piece (TEP), a bottom end piece (BEP), spacer grids (SGs), guide tubes (GTs) and an instrumentation tube (IT) and fuel rods (FRs). There are no ASME criteria about all components except for a TEP/BEP. The TEP/BEP should satisfy stress intensity limits in case of condition A and B of ASME, Section III, Division 1 . Subsection NB. In a dual cooled fuel assembly, the array and position of fuels are changed from those of a conventional PWR fuel assembly to achieve a power uprating. The flow plates of top/bottom end pieces (TEP/BEP) have to be modified into proper shape to provide flow holes to direct the heated coolant into/out of the fuel assembly but structural intensity of these plates within a 22.241 kN axial loading should satisfy Tresca stress limits in ASME code. In this paper, stress linearization procedure and strength evaluation of a newly designed BEP for the dual cooled fuel assembly are described

  3. Loss-of-flow test L5 on FFTF-type irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, R.; Gehl, S.M.; Lo, R.K.; Rothman, A.B.

    1978-03-01

    Test L5 simulated a hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in an LMFBR using three (Pu, U)O 2 fuel elements of the FTR type. The test elements were irradiated before TREAT Test L5 in the General Electric Test Reactor to 8 at. % burnup at about 40 kW/m. The preirradiation in GETR caused a fuel-restructuring range characteristic of moderate-power structure relative to the FTR. The test transient was devised so that a power burst would be initiated at incipient cladding melting after the loss of flow. The test simulation corresponds to a scenario for FTR in which fuel in high-power-structure subassemblies slump, resulting in a power excursion. The remaining subassemblies are subjected to this power burst. Test L5 addressed the fuel-motion behavior of the subassemblies in this latter category. Data from test-vehicle sensors, hodoscope, and post-mortem examinations were used to construct the sequence of events within the test zone. From these observations, the fuel underwent a predominantly dispersive event just after reaching a peak power six times nominal at, or after, scram. The fuel motion was apparently driven by the release of entrained fission-product gases, since fuel vapor pressure was deliberately kept below significant levels for the transient. The test remains show a wide range of microstructural evolution, depending on the extent of heat deposition along the active fuel column. Extensive fuel swelling was also observed as a result of the lack of the cladding restraint. The results of the thermal-hydraulic calculations with the SAS3A code agreed qualitatively with the postmortem results with respect to the extent of the melting and the dispersal of cladding and fuel. However, the calculated times of certain events did not agree with the observed times

  4. Forest fuel reduces the nitrogen load - calculations of nitrogen flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstroem, F.; Johansson, Jan.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen deposition in Sweden has increased strongly during recent decades, particularly in southern Sweden. Nitrogen appears to be largely accumulated in biomass and in the soil. It is therefore desirable to check the accumulation of nitrogen in the forest. The most suitable way of doing this is to remove more nitrogen-rich biomass from the forest, i.e., increase the removal of felling residues from final fellings and cleanings. An ecological condition for intensive removal of fuel is that the ashes are returned. The critical load for nitrogen, CL(N), indicates the level of nitrogen deposition that the forest can withstand without leading to ecological changes. Today, nitrogen deposition is higher than the CL(N) in almost all of Sweden. CL(N) is calculated in such a manner that nitrogen deposition should largely be balanced by nitrogen losses through harvesting during a forest rotation. The value of CL(N) thus largely depends on how much nitrogen is removed with the harvested biomass. When both stems and felling residues are harvested, the CL(N) is about three times higher than in conventional forestry. The increase is directly related to the amount of nitrogen in the removed biofuel. Use of biofuel also causes a certain amount of nitrogen emissions. From the environmental viewpoint there is no difference between the sources of the nitrogen compounds. An analysis of the entire fuel chain shows that, compared with the amount of nitrogen removed from the forest with the fuel, about 5 % will be emitted as nitrogen oxides or ammonia during combustion, and a further ca 5 % during handling and transports. A net amount of about 90 % of biomass nitrogen is removed from the system and becomes inert nitrogen (N 2 ). 60 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs, 11 appendices

  5. PWR Fuel licensing in France - from design to reprocessing: licensing of nuclear PWR fuel rod design to satisfy with criteria for normal and abnormal fuel operation in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, R.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture are presented: French regulatory context; Current fuel management methods; Request from the french operator EdF; Most recent actions of the french Nuclear safety authority; Fuel assemblies deformations (impact of high burn-up; investigations during reactor's exploitation; control rods drop off times)

  6. Fuel performance under normal PWR conditions: A review of relevant experimental results and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, M.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-06-01

    Experiments conducted at Grenoble (CEA/DRN) over the past 20 years in the field of nuclear fuel behaviour are reviewed. Of particular concern is the need to achieve a comprehensive understanding of and subsequently overcome the limitations associated with high burnup and load-following conditions (pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), fission gas release (FGR), water-side corrosion). A general view is given of the organization of research work as well as some experimental details (irradiation, postirradiation examination — PIE). Based on various experimental programmes (Cyrano, Medicis, Anemone, Furet, Tango, Contact, Cansar, Hatac, Flog, Decor), the main contributions of the thermomechanical behaviour of a PWR fuel rod are described: thermal conductivity, in-pile densification, swelling, fission gas release in steady state and moderate transient conditions, gap thermal conductance, formation of primary and secondary ridges under PCI conditions. Specific programmes (Gdgrif, Thermox, Grimox) are devoted to the behaviour of particular fuels (gadolinia-bearing fuel, MOX fuel). Moreover, microstructure-based studies have been undertaken on fission gas release (fine analysis of the bubble population inside irradiated fuel samples), and on cladding behaviour (PCI related studies on stress-corrosion cracking (SCO, irradiation effects on zircaloy microstructure).

  7. Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

    2005-09-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

  8. Flowing cerebrospinal fluid in normal and hydrocephalic states: Appearance on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.G.; Kortman, K.E.; Burgoyne, B.; Eng, D.

    1986-01-01

    The signal intensity of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct and lateral ventricles on magnetic resonance (MR) images was evaluated in 16 healthy individuals and in 32 patients with various forms of hydrocephalus (20 with chronic normal pressure hydrocephalus [NPH], seven with acute communicating hydrocephalus, and five with hydrocephalus ex vacuo [atrophy]). The low signal intensity frequently observed in the cerebral aqueduct is believed to reflect the pulsatile motion of CSF, which is related to the cardiac cycle. While this aqueductal flow void phenomenon can be observed in healthy individuals, it is most pronounced in patients with chronic, communicating NPH; is less evident in patients with acute, communicating hydrocephalus and is least evident in patients with atrophy. Ventricular compliance is known to be essentially normal in atrophy, mildly decreased in acute, communicating hydrocephalus; and severely decreased in NPH. The degree of aqueductal signal loss is believed to reflect the velocity of the pulsatile CSF motion, which in turn depends on the relative ventricular compliance and surface area

  9. Upper-airway flow limitation and transcutaneous carbon dioxide during sleep in normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimpilä, Ville; Jernman, Riina; Lassila, Katariina; Uotila, Jukka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäenpää, Johanna; Polo, Olli

    2017-08-01

    Sleep during pregnancy involves a physiological challenge to provide sufficient gas exchange to the fetus. Enhanced ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia may protect from deficient gas exchange, but sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) may predispose to adverse events. The aim of this study was to analyze sleep and breathing in healthy pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls, with a focus on CO 2 changes and upper-airway flow limitation. Healthy women in the third trimester and healthy non-pregnant women with normal body mass index (BMI) were recruited for polysomnography. Conventional analysis of sleep and breathing was performed. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcCO 2 ) was determined for each sleep stage. Flow-limitation was analyzed using the flattening index and TcCO 2 values were recorded for every inspiration. Eighteen pregnant women and 12 controls were studied. Pregnancy was associated with shorter sleep duration and more superficial sleep. Apnea-hypopnea index, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation, flow-limitation, snoring or periodic leg movements were similar in the two groups. Mean SaO 2 and minimum SaO 2 were lower and average heart rate was higher in the pregnant group. TcCO 2 levels did not differ between groups but variance of TcCO 2 was smaller in pregnant women during non-rapid eye movement (NREM). TcCO 2 profiles showed transient TcCO 2 peaks, which seem specific to pregnancy. Healthy pregnancy does not predispose to SDB. Enhanced ventilatory control manifests as narrowing threshold of TcCO 2 between wakefulness and sleep. Pregnant women have a tendency for rapid CO 2 increases during sleep which might have harmful consequences if not properly compensated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. ESBWR enhanced flow distribution with optimized orificing and related fuel cycle performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, G. J.; Karve, A. A.; Fawcett, R. M. [Global Nuclear Fuel - America, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, NC 28401 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) is GEH's latest Generation III+ reactor design with natural circulation coolant flow and passive safety features. Reliance on natural circulation as the sole means of core coolant driving force results in increased power-to-flow ratio and places increased importance on the efficient distribution of core flow in order to achieve optimum thermal margins and improved fuel cycle efficiency. In addition, the large core size of the ESBWR, containing 1132 bundles, greatly benefits from a more targeted distribution of flow, directing a higher fraction of flow to high power bundles in the 'ring of fire' region of typical BWR loading patterns and a lower fraction of flow to low power bundles on and near the core periphery. Desirable flow distributions can be achieved by modifying the hydraulic resistance of the inlet orifices to preferentially force flow to the targeted region. The inlet orifice is a feature that is incorporated into the fuel support piece of a typical BWR design. The majority of existing forced circulation BWR's rely on only two orifice types - a peripheral orifice located along the outermost row and a central orifice in all other locations. A more optimum distribution of core flow is achievable with the introduction of multiple inlet orifice types. Multi-zone orifice layouts comprised of two, three and four types have been evaluated for the ESBWR. An efficient radial distribution of flow can have a direct beneficial effect on the Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR). An improved multi-zone orifice layout in the ESBWR has the potential of significantly increasing active flow in high power bundles. On average, this flow increase corresponds to a noteworthy MCPR improvement. Additional MCPR margin may be used to enhance operating flexibility and to achieve reduced fuel cycle costs over the plant lifetime. Combined with GNF's latest high performance fuel design for the ESBWR, GNF2E

  11. Corpus luteum blood flow in normal and abnormal early pregnancy: evaluation and analysis with transvaginal color and pulsed doppler sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaoyi; Lin Meifang; Zheng Meirong; Liang Xiaoxian; Liu Jianfeng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Detecting and assessment the corpus luteum blood flow in normal and abnormal early pregnancy. Methods: Using transvaginal color and pulse Doppler sonography, we detected 215 pregnant women including 150 normal intrauterine pregnancies, 25 abortion, 29 ectopic pregnancies, and then recorded corpus luteum blood flow feature and the blood flow indexes (Vmax, RI and PI). Results: 1) Corpus luteum was successfully identified in 148 cases out of 150 of normal early pregnancies, 25 cases out of 26 of threatened abortion; 22 cases out of 29 of ectopic pregnancy. 2) Three groups shared the same feature of Color Doppler imaging: a circumferential rim around the entire corpus luteum. 3) The flow index revealed mean PVS, RI and PI had no statistical difference in normal and abnormal early pregnancy; The mean PVS was lower in ectopic pregnancy than in normal pregnancy (P<0.05), while PI and PR had no characteristic in ectopic pregnancy group compared with the indexes obtained in normal pregnancy group. Conclusion: The corpus luteum can be precisely identified in most pregnancy using transvaginal color Doppler and manifests a characterized rim Doppler imaging. PVS may help in differentiating the ectopic pregnancy from normal early pregnancy. (authors)

  12. FLATT - a computer programme for calculating flow and temperature transients in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Koranne, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    FLATT is a computer code written in Fortran language for BESM-6 computer. The code calculates the flow transients in the coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor, caused by pump failure, and the consequent temperature transients in the fuel, clad, and the coolant. In addition any desired flow transient can be fed into the programme and the resulting temperature transients can be calculated. A case study is also presented. (author)

  13. Calculation of Heat-Bearing Agent’s Steady Flow in Fuel Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosova, E. V.; Guba, G. G.

    2017-11-01

    This paper introduces the result of studying the heat exchange in the fuel bundle of the nuclear reactor’s fuel magazine. The article considers the fuel bundle of the infinite number of fuel elements, fuel elements are considered in the checkerboard fashion (at the tops of a regular triangle a fuel element is a plain round rod. The inhomogeneity of volume energy release in the rod forms the inhomogeneity of temperature and velocity fields, and pressure. Computational methods for studying hydrodynamics in magazines and cores with rod-shape fuel elements are based on a significant simplification of the problem: using basic (averaged) equations, isobaric section hypothesis, porous body model, etc. This could be explained by the complexity of math description of the three-dimensional fluid flow in the multi-connected area with the transfer coefficient anisotropy, curved boundaries and technical computation difficulties. Thus, calculative studying suggests itself as promising and important. There was developed a method for calculating the heat-mass exchange processes of inter-channel fuel element motions, which allows considering the contribution of natural convection to the heat-mass exchange based on the Navier-Stokes equations and Boussinesq approximation.

  14. The post-irradiation examination of fuel in support of Bruce A Nuclear Division fueling with flow program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montin, J.; Sagat, S.

    1995-10-01

    Bruce A Nuclear Division (BAND) units are operating at ∼ 75% of full power, because of the potential of a power pulse in the event of an inlet header break. As a result, BAND is converting to fueling with flow, to eliminate the potential of a power pulse and to allow for full-power operation. Concerns regarding the integrity of the end-of-life (EOL) bundles interacting with the latch at the downstream end of the fuel channel were raised. BAND carried out a test program in which EOL bundles in the upstream position of 13 of Unit 2 were cascaded into the downstream latch position 1 of another channel. Six of twelve cascaded bundles and two typical EOL position 13 (benchmark) bundles were selected for post-irradiation examination (PIE). Incipient cracks were found in the benchmark bundles. Metallographic and fractographic examination, along with crack dating, and hydrogen and deuterium analyses, indicated that the incipient cracks were the result of delayed-hydride assisted cracking at the EOL. Consequently, Ontario Hydro changed the design of the outlet shield plug to support all three rings of the fuel bundle, to minimize stress and prevent end plate cracking. Also, an ultrasonic end plate inspection tool (UT) was developed and located in the fuel bay, to inspect fuel-bundle end plates for cracks. A second test was done involving a series of four bundle cascades in BAND Unit 4 channels that had new outlet shield plugs. The latch bundles were discharged after a hot shutdown. The cascaded Unite 2 and Unit 4 latch bundles were checked for cracks using the UT. The PIE found incipient cracks or less-than-ideal welds in the assembly welds of fuel elements from Unit 2 (latch-supported fuel bundles) that had been identified by the UT as having incipient cracks. No incipient cracks were found in the assemble welds of fuel elements from Unit 4 (new outlet shield-supported fuel bundles) confirming the UT results. (author). 5 refs., 8 figs

  15. Comparison of power Doppler and color Doppler ultrasonography in the detection of intrasticular blood flow of normal infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sung Ran; Lee, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Won Gyun; Youk, Dong Joon; Rho, Taek Soo; Lee, Min Jin; Lee, Sang Chun

    1999-01-01

    To compare color Doppler ultrasonography (US) and power Doppler US in the detection of intratesticular blood flow in normal infants and to asses the symmetry of blood flow. Testicular blood flow was assessed prospectively in 100 testes of 50 infants with both power and color Doppler US. We compared the power Doppler with color Doppler to detect intratesticular blood. When the flow was detected, intratesticular blood flow was graded as follows: grade 1: single intratesticular Doppler signal ; grade 2: multiple intratesticular Doppler signals. The symmetry of intratesticular flow was assessed by using the same method. Intratesticular flow was detected in 72 (72%) and 68 (68%) testes on power and color Doppler US, respectively. In 76 testes (76%), intratesticular flow was detected in either one or both techniques. On power Doppler US, grade 1 was seen in 40 tests and grade 2 in 32 testes. On color Doppler US, grade 1 was noted in 52 testes and grade 2 in 16 testes. Testicular blood flow was symmetric on both power and color Doppler US in each patient. There was no difference between power Doppler and color Doppler ultrasonography in detecting intratesticular blood flow in normal infants.

  16. Three-dimensional flow phenomena in a wire-wrapped 37-pin fuel bundle for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Ho; Yoo, Jin; Lee, Kwi Lim; Ha, Kwi Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Three-dimensional flow phenomena in a wire-wrapped 37-pin fuel assembly mock-up of a Japanese loop-type sodium-cooled fast reactor, Monju, were investigated with a numerical analysis using a general-purpose commercial computational fluid dynamics code, CFX. Complicated and vortical flow phenomena in the wire-wrapped 37-pin fuel assembly were captured by a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow simulation using a shear stress transport turbulence model. The main purpose of the current study is to understand the three-dimensional complex flow phenomena in a wire-wrapped fuel assembly to support the license issue for the core design. Computational fluid dynamics results show good agreement with friction factor correlation models. The secondary flow in the corner and edge subchannels is much stronger than that in an interior subchannel. The axial velocity averaged in the corner and edge subchannels is higher than that averaged in the interior subchannels. Three-dimensional multiscale vortex structures start to be formed by an interaction between secondary flows around each wire-wrapped pin. Behavior of the large-scale vortex structures in the corner and edge subchannels is closely related to the relative position between the hexagonal duct wall and the helically wrapped wire spacer. The small-scale vortex is axially developed in the interior subchannels. Furthermore, a driving force on each wire spacer surface is closely related to the relative position between the hexagonal duct wall and the wire spacer.

  17. Development of 3-D Flow Analysis Code for Fuel Assembly using Unstructured Grid System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook; Kim, Jong Eun; Ahn, Jong Ki; Yang, Seung Yong [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The flow through a nuclear rod bundle with mixing vanes are very complex and required a suitable turbulence model to be predicted accurately. Final objective of this study is to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system. In order to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system, the following researches are made: - Development of numerical algorithm for CFD code's solver - Grid and geometric connectivity data - Development of software(PowerCFD code) for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system - Modulation of software(PowerCFD code) - Development of turbulence model - Development of analysis module of RANS/LES hybrid models - Analysis of turbulent flow and heat transfer - Basic study on LES analysis - Development of main frame on pre/post processors based on GUI - Algorithm for fully-developed flow.

  18. Development of 3-D Flow Analysis Code for Fuel Assembly using Unstructured Grid System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myong, Hyon Kook; Kim, Jong Eun; Ahn, Jong Ki; Yang, Seung Yong

    2007-03-01

    The flow through a nuclear rod bundle with mixing vanes are very complex and required a suitable turbulence model to be predicted accurately. Final objective of this study is to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system. In order to develop a CFD code for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system, the following researches are made: - Development of numerical algorithm for CFD code's solver - Grid and geometric connectivity data - Development of software(PowerCFD code) for fluid flow and heat transfer analysis in a nuclear fuel assembly using unstructured grid system - Modulation of software(PowerCFD code) - Development of turbulence model - Development of analysis module of RANS/LES hybrid models - Analysis of turbulent flow and heat transfer - Basic study on LES analysis - Development of main frame on pre/post processors based on GUI - Algorithm for fully-developed flow

  19. Experimental study of a reverse flow catalytic converter for a duel fuel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B.; Checkel, M. D. [Alberta Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Edmonton, ANB (Canada); Hayes, R. E. [Alberta Univ., Dept, of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Edmonton, AB, (Canada)

    2001-08-01

    Performance of a reverse flow catalytic converter for a methane/diesel dual fuel engine is evaluated under steady and transient engine conditions. The converter is of the monolith honeycomb type with palladium catalyst washcoat. Results of the reverse flow converter's performance was found to be superior for several steady state engine operations when compared to unidirectional flow operation. In transient operations following a step change in engine operating conditions, reverse flow was found to be better than unidirectional flow when the change in engine operation was such as to reduce the exhaust gas temperature. When exhaust gas temperature was increased, reverse flow decreased the rate of increase in the reactor temperature. Testing was done using the transient Japanese 6-Mode tests. Best results were achieved with a switch time in the five seconds to fifteen seconds range. 31 refs., 9 tabs., 24 figs.

  20. Material Flow Analysis of Fossil Fuels in China during 2000–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Dai, Jing; Su, Meirong

    2012-01-01

    Since the relationship between the supply and demand of fossil fuels is on edge in the long run, the contradiction between the economic growth and limited resources will hinder the sustainable development of the Chinese society. This paper aims to analyze the input of fossil fuels in China during 2000–2010 via the material flow analysis (MFA) that takes hidden flows into account. With coal, oil, and natural gas quantified by MFA, three indexes, consumption and supply ratio (C/S ratio), resource consumption intensity (RCI), and fossil fuels productivity (FFP), are proposed to reflect the interactions between population, GDP, and fossil fuels. The results indicated that in the past 11 years, China's requirement for fossil fuels has been increasing continuously because of the growing mine productivity in domestic areas, which also leads to a single energy consumption structure as well as excessive dependence on the domestic exploitation. It is advisable to control the fossil fuels consumption by energy recycling and new energy facilities' popularization in order to lead a sustainable access to nonrenewable resources and decrease the soaring carbon emissions. PMID:23365525

  1. Material flow analysis of fossil fuels in China during 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Dai, Jing; Su, Meirong

    2012-01-01

    Since the relationship between the supply and demand of fossil fuels is on edge in the long run, the contradiction between the economic growth and limited resources will hinder the sustainable development of the Chinese society. This paper aims to analyze the input of fossil fuels in China during 2000-2010 via the material flow analysis (MFA) that takes hidden flows into account. With coal, oil, and natural gas quantified by MFA, three indexes, consumption and supply ratio (C/S ratio), resource consumption intensity (RCI), and fossil fuels productivity (FFP), are proposed to reflect the interactions between population, GDP, and fossil fuels. The results indicated that in the past 11 years, China's requirement for fossil fuels has been increasing continuously because of the growing mine productivity in domestic areas, which also leads to a single energy consumption structure as well as excessive dependence on the domestic exploitation. It is advisable to control the fossil fuels consumption by energy recycling and new energy facilities' popularization in order to lead a sustainable access to nonrenewable resources and decrease the soaring carbon emissions.

  2. A Development of Technical Specification of a Research Reactor with Plate Fuels Cooled by Upward Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sujin; Kim, Jeongeun; Kim, Hyeonil

    2016-01-01

    The contents of the TS(Technical Specifications) are definitions, safety limits, limiting safety system settings, limiting conditions for operation, surveillance requirements, design features, and administrative controls. TS for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) have been developed since many years until now. On the other hands, there are no applicable modernized references of TS for research reactors with many differences from NPPs in purpose and characteristics. Fuel temperature and Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) are being used as references from the thermal-hydraulic analysis point of view for determining whether the design of research reactors satisfies acceptance criteria for the nuclear safety or not. Especially for research reactors using plate-type fuels, fuel temperature and critical heat flux, however, are very difficult to measure during the reactor operation. This paper described the outline of main contents of a TS for open-pool research reactor with plate-type fuels using core cooling through passive systems, where acceptance criteria for nuclear safety such as CHF and fuel temperature cannot be directly measured, different from circumstances in NPPs. Thus, three independent variables instead of non-measurable acceptance criteria: fuel temperature and CHF are considered as safety limits, i.e., power, flow, and flow temperature

  3. Design of flow-field patterns for proton exchange membrane fuel cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosli, M.I.; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that produce electricity at high efficiency without combustion. Fuel cells are emerging as viable candidates as power sources in many applications, including road vehicles, small-scale power stations, and possibly even portable electronics. This paper addresses the design of flow-field patterns for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC is a low-temperature fuel cell, in which a proton conductive polymer membrane is used as the electrolyte. In PEMFC, flow-field pattern is one important thing that effects the performance of PEMFC. This paper present three types of flow-field pattern that will be consider to be testing using CFD analysis and by experimental. The design look detail on to their shape and dimension to get the best pattern in term of more active electrode area compare to electrode area that will be used. Another advantage and disadvantage for these three type of flow-field patterns from literature also compared in this paper

  4. Low stoichiometry operation of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, Madeleine; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cell operation on dry reactant gases under low stoichiometry conditions employing the interdigitated flow field is investigated using a multi-fluid model. It is assumed that the MEA contains a water uptake layer which facilitates water absorption to the membrane and hence prevents the anode...

  5. Model-based Fuel Flow Control for Fossil-fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemczyk, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    -fired power plants represent the largest reserve of such controllable power sources in several countries. However, their production take-up rates are limited, mainly due to poor fuel flow control. The thesis presents analysis of difficulties and potential improvements in the control of the coal grinding...

  6. Flow channel shape optimum design for hydroformed metal bipolar plate in PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin; Liu, Dong' an; Hu, Peng [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ni, Jun [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Bipolar plate is one of the most important and costliest components of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Micro-hydroforming is a promising process to reduce the manufacturing cost of PEM fuel cell bipolar plates made of metal sheets. As for hydroformed bipolar plates, the main defect is the rupture because of the thinning of metal sheet during the forming process. The flow channel section decides whether high quality hydroformed bipolar plates can be successively achieved or not. Meanwhile, it is also the key factor that is related with the reaction efficiency of the fuel cell stacks. In order to obtain the optimum flow channel section design prior the experimental campaign, some key geometric dimensions (channel depth, channel width, rib width and transition radius) of flow channel section, which are related with both reaction efficiency and formability, are extracted and parameterized as the design variables. By design of experiments (DOE) methods and an adoptive simulated annealing (ASA) optimization method, an optimization model of flow channel section design for hydroformed metal bipolar plate is proposed. Optimization results show that the optimum dimension values for channel depth, channel width, rib width and transition radius are 0.5, 1.0, 1. 6 and 0.5 mm, respectively with the highest reaction efficiency (79%) and the acceptable formability (1.0). Consequently, their use would lead to improved fuel cell efficiency for low cost hydroformed metal bipolar plates. (author)

  7. Normal and compact spent fuel storage in light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenel, R.R.

    1978-01-01

    The compact storage of light water reactor spent fuel is a safe, cheap and reliable contribution towards overcoming the momentarily existing shortage in spent fuel reprocessing. The technical concept is described and physical behaviour discussed. The introduction of compact storage racks in nuclear power plants increases the capacity from 100 to about 240 %. The increase in decay heat is not more than about 14%, the increase in activity inventory and hazard potential does not exceed 20%. In most cases the existing power plant equipment fulfils the new requirements. (author)

  8. Flow measurement by Laser Doppler Anemometry in a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehoe, A.

    1984-12-01

    Development of a Laser Doppler Anemometer measurement system and its operation are examined in this research. The system is designed for flow measurement in laboratory models of nuclear fuel assemblies. Use of the system is demonstrated by measuring turbulent velocity profiles in the laboratory model at full scale reactor flow rates. The reactors at the Savanah River Plant (SRP) are heavy water moderated and operate at low temperatures and pressures. Reactor power is currently limited by the temperature of the water in the nuclear fuel assembly. These temperature limits are conservatively calculated without allowing for any turbulent mixing. This research incorporates the design, fabriction and operation of a plexiglas model fuel assembly for the purpose of making turbulent velocity measurement via a Laser Doppler Anemometer System

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic cross flow core and manifolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention discloses a monolithic core construction having the flow passageways for the fuel and for the oxidant gases extended transverse to one another, whereby full face core manifolding can be achieved for these gases and their reaction products. The core construction provides that only anode material surround each fuel passageway and only cathode material surround each oxidant passageway, each anode and each cathode further sandwiching at spaced opposing sides electrolyte and interconnect materials to define electrolyte and interconnect walls. Webs of the cathode and anode material hold the electrolyte and interconnect walls spaced apart to define the flow passages. The composite anode and cathode wall structures are further alternately stacked on one another (with the separating electrolyte or interconnect material typically being a single common layer) whereby the fuel passageway and the oxidant passageways are disposed transverse to one another

  10. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-15

    This well-illustrated, comprehensive dissertation by Dr. Ing. Denis Kramer takes an in-depth look at polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) and the possibilities for their application. First of all, the operating principles of polymer electrolyte fuel cells are described and discussed, whereby thermodynamics aspects and loss mechanisms are examined. The mass transport diagnostics made with respect to the function of the cells are discussed. Field flow geometry, gas diffusion layers and, amongst other things, liquid distribution, the influence of flow direction and the low-frequency behaviour of air-fed PEFCs are discussed. Direct methanol fuel cells are examined, as are the materials chosen. The documentation includes comprehensive mathematical and graphical representations of the mechanisms involved.

  11. Tracking of fuel particles after pin failure in nominal, loss-of-flow and shutdown conditions in the MYRRHA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckingham, Sophia; Planquart, Philippe [von Karman Institute, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, B-1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Van Tichelen, Katrien [SCK- CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Quantification of the design and safety of the MYRRHA reactor in the event of a pin failure. • Simulation of different accident scenarios in both forced and natural convection regime. • The accumulation areas at the free-surface in case of the least dense particles depend on the flow regime. • The densest particles form an important deposit at the bottom of the vessel. • Further study of the risk of core blockage requires a detailed model of the core. - Abstract: This work on fuel dispersion aims at quantifying the design and safety of the MYRRHA nuclear reactor. A number of accidents leading to the release of a secondary phase into the primary coolant loop are investigated. Among these scenarios, an incident leading to the failure of one or more of the fuel pins is simulated while the reactor is operating in nominal conditions, but also in natural convection regime either during accident transients such as loss-of-flow or during the normal shut-down of the reactor. Two single-phase CFD models of the MYRRHA reactor are constructed in ANSYS Fluent to represent the reactor in nominal and natural convection conditions. An Euler–Lagrange approach with one-way coupling is used for the flow and particle tracking. Firstly, a steady state RANS solution is obtained for each of the three conditions. Secondly, the particles are released downstream from the core outlet and particle distributions are provided over the coolant circuit. Their size and density are defined such that test cases represent potential extremes that may occur. Analysis of the results highlights different particle behaviors, depending essentially on gravity forces and kinematic effects. Statistical distributions highlight potential accumulation regions that may form at the free-surfaces, on top of the upper diaphragm plate or at the bottom of the vessel. These results help to localize regions of fuel accumulation in order to provide insight for development of strategies for

  12. LES and experimental studies of cold and reacting flow in a swirled partially remixed burner with and without fuel modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengissen, A.X.; van Kampen, J.F.; Huls, R.A.; Stoffels, Genie G.M.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Poinsot, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    In devices where air and fuel are injected separately, combustion processes are influenced by oscillations of the air flow rate but may also be sensitive to fluctuations of the fuel flow rate entering the chamber. This paper describes a joint experimental and numerical study of the mechanisms

  13. Exponential relationship between DMIPP uptake and blood flow in normal and ischemic canine myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comans, E.F.I.; Lingen, A. van; Bax, J.J.; Sloof, G.W. [Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Visser, F.C. [Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Cardiology; Vusse, G.J. van der [Limburg Univ., Maastricht (Netherlands). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Knapp, F.F. Jun. [Oak Ridge Lab., TN (United States). Nuclear Medicine Group

    1998-12-31

    In 10 open-chest dogs the left anterior descending coronary artery was cannulated and extracorporally bypass (ECB) perfused at reduced flow. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was assessed with Scandium-46 labeled microspheres. Forty minutes after i.v. injection of DMIPP, the heart was excised and cut into 120 samples. In each sample MBF (ml/g*min) and DMIPP uptake (percentage of the injected dose per gram: %id/g) were assessed. The relation between normalized MBF and DMIPP uptake was assessed using a linear, with a zero and with a non-zero intercept, and an exponential model function: A[1-e{sup -MBF/Fc}], where A and Fc are the amplitude and flow constant, respectively. The goodness of fit for all models was expressed as the standard error of estimate (SEE). In all individual dogs the relation between DMIPP uptake and MBF was significantly better (p<0.001) represented by an exponential model than a linear model with zero intercept. In 8 of 10 dogs the exponential model showed a better fit than the linear model with a non-zero intercept. The difference was significant (p<0.05) in 5 dogs. For Pooled data, linear regression analysis with a non-zero intercept revealed: DMIPP=0.54+0.44*MBF (SEE: 0.18) and with a zero intercept: DMIPP=0.97*MBF (SEE: 0.27). The goodness of fit of the exponential model: DMIPP=1.07[1-e{sup -MBF/0.35}] (SEE: 0.15) was significantly better (p<0.0001) than the linear models. In the normal to low MBF range, uptake of the dimenthyl branched fatty acid analogue DMIPP shows an exponential relationship, which is more appropriate than a linear relationship from a physiological point of view. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] An 10 Hunden mit eroeffnetem Brustkorb wurde der Ramus interventricularis anterior der linken Koronararterie kanueliert und ueber einen extrakorporalen Bypass (ECB) mit einem reduzierten Fluss perfundiert. Der myokardiale Blutfluss (MBF) wurde ueber Scandium-46-markierte Mikrosphaeren erfasst. Vierzig Minuten nach der iv. Injektion von DMIPP wurde

  14. 4D flow MRI assessment of right atrial flow patterns in the normal heart - influence of caval vein arrangement and implications for the patent foramen ovale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehill D Parikh

    Full Text Available To investigate atrial flow patterns in the normal adult heart, to explore whether caval vein arrangement and patency of the foramen ovale (PFO may be associated with flow pattern.Time-resolved, three-dimensional velocity encoded magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow was employed to assess atrial flow patterns in thirteen healthy subjects (6 male, 40 years, range 25-50 and thirteen subjects (6 male, 40 years, range 21-50 with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale (CS-PFO. Right atrial flow was defined as vortical, helico-vortical, helical and multiple vortices. Time-averaged and peak systolic and diastolic flows in the caval and pulmonary veins and their anatomical arrangement were compared.A spectrum of right atrial flow was observed across the four defined categories. The right atrial flow patterns were strongly associated with the relative position of the caval veins. Right atrial flow patterns other than vortical were more common (p = 0.015 and the separation between the superior and inferior vena cava greater (10±5mm versus 3±3mm, p = 0.002 in the CS-PFO group. In the left atrium all subjects except one had counter-clockwise vortical flow. Vortex size varied and was associated with left lower pulmonary vein flow (systolic r = 0.61, p = 0.001, diastolic r = 0.63 p = 0.002. A diastolic vortex was less common and time-averaged left atrial velocity was greater in the CS-PFO group (17±2cm/sec versus 15±1, p = 0.048. One CS-PFO subject demonstrated vortical retrograde flow in the descending aortic arch; all other subjects had laminar descending aortic flow.Right atrial flow patterns in the normal heart are heterogeneous and are associated with the relative position of the caval veins. Patterns, other than 'typical' vortical flow, are more prevalent in the right atrium of those with cryptogenic stroke in the context of PFO. Left atrial flow patterns are more homogenous in normal hearts and show a relationship with flow arising from the left

  15. Comparing characteristics and clinical and echocardiographic outcomes in low-flow vs normal-flow severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction in an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngiam, Jinghao Nicholas; Tan, Benjamin Yong-Qiang; Sia, Ching-Hui; Lee, Glenn K M; Kong, William K F; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2017-05-01

    In severe aortic stenosis (AS), deterioration of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to 50%) and with paired echocardiography were studied. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified factors associated with LVEF deterioration. Clinical outcomes were determined on follow-up for more than 5 years. Significant LVEF deterioration (to <50%) was seen in 18% of low-flow (initial LVEF 63±8% to 32±9%) and 18% of normal-flow AS (61±7% to 31±12%). Independent factors in low-flow AS were hypertension (OR: 30.7, 95% CI: 2.0-467.6, P=.014) and higher end-systolic wall stress (OR: 1.086, 95% CI: 1.022-1.153, P=.008), compared to normal-flow, which were hypertension (OR: 15.9, 95% CI: 3.1-81.9, P=.001), higher septal E/E' ratio (OR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.01-1.35, P=.043), lower septal S' velocity (OR: 0.204, 95% CI: 0.061-0.682, P=.010), and higher end-systolic wall stress (OR: 1.051, 95% CI: 1.001-1.104, P=.047). Overall, a third of the cohort experienced MACE, regardless of flow (log-rank 0.048, P=.827). However, aortic valve replacement (AVR) rates were lower in low-flow AS (20% vs 43%, P=.005). Low-flow AS despite normal LVEF appears similar to normal-flow in terms of LVEF deterioration and clinical outcomes in our Asian population. AVR rate was lower even though low-flow may not reflect less severe disease. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The post irradiation examination of fuel in support of Bruce A nuclear division fueling with flow program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montin, J.; Sagat, S.; Day, R.; Novak, J.; Bromfield, H.

    1995-01-01

    Bruce A Nuclear Division (BAND) units are operating at ∼ 75% of full power, because of the potential of a power pulse in the event of an inlet header break. As a result, BAND is converting to fueling with flow, to eliminate the potential of a power pulse and to allow for full-power operation. Concerns regarding the integrity of the end-of-life (EOL) bundles interacting with the latch at the downstream end of the fuel channel were raised. BAND carried out a test program in which EOL bundles in the upstream position 13 of Unit 2 were cascaded into the downstream latch position 1 of another channel. Six of twelve cascaded bundles and two typical EOL position 13 (benchmark) bundles were selected for post-irradiation examination (PIE). Incipient cracks were found in the assembly welds (endplateto-endcap welds) of all six cascaded bundles. No incipient cracks were found in the benchmark bundles. Metallographic and fractographic examination, along with crack dating, and hydrogen and deuterium analyses, indicated that the incipient cracks were the result of delayed-hydride assisted cracking at the EOL. Consequently, Ontario Hydro changed the design of the outlet shield plug to support all three rings of the fuel bundle, to minimize stress and prevent endplate cracking. Also, an ultrasonic endplate inspection tool (UT) was developed and located in the fuel bay. to inspect fuelbundle endplates for cracks. A second test was done involving a series of four bundle cascades in BAND Unit 4 channels that had new outlet shield plugs. The latch bundles were discharged after a hot shutdown. The cascaded Unit 2 and Unit 4 latch bundles were checked for cracks using the UT. The PIE found incipient cracks or less-than-ideal welds in the assembly welds of fuel elements from Unit 2 (latch-supported fuel bundles) that had been identified by the UT as having incipient cracks. No incipient cracks were found in the assembly welds of fuel elements from Unit 4 (new outlet shield

  17. Computer simulation of fuel behavior during loss-of-flow accidents in a gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    The sequence of events in a loss-of-flow accident without reactor shutdown in a gas-cooled fast breeder reactor is strongly influenced by the manner in which the fuel deforms. In order to predict the mode of initial gross fuel deformation, welling, melting or cracking, a thermomechanical computer simulation program was developed. Methods and techniques used make the simulation an economical, efficient, and flexible engineering tool. An innovative application of the enthalpy model within a finite difference scheme is used to caculate temperatures in the fuel rod. The method of successive elastic solutions is used to calculate the thermoelastic-creep response. Calculated stresses are compared with a brittle-fracture stress criterion. An independent computer code is used to calculate fission-gas-induced fuel swelling. Results obtained with the computer simulation indicate that swelling is not a mode of initial fuel deformation. Faster transients result in fuel melting, while slower transients result in fuel cracking. For investigated faster coolant flow coastdowns with time constants of 1 second and 10 seconds, compressive stresses in the outer radial portion of the fuel limit fuel swelling and inhibit fuel cracking. For a slower coolant flow coastdown with a 300 second time constant, tensile stresses in the outer radial portion of the fuel induce early fuel cracking before any melting or significant fuel swelling has occurred. Suggestions for further research are discussed. A derived noniterative solution for mechanics calculations may offer an order of magnitude decrease in computational effort

  18. Gravity-driven flow and heat transfer in a spent nuclear fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The GFLOW code analyzes a three-dimensional rectangular porous medium by dividing the porous medium into a number of nodes or cells specified by the user. The finite difference form of the fluid conservation equations is solved for each node by application of a modified ''marker and cell'' numerical technique. The existence of spent nuclear fuel in any node is modeled by using a porosity value less than unity in that node and by including a surface heat transfer term in the fluid energy equation. In addition, local pressure losses due to grid spaces or other planar flow obstructions can be modeled by local loss coefficients. Heat conduction in the fuel is simulated by a fast running implicit finite difference model of the fuel, gap, and clad regions of the fuel rod

  19. Heat and mass transfer of a fuel droplet evaporating in oscillatory flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangi, M.; Kobayashi, H.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical study of the heat and mass transfer from an evaporating fuel droplet in oscillatory flow was performed. The flow was assumed to be laminar and axisymmetric, and the droplet was assumed to maintain its spherical shape during its lifetime. Based on these assumptions, the conservation equations in a general curvilinear coordinate were solved numerically. The behaviors of droplet evaporation in the oscillatory flow were investigated by analyzing the effects of flow oscillation on the evaporation process of a n-heptane fuel droplet at high pressure. The response of the time history of the square of droplet diameter and space-averaged Nusselt numbers to the main flow oscillation were investigated in frequency band of 1-75 Hz with various oscillation amplitudes. Results showed that, depending on the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation, there are different modes of response of the evaporation process to the flow oscillation. One response mode is synchronous with the main flow oscillation, and thus the quasi-steady condition is attained. Another mode is asynchronous with the flow oscillation and is highly unsteady. As for the evaporation rate, however, in all conditions is more greatly enhanced in oscillatory flow than in quiescent air. To quantify the conditions of the transition from quasi-steady to unsteady, the response of the boundary layer around the droplet surface to the flow oscillation was investigated. The results led to including the oscillation Strouhal number as a criteria for the transition. The numerical results showed that at a low Strouhal number, a quasi-steady boundary layer is formed in response to the flow oscillation, whereas by increasing the oscillation Strouhal number, the phenomena become unsteady.

  20. Opposed-flow Flame Spread Over Solid Fuels in Microgravity: the Effect of Confined Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangfeng; Hu, Jun; Xiao, Yuan; Ren, Tan; Zhu, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Effects of confined spaces on flame spread over thin solid fuels in a low-speed opposing flow is investigated by combined use of microgravity experiments and computations. The flame behaviors are observed to depend strongly on the height of the flow tunnel. In particular, a non-monotonic trend of flame spread rate versus tunnel height is found, with the fastest flame occurring in the 3 cm high tunnel. The flame length and the total heat release rate from the flame also change with tunnel height, and a faster flame has a larger length and a higher heat release rate. The computation analyses indicate that a confined space modifies the flow around the spreading flame. The confinement restricts the thermal expansion and accelerates the flow in the streamwise direction. Above the flame, the flow deflects back from the tunnel wall. This inward flow pushes the flame towards the fuel surface, and increases oxygen transport into the flame. Such a flow modification explains the variations of flame spread rate and flame length with tunnel height. The present results suggest that the confinement effects on flame behavior in microgravity should be accounted to assess accurately the spacecraft fire hazard.

  1. Scaling of normalized mean energy and scalar dissipation rates in a turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Antonia, Robert Anthony

    2011-05-01

    Non-dimensional parameters for the mean energy and scalar dissipation rates Cɛ and Cɛθ are examined using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data obtained in a fully developed turbulent channel flow with a passive scalar (Pr = 0.71) at several values of the Kármán (Reynolds) number h+. It is shown that Cɛ and Cɛθ are approximately equal in the near-equilibrium region (viz., y+ = 100 to y/h = 0.7) where the production and dissipation rates of either the turbulent kinetic energy or scalar variance are approximately equal and the magnitudes of the diffusion terms are negligibly small. The magnitudes of Cɛ and Cɛθ are about 2 and 1 in the logarithmic and outer regions, respectively, when h+ is sufficiently large. The former value is about the same for the channel, pipe, and turbulent boundary layer, reflecting the similarity between the mean velocity and temperature distributions among these three canonical flows. The latter value is, on the other hand, about twice as large as in homogeneous isotropic turbulence due to the existence of the large-scale u structures in the channel. The behaviour of Cɛ and Cɛθ impacts on turbulence modeling. In particular, the similarity between Cɛ and Cɛθ leads to a simple relation for the scalar variance to turbulent kinetic energy time-scale ratio, an important ingredient in the eddy diffusivity model. This similarity also yields a relation between the Taylor and Corrsin microscales and analogous relations, in terms of h+, for the Taylor microscale Reynolds number and Corrsin microscale Peclet number. This dependence is reasonably well supported by both the DNS data at small to moderate h+ and the experimental data of Comte-Bellot [Ph. D. thesis (University of Grenoble, 1963)] at larger h+. It does not however apply to a turbulent boundary layer where the mean energy dissipation rate, normalized on either wall or outer variables, is about 30% larger than for the channel flow.

  2. Extending the application range of a fuel performance code from normal operating to design basis accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, P.; Gyori, C.; Schubert, A.; Laar, J. van de; Hozer, Z.; Spykman, G.

    2008-01-01

    Two types of fuel performance codes are generally being applied, corresponding to the normal operating conditions and the design basis accident conditions, respectively. In order to simplify the code management and the interface between the codes, and to take advantage of the hardware progress it is favourable to generate a code that can cope with both conditions. In the first part of the present paper, we discuss the needs for creating such a code. The second part of the paper describes an example of model developments carried out by various members of the TRANSURANUS user group for coping with a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In the third part, the validation of the extended fuel performance code is presented for LOCA conditions, whereas the last section summarises the present status and indicates needs for further developments to enable the code to deal with reactivity initiated accident (RIA) events

  3. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C G van Bussel

    Full Text Available Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD, the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase, and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range. Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001 than the other indices (% given are relative reductions: %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074; Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074; FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016 and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038. Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv << 1, which (therefore does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  4. Ignition of an organic water-coal fuel droplet floating in a heated-air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Strizhak, P. A.; Shevyrev, S. A.; Bogomolov, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Ignition of an organic water-coal fuel (CWSP) droplet floating in a heated-air flow has been studied experimentally. Rank B2 brown-coal particles with a size of 100 μm, used crankcase Total oil, water, and a plasticizer were used as the main CWSP components. A dedicated quartz-glass chamber has been designed with inlet and outlet elements made as truncated cones connected via a cylindrical ring. The cones were used to shape an oxidizer flow with a temperature of 500-830 K and a flow velocity of 0.5-5.0 m/s. A technique that uses a coordinate-positioning gear, a nichrome thread, and a cutter element has been developed for discharging CWSP droplets into the working zone of the chamber. Droplets with an initial size of 0.4 to 2.0 mm were used. Conditions have been determined for a droplet to float in the oxidizer flow long enough for the sustainable droplet burning to be initiated. Typical stages and integral ignition characteristics have been established. The integral parameters (ignition-delay times) of the examined processes have been compared to the results of experiments with CWSP droplets suspended on the junction of a quick-response thermocouple. It has been shown that floating fuel droplets ignite much quicker than the ones that sit still on the thermocouple due to rotation of an CWSP droplet in the oxidizer flow, more uniform heating of the droplet, and lack of heat drainage towards the droplet center. High-speed video recording of the peculiarities of floatation of a burning fuel droplet makes it possible to complement the existing models of water-coal fuel burning. The results can be used for a more substantiated modeling of furnace CWSP burning with the ANSYS, Fluent, and Sigma-Flow software packages.

  5. Portal venous blood flow while breath-holding after inspiration or expiration and during normal respiration in controls and cirrhotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Kunihiro; Sasao, Ken-ichiro; Watanabe, Manabu

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure portal blood flow in 12 healthy controls and 17 cirrhotics while they were breath-holding after inspiration and after expiration. We then compared the results with measurements made during normal respiration in the healthy controls and cirrhotics. Blood flow in the main portal vein under basal fasting conditions was quantitated using the cine phase-contrast MR velocity mapping method. Three measurements were made on one occasion, as follows: throughout the cardiac cycle during normal respiration, with the subject breath-holding after maximal inspiration, and with the subject breath-holding after maximal expiration. During normal respiration, portal blood flow was 1.3±0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.0±0.1 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001); while subjects were breath-holding after inspiration, portal blood flow was 1.0±0.2 l/min in controls vs 0.9±0.1 l/min in cirrhotics; and while subjects were breath-holding after expiration, portal blood flow was 1.5±0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.1±0.2 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001). The differences were primarily due to changes in flow velocity. When the magnitude of these hemodynamic changes in the three respiratory conditions was compared in controls and cirrhotics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference (P<0.0001). In controls, portal blood flow decreased during maximal inspiration relative to flow during normal respiration (-24.6±8.3%). Changes in portal blood flow in controls were greater than in cirrhotics (-13.5±4.5%) (P<0.0001); however, the difference in blood flow increase associated with maximal expiration between the two groups (+11.8±9.4% vs +5.9±11.5%) was not significant. We found that the respiration-induced hemodynamic variation in portal blood flow was less in cirrhotics than in the healthy controls. Portal blood flow measurements made during normal respiration using MR imaging closely reflect nearly physiologic conditions

  6. Portal venous blood flow while breath-holding after inspiration or expiration and during normal respiration in controls and cirrhotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Kunihiro; Sasao, Ken-ichiro; Watanabe, Manabu [Saiseikai Wakakusa Hospital, Yakohama (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure portal blood flow in 12 healthy controls and 17 cirrhotics while they were breath-holding after inspiration and after expiration. We then compared the results with measurements made during normal respiration in the healthy controls and cirrhotics. Blood flow in the main portal vein under basal fasting conditions was quantitated using the cine phase-contrast MR velocity mapping method. Three measurements were made on one occasion, as follows: throughout the cardiac cycle during normal respiration, with the subject breath-holding after maximal inspiration, and with the subject breath-holding after maximal expiration. During normal respiration, portal blood flow was 1.3{+-}0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.0{+-}0.1 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001); while subjects were breath-holding after inspiration, portal blood flow was 1.0{+-}0.2 l/min in controls vs 0.9{+-}0.1 l/min in cirrhotics; and while subjects were breath-holding after expiration, portal blood flow was 1.5{+-}0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.1{+-}0.2 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001). The differences were primarily due to changes in flow velocity. When the magnitude of these hemodynamic changes in the three respiratory conditions was compared in controls and cirrhotics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference (P<0.0001). In controls, portal blood flow decreased during maximal inspiration relative to flow during normal respiration (-24.6{+-}8.3%). Changes in portal blood flow in controls were greater than in cirrhotics (-13.5{+-}4.5%) (P<0.0001); however, the difference in blood flow increase associated with maximal expiration between the two groups (+11.8{+-}9.4% vs +5.9{+-}11.5%) was not significant. We found that the respiration-induced hemodynamic variation in portal blood flow was less in cirrhotics than in the healthy controls. Portal blood flow measurements made during normal respiration using MR imaging closely reflect nearly

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  8. Esophageal blood flow in the cat. Normal distribution and effects of acid perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollwarth, M.E.; Smith, M.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    The radioactive microsphere technique was used to estimate blood flow to different regions of the esophagus and to adjacent regions of the stomach before and after perfusion of the esophagus with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) for 5 min. Under resting conditions total blood flow, as well as blood flow to the mucosal-submucosal layer and the muscular layer, to both sphincters was significantly higher than to the esophageal body. Blood flow to the adjacent regions of the stomach was significantly higher than esophageal blood flow. Acid perfusion resulted in a large increase in total blood flow in both sphincters and the lower esophageal body. Gastric blood flow was not altered by acid perfusion. The esophageal hyperemia resulted primarily from an increase in blood flow to the muscular layer; mucosal-submucosal blood flow was increased only in the lower esophageal sphincter. The present study indicates that short periods (5 min) of gastroesophageal reflux may increase esophageal blood flow

  9. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L; Irmukhadenov, Akhmadjon; Rasmussen, Lars M; Pecini, Redi; Øvrehus, Kristian A; Søndergård, Eva V; Marcussen, Niels; Dahl, Jordi S

    2017-12-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (gradient (≥40 mm Hg; normal-flow high-gradient AS) or low mean gradient (normal-flow low-gradient [NFLG] AS). The benefit of aortic valve replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal-flow high-gradient. In total, 33 patients (38%) had NFLG. Before AVR, they were characterized by similar symptom burden but less severe AS measured by aortic valve area index (0.50±0.09 versus 0.40±0.08 cm 2 /m 2 ; P gradient condition independently predicted change in LV mass index. Patients with NFLG had less severe AS and LV remodeling than patients with normal-flow high-gradient. Furthermore, NFLG patients experienced less reverse remodeling but the same symptomatic benefit. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02316587. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Differences in aortic vortex flow pattern between normal and patients with stroke: qualitative and quantitative assessment using transesophageal contrast echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jang-Won; Hong, Geu-Ru; Hong, Woosol; Kim, Minji; Houle, Helene; Vannan, Mani A; Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Chung, Namsik

    2016-06-01

    The flow in the aorta forms a vortex, which is a critical determinant of the flow dynamics in the aorta. Arteriosclerosis can alter the blood flow pattern of the aorta and cause characteristic alterations of the vortex. However, this change in aortic vortex has not yet been studied. This study aimed to characterize aortic vortex flow pattern using transesophageal contrast echocardiography in normal and stroke patients. A total of 85 patients who diagnosed with ischemic stroke and 16 normal controls were recruited for this study. The 16 normal control subjects were designated as the control group, and the 85 ischemic stroke patients were designated as the stroke group. All subjects underwent contrast transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and particle image velocimetry was used to assess aortic vortex flow. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of vortex flow morphology, location, phasic variation, and pulsatility were undertaken and compared between the groups. In the control group, multiple irregularly-shaped vortices were observed in a peripheral location in the descending thoracic aorta. In contrast, the stroke group had a single, round, merged, and more centrally located aortic vortex flow. In the quantitative analysis of vortex, vortex depth, which represents the location of the major vortex in the aorta, was significantly higher in the control group than in the stroke group (0.599 ± 0.159 vs. 0.522 ± 0.101, respectively, P = 0.013). Vortex relative strength, which is the pulsatility parameter of the vortex itself, was significantly higher in the stroke group than in the control group (0.367 ± 0.148 vs. 0.304 ± 0.087, respectively, P = 0.025). It was feasible to visualize and quantify the characteristic morphology and pulsatility of the aortic vortex flow using contrast TEE, and aortic vortex pattern significantly differed between normal and stroke patients.

  11. CONCHAS-SPRAY, Reactive Flows with Fuel Sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloutman, L.D.; Dukowicz, J.K.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Amsden, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Description of program or function: CONCHAS-SPRAY solves the equations of transient, multicomponent, chemically reactive fluid dynamics, together with those for the dynamics of an evaporating liquid spray. The program was developed with applications to internal combustion engines in mind. The formulation is spatially two-dimensional, and encompasses both planar and axisymmetric geometries. In the latter case, the flow is permitted to swirl about the axis of symmetry. CONCHAS-SPRAY is a time-marching, finite- difference program that uses a partially implicit numerical scheme. Spatial differences are formed with respect to a generalized two- dimensional mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals whose corner locations are specified functions of time. This feature allows a Lagrangian, Eulerian, or mixed description, and is particularly useful for representing curved or moving boundary surfaces. Arbitrary numbers of species and chemical reactions are allowed. The latter are subdivided into kinetic and equilibrium reactions, which are treated by different algorithms. A turbulent law-of-the-wall boundary layer option is provided. CONCHAS-SPRAY calls a number of LANL system subroutines to display graphic or numerical information on microfiche. These routines are not included, but are described in the reference report. Several routines called from LINPACK and SLATEC1.0 are included

  12. Modeling and simulation of PEM fuel cell's flow channels using CFD techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Edgar F.; Andrade, Alexandre B.; Robalinho, Eric; Bejarano, Martha L.M.; Linardi, Marcelo; Cekinski, Efraim

    2007-01-01

    Fuel cells are one of the most important devices to obtain electrical energy from hydrogen. The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) consists of two important parts: the Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA), where the reactions occur, and the flow field plates. The plates have many functions in a fuel cell: distribute reactant gases (hydrogen and air or oxygen), conduct electrical current, remove heat and water from the electrodes and make the cell robust. The cost of the bipolar plates corresponds up to 45% of the total stack costs. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) is a very useful tool to simulate hydrogen and oxygen gases flow channels, to reduce the costs of bipolar plates production and to optimize mass transport. Two types of flow channels were studied. The first type was a commercial plate by ELECTROCELL and the other was entirely projected at Programa de Celula a Combustivel (IPEN/CNEN-SP) and the experimental data were compared with modelling results. Optimum values for each set of variables were obtained and the models verification was carried out in order to show the feasibility of this technique to improve fuel cell efficiency. (author)

  13. Modeling and simulation of PEM fuel cell's flow channels using CFD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Edgar F.; Andrade, Alexandre B.; Robalinho, Eric; Bejarano, Martha L.M.; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: efcunha@ipen.br; abodart@ipen.br; eric@ipen.br; mmora@ipen.br; mlinardi@ipen.br; Cekinski, Efraim [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: cekinski@ipt.br

    2007-07-01

    Fuel cells are one of the most important devices to obtain electrical energy from hydrogen. The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) consists of two important parts: the Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA), where the reactions occur, and the flow field plates. The plates have many functions in a fuel cell: distribute reactant gases (hydrogen and air or oxygen), conduct electrical current, remove heat and water from the electrodes and make the cell robust. The cost of the bipolar plates corresponds up to 45% of the total stack costs. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) is a very useful tool to simulate hydrogen and oxygen gases flow channels, to reduce the costs of bipolar plates production and to optimize mass transport. Two types of flow channels were studied. The first type was a commercial plate by ELECTROCELL and the other was entirely projected at Programa de Celula a Combustivel (IPEN/CNEN-SP) and the experimental data were compared with modelling results. Optimum values for each set of variables were obtained and the models verification was carried out in order to show the feasibility of this technique to improve fuel cell efficiency. (author)

  14. Study of thermal hydraulic behavior of supercritical water flowing through fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, Sachin; Lakshmanan, S.P.; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Pandey, Manmohan

    2009-01-01

    Investigations on thermal-hydraulic behavior in Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) fuel assembly have obtained a significant attention in the international SCWR community because of its potential to obtain high thermal efficiency and compact design. Present work deals with CFD analysis to study the flow and heat transfer behavior of supercritical water in 4 metre long 7-pin fuel bundle using commercial CFD package ANSYS CFX for single phase steady state conditions. Considering the symmetric conditions, 1/12th part of the fuel rod bundle is taken as a domain of analysis. RNG K-epsilon model with scalable wall functions is used for modeling the turbulence behavior. Constant heat flux boundary condition is applied at the fuel rod surface. IAPWS equations of state are used to compute thermo-physical properties of supercritical water. Sharp variations in its thermo-physical properties (specific heat, density) are observed near the pseudo-critical temperature causing sharp change in heat transfer coefficient. The pseudo-critical point initially appears in the gaps among heated fuel rods, and then spreads radially outward reaching the adiabatic wall as the flow goes downstream. The enthalpy gain in the centre of the channel is much higher than that in the wall region. Non-uniformity in the circumferential distribution of surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient is observed which is in agreement with published literature. Heat transfer coefficient is high on the rod surface near the tight region and decreases as the distance between rod surfaces increases. (author)

  15. Analysis of fluid fuel flow to the neutron kinetics on molten salt reactor FUJI-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro, E-mail: indartaaji@s.itb.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Waris, Abdul, E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics & Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Molten Salt Reactor is a reactor are operating with molten salt fuel flowing. This condition interpret that the neutron kinetics of this reactor is affected by the flow rate of the fuel. This research analyze effect by the alteration velocity of the fuel by MSR type Fuji-12, with fuel composition LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4} respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Calculation process in this study is performed numerically by SOR and finite difference method use C programming language. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section for calculation process obtain from SRAC-CITATION (Standard thermal Reactor Analysis Code) and JENDL-4.0 data library. SRAC system designed and developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). This study aims to observe the effect of the velocity of fuel salt to the power generated from neutron precursors at fourth year of reactor operate (last critical condition) with number of multiplication effective; 1.0155.

  16. Analysis of fluid fuel flow to the neutron kinetics on molten salt reactor FUJI-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2015-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactor is a reactor are operating with molten salt fuel flowing. This condition interpret that the neutron kinetics of this reactor is affected by the flow rate of the fuel. This research analyze effect by the alteration velocity of the fuel by MSR type Fuji-12, with fuel composition LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 - 233 UF 4 respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Calculation process in this study is performed numerically by SOR and finite difference method use C programming language. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section for calculation process obtain from SRAC-CITATION (Standard thermal Reactor Analysis Code) and JENDL-4.0 data library. SRAC system designed and developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). This study aims to observe the effect of the velocity of fuel salt to the power generated from neutron precursors at fourth year of reactor operate (last critical condition) with number of multiplication effective; 1.0155

  17. Prediction of droplet deposition around BWR fuel spacer by FEM flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Morooka, Shinichi

    1997-01-01

    The critical power of the BWR fuel assembly has been remarkably increased. That increase mainly depends on the improvement of the spacer which keeps fixed gaps between fuel rods. So far, these improvements have been carried out on the basis of what developers consider to be appropriate and the results of mockup tests of the BWR fuel assembly. However, continued reliance on these approaches for the development of a higher performance fuel assembly will prove time-consuming and costly. Therefore, it is hoped that the spacer effects for the critical power can be investigated by computer simulation, and it is significantly important to develop the critical power prediction method. Direct calculation of the two-phase flow in a BWR fuel channel s still difficult. Accordingly, a new method for predicting the critical power was proposed. Our method consists of CFD (computer fluid dynamics) code based on the single-phase flow analysis method and the subchannel analysis code. To verify our method, the critical power predictions for various spacer geometries were performed. The predicted results of the critical power were compared with the experimental data. The result of the comparison showed a good agreement and the applicability of our method for various spacer geometries. (author)

  18. Mitral valve coaptation and its relationship to late diastolic flow: A color Doppler and vector flow map echocardiographic study in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrid, Mark V; Kushner, Josef; Yang, Georgiana; Ro, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Three competing theories about the mechanism of mitral coaptation in normal subjects were evaluated by color Doppler and vector flow mapping (VFM): (1) beginning of ventricular (LV) ejection, (2) "breaking of the jet" of diastolic LV inflow, and (3) returning diastolic vortices impacting the leaflets on their LV surfaces. We analyzed 80 color Doppler frames and 320 VFM measurements. In all 20 normal subjects, coaptation occurred before LV ejection, 78±16 ms before onset. On color Doppler frames the larger anterior, and smaller posterior vortices circle back and, in all cases, strike the ventricular surfaces of the leaflets. On the first closing-begins frame, for the first time, vortex velocity normal to the ventricular surface of the anterior leaflet (AML) is greater than that in the mitral orifice, and the angle of attack of LV vortical flow onto the AML is twice as high as the angle of flow onto the valve in orifice. Thus, at the moment coaptation begins, vortical flow strikes the mitral leaflet with higher velocity, and higher angle of attack than orifice flow, and thus with greater force. According to the "breaking of the jet" theory, one would expect to see de novo LV flow perpendicular to the leaflets beginning after transmitral flow terminates. Instead, the returning continuous LV vortical flow that impacts the valve builds continuously after the P-wave. Late diastolic vortices strike the ventricular surfaces of the mitral leaflets and contribute to valve coaptation, permitted by concomitant decline in transmitral flow. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Methods and data for HTGR fuel performance and radionuclide release modeling during normal operation and accidents for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.; Martin, R.C.; Moormann, R.

    1993-01-01

    The previous status report released in 1987 on reference data and calculation models for fission product transport in High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) safety analyses has been updated to reflect the current state of knowledge in the German HTGR program. The content of the status report has been expanded to include information from other national programs in HTGRs to provide comparative information on methods of analysis and the underlying database for fuel performance and fission product transport. The release and transport of fission products during normal operating conditions and during the accident scenarios of core heatup, water and air ingress, and depressurization are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Method for the determination of the equation of state of advanced fuels based on the properties of normal fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, M.J.; Catton, I.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1976-12-01

    An equation of state based on the properties of normal fluids, the law of rectilinear averages, and the second law of thermodynamics can be derived for advanced LMFBR fuels on the basis of the vapor pressure, enthalpy of vaporization, change in heat capacity upon vaporization, and liquid density at the melting point. The method consists of estimating an equation of state by means of the law of rectilinear averages and the second law of thermodynamics, integrating by means of the second law until an instability is reached, and then extrapolating by means of a self-consistent estimation of the enthalpy of vaporization

  1. Numerical simulation of ambient flow and thermal distributions in a spent fuel storage cask array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michener, T.; Trent, D.S.; Guttmann, J.; Bajwa, C.

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) analyzed the thermal performance of the Utah Private Fuel Storage (PFS) using the TEMPEST computational fluid dynamics software. A three-dimensional section of the PFS with a total of 20 casks was modeled to estimate the ambient flow and temperature distributions surrounding the casks. The purpose of this analysis was to compute the cask inlet vent air temperature to be used for boundary conditions in a detailed analysis of an individual Holtec Hi-Storm 100 cask using the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) thermal hydraulic computer software. (author)

  2. Dynamics of nuclear fuel assemblies in vertical flow channels: computer modelling and associated studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, V.A.; Pettigrew, M.J.; Lelli, G.; Kates, L.; Reimer, E.

    1978-10-01

    A computer model, designed to predict the dynamic behaviour of nuclear fuel assemblies in axial flow, is described in this report. The numerical methods used to construct and solve the matrix equations of motion in the model are discussed together with an outline of the method used to interpret the fuel assembly stability data. The mathematics developed for forced response calculations are described in detail. Certain structural and hydrodynamic modelling parameters must be determined by experiment. These parameters are identified and the methods used for their evaluation are briefly described. Examples of typical applications of the dynamic model are presented towards the end of the report. (author)

  3. Modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with variable distance gas flow in anode and cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Shahbudin Masdar; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    A number of fundamental studies have been directed towards increasing our understanding of PEM fuel cell and their performance. Mathematical modeling is one of the way and very essential component in the development of this fuel cell. Model validation is presented, the validated model is then used to investigate the behavior of mole fraction of gases, current density, and the performances of stack using polarization curve depending on distance gases flow in channel. The model incorporates a complete cell with both the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and the serpentine gas distributor channel. Finally, the parametric studies in single stack design are illustrated

  4. Modeling a Distributed Power Flow Controller with a PEM Fuel Cell for Power Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chakravorty

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrical power demand is increasing at a relatively fast rate over the last years. Because of this increasing demand the power system is becoming very complex. Both electric utilities and end users of electric power are becoming increasingly concerned about power quality. This paper presents a new concept of distributed power flow controller (DPFC, which has been implemented with a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. In this paper, a PEM fuel cell has been simulated in Simulink/MATLAB and then has been used in the proposed DPFC model. The new proposed DPFC model has been tested on a IEEE 30 bus system.

  5. Experimental study of fuel bundle vibrations with rods subjected to mixed axial flow and cross-flow provided by a narrow gap (baffle jetting interaction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, P.; Jacques, Y.; Fardeau, P.; Barbier, D.; Rigaudeau, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Hydraulic Core Laboratory (LHC) performs experimental studies of PWR fuel assembly mechanical behaviour submitted to representative flows in PWR core. Cross-flows prove particularly troublesome by generating on rods, in special cases, vibratory levels high enough to induce early grid to rod fretting. The fluid-structure interaction under mixed axial and cross-flow is also a major topic for analysis. The authors present a test loop devoted to the mixed axial-cross-flow fluid-structure interaction on representative half-scale mockup which is able to simulate, under ambient conditions, any complex flow (direction and flow rates) representative of PWR core flows. Despite its reduced size, the mockup retains the overall structure of a PWR fuel assembly. Rods displacement/velocity and velocity flow field are measured by laser techniques

  6. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad, E-mail: Anas@uniten.edu.my [Centre of Nuclear Energy, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector [School of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Civil Engineering (MACE), University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-29

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  7. Investigation of analytical methods in thermal stratification analysis. Evaluation of flow rates through flow holes for normal and scram conditions of 40% power operation with AQUA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Yoshihiro; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    1997-08-01

    Thermal stratification phenomena are observed in an upper plenum of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) under reactor scram conditions, which give rise to thermal stress on structural components. Therefore it is important to evaluate characteristics of phenomena in the design of the internal structure in an LMFBR plenum. To evaluate flow rates through flow holes of the prototype fast breeder reactor, MONJU, numerical analyses were carried out with AQUA code for normal and scram conditions with 40% power operation. Through comparison of analysis results and measured temperature, thermal stratification phenomena in 300 second period after the scram was evaluated. Flow rate through the upper flow holes, the lower flow holes and annular gap between the inner barrel and the reactor vessel were evaluated with the measured temperature and the analysis results individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. In-core fuel element temperature and flow measurment of HFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong; Jiang Pei

    1988-02-01

    The HFETR in-core fuel element temperature-flow measurement facility and its measurement system are expounded. The applications of the instrumented fuel element to stationary and transient states measurements during the lift of power, the operation test of all lifetime at first load, and the deepening burn-up test at second load are described. The method of determination of the hot point temperature under the fin is discussed. The error analysis is made. The fuel element out-of-pile water deprivation test is described. The development of this measurement facility and succesful application have made important contribution to high power and deep burn-up safe operation at two load, in-core fuel element irradiation, and varied investigation of HFETR. After operation at two loads, the integrated power of this instrumented fuel element arrives at 90.88 MWd, its maximum point burn-up is about 64.9%, so that the economy of fuel use of HFETR is raised very much

  9. Influence of Chemical Blends on Palm Oil Methyl Esters’ Cold Flow Properties and Fuel Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed M. Ali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative fuels, like biodiesel, are being utilized as a renewable energy source and an effective substitute for the continuously depleting supply of mineral diesel as they have similar combustion characteristics. However, the use of pure biodiesel as a fuel for diesel engines is currently limited due to problems relating to fuel properties and its relatively poor cold flow characteristics. Therefore, the most acceptable option for improving the properties of biodiesel is the use of a fuel additive. In the present study, the properties of palm oil methyl esters with increasing additive content were investigated after addition of ethanol, butanol and diethyl ether. The results revealed varying improvement in acid value, density, viscosity, pour point and cloud point, accompanied by a slight decrease in energy content with an increasing additive ratio. The viscosity reductions at 5% additive were 12%, 7%, 16.5% for ethanol, butanol and diethyl ether, respectively, and the maximum reduction in pour point was 5 °C at 5% diethyl ether blend. Engine test results revealed a noticeable improvement in engine brake power and specific fuel consumption compared to palm oil biodiesel and the best performance was obtained with diethyl ether. All the biodiesel-additive blend samples meet the requirements of ASTM D6751 biodiesel fuel standards for the measured properties.

  10. Multiple-indicator dilution technique for characterization of normal and retrograde flow in once-through rat liver perfusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St-Pierre, M.V.; Schwab, A.J.; Goresky, C.A.; Lee, W.F.; Pang, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of normal and retrograde rat liver perfusion has been widely used to probe zonal differences in drug-metabolizing activities. The validity of this approach mandates the same tissue spaces being accessed by substrates during both normal and retrograde perfusions. Using the multiple-indicator dilution technique, we presently examine the extent to which retrograde perfusion alters the spaces accessible to noneliminated references. A bolus dose of 51Cr-labeled red blood cells, 125I-albumin, 14C-sucrose and 3H2O was injected into the portal (normal) or hepatic (retrograde) vein of rat livers perfused at 10 ml per min per liver. The outflow perfusate was serially collected over 220 sec to characterize the transit times and the distribution spaces of the labels. During retrograde perfusion, red blood cells, albumin and sucrose profiles peaked later and lower than during normal perfusion, whereas the water curves were similar. The transit times of red blood cells, albumin and sucrose were longer (p less than 0.005), whereas those for water did not change. Consequently, retrograde flow resulted in significantly larger sinusoidal blood volumes (45%), albumin Disse space (42%) and sucrose Disse space (25%) than during normal flow, whereas the distribution spaces for total and intracellular water remained unaltered. The distension of the vascular tree was confirmed by electron microscopy, by which occasional isolated foci of widened intercellular recesses and spaces of Disse were observed. Cellular ultrastructure was otherwise unchanged, and there was no difference found between normal and retrograde perfusion for bile flow rates, AST release, perfusion pressure, oxygen consumption and metabolic removal of ethanol, a substrate with flow-limited distribution, which equilibrates rapidly with cell water (hepatic extraction ratios were virtually identical: normal vs. retrograde, 0.50 vs. 0.48 at 6 to 7.4 mM input concentration)

  11. Quantitative analysis of normal fetal brain volume and flow by three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Chun Hsu

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: 3D ultrasound can be used to assess the fetal brain volume and blood flow development quantitatively. Our study indicates that the fetal brain vascularization and blood flow correlates significantly with the advancement of GA. This information may serve as a reference point for further studies of the fetal brain volume and blood flow in abnormal conditions.

  12. A simple global representation for second-order normal forms of Hamiltonian systems relative to periodic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avendaño-Camacho, M; Vallejo, J A; Vorobjev, Yu

    2013-01-01

    We study the determination of the second-order normal form for perturbed Hamiltonians relative to the periodic flow of the unperturbed Hamiltonian H 0 . The formalism presented here is global, and can be easily implemented in any computer algebra system. We illustrate it by means of two examples: the Hénon–Heiles and the elastic pendulum Hamiltonians. (paper)

  13. Flow-regulated versus differential pressure-regulated shunt valves for adult patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Wetterslev, Jørn; Tisell, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Since 1965 many ventriculo-peritoneal shunt systems have been inserted worldwide to treat hydrocephalus. The most frequent indication in adults is normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), a condition that can be difficult to diagnose precisely. Surgical intervention with flow-regulated and differential...

  14. Biophysical properties of the normal-sized aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome: evaluation with MR flow mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenink, M.; de Roos, A.; Mulder, B. J.; Verbeeten, B.; Timmermans, J.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Spaan, J. A.; van der Wall, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) flow mapping in the assessment of aortic biophysical properties in patients with Marfan syndrome and to detect differences in biophysical properties in the normal-sized aorta distal to the aortic root between these patients and

  15. Endometrial blood flow measured by xenon 133 clearance in women with normal menstrual cycles and dysfunctional uterine bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, I.S.; McCarron, G.; Hutton, B.; Macey, D.

    1987-01-01

    Endometrial blood flow was measured through the menstrual cycle in nonpregnant women (28 studies of 17 women with normal menstrual cycles and 32 studies of 20 women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding) with use of a clearance technique in which 100 to 400 microCi of the gamma-emitting isotope, xenon 133 in saline solution was instilled into the uterine cavity. The mean (+/- SEM) endometrial blood flow in normal cycles was 27.7 +/- 2.6 ml/100 gm/min, with a significant elevation in the middle to late follicular phase, followed by a substantial fall and a secondary slow luteal phase rise that was maintained until the onset of menstruation. There was a significant correlation between plasma estradiol levels and endometrial blood flow in the follicular but not the luteal phase. Blood flow patterns in women with ovulatory dysfunctional bleeding were similar to normal, except for a significantly lower middle follicular rate. Women with anovulatory dysfunctional bleeding exhibited exceedingly variable flow rates

  16. Endometrial blood flow measured by xenon 133 clearance in women with normal menstrual cycles and dysfunctional uterine bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, I.S.; McCarron, G.; Hutton, B.; Macey, D.

    1987-01-01

    Endometrial blood flow was measured through the menstrual cycle in nonpregnant women (28 studies of 17 women with normal menstrual cycles and 32 studies of 20 women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding) with use of a clearance technique in which 100 to 400 microCi of the gamma-emitting isotope, xenon 133 in saline solution was instilled into the uterine cavity. The mean (+/- SEM) endometrial blood flow in normal cycles was 27.7 +/- 2.6 ml/100 gm/min, with a significant elevation in the middle to late follicular phase, followed by a substantial fall and a secondary slow luteal phase rise that was maintained until the onset of menstruation. There was a significant correlation between plasma estradiol levels and endometrial blood flow in the follicular but not the luteal phase. Blood flow patterns in women with ovulatory dysfunctional bleeding were similar to normal, except for a significantly lower middle follicular rate. Women with anovulatory dysfunctional bleeding exhibited exceedingly variable flow rates.

  17. Characterization of esophageal pressure-flow abnormalities in patients with non-obstructive dysphagia and normal manometry findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Omari, Taher I

    2013-06-01

    Patients with non-obstructive dysphagia (NOD) report symptoms of impaired esophageal bolus transit without evidence of bolus stasis. In such patients, manometric investigation may diagnose esophageal motility disorders; however, many have normal motor patterns. We hypothesized that patients with NOD would demonstrate evidence of high flow-resistance during bolus passage which in turn would relate to the reporting of bolus hold up perception. Esophageal pressure-impedance recordings of 5 mL liquid and viscous swallows from 18 NOD patients (11 male; 19-71 years) and 17 control subjects (9 male; 25-60 years) were analyzed. The relationship between intrabolus pressure and bolus flow timing in the esophagus was assessed using the pressure flow index (PFI). Bolus perception was assessed swallow by swallow using standardized descriptors. NOD patients were characterized by a higher PFI than controls. The PFI defined a pressure-flow abnormality in all patients who appeared normal based on the assessment esophageal motor patterns and bolus clearance. The PFI was higher for individual swallows during which subjects reported perception of bolus passage. Bolus flow-resistance is higher in NOD patients compared with controls as well as higher in relation to perception of bolus transit, suggesting the presence of an esophageal motility disorder despite normal findings on conventional analysis. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Highly conductive composites for fuel cell flow field plates and bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bor Z; Zhamu, Aruna; Song, Lulu

    2014-10-21

    This invention provides a fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate having flow channels on faces of the plate, comprising an electrically conductive polymer composite. The composite is composed of (A) at least 50% by weight of a conductive filler, comprising at least 5% by weight reinforcement fibers, expanded graphite platelets, graphitic nano-fibers, and/or carbon nano-tubes; (B) polymer matrix material at 1 to 49.9% by weight; and (C) a polymer binder at 0.1 to 10% by weight; wherein the sum of the conductive filler weight %, polymer matrix weight % and polymer binder weight % equals 100% and the bulk electrical conductivity of the flow field or bipolar plate is at least 100 S/cm. The invention also provides a continuous process for cost-effective mass production of the conductive composite-based flow field or bipolar plate.

  19. A numerical investigation of turbulent flow in an 18-plate nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, R.; Lightstone, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the fluid flow in the core of the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) was performed. The standard k - ε turbulence model together with a two-layer wall boundary model was used in the current study. A two-dimensional numerical model for the MNR 18-plate nuclear fuel assembly was developed using the advanced commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX-TASCflow. The numerical predictions were compared with experimental data for the MNR 18-plate assembly at the same flow conditions. In general, the code over predicts the pressure drop for the range of the mass flow rate investigated, however, the difference decreases as the mass flow rate (or Reynolds number) increases. Errors of less than 4% were obtained for mass flows greater than 4.0 kg/s. The comparison shows that the predicted flow distribution and velocities are very close to the measured data for the high Reynolds number flows. It is found that the k - ε model with the two-layer wall boundary model can predict the flow in the vertical parallel plate channels in the low Reynolds number region (Re=3000 to 10,000) very well. (author)

  20. Near limit flame spread over thick fuels in a concurrent forced flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Blasi, C.; Crescitelli, S.; Russo, G.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the ambient level of oxygen concentration on the flow assisted flame spread over thick solid fuels and the extinction of the fame is studied by means of numerical modeling. The pyrolysis spread rate decreases with the oxygen concentration, showing qualitative agreement with experimental data. In fact, as the oxygen level decreases, the flame temperature decreases, causing lower heat fluxes at the fuel surfaces and lower pyrolysis mass rates so that the spread process is slowed. The effects due to finite kinetics are of increasing importance as extinction is approached. These effects appear mainly at the upstream flame leading edge, where the extinction length (distance of the flame leading edge from the edge of the fuel slab) increases. However, the spread process continues, that is, the flame and pyrolysis lengths increase with time, until the pyrolysis spread rate is greater than the upstream extinction rate. Complete extinction occurs when the extinction distance extends to the position of the pyrolysis front

  1. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71

  2. A three-dimensional model of PEM fuel cells with serpentine flow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, P.T.; Berning, T.; Bang, M.; Djilali, N.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational model of PEM fuel cell with serpentine flow field channels is presented in this paper. This model presents a comprehensive account for all important transport phenomena in fuel cell such as heat transfer, mass transfer, electrode kinetics, and potential fields in the membrane and gas diffusion layers. A new approach of solving for the potential losses across the cell was also developed in this model. The dependency of local current density on oxygen concentration and activation overpotential is fully addressed in this model. The computational domain consists of serpentine gas flow channels, porous gas diffusion layers, catalyst layers, and a membrane. Results obtained from this model are in good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  3. Numerical investigation of flow field configuration and contact resistance for PEM fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Mohammad Hadi; Rismanchi, Behzad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran)

    2008-08-15

    A steady-state three-dimensional non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is presented. Conservation of mass, momentum, species, energy, and charge, as well as electrochemical kinetics are considered. In this model, the effect of interfacial contact resistance is also included. The numerical solution is based on a finite-volume method. In this study the effects of flow channel dimensions on the cell performance are investigated. Simulation results indicate that increasing the channel width will improve the limiting current density. However, it is observed that an optimum shoulder size of the flow channels exists for which the cell performance is the highest. Polarization curves are obtained for different operating conditions which, in general, compare favorably with the corresponding experimental data. Such a CFD model can be used as a tool in the development and optimization of PEM fuel cells. (author)

  4. Continuous-Flow Processes in Heterogeneously Catalyzed Transformations of Biomass Derivatives into Fuels and Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A. Romero

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuous flow chemical processes offer several advantages as compared to batch chemistries. These are particularly relevant in the case of heterogeneously catalyzed transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into valuable chemicals and fuels. This work is aimed to provide an overview of key continuous flow processes developed to date dealing with a series of transformations of platform chemicals including alcohols, furanics, organic acids and polyols using a wide range of heterogeneous catalysts based on supported metals, solid acids and bifunctional (metal + acidic materials.

  5. Modelling multiphase flow inside the porous media of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Transport processes inside polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are highly complex and involve convective and diffusive multiphase, multispecies flow through porous media along with heat and mass transfer and electrochemical reactions in conjunction with water transport through...... an electrolyte membrane. We will present a computational model of a PEMFC with focus on capillary transport of water through the porous layers and phase change and discuss the impact of the liquid phase boundary condition between the porous gas diffusion layer and the flow channels, where water droplets can...

  6. Determination of Critical Properties of Endothermic Hydrocarbon Fuel RP-3 Based on Flow Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The critical pressure and temperature of an endothermic hydrocarbon fuel RP-3 were determined by flow visualization. The flow pattern images of RP-3 at different pressures and temperatures were obtained. The critical pressure is identified by disappearance of the phase change while the critical temperature is determined by appearance of the opalescence phenomenon under the critical pressure. The opalescence phenomenon is unique to the critical point. The critical pressure and temperature of RP-3 are determined to be 2.3 MPa and 646 K, respectively.

  7. Combustion characteristics and turbulence modeling of swirling reacting flow in solid fuel ramjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Omer; Xiong, Chen; Changsheng, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    This paper reviews the historical studies have been done on the solid-fuel ramjet engine and difficulties associated with numerical modeling of swirling flow with combustible gases. A literature survey about works related to numerical and experimental investigations on solid-fuel ramjet as well as using swirling flow and different numerical approaches has been provided. An overview of turbulence modeling of swirling flow and the behavior of turbulence at streamline curvature and system rotation are presented. A new and simple curvature/correction factor is proposed in order to reduce the programming complexity of SST-CC turbulence model. Finally, numerical and experimental investigations on the impact of swirling flow on SFRJ have been carried out. For that regard, a multi-physics coupling code is developed to solve the problems of multi-physics coupling of fluid mechanics, solid pyrolysis, heat transfer, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. The connected-pipe test facility is used to carry out the experiments. The results showed a positive impact of swirling flow on SFRJ along with, three correlations are proposed.

  8. Salt flow direction and velocity during subsalt normal faulting and syn-kinematic sedimentation—implications from analytical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsitzka, M.; Kukowski, N.; Kley, J.

    2018-04-01

    Salt flow induced by subsalt normal faulting is mainly controlled by tilting of the salt layer, the amount of differential loading due to syn-kinematic deposition, and tectonic shearing at the top or the base of the salt layer. Our study addresses the first two mechanisms and aims to examine salt flow patterns above a continuously moving subsalt normal fault and beneath a syn-kinematic minibasin. In such a setting, salt either tends to flow down towards the basin centre driven by its own weight or is squeezed up towards the footwall side owing to loading differences between the minibasin and the region above the footwall block. Applying isostatic balancing in analytical models, we calculated the steady-state flow velocity in a salt layer. This procedure gives insights into (1) the minimum vertical offset required for upward flow to occur, (2) the magnitude of the flow velocity, and (3) the average density of the supra-salt cover layer at the point at which upward flow starts. In a sensitivity study, we examined how the point of flow reversal and the velocity patterns are influenced by changes of the salt and cover layer thickness, the geometry of the cover flexure, the dip of the subsalt fault, compaction parameters of the supra-salt cover, the salt viscosity and the salt density. Our model results reveal that in most geological scenarios, salt flow above a continuously displacing subsalt normal fault goes through an early phase of downward flow. At sufficiently high fault offset in the range of 700-2600 m, salt is later squeezed upward towards the footwall side. This flow reversal occurs at smaller vertical fault displacement, if the thickness of the pre-kinematic layer is larger, the sedimentation rate of the syn-kinematic cover is higher, the compaction coefficient of cover sediments (i.e. the density increase with depth) is larger or the average density of the salt is lower. Other geometrical parameters such as the width of the cover monocline, the dip of the

  9. Cost and performance prospects for composite bipolar plates in fuel cells and redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, Christine; Hickmann, Thorsten; dos Santos, Antonio R.; Kunz, Ulrich; Turek, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Carbon-polymer-composite bipolar plates (BPP) are suitable for fuel cell and flow battery applications. The advantages of both components are combined in a product with high electrical conductivity and good processability in convenient polymer forming processes. In a comprehensive techno-economic analysis of materials and production processes cost factors are quantified. For the first time a technical cost model for BPP is set up with tight integration of material characterization measurements.

  10. Simulations and measurements of adiabatic annular flows in triangular, tight lattice nuclear fuel bundle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Abhishek, E-mail: asaxena@lke.mavt.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Zboray, Robert [Laboratory for Thermal-hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Prasser, Horst-Michael [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Laboratory for Thermal-hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-04-01

    High conversion light water reactors (HCLWR) having triangular, tight-lattice fuels bundles could enable improved fuel utilization compared to present day LWRs. However, the efficient cooling of a tight lattice bundle has to be still proven. Major concern is the avoidance of high-quality boiling crisis (film dry-out) by the use of efficient functional spacers. For this reason, we have carried out experiments on adiabatic, air-water annular two-phase flows in a tight-lattice, triangular fuel bundle model using generic spacers. A high-spatial-resolution, non-intrusive measurement technology, cold neutron tomography, has been utilized to resolve the distribution of the liquid film thickness on the virtual fuel pin surfaces. Unsteady CFD simulations have also been performed to replicate and compare with the experiments using the commercial code STAR-CCM+. Large eddies have been resolved on the grid level to capture the dominant unsteady flow features expected to drive the liquid film thickness distribution downstream of a spacer while the subgrid scales have been modeled using the Wall Adapting Local Eddy (WALE) subgrid model. A Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, which directly tracks the interface and does away with closure relationship models for interfacial exchange terms, has also been employed. The present paper shows first comparison of the measurement with the simulation results.

  11. Measurement and analysis of vibrational behavior of an SNR-fuel element in sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, B.F.H.; Ruppert, E.; Schmidt, H.; Vinzens, K.

    1975-01-01

    Within the framework of SNR-300 fuel element development programme a complete full size fuel element dummy has been tested thoroughly for nearly 3000 hours at 650 deg C system temperature in the AKB sodium loop at Interatom, Bensberg. It is known that the coolant flow through a subassembly can induce flutter or vibrations of structural parts such as single pins, the wrapper and the total pin bundle all of which have been of interest during this test. To detect these vibrations of different structural parts simultaneously with a minimum of instrumentation only 3 weldable high temperature strain gauges were employed. These strain gauges were especially prepared and bent in such a way as to form a bridge between the inner wrapper and a fuel pin top and spot-welded to both the wrapper and the fuel pin. Although this arrangement seems to be a rather unusual one, the simultaneous-measurement of bundle, wrapper and pin vibrations was possible and periodic flow fluctuations were also detected. The presented results are only relative due to calibration difficulties with these deformed strain gauges which were first used during this test. It is, however, believed that this arrangement, in connection with the proposed anlytical approach, leads to a simple and technical representation of the vibrational behavior of core elements during sodium tests. Detailed information needed for check and calibration of computer codes are however displayed by the respective power spectral density functions

  12. Preliminary CFD analysis methodology for flow in a LFR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, A.; Ioan, M.; Serbanel, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a preliminary Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed in order to setup a methodology to be used for more complex coolant flow analysis inside ALFRED nuclear reactor fuel assembly. The core contains 171 separated fuel assembly, each consisting in a hexagonal array of 127 fuel rods. Three honey comb spacer grids are proposed along fuel rods with the aim to keep flow geometry intact during reactor operation. The main goal of this paper is to compute some hydraulic parameters: pressure, velocity, wall shear stress and turbulence parameters with and without spacer grids. In this analysis we consider an adiabatic case, so far no heat transfer is considered but we pave the road toward more complex thermo hydraulic analysis for ALFRED (LFR in general). The CAELINUX CFD distribution was used with its main components: Salome-Meca (for geometry and mesh) and Code-Saturne as mono-phase CFD solver. Paraview and Visist Postprocessors were used for data extraction and graphical displays. (authors)

  13. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  14. Finite element analysis of turbulent flow in fast reactor fuel subassembly elementary flow cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, P.

    1987-03-01

    The method is described of calculating fully developed longitudinal steady-state turbulent flow of an incompressible fluid through an infinite bundle of parallel smooth rods, based on the finite element method and one-equation turbulence model. Theoretical calculation results are compared with experimental results. (author). 5 figs., 3 refs

  15. CFD Analysis of Random Turbulent Flow Load in Steam Generator of APR1400 Under Normal Operation Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Gyu; You, Sung Chang; Kim, Han Gon

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory guide 1.20 revision 3 of the Nuclear Regulatory Committee (NRC) modifies guidance for vibration assessments of reactor internals and steam generator internals. The new guidance requires applicants to provide a preliminary analysis and evaluation of the design and performance of a facility, including the safety margins of during normal operation and transient conditions anticipated during the life of the facility. Especially, revision 3 require rigorous assessments of adverse flow effects in the steam dryer cased by flow-excited acoustic and structural resonances such as the abnormality from power-uprated BWR cases. For two nearly identical nuclear power plants, the steam system of one BWR plant experienced failure of steam dryers and the main steam system components when steam flow was increased by 16 percent for extended power uprate (EPU). The mechanisms of those failures have revealed that a small adverse flow changing from the prototype condition induced severe flow-excited acoustic and structural resonances, leading to structural failures. In accordance with the historical background, therefore, potential adverse flow effects should be evaluated rigorously for steam generator internals in both BWR and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400), an evolutionary light water reactor, increased the power by 7.7 percent from the design of the 'Valid Prototype', System80+. Thus, reliable evaluations of potential adverse flow effects on the steam generator of APR1400 are necessary according to the regulatory guide. This paper is part of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis results for evaluation of the adverse flow effect for the steam generator internals of APR1400, including a series of sensitivity analyses to enhance the reliability of CFD analysis and an estimation the effect of flow loads on the internals of the steam generator under normal operation conditions

  16. Measurement of cerebral blood flow with /sup 133/Xe inhalation and dynamic single photon emission computer tomography. Normal values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rootwelt, K; Dybevold, S; Nyberg-Hansen, R; Russell, D

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow was studied by /sup 133/Xe inhalation tomography in 25 healthy subjects. Mean age was 41 years and range 23-66 years. Mean hemispheric CBF at rest was 59.8 ml/100 g/min, and cerebellar flow 60.8 ml/100 g/min. The distribution of CBF values was skewed and approximated a log normal distribution. Estimated lower and upper normal reference range limits calculated as mean (log) = - 2 S.D. (log) were 47-74 ml/100 g/min. Women had approximately 5 ml/100 g/min higher CBF values than men, corresponding to the difference in hematocrit. Neither in men or women was there any tendency to age dependent reduction or increase in flow. In both sexes hemispheric regional CBF (rCBF) was asymmetric with higher flow values in the right cerebral hemisphere; particularly in the anterior distribution territory of the middle cerebral artery. Emotional activation as a consequence of the study conditions is assumed to be the cause of this observed asymmetry. Cerebellar flow was not assymetric. No significant difference in cerebellar or hemispheric CBF was found when a second study followed the first by 3-15 months, PCO/sub 2/ correction of flow improved reproducibility. Acetazolamide responses are reported.

  17. Measurement of cerebral blood flow with 133Xe inhalation and dynamic single photon emission computer tomography. Normal values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rootwelt, Kjell; Dybevold, Synnoeve; Nyberg-Hansen, Rolf; Russell, David

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow was studied by 133 Xe inhalation tomography in 25 healthy subjects. Mean age was 41 years and range 23-66 years. Mean hemispheric CBF at rest was 59.8 ml/100 g/min, and cerebellar flow 60.8 ml/100 g/min. The distribution of CBF values was skewed and approximated a log normal distribution. Estimated lower and upper normal reference range limits calculated as mean (log) = - 2 S.D. (log) were 47-74 ml/100 g/min. Women had approximately 5 ml/100 g/min higher CBF values than men, corresponding to the difference in hematocrit. Neither in men or women was there any tendency to age dependent reduction or increase in flow. In both sexes hemispheric regional CBF (rCBF) was asymmetric with higher flow values in the right cerebral hemisphere; particularly in the anterior distribution territory of the middle cerebral artery. Emotional activation as a consequence of the study conditions is assumed to be the cause of this observed asymmetry. Cerebellar flow was not assymetric. No significant difference in cerebellar or hemispheric CBF was found when a second study followed the first by 3-15 months, PCO 2 correction of flow improved reproducibility. Acetazolamide responses are reported. (author)

  18. Confined dense particle-gas flow, application to nuclear fuel relocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we investigate particle-gas two-phase flows in the jamming regime where the flow stops in finite time. In this regime, which occurs quite often in nature and industrial applications, the flow is stochastic and needs therefore to be characterized by the jamming probability as well as the flow rate and its fluctuations that depend on the confining geometry, granular microstructure and gas properties. We developed a numerical approach based on the coupling of the Non Smooth Contact Dynamics for the solid phase and a mesoscopic method for the gas phase. We find that the flow rate as a function of the opening is well fit by a power law in agreement with reported experimental data. The presence of a gas affects only the mean flow rate, the flow statistics being sensibly the same as in the absence of the gas. We apply our quantitative statistical results in order to estimate the relocation rate of fragmented nuclear fuel inside its cladding tube as a result of a local balloon caused by an accident (loss-of-coolant accident). (author)

  19. Study of fuel bundle geometry on inter subchannel flow in a 19 pin wire wrapped bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen Raj, M.; Velusamy, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    In typical sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel pin bundle, gap between the pins is maintained by helically wound wire wrap around each pin. The presence of wire induces large inter-subchannel transverse flow, eventually promoting mixing and heat transfer. The magnitude of the transverse flow is highly dependent on the various pin-bundle dimensions. Appropriate modeling of these transverse flows in subchannel codes is necessary to predict realistic temperature distribution in pin bundle. Hence, detailed parametric study of transverse flow on pin-bundle geometric parameters has been conducted. The parameters taken for the present study are pin diameter, wire diameter, helical wire pitch and edge gap. Towards this 3-D computational fluid dynamic analysis on a structured mesh of 19 pin bundle is carried out using k-epsilon turbulence model. Periodic oscillations along the primacy flow direction were found in subchannel transverse flow and peripheral pin clad temperatures with periodicity over one pitch length. Based on parametric studies, correlations for transverse flow in central subchannels are proposed. (author)

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow in mood disorders. I. Comparison of major depressives and normal controls at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackeim, H.A.; Prohovnik, I.; Moeller, J.R.; Brown, R.P.; Apter, S.; Prudic, J.; Devanand, D.P.; Mukherjee, S.

    1990-01-01

    We measured regional cerebral blood flow with the xenon 133 inhalation technique in 41 patients with major depressive disorder and 40 matched, normal controls during an eyes-closed, resting condition. The depressed group had a marked reduction in global cortical blood flow. To examine topographic abnormalities, traditional multivariate analyses were applied, as well as a new scaled subprofile model developed to identify abnormal functional neural networks in clinical samples. Both approaches indicated that the depressed sample had an abnormality in topographic distribution of blood flow, in addition to the global deficit. The scaled subprofile model identified the topographic abnormality as being due to flow reduction in the depressed patients in selective frontal, central, superior temporal, and anterior parietal regions. This pattern may reflect dysfunction in the parallel distributed cortical network involving frontal and temporoparietal polymodal association areas. The extent of this topographic abnormality, as revealed by the scaled subprofile model, was associated with both patient age and severity of depressive symptoms

  1. Structural evaluation and analysis under normal conditions for spent fuel concrete storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Taechul; Baeg, Changyeal; Yoon, Sitae [Korea Radioactive waste Management Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Insoo [Korea Nuclear Engineering and Service Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is the verification of stabilities of the structural elements that influence the safety of a concrete storage cask. The evaluation results were reviewed with respect to every design criterion, in terms of whether the results satisfy the criteria, provided by 10CFR 72 and NUREG-1536. The basic information on the design is partially explained in 2. Description of spent fuel storage system and the maintainability and assumptions included in the analysis were confirmed through detailed explanations of the acceptable standards, analysis model, and analysis method. ABAQUS 6.10, a widely used finite element analysis program, was used in the structural analysis. The storage cask shall maintain the sub-criticality, shielding, structural integrity, thermal capability and confinement in accordance with the requirements specified in US 10 CFR 72. The safety of storage cask is analyzed and it has been confirmed to meet the requirements of US 10 CFR 72. This paper summarizes the structural stability evaluation results of a concrete storage cask with respect to the design criteria. The evaluation results of this paper show that the maximum stress was below the allowable stress under every condition, and the concrete storage cask satisfied the design criteria.

  2. Pressure-Flow Characteristics of Normal and Disordered Esophageal Motor Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singendonk, Maartje M. J.; Kritas, Stamatiki; Cock, Charles; Ferris, Lara F.; McCall, Lisa; Rommel, Nathalie; van Wijk, Michiel P.; Benninga, Marc A.; Moore, David; Omari, Taher I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To perform pressure-flow analysis (PFA) in a cohort of pediatric patients who were referred for diagnostic manometric investigation. Study design PFA was performed using purpose designed Matlab-based software. The pressure-flow index (PFI), a composite measure of bolus pressurization

  3. Interior flow and near-nozzle spray development in a marine-engine diesel fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, J.; Simmank, P.; Matlok, S.; Mayer, S.; Falgout, Z.; Linne, M.

    2016-04-01

    A consolidated effort at optically characterising flow patterns, in-nozzle cavitation, and near-nozzle jet structure of a marine diesel fuel injector is presented. A combination of several optical techniques was employed to fully transparent injector models, compound metal-glass and full metal injectors. They were all based on a common real-scale dual nozzle hole geometry for a marine two-stroke diesel engine. In a stationary flow rig, flow velocities in the sac-volume and nozzle holes were measured using PIV, and in-nozzle cavitation visualized using high-resolution shadowgraphs. The effect of varying cavitation number was studied and results compared to CFD predictions. In-nozzle cavitation and near-nozzle jet structure during transient operation were visualized simultaneously, using high-speed imaging in an atmospheric pressure spray rig. Near-nozzle spray formation was investigated using ballistic imaging. Finally, the injector geometry was tested on a full-scale marine diesel engine, where the dynamics of near-nozzle jet development was visualized using high-speed shadowgraphy. The range of studies focused on a single common geometry allows a comprehensive survey of phenomena ranging from first inception of cavitation under well-controlled flow conditions to fuel jet structure at real engine conditions.

  4. Effect of flow field with converging and diverging channels on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabiyan-Rezaie, Navid; Arefian, Amir; Kermani, Mohammad J.; Noughabi, Amir Karimi; Abdollahzadeh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of converging and diverging channels on fuel cell performance. • Over rib flow is observed from converging channels to neighbors. • Proposed flow field enriches oxygen level and current density in catalyst layer. • Net output power is enhanced more than 16% in new flow field. - Abstract: In this study, a novel bipolar flow field design is proposed. This new design consists of placed sequentially converging and diverging channels. Numerical simulation of cathode side is used to investigate the effects of converging and diverging channels on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Two models of constant and variable sink/source terms were implemented to consider species consumption and production. The distribution of oxygen mole fraction in gas diffusion and catalyst layers as a result of transverse over rib velocity is monitored. The results indicate that the converging channels feed two diverging neighbors. This phenomenon is a result of the over rib velocity which is caused by the pressure difference between the neighboring channels. The polarization curves show that by applying an angle of 0.3° to the channels, the net electrical output power increases by 16% compared to the base case.

  5. Flow of ideal fluid through a central region of a nuclear reactor wire-spaced fuel subassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, J.

    1991-04-01

    The results are given of calculations of the flow of an ideal fluid through the central region of a nuclear reactor wire-spaced fuel subassembly. The computer code used is briefly described. (author). 10 figs., 4 refs

  6. In situ diagnostic of two-phase flow phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells by neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Denis; Zhang, Jianbo; Shimoi, Ryoichi; Lehmann, Eberhard; Wokaun, Alexander; Shinohara, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Guenther G.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron radiographical measurements have been performed on operating hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). With the successful detection of liquid accumulation in flow field and gas diffusion layer (GDL) under various operating conditions a unique experimental approach for the investigation of two-phase flow phenomena in technical PEFC has been realized. The experimental setup will be described in detail. Algorithms for an enhanced quantitative evaluation of the obtained images are presented and successful application to the data demonstrated. Finally, results from PEFC investigations will be given. Different flow field geometries and their implications for liquid accumulation inside flow field and GDL are discussed

  7. Numerical study on channel size effect for proton exchange membrane fuel cell with serpentine flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaodong; Yan Weimon; Duan Yuanyuan; Weng Fangbor; Jung Guobin; Lee Chiyuan

    2010-01-01

    This work numerically investigates the effect of the channel size on the cell performance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with serpentine flow fields using a three-dimensional, two-phase model. The local current densities in the PEM, oxygen mass flow rates and liquid water concentrations at the interface of the cathode gas diffusion layer and catalyst layer were analyzed to understand the channel size effect. The predictions show that smaller channel sizes enhance liquid water removal and increase oxygen transport to the porous layers, which improve cell performance. Additionally, smaller channel sizes also provide more uniform current density distributions in the cell. However, as the channel size decreases, the total pressure drops across the cell increases, which leads to more pump work. With taking into account the pressure losses, the optimal cell performance occurs for a cell with a flow channel cross-sectional area of 0.535 x 0.535 mm 2 .

  8. THERMOSS: a thermohydraulic model of flow stagnation in a horizontal fuel channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulshani, P.; Caplan, M.Z.; Spinks, N.J.

    1984-01-01

    Following a postulated inlet-side small break in the CANDU reactor, emergency coolant is injected to refull the horizontal fuel channels and remove the decay heat. As part of the accident analysis, the effects of loss of forced circulation during the accident are predicted. A break size exists for which, at the end of pump rundown, the break force balances the natural circulation force and the channel flow is reduced to near zero. The subcooled, stagnant channel condition is referred to as the standing-start condition. Subsequently, the channel coolant boils and stratifies. Eventually the steam flow from the channel heats up the endfitting to the saturation temperature and reaches the vertical feeder. The resulting buoyancy-induced flow then refills the channel. One dimensional, two-fluid conservation equations are solved in closed form to predict the duration of stagnation. In this calculation the channel water level is an important intermediate variable because it determines the amount of steam production

  9. CANFLEX fuel bundle cross-flow endurance test 2 (test procedure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    This report describes test procedure of cross-flow 2 test for CANFLEX fuel. In October 1996. a cross-flow test was successfully performed in the KAERI Hot Test Loop for four hours at a water flow rate of 31kg/s, temperature of 266 deg C and inlet pressure of 11MPa, but it is requested more extended time periods to determine a realistic operational margin for the CANFLEX bundle during abnormal refuelling operations. The test shall be conducted for twenty two hours under the reactor conditions. After an initial period of ten hours, the test shall be stopped at the intervals of four hours for bundle inspection and inspect the test bundle end-plate to end-cap welds for failure or crack propagation using liquid penetrant examination. 2 refs., 1 fig. (Author)

  10. Test of Flow Characteristics in Tubular Fuel Assembly I - Establishment of test loop and measurement validation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hark; Chae, H. T.; Park, C.; Kim, H.

    2005-12-01

    Tubular type fuel has been developed as one of candidates for Advanced HANARO Reactor(AHR). It is necessary to test the flow characteristics such as velocity in each flow channels and pressure drop of tubular type fuel. A hydraulic test-loop to examine the hydraulic characteristics for a tubular type fuel has been designed and constructed. It consists of three parts; a) piping-loop including pump and motor, magnetic flow meter and valves etc, b) test-section part where a simulated tubular type fuel is located, and 3) data acquisition system to get reading signals from sensors or instruments. In this report, considerations during the design and installation of the facility and the selection of data acquisition sensors and instruments are described in detail. Before doing the experiment to measure the flow velocities in flow channels, a preliminary tests have been done for measuring the coolant velocities using pitot-tube and for validating the measurement accuracy as well. Local velocities of the radial direction in circular tubes are measured at regular intervals of 60 degrees by three pitot-tubes. Flow rate inside the circular flow channel can be obtained by integrating the velocity distribution in radial direction. The measured flow rate was compared to that of magnetic flow meter. According to the results, two values had a good agreement, which means that the measurement of coolant velocity by using pitot-tube and the flow rate measured by the magnetic flow meter are reliable. Uncertainty analysis showed that the error of velocity measurement by pitot-tube is less than ±2.21%. The hydraulic test-loop also can be adapted to others such as HANARO 18 and 36 fuel, in-pile system of FTL(Fuel Test Loop), etc

  11. Numerical Investigation of Fuel Distribution Effect on Flow and Temperature Field in a Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaowen; Xing, Li; Yin, Hong; Tian, Feng; Zhang, Qun

    2018-03-01

    Multiple-swirlers structure is commonly adopted for combustion design strategy in heavy duty gas turbine. The multiple-swirlers structure might shorten the flame brush length and reduce emissions. In engineering application, small amount of gas fuel is distributed for non-premixed combustion as a pilot flame while most fuel is supplied to main burner for premixed combustion. The effect of fuel distribution on the flow and temperature field related to the combustor performance is a significant issue. This paper investigates the fuel distribution effect on the combustor performance by adjusting the pilot/main burner fuel percentage. Five pilot fuel distribution schemes are considered including 3 %, 5 %, 7 %, 10 % and 13 %. Altogether five pilot fuel distribution schemes are computed and deliberately examined. The flow field and temperature field are compared, especially on the multiple-swirlers flow field. Computational results show that there is the optimum value for the base load of combustion condition. The pilot fuel percentage curve is calculated to optimize the combustion operation. Under the combustor structure and fuel distribution scheme, the combustion achieves high efficiency with acceptable OTDF and low NOX emission. Besides, the CO emission is also presented.

  12. Behavior of U3Si2 Fuel and FeCrAl Cladding under Normal Operating and Accident Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence; Hales, Jason Dean; Barani, Tommaso; Pizzocri, Davide; Pastore, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation program, an Accident Tolerant Fuel High Impact Problem was initiated at the beginning of fiscal year 2015 to investigate the behavior of \\usi~fuel and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) claddings under normal operating and accident reactor conditions. The High Impact Problem was created in response to the United States Department of Energy's renewed interest in accident tolerant materials after the events that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011. The High Impact Problem is a multinational laboratory and university collaborative research effort between Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. This report primarily focuses on the engineering scale research in fiscal year 2016 with brief summaries of the lower length scale developments in the areas of density functional theory, cluster dynamics, rate theory, and phase field being presented.

  13. SSYST, a code-system for analysing transient LWR fuel rod behaviour under off-normal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgwaldt, H.; Gulden, W.

    1983-01-01

    SSYST is a code-system for analysing transient fuel rod behaviour under off-normal conditions, developed conjointly by the Institut fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE), Stuttgart, and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) under contract of Projek Nukleare Sicherheit (PNS) at KfK. The main differences between SSYST and similar codes are (1) an open-ended modular code organisation, and (2) a preference for simple models, wherever possible. While the first feature makes SSYST a very flexible tool, easily adapted to changing requirements, the second feature leads to short execution times. The analysis of transient rod behaviour under LOCA boundary conditions takes 2 min cpu-time (IBM-3033), so that extensive parametric studies become possible. This paper gives an outline of the overall code organisation and a general overview of the physical models implemented. Besides explaining the routine application of SSYST in the analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents, examples are given of special applications which have led to a satisfactory understanding of the decisive influence of deviations from rotational symmetry on the fuel rod perimeter. (author)

  14. SSYST: A code-system for analyzing transient LWR fuel rod behaviour under off-normal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgwaldt, H.; Gulden, W.

    1983-01-01

    SSYST is a code-system for analyzing transient fuel rod behaviour under off-normal conditions, developed conjointly by the Institut fur Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE), Stuttgart, and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) under contract of Projekt Nukleare Sicherheit (PNS) at KfK. The main differences between SSYST and similar codes are an open-ended modular code organization, and a preference for simple models, wherever possible. While the first feature makes SSYST a very flexible tool, easily adapted to changing requirements, the second feature leads to short execution times. The analysis of transient rod behaviour under LOCA boundary conditions takes 2 min cpu-time (IBM-3033), so that extensive parametric studies become possible. This paper gives an outline of the overall code organisation and a general overview of the physical models implemented. Besides explaining the routine application of SSYST in the analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents, examples are given of special applications which have led to a satisfactory understanding of the decisive influence of deviations from rotational symmetry on the fuel rod perimeter

  15. Quantitative analysis of normal fetal medulla oblongata volume and flow by three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Ing-Luen; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chen, Chih-Yao; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Horng, Huann-Cheng; Yang, Ming-Jie; Yen, Ming-Shyen

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of the fetal medulla oblongata volume (MOV) and blood flow might be important in the evaluation of fetal brain growth. We used three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound (3DPDUS) to assess the fetal MOV and blood flow index in normal gestation. The relationships between these parameters were further analyzed. We assessed the total volume and blood flow index of the fetal MO in normal pregnancies using a 3DPDUS (Voluson 730 Expert). The true sagittal plane over the fetal occipital area was measured by a 3D transabdominal probe to scan the fetal MO under the power Doppler mode. Then, we quantitatively assessed the total volume of the fetal MOV, mean gray area (MG), vascularization index (VI), and flow index (FI). A total of 106 fetuses, ranging from 19 weeks to 39 weeks of gestation, were involved in our study. The volume of the fetal MO was highly positively correlated with gestational age [correlation coefficient (r) = 0.686, p < 0.0001]. The MG was negatively correlated with gestational age [r = -0.544, p < 0.0001). VI and FI showed no significant correlation with gestational age (p = 0.123 and p = 0.219, respectively). 3DPDUS can be used to assess the fetal MOV and blood flow development quantitatively. Our study indicated that fetal MOV and blood flow correlated significantly with the advancement of gestational age. This information may serve as reference data for further studies of the fetal brain and blood flow under abnormal conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Gothic simulation of single-channel fuel heatup following a loss of forced flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X-Q; Tahir, A. [NSS, Dept. of Thermal Hydraulics Analysis, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Parlatan, Y. [Ontario Power Generation, NSATD, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Kwee, M. [Bruce Power, NSASD, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    GOTHIC v7.2 was used to develop a computer model for the simulation of 28- and 37-element fuel heat-up at a loss of forced flow. The model has accounted for the non-uniformity of both axial and radial power distributions along the fuel channel for a typical CANDU reactor. In addition, the model has also accounted for the fuel rods, end-fittings, feeders and headers. Experimental test conditions for both 28- and 37-element bundles at either low or high powers were used for model validation. GOTHIC predictions of the rod and/or pressure-tube temperatures at a variety of test locations were compared with the corresponding experimental measurements. It is found that the numerical results agree well with the experimental measurements for most of the test locations. Results have also shown that the channel venting time is sensitive to the initial temperature distribution in the feeders and headers. An imposed temperature asymmetry at the beginning will cause the channel flow to vent earlier. (author)

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of reactant gases mass flow rates on power density in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, E. E.; Taymaz, I.

    2018-03-01

    In this study it was experimentally investigated the effect of mass flow rates of reactant gases which is one of the most important operational parameters of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell on power density. The channel type is serpentine and single PEM fuel cell has an active area of 25 cm2. Design-Expert 8.0 (trial version) was used with four variables to investigate the effect of variables on the response using. Cell temperature, hydrogen mass flow rate, oxygen mass flow rate and humidification temperature were selected as independent variables. In addition, the power density was used as response to determine the combined effects of these variables. It was kept constant cell and humidification temperatures while changing mass flow rates of reactant gases. From the results an increase occurred in power density with increasing the hydrogen flow rates. But oxygen flow rate does not have a significant effect on power density within determined mass flow rates.

  19. Measurement of Placental Blood Flow with {sup 133}Xe in Normal and Pathological Human Pregnancy; Mesure du Debit Placentaire dans les Grossesses Normales et Pathologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontonnier, G.; Delmas, H.; Farre, J.; Favretto, R. [Clinique Obstetricale, Hopital de la Grave, Toulouse (France)

    1971-02-15

    Most authors agree that changes in placental circulation play an important part in the genesis of chronic foetal disorders. However, until recently there was no technique by which a quantitative evaluation of placental haemodynamics could be obtained. Our method of measuring placental blood flow represents one application of the use of radioisotopes for measurements of local blood flows. We use {sup 133}Xe in solution in physiological serum. This radioactive gas has the advantage of being inert and instantly diffusible. After radiographic or ultrasonic localization of the placenta, 50 {mu}Ci of xenon are injected into it transabdominally. A scintillation detector is used to take the {sup 133}Xe clearance curve, which is recorded simultaneously on a linear writer and transmitted to a computer. We have made 111 measurements of placental blood flow - 45 in normal pregnancy, 59 in pathological pregnancy and 7 after perfusion of medication. The measurements made it possible to obtain, for the first time, a quantitative evaluation of placental blood flow in women. The value found for normal pregnancies between the thirty-second and the forty-first weeks was 145 ml/100 g per min. The measurements carried out in pathologically pregnant patients (with arterial hypertension, dysgravidity, urinary infection, diabetes, prolonged pregnancy) showed that such pregnancies are accompanied by a statistically significant diminution of placental blood flow, and that the magnitude of this diminution has a bearing on the clinical condition and the state of the child at birth. This method of measurement, which is easily reproducible in the same patient, is accordingly of interest from two points of view. As far as theoretical studies are concerned, it has made possible a quantitative evaluation of placental blood flow and has supplied proof that the maternal disorders which give rise to chronic foetal disorders are usually accompanied by a diminution in placental blood flow. From the

  20. Tracheal sound parameters of respiratory cycle phases show differences between flow-limited and normal breathing during sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkas, A; Huupponen, E; Virkkala, J; Saastamoinen, A; Rauhala, E; Tenhunen, M; Himanen, S-L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop new computational parameters to examine the characteristics of respiratory cycle phases from the tracheal breathing sound signal during sleep. Tracheal sound data from 14 patients (10 males and 4 females) were examined. From each patient, a 10 min long section of normal and a 10 min section of flow-limited breathing during sleep were analysed. The computationally determined proportional durations of the respiratory phases were first investigated. Moreover, the phase durations and breathing sound amplitude levels were used to calculate the area under the breathing sound envelope signal during inspiration and expiration phases. An inspiratory sound index was then developed to provide the percentage of this type of area during the inspiratory phase with respect to the combined area of inspiratory and expiratory phases. The proportional duration of the inspiratory phase showed statistically significantly higher values during flow-limited breathing than during normal breathing and inspiratory pause displayed an opposite difference. The inspiratory sound index showed statistically significantly higher values during flow-limited breathing than during normal breathing. The presented novel computational parameters could contribute to the examination of sleep-disordered breathing or as a screening tool

  1. Behavior of EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements in simulated loss-of-flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Holland, J.W.; Kramer, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Three furnace heating tests were conducted with irradiated, HT9-clad and U-19wt%Pu-10wt%Zr-alloy, EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements to evaluate the behavior that could be expected during a loss-of-flow event in the reactor. In general, very significant safety margins for cladding breaching have been demonstrated in these tests, under conditions that would envelop a bounding unlikely loss-of-flow event in EBR-II. Highlights of the test results are presented, as are discussions of the cladding breaching mechanisms, axial fuel motion, and fuel surface liquefaction that were found in these tests. (orig.)

  2. Enhanced fuel efficiency on tractor-trailers using synthetic jet-based active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Michael; Menicovich, David; Gallardo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The application of piezo-electrically-driven synthetic-jet-based active flow control to reduce drag on tractor-trailers was explored experimentally in wind tunnel testing as well as full-scale road tests. Aerodynamic drag accounts for more than 50% of the usable energy at highway speeds, a problem that applies primarily to trailer trucks. Therefore, a reduction in aerodynamic drag results in large saving of fuel and reduction in CO2 emissions. The active flow control technique that is being used relies on a modular system comprised of distributed, small, highly efficient actuators. These actuators, called synthetic jets, are jets that are synthesized at the edge of an orifice by a periodic motion of a piezoelectric diaphragm(s) mounted on one (or more) walls of a sealed cavity. The synthetic jet is zero net mass flux (ZNMF), but it allows momentum transfer to flow. It is typically driven near diaphragm and/or cavity resonance, and therefore, small electric input [O(10W)] is required. Another advantage of this actuator is that no plumbing is required. The system doesn't require changes to the body of the truck, can be easily reconfigured to various types of vehicles, and consumes small amounts of electrical power from the existing electrical system of the truck. Preliminary wind tunnel results showed up to 18% reduction in fuel consumption, whereas road tests also showed very promising results.

  3. Cine-MR imaging aqueductal CSF flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome before and after CSF shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascalchi, M.; Arnetoli, G.; Inzitari, D.; Dal Pozzo, G.; Lolli, F.; Caramella, D.; Bartolozzi, C.

    1993-01-01

    Reproducibility of the aqueductal CSF signal intensity on a gradient echo cine-MR sequence exploiting through plane inflow enhancement was tested in 11 patients with normal or dilated ventricles. Seven patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) syndrome were investigated with the sequence before and after CSF shunting. Two patients exhibiting central flow void within a hyperintense aqueductal CSF improved after surgery and the flow void disappeared after shunting. One patient with increased maximum and minimum aqueductal CSF signal as compared to 18 healthy controls also improved and the aqueductal CSF signal was considerably decreased after shunting. Three patients with aqueductal CSF values similar to those in the controls did not improve, notwithstanding their maximum aqueductal CSF signals decreasing slightly after shunting. No appreciable aqueductal CSF flow related enhancement consistent with non-communicating hydrocephalus was found in the last NPH patient who improved after surgery. Cine-MR with inflow technique yields a reproducible evaluation of flow-related aqueductal CSF signal changes which might help in identifying shunt responsive NPH patients. These are likely to be those with hyperdynamic aqueductal CSF or aqueductal obstruction. (orig.)

  4. Aircraft dual-shaft jet engine with indirect action fuel flow controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudosie, Alexandru-Nicolae

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with an aircraft single-jet engine's control system, based on a fuel flow controller. Considering the engine as controlled object and its thrust the most important operation effect, from the multitude of engine's parameters only its rotational speed n is measurable and proportional to its thrust, so engine's speed has become the most important controlled parameter. Engine's control system is based on fuel injection Qi dosage, while the output is engine's speed n. Based on embedded system's main parts' mathematical models, the author has described the system by its block diagram with transfer functions; furthermore, some Simulink-Matlab simulations are performed, concerning embedded system quality (its output parameters time behavior) and, meanwhile, some conclusions concerning engine's parameters mutual influences are revealed. Quantitative determinations are based on author's previous research results and contributions, as well as on existing models (taken from technical literature). The method can be extended for any multi-spool engine, single- or twin-jet.

  5. Mathematical model of an indirect action fuel flow controller for aircraft jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudosie, Alexandru-Nicolae

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with a fuel mass flow rate controller with indirect action for aircraft jet engines. The author has identified fuel controller's main parts and its operation mode, then, based on these observations, one has determined motion equations of each main part, which have built system's non-linear mathematical model. In order to realize a better study this model was linearised (using the finite differences method) and then adimensionalized. Based on this new form of the mathematical model, after applying Laplace transformation, the embedded system (controller+engine) was described by the block diagram with transfer functions. Some Simulink-Matlab simulations were performed, concerning system's time behavior for step input, which lead to some useful conclusions and extension possibilities.

  6. REFLOS, Fuel Loading and Cost from Burnup and Heavy Atomic Mass Flow Calculation in HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, W.; Schmidt, E.

    1969-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: REFLOS is a programme for the evaluation of fuel-loading schemes in heavy water moderated reactors. The problems involved in this study are: a) Burn-up calculation for the reactor cell. b) Determination of reactivity behaviour, power distribution, attainable burn-up for both the running-in period and the equilibrium of a 3-dimensional heterogeneous reactor model; investigation of radial fuel movement schemes. c) Evaluation of mass flows of heavy atoms through the reactor and fuel cycle costs for the running-in, the equilibrium, and the shut down of a power reactor. If the subroutine for treating the reactor cell were replaced by a suitable routine, other reactors with weakly absorbing moderators could be analyzed. 2 - Method of solution: Nuclear constants and isotopic compositions of the different fuels in the reactor are calculated by the cell-burn-up programme and tabulated as functions of the burn-up rate (MWD/T). Starting from a known state of the reactor, the 3-dimensional heterogeneous reactor programme (applying an extension of the technique of Feinberg and Galanin) calculates reactivity and neutron flux distribution using one thermal and one or two fast neutron groups. After a given irradiation time, the new state of the reactor is determined, and new nuclear constants are assigned to the various defined locations in the reactor. Reloading of fuel may occur if the prescribed life of the reactor is reached or if the effective multiplication factor or the power form factor falls below a specified level. The scheme of reloading to be carried out is specified by a load vector, giving the number of channels to be discharged, the kind of movement from one to another channel and the type of fresh fuel to be charged for each single reloading event. After having determined the core states characterizing the equilibrium period, and having decided the fuel reloading scheme for the running-in period of the reactor life, the fuel

  7. Flow behaviour in a CANDU horizontal fuel channel from stagnant subcooled initial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplan, M.Z.; Gulshani, P.; Holmes, R.W.; Wright, A.C.D.

    1984-01-01

    The flow behaviour in a CANDU primary system with horizontal fuel channels is described following a small inlet header break. With the primary pumps running, emergency coolant injection is in the forward direction so that the channel outlet feeders remain warmer than the inlet thereby promoting forward natural circulation. However, the break force opposes the forward driving force. Should the primary pumps run down after the circuit has refilled, there is a break size for which the natural circulation force is balanced by the break force and channels could, theoretically, stagnate. Result of visualization and of full-size channel tests on channel flow behaviour from an initially stagnant channel condition are discussed. After a channel stagnation, the decay power heats the coolant to saturation. Steam is then formed and the coolant stratifies. The steam expands into the subcooled water in the end fitting in a chugging type of flow regime due to steam condensation. After the end fitting reaches the saturation temperature, steam is able to penetrate into the vertical feeder thereby initiating a large buoyancy induced flow which refills the channel. The duration of stagnation is shown to be sensitive to small asymmetries in the initial conditions. A small initial flow can significantly shorten the occurrence and/or duration of boiling as has been confirmed by reactor experience. (author)

  8. Surface profiling of normally responding and nonreleasing basophils by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Poulsen, Lars Kærgaard; Jensen, Bettina Margrethe

    a maximum release blood mononuclear cells were purified by density centrifugation and using flow cytometry, basophils, defined as FceRIa+CD3-CD14-CD19-CD56-,were analysed for surface expression of relevant markers. All samples were compensated and analysed in logicle display. All gates......c, C3aR, C5aR CCR3, FPR1, ST2, CRTH2 on anti-IgE respondsive and nonreleasing basophils by flow cytometry, thereby generating a surface profile of the two phenotypes. Methods Fresh buffy coat blood (

  9. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic turbulence and cavitation are known to play a significant role in high-pressure atomizers, but the small geometries and extreme operating conditions hinder the understanding of the flow’s characteristics. Diesel internal flow experiments are generally conducted using x-ray techniques or on transparent, and often enlarged, nozzles with different orifice geometries and surface roughness to those found in production injectors. In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a 3D laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160 MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently found in the spectrograms between 6 and 7.5 kHz for all nozzles and injection pressures. Further evidence of a similar spectral peak was obtained from the fuel pressure transducer and a needle lift sensor mounted into the injector body. Evidence of propagation of the nozzle oscillations to the liquid sprays was obtained by recording high-speed videos of the near-nozzle diesel jet, and computing the fast Fourier transform for a number of pixel locations at the interface of the jets. This 6-7.5 kHz frequency peak is proposed to be the

  10. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodynamic turbulence and cavitation are known to play a significant role in high-pressure atomizers, but the small geometries and extreme operating conditions hinder the understanding of the flow’s characteristics. Diesel internal flow experiments are generally conducted using x-ray techniques or on transparent, and often enlarged, nozzles with different orifice geometries and surface roughness to those found in production injectors. In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a 3D laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160 MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently found in the spectrograms between 6 and 7.5 kHz for all nozzles and injection pressures. Further evidence of a similar spectral peak was obtained from the fuel pressure transducer and a needle lift sensor mounted into the injector body. Evidence of propagation of the nozzle oscillations to the liquid sprays was obtained by recording high-speed videos of the near-nozzle diesel jet, and computing the fast Fourier transform for a number of pixel locations at the interface of the jets. This 6–7.5 kHz frequency peak is proposed to be the

  11. Forest biomass flow for fuel wood, fodder and timber security among tribal communities of Jharkhand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M A; Quli, S M S; Rai, R; Ali, Angrej; Gangoo, S A

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated extraction and consumption pattern of fuel wood, fodder and timber and forest biomass flow for fuel wood, fodder and timber security among tribal communities in Bundu block of Ranchi district in Jharkhand (India). The study is based on personal interviews of the selected respondents through structured interview schedule, personal observations and participatory rural appraisal tools i.e. key informant interviews and focus group discussions carried out in the sample villages, using multi-stage random sampling technique. The study revealed that the total extraction of fuel wood from different sources in villages was 2978.40 tons annum(-1), at the rate of 0.68 tons per capita annum(-1), which was mostly consumed in cooking followed by cottage industries, heating, community functions and others. The average fodder requirement per household was around 47.77 kg day(-1) with a total requirement of 14227.34 tons annum(-1). The average timber requirement per household was computed to be 0.346 m3 annum(-1) accounting for a total timber demand of 282.49 m3 annum(-1), which is mostly utilized in housing, followed by agricultural implements, rural furniture, carts and carriages, fencing, cattle shed/ store house and others. Forest biomass is the major source of fuel wood, fodder and timber for the primitive societies of the area contributing 1533.28 tons annum(-1) (51.48%) of the total fuel wood requirement, 6971.55 tons annum(-1) (49.00%) of the total fodder requirement and 136.36 m3 annum(-1) (48.27%) of the total timber requirement. The forest biomass is exposed to enormous pressure for securing the needs by the aboriginal people, posing great threat to biodiversity and environment of the region. Therefore, forest biomass conservation through intervention of alternative avenues is imperative to keep pace with the current development and future challenges in the area.

  12. Nocturnal variations in subcutaneous blood flow rate in lower leg of normal human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Jørgensen, B

    1991-01-01

    in central and local postural sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. During sleep, characteristic variations in subcutaneous blood flow were disclosed. The 133Xe washout curve could be divided into three segments with significantly different slopes. Approximately 90 min after the subject went to sleep...

  13. The Stochastic Galerkin Method for Darcy Flow Problem with Log-Normal Random

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beres, Michal; Domesová, Simona

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2017), s. 267-279 ISSN 1336-1376 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1602 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Darcy flow * Gaussian random field * Karhunen-Loeve decomposition * polynomial chaos * Stochastic Galerkin method Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics http://advances.utc.sk/index.php/AEEE/article/view/2280

  14. Low flow measurement for infusion pumps: implementation and uncertainty determination of the normalized method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebeiro, J; Musacchio, A; Sardá, E Fernández

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous drug delivery is a standard practice in hospitalized patients. As the blood concentration reached depends directly on infusion rate, it is important to use safe devices that guarantee output accuracy. In pediatric intensive care units, low infusion rates (i.e. lower than 10.0 ml/h) are frequently used. Thus, it would be necessary to use control programs to search for deviations at this flow range. We describe the implementation of a gravimetric method to test infusion pumps in low flow delivery. The procedure recommended by the ISO/IEC 60601-2-24 standard was used being a reasonable option among the methods frequently used in hospitals, such as infusion pumps analyzers and volumetric cylinders. The main uncertainty sources affecting this method are revised and a numeric and graphic uncertainty analysis is presented in order to show its dependence on flow. Additionally, the obtained uncertainties are compared to those presented by an automatic flow analyzer. Finally, the results of a series of tests performed on a syringe infusion pump operating at low rates are shown.

  15. Effects of Cooling Fluid Flow Rate on the Critical Heat Flux and Flow Stability in the Plate Fuel Type 2 MW TRIGA Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    H. P. Rahardjo; V. I. Sri Wardhani

    2017-01-01

    The conversion program of the 2 MW TRIGA reactor in Bandung consisted of the replacement of cylindrical fuel (produced by General Atomic) with plate fuel (produced by BATAN). The replacement led into the change of core cooling process from upward natural convection type to downward forced convection type, and resulted in different thermohydraulic safety criteria, such as critical heat flux (CHF) limit, boiling limit, and cooling fluid flow stability. In this paper, a thermohydraulic safety an...

  16. A Comparison of Flow-Through Versus Non-Flow-Through Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for NASA's Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), NASA is developing both primary fuel cell power systems and regenerative fuel cell (RFC) energy storage systems within the fuel cell portion of the Energy Storage Project. This effort is being led by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in partnership with the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and industrial partners. The development goals are to improve fuel cell and electrolysis stack electrical performance, reduce system mass, volume, and parasitic power requirements, and increase system life and reliability. A major focus of this effort has been the parallel development of both flow-through and non-flow-through proton exchange membrane (PEM) primary fuel cell power systems. The plan has been, at the appropriate time, to select a single primary fuel cell technology for eventual flight hardware development. Ideally, that appropriate time would occur after both technologies have achieved a technology readiness level (TRL) of six, which represents an engineering model fidelity PEM fuel cell system being successfully tested in a relevant environment. Budget constraints in fiscal year 2009 and beyond have prevented NASA from continuing to pursue the parallel development of both primary fuel cell options. Because very limited data exists for either system, a toplevel, qualitative assessment based on engineering judgement was performed expeditiously to provide guidance for a selection. At that time, the non-flow-through technology was selected for continued development because of potentially major advantages in terms of weight, volume, parasitic power, reliability, and life. This author believes that the advantages are significant enough, and the potential benefits great enough, to offset the higher state of technology readiness of flow-through technology. This paper

  17. Reversing flow catalytic converter for a natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, E.; Checkel, M.D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hayes, R.E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Zheng, M.; Mirosh, E. [Alternative Fuel Systems Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    An experimental and modelling study was performed for a reverse flow catalytic converter attached to a natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine. The catalytic converter had a segmented ceramic monolith honeycomb substrate and a catalytic washcoat containing a predominantly palladium catalyst. A one-dimensional single channel model was used to simulate the operation of the converter. The kinetics of the CO and methane oxidation followed first-order behaviour. The activation energy for the oxidation of methane showed a change with temperature, dropping from a value of 129 to 35 kJ/mol at a temperature of 874 K. The reverse flow converter was able to achieve high reactor temperature under conditions of low inlet gas temperature, provided that the initial reactor temperature was sufficiently high. (author)

  18. Age-matched normal values and topographic maps for regional cerebral blood flow measurements by Xe-133 inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, H.; Maeda, T.; Yamada, M.; Gui, L.X.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between normal aging and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) computed as initial slope index (ISI) by Fourier method was investigated in 105 right-handed healthy volunteers (132 measurements) by Xe-133 inhalation method, and age-matched normal values were calculated. Mean brain ISI values showed significant negative correlation with advancing age (r . 0.70, p less than 0.001), and the regression line and its 95% confidence interval was Y . -0.32 (X - 19) + 63.5 +/- 11.2 (19 less than or equal to X less than or equal to 80). Regional ISI values also showed significant negative correlations for the entire brain (p less than 0.001). The regional reductions of ISI values with advancing age were significantly greater in the regional distribution of the middle cerebral arteries bilaterally, compared with regions in the distribution of the other arteries (p less than 0.05). Therefore, measured rCBF values for patients must be compared to age-matched normal values for mean hemispheric and each region examined. Two kinds of topographic maps, brain map showing rCBF compared to age-matched normal values and showing hemispheric differences were made by dividing patient's values by the 95% confidence limits for age-matched normal values and displaying laterality index calculated as follows, respectively. (formula; see text) These maps were useful for evaluating significantly decreased or increased regions and regional hemispheric differences

  19. Approximate solutions of pulse transport in turbulent flow in narrow fuel element bundle geometries, using the FE method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    The author is concerned with the flow conditions in case of narrow fuel element grids of pressurised-water reactors. Starting from the mathematical formulation of the flow processes for incompressible, isothermal flows, models of the turbulence characteristics are being developed. Besides turbulence models, and network structure the finite element method is treated as numeric solution process. Finally the results are summarized and discussed. (HAG) [de

  20. Using Sankey diagrams to map energy flow from primary fuel to end use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanyam, Veena; Paramshivan, Deepak; Kumar, Amit; Mondal, Md. Alam Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy flows from both supply and demand sides shown through Sankey diagrams. • Energy flows from reserves to energy end uses for primary and secondary fuels shown. • Five main energy demand sectors in Alberta are analyzed. • In residential/commercial sectors, highest energy consumption is in space heating. • In the industrial sector, highest energy use is in the mining subsector. - Abstract: The energy sector is the largest contributor to gross domestic product (GDP), income, employment, and government revenue in both developing and developed nations. But the energy sector has a significant environmental footprint due to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Efficient production, conversion, and use of energy resources are key factors for reducing the environmental footprint. Hence it is necessary to understand energy flows from both the supply and the demand sides. Most energy analyses focus on improving energy efficiency broadly without considering the aggregate energy flow. We developed Sankey diagrams that map energy flow for both the demand and supply sides for the province of Alberta, Canada. The diagrams will help policy/decision makers, researchers, and others to understand energy flow from reserves through to final energy end uses for primary and secondary fuels in the five main energy demand sectors in Alberta: residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation. The Sankey diagrams created for this study show total energy consumption, useful energy, and energy intensities of various end-use devices. The Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) model is used in this study. The model showed that Alberta’s total input energy in the five demand sectors was 189 PJ, 186 PJ, 828.5PJ, 398 PJ, and 50.83 PJ, respectively. On the supply side, the total energy input and output were found to be 644.84 PJ and 239 PJ, respectively. These results, along with the associated energy flows were depicted pictorially using

  1. Behavior of EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements in simulated loss-of-flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Holland, J.W.; Kramer, J.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses three furnace heating tests which were conducted with irradiated, HT9-clad and U-19wt.%Pu-l0wt.%Zr-alloy fuel, Mk-V-type fuel elements in the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois. In general, very significant safety margins for fuel-element cladding breaching have been demonstrated in these tests, under conditions that would envelop a bounding unlikely loss-of-flow event in EBR-II. Highlights of the test results will be given, as well as discussions of the cladding breaching mechanisms, axial fuel motion, and fuel surface liquefaction found in high-temperature testing of irradiated metallic fuel elements

  2. The Quantitative Measurements of Vascular Density and Flow Areas of Macula Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Normal Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Fariba; Fadakar, Kaveh; Bazvand, Fatemeh; Mirshahi, Reza; Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Sabour, Siamak

    2017-06-01

    The quantification of the density of macular vascular networks and blood flow areas in the foveal and parafoveal area in healthy subjects using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Cross-sectional, prospective study in an institutional setting at the Retina Services of Farabi Eye Hospital. One hundred twelve normal volunteers with no known ocular or systemic disease were included, including patient numbers (one or both eyes), selection procedures, inclusion/exclusion criteria, randomization procedure, and masking. En face angiogram OCTA was performed on a 3 mm × 3 mm region centered on the macula. Automated thresholding and measuring algorithm method for foveal and parafoveal blood flow and vascular density (VD) were used. The density of macular vascular networks and blood flow area in the foveal and parafoveal area were measured. A total of 224 healthy eyes from 112 subjects with a mean age of 36.4 years ± 11.3 years were included. In the foveal region, the VD of the superficial capillary network (sCN) was significantly higher than that of the deep capillary network (dCN) (31.1% ± 5.5% vs. 28.3% ± 7.2%; P < .001), whereas in the parafoveal area, VD was higher in the dCN (62.24% ± 2.8% vs. 56.5% ± 2.5%; P < .001). Flow area in the 1-mm radius circle in the sCN was less than in the dCN. Superficial foveal avascular zone (sFAZ) size was negatively correlated with the VD of the foveal sCN, but in the deep FAZ (dFAZ) was not correlated with VD or blood flow area of the fovea. There was no difference between measured VD and blood flow surface area in both eyes of the subjects. OCTA could be used as a noninvasive, repeatable, layer-free method in quantitative evaluation of VD and blood flow of macular area. The normal quantities of the vascular plexus density and flow will help in better understanding the pathophysiological basis of the vascular disease of retina. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:478-486.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK

  3. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips normal to the flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J. H.; Johnson, B. V.; Graziani, R. A.; Yeh, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multipass, heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. Trip strips on the leading and trailing surfaces of the radial coolant passages were used to produce the rough walls. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature ratio, Rossby number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. The first three of these four parameters were varied over ranges which are typical of advanced gas turbine engine operating conditions. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from stationary and rotating similar models with trip strips. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat increased with rotation and buoyancy, varied by as much as a factor of four. Maximum values of the heat transfer coefficients with high rotation were only slightly above the highest levels obtained with the smooth wall model. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat transfer decreased with rotation, varied by as much as a factor of three due to rotation and buoyancy. It was concluded that both Coriolis and buoyancy effects must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips and that the effects of rotation were markedly different depending upon the flow direction.

  4. Peclet number analysis of cross-flow in porous gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, P V; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2016-10-01

    Adoption of hydrogen economy by means of using hydrogen fuel cells is one possible solution for energy crisis and climate change issues. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is an important type of fuel cells, suffers from the problem of water management. Cross-flow is induced in some flow field designs to enhance the water removal. The presence of cross-flow in the serpentine and interdigitated flow fields makes them more effective in proper distribution of the reactants on the reaction layer and evacuation of water from the reaction layer than diffusion-based conventional parallel flow fields. However, too much of cross-flow leads to flow maldistribution in the channels, higher pressure drop, and membrane dehydration. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the amount of cross-flow required for effective distribution of reactants and removal of water in the gas diffusion layer. Unit cells containing two adjacent channels with gas diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layer at the bottom have been considered for the parallel, interdigitated, and serpentine flow patterns. Computational fluid dynamics-based simulations are carried out to study the reactant transport in under-the-rib area with cross-flow in the GDL. A new criterion based on the Peclet number is presented as a quantitative measure of cross-flow in the GDL. The study shows that a cross-flow Peclet number of the order of 2 is required for effective removal of water from the GDL. Estimates show that this much of cross-flow is not usually produced in the U-bends of Serpentine flow fields, making these areas prone to flooding.

  5. Flow instability tests for a particle bed reactor nuclear thermal rocket fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Timothy J.

    1993-05-01

    Recent analyses have focused on the flow stability characteristics of a particle bed reactor (PBR). These laminar flow instabilities may exist in reactors with parallel paths and are caused by the heating of the gas at low Reynolds numbers. This phenomena can be described as follows: several parallel channels are connected at the plenum regions and are stabilized by some inlet temperature and pressure; a perturbation in one channel causes the temperature to rise and increases the gas viscosity and reduces the gas density; the pressure drop is fixed by the plenum regions, therefore, the mass flow rate in the channel would decrease; the decrease in flow reduces the ability to remove the energy added and the temperature increases; and finally, this process could continue until the fuel element fails. Several analyses based on different methods have derived similar curves to show that these instabilities may exist at low Reynolds numbers and high phi's ((Tfinal Tinitial)/Tinitial). These analyses need to be experimentally verified.

  6. Steady state investigation on neutronics of a molten salt reactor considering the flow effect of fuel salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dalin; Qiu Suizheng; Su Guanghui; Liu Changliang

    2008-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), one of the 'Generation IV' concepts, is a liquid-fuel reactor, which is different from the conventional reactors using solid fissile materials due to the flow effect of fuel salt. The study on its neutronics considering the fuel salt flow, which is the base of the thermal-hydraulic calculation and safety analysis, must be done. In this paper, the theoretical model on neutronics under steady condition for a single-liquid-fueled MSR is conducted and calculated by numerical method. The neutronics model consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes, and balance equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors considering the flow effect of fuel salt. The spatial discretization of the above models is based on the finite volume method, and the discretization equations are computed by the source iteration method. The distributions of neutron fluxes and the distributions of the delayed neutron precursors in the core are obtained. The numerical calculated results show that, the fuel salt flow has little effect on the distribution of fast and thermal neutron fluxes and the effective multiplication factor; however, it affects the distribution of the delayed neutron precursors significantly, especially the long-lived one. In addition, it could be found that the delayed neutron precursors influence the neutronics slightly under the steady condition. (authors)

  7. Steady state investigation on neutronics of a molten salt reactor considering the flow effect of fuel salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-Lin; QIU Sui-Zheng; LIU Chang-Liang; SU Guang-Hui

    2008-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),one of the‘Generation Ⅳ'concepts,is a liquid-fuel reactor,which is different from the conventional reactors using solid fissile materials due to the flow effect of fuel salt.The study on its neutronice considering the fuel salt flow,which is the base of the thermal-hydraulic calculation and safety analysis,must be done.In this paper,the theoretical model on neutronics under steady condition for a single-liquid-fueled MSR is conducted and calculated by numerical method.The neutronics model consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes,and balance equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors considering the flow effect of fuel salt. The spatial discretization of the above models is based on the finite volume method,and the discretization equations are computed by the source iteration method.The distributions of neutron fluxes and the distributions of the delayed neutron precursors in the core are obtained.The numerical calculated results show that,the fuel salt flow has little effect on the distribution of fast and thermal neutron fluxes and the effective multiplication factor;however,it affects the distribution of the delayed neutron precursors significantly,especially the long-lived one.In addition,it could be found that the delayed neutron precursors influence the nentronics slightly under the steady condition.

  8. Flow field optimization for proton exchange membrane fuel cells with varying channel heights and widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaodong; Huang Yuxian; Cheng, C.-H.; Jang, J.-Y.; Lee, D.-J.; Yan, W.-M.; Su Ay

    2009-01-01

    The optimal cathode flow field design of a single serpentine proton exchange membrane fuel cell is obtained by adopting a combined optimization procedure including a simplified conjugate-gradient method (SCGM) and a completely three-dimensional, two-phase, non-isothermal fuel cell model. The cell output power density P cell is the objective function to be maximized with channel heights, H 1 -H 5 , and channel widths, W 2 -W 5 as search variables. The optimal design has tapered channels 1, 3 and 4, and diverging channels 2 and 5, producing 22.51% increment compared with the basic design with all heights and widths setting as 1 mm. Reduced channel heights of channels 2-4 significantly enhance sub-rib convection to effectively transport oxygen to and liquid water out of diffusion layer. The final diverging channel prevents significant leakage of fuel to outlet via sub-rib convection from channel 4. Near-optimal design without huge loss in cell performance but is easily manufactured is discussed.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of turbulent flow in wire wrapped fuel pin bundles cooled by sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Aakanksha; Cadiou, Thierry; Bieder, Ulrich; Viazzo, Stephane

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the study is to understand the thermal hydraulics in a core sub-assembly with liquid sodium as coolant by performing detailed numerical simulations. The passage for the coolant flow between the fuel rods is maintained by thin wires wrapped around the rods. The contact point between the fuel pin and the spacer wire is the region of creation of hot spots and a cyclic variation of temperature in hot spots can adversely affect the mechanical properties of the clad due to the phenomena like thermal stripping. The current status quo provides two different models to perform the numerical simulations, namely Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The two models differ in the extent of modelling used to close the Navier-Stokes equations. LES is a filtered approach where the large scale of motions are explicitly resolved while the small scale motions are modelled whereas RANS is a time averaging approach where all scale of motions are modelled. Thus LES involves less modelling as compared to RANS and so the results are comparatively more accurate. An attempt has been made to use the LES model. The simulations have been performed using the code Trio-U (developed by CEA). The turbulent statistics of the flow and thermal quantities are calculated. Finally the goal is to obtain the frequency of temperature oscillations at the region of hot spots near the spacer wire. (authors)

  10. A CFD analysis of flow blockage phenomena in ALFRED LFR demo fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Piazza, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.dipiazza@enea.it [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy); Magugliani, Fabrizio [Ansaldo Nucleare, ANN, Corso Perrone n.25, Genova (Italy); Tarantino, Mariano [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy); Alemberti, Alessandro [Ansaldo Nucleare, ANN, Corso Perrone n.25, Genova (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • URANS simulations were performed on internal flow blockage in HLM fuel assemblies. • Comparison with RELAP results for foot blockage shows a very good agreement. • The temperature peak behind the blockage is dominant for large blockages. • A blockage of ∼15% leads to a maximum clad temperature around 800 °C in 3–4 s. • Local clad temperatures around 1000 °C are reached for blockages of 30% or more. - Abstract: A CFD study was carried out on fluid flow and heat transfer in the Lead-cooled Fuel Pin Bundle of the ALFRED LFR DEMO. In the context of GEN-IV heavy liquid metal-cooled reactors safety studies, the flow blockage in a fuel sub-assembly is considered one of the main issues to be addressed and the most important and realistic accident for LFR fuel assembly. The present paper is a first step toward a detailed analysis of such phenomena, and a CFD model and approach are presented to have a detailed thermo-fluid dynamic picture in the case of blockage. In particular the closed hexagonal, grid-spaced fuel assembly of the LFR ALFRED was modeled and computed. At this stage, the details of the spacer grids were not included, but a conservative analysis has been carried out based on the current main geometrical and physical features. Reactivity feedback, as well as axial power profile, were not included in this analysis. Results indicate that critical conditions, with clad temperatures around ∼900 °C, are reached with blockage larger than 30% in terms of area fraction. Two main effects can be distinguished: a local effect in the wake/recirculation region downstream the blockage and a global effect due to the lower mass flow rate in the blocked subchannels; the former effect gives rise to a temperature peak behind the blockage and it is dominant for large blockages (>20%), while the latter effect determines a temperature peak at the end of the active region and it is dominant for small blockages (<10%). The blockage area was placed at

  11. Benchmark exercise for fluid flow simulations in a liquid metal fast reactor fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzari, E., E-mail: emerzari@anl.gov [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Fischer, P. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Yuan, H. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL (United States); Van Tichelen, K.; Keijers, S. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); De Ridder, J.; Degroote, J.; Vierendeels, J. [Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Doolaard, H.; Gopala, V.R.; Roelofs, F. [NRG, Petten (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • A EUROTAM-US INERI consortium has performed a benchmark exercise related to fast reactor assembly simulations. • LES calculations for a wire-wrapped rod bundle are compared with RANS calculations. • Results show good agreement for velocity and cross flows. - Abstract: As part of a U.S. Department of Energy International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) is collaborating with the Dutch Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN), and Ghent University (UGent) in Belgium to perform and compare a series of fuel-pin-bundle calculations representative of a fast reactor core. A wire-wrapped fuel bundle is a complex configuration for which little data is available for verification and validation of new simulation tools. UGent and NRG performed their simulations with commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. The high-fidelity Argonne large-eddy simulations were performed with Nek5000, used for CFD in the Simulation-based High-efficiency Advanced Reactor Prototyping (SHARP) suite. SHARP is a versatile tool that is being developed to model the core of a wide variety of reactor types under various scenarios. It is intended both to serve as a surrogate for physical experiments and to provide insight into experimental results. Comparison of the results obtained by the different participants with the reference Nek5000 results shows good agreement, especially for the cross-flow data. The comparison also helps highlight issues with current modeling approaches. The results of the study will be valuable in the design and licensing process of MYRRHA, a flexible fast research reactor under design at SCK·CEN that features wire-wrapped fuel bundles cooled by lead-bismuth eutectic.

  12. Evaporation and abstraction determined from stable isotopes during normal flow on the Gariep River, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Roger E.; Jack, Sam

    2018-04-01

    Changes in the stable isotope composition of water can, with the aid of climatic parameters, be used to calculate the quantity of evaporation from a water body. Previous workers have mostly focused on small, research catchments, with abundant data, but of limited scope. This study aimed to expand such work to a regional or sub-continental scale. The first full length isotope survey of the Gariep River quantifies evaporation on the river and the man-made reservoirs for the first time, and proposes a technique to calculate abstraction from the river. The theoretically determined final isotope composition for an evaporating water body in the given climate lies on the empirically determined local evaporation line, validating the assumptions and inputs to the Craig-Gordon evaporation model that was used. Evaporation from the Gariep River amounts to around 20% of flow, or 40 m3/s, of which about half is due to evaporation from the surface of the Gariep and Vanderkloof Reservoirs, showing the wastefulness of large surface water impoundments. This compares well with previous estimates based on evapotranspiration calculations, and equates to around 1300 GL/a of water, or about the annual water consumption of Johannesburg and Pretoria, where over 10 million people reside. Using similar evaporation calculations and applying existing transpiration estimates to a gauged length of river, the remaining quantity can be attributed to abstraction, amounting to 175 L/s/km in the lower middle reaches of the river. Given that high water demand and climate change are global problems, and with the challenges of maintaining water monitoring networks, stable isotopes are shown to be applicable over regional to national scales for modelling hydrological flows. Stable isotopes provide a complementary method to conventional flow gauging for understanding hydrology and management of large water resources, particularly in arid areas subject to significant evaporation.

  13. A single subcutaneous bolus of erythropoietin normalizes cerebral blood flow autoregulation after subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Ma, XiaoDong; Rochat, Per

    2002-01-01

    the intracarotid (133)Xe method. CBF autoregulation was preserved in both sham-operated groups (lower limits of mean arterial blood pressure: 91+/-3 and 98+/-3 mmHg in groups A and B, respectively). In the vehicle treated SAH-group, autoregulation was abolished and the relationship between CBF and blood pressure...... administered recombinant EPO on impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation after experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group A, sham operation plus vehicle; group B, sham operation plus EPO; group C, SAH plus vehicle; group D, SAH plus EPO...

  14. Transplantation of Normal Adipose Tissue Improves Blood Flow and Reduces Inflammation in High Fat Fed Mice With Hindlimb Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fat deposition is associated with peripheral arterial disease. Adipose tissue has recently been implicated in vascular remodeling and angiogenic activity. We hypothesized that the transplantation of adipose tissues from normal mice improves blood flow perfusion and neovascularization in high-fat diet fed mice.Methods: After 14 weeks of high-fat diet (HFD-fed mice, unilateral hind limb ischemia was performed. Subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT and brown adipose tissue (BAT fat pads were harvested from normal EGFP mice, and subcutaneously transplanted over the region of the adductor muscles of HFD mice. Blood flow was measured using Laser Doppler Scanner. Vascular density, macrophages infiltration, and macrophage polarization were examined by RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry.Results: We found that the transplantation of WAT derived from normal mice improved functional blood flow in HFD-fed mice compared to mice transplanted with BAT and sham-treated mice. WAT transplantation increased the recruitment of pericytes associated with nascent blood vessels, but did not affect capillary formation. Furthermore, transplantation of WAT ameliorated HFD-induced insulin resistance, M2 macrophage predominance and the release of arteriogenic factors in ischemic muscles. Mice receiving WAT also displayed a marked reduction in several proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, mice transplanted with BAT were glucose intolerant and demonstrated increased IL-6 levels in ischemic muscles.Conclusion: These results indicate that transplantation of adipose tissue elicits improvements in blood perfusion and beneficial effects on systemic glucose homeostasis and could be a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of diabetic peripheral arterial disease.

  15. Normalizing the maximum permissible seal failure of the fuel cladding of VVER and the activity of the fission products in the coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzanova, L.M.; Miglo, V.N.; Slavyagin, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    In most countries developing a nuclear power industry based on pressurized water reactors, one of the conditions for issuing a license under normal operating conditions for issuing a license stipulates that the fuel elements may not lose their hermetic seal either under normal operating conditions or during presumable disturbances of the conditions of normal use. At a conference on radiation safety the ALARA principle was taken to be fundamental, it being attempted to keep the activity of the coolant of the primary circuit, including the fission products emerging from unsealed fuel elements, to a level as low as reasonably possible. As many years of experience in the nuclear power industry have shown, nuclear power stations are in many cases operated with nonhermetic fuel elements in the core. Therefore, from the point of view of safety and economy, the best way to operate a power plant is to try to ensure maximum burnup of the fuel of the unsealed elements as they operate within the limits of safe activity of the fission products in the fuel circuits

  16. Progressive epicardial coronary blood flow reduction fails to produce ST-segment depression at normal heart rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chantal, Marilyn; Diodati, Jean G; Nasmith, James B; Amyot, Robert; LeBlanc, A Robert; Schampaert, Erick; Pharand, Chantal

    2006-12-01

    ST-segment depression is commonly seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Most authors have attributed it to transient reductions in coronary blood flow due to nonocclusive thrombus formation on a disrupted atherosclerotic plaque and dynamic focal vasospasm at the site of coronary artery stenosis. However, ST-segment depression was never reproduced in classic animal models of coronary stenosis without the presence of tachycardia. We hypothesized that ST-segment depression occurring during acute coronary syndromes is not entirely explained by changes in epicardial coronary artery resistance and thus evaluated the effect of a slow, progressive epicardial coronary artery occlusion on the ECG and regional myocardial blood flow in anesthetized pigs. Slow, progressive occlusion over 72 min (SD 27) of the left anterior descending coronary artery in 20 anesthetized pigs led to a 90% decrease in coronary blood flow and the development of ST-segment elevation associated with homogeneous and transmural myocardial blood flow reductions, confirmed by microspheres and myocardial contrast echocardiography. ST-segment depression was not observed in any ECG lead before the development of ST-segment elevation. At normal heart rates, progressive epicardial stenosis of a coronary artery results in myocardial ischemia associated with homogeneous, transmural reduction in regional myocardial blood flow and ST-segment elevation, without preceding ST-segment depression. Thus, in coronary syndromes with ST-segment depression and predominant subendocardial ischemia, factors other than mere increases in epicardial coronary resistance must be invoked to explain the heterogeneous parietal distribution of flow and associated ECG changes.

  17. Experimental and modelling study of reverse flow catalytic converters for natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B.

    2000-07-01

    There is renewed interest in the development of natural gas vehicles in response to the challenge to reduce urban air pollution and consumption of petroleum. The natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine is one way to apply natural gas to the conventional diesel engine. Dual fuel engines operating on natural gas and diesel emit less nitrogen oxides, and less carbon soot to the air compared to conventional diesel engines. The problem is that at light loads, fuel efficiency is reduced and emissions of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are increased. This thesis focused on control methods for emissions of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide in the dual fuel engine at light loads. This was done by developing a reverse flow catalytic converter to complement dual fuel engine exhaust characteristics. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations of reverse flow catalytic converters were conducted. Reverse flow creates a high reactor temperature even when the engine is run at low exhaust temperature levels at light loads. The increase in reactor temperature from reverse flow could be 2 or 3 times higher than the adiabatic temperature increase, which is based on the reactor inlet temperature and concentration. This temperature makes it possible for greater than 90 per cent of the hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide to be converted with a palladium based catalyst. Reverse flow appears to be better than conventional unidirectional flow to deal with natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine pollution at light loads. Reverse flow could also maintain reactor temperature at over 800 K and hydrocarbon conversion at about 80 per cent during testing. The newly presented model simulates reactor performance with reasonable accuracy. Both carbon monoxide and methane oxidation over the palladium catalyst in excess oxygen and water were described using first order kinetics.

  18. Mean blood velocities and flow impedance in the fetal descending thoracic aortic and common carotid artery in normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardo, C M; Campbell, S; Nicolaides, K H

    1988-12-01

    A linear array pulsed Doppler duplex scanner was used to establish reference ranges for mean blood velocities and flow impedance (Pulsatility Index = PI) in the descending thoracic aorta and in the common carotid artery from 70 fetuses in normal pregnancies at 17-42 weeks' gestation. The aortic velocity increased with gestation up to 32 weeks, then remained constant until term, when it decreased. In contrast, the velocity in the common carotid artery increased throughout pregnancy. The PI in the aorta remained constant throughout pregnancy, while in the common carotid artery it fell steeply after 32 weeks. These results suggest that with advancing gestation there is a redistribution of the fetal circulation with decreased impedance to flow to the fetal brain, presumably to compensate for the progressive decrease in fetal blood PO2.

  19. Normal Control Study of Cerebral Blood Flow by 99mTc HM-PAO SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koong, Sung Soo; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Bum Woo; Lee, Kyung Han

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion was evaluated in 15 normal controls by single photon emission computed tomography using 99m Tc HM-PAO. For quantitative analysis, 13 pairs of homologous region of interest (ROI) were drawn on three transverse slices matching the vascular territories and cerebral cortices, and normal values of 3 semiquantitative indices including 'Right to left ratio' (R/L ratio), 'Regional index' (RI), and 'Region to cerebellum ratio (R/cbll ratio) were calculated. Mean values of R/L ratios of homologous regions were ranged from 0.985 to 1.023, and mean ± 2 s.d. of all regions did not exceed 11% of mean. Significant difference of Rls (mean count per voxel of a ROI/mean count per voxel of total ROls) between regions were found (p<0.001) with highest values in occipital cortex and cerebellum. After attenuation correction, Rls in deep gray, cranial portion of anterior cerebral artery and vascular territories in the 2nd slice increased significantly (p<0.05-0.001) hut vise versa in other ROIs. Region to cerebellum ratios also showed regional difference similar to Rls.

  20. Assembly and Stacking of Flow-through Enzymatic Bioelectrodes for High Power Glucose Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Caroline; Nedellec, Yannig; Gross, Andrew J; Ondel, Olivier; Buret, Francois; Goff, Alan Le; Holzinger, Michael; Cosnier, Serge

    2017-07-19

    Bioelectrocatalytic carbon nanotube based pellets comprising redox enzymes were directly integrated in a newly conceived flow-through fuel cell. Porous electrodes and a separating cellulose membrane were housed in a glucose/oxygen biofuel cell design with inlets and outlets allowing the flow of electrolyte through the entire fuel cell. Different flow setups were tested and the optimized single cell setup, exploiting only 5 mmol L -1 glucose, showed an open circuit voltage (OCV) of 0.663 V and provided 1.03 ± 0.05 mW at 0.34 V. Furthermore, different charge/discharge cycles at 500 Ω and 3 kΩ were applied to optimize long-term stability leading to 3.6 J (1 mW h) of produced electrical energy after 48 h. Under continuous discharge at 6 kΩ, about 0.7 mW h could be produced after a 24 h period. The biofuel cell design further allows a convenient assembly of several glucose biofuel cells in reduced volumes and their connection in parallel or in series. The configuration of two biofuel cells connected in series showed an OCV of 1.35 V and provided 1.82 ± 0.09 mW at 0.675 V, and when connected in parallel, showed an OCV of 0.669 V and provided 1.75 ± 0.09 mW at 0.381 V. The presented design is conceived to stack an unlimited amount of biofuel cells to reach the necessary voltage and power for portable electronic devices without the need for step-up converters or energy managing systems.

  1. Time-dependent tritium inventories and flow rates in fuel cycle components of a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, W.

    1995-01-01

    Time-dependent inventories and flow rates for several components of the fuel cycle are modeled and studied through the use of a new modular-type model for the dynamic simulation of the fuel cycle in a fusion reactor. The complex dynamic behavior in the modeled subsystems is analyzed using this new model. Preliminary results using fuel cycle design configurations similar to ITER are presented and analyzed. The inventories and flow rates inside the primary vacuum pumping, fuel cleanup unit and isotope separation system are studied. Ways to minimize the tritium inventory are also assessed. This was performed by looking at various design options that could be used to minimize tritium inventory for specific components. (orig.)

  2. Co-flow anode/cathode supply heat exchanger for a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2005-11-22

    In a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly, a co-flow heat exchanger is provided in the flow paths of the reformate gas and the cathode air ahead of the fuel cell stack, the reformate gas being on one side of the exchanger and the cathode air being on the other. The reformate gas is at a substantially higher temperature than is desired in the stack, and the cathode gas is substantially cooler than desired. In the co-flow heat exchanger, the temperatures of the reformate and cathode streams converge to nearly the same temperature at the outlet of the exchanger. Preferably, the heat exchanger is formed within an integrated component manifold (ICM) for a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly.

  3. Fuel assembly outlet temperature profile influence on core by-pass flow and power distribution determination in WWER -440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petenyi, V.; Klucarova, K.; Remis, J.

    2003-01-01

    The in core instrumentation of the WWER-440 reactors consists of the thermocouple system and the system of self powered detectors (SPD). The thermocouple systems are positioned about 50 cm above the fuel bundle upper flow-mixing grid. The usual assumption is that, the coolant is well mixed in the Tc location, i.e. the temperature is constant through the flow cross-section area. The present evaluations by using the FLUENT 5.5.14 code reveal that, this assumption is not fulfilled. There exists a temperature profile that depends on fuel assembly geometry and on inner power profile of the fuel assembly. The paper presents the estimation of this effect and its influence on the core power distribution and the core by-pass flow determination. Comparison with measurements in Mochovce NPP will also be a part of this presentation (Authors)

  4. Design of experiment study of the parameters that affect performance of three flow plate configurations of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carton, J.G.; Olabi, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Low temperature hydrogen fuel cells are electrochemical devices which offer a promising alternative to traditional power sources. Fuel cells produce electricity with a reaction of the fuel (hydrogen) and air. Fuel cells have the advantage of being clean; only producing water and heat as by products. The efficiency of a fuel cell varies depending on the type; SOFC with CHP for example, can have a system efficiency of up to 65%. What the Authors present here is a comparison between three different configurations of flow plates of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, the manufacturer's serpentine flow plate and two new configurations; the maze flow plate and the parallel flow plate. A study of the input parameters affecting output responses of voltage, current, power and efficiency of a fuel cell is performed through experimentation. The results were taken from direct readings of the fuel cell and from polarisation curves produced. This information was then analysed through a design of experiment to investigate the effects of the changing parameters on different configurations of the fuel cell's flow plates. The results indicate that, in relation to current and voltage response of the polarisation curve and the corresponding graphs produced from the DOE, the serpentine flow plate design is a much more effective design than the maze or parallel flow plate design. It was noted that the parallel flow plate performed reasonably well at higher pressures but over all statically the serpentine flow plate performed better.

  5. New Approach to Study the Ignition Processes of Organic Coal-Water Fuels in an Oxidizer Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiullin T.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To converge the conditions of organic water-coal fuel composition combustion in the typical power equipment we developed a new approach and installed an experimental setup, eliminating the traditional fixing the fuel droplets on the thermocouples or rods. Specialized cone-shaped chamber was used to implement the process of lingering of organic water-coal fuel droplets. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the lingering of organic water-coal fuel droplets were established. We determined the parameters of the system (droplet size of 0.4-0.6 mm, temperatures 823-903 K and the velocity of the oxidizer flow 1.5-6 m/s at which the droplets were consistently ignited in the process of lingering. Minimum temperatures and ignition delay times of organic water-coal fuel droplets based on brown coal, used motor, turbine, transformer oils, kerosene, gasoline and water were defined.

  6. Numerical and experimental investigation on effects of inlet humidity and fuel flow rate and oxidant on the performance on polymer fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takalloo, Pourya Karimi; Nia, Ehsan Shabahang; Ghazikhani, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The impact of alteration in humidification on performance of fuel cell. • The impact of variation of temperature on performance of fuel cell. • The effects of using pure oxygen on the polarity curve are studied. • Fuel cell has been investigated both experimentally and numerically. - Abstract: Considering the importance of water management in a fuel cell and in order to increase the rate of the electro-chemical process in fuel cells with polymer membrane, it is required to optimize the humidity and inlet flow rates on anode and cathode sides. In this study, the impact of alteration in humidification and inlet flow rates on performance improvements for polymer membrane fuel cells is investigated both experimentally and numerically. To obtain the objective, employing the results from experiments and simulations, polarity curve and power density are produced and further used to conduct the desired investigations. In addition, through the conducted simulations the effects of using pure oxygen in the cathode side and inlet gas temperatures on the polarity curve is studied. The results demonstrate that an increase in humidity of the inlet gases will lead to performance amelioration in the cell, due to reduction in ionic resistance at the membrane. Furthermore, with the aforementioned increment; molar fractions of hydrogen and oxygen are decreased through the channel which results in produced water increment. Amplification in inlet flow rates to a certain level will improve the penetration possibility for gaseous forms leading to betterment of the cell performance in this specified range. Performance improvements with inlet gases temperature increment conclude other results of this study.

  7. Subcutaneous blood flow during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia: studies in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Sestoft, L

    1982-08-01

    Subcutaneous blood flow was measured preceding insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms and 2 h later in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal males. In all groups subcutaneous blood flow decreased at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. Two hours after onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms, subcutaneous blood flow was still significantly decreased compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. In normal subjects local nerve blockade had no effect on blood flow changes during hypoglycaemia, whereas local alpha-receptor blockade abolished the vasoconstrictor response. We suggest that circulating catecholamines stimulating vascular alpha-receptors are probably responsible for flow reduction in the subcutaneous tissue during hypoglycaemia.

  8. Flow sheet development for the dissolution of unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes in F-Canyon, Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two dissolution flow sheets were tested for the desorption of unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes. Both the aluminum (from the can, cladding, and fuel core) and the plutonium oxide (PuO 2 ) are dissolved simultaneously, i.e., a co-dissolution flow sheet. In the first series of tests, 0.15 and 0.20 molar (M) potassium fluoride (KF) solutions were used and the dissolution extended over several days. In the other series of tests, solutions with higher concentrations of fluoride (0.25 to 0.30 M) were used. Calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) was used in those tests as the fluoride source

  9. Experimental and numerical study of temperature fields and flows in flame during the diffusion combustion of certain liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, E. L.; Matvienko, O. V.; Agafontsev, M. V.; Reyno, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    The paper represents experimental studying the pulsations of temperature fields and the structure of a flow in the flame formed during the combustion of certain fuels. Also, the paper provides the mathematical modeling of a flow in the flame formed during the combustion of diesel fuels, as well as the comparison with experimental data and the estimation of the scale for turbulent vortices in flame. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement with numerical modeling, which confirms the hypothesis of similarity for the pulsations of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic parameters.

  10. Effects of smoking on regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral vascular disease patients and normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1987-01-01

    The chronic effect of smoking on the regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) was studied by 133-Xenon inhalation method and described with the Initial Slope Index (ISI). Fifty-two patients as the control group who had no abnormality neurologically or with CT scan, 32 patients with old cerebral infarction and 20 patients with old cerebral hemorrhage were introduced to the present study, and these patients were divided into smokers and non-smokers in each group. Those whose smoking index of 200 or more [(number of cigarettes/day) x (years of smoking history) ≥ 200] were designated as smokers. ISI values were decreased significantly in smokers than non-smokers in all groups. Mean ISI value of unaffected hemisphere in smokers decreased by 16 % in the infarction group and 22 % in the hemorrhage group comparing to the non-smokers', respectively. In the control group, mean ISI value of right hemisphere decreased by 15 % and left 14 % in smokers compared to the non-smokers. The r-CBF values in 44 of the 47 smokers were found to be lower than the expected age matched values in non-smokers. Serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol value in smokers was significantly lower than that in non-smokers. We demonstrated preliminarily that the smoking chronically reduced the r-CBF. Advanced atherosclerosis associated with the smoker was suggested to affect the CBF. (author)

  11. A Protocol for the Comprehensive Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells in Normal and Inflamed Murine Non-Lymphoid Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yen-Rei A.; O’Koren, Emily G.; Hotten, Danielle F.; Kan, Matthew J.; Kopin, David; Nelson, Erik R.; Que, Loretta; Gunn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is used extensively to examine immune cells in non-lymphoid tissues. However, a method of flow cytometric analysis that is both comprehensive and widely applicable has not been described. We developed a protocol for the flow cytometric analysis of non-lymphoid tissues, including methods of tissue preparation, a 10-fluorochrome panel for cell staining, and a standardized gating strategy, that allows the simultaneous identification and quantification of all major immune cell types in a variety of normal and inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. We demonstrate that our basic protocol minimizes cell loss, reliably distinguishes macrophages from dendritic cells (DC), and identifies all major granulocytic and mononuclear phagocytic cell types. This protocol is able to accurately quantify 11 distinct immune cell types, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, inflammatory monocytes, resident monocytes, alveolar macrophages, resident/interstitial macrophages, CD11b- DC, and CD11b+ DC, in normal lung, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, skin, eyes, and mammary gland. We also characterized the expression patterns of several commonly used myeloid and macrophage markers. This basic protocol can be expanded to identify additional cell types such as mast cells, basophils, and plasmacytoid DC, or perform detailed phenotyping of specific cell types. In examining models of primary and metastatic mammary tumors, this protocol allowed the identification of several distinct tumor associated macrophage phenotypes, the appearance of which was highly specific to individual tumor cell lines. This protocol provides a valuable tool to examine immune cell repertoires and follow immune responses in a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions. PMID:26938654

  12. Assessment of coronary flow reserve by sestamibi imaging in patients with typical chest pain and normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storto, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Anna R.; Pellegrino, Teresa; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cuocolo, Alberto; Petretta, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We assessed coronary flow reserve (CFR) by sestamibi imaging in patients with typical chest pain, positive exercise stress test and normal coronary vessels. Thirty-five patients with typical chest pain and normal angiogram and 12 control subjects with atypical chest pain underwent dipyridamole/rest 99m Tc-sestamibi imaging. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was estimated by measuring first transit counts in the pulmonary artery and myocardial counts from SPECT images. Estimated CFR was expressed as the ratio of stress to rest MBF. Rest MBF and CFR were corrected for rate-pressure product (RPP) and expressed as normalised MBF (MBF n ) and normalised CFR (CFR n ). Coronary vascular resistances (CVR) were calculated as the ratio between mean arterial pressure and estimated MBF. At rest, estimated MBF and MBF n were lower in controls than in patients (0.98 ± 0.4 vs 1.30 ± 0.3 counts/pixel/s and 1.14 ± 0.5 vs 1.64 ± 0.6 counts/pixel/s, respectively, both p n was still higher in controls than in patients (2.1 ± 0.5 vs 1.29 ± 0.5, p < 0.0001). At baseline, CVR values were lower (p < 0.01) in patients than in controls. Dipyridamole-induced changes in CVR were greater (p < 0.0001) in controls (-63%) than in patients (-35%). In the overall study population, a significant correlation between dipyridamole-induced changes in CVR and CFR was observed (r = -0.88, p < 0.0001). SPECT might represent a useful non-invasive method for assessing coronary vascular function in patients with angina and a normal coronary angiogram. (orig.)

  13. Characteristics of Cerebral Blood Flow in Vascular Dementia using SPM Analysis Compared to Normal Control and Alzheimer's Dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Jae Woo

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion pattern of vascular dementia (VD) was not well established and overlap of cerebral perfusion pattern was reported between VD and Alzheimer's dementia (AD). The aim of this study is to assess the specific patterns of SPECT finding in VD compared with normal control subjects and to disclose differences of cerebral blood flow between subjects with VD and AD were investigated using statistic parametric mapping analysis. Thirty-two VD (mean age ; 67.86.4 years, mean CDR ; 0.980.27), 51 AD (mean age ; 71.47.2 years, CDR ; 1.160.47), which were matched for age and severity of dementia, and 30 normal control subjects (mean age ; 60.17.7 years) participated in this study. The Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT data were analyzed by SPM99. The SPECT data of the patients with VD were compared to those of the control subjects and then compared to the patients with AD. SPM analysis of the SPECT image showed significant perfusion deficits in the both frontal (both cingulate gyrus, both inferior frontal gyrus, B no.47, right frontal rectal gyrus, left frontal subcallosal gyrus, B no.25), both temporal (right insula, B no.13, left superior temporal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus, B no.35), occipital (occipital lingual gyrus), right corpus callosum and right cerebellar tonsil regions in subjects with VD compared with normal control subjects (uncorrected p<0.01). Comparison of the two dementia groups (uncorrected p<0.01) revealed significant hypoperfusion in both parietal posterior central gyrus, right inferior frontal gyrus (B no.47), left insula, right thalamus (ventral lateral nucleus), right claustrum and right occipital cuneus regions in VD group compared with AD. There were no typical confined regional hypoperfusion areas but scattered multiple perfusion deficits in VD compared AD. These findings may be helpful to reflect the pathophysiological mechanisms of VD and to disclose differences of cerebral blood flow between subjects with VD and AD

  14. Estimation of coronary flow reserve by sestamibi imaging in patients with mild hypertension and normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storto, G.; Gallicchio, R.; Maddalena, F.; Pellegrino, T.; Petretta, M.; Fiumara, G.; Cuocolo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hypertension may exhibit abnormal vasodilator capacity during pharmacological vasodilatation. We assessed coronary flow reserve (CFR) by sestamibi imaging in hypertensive patients with normal coronary vessels. Twenty-five patients with untreated mild essential hypertension and normal coronary vessels and 10 control subjects underwent dipyridamole-rest Tc-99m sestamibi imaging. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was estimated by measuring first transit counts in pulmonary artery and myocardial counts from tomograhic images. CFR was expressed as the ratio of stress to rest MBF. Coronary vascular resistances (CVR) were computed as the ratio between mean arterial pressure and MBF. Estimated MBF at rest was not different in patients and controls (1.11±0.59 vs. 1.14±0.28 counts/pixel/s; P=0.87). Conversely, stress MBF was lower in patients than in controls (1.55±0.47 vs. 2.68±0.53 counts/pixel/s; P<0.001). Thus, CFR was reduced in patients compared to controls (1.61±0.58 vs. 2.43±0.62; P<0.001). Rest and stress CVR values were higher in patients (P<0.001), while stress-induced changes in CVR were not different (P=0.08) between patients (-51%) and controls (-62%). In the overall study population, a significant relation between CFR and stress-induced changes in CVR was observed (r=-0.86; P<0.001). Sestamibi imaging may detect impaired coronary vascular function in response to dipyridamole in patients with untreated mild essential hypertension and normal coronary arteries. A mild increase in arterial blood pressure does not affect baseline MBF, but impairs coronary reserve due to the amplified resting coronary resistances.

  15. Normalization of flow-mediated dilation to shear stress area under the curve eliminates the impact of variable hyperemic stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickleborough Timothy D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normalization of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD to individual shear stress area under the curve (peak FMD:SSAUC ratio has recently been proposed as an approach to control for the large inter-subject variability in reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress; however, the adoption of this approach among researchers has been slow. The present study was designed to further examine the efficacy of FMD normalization to shear stress in reducing measurement variability. Methods Five different magnitudes of reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress were applied to 20 healthy, physically active young adults (25.3 ± 0. 6 yrs; 10 men, 10 women by manipulating forearm cuff occlusion duration: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, in a randomized order. A venous blood draw was performed for determination of baseline whole blood viscosity and hematocrit. The magnitude of occlusion-induced forearm ischemia was quantified by dual-wavelength near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS. Brachial artery diameters and velocities were obtained via high-resolution ultrasound. The SSAUC was individually calculated for the duration of time-to-peak dilation. Results One-way repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated distinct magnitudes of occlusion-induced ischemia (volume and peak, hyperemic shear stress, and peak FMD responses (all p AUC (p = 0.785. Conclusion Our data confirm that normalization of FMD to SSAUC eliminates the influences of variable shear stress and solidifies the utility of FMD:SSAUC ratio as an index of endothelial function.

  16. The effect of smoking on regional cerebral blood flow in the normal aged volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Kitani, Kohaku; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1987-01-01

    They were divided into four groups of (1) 15 young smokers (mean age of 55 years), (2) 14 young non-smokers (mean age of 52 years), (3) 16 elderly smokers (mean age of 74 years), and (4) elderly non-smokers (mean age of 75 years). All subjects were healthy volunteers without any past history of cerebral and pulmonary diseases. The rCBF was measured by Xe 133 inhalation method using 16-ch-Novo-cerebrograph. Pulmonary functions such as FVC, FEV 1.0 %, %VC, FEV 1.0 , V 50 and V 25 were measured by Autospiror HI-498, and End-tidal partial pressures for carbon dioxide (PeCO 2 ) were monitored by capnograph (Normocap, Datex). The rCBF reduced significantly with advancing age. Although there was no significant difference in rCBF between young smokers and non-smokers, elderly smokers showed significantly lower rCBF than elderly non-smokers. There was no difference in vital capacity and FEV 1.0 % between smokers and non-smokers in both young and elderly people. Smokers group, however, showed significantly lower V 50 than non-smokers group. PeCO 2 in smokers was significantly lower than that in non-smokers. No significant differences were seen in hematocrit, antithrombin III, serum lipids, and blood pressure between two groups in the young and elderly. There was a significantly positive correlation between rCBF and PeCO 2 . Our finding showed smoking over a long period produces reductions in the cerebral blood flow. This was consistent with the reports by other researchers. In addition, the results of the present study suggested the possibility that the latent small airway disturbances resulting from long-term smoking also play a ole of leading to decreased PCO 2 and eventually cause reductions in rCBF. (author)

  17. Flow field measurements using LDA and numerical computation for rod bundle of reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Zou Zunyu

    1995-02-01

    Local mean velocity and turbulence intensity measurements were obtained with DANTEC 55 X two-dimensional Laser Dopper Anemometry (LDA) for rod bundle of reactor fuel assembly test model which was a 4 x 4 rod bundle. The data were obtained from different experimental cross-sections both upstream and downstream of the model support plate. Measurements performed at test Reynolds numbers of 1.8 x 10 4 ∼3.6 x 10 4 . The results described the local and gross effects of the support plate on upstream and downstream flow distributions. A numerical computation was also given, the experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical one and the others in references. Finally, a few suggestions were proposed for how to use the LDA system well. (11 figs.)

  18. Numerical simulation of water flow through the bottom en piece of a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Moyses A.; Santos, Andre A. Campagnole dos

    2007-01-01

    The water flow through the bottom nozzle of a nuclear fuel assembly was simulated using a commercial CFD code, CFX 10.0. Previously, simulations with a perforated plate similar to the bottom nozzle plate were performed to define the appropriate mesh refinement and turbulence model (κ-ε or SST). Subsequently, the numerical simulation was performed with the optimized mesh using the turbulence model (κ-ε in a standard bottom nozzle with some geometric simplifications. The numerical results were compared with experimental results to determine the pressure drop through the bottom nozzle in the Reynolds range from ∼10500 to ∼95000. The agreement between the numerical simulations and experimental results may be considered satisfactory. The study indicated that the CFD codes can play an important role in the development of pieces with complex geometries, optimizing the planning of the experiments and aiding in the experimental analysis. (author)

  19. Numerical simulation of the flow field and fuel sprays in an IC engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Schock, H. J.; Ramos, J. I.; Carpenter, M. H.; Stegeman, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional model for axisymmetric piston-cylinder configurations is developed to study the flow field in two-stroke direct-injection Diesel engines under motored conditions. The model accounts for turbulence by a two-equation model for the turbulence kinetic energy and its rate of dissipation. A discrete droplet model is used to simulate the fuel spray, and the effects of the gas phase turbulence on the droplets is considered. It is shown that a fluctuating velocity can be added to the mean droplet velocity every time step if the step is small enough. Good agreement with experimental data is found for a range of ambient pressures in Diesel engine-type microenvironments. The effects of the intake swirl angle in the spray penetration, vaporization, and mixing in a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke Diesel engine are analyzed. It is found that the swirl increases the gas phase turbulence levels and the rates of vaporization.

  20. Enhanced heat transfer with corrugated flow channel in anode side of direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidary, H.; Abbassi, A.; Kermani, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of corrugated flow channel on the heat exchange of DMFC is studied. • Corrugated boundary (except rectangular type) increase heat transfer up to 90%. • Average heat transfer in rectangular-corrugated boundary is less than straight one. • In Re > 60, wavy shape boundary has highest heat transfer. • In Re < 60, triangular shape boundary has highest heat transfer. - Abstract: In this paper, heat transfer and flow field analysis in anode side of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is numerically studied. To enhance the heat exchange between bottom cold wall and core flow, bottom wall of fluid delivery channel is considered as corrugated boundary instead of straight (flat) one. Four different shapes of corrugated boundary are recommended here: rectangular shape, trapezoidal shape, triangular shape and wavy (sinusoidal) shape. The top wall of the channel (catalyst layer boundary) is taken as hot boundary, because reaction occurs in catalyst layer and the bottom wall of the channel is considered as cold boundary due to coolant existence. The governing equations are numerically solved in the domain by the control volume approach based on the SIMPLE technique (1972). A wide spectrum of numerical studies is performed over a range of various shape boundaries, Reynolds number, triangle block number, and the triangle block amplitude. The performed parametric studies show that corrugated channel with trapezoidal, triangular and wavy shape enhances the heat exchange up to 90%. With these boundaries, cooling purpose of reacting flow in anode side of DMFCs would be better than straight one. Also, from the analogy between the heat and mass transfer problems, it is expected that the consumption of reacting species within the catalyst layer of DMFCs enhance. The present work provides helpful guidelines to the bipolar plate manufacturers of DMFCs to considerably enhance heat transfer and performance of the anode side of DMFC

  1. Numerical investigation on the effect of injection pressure on the internal flow characteristics for diethyl ether, dimethyl ether and diesel fuel injectors using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Thulasi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spray characteristics of the diesel fuel are greatly affected by the cavitation formed inside the injector due to the high pressure differential across the nozzle. Many researchers across the globe are exploring the potential of using diethyl ether and dimethyl ether as an alternate for diesel fuel to meet the strict emission norms. Due to the variation in the fuel properties the internal flow characteristics in injectors for ether fuels are expected to be different from that of the diesel fuel. In this paper computational technique is used to study and compare the internal flow characteristics of diethyl ether, dimethyl ether and diesel fuel. The two phase flow model considering the fuel as a mixture of liquid and vapor is adopted for the simulation study. The injection pressure is varied from 100 to 400 bar and the flow characteristics of all three fuels are simulated and compared. Results indicate that all three fuels have distinct cavitating patterns owing to different property values. The dimethyl ether is found to be more cavitating than diesel and diethyl ether fuels as expected. The mass of fuel injected are found to be decreasing for the ether fuels when compared with diesel fuel at all injection pressures.

  2. Combustion of Solid Fuel in a Vortex Furnace with Counter-swirling Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redko A.A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of computer simulation of the processes of incineration of low-grade solid fuel-pulverized peat with a moisture content of 40%, an ash content of 6% are given. It has been determined the fields of distribution of temperature, velocity of gases and particles in the volume and at the outlet from the furnace. The three-dimensional temperature distribution in the combustion chamber indicates high-temperature combustion of peat particles at temperatures above 1700°C with liquid ash removal in the lower part of the furnace. It has been determined that when the furnace is cooled, it is not ensured combustion of the fuel completely. The value of the swirling flow rate at the outlet from the furnace (up to 370 m/s ensures the efficiency of separation of fuel particles, reducing heat losses from mechanical underburning. It is determined that the concentration of oxygen is close to zero over the entire height of the furnace, at an outlet from the furnace the oxygen concentration is 5...6%, since oxygen is supplied with excess (αв=1,2. The results of a numerical study showed that the diameter of peat particles affects the process of their combustion: coke particles with an initial diameter of 25 mkm to 250 mkm burn out by 96%. With an increase in particle diameter up to 1000 mkm, the degree of burn-out of coke decreases, but at the same time their removal decreases. It is shown that the furnace ensures the completeness of combustion of peat particles of peat 99.8%, volatiles is 100%.

  3. Analysis of cold flow fluidization test results for various biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, M.Z.; Husain, Z.; Pong, S.L.Y. [University Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia). School of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    A systematic theoretical and experimental study was conducted to obtain hydrodynamic properties such as particle size diameter, bulk density, fluidizing velocity, etc. for locally available biomass residue fuels in Malaysia like rice husk, sawdust, peanut shell, coconut shell, palm fiber as well as coal and bottom ash. The tests were carried out in a cold flow fluidization bed chamber of internal diameter 60 mm with air as fluidizing medium. Bed-pressure drop was measured as a function of superficial air velocity over a range of bed heights for each individual type of particle. The data were used to determine minimum fluidization velocity, which could be used to compare with theoretical values. The particle size of biomass residue fuel was classified according to Gildart's distribution diagram. The results show that Gildart's particle size (B) for sawdust, coal bottom ash, coconut shell have good fluidizing properties compared to rice husk, type (D) or palm fiber, type (A). The bulk density and voidage are found to be main factors contributing to fluidizing quality of the bed.

  4. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-27

    This work deals with selected aspects of mass transport phenomena in PEFCs and DMFCs. Emphasis is placed on the implications originating from the occurrence of two-phase flow within these devices. Optimality of supply, distribution, and removal of the fuel, the oxidant, and the reaction products is of utmost importance for the stability, efficiency, and durability of the devices. Being a prerequisite for high current densities while maintaining sufficient voltage, mass transport optimization contributes to the development of cost effective as well as compact designs and hence competitive fuel cells. [German] Die Visualisierung und Quantifizierung von Fluessigwasseransammlungen in Polymerelektrolytmembran-Brennstoffzellen konnte mittels Neutronenradiographie erreicht werden. Dank dieser neuartigen diagnostischen Methode konnte erstmals die Fluessigwasseransammlung in den poroesen Gasdiffusionsschichten direkt nachgewiesen und quantifiziert werden. Die Kombination von Neutronenradiographie mit ortsaufgeloesten Stromdichtemessungen bzw. lokaler Impedanzspektroskopie erlaubte die Korrelation des inhomogenen Fluessigwasseranfalls mit dem lokalen elektrochemischen Leistungsverhalten. Systematische Untersuchungen an Polymerelektrolyt- und Direkt-Methanol-Brennstoffzellen verdeutlichen sowohl den Einfluss von Betriebsbedingungen als auch die Auswirkung von Materialeigenschaften auf die Ausbildung zweiphasiger Stroemungen.

  5. Rapid detection of defects in fuel-cell electrodes using infrared reactive-flow-through technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prodip K.; Weber, Adam Z.; Bender, Guido; Manak, Austin; Bittinat, Daniel; Herring, Andrew M.; Ulsh, Michael

    2014-09-01

    As fuel cells become more prominent, new manufacturing and production methods will need to be developed to deal efficiently and effectively with increased demand. One necessary component of this industrial growth is the accurate measurement of the variability in the manufacturing process. In this study, we present a diagnostic system that combines infrared thermography with a reactive-flow-through technique to detect catalyst-loading defects in fuel-cell gas-diffusion electrodes accurately with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Experimental results are compared with model predictions of thermal response with good agreement. Data analysis, operating-condition impacts, and detection limits are explored using both experiments and simulation. Overall, the results demonstrate the potential of this technique to measure defects on the millimeter length scale with temporal resolutions appropriate for use on a web-line. Thus we present the first development stage of a next-generation non-destructive diagnostic tool, which may be amenable to eventual use on roll-to-roll manufacturing lines.

  6. Measurement of cerebral blood flow with two-dimensional cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Evaluation of normal subjects and patients with vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimada, Akio; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Mamiya, Toshio; Takahashi, Taku; Kamano, Tsuyoshi; Osada, Hisato

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the vertebral flow of patients with vertigo and normal brain magnetic resonance (MR) images was decreased in comparison with normal controls. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was quantitatively measured by a two-dimensional phase contrast cine MR imaging technique in 24 normal controls (mean age, 38.6 years; range, 12-70) and 23 patients (mean age, 53.7 years; range, 19-76) with a 1.5 Tesla MR imaging unit. Inter-and intraobserver variation in blood flow measurements was small (r=0.970, standard error of the estimate [SEE]=2.9 ml, n=80; r=0.963, SEE=4.6 ml, n=40, respectively), In the normal group, mean summed vertebral flow (171 ml/min, SD=40.6) was significantly less than mean summed carotid flow (523 ml/min, SD=111). Right vertebral flow (80.2 ml/min, SD=30.5) was less than left vertebral flow (91.2 ml/min, SD=38.2), but the difference was not statistically significant (p<0.05), In the 23 patients, although the summed vertebral flows of two patients (63.3, 88.8 ml/min) were significantly less than that of the normal group, mean summed vertebral flow (165 ml/min, SD=59.1) showed no significant difference from that of the normal group (p<0.05). In this study, the majority of patients had normal CBF. This method is clinically useful for estimating CBF. (author)

  7. Measurement of cerebral blood flow with two-dimensional cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Evaluation of normal subjects and patients with vertigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashimada, Akio; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Mamiya, Toshio; Takahashi, Taku; Kamano, Tsuyoshi; Osada, Hisato [Saitama Medical School, Kawagoe (Japan). Saitama Medical Center

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the vertebral flow of patients with vertigo and normal brain magnetic resonance (MR) images was decreased in comparison with normal controls. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was quantitatively measured by a two-dimensional phase contrast cine MR imaging technique in 24 normal controls (mean age, 38.6 years; range, 12-70) and 23 patients (mean age, 53.7 years; range, 19-76) with a 1.5 Tesla MR imaging unit. Inter-and intraobserver variation in blood flow measurements was small (r=0.970, standard error of the estimate [SEE]=2.9 ml, n=80; r=0.963, SEE=4.6 ml, n=40, respectively), In the normal group, mean summed vertebral flow (171 ml/min, SD=40.6) was significantly less than mean summed carotid flow (523 ml/min, SD=111). Right vertebral flow (80.2 ml/min, SD=30.5) was less than left vertebral flow (91.2 ml/min, SD=38.2), but the difference was not statistically significant (p<0.05), In the 23 patients, although the summed vertebral flows of two patients (63.3, 88.8 ml/min) were significantly less than that of the normal group, mean summed vertebral flow (165 ml/min, SD=59.1) showed no significant difference from that of the normal group (p<0.05). In this study, the majority of patients had normal CBF. This method is clinically useful for estimating CBF. (author).

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during normal human sleep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ken [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1989-09-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional oxygen extraction fraction (rCEF) and regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured using the continuous inhalation technique for {sup 15}O with positron emission tomography (PET) during both wakefulness and sleep. Ten paid volunteers, with a mean age of 21.6 yrs., were deprived of sleep for a period of approximately 20 hours, and the experiments were performed mostly in the morning. {sup 15}O activity of both whole blood and the plasma, pixel count of PET, total arterial blood oxygen content were used for analysis of rCBF, rOEF and rCMRO{sub 2}. PET scannings were carried out mostly during the very light non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, i.e. stage 1 and/or 2, and wakefulness. About 10 minutes after the start of continuous inhalation of {sup 15}O gas, the {sup 15}O activity of the brain was found to be in a steady-state condition. During this steady-state condition, PET scannings were performed for about 10 minutes. Regions of interest, square in shape and having an area of 2.8 cm{sup 3}, were set in each cortex on PET images of a horizontal cross-section of the brain, set at 45 mm above the orbitomeatal line. The rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were analysed in 5 of 10 male subjects during both wakefulness and NREM sleep, and only 3 were done during three sleep stages, including REM sleep. Levels of rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were found to be decreased in NREM sleep, and the decreasing rates were calculated at 10.2% and 7.6% from the level of wakefulness, respectively. There was no significant difference in the mean value of rOEF between wakefulness and NREM sleep. There were no significant regional differences found in the rate of decrease among the frontal, temporal and occipital cortices. It was considered that the decrease of rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} during NREM sleep suggested a decrease of the activity levels in the cerebral functions. (author).

  9. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during normal human sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ken

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional oxygen extraction fraction (rCEF) and regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (rCMRO 2 ) were measured using the continuous inhalation technique for 15 O with positron emission tomography (PET) during both wakefulness and sleep. Ten paid volunteers, with a mean age of 21.6 yrs., were deprived of sleep for a period of approximately 20 hours, and the experiments were performed mostly in the morning. 15 O activity of both whole blood and the plasma, pixel count of PET, total arterial blood oxygen content were used for analysis of rCBF, rOEF and rCMRO 2 . PET scannings were carried out mostly during the very light non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, i.e. stage 1 and/or 2, and wakefulness. About 10 minutes after the start of continuous inhalation of 15 O gas, the 15 O activity of the brain was found to be in a steady-state condition. During this steady-state condition, PET scannings were performed for about 10 minutes. Regions of interest, square in shape and having an area of 2.8 cm 3 , were set in each cortex on PET images of a horizontal cross-section of the brain, set at 45 mm above the orbitomeatal line. The rCBF and rCMRO 2 were analysed in 5 of 10 male subjects during both wakefulness and NREM sleep, and only 3 were done during three sleep stages, including REM sleep. Levels of rCBF and rCMRO 2 were found to be decreased in NREM sleep, and the decreasing rates were calculated at 10.2% and 7.6% from the level of wakefulness, respectively. There was no significant difference in the mean value of rOEF between wakefulness and NREM sleep. There were no significant regional differences found in the rate of decrease among the frontal, temporal and occipital cortices. It was considered that the decrease of rCBF and rCMRO 2 during NREM sleep suggested a decrease of the activity levels in the cerebral functions. (author)

  10. Interaction of a vacuum arc plasma beam with an obstacle positioned normal to the plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarchin, O; Zhitomirsky, V N; Goldsmith, S; Boxman, R L

    2003-01-01

    The effect of an obstacle positioned normal to a plasma jet produced by a vacuum arc plasma source on the radial distribution of ion flux in the vicinity of the obstacle was studied. This study was motivated by interest in the mutual influence of tightly packed substrates on coatings in industrial vacuum arc deposition systems. The experimental system consisted of a vacuum arc plasma source, a straight plasma duct, and a multi-probe consisting of a removable disc obstacle and a set of ring probes for measuring the radial ion flux. A dc arc discharge was ignited in vacuum between a truncated cone-shaped Cu cathode and an annular anode. The plasma jet produced by cathode spots passed through the anode aperture into the straight plasma duct. An axial magnetic field guided the plasma jet in the duct. The multi-probe consisted of a removable disc obstacle and a set of five ring probes for measuring the radial plasma flux as a function of distance from the disc obstacle. The rings and the disc probes were coaxially arranged on the multi-probe assembly and positioned so that plasma from the source passed through the ring probes and then encountered the disc. The influence of the obstacle was determined by measuring the ring ion currents, both in the presence of the obstacle, and when the disc obstacle was removed. The difference between the measured ion currents with and without the obstacle was interpreted to be the contribution of reflected or sputtered particles from the obstacle to the radial ion flux. The ring probes were biased by -60 V with respect to the grounded anode, to collect the saturated ion current. The multi-probe was connected to a movable stem, and positioned at different distances from the plasma source. A plasma density of ∼6 x 10 17 m -3 was estimated in this study based on the ion current to the obstacle. The radial ion flux collected by the ring probes increased by 20-25% due to the presence of the obstacle. As the calculated mean free path for

  11. Cerebral Blood Flow and Amyloid-β Interact to Affect Memory Performance in Cognitively Normal Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J. Bangen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral blood flow (CBF alterations and amyloid-β (Aβ accumulation have been independently linked to cognitive deficits in older adults at risk for dementia. Less is known about how CBF and Aβ may interact to affect cognition in cognitively normal older adults. Therefore, we examined potential statistical interactions between CBF and Aβ status in regions typically affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD within a sample of older adults from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI study. Sixty-two cognitively normal participants (mean age = 72 years underwent neuroimaging and memory testing. Arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify CBF and florbetapir PET amyloid imaging was used to measure Aβ deposition. Aβ status (i.e., positivity versus negativity was determined based on established cutoffs (Landau et al., 2013. The Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test was used to assess memory. Linear regression models adjusted for age, education, and sex, demonstrated significant interactions between CBF and Aβ status on memory performance. Among Aβ positive older adults, there were significant negative associations between higher CBF in hippocampus, posterior cingulate, and precuneus and poorer memory performance. In contrast, among Aβ negative older adults, there were no significant associations between CBF and cognition. Our findings extend previous CBF studies of dementia risk by reporting interactions between Aβ status and CBF on memory performance in a sample of well-characterized, cognitively normal older adults. Results suggest that differential CBF-cognition associations can be identified in healthy, asymptomatic Aβ positive older adults relative to Aβ negative individuals. Associations between higherCBF and poorer memory among Aβ positive older adults may reflect a cellular and/or vascular compensatory response to pathologic processes whereby higher CBF is needed to maintain normal memory

  12. Flow induced deformation and collapse of a thin rectangular plate with application to the Engineering Test Reactor nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This work examines a single flat fuel plate bounded by two channels and determines static plate deflections, resultant forces and bending stresses due to pressure differential and hydrodynamic loadings. The classical then reactangular plate equations are used to model the fuel plate. These equations contain as an input the hydrodynamic loading function for modeling the fluid-structural interaction. Two models of the channel flow are developed. One assumes the accelerating potential core flow is laminar with developing two-dimensional laminar boundary layers being formed on the channel walls. The Schlichting entry length solution for developing laminar flow is found to be valid the entire length of the channel. The second model assumes the core flow is fully-developed turbulent the entire length of the channel. Hydrodynamic loading functions are developed for both flow models containing parameters for fluid density, fluid velocity, Reynolds number and channel and plate dimensions. Hence the effects of each parameter can be examined independently. A criterion is developed for predicting ETR fuel plate collapse at high channel flow velocities, 1067 cm/s (420 in/sec) (R/sub e/ = 60,000). The criterion predicts that in order to prevent ETR plate collapse the inlet velocities between channels must not differ by more than 2%

  13. Paper-based enzymatic microfluidic fuel cell: From a two-stream flow device to a single-stream lateral flow strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerrero, Maria José; del Campo, F. Javier; Esquivel, Juan Pablo; Giroud, Fabien; Minteer, Shelley D.; Sabaté, Neus

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a first approach towards the development of a cost-effective enzymatic paper-based glucose/O2 microfluidic fuel cell in which fluid transport is based on capillary action. A first fuel cell configuration consists of a Y-shaped paper device with the fuel and the oxidant flowing in parallel over carbon paper electrodes modified with bioelectrocatalytic enzymes. The anode consists of a ferrocenium-based polyethyleneimine polymer linked to glucose oxidase (GOx/Fc-C6-LPEI), while the cathode contains a mixture of laccase, anthracene-modified multiwall carbon nanotubes, and tetrabutylammonium bromide-modified Nafion (MWCNTs/laccase/TBAB-Nafion). Subsequently, the Y-shaped configuration is improved to use a single solution containing both, the anolyte and the catholyte. Thus, the electrolytes pHs of the fuel and the oxidant solutions are adapted to an intermediate pH of 5.5. Finally, the fuel cell is run with this single solution obtaining a maximum open circuit of 0.55 ± 0.04 V and a maximum current and power density of 225 ± 17 μA cm-2 and 24 ± 5 μW cm-2, respectively. Hence, a power source closer to a commercial application (similar to conventional lateral flow test strips) is developed and successfully operated. This system can be used to supply the energy required to power microelectronics demanding low power consumption.

  14. On the calculation of flow and heat transfer characteristics for CANDU-type 19-rod fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh-Shan Yueh; Ching-Chang Chieng

    1987-01-01

    A numerical study is reported of flow and heat transfer in a CANDU-type 19 rod fuel bundle. The flow domain of interest includes combinations of trangular, square, and peripheral subchannels. The basic equations of momentum and energy are solved with the standard k--ε model of turbulence. Isotropic turbulent viscosity is assumed and no secondary flow is considered for this steady-state, fully developed flow. Detailed velocity and temperature distributions with wall shear stress and Nusselt number distributions are obtained for turbulent flow of Re = 4.35 x 10 4 , 10 5 , 2 x 10 5 , and for laminar flow of Re--2400. Friction factor and heat transfer ceofficients of various subchannels inside the full bundle are compared with those of infinite rod arrays of triangular or square arrangements. The calculated velocity contours of peripheral subchannel agreed reasonably with measured data

  15. Fire resistant nuclear fuel cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.C.; Moss, M.

    1979-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a fire resistant nuclear fuel cask employing reversibly thermally expansible bands between adjacent cooling fins such that normal outward flow of heat is not interfered with, but abnormal inward flow of heat is impeded or blocked

  16. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) among Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijay Rao, J.; Venkaiah, K.; Mohan Rao, N.

    2010-01-01

    At Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), employees are exposed to ammonia, hydrofluoric acid, acetone, etc., which are respiratory toxicants and inhalation of these pollutants may produce irritation and obstruction in airways. Due to nature of their occupation, tradesman working in plants are having longer duration of exposure (LDE) and others, such as supervisors, scientific officers, helpers, etc., that occasionally visit plants are having shorter duration of exposure (SDE) to these pollutants. The peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) is an index to diagnose obstruction in larger airways and this is metered with mini peak flow meter among 835 NFC employees. Using ANOVA test, PEFR value was compared according to age and smoking. The value was compared between LDE and SDE employees according to smoking and duration of employment. The multiple regression equation for prediction of PEFR was developed. Age, smokers and higher duration of LDE employees demonstrated significantly lower PEFR value. In comparison to 10 year duration, 30 and above year duration of employment, LDE employees showed a higher decline in PEFR, that is 95 L (17.6%) and in SDE employees, that is 41L (7.8%). This may be due to longer duration of employment of LD employees smoking prevention and follow up study is suggested. (author)

  17. Mapping Global Flows of Chemicals: From Fossil Fuel Feedstocks to Chemical Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Peter G; Cullen, Jonathan M

    2018-02-20

    Chemical products are ubiquitous in modern society. The chemical sector is the largest industrial energy consumer and the third largest industrial emitter of carbon dioxide. The current portfolio of mitigation options for the chemical sector emphasizes upstream "supply side" solutions, whereas downstream mitigation options, such as material efficiency, are given comparatively short shrift. Key reasons for this are the scarcity of data on the sector's material flows, and the highly intertwined nature of its complex supply chains. We provide the most up to date, comprehensive and transparent data set available publicly, on virgin production routes in the chemical sector: from fossil fuel feedstocks to chemical products. We map global mass flows for the year 2013 through a complex network of transformation processes, and by taking account of secondary reactants and by-products, we maintain a full mass balance throughout. The resulting data set partially addresses the dearth of publicly available information on the chemical sector's supply chain, and can be used to prioritise downstream mitigation options.

  18. Numerical simulation of internal and near-nozzle flow of a gasoline direct injection fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kaushik; Som, Sibendu; Battistoni, Michele; Li, Yanheng; Quan, Shaoping; Senecal, Peter Kelly

    2015-12-01

    A numerical study of two-phase flow inside the nozzle holes and the issuing spray jets for a multi-hole direct injection gasoline injector has been presented in this work. The injector geometry is representative of the Spray G nozzle, an eight-hole counterbore injector, from, the Engine Combustion Network (ECN). Simulations have been carried out for the fixed needle lift. Effects of turbulence, compressibility and, non-condensable gases have been considered in this work. Standard k—ɛ turbulence model has been used to model the turbulence. Homogeneous Relaxation Model (HRM) coupled with Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach has been utilized to capture the phase change phenomena inside and outside the injector nozzle. Three different boundary conditions for the outlet domain have been imposed to examine non-flashing and evaporative, non-flashing and non-evaporative, and flashing conditions. Inside the nozzle holes mild cavitation-like and in the near-nozzle region flash boiling phenomena have been predicted in this study when liquid fuel is subjected to superheated ambiance. Noticeable hole to hole variation has been also observed in terms of mass flow rates for all the holes under both flashing and non-flashing conditions.

  19. An initial study on modeling the global thermal and fast reactor fuel cycle mass flow using Vensim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinton, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    This study concentrated on modeling the construction and decommissioning rates of five major facilities comprising the nuclear fuel cycle: (1) current LWRs with a 60-year service life, (2) new LWRs burning MOX fuel, (3) new LWRs to replace units in the current fleet, (4) new FRs to be added to the fleet, and (5) new spent fuel reprocessing facilities. This is a mass flow mode starting from uranium ore and following it to spent forms. The visual dynamic modeling program Vensim was used to create a system of equations and variables to track the mass flows from enrichment, fabrication, burn-up, and the back-end of the fuel cycle. The scenarios considered provide estimates of the uranium ore requirements, quantities of LLW and HLW production, and the number of reprocessing facilities necessary to reduce recently reported levels of spent fuel inventory. Preliminary results indicate that the entire national spent fuel inventory produced in the next 100 years can be reprocessed with a reprocessing plant built every 11 years (small capacity) or even as low as every 23 years (large capacity). (authors)

  20. Analytical and numerical study on cooling flow field designs performance of PEM fuel cell with variable heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Ebrahim; Ziaei-Rad, Masoud; Jahantigh, Nabi

    2016-06-01

    In PEM fuel cells, during electrochemical generation of electricity more than half of the chemical energy of hydrogen is converted to heat. This heat of reactions, if not exhausted properly, would impair the performance and durability of the cell. In general, large scale PEM fuel cells are cooled by liquid water that circulates through coolant flow channels formed in bipolar plates or in dedicated cooling plates. In this paper, a numerical method has been presented to study cooling and temperature distribution of a polymer membrane fuel cell stack. The heat flux on the cooling plate is variable. A three-dimensional model of fluid flow and heat transfer in cooling plates with 15 cm × 15 cm square area is considered and the performances of four different coolant flow field designs, parallel field and serpentine fields are compared in terms of maximum surface temperature, temperature uniformity and pressure drop characteristics. By comparing the results in two cases, the constant and variable heat flux, it is observed that applying constant heat flux instead of variable heat flux which is actually occurring in the fuel cells is not an accurate assumption. The numerical results indicated that the straight flow field model has temperature uniformity index and almost the same temperature difference with the serpentine models, while its pressure drop is less than all of the serpentine models. Another important advantage of this model is the much easier design and building than the spiral models.

  1. 1D + 3D two-phase flow numerical model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rui B.; Falcão, D.S.; Oliveira, V.B.; Pinto, A.M.F.R.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A 1D + 3D model of a PEM fuel cell is described and experimentally validated. •VOF method tracks the two-phase flow and electrochemical reactions are considered. •Water dynamics inside a serpentine channel is analyzed for different voltages. •Water content in different regions of channel is quantified. •Important issues on coupling of the VOF model with electrochemical reactions are addressed. -- Abstract: In this work, a numerical model of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is presented. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is employed to simulate the air-water two-phase flow in the cathode gas channel, at the same time that the cell electrochemical performance is predicted. The model is validated against an experimental polarization curve and through the visualization of water distribution inside a transparent fuel cell. The water dynamics inside a serpentine gas channel is numerically analyzed under different operating voltages. Moreover, water content in different regions of the channel is quantified. Current density and water generation rate spatial distributions are also displayed and it is shown how they affect the process of water emergence into the gas channel. Important issues on the simulation of the PEM fuel cells two-phase flow are addressed, especially concerning the coupling of the VOF technique with electrochemical reactions. Both the model and the numerical results aim to contribute to a better understanding of the two-phase flow phenomenon that occurs in these devices.

  2. Experimental study of water flow in nuclear fuel elements; Estudo experimental do escoamento de agua em elementos combustiveis nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Lorena Escriche, E-mail: ler@cdtn.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de; Barros Filho, Jose Afonso; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br, E-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br, E-mail: jabf@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to develop an experimental methodology for investigating the water flow through rod bundles after spacer grids of nuclear fuel elements of PWR type reactors. Speed profiles, with the device LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), and the pressure drop between two sockets located before and after the spacer grid, using pressure transducers were measured.

  3. Cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labeling MRI at resting state in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Gordon, Marc L; Goldberg, Terry E

    2017-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging uses arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). In this review, based on ASL studies in the resting state, we discuss state-of-the-art technical and data processing improvements in ASL, and ASL CBF changes in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other types of dementia. We propose that vascular and AD risk factors should be considered when evaluating CBF changes in aging, and that other validated biomarkers should be used as inclusion criteria or covariates when evaluating CBF changes in MCI and AD. With improvements in hardware and experimental design, ASL is proving to be an increasingly promising tool for exploring pathogenetic mechanisms, early detection, monitoring disease progression and pharmacological response, and differential diagnosis of AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Summary and evaluation: fuel dynamics loss-of-flow experiments (tests L2, L3, and L4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barts, E.W.; Deitrich, L.W.; Eberhart, J.G.; Fischer, A.K.; Meek, C.C.

    1975-09-01

    Three similar experiments conducted to support the analyses of hypothetical LMFBR unprotected-loss-of-flow accidents are summarized and evaluated. The tests, designated L2, L3, and L4, provided experimental data against which accident-analysis codes could be compared, so as to guide further analysis and modeling of the initiating phases of the hypothetical accident. The tests were conducted using seven-pin bundles of mixed-oxide fuel pins in Mark-II flowing-sodium loops in the TREAT reactor. Test L2 used fresh fuel. Tests L3 and L4 used irradiated fuel pins having, respectively, ''intermediate-power'' (no central void) and ''high-power'' (fully developed central void) microstructure. 12 references

  5. Ruthenium cluster-like chalcogenide as a methanol tolerant cathode catalyst in air-breathing laminar flow fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whipple, Devin T.; Jayashree, Ranga S.; Egas, Daniela; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Kenis, Paul J.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the incorporation of a cluster-like Ru x Se y as a methanol tolerant cathode catalyst in a laminar flow fuel cell. The effect on cell performance of several concentrations of methanol in the cathode stream was investigated for the Ru x Se y catalyst and compared to a conventional platinum catalyst. While the Pt catalyst exhibited up to ∼80% drop in power density, the Ru x Se y catalyst showed no decrease in performance when the cathode was exposed to methanol. At several methanol concentrations the Ru x Se y catalyst performed better than the Pt catalyst. This demonstration of a methanol tolerant catalyst in a laminar flow fuel cell opens up the way for further miniaturization of the cell design and simplification of its operation as the need for an electrolyte stream to prevent fuel crossover has been eliminated.

  6. A small-scale flow alkaline fuel cell for on-site production of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillas, Enric; Alcaide, Francisco; Cabot, Pere-Lluis

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a small-scale flow alkaline fuel cell (AFC) built-up for on-site production of HO 2 - using commercial gas-diffusion electrodes has been studied. It produces a spontaneous current due to the oxidation of H 2 to H 2 O at the H 2 -diffusion anode and the reduction of O 2 to HO 2 - at the O 2 -diffusion cathode, while a fresh 1.0-6.0 mol dm -3 KOH electrolyte at 15.0-45.0 deg. C is injected through it. Under circulation of HO 2 - +KOH solutions in open circuit, the flow AFC behaves as a two-electron reversible system. When it is shorted with an external load (R ext ), steady cell voltage-current density curves are found. The use of O 2 /N 2 mixtures to fed the cathode causes a loss of its performance, being required to supply pure O 2 to yield a maximum HO 2 - electrogeneration. The current density and HO 2 - productivity increase with raising OH - concentration, temperature and pressure of O 2 fed. At R ext =0.10 Ω, a current efficiency close to 100% is obtained, and current densities >100 mA cm -2 are achieved for 1.0 mol dm -3 KOH at 45.0 deg. C and for higher KOH concentrations at 25.0 deg. C. The flow AFC can work under optimum conditions up to 6.0 mol dm -3 KOH and 45.0 deg. C for possible industrial applications

  7. Use of flow-normalization to evaluate nutrient concentration and flux changes in Lake Champlain tributaries, 1990-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medalie, Laura; Hirsch, Robert M.; Archfield, Stacey A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey evaluated 20 years of total phosphorus (P) and total nitrogen (N) concentration data for 18 Lake Champlain tributaries using a new statistical method based on weighted regressions to estimate daily concentration and flux histories based on discharge, season, and trend as explanatory variables. The use of all the streamflow discharge values for a given date in the record, in a process called "flow-normalization," removed the year-to-year variation due to streamflow and generated a smooth time series from which trends were calculated. This approach to data analysis can be of great value to evaluations of the success of restoration efforts because it filters out the large random fluctuations in the flux that are due to the temporal variability in streamflow. Results for the full 20 years of record showed a mixture of upward and downward trends for concentrations and yields of P and N. When the record was broken into two 10-year periods, for many tributaries, the more recent period showed a reversal in N from upward to downward trends and a similar reversal or reduction in magnitude of upward trends for P. Some measures of P and N concentrations and yields appear to be related to intensity of agricultural activities, point-source loads of P, or population density. Total flow-normalized P flux aggregated from the monitored tributaries showed a decrease of 30 metric tons per year from 1991 to 2009, which is about 15% of the targeted reduction established by the operational management plan for the Lake Champlain Basin.

  8. Three-dimensional analysis of the coolant flow characteristics in the fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Van Thin; Tran Thi Nhan

    2015-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a widely used method around the world for complex flow and heat industrial problems. In this paper, the coolant flow parameters were investigated in subchannels of VVER-1000 reactor’s fuel assemblies by ANSYS V14.5 programme. The different mesh solutions and turbulence models were carried out to deal with the water flow problems such as velocity distribution, streamline, temperature and pressure change as well as the hydraulic resistances of the spacer grids. The obtained results are good agreement with the measured values and the published reports from other authors. (author)

  9. A longitudinal study of cerebral blood flow and intelligences in normal elderly people living in retirement house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Kitani, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Kazunori; Arimoto, Satao

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the number of the neuron in the brain gradually reduced with advancing age, but speed of decline of brain functions differs among individuals. We have reported that social environmental factors had significant influences to cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mental function. In this paper, we report 2.5 years longitudinal study concerning with CBF and intelligences in twenty normal elderly people, mean age of 76 years old at the first measurement, living in retirement house. 1) Mean CBF measured by Xe 133 inhalation method did not alter significantly during the observation period. 2) Performance intelligence evaluated by Kohs' block design test had reduced at the point of begining but no more reduction was observed during the period. 3) Verbal intelligence evaluated by Hasegawa's intelligence scale for aged which was within normal range at the begining, slightly (-7.5 %) but significantly (p < 0.05) reduced during the period. 4) Performance intelligence tended to reduce in subjects who showed reduction of CBF. There were no significant correlation between both intelligences and CBF. CBF could be maintained even in elderly people living in retirement house which has less social stimuli during relatively short observation period in so far as they maintain active daily life. The speed of reduction of performance intelligence may be getting slow after certain age and verbal intelligence gradually decreases perhaps by disuse of the mental function. (author)

  10. Reduction in mean cerebral blood flow measurements using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD-SPECT during normal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahata, Nobuya; Daitoh, Nobuyuki; Shirai, Fumie; Hara, Shigeru [Narita Memorial Hospital, Toyohashi, Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) was measured by SPECT using the {sup 99m}Tc-ECD-Patlak-Plot method in a selected group of 61 normal non-hospitalized subjects aged 51 to 91 years. The mCBF values showed 48.4{+-}4.7 ml/100 g/min in aged 50-59 years group, 49.9{+-}5.9 ml/100 g/min in aged 60-69 years group, 46.4 {+-}6.5 ml/100 g/min in aged 70-79 group, 38.0{+-}3.7 ml/100 g/min in aged 80-89 years group, 38.9 ml/100 g/min in aged 90-99 years group. There was a statistically significant reduction of mCBF with advancing age (R=-0.41; p=0.001). Women have significantly higher mCBF values than men up to aged 70 years group. In this study, there was no significant laterality in the mCBF between right and left hemispheres in all decade groups. The history of hypertension, alcohol consumption, and cigarette smoking failed to show significant difference in the mCBF values. The present study shows that normal aging is associated with mCBF reduction. (author)

  11. Normal stress differences from Oldroyd 8-constant framework: Exact analytical solution for large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengow, C.; Giacomin, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Oldroyd 8-constant framework for continuum constitutive theory contains a rich diversity of popular special cases for polymeric liquids. In this paper, we use part of our exact solution for shear stress to arrive at unique exact analytical solutions for the normal stress difference responses to large-amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) flow. The nonlinearity of the polymeric liquids, triggered by LAOS, causes these responses at even multiples of the test frequency. We call responses at a frequency higher than twice the test frequency higher harmonics. We find the new exact analytical solutions to be compact and intrinsically beautiful. These solutions reduce to those of our previous work on the special case of the corotational Maxwell fluid. Our solutions also agree with our new truncated Goddard integral expansion for the special case of the corotational Jeffreys fluid. The limiting behaviors of these exact solutions also yield new explicit expressions. Finally, we use our exact solutions to see how η∞ affects the normal stress differences in LAOS.

  12. Reduction in mean cerebral blood flow measurements using 99mTc-ECD-SPECT during normal aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahata, Nobuya; Daitoh, Nobuyuki; Shirai, Fumie; Hara, Shigeru

    1997-01-01

    Mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) was measured by SPECT using the 99m Tc-ECD-Patlak-Plot method in a selected group of 61 normal non-hospitalized subjects aged 51 to 91 years. The mCBF values showed 48.4±4.7 ml/100 g/min in aged 50-59 years group, 49.9±5.9 ml/100 g/min in aged 60-69 years group, 46.4 ±6.5 ml/100 g/min in aged 70-79 group, 38.0±3.7 ml/100 g/min in aged 80-89 years group, 38.9 ml/100 g/min in aged 90-99 years group. There was a statistically significant reduction of mCBF with advancing age (R=-0.41; p=0.001). Women have significantly higher mCBF values than men up to aged 70 years group. In this study, there was no significant laterality in the mCBF between right and left hemispheres in all decade groups. The history of hypertension, alcohol consumption, and cigarette smoking failed to show significant difference in the mCBF values. The present study shows that normal aging is associated with mCBF reduction. (author)

  13. Normalization of flow-mediated dilation to shear stress area under the curve eliminates the impact of variable hyperemic stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jaume; Johnson, Blair D; Newcomer, Sean C; Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D; Fly, Alyce D; Mather, Kieren J; Wallace, Janet P

    2008-09-04

    Normalization of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to individual shear stress area under the curve (peak FMD:SSAUC ratio) has recently been proposed as an approach to control for the large inter-subject variability in reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress; however, the adoption of this approach among researchers has been slow. The present study was designed to further examine the efficacy of FMD normalization to shear stress in reducing measurement variability. Five different magnitudes of reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress were applied to 20 healthy, physically active young adults (25.3 +/- 0. 6 yrs; 10 men, 10 women) by manipulating forearm cuff occlusion duration: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, in a randomized order. A venous blood draw was performed for determination of baseline whole blood viscosity and hematocrit. The magnitude of occlusion-induced forearm ischemia was quantified by dual-wavelength near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS). Brachial artery diameters and velocities were obtained via high-resolution ultrasound. The SSAUC was individually calculated for the duration of time-to-peak dilation. One-way repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated distinct magnitudes of occlusion-induced ischemia (volume and peak), hyperemic shear stress, and peak FMD responses (all p index of endothelial function.

  14. Normal Reflection Characteristics of One-Dimensional Unsteady Flow Shock Waves on Rigid Walls from Pulse Discharge in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong shock waves can be generated by pulse discharge in water, and the characteristics due to the shock wave normal reflection from rigid walls have important significance to many fields, such as industrial production and defense construction. This paper investigates the effects of hydrostatic pressures and perturbation of wave source (i.e., charging voltage on normal reflection of one-dimensional unsteady flow shock waves. Basic properties of the incidence and reflection waves were analyzed theoretically and experimentally to identify the reflection mechanisms and hence the influencing factors and characteristics. The results indicated that increased perturbation (i.e., charging voltage leads to increased peak pressure and velocity of the reflected shock wave, whereas increased hydrostatic pressure obviously inhibited superposition of the reflection waves close to the rigid wall. The perturbation of wave source influence on the reflected wave was much lower than that on the incident wave, while the hydrostatic pressure obviously affected both incident and reflection waves. The reflection wave from the rigid wall in water exhibited the characteristics of a weak shock wave, and with increased hydrostatic pressure, these weak shock wave characteristics became more obvious.

  15. Effects of structure parameters on flow and cavitation characteristics within control valve of fuel injector for modern diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Guo-Xiu; Sun, Zuo-Yu; Wang, Lan; Sun, Shu-Ping; Gu, Jiao-Jiao; Wu, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The Schnerr-Sauer model was used to calculate the cavitation source term. • The development process and influencing factors of cavitation were studied. • The flow process inside control valve during the ball valve opened were studied. • The effects of the structure parameters of the control valve on the cavitation and flow were studied. - Abstract: Cavitation is a common phenomenon in diesel injector and has a strong influence on the internal flow. However, studies so far have focused on cavitation characteristics inside the nozzle. Its influence on the flow during control valve opening remains still unclear. In the paper, a computational study focused on the flow and cavitation phenomena within control valve has been reported and the effects of control valve’s structure parameters (including rounded edge, seal cone angle and outflowing control-orifice structure) on the flow and cavitation characteristics have been investigated in detail. Firstly the 3D model has been validated in terms of single injection quantity and fuel injection duration, showing a good consistency. And then, the development from sheet cavitation to cloud cavitation and the relationship between cavitation, pressure and velocity has been discussed. Based on the numerical results obtained, it is shown that not only the variation of pressure but also the velocity is the important factor which affects cavitation. The increase of the flow velocity reduces the pressure within the flow field which can aggravate the development of cavitation. As cavitation region increases, the fuel flow is hindered and the flow velocity decreases. However, the decrease of flow velocity has suppressed the development of cavitation. All of those variations form a cyclical process.

  16. Age and gender effects on normal regional cerebral blood flow studied using two different voxel-based statistical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirson, A.S.; George, J.; Krug, B.; Vander Borght, T.; Van Laere, K.; Jamart, J.; D'Asseler, Y.; Minoshima, S.

    2009-01-01

    Fully automated analysis programs have been applied more and more to aid for the reading of regional cerebral blood flow SPECT study. They are increasingly based on the comparison of the patient study with a normal database. In this study, we evaluate the ability of Three-Dimensional Stereotactic Surface Projection (3 D-S.S.P.) to isolate effects of age and gender in a previously studied normal population. The results were also compared with those obtained using Statistical Parametric Mapping (S.P.M.99). Methods Eighty-nine 99m Tc-E.C.D.-SPECT studies performed in carefully screened healthy volunteers (46 females, 43 males; age 20 - 81 years) were analysed using 3 D-S.S.P.. A multivariate analysis based on the general linear model was performed with regions as intra-subject factor, gender as inter-subject factor and age as co-variate. Results Both age and gender had a significant interaction effect with regional tracer uptake. An age-related decline (p < 0.001) was found in the anterior cingulate gyrus, left frontal association cortex and left insula. Bilateral occipital association and left primary visual cortical uptake showed a significant relative increase with age (p < 0.001). Concerning the gender effect, women showed higher uptake (p < 0.01) in the parietal and right sensorimotor cortices. An age by gender interaction (p < 0.01) was only found in the left medial frontal cortex. The results were consistent with those obtained with S.P.M.99. Conclusion 3 D-S.S.P. analysis of normal r.C.B.F. variability is consistent with the literature and other automated voxel-based techniques, which highlight the effects of both age and gender. (authors)

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow pattern in normal young and aged volunteers: a 99mTc-HMPAO SPET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catafau, A.M.; Lomena, J.; Pavia, J.; Parellada, E.; Bernardo, M.; Setoain, J.; Tolosa, E.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the normal pattern of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) distribution in normal young and aged volunteers using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ( 99m -Tc-HMPAO) as a tracer. The region brain perfusion of young and aged subjects was compared, especially regarding rCBF differences due to age and gender, and interhemispheric rCBF asymmetries. Sixty-eight right-handed normal volunteers -40 young (mean age 29.5±6.3 years) and 28 aged (mean age 71.2±4.3 years) - were included in the study. rCBF was estimated on the basis of a semiquantitative approach by means of a left-right index and two region/reference ratios, using the cerebellum and the whole brain activity as references. A good correlation between these two region/reference ratios was found (P<0.005 in all cerebral regions). The highest rCBF ratios corresponded to the cerebellum, followed by the occipital lobe. The remaining cortical regions (temporal, parietal, frontal and basal ganglia) showed slightly lower values. The white matter showed rCBF ratios substantially lower than the grey matter. In neighter young nor aged subjects were significant rCBF differences between the genders found in any of the two region/reference indices employed. Aged sugjects showed significantly lower rCBF ratios than young subjects in the left frontal lobe and in the posterior region of the left temporal lobe. In both young and aged subjects, lower perfusion was found in the left hemisphere, except for the white matter region in both age groups and the frontal lobe in the young subjects. Aged subjects presented a slightly higher interhemispheric asymmetry in the frontal lobe. However, interhemispheric asymmetry was minimal (-1.01% to 3.14%). Consequently, a symmetrical rCBF distribution can be assumed between homologous regions, independent of age. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of coronary flow reserve by sestamibi imaging in patients with typical chest pain and normal coronary arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storto, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Anna R.; Pellegrino, Teresa; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages of the National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    We assessed coronary flow reserve (CFR) by sestamibi imaging in patients with typical chest pain, positive exercise stress test and normal coronary vessels. Thirty-five patients with typical chest pain and normal angiogram and 12 control subjects with atypical chest pain underwent dipyridamole/rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi imaging. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was estimated by measuring first transit counts in the pulmonary artery and myocardial counts from SPECT images. Estimated CFR was expressed as the ratio of stress to rest MBF. Rest MBF and CFR were corrected for rate-pressure product (RPP) and expressed as normalised MBF (MBF{sub n}) and normalised CFR (CFR{sub n}). Coronary vascular resistances (CVR) were calculated as the ratio between mean arterial pressure and estimated MBF. At rest, estimated MBF and MBF{sub n} were lower in controls than in patients (0.98 {+-} 0.4 vs 1.30 {+-} 0.3 counts/pixel/s and 1.14 {+-} 0.5 vs 1.64 {+-} 0.6 counts/pixel/s, respectively, both p < 0.02). Stress MBF was not different between controls and patients (2.34 {+-} 0.8 vs 2.01 {+-} 0.7 counts/pixel/s, p=NS). Estimated CFR was 2.40 {+-} 0.3 in controls and 1.54 {+-} 0.3 in patients (p < 0.0001). After correction for the RPP, CFR{sub n} was still higher in controls than in patients (2.1 {+-} 0.5 vs 1.29 {+-} 0.5, p < 0.0001). At baseline, CVR values were lower (p < 0.01) in patients than in controls. Dipyridamole-induced changes in CVR were greater (p < 0.0001) in controls (-63%) than in patients (-35%). In the overall study population, a significant correlation between dipyridamole-induced changes in CVR and CFR was observed (r = -0.88, p < 0.0001). SPECT might represent a useful non-invasive method for assessing coronary vascular function in patients with angina and a normal coronary angiogram. (orig.)

  19. Characterizing dynamic hysteresis and fractal statistics of chaotic two-phase flow and application to fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkholder, Michael B.; Litster, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the stability of two-phase flow regimes and their transitions using chaotic and fractal statistics, and we report new measurements of dynamic two-phase pressure drop hysteresis that is related to flow regime stability and channel water content. Two-phase flow dynamics are relevant to a variety of real-world systems, and quantifying transient two-phase flow phenomena is important for efficient design. We recorded two-phase (air and water) pressure drops and flow images in a microchannel under both steady and transient conditions. Using Lyapunov exponents and Hurst exponents to characterize the steady-state pressure fluctuations, we develop a new, measurable regime identification criteria based on the dynamic stability of the two-phase pressure signal. We also applied a new experimental technique by continuously cycling the air flow rate to study dynamic hysteresis in two-phase pressure drops, which is separate from steady-state hysteresis and can be used to understand two-phase flow development time scales. Using recorded images of the two-phase flow, we show that the capacitive dynamic hysteresis is related to channel water content and flow regime stability. The mixed-wettability microchannel and in-channel water introduction used in this study simulate a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode air flow channel.

  20. Characterizing dynamic hysteresis and fractal statistics of chaotic two-phase flow and application to fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, Michael B.; Litster, Shawn, E-mail: litster@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we analyze the stability of two-phase flow regimes and their transitions using chaotic and fractal statistics, and we report new measurements of dynamic two-phase pressure drop hysteresis that is related to flow regime stability and channel water content. Two-phase flow dynamics are relevant to a variety of real-world systems, and quantifying transient two-phase flow phenomena is important for efficient design. We recorded two-phase (air and water) pressure drops and flow images in a microchannel under both steady and transient conditions. Using Lyapunov exponents and Hurst exponents to characterize the steady-state pressure fluctuations, we develop a new, measurable regime identification criteria based on the dynamic stability of the two-phase pressure signal. We also applied a new experimental technique by continuously cycling the air flow rate to study dynamic hysteresis in two-phase pressure drops, which is separate from steady-state hysteresis and can be used to understand two-phase flow development time scales. Using recorded images of the two-phase flow, we show that the capacitive dynamic hysteresis is related to channel water content and flow regime stability. The mixed-wettability microchannel and in-channel water introduction used in this study simulate a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode air flow channel.

  1. Design, fabrication and testing of an air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell with compound anode flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Luwen; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhao, Youran; An, Zijiang; Zhou, Zhiping; Liu, Xiaowei

    2011-01-01

    An air-breathing micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) with a compound anode flow field structure (composed of the parallel flow field and the perforated flow field) is designed, fabricated and tested. To better analyze the effect of the compound anode flow field on the mass transfer of methanol, the compound flow field with different open ratios (ratio of exposure area to total area) and thicknesses of current collectors is modeled and simulated. Micro process technologies are employed to fabricate the end plates and current collectors. The performances of the μDMFC with a compound anode flow field are measured under various operating parameters. Both the modeled and the experimental results show that, comparing the conventional parallel flow field, the compound one can enhance the mass transfer resistance of methanol from the flow field to the anode diffusion layer. The results also indicate that the μDMFC with an anode open ratio of 40% and a thickness of 300 µm has the optimal performance under the 7 M methanol which is three to four times higher than conventional flow fields. Finally, a 2 h stability test of the μDMFC is performed with a methanol concentration of 7 M and a flow velocity of 0.1 ml min −1 . The results indicate that the μDMFC can work steadily with high methanol concentration.

  2. Impact of Flight Enthalpy, Fuel Simulant, and Chemical Reactions on the Mixing Characteristics of Several Injectors at Hypervelocity Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Baurle, Robert A.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2016-01-01

    The high total temperatures or total enthalpies required to duplicate the high-speed flight conditions in ground experiments often place stringent requirements on the material selection and cooling needs for the test articles and intrusive flow diagnostic equipment. Furthermore, for internal flows, these conditions often complicate the use of nonintrusive diagnostics that need optical access to the test section and interior portions of the flowpath. Because of the technical challenges and increased costs associated with experimentation at high values of total enthalpy, an attempt is often made to reduce it. This is the case for the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project (EIMP) currently underway in the Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The EIMP aims to investigate supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships between mixing performance and losses relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than 8. The experiments will consider a "direct-connect" approach and utilize a Mach 6 nozzle to simulate the combustor entrance flow of a scramjet engine. However, while the value of the Mach number is matched to that expected at the combustor entrance in flight, the maximum value of the total enthalpy for these experiments is limited by the thermal-structural limits of the uncooled experimental hardware. Furthermore, the fuel simulant is helium, not hydrogen. The use of "cold" flows and non-reacting mixtures of fuel simulants for mixing experiments is not new and has been extensively utilized as a screening technique for scramjet fuel injectors. In this study, Reynolds-averaged simulations are utilized (RAS) to systematically verify the implicit assumptions used by the EIMP. This is accomplished by first performing RAS of mixing for two injector configurations at planned nominal experimental

  3. Effect of removal of a central thimble on coolant flow distribution in a research reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    Using two twice full-size models of a HIFAR research reactor fuel element, experiments have been performed to determine how the flow distribution of coolant gas through the element in a transfer flask is affected by removal of the central instrumentation thimble. With the thimble present, experimental flow results agree with theoretical predictions. Over the range of total flowrates considered, mass flow apportioning among the five annular channels was independent of annular channel Reynolds number (in the range 3500 to 10,500) and ranged between 13% and 27% of the total flowrate. For the case with the thimble removed, interesting experimental flow characteristics were obtained which could not have been predicted. Flow apportioning among the annular channels was found to be uniquely dependent upon total flowrate and ranged between 3% and 8% for the experimental conditions investigated (annular channel Reynolds numbers in the range 800 to 4000). (Author)

  4. System and method having multi-tube fuel nozzle with differential flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael John; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Berry, Jonathan Dwight; York, William David

    2017-01-03

    A system includes a multi-tube fuel nozzle with a fuel nozzle body and a plurality of tubes. The fuel nozzle body includes a nozzle wall surrounding a chamber. The plurality of tubes extend through the chamber, wherein each tube of the plurality of tubes includes an air intake portion, a fuel intake portion, and an air-fuel mixture outlet portion. The multi-tube fuel nozzle also includes a differential configuration of the air intake portions among the plurality of tubes.

  5. Computation fluid dynamic modelling of natural convection heat flow in unpumped molten salt fuel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leefe, S.; Jackson-Laver, P.; Scott, I.R.

    2015-01-01

    Use of static molten salt nuclear fuel in simple tubes was discarded in 1949 without considering how convection could affect its utility. This poster describes CFD studies showing that such tubes are practical as fuel elements in essentially conventional fuel assemblies. They can achieve power densities above 250kW per liter of fuel salt (higher than PWR's) and do so without causing the tube wall to heat to dangerous levels. This discovery enables the achievement of the many benefits of molten salt fuel while utilizing the highly developed technology, regulatory, non proliferation and safety benefits of current fuel assembly technology. (author)

  6. Nuclear energy in Europe: uranium flow modeling and fuel cycle scenario trade-offs from a sustainability perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendall, Danielle M; Binder, Claudia R

    2011-03-15

    The European nuclear fuel cycle (covering the EU-27, Switzerland and Ukraine) was modeled using material flow analysis (MFA).The analysis was based on publicly available data from nuclear energy agencies and industries, national trade offices, and nongovernmental organizations. Military uranium was not considered due to lack of accessible data. Nuclear fuel cycle scenarios varying spent fuel reprocessing, depleted uranium re-enrichment, enrichment assays, and use of fast neutron reactors, were established. They were then assessed according to environmental, economic and social criteria such as resource depletion, waste production, chemical and radiation emissions, costs, and proliferation risks. The most preferable scenario in the short term is a combination of reduced tails assay and enrichment grade, allowing a 17.9% reduction of uranium demand without significantly increasing environmental, economic, or social risks. In the long term, fast reactors could theoretically achieve a 99.4% decrease in uranium demand and nuclear waste production. However, this involves important costs and proliferation risks. Increasing material efficiency is not systematically correlated with the reduction of other risks. This suggests that an overall optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle is difficult to obtain. Therefore, criteria must be weighted according to stakeholder interests in order to determine the most sustainable solution. This paper models the flows of uranium and associated materials in Europe, and provides a decision support tool for identifying the trade-offs of the alternative nuclear fuel cycles considered.

  7. Effect of fuel temperature on the methanol spray and nozzle internal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhifang; Yao, Anren; Yao, Chunde; Yin, Zenghui; Xu, Han; Geng, Peilin; Dou, Zhancheng; Hu, Jiangtao; Wu, Taoyang; Ma, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Cavitation region increases with the increasing of methanol temperature. • The nozzle exit velocity increases with the increasing of methanol temperature. • The discharge coefficient decreases with the increasing of methanol temperature. • Droplet SMD reduces when methanol temperature increases measured by PDPA system. • Droplet velocity has the maximum value when methanol temperature is 60 °C. - Abstract: The increasing of fuel temperature can reduce the droplet size and have an advantage of improving spray atomization, while investigations of the effect of temperature on the methanol injector internal flow and external spray is rare. Firstly, a detailed three dimensional numerical simulations of nozzle internal flow have been conducted to probe into the cavitation in methanol injector nozzles, and then an experimental study has been carried out to investigate the droplet size and velocity of methanol spray at various temperatures using the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) detecting system. And results show that the region of cavitations in nozzle orifice enlarges as methanol temperature and injection pressure increases, and the temperature for 'super-cavitation' occurring decreases gradually with the increasing of injection pressure. Moreover, the nozzle exit velocity, discharge coefficient and cavitations number were also analyzed. However, the discharge coefficient reduces nearly equal under various pressure when the methanol temperature is higher than 60 °C. In addition, the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and velocity of methanol droplet were also analyzed, and found that the droplet velocity reaches the maximum value when the methanol temperature is 60 °C.

  8. Local flow management/profile descent algorithm. Fuel-efficient, time-controlled profiles for the NASA TSRV airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, J. L.; Izumi, K. H.; Markham, C. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Thompson, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Local Flow Management/Profile Descent (LFM/PD) algorithm designed for the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle program is described. The algorithm provides fuel-efficient altitude and airspeed profiles consistent with ATC restrictions in a time-based metering environment over a fixed ground track. The model design constraints include accommodation of both published profile descent procedures and unpublished profile descents, incorporation of fuel efficiency as a flight profile criterion, operation within the performance capabilities of the Boeing 737-100 airplane with JT8D-7 engines, and conformity to standard air traffic navigation and control procedures. Holding and path stretching capabilities are included for long delay situations.

  9. Flow visualization study of two-phase flow in the horizontal annulus of the fuel-channel outlet end-fitting of a CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supa-Amornkul, S.; Steward, F.R.; Lister, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    In CANDU-6 reactors, the pressurized hightemperature coolant flows through 380 fuel channels passing horizontally through the core. In 1996, higher than expected rates of wall thinning of the outlet feeders were ascribed to flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). Such corrosion is strongly influenced by the hydrodynamics of the coolant. Results of preliminary flow visualization and modelling studies have suggested that flow conditions in the end-fitting annulus upstream of the outlet feeder may influence the pattern of FAC. For a full-scale flow visualization, an acrylic test section was built to simulate the cylindrical end-fitting with its annulus flow path. The tests were performed with water and air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The phase distribution along the length of the annulus was recorded with a digital video recorder. Size, concentration and velocity of the air bubbles at particular locations were studied with a high-speed digital still camera and a high-speed digital video camera. Phase distributions and variations in bubble size with velocity were determined. Significant effects on the flow patterns of spacer buttons in the annulus were observed. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code-Fluent 6.1-was used to model the results. (authors)

  10. Influence of cathode flow pulsation on performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with interdigitated gas distributors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramiar, A.; Mahmoudi, A.H.; Esmaili, Q.; Abdollahzadeh, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical study is conducted in order to investigate the effect of pulsation of air flow at the cathode side of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell with interdigitated flow field. A two dimensional, isothermal, two-phase, unsteady multi-component transport model is used in order to simulate the transport phenomena. The obtained results are discussed in terms of the influence of flow pulsation on water management and cell performance. The results prove the effectiveness of flow pulsation on improving water removal from cell, enhancing reactants transports to the reaction sites, and increasing the cell performance expressed by increment in the cell limiting current density and maximum output power. The effects of pulsation frequency (f), amplitude (Amp), and mean inlet pressure (P_i_n) on the performance and the output power of the cell, are also investigated. The performance of the cell has no dependency on the frequency range considered in this study. However, as the pulsation amplitude increases the increment in the cell performance is more obvious. Moreover, applying flow pulsation at low flow rates leads to higher efficiency in water removal and performance enhancement. - Highlights: • Mechanism of water and oxygen transport under flow pulsation are discussed. • Pulsating cathode flow increases the limiting current density and output power. • The performance of cell has no significant dependency on pulsation frequency. • The performance and output power increase with the pulsation amplitude. • Using pulsating flow at lower average pressures leads to higher water removal rate.

  11. Performance of PEM fuel cells stack as affected by number of cell and gas flow-rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syampurwadi, A.; Onggo, H.; Indriyati; Yudianti, R.

    2017-03-01

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is a promising technology as an alternative green energy due to its high power density, low operating temperatures, low local emissions, quiet operation and fast start up-shutdown. In order to apply fuel cell as portable power supply, the performance investigation of small number of cells is needed. In this study, PEMFC stacks consisting of 1, 3, 5 and 7-cells with an active area of 25 cm2 per cell have been designed and developed. Their was evaluated in variation of gas flow rate. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was prepared by hot-pressing commercial gas diffusion electrodes (Pt loading 0.5 mg/cm2) on pre-treated Nafion 117 membrane. The stacks were constructed using bipolar plates in serpentine pattern and Z-type gas flow configuration. The experimental results were presented as polarization and power output curves which show the effects of varying number of cells and H2/O2 flow-rates on the PEMFC performance. The experimental results showed that not only number of cells and gas flow-rates affected the fuel cells performance, but also the operating temperature as a result of electrochemistry reaction inside the cell.

  12. Determination of maximum reactor power level consistent with the requirement that flow reversal occurs without fuel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; Darby, J.L.; Ross, S.B.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) operated by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employs forced downflow for heat removal during normal operation. In the event of total loss of forced flow, the reactor will shutdown and the flow reversal valves open. When the downward core flow becomes sufficiently small then the opposing thermal buoyancy induces flow reversal leading to decay heat removal by natural convection. There is some uncertainty as to whether the natural circulation is adequate for decay heat removal after 60 MW operation. BNL- staff carried out a series of calculations to establish the adequacy of flow reversal to remove decay heat. Their calculations are based on a natural convective CHF model. The primary purpose of the present calculations is to review the accuracy and applicability of Fauske's CHF model for the HFBR, and the assumptions and methodology employed by BNL-staff to determine the heat removal limit in the HFBR during a flow reversal and natural convection situation

  13. Cold flow testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine alternate turbopump development high pressure fuel turbine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.; Hudson, Susan T.; Johnson, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has established a cold airflow turbine test program to experimentally determine the performance of liquid rocket engine turbopump drive turbines. Testing of the SSME alternate turbopump development (ATD) fuel turbine was conducted for back-to-back comparisons with the baseline SSME fuel turbine results obtained in the first quarter of 1991. Turbine performance, Reynolds number effects, and turbine diagnostics, such as stage reactions and exit swirl angles, were investigated at the turbine design point and at off-design conditions. The test data showed that the ATD fuel turbine test article was approximately 1.4 percent higher in efficiency and flowed 5.3 percent more than the baseline fuel turbine test article. This paper describes the method and results used to validate the ATD fuel turbine aerodynamic design. The results are being used to determine the ATD high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine performance over its operating range, anchor the SSME ATD steady-state performance model, and validate various prediction and design analyses.

  14. Effect of oxy-fuel combustion with steam addition on coal ignition and burnout in an entrained flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaza, J.; Alvarez, L.; Gil, M.V.; Pevida, C.; Pis, J.J.; Rubiera, F.

    2011-01-01

    The ignition temperature and burnout of a semi-anthracite and a high-volatile bituminous coal were studied under oxy-fuel combustion conditions in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The results obtained under oxy-fuel atmospheres (21%O 2 -79%CO 2 , 30%O 2 -70% O 2 and 35%O 2 -65%CO 2 ) were compared with those attained in air. The replacement of CO 2 by 5, 10 and 20% of steam in the oxy-fuel combustion atmospheres was also evaluated in order to study the wet recirculation of flue gas. For the 21%O 2 -79%CO 2 atmosphere, the results indicated that the ignition temperature was higher and the coal burnout was lower than in air. However, when the O 2 concentration was increased to 30 and 35% in the oxy-fuel combustion atmosphere, the ignition temperature was lower and coal burnout was improved in comparison with air conditions. On the other hand, an increase in ignition temperature and a worsening of the coal burnout was observed when steam was added to the oxy-fuel combustion atmospheres though no relevant differences between the different steam concentrations were detected. -- Highlights: → The ignition temperature and the burnout of two thermal coals under oxy-fuel combustion conditions were determined. → The effect of the wet recirculation of flue gas on combustion behaviour was evaluated. → Addition of steam caused a worsening of the ignition temperature and coal burnout.

  15. Numerical simulations of carbon monoxide poisoning in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells with various flow channel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Kui; Zhou, Yibo; Du, Qing; Yin, Yan; Yu, Shuhai; Li, Xianguo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simulations of CO poisoning in HT-PEMFC with different flow channels are conducted. ► Parallel and serpentine designs result in least and most CO effects, respectively. ► General CO distributions in CLs are similar with different flow channel designs. - Abstract: The performance of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) is significantly affected by the carbon monoxide (CO) in hydrogen fuel, and the flow channel design may influence the CO poisoning characteristics by changing the reactant flow. In this study, three-dimensional non-isothermal simulations are carried out to investigate the comprehensive flow channel design and CO poisoning effects on the performance of HT-PEMFCs. The numerical results show that when pure hydrogen is supplied, the interdigitated design produces the highest power output, the power output with serpentine design is higher than the two parallel designs, and the parallel-Z and parallel-U designs have similar power outputs. The performance degradation caused by CO poisoning is the least significant with parallel flow channel design, but the most significant with serpentine and interdigitated designs because the cross flow through the electrode is stronger. At low cell voltages (high current densities), the highest power outputs are with interdigitated and parallel flow channel designs at low and high CO fractions in the supplied hydrogen, respectively. The general distributions of absorbed hydrogen and CO coverage fractions in anode catalyst layer (CL) are similar for the different flow channel designs. The hydrogen coverage fraction is higher under the channel than under the land, and is also higher on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) side than on the membrane side; and the CO coverage distribution is opposite to the hydrogen coverage distribution

  16. Evaluation of LWR fuel performance under transient and off-normal conditions. A review of recent reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, P.

    1979-11-01

    Reports from the meetings at Petten (Nov. - Dec. 1978), Portland (April-May 1979) and Arles (May 1979) have been reviewed together with various reports related to the Three-Mile Island accident. The reports were selected to cover transients in normal operation (power ramps, load-following) as well as off-normal transients. (author)

  17. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of

  18. Prediction of effectiveness of shunting in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus by cerebral blood flow measurement and computed tomography cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chia-Cheng; Kuwana, Nobumasa; Ito, Susumu; Ikegami, Tadashi [Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and computed tomography (CT) cisternography were performed in 37 patients with a tentative diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) to predict their surgical outcome. The mean CBF of the whole brain was measured quantitatively by single photon emission computed tomography with technetium-99m-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime before surgery. The results of CT cisternography were classified into four patients: type I, no ventricular stasis at 24 hours; type II, no ventricular stasis with delayed clearance of cerebral blush; type III, persistent ventricular stasis with prominent cerebral blush; type IV, persistent ventricular stasis with diminished cerebral blush and/or asymmetrical filling of the sylvian fissures. The mean CBF was significantly lower than that of age-matched controls (p<0.005). Patients with a favorable outcome had a significantly higher mean CBF than patients with an unfavorable outcome (p<0.005). Patients with the type I pattern did not respond to shunting. Some patients with type II and III patterns responded to shunting but improvement was unsatisfactory. Patients with type IV pattern responded well to shunting, and those with a mean CBF of 35 ml/100 g/min or over achieved a favorable outcome. The combination of CBF measurement and CT cisternography can improve the prediction of surgical outcome in patients with suspected NPH. (author)

  19. Prediction of effectiveness of shunting in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus by cerebral blood flow measurement and computed tomography cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chia-Cheng; Kuwana, Nobumasa; Ito, Susumu; Ikegami, Tadashi

    1999-01-01

    Measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and computed tomography (CT) cisternography were performed in 37 patients with a tentative diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) to predict their surgical outcome. The mean CBF of the whole brain was measured quantitatively by single photon emission computed tomography with technetium-99m-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime before surgery. The results of CT cisternography were classified into four patients: type I, no ventricular stasis at 24 hours; type II, no ventricular stasis with delayed clearance of cerebral blush; type III, persistent ventricular stasis with prominent cerebral blush; type IV, persistent ventricular stasis with diminished cerebral blush and/or asymmetrical filling of the sylvian fissures. The mean CBF was significantly lower than that of age-matched controls (p<0.005). Patients with a favorable outcome had a significantly higher mean CBF than patients with an unfavorable outcome (p<0.005). Patients with the type I pattern did not respond to shunting. Some patients with type II and III patterns responded to shunting but improvement was unsatisfactory. Patients with type IV pattern responded well to shunting, and those with a mean CBF of 35 ml/100 g/min or over achieved a favorable outcome. The combination of CBF measurement and CT cisternography can improve the prediction of surgical outcome in patients with suspected NPH. (author)

  20. Rail-Cask Tests: Normal-Conditionsof- Transport Tests of Surrogate PWR Fuel Assemblies in an ENSA ENUN 32P Cask.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ross, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grey, Carissa Ann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arviso, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garmendia, Rafael [Equipos Nucleares Sociedad Anonima, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez Perez, Ismael [Equipos Nucleares Sociedad Anonima, Madrid (Spain); Palacio, Alejandro [Equipos Nucleares Sociedad Anonima, Madrid (Spain); Calleja, Guillermo [Equipos Nucleares Sociedad Anonima, Madrid (Spain); Garrido, David [COORDINADORA, Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez Casas, Ana [COORDINADORA, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez Garcia, Luis [COORDINADORA, Madrid (Spain); Chilton, Lyman Wes [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walz, Jacob [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gershon, Sabina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klymyshyn, Nicholas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanson, Brady [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pena, Ruben [Transportation Technology Center, Inc., Pueblo, CO (United States); Walker, Russell [Transportation Technology Center, Inc., Pueblo, CO (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This report describes tests conducted using a full-size rail cask, the ENSA ENUN 32P, involving handling of the cask and transport of the cask via truck, ships, and rail. The purpose of the tests was to measure strains and accelerations on surrogate pressurized water reactor fuel rods when the fuel assemblies were subjected to Normal Conditions of Transport within the rail cask. In addition, accelerations were measured on the transport platform, the cask cradle, the cask, and the basket within the cask holding the assemblies. These tests were an international collaboration that included Equipos Nucleares S.A., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Coordinadora Internacional de Cargas S.A., the Transportation Technology Center, Inc., the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. All test results in this report are PRELIMINARY – complete analyses of test data will be completed and reported in FY18. However, preliminarily: The strains were exceedingly low on the surrogate fuel rods during the rail-cask tests for all the transport and handling modes. The test results provide a compelling technical basis for the safe transport of spent fuel.

  1. Entropy generation analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a fermat spiral as a flow distributor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel-Hernandez, V.H.; Damian-Ascencio, C.; Juarez-Robles, D.; Gallegos-Munoz, A.; Zaleta-Aguilar, A.; Plascencia-Mora, H.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims at investigating the main sources of irreversibility in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) using a Fermat spiral as flow distributor and also to direct possible improvements in its design. The numerical analysis is based on a finite volume technique with a SIMPLE algorithm as numerical procedure. In order to have a more complete and rigorous analysis a new dimensionless parameter is proposed here. The parameter represents the ratio of the entropy generation due to mass transfer to the total entropy generation is proposed here. Results demonstrate that the main sources of irreversibility in a fuel cell are the concentration losses for the most part of the operational domain, whereas the heat transfer effect is not dominant. -- Highlights: → PEM Fuel Cell with Fermat Spiral as distributor. → Causes of irreversibilities. → A new dimensionless parameter to determine contribution of mass transfer in entropy generation.

  2. Random hydrodynamic loads and the vibration of fuel elements in the turbulent coolant flow in WWER fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevezentsev, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    The generalizing empirical dependences of vibration movements on the random hydrodynamic loads have been obtained. Two characteristic regions of the influence of random hydrodynamic loads on the vibration movements have been discovered. With the values of random hydrodynamic loads more than 80 N/m, a considerable increase in the intensity of vibrations has been observed. It can be explained by the slippage of fuel element in the cell of the spacing lattice [ru

  3. On scaling laws for modelling the steam/water flow in a 'Dodewaard' fuel-assembly using Freon-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, R. van de; Mudde, R.F.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der.

    1991-09-01

    To stimulate the steam/water flow behaviour in a fuel assembly as present in the boiling water reactor at Dodewaard, Freon-12 is used as a modelling fluid. Scaling criteria are elaborated using dimensional analysis as a fluid-to-fluid modelling technique. When scaling is emphasized on void-fraction distribution and flow-regime transitions it is found that an approximately half-scale geometry for the Freon-model should be used. Together with the low latent heat of vaporization of Freon-12 this reduces the total required heat input significantly to be only 2% of the required heat input in a 'Dodewaard' fuel-assembly. Finally, working pressure (and saturation temperature) can also be brought to a convenient level. (author). 16 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  4. Multidimensional simulations of fuel rod appendage effects on pressure drop and heat transfer in an annulus flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Leung, J.C.H.; Bromley, B.P.

    1992-10-01

    The general purpose computational fluid dynamics code, Harwell-FLOW3D, has been used to simulate the effects of fuel rod obstructions on pressure drop and heat transfer in single phase turbulent flows in a concentric annular channel. The results of two and three dimensional simulations are reported for obstructions approximating the geometry of bearing pads used in 37 element CANDU fuel bundles. Pressure drop penalty and augmentation of heat transfer have been quantified and correlated with the obstruction geometrical parameters and the dimensionless numbers representing operating conditions. The predicted effects on pressure drop have been compared with several experimental correlations, yielding good agreement. The methodology presented offers results that can be used directly as input into thermalhydraulic analyses in subchannel and system codes. (Author) (23 figs., 15 refs.)

  5. Role of macrophyte and effect of supplementary aeration in up-flow constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Yoong-Ling; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Oon, Yoong-Sin; Lehl, Harvinder Kaur; Thung, Wei-Eng; Nordin, Noradiba

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the role of plant (Elodea nuttallii) and effect of supplementary aeration on wastewater treatment and bioelectricity generation in an up-flow constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell (UFCW-MFC). Aeration rates were varied from 1900 to 0mL/min and a control reactor was operated without supplementary aeration. 600mL/min was the optimum aeration flow rate to achieve highest energy recovery as the oxygen was sufficient to use as terminal electron acceptor for electrical current generation. The maximum voltage output, power density, normalized energy recovery and Coulombic efficiency were 545.77±25mV, 184.75±7.50mW/m 3 , 204.49W/kg COD, 1.29W/m 3 and 10.28%, respectively. The variation of aeration flow rates influenced the NO 3 - and NH 4 + removal differently as nitrification and denitrification involved conflicting requirement. In terms of wastewater treatment performance, at 60mL/min aeration rate, UFCW-MFC achieved 50 and 81% of NO 3 - and NH 4 + removal, respectively. E. nuttallii enhanced nitrification by 17% and significantly contributed to bioelectricity generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Power and power-to-flow reactivity transfer functions in EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity transfer functions are important in determining the reactivity history during a power transient. Overall nodal transfer functions have been calculated for different subassembly types in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Steady-state calculations for temperature changes and, hence, reactivities for power changes have been separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent terms. Axial nodal transfer functions separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent components are reported in this paper for a typical EBR-II fuel pin. This provides an improved understanding of the time dependence of these components in transient situations

  7. Calculation of the heat flow peak in case of local defect of the fuel plate of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrega, Serge

    1965-11-01

    The author reports the calculation of the local thermal flow which exits a fuel plate in a nuclear reactor, where a fabrication defect creates a much localized peak of the power density released in the plate. He first reports the development of the problem equations: hypotheses and data, equation elaboration, simplification and resolution. He presents the results of a numeric application to actual cases, and describes how the conduction in the sheath is taken into account (study of the influence of peak width and shape), and gives a synthetic presentation of the formula for the approximate calculation of the heat flow in case of local defect [fr

  8. Experimental Comparison of Speed : Fuel-flow and Speed-area Controls on a Turbojet Engine for Small Step Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, L M; Hart, C E; Craig, R T

    1957-01-01

    Optimum proportional-plus-integral control settings for speed - fuel-flow control, determined by minimization of integral criteria, correlated well with analytically predicted optimum settings. Engine response data are given for a range of control settings around the optimum. An inherent nonlinearity in the speed-area loop necessitated the use of nonlinear controls. Response data for two such nonlinear control schemes are presented.

  9. Bioelectrocatalytic NAD+/NADH inter-conversion: transformation of an enzymatic fuel cell into an enzymatic redox flow battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Timothy; Milton, Ross D; Abdellaoui, Sofiene; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-07-25

    Diaphorase and a benzylpropylviologen redox polymer were combined to create a bioelectrode that can both oxidize NADH and reduce NAD + . We demonstrate how bioelectrocatalytic NAD + /NADH inter-conversion can transform a glucose/O 2 enzymatic fuel cell (EFC) with an open circuit potential (OCP) of 1.1 V into an enzymatic redox flow battery (ERFB), which can be rapidly recharged by operation as an EFC.

  10. Optimization of material flow in the nuclear fuel cycle using a cyclic multi-stage production-to-inventory model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePorter, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle is modelled as a cyclic, multi-stage production-to-inventory system. The objective is to meet a known deterministic demand for energy while minimizing acquisition, production, and inventory holding costs for all stages of the fuel cycle. The model allows for cyclic flow (feedback) of materials, material flow conversion factors at each stage, production lag times at each stage, and for escalating costs of uranium ore. It does not allow shortages to occur in inventories. The model is optimized by the application of the calculus of variations and specifically through recently developed theorems on the solution of functionals constrained by inequalities. The solution is a set of optimal cumulative production trajectories which define the stagewise production rates. Analysis of these production rates reveals the optimal nuclear fuel cycle costs and that inventories (stockpiles) occur in uranium fields, enriched uranium hexafluoride, and fabricated fuel assemblies. An analysis of the sensitivity of the model to variation in three important parameters is performed

  11. Modeling of fuel performance and fission product release behavior during HTTR normal operation. A comparative study of the FZJ and JAERI modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Sumita, Junya; Ueta, Shohei; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2001-03-01

    For the prediction of fuel performance and fission product release behavior in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, HTTR of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute(JAERI), during its normal operation, calculation tools were applied as have been used at the Research Center Juelich (FZJ) in safety analyses for pebble-bed HTGR designs. Calculations were made assuming the HTTR operation with a nominal operation time of 660 efpd including a 110 efpd period with elevated fuel temperatures. Fuel performance calculations by the PANAMA code with given fuel temperature distribution in the core have shown that the additional failure level of about 5x10 -6 is expected which is about twice as much as the as-fabricated through-coatings failure level. Under the extreme safety design conditions, the predicted particle failure fraction in the core increases to about 1x10 -3 in maximum. The diffusive release of metallic fission products from the fuel primarily occurs in the core layer with the maximum fuel temperature (layer 3) whereas there is hardly any contribution from layer 1 except for the recoil fraction. Silver most easily escapes the fuel; the predicted release fractions from the fuel compacts are 10% (expected) and 50% (safety design). The figures for strontium (expected: 1.5x10 -3 ), safety design: 3.1x10 -2 ) and cesium (5.6x10 -4 , 2.9x10 -2 ) reveal as well a significant fraction to originate already from intact particles. Comparison with the calculation based on JAERI's diffusion model for cesium shows a good agreement for the release behavior from the particles. The differences in the results can be explained mainly by the different diffusion coefficients applied. The release into the coolant can not modelled because of the influence of the gap between compact and graphite sleeve lowering the release by a factor of 3 to 10. For the prediction of performance and fission product release behavior of advanced ZrC TRISO particles, more experimental work is

  12. Flow-Induced Vibration Measurement of an Inner Cladding Tube in a Simulated Dual-Cooled Fuel Rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jae Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    To create an internal coolant flow passage in a dual cooled fuel rod, an inner cladding tube cannot have intermediate supports enough to relieve its vibration. Thus it can be suffered from a flow-induced vibration (FIV) more severely than an outer cladding tube which will be supported by series of spacer grids. It may cause a fatigue failure at welding joints on the cladding's end plug or fluid elastic instability of long, slender inner cladding due to decrease of a critical flow velocity. This is one of the challenging technical issues when a dual cooled fuel assembly is to be realized into a conventional reactor core To study an actual vibration phenomenon of a dual cooled fuel rod, FIV tests using a small-scale test bundle are being carried out. Measurement results of inner cladding tube of two typically simulated rods are presented. Causes of the differences in the vibration amplitude and response spectrum of the inner cladding tube in terms of intermediate support condition and pellet stacking are discussed.

  13. Prevalence, clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of various flow and gradient patterns in mild or moderate aortic stenosis with normal left ventricular ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong-Qiang Benjamin; Ngiam, Jinghao Nicholas; Kong, William K F; Yeo, Tiong-Cheng; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2016-10-15

    Paradoxical low-flow aortic stenosis (AS) with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) has only been described in severe AS. Controversy surrounds prognosis and management but no studies have reported this phenomenon in mild or moderate AS. We investigated the prevalence of flow and gradient patterns in this population, characterising their clinical and echocardiographic profile. Consecutive subjects (n=1362) with isolated AS: mild (n=462, aortic valve area≥1.5cm(2), 2.5m/snormal LVEF (≥50%) were studied. Subjects with low-flow (stroke volume index<35ml/m(2)) were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to compare the flow and gradient patterns. In mild AS, 130 (28%) had low-flow. Lower left ventricular mass index (LVMI) (97.0±28.5vs116.4±2.3g/m(2),p<0.001), higher percentage of concentric remodelling (40%vs6%,p<0.001) and hypertrophy (43%vs40%,p<0.001) and lower end-systolic wall stress (ESWS) (57.6±1.60vs67.7±19.6dyn/cm(2),p=0.014) were independently associated with low-flow. Similarly, in moderate AS, 297 (33%) had low-flow. Older age (73.4±14.8vs69.5±16.5,p=0.027), lower LVMI (88.6±25.9vs118.0±36.5,p<0.001), higher percentage of concentric remodelling (46%vs8%,p<0.001) and lower ESWS (59.9±18.3vs70.5±19.7,p<0.001) were independently associated with low-flow. Despite moderate AS, most had lower mean pressure gradients, especially subjects with concentric remodelling. In the entire cohort, low-flow patients had more concentric remodelling (43%vs7%,p<0.001) and less eccentric hypertrophy (2%vs27%,p<0.001) compared to normal flow. Low-flow AS with normal LVEF is observed in mild or moderate AS, in up to a third of the cases. These patients had different LV structure compared to normal-flow, with more concentric remodelling. Further studies are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling solid-fuel dispersal during slow loss-of-flow-type transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Fenske, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The dispersal, under certain accident conditions, of solid particles of fast-reactor fuel is examined in this paper. In particular, we explore the possibility that solid-fuel fragmentation and dispersal can be driven by expanding fission gas, during a slow LOF-type accident. The consequences of fragmentation are studied in terms of the size and speed of dispersed particles, and the overall quantity of fuel moved. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of current distribution in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with various flow arrangements – A parametric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaefour, Ibrahim; Karimi, G.; Jiao, Kui; Li, X.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Spatial local current distributions in a single PEMFC are measured. ► Effects of key operating conditions on the local current density are investigated. ► Increasing air and hydrogen stoichiometries improves local current density distributions. ► Operating pressure and temperature have negligible impact on local current distribution. - Abstract: Understanding of current distributions in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is crucial for designing cell components such as the flow field plates and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this study, the spatial current density distributions in a single PEMFC with three serpentine flow channels are measured using a segmented bipolar plate and printed circuit board technique. The effects of key operating conditions such as stoichiometry ratios, inlet humidity levels, cell pressure and temperature on the local current density distributions for co-, counter-, and cross-flow arrangements are examined. It is observed that the local current density distribution over the MEA is directly affected by the cell operating conditions along with the configuration of the flow arrangement. It is also found that among the different flow configurations tested under the various operating conditions, the counter flow arrangement provides the optimum average current density and the lowest variations in the local current densities along the flow channels.

  16. The influence of social activity on regional cerebral blood flow and mental function in the normal aged volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Katsube, Tomoko; Kitani, Kohaku; Okada, Masanori

    1983-01-01

    The infuence of social activity on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and mental function was studied by Xe133 inhalation method in normal aged volunteers. Subjects: The first group consisted of 33 aged volunteers living in nursing home and exposed to little social stimuli. There were 15 males (mean age of 77 years) and 18 females (77 years). The second group consisted of 49 aged community volunteers who were confirmed socially active. There were 25 males (76 years) and 24 females (72 years). All subjects were healthy persons without a past hitory of cerebral diseases and lung diseases. There were no difference in blood pressure and hematocrit between the two groups. Method: The rCBF was measured by 16-ch-Novo-cerebrograph. Verbal intelligence was evaluated by the Hasegawa Simple Intelligence Scale for Aged. Performance intelligence was evaluated with the Kohs' Block Design Test. Results: 1) The mean rCBF in group I showed significantly lower value than that of group II, especially in the frontotemporal region. The performance intelligence was decreased in group I. However, there were no significant difference in the verbal intelligence between the two groups. 2) The aging effect on rCBF and intelligences was more prominent in group II. 3) In males, hemispheric rCBF of group I decreased bilaterally associated with the decrease of both intelligences. While the left hemispheric rCBF in females was relatively preserved as well as the preservation of verbal intelligence. These results indicate that the social environmental factors may have significant influence to aging of the brain especially in the males. (author)

  17. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Coolant Flow Decrease in Fuel Channels of Smolensk-3 RBMK during GDH Blockage Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A. L.; Cherubini, M.; D'Auria, F.; Giannotti, W.; Moskalev, A.

    2007-01-01

    One of the transients that have received considerable attention in the safety evaluation of RBMK reactors is the partial break of a group distribution header (GDH). The coolant flow rate blockage in one GDH might lead to excessive heat-up of the pressure tubes and can result in multiple fuel channels (FC) ruptures. In this work, the GDH flow blockage transient has been studied considering the Smolensk-3 RBMK NPP (nuclear power plant). In the RBMK, each GDH distributes coolant to 40-43 FC. To investigate the behavior of each FC belonging to the damaged GDH and to have a more realistic trend, one (affected) GDH has been schematised with its forty-two FC, one by one. The calculations were performed using the 0-D NK (neutron kinetic) model of the RELAP5-3.3 stand-alone code. The results show that, during the event, the mass flow rate is disturbed differently according to the power distribution established for each FC in the schematization. The start time of the oscillations in mass flow rate depends strongly on the attributed power to each FC. It was also observed that, during the event, the fuel channels at higher thermal power values tend to undergo first cladding rupture leaving the reactor to scram and safeguarding all the other FCs connected to the affected GDH.

  18. Blood disappearance rate of /sup 198/Au-colloid and changes of hepatic blood flow during position change in normal persons and in patients with various hepatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, B Y [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Republic of Korea); Hong, K S; Koh, C S; Lee, M [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea). Coll. of Medicine

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic significance of the blood disappearance rate of /sup 198/Au-colloid and to evaluate the change of hepatic blood flow during position change from supine to erect, we measured the half time of blood disappearance rate of 7,1/sup 98/Au-colloid using external counting method in 94 normal persons and in 77 patients with various hepatic diseases. The results obtained were as follows: 1. In normal control, the mean blood disappearance half time of /sup 198/Au-colloid in supine position was 2.7+-0.4 minutes. There was no significant difference of hepatic blood flow in age and sex. 2. In acute hepatitits, chronic hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis, the mean blood disappearance half times in supine position were 3.0+-0.45, 3.5+-0.74, 7.2+-3.6 minutes respectively. The hepatic blood flow of the patients with chronic hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis were significantly decreased than that of normal control. 3. In the normal control and acute hepatitis, the decreaces of the hepatic blood flow during the position change from supine to erect were 27.7% and 22.6% respectively.

  19. The blood disappearance rate of 198Au-colloid and changes of hepatic blood flow during position change in normal persons and in patients with various hepatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, B.Y.; Hong, K.S.; Koh, C.S.; Lee, M.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic significance of the blood disappearance rate of 198 Au-colloid and to evaluate the change of hepatic blood flow during position change from supine to erect, we measured the half time of blood disappearance rate of 7,1 98 Au-colloid using external counting method in 94 normal persons and in 77 patients with various hepatic diseases. The results obtained were as follows: 1. In normal control, the mean blood disappearance half time of 198 Au-colloid in supine position was 2.7+-0.4 minutes. There was no significant difference of hepatic blood flow in age and sex. 2. In acute hepatitits, chronic hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis, the mean blood disappearance half times in supine position were 3.0+-0.45, 3.5+-0.74, 7.2+-3.6 minutes respectively. The hepatic blood flow of the patients with chronic hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis were significantly decreased than that of normal control. 3. In the normal control and acute hepatitis, the decreaces of the hepatic blood flow during the position change from supine to erect were 27.7% and 22.6% respectively. (author)

  20. The Blood Disappearance Rate of 198Au-Colloid and Changes of Hepatic Blood Flow During Position Change in Normal Persons and in Patients with Various Hepatic Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bo Yeon; Hong, Kee Suk; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic significance of the blood disappearance rate of 198 Au-colloid and to evaluate the change of hepatic blood flow during position change from supine to erect, we measured the half time of blood disappearance rate of 198 Au-colloid using external counting method in 94 normal persons and in 77 patients with various hepatic diseases. The results obtained were as follows: 1) In normal control, the mean blood disappearance half time of 198 Au-colloid in supine position was 2.7±0.4 minutes. There was no significant difference of hepatic blood flow in age and sex. 2) In acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis, the mean blood disappearance half times in supine position were 3.0±0.45, 3.5±0.74, 7.2±3.6 minutes respectively. The hepatic blood flow of the patients with chronic hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis were significantly decreased than that of normal control. 3) In the normal control and acute hepatitis, the decreases of the hepatic blood flow during the position change from supine to erect were 27.7% and 22.6% respectively.

  1. Effects of duct configuration on flow and temperature structure in sodium-cooled 19-rod simulated LMFBR fuel bundles with helical wire-wrap spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wantland, J.L.; Fontana, M.H.; Gnadt, P.A.; Hanus, N.; MacPherson, R.E.; Smith, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal-hydrodynamic testing of sodium-cooled 19-rod simulated LMFBR fuel bundles is being conducted at the O ak Ridge National Laboratory in the Fuel Failure Mockup (FFM), an engineering-scale high-temperature sodium facility which provides prototypic flows, temperatures and power densities. Electrically heated bundles have been tested with two scalloped and two hexagonal duct configurations. Peripheral helical flows, attributed to the spacers, have been observed with strengths dependent upon the evenness and relative sizes of the peripheral flow areas. Diametral sodium temperature profiles are more uniform with smaller peripheral flow areas

  2. Modeling of atomization and distribution of drop-liquid fuel in unsteady swirling flows in a combustion chamber and free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridenkov, A. A.; Toktaliev, P. D.; Tretyakov, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    Numerical and experimental research of atomization and propagation of drop-liquid phase in swirling flow behind the frontal device of combustion chamber was performed. Numerical procedure was based on steady and unsteady Reynolds equations solution. It's shown that better agreement with experimental data could be obtained with unsteady approach. Fractional time step method was implemented to solve Reynolds equations. Models of primary and secondary breakup of liquid fuel jet in swirling flows are formulated and tested. Typical mean sizes of fuel droplets for base operational regime of swirling device and combustion chamber were calculated. Comparison of main features of internal swirling flow in combustion chamber with unbounded swirling flow was made.

  3. Analysis of fuel pin mechanics in case of flow blockage of a single RBMK channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierro, F.; Moretti, F.; Mazzini, D.; D'Auria, F.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of the consequences of the pressure tube rupture due to accidental overheating is one of the key elements for addressing an RBMK safety analysis, since it causes the lost of design boundaries against the fission products release. Several events are expected to take place: thermal hydraulic crisis (energy unbalance), fuel overheating, fuel rod damage, pressure tube overheating, pressure tube failure and graphite stack damage, Hydrogen and fission products release. The present work deals with the research activity carried out at ''Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione'' (DIMNP) of the University of Pisa aimed at assessing numerical models for safety analysis of the RBMK-1000. The attention is focused on the modelling of (1) a single fuel channel and its surrounding graphite column for evaluating the transient conditions enabling the different damaging phenomena, (2) a single fuel rod for investigating fuel pin behaviour, (3) the ruptured fuel channel for figuring the magnitude of the hydrodynamic loads acting on fuel rods. Different codes were employed to cover the competences for the investigation of each field; in particular, RELAP5 code for thermal-hydraulics, FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN1-2 codes for fuel pin mechanics, FLUENT-6 for fluid dynamics. The paper discusses the numerical models, the analysis capabilities of numerical models in comparison with available data about the Leningrad NPP 1992 accident. Furthermore, the possibility to draw a failure map identifying the range of the cladding safety respect to the transient condition is outlined. (author)

  4. Subchannel analysis program for boiling water reactor fuel bundles based on five conservation equations of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessho, Y.; Uchikawa, S.

    1985-01-01

    A subchannel analysis program, MENUETT, is developed for evaluation of thermal-hydraulic characteristics in boiling water reactor fuel bundles. This program is based on five conservation equations of two-phase flow with the drift-flux correlation. The cross flows are calculated separately for liquid and vapor phases from the lateral momentum conservation equation. The effects of turbulent mixing and void drift are accounted for in the program. The conservation equations are implicitly differentiated with the convective terms by the donor-cell method, and are solved iteratively in the axial and lateral directions. Data of the 3 X 3 rod bundle experiments are used for program verification. The lateral distributions of equilibrium quality and mass flow rate at the bundle exit calculated by the program compare satisfactorily with the experimental results

  5. IR1 flow tube and In-Pile Test Section Pressure drop test for the 3-Pin Fuel Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, K. N.; Chi, D. Y.; Sim, B. S.; Park, S. K.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, H. N

    2006-02-15

    The in-pile Section (IPS) of 3-pin Fuel Test Loop(FTL) shall be installed in the vertical hole call IR1 of HANARO reactor core. In order to verify the pressure drop and flow rate both the inside region of IPS at the annular region between IPS and IR1 flow tube, a pressure drop was measured by varing the flow rate on both regions. The measured pressure drop in the annular region is 209kpa at 14.9kg/s which meets the limiting condition of operation of 200kpa. The measured pressure drop in side the IPS becomes 260.25kpa which is lower than the designed value of 306.65kpa. As the pressure drop is lower than the design value, it is quite conservative from the safety and operating point of view.

  6. Computational comparison of the effect of mixing grids of 'swirler' and 'run-through' types on flow parameters and the behavior of steam phase in WWER fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, S.; Sergeev, V.

    2011-01-01

    The results obtained using the TURBOFLOW computer code are presented for the numerical calculations of space distributions of coolant flow, heating and boiling characteristics in WWER fuel assemblies with regard to the effect of mixing grids of 'Swirler' and 'Run-through' types installed in FA on the above processes. The nature of the effect of these grids on coolant flow was demonstrated to be different. Thus, the relaxation length of cross flows after passing a 'Run-through' grid is five times as compared to a 'Swirler'-type grid, which correlates well with the experimental data. At the same time, accelerations occurring in the flow downstream of a 'Swirler'-type grid are by an order of magnitude greater than those after a 'Run-through' grid. As a result, the efficiency of one-phase coolant mixing is much higher for the grids of 'Run-through' type, while the efficiency of steam removal from fuel surface is much higher for 'Swirler'-type grids. To achieve optimal removal of steam from fuel surface it has been proposed to install into fuel assemblies two 'Swirler'-type grids in tandem at a distance of about 10 cm from each other with flow swirling in opposite directions. 'Run-through' grids would be appropriate for use for mixing in fuel assemblies with a high non-uniformity of fuel-by-fuel power generation. (authors)

  7. CFD simulation of flow-pressure characteristics of a pressure control valve for automotive fuel supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dazhuan; Li, Shiyang; Wu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Direct CFD method for flow-pressure characteristic of a pressure control valve. • Fitted and interpreted the constants of the spool hydraulic force equation. • Established a flow coefficient function of both valve opening and pressure drop. • Developed an indirect CFD method based on the valve-governing equations. - Abstract: This study aims to elaborate on specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation methods for fitting the flow-pressure curve of a pressure control valve, which is spring-load valve widely used in the automotive fuel supply system. Given that the couple mechanism exists between the flow field in the valve and the spring system, numerous researchers chose to fit the characteristic curve with experimental approaches but scarcely focused on CFD methods. A direct CFD method is introduced in this study to solve this problem. Two evaluation criteria are used to determine whether the internal flow is physically real. An experiment is conducted to verify the simulation results, and the accuracy of this CFD method is proved. However, it is designed to solve one operating condition with fixed spring parameters and the accuracy depends on the amount of operating conditions. Thus, an indirect CFD method is developed based on the well-elaborated valve-governing equations to improve the efficiency and broaden the application extension. This method aims to simulate the exact value of the equation constants to uncouple the flow by numerical method. It is capable of dealing with changed operating conditions and varied spring parameters, and the results are also verified. The visualization of the internal flow provides a better understanding of the flow fields in the valve. The valve gap directly influences the hydraulic force distribution on the spool and causes most pressure loss. The physical meaning of the function constants are explained based on the flow analysis

  8. KIVA3, Transient Multicomponent 2-D and 3-D Reactive Flows with Fuel Sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsden, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: KIVA3VRELEASE2 is a computer program for the numerical calculation of transient, two and three-dimensional, chemically reactive flows with sprays. It is a newer version of the earlier KIVA3 (1993) that has now been extended to model vertical of canted valves in the cylinder head of a gasoline or diesel engine. KIVA3, in turn, was based on the earlier KIVA2 (1989) and uses the same numerical solution procedure and solves the same sort of equations. KIVA3VRELEASE2 uses a block-structured mesh with connectivity defined through indirect addressing. The departure from a single rectangular structure in logical space allows complex geometries to be modeled with significantly greater efficiency because large regions of deactivated cells are no longer necessary. Cell-face boundary conditions permit greater flexibility and simplification in the application of boundary conditions. KIVA3VRELEASE2 contains a number of significant changes. New features enhance the robustness, efficiency, and usefulness of the overall program for engine modeling. Automatic restart of the cycle with a reduced time-step in case of iteration limit or temperature overflow will reduce code crashes. A new option provides automatic deactivation of a port region when it is closed from the cylinder and reactivation when it communicates with the cylinder. Corrections in the code improve accuracy; extensions to the particle-based liquid wall film model makes the model more complete and a spli injection option has been added. A new subroutine monitors the liquid and gaseous fuel phases and energy balance data and emissions are monitored and printed. New features have been added to the grid generator K3PREP and the graphics post processor, K3POST. 2 - Method of solution: KIVA3VRELEASE2 solves the unsteady equations of motion of a turbulent, chemically reactive mixture of ideal gases, coupled to the equations for a single-component vaporizing fuel spray. The gas

  9. Pressure loss coefficient and flow rate of side hole in a lower end plug for dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: shinch@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Ju-Yong, E-mail: juyong@kaeri.re.kr; In, Wang-Kee, E-mail: wkin@kaeri.re.kr

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A lower end plug with side flow holes is suggested to provide alternative flow paths of the inner channel. • The inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug is estimated from the experiment. • The flow rate through the side holes is estimated in a complete entrance blockage of inner channel. • The consequence in the reactor core condition is evaluated with a subchannel analysis code. - Abstract: Dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been introduced for a significant increase in reactor power. KAERI has been developing a dual-cooled annular fuel for a power uprate of 20% in an optimized PWR in Korea, the OPR1000. This annular fuel can help decrease the fuel temperature substantially relative to conventional cylindrical fuel at a power uprate. Annular fuel has dual flow channels around itself; however, the inner flow channel has a weakness in that it is isolated unlike the outer flow channel, which is open to other neighbouring outer channels for a coolant exchange in the reactor core. If the entrance of the inner channel is, as a hypothetical event, completely blocked by debris, the inner channel will then experience a rapid increase in coolant temperature such that a departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) may occur. Therefore, a remedy to avoid such a postulated accident is indispensable for the safety of annular fuel. A lower end plug with side flow holes was suggested to provide alternative flow paths in addition to the central entrance of the inner channel. In this paper, the inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug and the flow rate through the side holes were estimated from the experimental results even in a complete entrance blockage of the inner channel. An optimization for the side hole was also performed, and the results are applied to a subchannel analysis to evaluate the consequence in the reactor core condition.