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Sample records for normal ct examinations

  1. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  2. Yield of Computed Tomography (CT) Angiography in Patients with Acute Headache, Normal Neurological Examination, and Normal Non Contrast CT: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alons, Imanda M E; Goudsmit, Ben F J; Jellema, Korne; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Wermer, Marieke J H; Algra, Ale

    2018-04-01

    Patients with acute severe headache, normal neurological examination, and a normal noncontrast head computed tomography (NCCT) may still have subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), cervical arterial dissection, or reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is used increasingly in the emergency department for evaluating this, but its added value remains controversial. We retrospectively collected data on the diagnostic yield of CTA in patients with acute severe headache, normal neurological examination, and normal NCCT who received additional CTA in the acute phase in 2 secondary referral centers for vascular neurology. We combined data of our patients with those from the literature and performed a meta-analysis. We included 88 patients from our hospital files and 641 patients after literature search. Of 729 patients 54 had a vascular abnormality on CTA (7.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.5%-9.3%). Abnormalities consisted of aneurysms (n = 42; 5.4%; 95% CI 3.8%-7.0%), CVT (n = 3, .5%), RCVS (n = 4, .5%), Moyamoya syndrome (n = 2, .3%), arterial dissection (n = 2, .3%), and ischemia (n = 1, .1%). Because most of the aneurysms were probably incidental findings, only 12 (1.6%) patients had a clear relation between the headache and CTA findings. The number needed to scan to find an abnormality was 14 overall, and 61 for an abnormality other than an aneurysm. Diagnostic yield of CTA in patients with acute headache, normal neurological examination, and normal NCCT is low, but because of the possible therapeutic consequences, its use might be justified in the emergency setting. Prospective studies confirming these results including cost-effectiveness analyses are needed. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CT examination of the kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Youji; Ishida, Ken; Arita, Takeshi; Ishine, Kenji; Tezen, Takashi; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    1985-01-01

    Plain CT scanning of the kidney was performed in 16 patients with renal failure whose basic renal disorder had been not necessarily known beforehand. The findings of the CT examination were composed of renal atrophy of various degree (12 cases), cystic lesions (8 cases), polycystic renal disease (one case), nephrosclerosis (2 cases), hydronephrosis (2 cases), ureter and renal stones (one case), and normal CT profile (2 cases). Being based on these CT findings and other clinical informations, basic renal disorders could be either presumed or confirmed. It was concluded that plain CT scanning of the kidney was useful to decide a method of treatment and to estimate prognosis in patients with renal failure. (author)

  4. CT and MRI normal findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.

    1998-01-01

    This book gives answers to questions frequently heard especially from trainees and doctors not specialising in the field of radiology: Is that a normal finding? How do I decide? What are the objective criteria? The information presented is three-fold. The normal findings of the usual CT and MRI examinations are shown with high-quality pictures serving as a reference, with inscribed important additional information on measures, angles and other criteria describing the normal conditions. These criteria are further explained and evaluated in accompanying texts which also teach the systematic approach for individual picture analysis, and include a check list of major aspects, as a didactic guide for learning. The book is primarily intended for students, radiographers, radiology trainees and doctors from other medical fields, but radiology specialists will also find useful details of help in special cases. (orig./CB) [de

  5. CT in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Katsuzo; Nogaki, Hidekazu; Noda, Masaya; Kusunoki, Tadaki; Tamaki, Norihiko

    1981-01-01

    CT scans were obtained on 33 patients (age 73y. to 31y.) with the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus. In each case, the diagnosis was made on the basis of the symptoms, CT and cisternographic findings. Underlying diseases of normal pressure hydrocephalus are ruptured aneurysms (21 cases), arteriovenous malformations (2 cases), head trauma (1 case), cerebrovascular accidents (1 case) and idiopathie (8 cases). Sixteen of 33 patients showed marked improvement, five, moderate or minimal improvement, and twelve, no change. The results were compared with CT findings and clinical response to shunting. CT findings were classified into five types, bases on the degree of periventricular hypodensity (P.V.H.), the extent of brain damage by underlying diseases, and the degree of cortical atrophy. In 17 cases of type (I), CT shows the presence of P.V.H. with or without minimal frontal lobe damage and no cortical atrophy. The good surgical improvements were achieved in all cases of type (I) by shunting. In 4 cases of type (II), CT shows the presence of P.V.H. and severe brain damage without cortical atrophy. The fair clinical improvements were achieved in 2 cases (50%) by shunting. In one case of type (III), CT shows the absence of P.V.H. without brain damage nor cortical atrophy. No clinical improvement was obtained by shunting in this type. In 9 cases of type (IV) with mild cortical atrophy, the fair clinical improvement was achieved in two cases (22%) and no improvement in 7 cases. In 2 cases of type (V) with moderate or marked cortical atrophy, no clinical improvement was obtained by shunting. In conclusion, it appeared from the present study that there was a good correlation between the result of shunting and the type of CT, and clinical response to shunting operation might be predicted by classification of CT findings. (author)

  6. Normal pediatric postmortem CT appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Willemijn M.; Bosboom, Dennis G.H.; Koopmanschap, Desiree H.J.L.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Nikkels, Peter G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijn, Rick R. van [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-04-01

    Postmortem radiology is a rapidly developing specialty that is increasingly used as an adjunct to or substitute for conventional autopsy. The goal is to find patterns of disease and possibly the cause of death. Postmortem CT images bring to light processes of decomposition most radiologists are unfamiliar with. These postmortem changes, such as the formation of gas and edema, should not be mistaken for pathological processes that occur in living persons. In this review we discuss the normal postmortem thoraco-abdominal changes and how these appear on CT images, as well as how to differentiate these findings from those of pathological processes. (orig.)

  7. Normal CT in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Tatsuo; Okuno, Takehiko; Ito, Masatoshi; Konishi, Yukuo; Yoshioka, Mieko

    1980-01-01

    There have been several reports as to normal CT in children. However, they included children with convulsions as normal subjects. In our experience, children with convulsions have an enlargement of the subdural space in the frontal region. Therefore, we studied CT in children without convulsions. Of the 10,000 patients examined with EMI 1000 or EMI 1010 at Kyoto Univ. Hospital from 1976 to 1979, 110 children could be classified into the following types according to their symptoms: 1) Type-1 head injury, without abnormalities in CT resulting from this injury, 2) non-migraining headaches, and 3) others with on CT abnormalities who were routinely examined. Previous studies have shown that the enlargement of the subdural space in the frontal region was not abnormal under one year. However, the present study has shown that it was not dilated in children without convulsions. We stressed the usefulness of our newly calculated basal cistern index, because the SD was small and could be readily indentified (this index was under 0.29 in most cases; their SD's were 0.04 in those under one year and 0.02 over one year). The other data were not so different from those of previous studies. (J.P.N.)

  8. Normal CT anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiroga, O.; Matozzi, F.; Beranger, M.; Nazarian, S.; Salamon, G.; Gambarelli, J.

    1982-01-01

    To analyse the anatomo-radiological correlation of the spine and spinal cord, 22 formalized, frozen anatomical specimens corresponding to different regions of the spinal column (8 cervical, 5 dorsal, and 9 lumbar) were studied by CT scans on axial, sagittal and coronal planes and by contact radiography after they were cut into anatomical slices in order to clarify the normal CT anatomy of the spinal column. The results obtained from CT patient scans, performed exclusively on the axial plane, were compared with those obtained from the anatomical specimens (both CT and contrast radiography). High resolution CT programs were used, enabling us to obtain better individualization of the normal structures contained in the spinal column. Direct sagittal and coronal sections were performed on the specimens in order to get further anatomo-radiological information. Enhanced CT studies of the specimens were also available because of the air already present in the subarachnoid spaces. Excellent visualization was obtained of bone structures, soft tissue and the spinal cord. High CT resolution of the spine appeares to be an excellent neuroradiological procedure to study the spine and spinal cord. A metrizamide CT scan is, however, necessary when a normal unenhanced CT scan is insufficient for diagnosis and when the spinal cord is not clearly visible, as often happens at the cervical level. Clinical findings are certainly very useful to ascertain the exact CT level and to limit the radiation exposure. (orig.)

  9. Normal pediatric postmortem CT appearances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Willemijn M.; Bosboom, Dennis G. H.; Koopmanschap, Desiree H. J. L. M.; Nievelstein, Rutger A. J.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2015-01-01

    Postmortem radiology is a rapidly developing specialty that is increasingly used as an adjunct to or substitute for conventional autopsy. The goal is to find patterns of disease and possibly the cause of death. Postmortem CT images bring to light processes of decomposition most radiologists are

  10. Normal pediatric postmortem CT appearances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Willemijn M.; Bosboom, Dennis G. H.; Koopmanschap, Desiree H. J. L. M.; Nievelstein, Rutger A. J.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    Postmortem radiology is a rapidly developing specialty that is increasingly used as an adjunct to or substitute for conventional autopsy. The goal is to find patterns of disease and possibly the cause of death. Postmortem CT images bring to light processes of decomposition most radiologists are

  11. CT and MRI normal findings; CT- und MRT-Normalbefunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E. [Caritas-Krankenhaus, Dillingen (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    This book gives answers to questions frequently heard especially from trainees and doctors not specialising in the field of radiology: Is that a normal finding? How do I decide? What are the objective criteria? The information presented is three-fold. The normal findings of the usual CT and MRI examinations are shwon with high-quality pictures serving as a reference, with inscribed important additional information on measures, angles and other criteria describing the normal conditions. These criteria are further explained and evaluated in accompanying texts which also teach the systematic approach for individual picture analysis, and include a check list of major aspects, as a didactic guide for learning. The book is primarily intended for students, radiographers, radiology trainees and doctors from other medical fields, but radiology specialists will also find useful details of help in special cases. (orig./CB) [German] Normalbefunde sind die haeufigsten Befunde ueberhaupt. Also kein Problem? Doch. Besonders Radiologen in der Ausbildung und Aerzte aus anderen Fachgebieten stellen sich immer wieder die entscheidende Frage: Ist das normal? Woran kann ich das erkennen? Wie kann ich das objektivieren? Dieses Buch leistet dreierlei: 1. Es zeigt klassische Normalbefunde der gaengigen CT- und MRT-Untersuchungen in hoher Abbildungsqualitaet als Referenz. Direkt in die Aufnahmen eingezeichnet sind wichtige Daten: Masse, Winkel und andere Kriterien des Normalen. Sie werden im Text nochmals zusammengefasst, erklaert und bewertet. 2. Es lehrt die Systematik der Bildbetrachtung - wie schaue ich mir ein Bild an, welche Strukturen betrachte ich in welcher Reihenfolge und worauf muss ich dabei besonders achten? Dies alles in Form einer uebersichtlichen Checkliste zu jeder Aufnahme. 3. Es gibt eine Befundformulierung vor, die sich wiederum an dem Schema der Bildanalyse orientiert, alle Kriterien des Normalen definiert und dadurch auch ein wichtiges didaktisches Element darstellt

  12. Radiation exposure from CT examinations in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoshito; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Takei, Hiroyuki; Otake, Hidenori; Endo, Keigo

    2010-11-02

    Computed tomography (CT) is the largest source of medical radiation exposure to the general population, and is considered a potential source of increased cancer risk. The aim of this study was to assess the current situation of CT use in Japan, and to investigate variations in radiation exposure in CT studies among institutions and scanners. Data-sheets were sent to all 126 hospitals and randomly selected 14 (15%) of 94 clinics in Gunma prefecture which had CT scanner(s). Data for patients undergoing CT during a single month (June 2008) were obtained, along with CT scan protocols for each institution surveyed. Age and sex specific patterns of CT examination, the variation in radiation exposure from CT examinations, and factors which were responsible for the variation in radiation exposure were determined. An estimated 235.4 patients per 1,000 population undergo CT examinations each year, and 50% of the patients were scanned in two or more anatomical locations in one CT session. There was a large variation in effective dose among hospitals surveyed, particularly in lower abdominal CT (range, 2.6-19.0 mSv). CT examinations of the chest and upper abdomen contributed to approximately 73.2% of the collective dose from all CT examinations. It was estimated that in Japan, approximately 29.9 million patients undergo CT annually, and the estimated annual collective effective dose in Japan was 277.4 *103 Sv person. The annual effective dose per capita for Japan was estimated to be 2.20 mSv. There was a very large variation in radiation exposure from CT among institutions surveyed. CT examinations of the chest and upper abdomen were the predominant contributors to the collective dose.

  13. Indications for chest CT. Retrospective study of cases with normal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in thoracic radiology is now well appreciated, and the number of chest CTs has greatly increased. There are, however, many chest CT cases that are completely or almost completely normal. Indications for chest CT should be re-evaluated considering the cost and radiation exposure associated with the examination. Reviewing the reports of 4930 chest CT examinations performed in three hospitals during the period of two years, the author found 620 (12.6%) negative CT examinations. In 312 of the 620, the CT was requested because of 'abnormal shadow' on chest radiograph. When the same chest radiographs were re-evaluated by two radiologists, no abnormality was noted in 257 cases (82.4%). CT examinations were considered justified in only 55 cases (17.6%). There was a significant difference in the frequency of normal chest CT examinations between the university hospital and two other hospitals. The causes of false positive interpretation of chest radiographs were analyzed, and it was felt that fundamental knowledge necessary to interpret chest radiographs was lacking. The importance of close cooperation between clinicians and radiologists should be emphasized. (author)

  14. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the

  15. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence

  16. [Epilepsy with normal CT: the MR contribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Asensio, S; Guelbenzu, S; Barrena, R; López del Val, J; Mazas, L; Macho, J

    1995-01-01

    We present a study of 165 patients with fits with normal brain computerized tomography (CT) scan or else who showed no evidence as to the etiology of such attacks. We analyzed the magnetic resonance (MR) results obtained. In 36.6% of cases MR was pathological, the most frequent finding in our series being cerebral atrophy (12.8%). We comment on the most important pathology groups, highlighting the contribution MR made in our patients.

  17. Post-mortem CT examination - own experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanik, A.; Chrzan, R.; Wozniak, K.; Moskala, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work was to present the possibilities and usefulness of the post - mortem CT examination in the evaluation of human corpses for the purposes of the forensic medicine. The examinations were performed with the use of the multidetector-row CT Somatom 16 (Siemens) unit, and involved 32 human corpses of people who died of unnatural causes (various causes, mostly injuries). CT examination made it possible to highlight the changes in the osseous system (skeletal system), parenchymatous organs (parenchymal organs, solid organs) and in the soft tissues, in every case. The CT images were useful in directing the performance of the traditional autopsy. When comparing the results of the virtual and the traditional autopsy, a high correlation of the results was affirmed. (authors)

  18. Standardized CT examination of the multitraumatized patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidner, B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden)]|[Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Huddinge University Hospital (Sweden); Adiels, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden); Aspelin, P. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Huddinge University Hospital (Sweden); Gullstrand, P.; Wallen, S. [Department of Surgery, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a standardized non-helical-CT protocol including head, body and proximal extremities in order to achieve a good time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy in the initial radiological evaluation of the multitraumatized patient. A total of 111 circulatory stable blunt trauma patients, brought in to a trauma level II-III hospital, were examined according to a standardized CT protocol. After examining the head with contiguous 10-mm slices without IV contrast medium injection, the trunk was examined with 10-mm slices every 30 mm through thorax-abdomen-pelvis with IV contrast medium enhancement (occasionally modified). All data in the medical reports were collected and used as ``end-point``, and the outcome of the CT examination was compared with this final diagnosis. Mean examination time was 20 min (range 12-32 min). In total, 55 head injuries, 89 thoracic injuries, 27 abdominal/pelvic injuries and 62 fractures were found. Computed tomography correctly identified the injuries, except one brain stem injury, one contusion/rupture of the heart, one hepatic injury, two intestinal injuries, eight vertebral injuries and one joint dislocation. A standardized non-helical-CT examination of the head and body may be achieved in 20 min. Its diagnostic accuracy was high, except for vertebral column injuries, which is why we recommend it as the method of choice for initial radiological examination of multitraumatized patients. When available, helical scanning would improve both examination speed and accuracy. (orig.) With 6 figs., 40 refs.

  19. Is primary care access to CT brain examinations effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamore, R.E.; Wright, D.; Britton, I.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Primary care access to CT head examinations could enable common neurological conditions to be managed within primary care. Outcome data from the first 8 years of a local service were used to identify effective referral criteria. METHODS: Primary care head CT results from 1 March 1995 to 31 October 2003 were categorized as normal, incidental or significant findings. Normal reports were cross-referenced for referral to secondary care. Case notes with incidental or significant CT findings were reviewed for secondary care attendance and outcome. RESULTS: Records of 1403/1645 CT head examinations (85%) were available for review. Of these 1403, 951 (67.8%) returned normal findings, 317 (22.6%) incidental findings and 135 (9.6%) significant findings. The commonest indication for referral was investigation of headaches (46.6%). Of the total 533 patients under 50 years of age, 13 (2.4%) yielded significant findings and all 13 showed other features in addition to headache. Of 314 cases presenting with focal neurology, 83 (26.4%) showed significant findings. 314 patients were referred from primary to secondary care. 189 had normal scans and 74 had findings described as incidental. 60% of secondary care referrals were for normal CT scans. In patients with focal neurology, 90 of 314 were referred, allowing 71% to be managed in primary care. Yield was also 0% for headaches, dizziness, visual disturbance or nausea and vomiting. CONCLUSION: Primary care access to CT brain examinations is effective for patients with focal neurology, neurological symptoms or a known malignancy, but not for patients aged less than 50 years, or with uncomplicated headaches, dizziness or diplopia

  20. Evaluation of head examinations produced with a mobile CT unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, M B; Jarosz, J M; Gallacher, D; Malcolm, P N; Holemans, J A; Leong, C; Seed, P T; Ayers, A B; Rankin, S C

    1999-07-01

    Recent years have seen the development of mobile CT units, designed for use in operating theatres, intensive care units and accident and emergency departments. One such unit is the Tomoscan M (Philips, Utrecht, The Netherlands). It operates with a maximum tube voltage of 130 kV, and a maximum tube current of only 50 mA. This study tested whether acceptable quality CT images of the brain could be produced on the mobile unit with these parameters. 44 consecutive normal head examinations performed on the mobile scanner were compared with 35 examinations from two conventional CT units. Two independent readers scored the examinations for noise and artefact. CT dose index (CTDI) values for the three CT units were obtained in free air as an estimate of patient dose. Differences in artefact score between CT units were generally small, but noise scores were worse when using the Tomoscan M with a 2 s slice time. The lowest CTDI values were obtained with the Somatom DRH (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) unit and the highest with the SR 7000 (Philips, Utrecht, The Netherlands), with values from Tomoscan M, in all except one case, falling between these values for the protocols used in the study. The measured scattered radiation doses from the Tomoscan M are presented.

  1. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  2. Cushing's syndrome with an apparently normal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahos, L.; Strigaris, K.; Aliferopoulos, D.; Pontifex, G.

    1981-01-01

    A case of Cushing's syndrome is described in which the CT scan was considered as normal. The diagnosis was established with selective venography and blood sampling and was verified surgically. (orig.)

  3. CT quantification of lung and airways in normal Korean subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Song Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Shin, Hye Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gong Yong; Li, Yuan Zhe [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To measure and compare the quantitative parameters of the lungs and airways in Korean never-smokers and current or former smokers (“ever-smokers”). Never-smokers (n = 119) and ever-smokers (n = 45) who had normal spirometry and visually normal chest computed tomography (CT) results were retrospectively enrolled in this study. For quantitative CT analyses, the low attenuation area (LAA) of LAA{sub I-950}, LAA{sub E-856}, CT attenuation value at the 15th percentile, mean lung attenuation (MLA), bronchial wall thickness of inner perimeter of a 10 mm diameter airway (Pi10), total lung capacity (TLC{sub CT}), and functional residual capacity (FRC{sub CT}) were calculated based on inspiratory and expiratory CT images. To compare the results between groups according to age, sex, and smoking history, independent t test, one way ANOVA, correlation test, and simple and multiple regression analyses were performed. The values of attenuation parameters and volume on inspiratory and expiratory quantitative computed tomography (QCT) were significantly different between males and females (p < 0.001). The MLA and the 15th percentile value on inspiratory QCT were significantly lower in the ever-smoker group than in the never-smoker group (p < 0.05). On expiratory QCT, all lung attenuation parameters were significantly different according to the age range (p < 0.05). Pi10 in ever-smokers was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (r = −0.455, p = 0.003). In simple and multivariate regression analyses, TLC{sub CT}, FRC{sub CT}, and age showed significant associations with lung attenuation (p < 0.05), and only TLC{sub CT} was significantly associated with inspiratory Pi10. In Korean subjects with normal spirometry and visually normal chest CT, there may be significant differences in QCT parameters according to sex, age, and smoking history.

  4. CT quantification of lung and airways in normal Korean subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Song Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Shin, Hye Soo; Jin, Gong Yong; Li, Yuan Zhe

    2017-01-01

    To measure and compare the quantitative parameters of the lungs and airways in Korean never-smokers and current or former smokers (“ever-smokers”). Never-smokers (n = 119) and ever-smokers (n = 45) who had normal spirometry and visually normal chest computed tomography (CT) results were retrospectively enrolled in this study. For quantitative CT analyses, the low attenuation area (LAA) of LAA I-950 , LAA E-856 , CT attenuation value at the 15th percentile, mean lung attenuation (MLA), bronchial wall thickness of inner perimeter of a 10 mm diameter airway (Pi10), total lung capacity (TLC CT ), and functional residual capacity (FRC CT ) were calculated based on inspiratory and expiratory CT images. To compare the results between groups according to age, sex, and smoking history, independent t test, one way ANOVA, correlation test, and simple and multiple regression analyses were performed. The values of attenuation parameters and volume on inspiratory and expiratory quantitative computed tomography (QCT) were significantly different between males and females (p < 0.001). The MLA and the 15th percentile value on inspiratory QCT were significantly lower in the ever-smoker group than in the never-smoker group (p < 0.05). On expiratory QCT, all lung attenuation parameters were significantly different according to the age range (p < 0.05). Pi10 in ever-smokers was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (r = −0.455, p = 0.003). In simple and multivariate regression analyses, TLC CT , FRC CT , and age showed significant associations with lung attenuation (p < 0.05), and only TLC CT was significantly associated with inspiratory Pi10. In Korean subjects with normal spirometry and visually normal chest CT, there may be significant differences in QCT parameters according to sex, age, and smoking history

  5. Radiation Exposure from CT Examinations in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Tsushima, Yoshito; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Takei, Hiroyuki; Otake, Hidenori; Endo, Keigo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Computed tomography (CT) is the largest source of medical radiation exposure to the general population, and is considered a potential source of increased cancer risk. The aim of this study was to assess the current situation of CT use in Japan, and to investigate variations in radiation exposure in CT studies among institutions and scanners. Methods Data-sheets were sent to all 126 hospitals and randomly selected 14 (15%) of 94 clinics in Gunma prefecture which had CT scan...

  6. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology); Baleriaux, D.; Christophe, C. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology))

    1992-02-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.).

  7. Measurement of normal cervical spinal cord in metrizamide CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fumio; Koyama, Tsunemaro; Aii, Heihachirou

    1985-01-01

    The shape of the spinal cord is the most important factor in diagnosis of spinal disorders by metrizamide CT myelography (met. CT). Even in cases where the spinal cord looks normal in shape its size might be abnormal, for example in cases with spinal cord atrophy, syringomyelia, intramedullary tumor and several other conditions. In detecting the slightest abnormality in such cases, it is absolutely necessary to have in hand the knowledge of the nomal size of the spinal cord at each level. We measured, therefore, the sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord in 55 patients with no known lesions on met. CT (Fig. 1). Comparing our results with those by others, we found some differences as to the size of the spinal cord. We assume that these differences are due to the differences in resolution of the CT scanners used. The size of the spinal cord tends to measure larger with a CT scanner with high resolution than with others. Previous authors reported that the size of the spinal cord would vary by window center settings. Our experimental results indicate, however, that window center settings do not significantly affect the measurements. It is concluded that the normal values of the spinal cord dimensions at each level somewhat differ by CT equipments used. One should have normal values with one's own equipment in hand in order to take full advantage of this sophisticated diagnostic technique. (author)

  8. Normal CT characteristics of the thymus in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith; Loubashevsky, Natali; Rozovsky, Katya

    2012-01-01

    Background: The thymus changes with age. Its shape and the proportion of solid tissue and fat vary between individuals, yet there is no comprehensive work describing the size and morphology of the normal thymus on CT. As a result, many adults with some preserved soft tissue in the thymus may undergo extensive work-up to exclude mediastinal tumor. Our aim was to quantify CT characteristics of the normal thymus in an adult population. Methods: CT chest scans of 194 trauma patients aged 14–78 years (mean 52.6 years), were retrospectively reviewed. The density, volume, shape and predominant side of the thymus were recorded for 56 patients in whom some solid tissue was preserved. Statistical analysis of these characteristics according to the patient age and gender was performed. Results: Thymic density and volume decreased progressively with age. No solid tissue component was seen in the thymus in patients older than 54 years. In the majority of patients, the thymus had an arrowhead shape, with middle position. However, great variability in thymic shape and border were noted. There was a highly significant relationship between density and patient age (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: We hope that our work will help in the definition of normal thymic CT parameters in adults, help to prevent unnecessary and expensive imaging procedures, and reduce patient exposure to ionizing radiation.

  9. Normal CT characteristics of the thymus in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simanovsky, Natalia, E-mail: natalias@hadassah.org.il [Department of Medical Imaging, Hadassah - Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel); Hiller, Nurith; Loubashevsky, Natali; Rozovsky, Katya [Department of Medical Imaging, Hadassah - Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2012-11-15

    Background: The thymus changes with age. Its shape and the proportion of solid tissue and fat vary between individuals, yet there is no comprehensive work describing the size and morphology of the normal thymus on CT. As a result, many adults with some preserved soft tissue in the thymus may undergo extensive work-up to exclude mediastinal tumor. Our aim was to quantify CT characteristics of the normal thymus in an adult population. Methods: CT chest scans of 194 trauma patients aged 14-78 years (mean 52.6 years), were retrospectively reviewed. The density, volume, shape and predominant side of the thymus were recorded for 56 patients in whom some solid tissue was preserved. Statistical analysis of these characteristics according to the patient age and gender was performed. Results: Thymic density and volume decreased progressively with age. No solid tissue component was seen in the thymus in patients older than 54 years. In the majority of patients, the thymus had an arrowhead shape, with middle position. However, great variability in thymic shape and border were noted. There was a highly significant relationship between density and patient age (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: We hope that our work will help in the definition of normal thymic CT parameters in adults, help to prevent unnecessary and expensive imaging procedures, and reduce patient exposure to ionizing radiation.

  10. [Application of computed tomography (CT) examination for forensic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a own experiences in usage of post mortem CT examination for forensic medicine. With the help of 16-slice CT scanner 181 corpses were examined. Obtained during acquisition imaging data are later developed with dedicated programmes. Analyzed images were extracted from axial sections, multiplanar reconstructions as well as 3D reconstructions. Gained information helped greatly when classical autopsy was performed by making it more accurate. A CT scan images recorded digitally enable to evaluate corpses at any time, despite processes of putrefaction or cremation. If possible CT examination should precede classical autopsy.

  11. Anticlockwise swirl of mesenteric vessels: A normal CT appearance, retrospective analysis of 200 pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S.; Bhatia, Anmol; Saxena, Akshay K.; Rao, Katragadda L.N.; Menon, Prema; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The counterclockwise rotation of the SMV on SMA is a normal and non-specific finding, which results in an incomplete swirl formation on CT scans. However, it has a potential to be misinterpreted as ‘midgut volvulus’ resulting in serious clinical implications. The study was done to determine the frequency and degree of counterclockwise rotation of the SMV on SMA on CT in normal otherwise asymptomatic pediatric patients undergoing CT scan. Methods: In this IRB approved study, we retrospectively analyzed abdominal CT scan examinations of 200 consecutive pediatric patients (age range of 11 days to 18 years), which were performed for different clinical indications over a period of 10 months. They were evaluated for the absence or presence and degree of counterclockwise rotation of the mesenteric vessels. Results: Of the 200 patients, 128 (64%) patients showed no clockwise or anticlockwise rotation of mesenteric vessels. Counterclockwise rotation of SMV on SMA was seen in 72 (36%) patients. Further, the degree of rotation of vessels was also calculated, based on the criteria proposed by the authors. Conclusions: The counterclockwise rotation of SMV on SMA gives an appearance of mesenteric whirlpool in otherwise normal mesenteric vessels and can be misinterpreted as midgut volvulus. It is a normal CT appearance and is due to a variation in branching pattern of mesenteric vessels. Awareness of this normal branching pattern of mesenteric vessels is important to avoid an inadvertent laparotomy

  12. Anticlockwise swirl of mesenteric vessels: A normal CT appearance, retrospective analysis of 200 pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S., E-mail: sodhiks@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Bhatia, Anmol, E-mail: anmol_bhatia26@yahoo.co.in [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Saxena, Akshay K., E-mail: fatakshay@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Rao, Katragadda L.N., E-mail: klnrao@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Menon, Prema, E-mail: menonprema@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Khandelwal, Niranjan, E-mail: khandelwaln@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Objective: The counterclockwise rotation of the SMV on SMA is a normal and non-specific finding, which results in an incomplete swirl formation on CT scans. However, it has a potential to be misinterpreted as ‘midgut volvulus’ resulting in serious clinical implications. The study was done to determine the frequency and degree of counterclockwise rotation of the SMV on SMA on CT in normal otherwise asymptomatic pediatric patients undergoing CT scan. Methods: In this IRB approved study, we retrospectively analyzed abdominal CT scan examinations of 200 consecutive pediatric patients (age range of 11 days to 18 years), which were performed for different clinical indications over a period of 10 months. They were evaluated for the absence or presence and degree of counterclockwise rotation of the mesenteric vessels. Results: Of the 200 patients, 128 (64%) patients showed no clockwise or anticlockwise rotation of mesenteric vessels. Counterclockwise rotation of SMV on SMA was seen in 72 (36%) patients. Further, the degree of rotation of vessels was also calculated, based on the criteria proposed by the authors. Conclusions: The counterclockwise rotation of SMV on SMA gives an appearance of mesenteric whirlpool in otherwise normal mesenteric vessels and can be misinterpreted as midgut volvulus. It is a normal CT appearance and is due to a variation in branching pattern of mesenteric vessels. Awareness of this normal branching pattern of mesenteric vessels is important to avoid an inadvertent laparotomy.

  13. CTDIvol: a suitable normalization for CT dose conversion coefficients at different tube voltages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattl, Helmut; Zankl, Maria; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    Reliable estimates for patient doses for CT examinations are desirable for the patients themselves as well as for new epidemiological studies. It has been shown that dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol provide rather scanner independent quantities. In this work, it is demonstrated that this normalization provides also tube voltage independent values by simulating axial CT scans of a seven-year old infant and an adult. The differences in the effective dose conversion coefficients per CTDIvol between 80 and 120 kV is for most body heights below 5%. Only at the height of the testes and the thyroid the difference can be as large as 15%. This results in differences of the effective dose conversion coefficient per CTDIvol between 80 and 120 kV of less than 6-7% for typical CT examinations.

  14. MR and CT imaging of pulmonary valved conduits in children and adolescents: normal appearance and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenisch, Estelle V.; Alamo, Leonor T.; Gudinchet, Francois [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sekarski, Nicole [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hurni, Michel [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The Contegra registered is a conduit made from the bovine jugular vein and then interposed between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery. It is used for cardiac malformations in the reconstruction of right ventricular outflow tract. To describe both normal and pathological appearances of the Contegra registered in radiological imaging, to describe imaging of complications and to define the role of CT and MRI in postoperative follow-up. Forty-three examinations of 24 patients (17 boys and 7 girls; mean age: 10.8 years old) with Contegra registered conduits were reviewed. Anatomical description and measurements of the conduits were performed. Pathological items examined included stenosis, dilatation, plicature or twist, thrombus or vegetations, calcifications and valvular regurgitation. Findings were correlated to the echographic gradient through the conduit when available. CT and MR work-up showed Contegra registered stenosis (n = 12), dilatation (n = 9) and plicature or twist (n = 7). CT displayed thrombus or vegetations in the Contegra registered in three clinically infected patients. Calcifications of the conduit were present at CT in 12 patients and valvular regurgitation in three patients. The comparison between CT and/or MR results showed a good correlation between the echographic gradient and the presence of stenosis in the Contegra registered. CT and MR bring additional information about permeability and postoperative anatomy especially when echocardiography is inconclusive. Both techniques depict the normal appearance of the conduit, and allow comparison and precise evaluation of changes in the postoperative follow-up. (orig.)

  15. Radiation dose and cancer risk from pediatric CT examinations on 64-slice CT: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shi-Ting; Law, Martin Wai-Ming; Huang, Bingsheng; Ng, Sherry; Li, Zi-Ping; Meng, Quan-Fei; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2010-11-01

    To measure the radiation dose from CT scans in an anthropomorphic phantom using a 64-slice MDCT, and to estimate the associated cancer risk. Organ doses were measured with a 5-year-old phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Four protocols; head CT, thorax CT, abdomen CT and pelvis CT were studied. Cancer risks, in the form of lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence, were estimated by linear extrapolation using the organ radiation doses and the LAR data. The effective doses for head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis CT, were 0.7mSv, 3.5mSv, 3.0mSv, 1.3mSv respectively. The organs with the highest dose were; for head CT, salivary gland (22.33mGy); for thorax CT, breast (7.89mGy); for abdomen CT, colon (6.62mGy); for pelvis CT, bladder (4.28mGy). The corresponding LARs for boys and girls were 0.015-0.053% and 0.034-0.155% respectively. The organs with highest LARs were; for head CT, thyroid gland (0.003% for boys, 0.015% for girls); for thorax CT, lung for boys (0.014%) and breast for girls (0.069%); for abdomen CT, colon for boys (0.017%) and lung for girls (0.016%); for pelvis CT, bladder for both boys and girls (0.008%). The effective doses from these common pediatric CT examinations ranged from 0.7mSv to 3.5mSv and the associated lifetime cancer risks were found to be up to 0.16%, with some organs of higher radiosensitivity including breast, thyroid gland, colon and lungs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Techniques and radiation dose in CT examinations of adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elameen, S. E. A.

    2010-06-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation dose to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lake of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose. The aim of this study was to measure radiation doses in CT examination of the adults in three Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 160 CT examination carried out in 3 hospitals (3 CT scanners). Effective dose was calculated for each examination using CT dose indices. exposure related parameters and CT D1- to- effective dose conversion factors. CT air kerma index (CT D1) and dose length products (DLP) determined were below the established international reference dose levels. The mean effective doses in this study for the head, chest, and abdomen are 0.82, 3.7 and 5.4 mGy respectively. These values were observed that the effective dose per examination was lower in Sudan than in other countries. The report of a CT survey done in these centers indicates that the mean DLP values for adult patients were ranged from 272-460 mGy cm (head) 195-995 mGy cm (chest), 270-459 mGy cm (abdomen). There are a number of observed parameters that greatly need optimization, such as minimize the scan length, without missing any vital anatomical regions, modulation of exposure parameters (kV, mA, exposure time, and slice thickness) based on patient size and age. Another possible method is through use of contrast media only to optimize diagnostic yield. The last possible method is the use of radio protective materials for protection however, in order to achieve the above optimization strategies: there is great demand to educate CT personnel on the effects of scan parameter settings on radiation dose to patients and image quality required for accurate diagnosis. (Author)

  17. Calculation of Organ Doses for a Large Number of Patients Undergoing CT Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Miglioretti, Diana; Kruger, Randell; Flynn, Michael; Weinmann, Sheila; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-10-01

    The objective of our study was to develop an automated calculation method to provide organ dose assessment for a large cohort of pediatric and adult patients undergoing CT examinations. We adopted two dose libraries that were previously published: the volume CT dose index-normalized organ dose library and the tube current-exposure time product (100 mAs)-normalized weighted CT dose index library. We developed an algorithm to calculate organ doses using the two dose libraries and the CT parameters available from DICOM data. We calculated organ doses for pediatric (n = 2499) and adult (n = 2043) CT examinations randomly selected from four health care systems in the United States and compared the adult organ doses with the values calculated from the ImPACT calculator. The median brain dose was 20 mGy (pediatric) and 24 mGy (adult), and the brain dose was greater than 40 mGy for 11% (pediatric) and 18% (adult) of the head CT studies. Both the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and ImPACT methods provided similar organ doses (median discrepancy variety of CT-related studies including retrospective epidemiologic studies and CT dose trend analysis studies.

  18. Estimating cancer risks to adults undergoing body CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; He, Wenjun

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to estimate cancer risks from the amount of radiation used to perform body computed tomography (CT) examination. The ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator was used to compute values of organ doses for adult body CT examinations. The radiation used to perform each examination was quantified by the dose-length product (DLP). Patient organ doses were converted into corresponding age and sex dependent cancer risks using data from BEIR VII. Results are presented for cancer risks per unit DLP and unit effective dose for 11 sensitive organs, as well as estimates of the contribution from 'other organs'. For patients who differ from a standard sized adult, correction factors based on the patient weight and antero-posterior dimension are provided to adjust organ doses and the corresponding risks. At constant incident radiation intensity, for CT examinations that include the chest, risks for females are markedly higher than those for males, whereas for examinations that include the pelvis, risks in males were slightly higher than those in females. In abdominal CT scans, risks for males and female patients are very similar. For abdominal CT scans, increasing the patient age from 20 to 80 resulted in a reduction in patient risks of nearly a factor of 5. The average cancer risk for chest/abdomen/pelvis CT examinations was ∼26 % higher than the cancer risk caused by 'sensitive organs'. Doses and radiation risks in 80 kg adults were ∼10 % lower than those in 70 kg patients. Cancer risks in body CT can be estimated from the examination DLP by accounting for sex, age, as well as patient physical characteristics.

  19. Investigation of normal intrathoracic trachea during dynamic CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jishu; Yang Ming; Chen Qihang

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the diameters and cross-sectional areas, as well as the shape of normal adult intrathoracic trachea during forced respiration in the Chinese. Materials and methods: 25 male volunteers were studied with dynamic CT, using electron beam CT scanner, at a level 2 cm above aortic arch, with 3 mm collimation. Ten 100-msec dynamic scans were obtained at 500-msec intervals during 5.5-second period as the volunteers performed forced inspiration and expiration vital capacity maneuvers. Results: The mean cross-sectional area, sagittal and coronal diameter of the trachea decreased dynamically from 228.36 mm 2 , 18.28 mm and 16.97 mm at end inspiration to 191.24 mm 2 , 15.62 mm and 16.19 mm at end expiration respectively. The average cross-section area decreased by 15.48% +- 9.6% between inspiration and expiration. The shape of trachea was rounded or elliptical on inspiration image and horseshoe shaped on end of expiration. Conclusion: The dynamic CT is ideally suited for the study of tracheal dimensions and shape during respiration maneuvers. Among the Chinese, if the cross-sectional area of trachea decrease by more than 50% from inspiration to expiration, diagnosis of tracheomalacia can be established

  20. JOURNAL CLUB: CT dose optimization for whole-body PET/CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkopi, Elena; Ross, Andrew A; MacDonald, Anita

    2013-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to optimize CT protocols for whole-body PET/CT by reducing radiation dose while minimizing effects on image quality. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Before protocol optimization, a survey of 140 consecutive patients was conducted to establish the baseline dose from a whole-body PET/CT examination. Another sample of 100 patients was surveyed to evaluate the reduction of radiation dose after implementation of the new protocol. Effective dose from the CT component of the examination was estimated using dose-length product (DLP) values from reports generated by the scanner and anatomy-specific conversion factors. Twenty-six patients who underwent studies before and after the optimization were included in an analysis of image quality. All 26 patients had maintained the same weight between the examinations and were scanned in the same position using a similar technique except for the changes made for CT dose optimization. The studies were randomized and blinded for an experienced PET and CT reader who graded the imaging quality of anatomic structures. RESULTS. CT protocol optimization resulted in a 32% reduction of the mean CT radiation dose: The mean effective dose was reduced from 8.1 to 5.5 mSv. The blinded analysis of image quality showed no clinically significant degradation of the lower-dose studies. The only structures visualized statistically better on the higher-dose CT scans were the carotid arteries and the region of the posterior triangle. CONCLUSION. The results of this study showed that optimization of CT acquisition can effectively reduce radiation dose in a whole-body PET/CT examination without significantly sacrificing image quality.

  1. CT attenuation in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.S.; Pearlson, G.D.; Goldfinger, A.D.; Tune, L.E.; Heyler, G.

    1986-01-01

    113 screened normal volunteers aged 18-85 and 50 elderly demented individuals meeting NINCDS/ADRDA criteria for probable senile dementia of the Alzheimer type, (SDAT), received a non-contrast x-CT head scan on a single 512x512 matrix Siemens Somatom DR3 Scanner. Scanning parameters (KV,MA) were kept constant, and the authors used a specially designed head holder to ensure a uniform scanning angle. Standard 8mm thick cuts, at zero degrees to the supra-orbito-meatal line, were taken through the entire brain. A ''phantom'' consisting of plastics of several different attenuation values was scanned before each patient as a reference to correct for any numerical drift in the scanner. Both patients and controls were scanned during the same sessions to eliminate possible systematic bias, and a single CT technologist carried out all scanning. Numerical CT data were collected on magnetic tape for analysis on a specially designed image processing system. Software was used to read CT density data from the 512x512 matrix scanner output tapes and to transfer the resulting image in standardized format to hard disk on the processing system. This system consists of a PDP-11-34 computer, linked to a Gould DeAnza IP-5000 image processors, hard disk system and tape drive. Once transferred to disk, images were rated blindly to subject identity or diagnosis by another 2 separate raters using a computer-linked cursor, and digitizer tablet. These numerical attenuation data from various anatomically defined regions of interest, (ROI's), were then corrected for head size using a regression model

  2. CT and MR imaging of the normal and pathologic conditions of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Lorenz E-mail: jaeger@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well established imaging modalities to examine the facial nerve as well as the course of the facial nerve itself. High spatial resolution is guaranteed not only in the x- and y-axis, but also in the z-axis using multislice spiral CT. With this technique, reformatted multiplanar images in oblique planes, avoiding additional examinations in the coronal plane, facilitate the delineation of the facial nerve canal. This is beneficial in patients with temporal bone trauma, malformation or osseous changes. MR has a superior soft-tissue contrast to CT that enables imaging of the facial nerve itself. Therefore the normal facial nerve as well as pathologic changes of the facial nerve is readily visualized from the brain stem to the parotid gland. This review article presents anatomy, pathology and imaging strategies in the diagnostics of the facial nerve.

  3. Perforated colorectal neoplasms: Correlation of clinical, barium, and CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulnick, D.H.; Megibow, A.J.; Gordon, R.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Findings on clinical, barium enema, and CT examinations in 24 patients with perforated colorectal neoplasms were retrospectively reviewed. In 12 patients with fever and leukocytosis, the clinical diagnoses were diverticulitis (n=8), appendicitis (n=2), pelvic inflammatory disease (n=2), and perforation of a known carcinoma (n=1). In 12 nontoxic patients, the clinical diagnoses were malignancy (n=8), obstruction (n=3) and an abdominal mass (n=1). In 18 barium enema examinations, the radiologic impression was uncomplicated carcinoma (n=9), perforated carcinoma (n=6), and diverticulitis (n=3). Twenty-two CT examinations revealed pericolic inflammation in all cases and macroperforation in 12. The primary tumor was evident in 14 patients, liver metastases were found in six, and ascites was present in three. CT findings influenced the management of patients initially suspected of having inflammatory conditions

  4. Estimates of effective dose in adult CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mustafa Awad Elhaj.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of study was to estimate effective dose (E) in adult CT examinations for Toshiba X64 slice using CT. Exp version 2.5 software in Sudan. Using of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. lack of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. In order to achieve these objectives, data of CT-scanner has been collected from three hospitals ( ANH, ZSH and MMH). Data collected included equipment information and scan parameters for individual patients, who were used to asses. 300 adult patients underwent head, chest, abdomen-pelvis and peivis CT examinations. The CT1 w , CTD1 v ol, DLP, patient effective dos and organ doses were estimated, using CT exposure parameters and CT Exp version 2.5 software. A large variation of mean effective dose and organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scan length. The mean effective dose in this study in the Brain, PNS, Chest, pulmonary, Abdomen-pelvis, Pelvis, KUB and CTU were 3.2 mSv, 2.6 mSv, 18.9 mSv 17.6 mSv 27.1 mSv, 11.2 mSv, 9.6 mSv and 23.7 mSv respectively, and organ equivalent, doses presented in this study in this study for the eye lens (for head), lungs and thymus ( for chest) , liver, kidney and small intest ( for abdomen t-pelvis), bladder, uterus and gonads ( for pelvis), were 62.9 mSv, 39.5 mSv, 34.1 mSv, 53.9 mSv, 52.6 mSv, 58.1 mSv, 37 mSv, and 34.6 mSv, respectively. These values were mostly comparable to and slightly higher than the values of effective doses reported from similar studies the United Kingdom, Tanzania, Australia, Canada and Sudan. It was concluded that patient effective dose and organ doses could be substantially minimized through careful selection of scanning parameters based on clinical indications of study, patient size, and body

  5. Dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations of adults with automatic tube current modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-10-01

    Automatic tube current modulation (TCM) is used in modern CT devices. This is implemented in the numerical calculation of dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations. For four models of adults, the female and male reference models of ICRP and ICRU and a lighter and a heavier female model, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol (DCCCT) have been computed with a Monte Carlo transport code for CT scans with and without TCM. It could be shown for both cases that reliable values for spiral CT scans are obtained when combining the results from an appropriate set of axial scans. The largest organ DCCCT are presented for typical CT examinations for all four models. The impact of TCM is greatest for chest, pelvis and whole-trunk CT examinations, where with TCM the effective DCCCT can be 20-25% lower than without TCM. Typical organs with strong dependence on TCM are thyroid, urinary bladder, lungs and oesophagus. While the DCCCT of thyroid and urinary bladder are mainly sensitive to angular TCM, the DCCCT of lungs and oesophagus are influenced primarily by longitudinal TCM. The impact of the body stature on the effective DCCCT is of the same order as the effect of TCM. Thus, for CT scans in the trunk region, accurate dose values can only be obtained when different sets of DCCCT are employed that are appropriate for the patient's sex and stature and the actual TCM settings.

  6. Patient doses in chest CT examinations: Comparison of various CT scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Božović Predrag; Ciraj-Bjelac Olivera; Aranđić Danijela; Hadnađev Darka; Stojanović Sanja

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results from study on patient exposure level in chest CT examinations. CT scanners used in this study were various Siemens and General Electric (GE) models. Data on patient doses were collected for adult and pediatric patients. Doses measured for adult patients were lower then those determined as Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) for Europe, while doses for pediatric patients were similar to those found in published data. As for the manu...

  7. Extravasation of contrast medium during CT examination: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: extravasation is an adverse reaction to intravenous injection of contrast medium (CM) during CT examination. The objectives of this study are to determine the frequency, management and outcomes of extravasations and to assess risk factors for extravasation. Methods: every incident of extravasation which ...

  8. CT and MR findings in retinoblastoma : correlation with histopathologic examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Son Won; Han, Moon Hee; Chi, Je G.; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Yeon Mee; Chung, Jin Haeng; Yu, In Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To evaluate histopathologic correlation of the component of the lesion on CT and MR of retinoblastomas. Gross pathologic findings of 24 enucleated eyeballs in 24 patients with retinoblastomas were compared with preoperative CT (n=19) and MR (n=5) findings. In eight eyeballs, in which there were findings other than mass, histopathologic findings were reviewed and correlated with image findings. Retinal detachment and subretinal hemorrhage which were not detected on CT were demonstrated in two of eight eyeballs on histopathologic examination. In one eyeball, retinal detachment and subretinal effusion were detected on both CT and in a pathologic specimen. In two eyeballs with peripheral heterogeneous MR enhancement of the masses, tumor necrosis and calcification were demonstrated in the central non-emhancing portion of the mass, In two eveballs, linear soft tissue along the retina apart from the main mass were revealed as tumor spread along the retinal surface. In one patient, retinal thickening on MR was presumed to be an MR artifact and no lesion was found in the gross specimen. On CT, retinal detachment and subretinal hemorrhage associated with retinoblastoma can mimic mass, and tumor spread along the retinal surface can be seen as a linear retinal lesion. On MR, tumor necrosis and calcification can be a cause of heterogeneous enhancement.

  9. CT and MR findings in retinoblastoma : correlation with histopathologic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Son Won; Han, Moon Hee; Chi, Je G.; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Yeon Mee; Chung, Jin Haeng; Yu, In Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate histopathologic correlation of the component of the lesion on CT and MR of retinoblastomas. Gross pathologic findings of 24 enucleated eyeballs in 24 patients with retinoblastomas were compared with preoperative CT (n=19) and MR (n=5) findings. In eight eyeballs, in which there were findings other than mass, histopathologic findings were reviewed and correlated with image findings. Retinal detachment and subretinal hemorrhage which were not detected on CT were demonstrated in two of eight eyeballs on histopathologic examination. In one eyeball, retinal detachment and subretinal effusion were detected on both CT and in a pathologic specimen. In two eyeballs with peripheral heterogeneous MR enhancement of the masses, tumor necrosis and calcification were demonstrated in the central non-emhancing portion of the mass, In two eveballs, linear soft tissue along the retina apart from the main mass were revealed as tumor spread along the retinal surface. In one patient, retinal thickening on MR was presumed to be an MR artifact and no lesion was found in the gross specimen. On CT, retinal detachment and subretinal hemorrhage associated with retinoblastoma can mimic mass, and tumor spread along the retinal surface can be seen as a linear retinal lesion. On MR, tumor necrosis and calcification can be a cause of heterogeneous enhancement

  10. Optimization of pediatric examinations in a multislice helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ombada, T. H. A.

    2010-12-01

    Radiological protection of pediatric patients undergoing medical imaging procedures involving ionizing radiation has always received special attention. This is due to the fact that children have higher radiation sensitivity and increased likelihood for radiation-induced cancer manifesting in many more years of their life than adults. In computed tomography (CT), such attention is more important because of the potential of relatively higher radiation doses during these procedures. Such high doses are possible with technological developments where volume scanning using faster multi-slice CT systems is now preferred to conventional CT equipment. The task of this study is to assess the optimization of paediatric doses in multi-slice CT examinations. It was carried out in Alrebat University Hospital for 31 pediatric patients, 43 examinations (27 head examination and 16 body (chest, abdomen and pelvis) examinations). Data were collected for scan parameters (kV, m As, pitch, scan length, number of slices and slice thickness) and doses displayed in monitor (CTDI v ol and DLP) for head examinations and body (chest, abdomen and pelvis) examinations. For head CT, displayed CTDI v ol ranged from 1.56 to 69.12 mGy, calculated value from 2.10 to 70.93 mGy. Displayed DLP ranged from 53 to 1817 mGy.cm, calculated from 95.30 to 1532.16 mGy. cm. For body examination, the range of displayed CTDI from 1.63 to 3.92 mGy, calculated value from 2.22 to 5.34 mGy. Displayed DLP ranged from 34 to 194 mGy.cm, for calculated from 45.89 to 161.98 mGy. cm. The calculated values are in agreement with reference study dose values although there are some high values in this study for some examinations, this variation or difference may attribute to variation in pediatric ages (9 days- 15 years), scan length and m As values. There is variation between calculated and displayed values. more optimization for CT doses is needed. (Author)

  11. Computing effective doses to pediatric patients undergoing body CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M

    2008-04-01

    The computation of patient effective doses to children is of particular interest given the relatively high doses received from this imaging modality, as well as the increased utilization of CT in all areas of medicine. Current methods for computing effective doses to children are relatively complex, and it would be useful to develop a simple method of computing pediatric effective doses for clinical purposes that could be used by radiologists and technologists. To obtain pediatric effective doses for body CT examinations by the use of adult effective doses obtained from effective dose (E) per unit dose length product (DLP) coefficients, and energy imparted to a child relative to an adult. Adult E/DLP coefficients were obtained at 120 kV using the ImPACT CT dosimetry spreadsheet. Patients were modeled as cylinders of water, and values of energy imparted to cylinders of varying radii were generated using Monte Carlo modeling. The amounts of energy imparted to the chest and abdomen of children relative to adults (R(en)) were obtained. Pediatric effective doses were obtained using scaling factors that accounted for scan length, mAs, patient weight, and relative energy imparted (R(en)). E/DLP values were about 16 microSv/mGy cm for males and about 19 microSv/mGy cm for females. R(en) at 120 kV for newborns was 0.35 for the chest and 0.49 for the abdomen. At constant mAs, the effective dose to 6-month-old patients undergoing chest CT examinations was found to be about 50% higher than that to adults, and for abdominal examinations about 100% higher. Adult effective doses can be obtained using DLP data and can be scaled to provide corresponding pediatric effective doses from body examinations on the same CT scanner.

  12. Classification of CT examinations for COPD visual severity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jun; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xingwei; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David; Sciurba, Frank C.; Leader, J. Ken

    2012-03-01

    In this study we present a computational method of CT examination classification into visual assessed emphysema severity. The visual severity categories ranged from 0 to 5 and were rated by an experienced radiologist. The six categories were none, trace, mild, moderate, severe and very severe. Lung segmentation was performed for every input image and all image features are extracted from the segmented lung only. We adopted a two-level feature representation method for the classification. Five gray level distribution statistics, six gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and eleven gray level run-length (GLRL) features were computed for each CT image depicted segment lung. Then we used wavelets decomposition to obtain the low- and high-frequency components of the input image, and again extract from the lung region six GLCM features and eleven GLRL features. Therefore our feature vector length is 56. The CT examinations were classified using the support vector machine (SVM) and k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and the traditional threshold (density mask) approach. The SVM classifier had the highest classification performance of all the methods with an overall sensitivity of 54.4% and a 69.6% sensitivity to discriminate "no" and "trace visually assessed emphysema. We believe this work may lead to an automated, objective method to categorically classify emphysema severity on CT exam.

  13. CT Densitometry of the Lung in Healthy Nonsmokers with Normal Pulmonary Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Tack Sun; Chae, Eun Jin; Seo, Joon Beom; Jung, Young Ju; Oh, Yeon Mok; Lee, Sang Do

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the upper normal limit of low attenuation area in healthy nonsmokers. A total of 36 nonsmokers with normal pulmonary function test underwent a CT scan. Six thresholds (-980 --930 HU) on inspiration CT and two thresholds (-950 and -910 HU) on expiration CT were used for obtaining low attenuation area. The mean lung density was obtained on both inspiration CT and expiration CT. Descriptive statistics of low attenuation area and the mean lung density, evaluation of difference of low attenuation area and the mean lung density in both sex and age groups, analysis of the relationship between demographic information and CT parameters were performed. Upper normal limit for low attenuation area was 12.96% on inspiration CT (-950 HU) and 9.48% on expiration CT (-910 HU). Upper normal limit for the mean lung density was -837.58 HU on inspiration CT and 686.82 HU on expiration CT. Low attenuation area and the mean lung density showed no significant differences in both sex and age groups. Body mass index (BMI) was negatively correlated with low attenuation area on inspiration CT (-950 HU, r = -0.398, p = 0.016) and positively correlated with the mean lung density on inspiration CT (r 0.539, p = 0.001) and expiration CT (r = 0.432, p = 0.009). Age and body surface area were not correlated with low attenuation area or the mean lung density. Low attenuation area on CT densitometry of the lung could be found in healthy nonsmokers with normal pulmonary function, and showed negative association with BMI. Reference values, such as range and upper normal limit for low attenuation area in healthy subjects could be helpful in quantitative analysis and follow up of early emphysema, using CT densitometry of the lung.

  14. CT Densitometry of the Lung in Healthy Nonsmokers with Normal Pulmonary Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Tack Sun; Chae, Eun Jin; Seo, Joon Beom; Jung, Young Ju; Oh, Yeon Mok; Lee, Sang Do [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the upper normal limit of low attenuation area in healthy nonsmokers. A total of 36 nonsmokers with normal pulmonary function test underwent a CT scan. Six thresholds (-980 --930 HU) on inspiration CT and two thresholds (-950 and -910 HU) on expiration CT were used for obtaining low attenuation area. The mean lung density was obtained on both inspiration CT and expiration CT. Descriptive statistics of low attenuation area and the mean lung density, evaluation of difference of low attenuation area and the mean lung density in both sex and age groups, analysis of the relationship between demographic information and CT parameters were performed. Upper normal limit for low attenuation area was 12.96% on inspiration CT (-950 HU) and 9.48% on expiration CT (-910 HU). Upper normal limit for the mean lung density was -837.58 HU on inspiration CT and 686.82 HU on expiration CT. Low attenuation area and the mean lung density showed no significant differences in both sex and age groups. Body mass index (BMI) was negatively correlated with low attenuation area on inspiration CT (-950 HU, r = -0.398, p = 0.016) and positively correlated with the mean lung density on inspiration CT (r 0.539, p = 0.001) and expiration CT (r = 0.432, p = 0.009). Age and body surface area were not correlated with low attenuation area or the mean lung density. Low attenuation area on CT densitometry of the lung could be found in healthy nonsmokers with normal pulmonary function, and showed negative association with BMI. Reference values, such as range and upper normal limit for low attenuation area in healthy subjects could be helpful in quantitative analysis and follow up of early emphysema, using CT densitometry of the lung.

  15. Development of a method to estimate organ doses for pediatric CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Antonios E., E-mail: apapadak@pagni.gr; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Heraklion, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1352, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for estimating doses to primarily exposed organs in pediatric CT by taking into account patient size and automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Methods: A Monte Carlo CT dosimetry software package, which creates patient-specific voxelized phantoms, accurately simulates CT exposures, and generates dose images depicting the energy imparted on the exposed volume, was used. Routine head, thorax, and abdomen/pelvis CT examinations in 92 pediatric patients, ranging from 1-month to 14-yr-old (49 boys and 43 girls), were simulated on a 64-slice CT scanner. Two sets of simulations were performed in each patient using (i) a fixed tube current (FTC) value over the entire examination length and (ii) the ATCM profile extracted from the DICOM header of the reconstructed images. Normalized to CTDI{sub vol} organ dose was derived for all primary irradiated radiosensitive organs. Normalized dose data were correlated to patient’s water equivalent diameter using log-transformed linear regression analysis. Results: The maximum percent difference in normalized organ dose between FTC and ATCM acquisitions was 10% for eyes in head, 26% for thymus in thorax, and 76% for kidneys in abdomen/pelvis. In most of the organs, the correlation between dose and water equivalent diameter was significantly improved in ATCM compared to FTC acquisitions (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The proposed method employs size specific CTDI{sub vol}-normalized organ dose coefficients for ATCM-activated and FTC acquisitions in pediatric CT. These coefficients are substantially different between ATCM and FTC modes of operation and enable a more accurate assessment of patient-specific organ dose in the clinical setting.

  16. Assessment of effective dose in paediatric CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougeni, E; Chapple, C L; Willis, J; Panayiotakis, G

    2011-09-01

    Current concerns focus on the high doses encountered in computed tomography (CT) examinations as they are extending towards younger and more radiosensitive patients. Previous work produced conversion coefficients for effective dose (E) from dose-length product (DLP) for four anatomical body regions applicable to any patient size. This work aims to update the earlier work, incorporating the new ICRP 2007 tissue-weighting factors and testing the methodology on modern scanners. For each age and body region, E was determined relative to DLP. Measurements were carried out on a 64-slice scanner to test this methodology. The conversion coefficients show exponential decrease with patient size. Conversion factors for the pelvis region are lower than before (30-40 %), those for the chest increased (by up to 25 %) whereas those for the head and abdomen remained fairly similar. Application of the coefficients to modern scanners verified the results, so that this methodology can be applied for a wide range of paediatric CT examinations.

  17. Patient doses in chest CT examinations: Comparison of various CT scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božović Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from study on patient exposure level in chest CT examinations. CT scanners used in this study were various Siemens and General Electric (GE models. Data on patient doses were collected for adult and pediatric patients. Doses measured for adult patients were lower then those determined as Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL for Europe, while doses for pediatric patients were similar to those found in published data. As for the manufactures, slightly higher doses were measured on GE devices, both for adult and pediatric patients.

  18. National Survey on Justification of CT-examinations in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, Anja; Leitz, Wolfram; Richter, Sven

    2009-02-01

    All examinations in diagnostic radiology shall be justified to avoid unnecessary irradiation of the patients. The objective of the study was to investigate the degree of justification for CT-examinations in Sweden. Referrals for all examinations performed during one day were retrospectively evaluated by a group of physicians. The study was designed and conducted by a project group lead by prof. Haakan Jorulf. The authors of this report have derived the results and conclusions on the basis of the data and are responsible for the content of this report. The principle result was that approximately 20 % of all examinations were not justified. The degree of justification varied strongly with organ examined, moderately with prescriber affiliation and weakly with geographical region. If unjustified examinations could be avoided a large dose reduction for the population would be achieved. This study shows that there is a need for improvements and the authority will continue to work with this issue

  19. National Survey on Justification of CT-examinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, Anja; Leitz, Wolfram; Richter, Sven

    2009-02-15

    All examinations in diagnostic radiology shall be justified to avoid unnecessary irradiation of the patients. The objective of the study was to investigate the degree of justification for CT-examinations in Sweden. Referrals for all examinations performed during one day were retrospectively evaluated by a group of physicians. The study was designed and conducted by a project group lead by prof. Haakan Jorulf. The authors of this report have derived the results and conclusions on the basis of the data and are responsible for the content of this report. The principle result was that approximately 20 % of all examinations were not justified. The degree of justification varied strongly with organ examined, moderately with prescriber affiliation and weakly with geographical region. If unjustified examinations could be avoided a large dose reduction for the population would be achieved. This study shows that there is a need for improvements and the authority will continue to work with this issue

  20. Radiation doses in head CT examinations in Serbia: comparison among different CT units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arandjic, D.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Bozovic, P.; Stankovic, J.; Hadnadjev, D.; Stojanovic, S.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid increase in number of Computed Tomography (CT) examinations has been observed world wide. As haed CT is the most frequent CT examination, the purpose of this study was to collect and analyse patient doses in children and adults in different CT units for this procedure. The study included 8 CT units from three manufacturers (Siemens, Toshiba and General Electric). Data for adults and pediatric patients were collected in terms of CTDIvol and DLP values. The doses were estimated as a mean value of 10 patients on each CT unit. For pediatrics, doses were collected for four age groups (0-1year, >1-5years, >5-10years and >10-15years). Comparing different manufacturers and the same number of detector rows it was observed that, in case of 16 slices units, doses were very similar on Siemens and General Electric scanner. CTDIvol and DLP on Siemens scanner were 60 mGy and 1066 mGy·cm, respectively, while on General Electric those values were 66 mGy and 1050 mGy·cm. However, this trend was not observed in case of 64 slices units. CTDIvol and DLP values collected on Toshiba were much higher (177 mGy and 2109 mGy·cm) than in case of Siemens scanner (59 mGy and 1060 mGy·cm). Doses on 16 and 64 slices Siemens scanners were very similar, while on 4 slices were higher. Except in two units, doses were were in line with DRLs. In case of pediatrics, doses increase with patient age and again Siemens scanner showed the lowest values while the highest were observed on Toshiba. (authors)

  1. Examination of CT-AEC when the positioning changes after planning of CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaki, Tooru; Yamazaki, Shoichi

    2009-01-01

    CT-automatic exposure control (AEC) controls tube current collecting information of the subject from positioning shooting. Because of this, we consider that CT-AEC does not get to operate properly if the body position of the test subject changes after the positioning shooting. However, we often experience in body positions of test subjects after the positioning shooting. In cases like this, we measured by using a phantom again to see how they affect the tube current value and standard deviation (SD) value comparing them to the normal scan where a body position does not change. As a result of the measurement, there was an impact on CT-AEC that optimization of tube current becomes insufficient if the body position of a test subject changes. As the image quality is deteriorated and radiation exposure increases because of this, taking positioning shooting again is required on the part of users and it's desirable on the part of manufacturers to develop CT-AEC that can be controlled with high accuracy. (author)

  2. Brain parenchymal density measurements by CT in demented subjects and normal controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, M.; Danziger, W.L.; Chi, D.; Hughes, C.P.; Coben, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Parachymal density measurements of 14 regions of gray and white matter from each cerebral hemisphere were made from CT scans of 25 subjects who had varying degrees of dementia as measured by a global Clinical Dementia Rating, and also from CT scans of 33 normal control subjects. There were few significant differences between the two groups in the mean density value for each of the regions examined, although several individual psychometric tests did correlate with density changes. Moreover, for six regions in the cerebral cortex, and for one region in the thalamus of each hemisphere, we found no significant correlation between the gray-white matter density difference and dementia. There was, however, a loss of the discriminability between the gray and white matter with an increase in the size of the ventricles. These findings may be attributed to the loss of white matter volume

  3. Parkinsonian Symptomatology May Correlate with CT Findings before and after Shunting in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Ishii

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the characteristics of Parkinsonian features assessed by the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS and determine their correlations with the computed tomography (CT findings in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH. The total score and the scores for arising from chair, gait, postural stability, and body hypokinesia in the motor examination section of UPDRS were significantly improved after shunt operations. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that postural stability was the determinant of the gait domain score of the iNPH grading scale. The canonical correlation analysis between the CT findings and the shunt-responsive Parkinsonian features indicated that Evans index rather than midbrain diameters had a large influence on the postural stability. Thus, the pathophysiology of postural instability as a cardinal feature of gait disturbance may be associated with impaired frontal projections close to the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles in the iNPH patients.

  4. Assessment of Patient Dose from CT Examinations in Khorasan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni Toossi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Computed Tomography scans are a very important tool for diagnosis and assessment of response to treatment in the practice of medicine. Ionizing radiation in medical imaging is undoubtedly one of the most powerful diagnostic tools in medicine. Yet, as with all medical interventions, there are potential risks in addition to the clear potential benefits. Materials and Methods Two reference dose quantities have been defined in order to promote the use of good technique in CT. These are weighted CT dose index (CTDIw in (mGy for a single slice in serial scanning or per rotation in helical scanning, and dose–length product (DLP per complete examination (mGy.cm, All measurements were performed using a pencil shaped ionization chamber introduced into polymethyl methacrylate cylindrical brain and body phantoms. This survey was performed on 7 CT scanners in Khorasan Province-Iran. Results DLP for brain, chest, abdomen and pelvic examinations had a range of 255 - 1026, 76-1277, 48-737, 69-854 mGy.cm, respectively. Conclusion The results obtained in this study show that the DLP values obtained in this province are lower than European Commission reference dose levels (EC RDL, in other words performance of all the scanners were satisfactory.

  5. On the use of Monte Carlo-derived dosimetric data in the estimation of patient dose from CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the applicability and appropriateness of Monte Carlo-derived normalized data to provide accurate estimations of patient dose from computed tomography (CT) exposures. Monte Carlo methodology and mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms were used to simulate standard patient CT examinations of the head, thorax, abdomen, and trunk performed on a multislice CT scanner. Phantoms were generated to simulate the average adult individual and two individuals with different body sizes. Normalized dose values for all radiosensitive organs and normalized effective dose values were calculated for standard axial and spiral CT examinations. Discrepancies in CT dosimetry using Monte Carlo-derived coefficients originating from the use of: (a) Conversion coefficients derived for axial CT exposures, (b) a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom of standard body size to derive conversion coefficients, and (c) data derived for a specific CT scanner to estimate patient dose from CT examinations performed on a different scanner, were separately evaluated. The percentage differences between the normalized organ dose values derived for contiguous axial scans and the corresponding values derived for spiral scans with pitch = 1 and the same total scanning length were up to 10%, while the corresponding percentage differences in normalized effective dose values were less than 0.7% for all standard CT examinations. The normalized organ dose values for standard spiral CT examinations with pitch 0.5-1.5 were found to differ from the corresponding values derived for contiguous axial scans divided by the pitch, by less than 14% while the corresponding percentage differences in normalized effective dose values were less than 1% for all standard CT examinations. Normalized effective dose values for the standard contiguous axial CT examinations derived by Monte Carlo simulation were found to considerably decrease with increasing body size of the mathematical

  6. Automated extraction of radiation dose information for CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to radiation as a result of medical imaging is currently in the spotlight, receiving attention from Congress as well as the lay press. Although scanner manufacturers are moving toward including effective dose information in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine headers of imaging studies, there is a vast repository of retrospective CT data at every imaging center that stores dose information in an image-based dose sheet. As such, it is difficult for imaging centers to participate in the ACR's Dose Index Registry. The authors have designed an automated extraction system to query their PACS archive and parse CT examinations to extract the dose information stored in each dose sheet. First, an open-source optical character recognition program processes each dose sheet and converts the information to American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) text. Each text file is parsed, and radiation dose information is extracted and stored in a database which can be queried using an existing pathology and radiology enterprise search tool. Using this automated extraction pipeline, it is possible to perform dose analysis on the >800,000 CT examinations in the PACS archive and generate dose reports for all of these patients. It is also possible to more effectively educate technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians about exposure to radiation from CT by generating report cards for interpreted and performed studies. The automated extraction pipeline enables compliance with the ACR's reporting guidelines and greater awareness of radiation dose to patients, thus resulting in improved patient care and management. Copyright © 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinically relevant incidental cardiovascular findings in CT examinations; Klinisch relevante kardiovaskulaere Zufallsbefunde bei CT-Untersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, P.; Fahnert, J.; Kahn, T.; Surov, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany); Schramm, D.; Bach, A.G. [Universitaetsklinikum Halle (Saale), Klinik fuer Radiologie, Halle (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Incidental cardiovascular findings are a frequent phenomenon in computed tomography (CT) examinations. As the result of a dedicated PubMed search this article gives a systemic overview of the current literature on the most important incidental cardiovascular findings, their prevalence and clinical relevance. The majority of incidental cardiovascular findings are of only low clinical relevance; however, highly relevant incidental findings, such as aortic aneurysms, thromboses and thromboembolic events can also occasionally be found, especially in oncology patients. The scans from every CT examination should also be investigated for incidental findings as they can be of decisive importance for the further clinical management of patients, depending on their clinical relevance. (orig.) [German] Inzidentelle kardiovaskulaere Befunde sind ein haeufiges Phaenomen bei CT-Untersuchungen. Mit dieser Arbeit soll nach gezielter PubMed-Recherche ein systematischer Literaturueberblick ueber die wichtigsten kardiovaskulaeren Zufallsbefunde sowie deren Haeufigkeit und klinische Relevanz gegeben werden. Die Mehrzahl der inzidentellen kardiovaskulaeren Befunde sind klinisch nur von untergeordneter Bedeutung, allerdings werden immer wieder auch hochgradig relevante Zufallsbefunde wie beispielsweise Aortenaneurysmata oder - gerade bei onkologischen Patienten - Thrombosen und thrombembolische Ereignisse detektiert. Jede CT-Untersuchung sollte gezielt nach inzidentellen Befunden durchsucht werden, da diese je nach klinischer Relevanz von entscheidender Bedeutung fuer das weitere klinische Management des Patienten sein koennen. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong; Lee, Young Hwan

    1994-01-01

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions

  9. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong [School of Medicine, Taegu Catholic University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hwan [Taegu Armed Forces General Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions.

  10. Likelihood of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in patients with normal unenhanced CT, CSF xanthochromia on spectrophotometry and negative CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, A K; Turner, H E; Deans, K A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage, a normal noncontrast computed tomography (CT) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evidence of haemoglobin breakdown products often undergo CT angiography (CTA). If this is normal, then invasive catheter angiography may be offered. In current clinical practice, haemoglobin breakdown products are detected by spectrophotometry rather than visible xanthochromia, and CTA is performed on multidetector scanners. The aim of this study was to determine if such patients should still have a catheter angiography, given the associated risks. Patients positive for CSF spectrophotometry (n=26) were retrospectively identified from the clinical biochemistry information system and imaging data from the electronic radiology records were reviewed. Discharge letters were consulted to relate the biochemistry and radiology results to the final diagnosis. 15 patients with CT angiography were found. Nine patients had normal CT angiography. No causative aneurysms had been missed. One patient had small, coincidental aneurysms missed on initial reading of the CTA. The likelihood of a clinically significant aneurysm in a patient who is CT negative, lumbar puncture positive and CTA negative is low. Double reporting of negative CT angiograms may be advisable.

  11. Effective dose from cone beam CT examinations in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J A; Drage, N A; Davies, J; Thomas, D W

    2009-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) is becoming an increasingly utilized imaging modality for dental examinations in the UK. Previous studies have presented little information on patient dose for the range of fields of view (FOVs) that can be utilized. The purpose of the study was therefore to calculate the effective dose delivered to the patient during a selection of CBCT examinations performed in dentistry. In particular, the i-CAT CBCT scanner was investigated for several imaging protocols commonly used in clinical practice. A Rando phantom containing thermoluminescent dosemeters was scanned. Using both the 1990 and recently approved 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended tissue weighting factors, effective doses were calculated. The doses (E(1990), E(2007)) were: full FOV head (92.8 microSv, 206.2 microSv); 13 cm scan of the jaws (39.5 microSv, 133.9 microSv); 6 cm high-resolution mandible (47.2 microSv, 188.5 microSv); 6 cm high-resolution maxilla (18.5 microSv, 93.3 microSv); 6 cm standard mandible (23.9 microSv, 96.2 microSv); and 6 cm standard maxilla (9.7 microSv, 58.9 microSv). The doses from CBCT are low compared with conventional CT but significantly higher than conventional dental radiography techniques.

  12. Evaluation of changes in vertebral body density following administration of contrast medium during routine CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janicek, M.; Bruna, J.; Stenhova, H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of depicting changes in the density of spongiosis of the vertebral body in normal patients after intravenous administration of a bolus of 40 ml 60% Diazetrizoate in the course of a routine CT examination. The average increase in density immediately after the administration of the contrast medium is 12 H (8%), in the course of 10 minutes is reduced to 5 H (4%) against the initial values in native examination. These average changes are statistically significant, in individual patients, however, the increase in density following the administration of a contrast medium fluctuates considerably (from 0.7% to 10%). Only systematic comparison with various pathological conditions will make it possible to assess the possibilities of the evaluation of the structure of the vertebral body in routine CT with the administration of a contrast medium into the blood flow. (author)

  13. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: normal anatomy and technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvoisin, B.; Schnyder, P.; Klaus, E.; Jacques, B.

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is common. This entity is most often consecutive to internal derangements of the TMJ, which are not recognizable on plain films and tomograms. TMJ arthrography has proved a valuable tool in diagnosing these abnormalities. The technique of examination and normal arthrographic anatomy are reviewed. (author) [pt

  14. A new low-dose CT examination compared with standard-dose CT in the diagnosis of acute sinusitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagtvedt, T.; Aaloekken, T.M.; Noetthellen, J.; Kolbenstvedt, A. [Department of Radiology, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway)

    2003-05-01

    A low-dose CT of the paranasal sinuses was designed with few, thin sections, non-uniform intersection gaps, low milliampere settings and avoidance of direct radiation to the eye lens. The low-dose CT was prospectively compared with standard-dose CT in patients with suspicion of acute sinusitis. Forty-seven patients were examined with low-dose CT immediately after standard-dose CT. The effective dose and the lens dose were calculated and compared. Using standard-dose CT as a gold standard the sensitivity and specificity of low-dose CT was calculated for each sinus group. The effective dose and the lens dose of the low-dose CT were reduced to, respectively, 3 and 2% of the standard-dose CT. The diagnostic yield of the low-dose CT with regard to acute sinusitis was good with a high specificity ({>=}96%) for all sinus groups. The sensitivity was also high ({>=}95%) except for the frontal sinus where the sensitivity was 83%. Low-dose CT offers considerable dose reduction and should be the standard for imaging patients with suspected acute inflammatory paranasal disease. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of four chambers' volumes and ventricular masses by cardiac CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Motomasa; Naito, Hiroaki; Ohta, Mitsushige; Kozuka, Takahiro; Kito, Yoshitsugu (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1983-09-01

    Using cardiac computed tomography (CT), the ''mean'' volume of each cardiac chamber and both ventricular masses were calculated from summation of a sliced volume by ungated scans obtained using rapid sequential scanning covering the whole heart. 1. Estimation of a normal value of each chamber's volume was attempted in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease and with normal heart function. The ''mean'' volume of the right atrium (RAMV), right ventricle (RVMV), and left atrium (LAMV) was 22.3 +- 6.5, 40.3 +- 6.5 and 28.7 +- 8.2ml/m/sup 2/, respectively. 2. In 54 patients with valvular heart diseases, each chamber's volume obrained by CT was compared with the grade of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) estimated by ultrasonic Doppler technique or the grade of mitral regurgitation (MR) by left ventriculography (LVG). The RAMV (234 +- 119 ml/m/sup 2/) and the RVMV (101 +- 39 ml/m/sup 2/) were markedly increased in patients with severe TR (grade 3 to 4) (p<0.01). The LAMV (487 +- 231 ml/m/sup 2/) was also increased in patients with severe mitral regurgitation (grade 3 to 4) (p<0.01). 3. In 46 patients with valvular heart diseases, the LVMV by CT was well correlated with end-diastolic volume (EDV) obtained by LVG (r=0.92), and the LVEDVs by ECG gated CT and by LVG showed a fairly good correlation (r=0.95). 4. CT examination was performed before and after surgery in 17 patients with MR or TR for evaluation of the change of chamber volumes. The mean reduction ratio (MRR) of the RAMV after tricuspid annuloplasty, the LVMV after mitral valve plasty, and the LAMV after left atrial plication was 44%, 41%, and 60%, respectively.

  16. CT examination of the temporal bones for cochlear implantation; Badanie CT kosci skroniowych u osob przygotowanych do operacji wszczepu slimakowego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szyfter, W.; Szymiec, E.; Pruszewicz, A.; Szmeja, Z.; Paprzycki, W.; Sekula, A.; Przybylska, J. [Klinika Otolaryngologii, Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    CT examinations of temporal bones were performed in 31 deaf patients from qualify diagnostic stage prepared for cochlear implants. Essential for surgical treatment anatomic details were estimated, especially canalis spiralis cochleae was paid to attention. In our group, 8 patients had some CT changes (abnormal findings) which corresponded to different stages of obliteration the cochlea. The majority of patients lost the hearing because of meningitis. In 6 implanted patients CT scan was compared with surgical findings. During the operation 1 patient with patent cochlea on CT scan had partially ossified basal turn. (author) 16 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jiin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  18. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Choi, Jiin

    2015-01-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  19. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (

  20. Radiation Exposure in X-Ray and CT Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams What ... page for more information. top of page Measuring radiation dosage The scientific unit of measurement for radiation ...

  1. Real practice radiation dose and dosimetric impact of radiological staff training in body CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Faggioni, Lorenzo; Bastiani, Luca; Molinaro, Sabrina; Caramella, Davide; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the radiation dose of the main body CT examinations performed routinely in four regional diagnostic centres, the specific contribution of radiologists and technologists in determining CT dose levels, and the role of radiological staff training in reducing radiation doses. We retrospectively evaluated the radiation dose in terms of dose-length product (DLP) values of 2,016 adult CT examinations (chest, abdomen-pelvis, and whole body) collected in four different centres in our region. DLP values for contrast-unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations performed at each centre were compared for each anatomical area. DLP values for CT examinations performed before and after radiological staff training were also compared. DLP values for the same CT examinations varied among centres depending on radiologists' preferences, variable training of technologists, and diversified CT image acquisition protocols. A specific training programme designed for the radiological staff led to a significant overall reduction of DLP values, along with a significant reduction of DLP variability. Training of both radiologists and technologists plays a key role in optimising CT acquisition procedures and lowering the radiation dose delivered to patients. • The effective dose for similar CT examinations varies significantly among radiological centres. • Staff training can significantly reduce and harmonise the radiation dose. • Training of radiologists and technologists is key to optimise CT acquisition protocols.

  2. Discrepancy between absorbed dose estimated from phantom measurements and from estimates using data on individual head sizes in head CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adliene, D; Mockeviciene, S

    2010-01-01

    Patient doses during computed tomography (CT) scanning are relative high, as compared with doses received by patients during conventional X-ray examinations. Owing to this, every possible optimisation of CT examinations is of importance. Dose estimation in CT examinations of patients are normally based on measurements of CT dose index and dose length products in standardised CT phantoms, representing a standard person of 70 kg. Real patients may differ significantly from this standard, and hence the dose values calculated for a phantom are not relevant for the individual patient. In this investigation, the effective dose for 31 patients undergoing a CT examination of their head has been evaluated using measurements on a standard CT head phantom and the data corrected for the real size (perimeter) and exposed volume of the patient's head. It is shown that the actual doses to patients were higher in 50 % cases of all performed head CT examinations, compared with doses estimated from phantom measurements. A dose calculation model for head CT patients based on the individual patient's head size (perimeter) and exposed head volume is proposed and the possibility to optimise head CT examinations of patients is discussed.

  3. Real practice radiation dose and dosimetric impact of radiological staff training in body CT examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Faggioni, Lorenzo; Bastiani, Luca; Molinaro, Sabrina; Caramella, Davide; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the radiation dose of the main body CT examinations performed routinely in four regional diagnostic centres, the specific contribution of radiologists and technologists in determining CT dose levels, and the role of radiological staff training in reducing radiation doses. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the radiation dose in terms of dose-length product (DLP) values of 2,016 adult CT examinations (chest, abdomen-pelvis, and whole body) collected in four different c...

  4. The clinical evaluation of CT and radionuclide examination in renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Wataru; Ishida, Hirofumi; Shirakawa, Shigetoshi; Shintaku, Takao; Funaki, Ryo

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twelve cases of renal diseases were studied by computed tomography (CT) using EMI 5005/12. Of them, 60 were examined by both CT and renal scintigraphy, and comparatively evaluated. The CT units were checked before and after the contrast enhancement. Renal scintigrams were obtained by gamma cameras (PHO/GAMMA HP 6406, PHO/GAMMA LFOV) using 99 M Tc-DMSA. CT was especially useful in diagnosing the renal cysts and the hydronephrosis. Cysts in other organs (liver, spleen and pancreas) were simultaneously ascertained in polycystic diseases. CT was not helpful in diagnosing nephritis and diabetic nephropathy. Floating kidney and horse-shoe kidney were difficult to diagnose with CT. The renal scintigram was the reflection of the renal function, and was relatively more useful than CT in diagnosing horse-shoe kidney, floating kidney and nephritis, while it was not useful for non-functioning kidneys. (author)

  5. Examination of jaws and teeth using Dental CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov, Vl.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to establish a new method for dental imaging using Dental CT. Dental computer assisted tomography represents valuable addition to the diagnostics spectrum for planning oral and maxillofacial surgery. High resolution spiral CT and specially designed computer software allow representation of the jaws in different planes that are easy to match. The further allow the display of very small structures relevant to oral surgical interventions and reveal their spatial relationship in three dimensions. Dental CT is indicated, when clinical and conventional radiological techniques will not allow exact interpretation of the situation. It is modern oral implantology that primarily benefits from computer software enabling the assessment of surgical sites in the pre surgical phase. Such planning was not yet possible using two dimensional radiographic techniques. The dental-implantological part expects from radiography sharply defined contours of the external bony contours and the mandibular canal, exactly defined relation between slices and planes, no distortion in the ortho-radial planes, tools for reliable measurements of distances, angles and volumes, possibility to transmit pictures electronically or on hardcopy without loss of quality. Thus communication between dentists and radiologists may and must be intensified and supported by usage of modern telecommunication systems. (author)

  6. Measurement of normal auditory ossicles by high-resolusion CT with application of normal criteria to disease cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Jyoko

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to define criteria for the normal position of ossicles and to apply them in patients with rhinolaryngologically or pathologically confirmed diseases. Ossicles were measured on high-resolution CT images of 300 middle ears, including 241 normal ears and 59 diseased ears, in a total of 203 subjects. Angles A, B, and C to the baseline between the most lateral margins of bilateral internal auditory canals, and distance ratio b/a were defined as measurement items. Normal angles A, B, and C and distance ratio b/a ranged from 19 deg to 59 deg, 101 deg to 145 deg, 51 deg to 89 deg, and 0.49 to 0.51, respectively. Based on these criteria, all of these items were within the normal range in 30/34 (88.2 %) ears for otitis media and mastoiditis. One or more items showed far abnormal values (standard deviation; more than 3) in 5/7 (71.4 %) ears for cholesteatoma and 4/4 (100 %) ears for external ear anomaly. These normal measurements may aid in evaluating the position of auditory ossicles especially in the case of cholesteatoma and auditory ossicle abnormality. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Measurement of normal auditory ossicles by high-resolusion CT with application of normal criteria to disease cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Jyoko

    1988-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to define criteria for the normal position of ossicles and to apply them in patients with rhinolaryngologically or pathologically confirmed diseases. Ossicles were measured on high-resolution CT images of 300 middle ears, including 241 normal ears and 59 diseased ears, in a total of 203 subjects. Angles A, B, and C to the baseline between the most lateral margins of bilateral internal auditory canals, and distance ratio b/a were defined as measurement items. Normal angles A, B, and C and distance ratio b/a ranged from 19 deg to 59 deg, 101 deg to 145 deg, 51 deg to 89 deg, and 0.49 to 0.51, respectively. Based on these criteria, all of these items were within the normal range in 30/34 (88.2 %) ears for otitis media and mastoiditis. One or more items showed far abnormal values (standard deviation; more than 3) in 5/7 (71.4 %) ears for cholesteatoma and 4/4 (100 %) ears for external ear anomaly. These normal measurements may aid in evaluating the position of auditory ossicles especially in the case of cholesteatoma and auditory ossicle abnormality. (Namekawa, K.).

  8. The diagnostic importance of the recognition of the inferior Vena cava abnormalities on CT-examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouliamos, A.; Striggaris, K.; Haliasos, N.; Vlahos, N.; Pontifex, G.

    1981-01-01

    Two unusual variations of the Vena cava inferior, as shown by CT examinations, are reported and characteristic X-rays, as well as CT scans, are presented. The first case shows an IVC course to the left of the aorta and the second case absence of the intrahepatic portion of the IVC with azygos continuation. Difficulties in the differential diagnosis are analyzed and discussed, both demonstrated by plain X-rays and CT scans. (orig.) [de

  9. Delayed traumatic intracranial hematoma. In view of serial CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Hiroki (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-03-01

    CT was performed serially within 24 hours after head injury in 64 patients having Glasgow Coma Scale of 14 or less or cranial fracture shown on roentgenogram. Delayed traumatic extradural hematoma was observed within 7-12 hours after head injury in 6 cases (9.4%). This was prominent in the frontal and occipital regions (67%). Good recovery was seen in 83.3%. Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma was observed within 6-24 hours after head injury in 17 cases (26.6%). This higher incidence was related to contre coup injury. Conservative treatment was possible in 14 of the 17 patients (82.4%), showing good recovery in 70%.

  10. Comparative study of patellar subluxation syndrome and normal group using axial radiography and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, Mamoru; Tomonaga, Kunio; Egawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Gotoh, Shoji; Mihara, Shigeru (Nagasaki Municipal Hospital (Japan))

    1989-10-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the 20 knees of 10 females with normal knee joints (age, 22-35 years) and on 7 knees of 7 patients with subluxation syndrome (age, 15-24 years), using axial radiography and CT. In axial radiography where the angle of knee flexion was 30 deg or 60 deg, no significant difference was recognized between the two groups with respect to tilting angle, patellofemoral angle, congruence angle and lateral shift. However, a significant difference was found using CT. Thus, CT was considered useful for diagnosis. Because of these results, all 7 cases underwent surgery for detachment of the lateral side and tightening of the medial side. Three cases underwent shifting of the tibial tuberosity to the anteromedial side, resulting in a favourable outcome. Here, we report the study. (author).

  11. Comparative study of patellar subluxation syndrome and normal group using axial radiography and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Mamoru; Tomonaga, Kunio; Egawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Gotoh, Shoji; Mihara, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the 20 knees of 10 females with normal knee joints (age, 22-35 years) and on 7 knees of 7 patients with subluxation syndrome (age, 15-24 years), using axial radiography and CT. In axial radiography where the angle of knee flexion was 30 deg or 60 deg, no significant difference was recognized between the two groups with respect to tilting angle, patellofemoral angle, congruence angle and lateral shift. However, a significant difference was found using CT. Thus, CT was considered useful for diagnosis. Because of these results, all 7 cases underwent surgery for detachment of the lateral side and tightening of the medial side. Three cases underwent shifting of the tibial tuberosity to the anteromedial side, resulting in a favourable outcome. Here, we report the study. (author)

  12. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  13. Updated estimates of typical effective doses for common CT examinations in the UK following the 2011 national review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimpton, Paul C; Jansen, Jan T M; Harrison, John D

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the impact of evolving International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations concerning calculation of effective dose (E) and compare updated typical UK values for common CT examinations with previous data. Monte Carlo simulations have provided normalized organ doses relating to 15 CT scanner models and 5 virtual reference adults. Series of representative E/dose-length product (DLP) coefficients were derived for common examinations on the separate bases of not only older stylized mathematical phantoms and voxel phantoms presently recommended by ICRP, but also the 1977, 1990 and 2007 formulations for E. Updated E/DLP coefficients were applied to typical values of DLP from the 2011 UK survey. Changes in ICRP recommendations that have arisen from improving evidence on stochastic risk, influence values of E by up to a factor two for CT examinations of the head and neck, although differences for the trunk typically amount to ±10%. Adoption of the voxel rather than the mathematical phantoms used previously can lead to further changes in E by a few tens of percent. Updated typical values of E for UK CT examinations range from 2 to 20 mSv. Increases by 20-400% since 2003 arise not only from increases by 30-160% in typical values of DLP, but also increases by 30-90% in relation to E/DLP coefficients for examinations of the trunk. Values of E, including updated typical data for UK CT, should be compared with caution in relation to their purpose and underlying factors concerning their calculation. Updated E/DLP coefficients and typical values of E for UK CT, and an appreciation of factors influencing these data.

  14. Examination of venous tumor thrombus with colorectal cancer by enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Kiba, Maki; Tazoe, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Recently, multi detector row CT (MDCT) has been largely used and enabled to detect drainage vessels of tumors. Then we tried examining the ratio, by using enhanced CT, of the cases that has venous tumor thrombus with colorectal cancer, and found the 3 cases out of 176 to be venous tumor thrombus of mesenteric veins in advanced stage. (author)

  15. [The clinical application of gene chips combined with CT examination in the diagnosis of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Lin, Ying; Luo, Qiong; Chen, Xiaoke; Huang, Lifen; Liang, Zijian; Wang, Haitao; Yu, Feng

    2013-10-01

    To explore the feasibility and superiority of the gene chip method and temporal bone CT in diagnosis of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. One hundred and eighty-eight cases of deaf students in Guangzhou were selected,the microarray detection of the SLC26A4 gene locus was performed,and the 26 cases of students with detected SLC26A4 gene mutations received temporal bone CT imaging. Among the detected 26 cases of patients with hearing loss, IVS7-2A>G homozygous mutation was found in 7 cases, 17 cases were heterozygous mutation, 2168A>G heterozygous mutation presented in three cases, including one case of IVS7-2A>G and 2168A>G compound heterozygous mutations. Temporal bone CT findings of 25 cases among the 26 patients showed bilateral large vestibular aqueduct,among which 9 cases exhibited bilateral cochlear malformations, and 1 case was normal. Among the different SLC26A4 gene mutations, IVS7-2A>G point mutation rates the highest, followed by 2168A>G. Most of the CT examination prompted the expansion of the vestibular aqueduct. Deafness gene chip hotspot detection of SLC26A4 gene mutations can diagnose such patients before CT examination,which can be used for screening people with high risk of deafness prenatal screening. The early detection and early diagnosis can guide proper precautionary measures in advance to prevent the occurrence of prelingual deafness.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVE DOSE FROM CONE BEAM CT IMAGING IN SPECT/CT EXAMINATION IN COMPARISON WITH OTHER MODALITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkopi, Elena; Ross, Andrew A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiation dose from the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) component of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) examinations and to compare it with the radiopharmaceutical related dose as well as dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Effective dose (ED) from computed tomography (CT) was estimated using dose-length product values and anatomy-specific conversion factors. The contribution from the SPECT component was evaluated using ED per unit administered activity for the radiopharmaceuticals listed in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publications 80 and 106. With the exception of cardiac studies (0.11 mSv), the CBCT dose (3.96-6.04 mSv) was similar to that from the radiopharmaceutical accounting for 29-56 % of the total ED from the examination. In comparison with MDCT examinations, the CBCT dose was 48 and 42 % lower for abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis scans, respectively, while in the chest the CBCT scan resulted in higher dose (23 %). Radiation dose from the CT component should be taken into consideration when evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Estimating organ doses from tube current modulated CT examinations using a generalized linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostani, Maryam; McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Grace Hyun J; Cody, Dianna; Arbique, Gary; Greenberg, S Bruce; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Chris H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2017-04-01

    Currently, available Computed Tomography dose metrics are mostly based on fixed tube current Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and/or physical measurements such as the size specific dose estimate (SSDE). In addition to not being able to account for Tube Current Modulation (TCM), these dose metrics do not represent actual patient dose. The purpose of this study was to generate and evaluate a dose estimation model based on the Generalized Linear Model (GLM), which extends the ability to estimate organ dose from tube current modulated examinations by incorporating regional descriptors of patient size, scanner output, and other scan-specific variables as needed. The collection of a total of 332 patient CT scans at four different institutions was approved by each institution's IRB and used to generate and test organ dose estimation models. The patient population consisted of pediatric and adult patients and included thoracic and abdomen/pelvis scans. The scans were performed on three different CT scanner systems. Manual segmentation of organs, depending on the examined anatomy, was performed on each patient's image series. In addition to the collected images, detailed TCM data were collected for all patients scanned on Siemens CT scanners, while for all GE and Toshiba patients, data representing z-axis-only TCM, extracted from the DICOM header of the images, were used for TCM simulations. A validated MC dosimetry package was used to perform detailed simulation of CT examinations on all 332 patient models to estimate dose to each segmented organ (lungs, breasts, liver, spleen, and kidneys), denoted as reference organ dose values. Approximately 60% of the data were used to train a dose estimation model, while the remaining 40% was used to evaluate performance. Two different methodologies were explored using GLM to generate a dose estimation model: (a) using the conventional exponential relationship between normalized organ dose and size with regional water equivalent diameter

  18. Interval lung cancer after a negative CT screening examination: CT findings and outcomes in National Lung Screening Trial participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierada, David S. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Pinsky, Paul F. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Duan, Fenghai [Brown University School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Sciences, Providence, RI (United States); Garg, Kavita [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Mail Stop F726, Box 6510, Aurora, CO (United States); Hart, Eric M. [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kazerooni, Ella A. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nath, Hrudaya; Watts, Jubal R. [University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Department of Radiology-JTN370, Birmingham, AL (United States); Aberle, Denise R. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This study retrospectively analyses the screening CT examinations and outcomes of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants who had interval lung cancer diagnosed within 1 year after a negative CT screen and before the next annual screen. The screening CTs of all 44 participants diagnosed with interval lung cancer (cases) were matched with negative CT screens of participants who did not develop lung cancer (controls). A majority consensus process was used to classify each CT screen as positive or negative according to the NLST criteria and to estimate the likelihood that any abnormalities detected retrospectively were due to lung cancer. By retrospective review, 40/44 cases (91%) and 17/44 controls (39%) met the NLST criteria for a positive screen (P < 0.001). Cases had higher estimated likelihood of lung cancer (P < 0.001). Abnormalities included pulmonary nodules ≥4 mm (n = 16), mediastinal (n = 8) and hilar (n = 6) masses, and bronchial lesions (n = 6). Cancers were stage III or IV at diagnosis in 32/44 cases (73%); 37/44 patients (84%) died of lung cancer, compared to 225/649 (35%) for all screen-detected cancers (P < 0.0001). Most cases met the NLST criteria for a positive screen. Awareness of missed abnormalities and interpretation errors may aid lung cancer identification in CT screening. (orig.)

  19. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8-35 mGy and 7-18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12-33 mGy and 10-21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4-17 mGy and 3-7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5-14 mGy and 3-9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDI(vol)), dose-length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) and 0.019 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively.

  20. Three-phase CT examination of the pancreatobiliary region using multislice CT with 1-mm collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shigeki; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Koujiro; Iwano, Shingo; Satake, Hiroko; Ota, Toyohiro; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement and accuracy of imaging of the circulatory phase in the first-pass, second-pass, and third-pass acquisitions in the pancreato-biliary region with 1-mm collimation obtained by multislice computed tomography (CT). In 53 patients, two sequential acquisitions from the porta hepatis to the pancreas were performed during a single breath-hold, followed by a third-pass acquisition including the liver beginning 15 sec after the second-pass acquisition. Contrast enhancement in each acquisition was measured in the aorta, portal vein and its branches, and pancreas. Four experienced radiologists graded using four-point scoring whether or not each acquisition was appropriate for imaging of the arterial phase, pancreatic phase, and portal venous phase. Aortic enhancement was highest at the beginning of the second-pass acquisition. The portal and splenic veins and pancreas showed maximum enhancement in the second-pass acquisition, while the superior mesenteric vein showed maximum enhancement in the third-pass acquisition. In the visual assessment, significantly higher grades were achieved in the first-pass, second-pass, and third-pass acquisitions with regard to imaging of the arterial phase, pancreatic phase, and portal venous phase, respectively. Multislice CT permits the acquisition of three distinct circulatory phases (arterial, pancreatic, and portal venous phases) in the pancreatobiliary region with 1-mm collimation. (author)

  1. An estimation of the annual effective dose to the Canadian population from medical CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Moir, Deborah

    2010-06-01

    This study was carried out to assess the annual per capita effective dose from medical diagnostic procedures using computed tomography (CT) in Canada. Relevant data concerning the nature and the frequency of various diagnostic CT examinations were obtained from the reports on Medical Imaging in Canada and Diagnostic Services in Ontario. Doses associated with examinations of different types were based primarily on typical effective doses used in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report 160 with considerations of limited dose information surveyed in Canada. The results show that the per capita annual effective dose from diagnostic CT exams was 0.74 mSv in 2006, up from 0.19 mSv in 1991. This significant increase in population radiation dose from CT scans is due mainly to a more than doubling in the examination rate and to a higher radiation dose per procedure from the newer generation of multi-detector CTs.

  2. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  3. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P history (P = .001) were associated with increased likelihood of a recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17

  4. Phase- and size-adjusted CT cut-off for differentiating neoplastic lesions from normal colon in contrast-enhanced CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luboldt, W.; Kroll, M.; Wetter, A.; Vogl, T.J.; Toussaint, T.L.; Hoepffner, N.; Holzer, K.; Kluge, A.

    2004-01-01

    A computed tomography (CT) cut-off for differentiating neoplastic lesions (polyps/carcinoma) from normal colon in contrast-enhanced CT colonography (CTC) relating to the contrast phase and lesion size is determined. CT values of 64 colonic lesions (27 polyps 0 . The slope m was determined by linear regression in the correlation (lesion ∝[xA + (1 - x)V]//H) and the Y-intercept y 0 by the minimal shift of the line needed to maximize the accuracy of separating the colonic wall from the lesions. The CT value of the lesions correlated best with the intermediate phase: 0.4A+ 0.6V(r=0.8 for polyps ≥10 mm, r=0.6 for carcinomas, r=0.4 for polyps <10 mm). The accuracy in the differentiation between lesions and normal colonic wall increased with the height implemented as divisor, reached 91% and was obtained by the dynamic cut-off described by the formula: cut-off(A,V,H) = 1.1[0.4A + 0.6V]/H + 69.8. The CT value of colonic polyps or carcinomas can be increased extrinsically by scanning in the phase in which 0.4A + 0.6V reaches its maximum. Differentiating lesions from normal colon based on CT values is possible in contrast-enhanced CTC and improves when the cut-off is adjusted (normalized) to the contrast phase and lesion size. (orig.)

  5. Water enema CT examination of rectum cancer by reduced amount of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palko, A.; Gyulai, Cs.; Fedinecz, N. [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Radiology; Balogh, A. [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Surgery; Nagy, F. [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Faculty of General Medicine

    2000-11-01

    To define whether volume of water, administered during water enema CT (WE-CT) for local staging of rectal cancer, may be reduced without compromising the diagnostic value of the examination. Materials and Methods: 29 patients with rectum cancer underwent preoperative WE-CT. Contrast-enhanced CT (equilibrium phase) measurements were performed after i.v. injection of smooth muscle relaxant and rectal administration of 400 - 500 ml lukewarm tap water. Quality of the obtained scans was evaluated and the images were analyzed for depth of tumor invasion. Results of the CT examinations were compared to findings at surgery. Results: Despite reduced dose of water enema, 19/29 examinations were of excellent quality, 6/29 good, and 4/29 poor, but still diagnostic. We achieved sensitivity (90.1), specificity (70.1) and accuracy (86.2) in differentiating tumors confined to the bowel wall from those extending beyond it. Conclusion: Large volume of water enema administered during CT examination of the rectum may cause complaints and increases the risk of complications. Our results prove that using lower amount of water does not impair the quality of examination and accuracy of local staging of rectum carcinomas. (orig.) [German] Beurteilen, ob die in der Hydro-CT (H-CT) rektal applizierte Wassermenge reduziert werden kann, ohne den diagnostischen Wert der Untersuchung im lokal-Staging des Rektumkarzinoms zu mindern. Material und Methode: 29 Patienten mit Rektumkarzinom wurden praeoperativ mit H-CT untersucht. Nach i.v. Praemedikation zur Darmparalyse wurden rektal ca. 400 - 500 ml lauwarmes Wasser appliziert, und i.v. kontrastverstaerkte CT-Untersuchungen durchgefuehrt. Die Qualitaet der CT-Scans und die Tiefe der invasion des Tumors in die Darmwand wurden analysiert. Die computertomographischen Befunde wurden mit den Operationsbefunden verglichen. Ergebnisse: Trotz der reduzierten Menge des Einlaufswassers, 19/29 Untersuchungen hatten ausgezeichnete, 6/29 gute, und 4/29 schwache

  6. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhalisa, H.; Mohamad, A. S.; Rafidah, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  7. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhalisa, H., E-mail: dhalisa82@gmail.com; Rafidah, Z. [Kluster Oncology Science and Radiology, Advanced Medical Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Bertam, Penang (Malaysia); Mohamad, A. S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute, No 4 Jalan P7, Presint 7, Putrajaya (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  8. Effective radiation doses of CT examinations in Japan: a nationwide questionnaire-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Ai; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Masanao; Asada, Yasuki; Minami, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Shoichi; Chida, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to estimate the effective radiation doses from CT examinations of both adults and children in Japan and to study the impact of various scan parameters on the effective doses. Methods: A questionnaire, which contained detailed questions on the CT scan parameters employed, was distributed to 3000 facilities throughout Japan. For each scanner protocol, the effective doses for head (non-helical and helical), chest and upper abdomen acquisitions were estimated using ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator software v. 1.0.4 (St George's Hospital, London, UK). Results: The mean effective doses for chest and abdominal examinations using 80–110 kV were significantly lower than those using 120 kV. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean effective doses for head scans between facilities employing 80–110 kV and 120 kV. In chest and abdominal examinations, the mean effective doses using CT scanners from Western manufacturers [Siemens (Forchheim, Germany), Philips (Eindhoven, Netherlands) and GE Medical Systems (Milwaukee, WI)] were significantly lower than those of examinations using Japanese scanners [Hitachi (Kashiwa, Japan) and Toshiba (Otawara, Tochigi, Japan)], except for in paediatric chest examinations. Conclusion: The mean effective doses for adult head, chest and abdominal CT examinations were 2.9, 7.7 and 10.0 mSv, respectively, whereas the corresponding mean effective doses for paediatric examinations were 2.6, 7.1 and 7.7 mSv, respectively. Advances in knowledge: Facilities using CT scanners by Western manufacturers commonly adopt low-tube-voltage techniques, and low-tube-voltage CT may be useful for reducing the radiation doses to the patients, particularly for the body region. PMID:26647804

  9. Reproducibility of CT Perfusion Parameters in Liver Tumors and Normal Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chaan S.; Chandler, Adam G.; Wei, Wei; Herron, Delise H.; Anderson, Ella F.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Charnsangavej, Chusilp

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the reproducibility of computed tomographic (CT) perfusion measurements in liver tumors and normal liver and effects of motion and data acquisition time on parameters. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this prospective study. The study complied with HIPAA regulations. Two CT perfusion scans were obtained 2–7 days apart in seven patients with liver tumors with two scanning phases (phase 1: 30-second breath-hold cine; phase 2: six intermittent free-breathing cines) spanning 135 seconds. Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability–surface area product (PS) for tumors and normal liver were calculated from phase 1 with and without rigid registration and, for combined phases 1 and 2, with manually and rigid-registered phase 2 images, by using deconvolution modeling. Variability was assessed with within-patient coefficients of variation (CVs) and Bland-Altman analyses. Results: For tumors, BF, BV, MTT, and PS values and reproducibility varied by analytical method, the former by up to 11%, 23%, 21%, and 138%, respectively. Median PS values doubled with the addition of phase 2 data to phase 1 data. The best overall reproducibility was obtained with rigidly registered phase 1 and phase 2 images, with within-patient CVs for BF, BV, MTT, and PS of 11.2%, 14.4%, 5.5% and 12.1%, respectively. Normal liver evaluations were similar, except with marginally lower variability. Conclusion: Absolute values and reproducibility of CT perfusion parameters were markedly influenced by motion and data acquisition time. PS, in particular, probably requires data acquisition beyond a single breath hold, for which motion-correction techniques are likely necessary. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11110331/-/DC1 PMID:21788525

  10. SPECT/CT Detection of a Communicating Arachnoid Cyst in a Patient With Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lisa; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Bucklan, Daniel; Faulhaber, Peter F; O'Donnell, James K

    2017-07-01

    A 59-year-old man with history of multiple sclerosis and residual sensory and motor dysfunction presented with progressive lower-extremity weakness, ataxic gait, and intermittent urinary incontinence. Brain MRI demonstrated volume loss with disproportionate ventricular dilatation, but no evidence of infarction or abnormal enhancement. Radionuclide cisternography showed early and persistent ventricular reflux, poor progression of radiopharmaceutical over convexities, and delayed clearance in a pattern consistent with normal pressure hydrocephalus. Asymmetric activity in the right parietal region was also identified. Fused SPECT/CT, as well as fusion of the SPECT with a previous brain MRI, demonstrated a communicating arachnoidal cyst.

  11. Normal anatomy of the female pelvis in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated with reformatted CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, O.C.; Cooke, J.C.; Parsons, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Axial CT is used in assessing gynecologic malignancies. Accurate delineation of local tumor extent in carcinoma of the cervix is important in initial staging and in planning subsequent management. A modified scanning technique produces reformatted coronal and sagittal images, which demonstrate additional valuable information about the cardinal ligaments, parametria, ureters, boundaries between the cervix, bladder, and rectum, and extension to vagina and uterus. This information is illustrated by representative axial, coronal, and sagittal scans. Familiarity with normal appearances is essential to allow correct interpretation of pathology

  12. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels for CT trunk examinations in the western region of Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qurashi, Abdulaziz A.; Rainford, Louise A.; Foley, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are an important optimisation tool, which aid in identifying abnormally high dose levels. These are currently not available in Saudi Arabia, and this research aims to remedy this. CT dose data (DLP and CTDIvol) were collected for a minimum number of 10 adult patients of average size (60-80 kg) presenting for a range of CT examinations from public hospitals in the western region of Saudi Arabia. These include routine chest, high-resolution chest (HRCT), pulmonary angiography (CTPA), abdomen and pelvis (AP) and the combined chest, abdomen and pelvis (CAP) CT examinations. Mean values for each site were calculated, and the 75. percentile of DLP and CTDIvol was used as a basis for DRLs. Data for 550 patients were collected from 14 hospitals over a 7-month period. The rounded third-quartile CTDIvol and DLP were 18 mGy and 630 mGy cm -1 for chest CT, 20 mGy and 600 mGy cm -1 for HRCT, 18 mGy and 480 mGy cm -1 for CTPA, 15 mGy and 800 mGy cm -1 for AP, and 16 mGy and 1040 mGy cm -1 for CAP, respectively. Regional DRLs have been proposed from this study. Dose variations across CT departments have identified an urgent need for optimisation to improve distribution of observed doses for CT examinations. (authors)

  13. CT findings of normal pancreatic tail: variety of morphology and location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Hye Seung; Son, San Hoo; Moon, Gae Hyuk; Kim, Hu Ho; Gong Jae Chul; Yang Jae Boum; Park, Mee Sook

    1998-01-01

    To determine the morphology and location of normal pancreatic tail, as seen on abdominal CT. A hundred and one patients without pancreatic disease underwent CT scanning. We then determined how to relate the location of the pancreatic tail with the splenic hilum, left kidney, and pancreatic body. We compared the thickness of the tail with that of the body and analysed of the morphology of the tail. Seventy-seven percent of all pancreatic tails were located below the splenic hilum, with 59% of this proportion located 1 to 2 cm below. Fifty percent of tails were located at the level of the uppermost quarter of the left kidney, and a further 27% at the level of the second quarter; 75 % were located in the ventrolateral portion of this kidney and 23% in the ventral portion. In 48% of patients, the pancreatic tail and body were the same thickness, and in a further 48 %, the tail was thicker than the body. In 34% of patients, the tail showed focal bulging, and in another 32%, it tapered smoothly. Forty seven percent of tails were located below the pancreatic body and a further 37% were found at the same level as the body. Abdominal CT scans showed differing morphology and location of the pancreatic tail. The recognition of these variations will diminish speculation as to their true nature. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs

  14. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  15. Spatial Distribution of Iron Within the Normal Human Liver Using Dual-Source Dual-Energy CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadia, Andres F; Grant, Katharine L; Carey, Kathleen E; Bolch, Wesley E; Morin, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Explore the potential of dual-source dual-energy (DSDE) computed tomography (CT) to retrospectively analyze the uniformity of iron distribution and establish iron concentration ranges and distribution patterns found in healthy livers. Ten mixtures consisting of an iron nitrate solution and deionized water were prepared in test tubes and scanned using a DSDE 128-slice CT system. Iron images were derived from a 3-material decomposition algorithm (optimized for the quantification of iron). A conversion factor (mg Fe/mL per Hounsfield unit) was calculated from this phantom study as the quotient of known tube concentrations and their corresponding CT values. Retrospective analysis was performed of patients who had undergone DSDE imaging for renal stones. Thirty-seven patients with normal liver function were randomly selected (mean age, 52.5 years). The examinations were processed for iron concentration. Multiple regions of interest were analyzed, and iron concentration (mg Fe/mL) and distribution was reported. The mean conversion factor obtained from the phantom study was 0.15 mg Fe/mL per Hounsfield unit. Whole-liver mean iron concentrations yielded a range of 0.0 to 2.91 mg Fe/mL, with 94.6% (35/37) of the patients exhibiting mean concentrations below 1.0 mg Fe/mL. The most important finding was that iron concentration was not uniform and patients exhibited regionally high concentrations (36/37). These regions of higher concentration were observed to be dominant in the middle-to-upper part of the liver (75%), medially (72.2%), and anteriorly (83.3%). Dual-source dual-energy CT can be used to assess the uniformity of iron distribution in healthy subjects. Applying similar techniques to unhealthy livers, future research may focus on the impact of hepatic iron content and distribution for noninvasive assessment in diseased subjects.

  16. Exposure to radiation in whole body and skull CT examinations depending upon parameters determined by the technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebach, B.J.O.; Makoski, H.B.; Ewen, K.

    1983-01-01

    The article gives the organ doses for whole body CT examinations of the thoracic region, the upper abdomen, the mesogastric and pelvic regions as well as of the lumbar vertebral column and for CT scanning of the skull. The examinations were performed using in Alderson-Rando phantom with the whole body computer thomograph Somatom DR2 supplied by Siemens and with the skull computer tomograph Siretom 2000, also supplied by Siemens, It was found that the magnitude of radiation exposure of the patient depends not only on instrument-specific properties, but also to a very large measure on the examination parameters and techniques which can vary considerably from one clinic to another. (orig.) [de

  17. [Results of the Austrian CT dose study 2010: typical effective doses of the most frequent CT examinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Leithner, Robert; Billinger, Jochen; Gruber, Michael

    2014-09-01

    To determine typical doses from common CT examinations of standard sized adult patients and their variability between CT operators for common CT indications. In a nationwide Austrian CT dose survey doses from approx. 10,000 common CT examinations of adults during 2009 and 2010 were collected and "typical" radiation doses to the "average patient", which turned out to have 75.6kg body mass, calculated. Conversion coefficients from DLP to effective dose were determined and effective doses calculated according to ICRP 103. Variations of typically applied doses to the "average patient" were expressed as ratios between 90(th) and 10(th) percentile (inter-percentile width, IPW90/10), 1(st) and 3(rd) quartile (IPW75/25), and Maximum/Minimum. Median effective doses to the average patients for standard head and neck scans were 1.8 mSv (cervical spine), 1.9 mSv (brain: trauma/bleeding, stroke) to 2.2 mSv (brain: masses) with typical variation between facilities of a factor 2.5 (IPW90/10) and 1.7 (IPW75/25). In the thorax region doses were 6.4 to 6.8 mSv (pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and inflammation, oncologic scans), the variation between facilities was by a factor of 2.1 (IPW90/10) and 1.5 (IPW75/25), respectively. In the abdominal region median effective doses from 6.5 mSv (kidney stone search) to 22 mSv (liver lesions) were found (acute abdomen, staging/metastases, lumbar spine: 9-12 mSv; oncologic abdomen plus chest 16 mSv; renal tumor 20 mSv). Variation factors between facilities were on average for abdominal scans 2.7 (IPW90/10) and 1.8 (IPW75/25). Variations between CT operators are generally moderate for most operators, but in some indications the ratio between the minimum and the maximum of average dose to the typical standard patients exceeds a factor of 4 or even 5. Therefore, comparing average doses to Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) and optimizing protocols need to be encouraged. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Low contrast media volume in pre-TAVI CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Madeleine; Turek, Jakub; Mihl, Casper; Reinartz, Sebastian D; Gohmann, Robin F; Nijssen, Estelle C; Kats, Suzanne; van Ommen, Vincent G; Kietselaer, Bas L J H; Wildberger, Joachim E; Das, Marco

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate image quality using reduced contrast media (CM) volume in pre-TAVI assessment. Forty-seven consecutive patients referred for pre-TAVI examination were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: group 1 BMI  28 kg/m(2) (n = 18). Patients received a combined scan protocol: retrospective ECG-gated helical CTA of the aortic root (80kVp) followed by a high-pitch spiral CTA (group 1: 70 kV; group 2: 80 kVp) from aortic arch to femoral arteries. All patients received one bolus of CM (300 mgI/ml): group 1: volume = 40 ml; flow rate = 3 ml/s, group 2: volume = 53 ml; flow rate = 4 ml/s. Attenuation values (HU) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured at the levels of the aortic root (helical) and peripheral arteries (high-pitch). Diagnostic image quality was considered sufficient at attenuation values > 250HU and CNR > 10. Diagnostic image quality for TAVI measurements was obtained in 46 patients. Mean attenuation values and CNR (HU ± SD) at the aortic root (helical) were: group 1: 381 ± 65HU and 13 ± 8; group 2: 442 ± 68HU and 10 ± 5. At the peripheral arteries (high-pitch), mean values were: group 1: 430 ± 117HU and 11 ± 6; group 2: 389 ± 102HU and 13 ± 6. CM volume can be substantially reduced using low kVp protocols, while maintaining sufficient image quality for the evaluation of aortic root and peripheral access sites. • Image quality could be maintained using low kVp scan protocols. • Low kVp protocols reduce contrast media volume by 34-67 %. • Less contrast media volume lowers the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy.

  19. Value of non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract (stone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Samir Shaaban

    2015-09-04

    Sep 4, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases worldwide, with a wide range of affected age groups. Non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract is the gold-standard examination for detection and characterization of urinary tract stones, with great impact upon the ...

  20. Value of non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract (stone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases worldwide, with a wide range of affected age groups. Non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract is the gold-standard examination for detection and characterization of urinary tract stones, with great impact upon the choice of method of ...

  1. CT examinations to age and sex depended variations of intracranial structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellkamp, H. v.; Rosenkranz, G.; Koehler, K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper supplies proof of the age dependence of the physiological cerebral density and ventricle size. The studies are based on the evaluation of normal cerebral computer tomograms of a total of 1100 patients of both sexes. Mathematical statistical calculations yield accurate data on the age-conditioned physiological 'standard ranges' of cerebral density and ventricle width (3rd and 4th ventricle). By means of the graphic representations and calculation formulas it is possible to achieve rapid orientation provided the CT technique employed is the same. The results as communicated in this paper enable further quantification and objectivation of our CT data. (orig.) [de

  2. Normalized emphysema scores on low dose CT: Validation as an imaging biomarker for mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Gallardo-Estrella

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a computed tomography (CT biomarker of emphysema that is robust across reconstruction settings, and evaluate its ability to predict mortality in patients at high risk for lung cancer. Data included baseline CT scans acquired between August 2002 and April 2004 from 1737 deceased subjects and 5740 surviving controls taken from the National Lung Screening Trial. Emphysema scores were computed in the original scans (origES and after applying resampling, normalization and bullae analysis (normES. We compared the prognostic value of normES versus origES for lung cancer and all-cause mortality by computing the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC and the net reclassification improvement (NRI for follow-up times of 1-7 years. normES was a better predictor of mortality than origES. The 95% confidence intervals for the differences in AUC values indicated a significant difference for all-cause mortality for 2 through 6 years of follow-up, and for lung cancer mortality for 1 through 7 years of follow-up. 95% confidence intervals in NRI values showed a statistically significant improvement in classification for all-cause mortality for 2 through 7 years of follow-up, and for lung cancer mortality for 3 through 7 years of follow-up. Contrary to conventional emphysema score, our normalized emphysema score is a good predictor of all-cause and lung cancer mortality in settings where multiple CT scanners and protocols are used.

  3. Differentiation of normal thymus from anterior mediastinal lymphoma and lymphoma recurrence at pediatric PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawande, Rakhee S; Khurana, Aman; Messing, Solomon; Zhang, Dong; Castañeda, Rosalinda T; Goldsby, Robert E; Hawkins, Randall A; Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the role of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in the differentiation of normal thymus from mediastinal lymphoma and lymphoma recurrence in pediatric patients. The study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was waived. The study was HIPAA compliant. Two hundred eighty-two fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT studies in 75 pediatric oncology patients were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were divided into four groups: anterior mediastinal lymphoma (group A, n=16), anterior mediastinal lymphoma with subsequent recurrence (group B, n=5), lymphoma outside the mediastinum (group C, n=16), and other malignant tumors outside the thymus (group D, n=38). Analyses included measurements of the maximum anteroposterior and transverse dimensions of the anterior mediastinal mass or thymus on axial CT images and measurements of maximum standardized uptake values of anterior mediastinal mass, thymus (SUVt), and bone marrow at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra (SUVb) on PET images. Quantitative parameters were compared by using an analysis of variance test. Mean prechemotherapy SUVt was 4.82 for group A, 8.45 for group B, 2.00 for group C, and 2.09 for group D. Mean postchemotherapy SUVt for group B was 4.74. Thymic rebound (mean SUVt, 2.89) was seen in 44% of patients at a mean interval of 10 months from the end of chemotherapy. The differences between prechemotherapy SUVt of mediastinal lymphoma and normal thymus and postchemotherapy SUVt of lymphoma recurrence and thymic rebound were highly significant (Pmediastinal lymphoma. SUVt of 3.4 or higher is a strong predictor of mediastinal lymphoma. © RSNA, 2011

  4. Automatic Classification of Normal and Cancer Lung CT Images Using Multiscale AM-FM Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Magdy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided diagnostic (CAD systems provide fast and reliable diagnosis for medical images. In this paper, CAD system is proposed to analyze and automatically segment the lungs and classify each lung into normal or cancer. Using 70 different patients’ lung CT dataset, Wiener filtering on the original CT images is applied firstly as a preprocessing step. Secondly, we combine histogram analysis with thresholding and morphological operations to segment the lung regions and extract each lung separately. Amplitude-Modulation Frequency-Modulation (AM-FM method thirdly, has been used to extract features for ROIs. Then, the significant AM-FM features have been selected using Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR for classification step. Finally, K-nearest neighbour (KNN, support vector machine (SVM, naïve Bayes, and linear classifiers have been used with the selected AM-FM features. The performance of each classifier in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity is evaluated. The results indicate that our proposed CAD system succeeded to differentiate between normal and cancer lungs and achieved 95% accuracy in case of the linear classifier.

  5. Automatic Classification of Normal and Cancer Lung CT Images Using Multiscale AM-FM Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Nourhan; Fakhr, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) systems provide fast and reliable diagnosis for medical images. In this paper, CAD system is proposed to analyze and automatically segment the lungs and classify each lung into normal or cancer. Using 70 different patients' lung CT dataset, Wiener filtering on the original CT images is applied firstly as a preprocessing step. Secondly, we combine histogram analysis with thresholding and morphological operations to segment the lung regions and extract each lung separately. Amplitude-Modulation Frequency-Modulation (AM-FM) method thirdly, has been used to extract features for ROIs. Then, the significant AM-FM features have been selected using Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) for classification step. Finally, K-nearest neighbour (KNN), support vector machine (SVM), naïve Bayes, and linear classifiers have been used with the selected AM-FM features. The performance of each classifier in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity is evaluated. The results indicate that our proposed CAD system succeeded to differentiate between normal and cancer lungs and achieved 95% accuracy in case of the linear classifier. PMID:26451137

  6. The influence of CT control examinations on the irradiation planning for patients with cerebral metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haumann, S.

    1986-01-01

    The thesis is aimed at reviewing a therapy plan worked out previously for the treatment of patients with cerebral metastases, and at studying computerized tomography for its potential benefit in the planning and implementation of radiotherapy. 61 patients were irradiated and examined neurologically and by CT before, during and after treatment, thus allowing a thorough-going analysis of the findings. CT evaluations differentiated between the change of volume and the number of metastases as well as the change of the extension of perifocal oedema. Our experience shows a dose of 30 Gy related to the centre of the skull to be sufficient, on the one hand, in order to determine by CT whether or not the existing intracerebral tumour metastases of the patient concerned will be accessible by radiotherapy at all, and, on the other hand, to destroy metastases smaller than 5 mm which cannot be detected by CT. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Enteroelysis and spiral CT examination in diagnosis and evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mako, E.K.; Mester, A.R.; Tarjan, Zs.; Karlinger, K.; Toth, G.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: During the last few decades introducing many of new radiologic methods, diagnostic conditions and facilities of Crohn's disease has became markedly improved. Appropriate using of these techniques definitely modifies the management of patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease serving reliable information about extent, severity and possible complications of disease. Enteroclysis and Computed tomography are the two major and basic methods to disclose or confirm diagnosis of Crohn's disease, obtain appropriate inforination about disease either with mucosal, transmural or extraintestinal manifestation. Methods and patients: We evaluated 281 patients who were referred in our institution under suspicion of Crohn's disease. Enteroclysis and abdominal spiral CT in all cases were carried out usually within 1 week. The 172 patients underwent abdominal spiral CT as the primary examination to evaluate diagnostic value of spiral CT in this entity, while 109 patients had enteroclysis followed by abdominal CT. In 11 cases we also perforined CT enteroclysis with administration of 0.5% methylcellulose solution thorough nasojejunal tube controlled by electric motor driven contrast pump. Results were compared with final clinical, pathological or surgical data were available. Results: From the 281 patients eventually 74 proved Crohn's disease; sensitivity and specificity of enteroclysis proved to be 96 and 98%, while spiral CT sensitivity and specificity was 94 and 95%, respectively. Enteroclysis was superior to the spiral CT in demonstration of early lesions and functional disorders, while spiral CT proved to be essential in evaluation of transmural and extraintestinal complications. Conclusions: Regarding enteroclysis and spiral CT as complementary methods, they provide excellent results in diagnosis of Crohn's disease

  8. Significance of pelvic CT examination for the diagnosis of the distal colonic and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Takeshi

    1984-01-01

    Pelvic CT examination was performed in preoperative 40 patients and postoperrative 51 patients of the distal colonic and rectal carcinoma. CT study expect for the decision of the depth of invasion and the detection of lymphnode metastasis, or the location of recurrence. Diagnostic accuracy rate of the depth of invasion was 68.6% in tumors of sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid, and upper rectum, and 78.9% in lower rectum, and anal canal. These rate were superior to those of selective angiographic examination. Diagnostic accuracy rate for lymphnode metastasis was 73.0%. CT examination could define the lymphnode swelling, but could not define if those were metastasis or not. Furthermore, CT-angiography was beneficial for the estimation of the depth of invasion. The differentiation between local recurrent tumor and granulomatous mass in the perineum after abdomino-perineal resection is the most important problem, however, the further studies are necessary to obtain the definite criteria of differential diagnosis. Above results support that CT examination should be used routinely in the distal colonic and rectal cancer patients. (author)

  9. Consideration of the usefulness of a size-specific dose estimate in pediatric CT examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Obara, Hideki; Ono, Shuichi; Saito, Yoko; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2018-04-05

    Computed tomography (CT) has recently been utilized in various medical settings, and technological advances have resulted in its widespread use. However, medical radiation exposure associated with CT scans accounts for the largest share of examinations using radiation; thus, it is important to understand the organ dose and effective dose in detail. The CT dose index and dose-length product are used to evaluate the organ dose. However, evaluations using these indicators fail to consider the age and body type of patients. In this study, we evaluated the effective dose based on the CT examination data of 753 patients examined at our hospital using the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) method, which can calculate the exposure dose with consideration of the physique of a patient. The results showed a large correlation between the SSDE conversion factor and physique, with a larger exposure dose in patients with a small physique when a single scan is considered. Especially for children, the SSDE conversion factor was found to be 2 or more. In addition, the patient exposed to the largest dose in this study was a 10-year-old, who received 40.4 mSv (five series/examination). In the future, for estimating exposure using the SSDE method and in cohort studies, the diagnostic reference level of SSDE should be determined and a low-exposure imaging protocol should be developed to predict the risk of CT exposure and to maintain the quality of diagnosis with better radiation protection of patients.

  10. U.S. Diagnostic Reference Levels and Achievable Doses for 10 Adult CT Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanal, Kalpana M; Butler, Priscilla F; Sengupta, Debapriya; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Coombs, Laura P; Morin, Richard L

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To develop diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) and achievable doses (ADs) for the 10 most common adult computed tomographic (CT) examinations in the United States as a function of patient size by using the CT Dose Index Registry. Materials and Methods Data from the 10 most commonly performed adult CT head, neck, and body examinations from 583 facilities were analyzed. For head examinations, the lateral thickness was used as an indicator of patient size; for neck and body examinations, water-equivalent diameter was used. Data from 1 310 727 examinations (analyzed by using SAS 9.3) provided median values, as well as means and 25th and 75th (DRL) percentiles for volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ), dose-length product (DLP), and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE). Applicable results were compared with DRLs from eight countries. Results More than 46% of the facilities were community hospitals; 13% were academic facilities. More than 48% were in metropolitan areas, 39% were suburban, and 13% were rural. More than 50% of the facilities performed fewer than 500 examinations per month. The abdomen and pelvis was the most frequently performed examination in the study (45%). For body examinations, DRLs (75th percentile) and ADs (median) for CTDI vol , SSDE, and DLP increased consistently with the patient's size (water-equivalent diameter). The relationships between patient size and DRLs and ADs were not as strong for head and neck examinations. These results agree well with the data from other countries. Conclusion DRLs and ADs as a function of patient size were developed for the 10 most common adult CT examinations performed in the United States. © RSNA, 2017.

  11. Morphological analysis of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals using CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Ohmori, K.; Takatsu, T.; Teramoto, T.; Ishida, Y.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-01-01

    To verify the conventional concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'', we performed a morphological analysis of the relations of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals. The sagittal diameter, area and circularity of the three structures, and the dispersion of each parameter, were examined on axial sections of CT myelograms of 36 normal subjects. The spinal canal was narrowest at C4, followed by C5, while the spinal cord was largest at C4/5. The area and circularity of the cervical spinal cord were not significantly correlated with any parameter of the spinal canal nor with the sagittal diameter and area of the dural tube at any level examined, and the spinal cord showed less individual variation than the bony canal. Compression of the spinal cord might be expected whenever the sagittal diameter of the spinal canal is below the lower limit of normal, that is about 12 mm on plain radiographs. Thus, we concluded that the concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'' was reasonable and acceptable. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs

  12. EFFECT ON PERFUSION VALUES OF SAMPLING INTERVAL OF CT PERFUSION ACQUISITIONS IN NEUROENDOCRINE LIVER METASTASES AND NORMAL LIVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chaan S.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Wei, Wei; Anderson, Ella F.; Herron, Delise H.; Yao, James C.; Chandler, Adam G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of sampling interval (SI) of CT perfusion acquisitions on CT perfusion values in normal liver and liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors. Methods CT perfusion in 16 patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases were analyzed by distributed parameter modeling to yield tissue blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, permeability, and hepatic arterial fraction, for tumor and normal liver. CT perfusion values for the reference sampling interval of 0.5s (SI0.5) were compared with those of SI datasets of 1s, 2s, 3s and 4s, using mixed-effects model analyses. Results Increases in SI beyond 1s were associated with significant and increasing departures of CT perfusion parameters from reference values at SI0.5 (p≤0.0009). CT perfusion values deviated from reference with increasing uncertainty with increasing SIs. Findings for normal liver were concordant. Conclusion Increasing SIs beyond 1s yield significantly different CT perfusion parameter values compared to reference values at SI0.5. PMID:25626401

  13. Development of age-specific Japanese physical phantoms for dose evaluation in infant CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C.; Fujii, K.; Imai, K.; Ikeda, M.; Akahane, K.; Obara, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Narai, K.; Katsu, T.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary to the previous development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms, the authors designed Japanese torso phantoms for dose assessment in infant computed tomography (CT) examinations and completed a Japanese 3-y-old head-torso phantom. For design of age-specific torso phantoms (0, 0.5, 1 and 3 y old), anatomical structures were measured from CT images of Japanese infant patients. From the CT morphometry, it was found that rib cages of Japanese infants were smaller than those in Europeans and Americans. Radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters were used for dose measurement of a 3-y-old head-torso phantom. To examine the validity of the developed phantom, organ and effective doses by the in-phantom dosimetry system were compared with simulation values in a web-based CT dose calculation system (WAZA-ARI). The differences in doses between the two systems were <20 % at the doses of organs within scan regions and effective doses in head, chest and abdomino-pelvic CT examinations. (authors)

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF AGE-SPECIFIC JAPANESE PHYSICAL PHANTOMS FOR DOSE EVALUATION IN INFANT CT EXAMINATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Yamauchi, M; Obara, S; Narai, K; Katsu, T; Imai, K; Ikeda, M

    2016-12-01

    Secondary to the previous development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms, the authors designed Japanese torso phantoms for dose assessment in infant computed tomography (CT) examinations and completed a Japanese 3-y-old head-torso phantom. For design of age-specific torso phantoms (0, 0.5, 1 and 3 y old), anatomical structures were measured from CT images of Japanese infant patients. From the CT morphometry, it was found that rib cages of Japanese infants were smaller than those in Europeans and Americans. Radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters were used for dose measurement of a 3-y-old head-torso phantom. To examine the validity of the developed phantom, organ and effective doses by the in-phantom dosimetry system were compared with simulation values in a web-based CT dose calculation system (WAZA-ARI). The differences in doses between the two systems were doses of organs within scan regions and effective doses in head, chest and abdominopelvic CT examinations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Adult patient radiation doses from non-cardiac CT examinations: a review of published results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantos, I; Thalassinou, S; Argentos, S; Kelekis, N L; Panayiotakis, G; Efstathopoulos, E P

    2011-01-01

    Objectives CT is a valuable tool in diagnostic radiology but it is also associated with higher patient radiation doses compared with planar radiography. The aim of this article is to review patient dose for the most common types of CT examinations reported during the past 19 years. Methods Reported dosimetric quantities were compared with the European diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). Effective doses were assessed with respect to the publication year and scanner technology (i.e. single-slice vs multislice). Results Considerable variation of reported values among studies was attributed to variations in both examination protocol and scanner design. Median weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) and dose length product (DLP) are below the proposed DRLs; however, for individual studies the DRLs are exceeded. Median reported effective doses for the most frequent CT examinations were: head, 1.9 mSv (0.3–8.2 mSv); chest, 7.5 mSv (0.3–26.0 mSv); abdomen, 7.9 mSv (1.4–31.2 mSv); and pelvis, 7.6 mSv (2.5–36.5 mSv). Conclusion The introduction of mechanisms for dose reduction resulted in significantly lower patient effective doses for CT examinations of the head, chest and abdomen reported by studies published after 1995. Owing to the limited number of studies reporting patient doses for multislice CT examinations the statistical power to detect differences with single-slice scanners is not yet adequate. PMID:21266399

  16. Evaluation of the radiation doses in newborn patients submitted to CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza Santos, William; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (IPENCNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP, (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA, (Brazil); Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG, (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scans available to the population is increasing, as well as the complexity of such exams. As a result, the radiation doses are increasing as well. Considering the population exposed to CT exams, pediatric patients are considerably more sensitive to radiation than adults. They have a longer life expectancy than adults, and may receive a higher radiation dose than necessary if the CT scan settings are not adjusted for their smaller body size. As a result of these considerations, the risk of developing cancer is of great concern when newborn patients are involved. The objective of this work was to study the radiation doses on radiosensitive organs of newborn patients undergoing a whole body CT examination, utilizing Monte Carlo simulations. The novelty of this work is the use of pediatric virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, developed at the Department of Nuclear Energy at the Federal University of Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE). The CT equipment utilized during the simulations was a Discovery VCT GE PET/CT system, with a tube voltage of 140 kVp. The X-ray spectrum of this CT scanner was generated by the SRS-78 software, which takes into account the X-ray beam energy used in PET/CT procedures. The absorbed organ doses were computed employing the F6 tally (MeV/g). The results were converted to dose coefficients (mGy/100 mA) for all the structures, considering all employed beams. The highest dose coefficients values were obtained for the brain and the thyroid. This work provides useful information regarding the risks involving ionizing radiation in newborn patients, employing a new and reliable technique. (authors)

  17. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: reducing dose while preserving image quality in the pediatric head CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, Colin D.; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Baer, Aaron H.; Parmar, Hemant A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been escalating concern regarding the increasing radiation exposure stemming from CT exams, particularly in children. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is a relatively new and promising tool to reduce radiation dose while preserving image quality. While encouraging results have been found in adult head and chest and body imaging, validation of this technique in pediatric population is limited. The objective of our study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and radiation dose of pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR compared to pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR in a large patient population. Retrospective analysis was performed on 82 pediatric head CT examinations. This group included 33 pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR and 49 pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol ) was recorded on all examinations. Quantitative analysis consisted of standardized measurement of attenuation and the standard deviation at the bilateral centrum semiovale and cerebellar white matter to evaluate objective noise. Qualitative analysis consisted of independent assessment by two radiologists in a blinded manner of gray-white differentiation, sharpness and overall diagnostic quality. The average CTDI vol value of the ASIR group was 21.8 mGy (SD = 4.0) while the average CTDI vol for the non-ASIR group was 29.7 mGy (SD = 13.8), reflecting a statistically significant reduction in CTDI vol in the ASIR group (P 12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the >12-year-old non-ASIR group (29.7 mGy vs. 49.9 mGy; P = 0.0002). Quantitative analysis revealed no significant difference in the homogeneity of variance in the ASIR group compared to the non-ASIR group. Radiologist assessment of gray-white differentiation, sharpness and overall diagnostic quality in ASIR examinations was not substantially different compared to non-ASIR examinations. The use of ASIR in

  18. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: reducing dose while preserving image quality in the pediatric head CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Colin D.; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Baer, Aaron H.; Parmar, Hemant A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Over the last decade there has been escalating concern regarding the increasing radiation exposure stemming from CT exams, particularly in children. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is a relatively new and promising tool to reduce radiation dose while preserving image quality. While encouraging results have been found in adult head and chest and body imaging, validation of this technique in pediatric population is limited. The objective of our study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and radiation dose of pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR compared to pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR in a large patient population. Retrospective analysis was performed on 82 pediatric head CT examinations. This group included 33 pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR and 49 pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) was recorded on all examinations. Quantitative analysis consisted of standardized measurement of attenuation and the standard deviation at the bilateral centrum semiovale and cerebellar white matter to evaluate objective noise. Qualitative analysis consisted of independent assessment by two radiologists in a blinded manner of gray-white differentiation, sharpness and overall diagnostic quality. The average CTDI{sub vol} value of the ASIR group was 21.8 mGy (SD = 4.0) while the average CTDI{sub vol} for the non-ASIR group was 29.7 mGy (SD = 13.8), reflecting a statistically significant reduction in CTDI{sub vol} in the ASIR group (P < 0.01). There were statistically significant reductions in CTDI for the 3- to 12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the 3- to 12-year-old non-ASIR group (21.5 mGy vs. 30.0 mGy; P = 0.004) as well as statistically significant reductions in CTDI for the >12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the >12-year-old non-ASIR group (29.7 mGy vs. 49.9 mGy; P = 0.0002). Quantitative analysis revealed no significant difference in the

  19. CT coronary angiography: examination technique, clinical results, and outlook on future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, M.; Hamm, B.

    2007-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) after intravenous contrast agent administration enables visualization of the coronary arteries with high spatial resolution (voxel sizes down to 0.5 x 0.35 x 0.35 mm3) and a short scan time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is also intensively studied with respect to the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenosis and thus the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) without radiation exposure but is not equal to MSCT at present. This article provides an overview of the historical development of CT coronary angiography from 4-slice CT to 16-slice CT and 64-slice CT. A crucial aspect of this development is the improvement in image quality resulting from shorter breath-hold periods and the reduced gantry rotation time. Other techniques that appear to considerably improve image quality and accuracy and make CT independent of patient heart rates are multisegment reconstruction and dual-source CT. Sublingual nitroglycerin as well as oral or intravenous betablocker administration should be considered in relation to the diagnostic question to be answered and the patient's heart rate. In the studies available CT coronary angiography with at least 12 simultaneous detector rows has a sensitivity of 96.9 % and a specificity of 75.3 % at the patient level. Especially the negative predictive value of CT (94.6 %) emphasizes the idea that this technique may reliably exclude CAD in patients with intermediate pretest likelihood. In the near future, 256-slice CT will allow examination of the entire heart during one heartbeat or even 4D CT scanning with simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion. Automatic or semiautomatic software tools will assume a central place in detecting and quantifying coronary artery stenoses and plaques as well as in the analysis of cardiac function in the clinical setting over the next years. Prior to its routine clinical use, the cost-effectiveness of CT coronary angiography must be determined and the

  20. Evaluation of radiation dose in pediatric head CT examination: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhasrina Nik Din, Nik; Zainon, Rafidah; Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose in pediatric head Computed Tomography examination. It was reported that decreasing tube voltage in CT examination can reduce the dose to patients significantly. A head phantom was scanned with dual-energy CT at 80 kV and 120 kV. The tube current was set using automatic exposure control mode and manual setting. The pitch was adjusted to 1.4, 1.45 and 1.5 while the slice thickness was set at 5 mm. The dose was measured based on CT Dose Index (CTDI). Results from this study have shown that the image noise increases substantially with low tube voltage. The average dose was 2.60 mGy at CT imaging parameters of 80 kV and 10 - 30 mAs. The dose increases up to 17.19 mGy when the CT tube voltage increases to 120 kV. With the reduction of tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV, the radiation dose can be reduced by 12.1% to 15.1% without degradation of contrast-to-noise ratio.

  1. An investigation into CT radiation dose variations for head examinations on matched equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarb, Francis; Foley, Shane; Toomey, Rachel; Rainford, Louise; Holm, Susanne; Evanoff, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated radiation dose and image quality differences for computed tomography (CT) head examinations across centres with matched CT equipment. Radiation dose records and imaging protocols currently employed across three European university teaching hospitals were collated, compared and coded as Centres A, B and C from specification matched CT equipment models. Patient scans (n = 40) obtained from Centres A and C were evaluated for image quality, based on the visualisation of Commission of European Community (CEC) image quality criteria using visual grading characteristic (VGC) analysis, where American Board of Radiology examiners (n = 11) stated their confidence in identifying anatomical criteria. Mean doses in terms of CT dose index (CTDI vol -mGy) and dose length product (DLP-mGy cm) were as follows: Centre A-33.12 mGy and 461.45 mGy cm; Centre B -101 mGy (base)/32 mGy (cerebrum) and 762 mGy cm and Centre C-71.98 mGy and 1047.26 mGy cm, showing a significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) in DLP across centres. VGC analysis indicated better visualisation of CEC criteria on Centre C images (VGC AUC 0.225). All three imaging protocols are routinely used clinically, and image quality is acceptable in each centre. Clinical centres with identical model CT scanners have variously customised their protocols achieving a range of dose savings and still resulting in clinically acceptable image quality. (authors)

  2. The use of CT-scanning at the medicolegal external postmortem examination and at the forensic autopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Can CT-scanning of deceased at the medico legal external examination improve the selection of cases to autopsy? Is CT-scanning a substitute or a supplement to the traditional forensic autopsy? Material: In 2006 60 deceased individuals from Southern Denmark (counties of Fyn and Sønde......Introduction: Can CT-scanning of deceased at the medico legal external examination improve the selection of cases to autopsy? Is CT-scanning a substitute or a supplement to the traditional forensic autopsy? Material: In 2006 60 deceased individuals from Southern Denmark (counties of Fyn...... and Sønderjylland) (15 females and 45 males) were CT-scanned before autopsy. Method: A double-blind prospective investigation of CT-scanning in autopsy cases. A multislice spiral CT-scanner (Siemens Somatom Spirit) was used. Data from the CT-scanning and the autopsy were registered in a computer database...

  3. Evaluation of the effective dose of cone beam CT and multislice CT for temporomandibular joint examinations at optimized exposure levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadesjö, N; Benchimol, D; Falahat, B; Näsström, K; Shi, X-Q

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effective dose to patients from temporomandibular joint examinations using a dental CBCT device and a multislice CT (MSCT) device, both before and after dose optimization. A Promax(®) 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) dental CBCT and a LightSpeed VCT(®) (GE Healthcare, Little Chalfont, UK) multislice CT were used. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated from thermoluminescent dosemeters at 61 positions inside an anthropomorphic phantom at the exposure settings in clinical use. Optimized exposure protocols were obtained through an optimization study using a dry skull phantom, where four observers rated image quality taken at different exposure levels. The optimal exposure level was obtained when all included criteria were rated as acceptable or better by all observers. The effective dose from a bilateral examination was 184 µSv for Promax 3D and 113 µSv for LightSpeed VCT before optimization. Post optimization, the bilateral effective dose was 92 µSv for Promax 3D and 124 µSv for LightSpeed VCT. At optimized exposure levels, the effective dose from CBCT was comparable to MSCT.

  4. Discrete Event Simulation Models for CT Examination Queuing in West China Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li; Tang, Shijun; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Huili

    2016-01-01

    In CT examination, the emergency patients (EPs) have highest priorities in the queuing system and thus the general patients (GPs) have to wait for a long time. This leads to a low degree of satisfaction of the whole patients. The aim of this study is to improve the patients' satisfaction by designing new queuing strategies for CT examination. We divide the EPs into urgent type and emergency type and then design two queuing strategies: one is that the urgent patients (UPs) wedge into the GPs' queue with fixed interval (fixed priority model) and the other is that the patients have dynamic priorities for queuing (dynamic priority model). Based on the data from Radiology Information Database (RID) of West China Hospital (WCH), we develop some discrete event simulation models for CT examination according to the designed strategies. We compare the performance of different strategies on the basis of the simulation results. The strategy that patients have dynamic priorities for queuing makes the waiting time of GPs decrease by 13 minutes and the degree of satisfaction increase by 40.6%. We design a more reasonable CT examination queuing strategy to decrease patients' waiting time and increase their satisfaction degrees. PMID:27547237

  5. CT examination after intrathecal or intraventricular application of metrizamide in 110 patients for neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakow, D.

    1983-01-01

    The CT scans were done in 110 patients for examination of the liquor carrying cerebral brain compartments, especially the cisterns, after intrathecal application of the radiopaque medium metrizamide. The properties of the medium are explained in detail. (orig./MG) [de

  6. The influence of population aging and size on the number of CT examinations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ischa de Waard-Schalkx; Mathieu Pruppers; Harmen Bijwaard

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to ionizing radiation frommedical examinations are on the rise. An important cause for this has been the advent and ever-increasing use of computed tomography (CT) scans for diagnostic purposes. It is often implied that population aging contributes significantly to this rise. Here, the

  7. Comparative evaluation of organ and effective doses for paediatric patients with those for adults in chest and abdominal CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Koyama, S; Kawaura, C

    2007-08-01

    Patient doses in paediatric and adult CT examinations were investigated for modern multislice CT scanners by using specially constructed in-phantom dose measuring systems. The systems were composed of 32 photodiode dosemeters embedded in various tissue and organ sites within anthropomorphic phantoms representing the bodies of 6-year-old children and adults. Organ and the effective doses were evaluated from dose values measured at these sites. In chest CT examinations, organ doses for organs within the scanning area were 2-21 mGy for children and 7-26 mGy for adults. Thyroid doses for children were frequently the highest with a maximum of 21 mGy. In abdominal CT examinations, organ doses for organs within the scanning area were 3-16 mGy for children and 10-34 mGy for adults. Effective doses evaluated for children and adults were found to be proportional to the effective mAs of CT scanners, where linear coefficients were specific to the types of CT examinations and to the manufacturers of CT scanners. Effective doses in paediatric chest CT and abdominal CT examinations were lower than those in adult examinations by a factor of two or greater on average for the same CT scanners because of the lower effective mAs adopted in paediatric examinations.

  8. Effective and equivalent doses for CT head examinations calculated using the voxelized phantoms MASH and FASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C. C.; Folly, W. S. D.; Vieira, J. W.; Maia, A. F.

    2011-09-01

    The voxelized phantoms MASH and FASH have been used for calculating conversion coefficients (CCs) for a specific CT head examination performed in a specific Toshiba CT scanner. The X-ray spectrum was selected according to the concordance between the calculated C 100,c and measured C 100,c. For 120 kV, the X-raytbc code presented the smaller deviation, equal to -7.11%. Finally, effective doses calculated for the voxelized phantoms MASH and FASH were 6.1 and 4.5, respectively, smaller than the effective dose obtained though the European guidelines on quality criteria for computed tomography.

  9. Are CT Scans a Satisfactory Substitute for the Follow-Up of RSA Migration Studies of Uncemented Cups? A Comparison of RSA Double Examinations and CT Datasets of 46 Total Hip Arthroplasties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Otten

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the 14-year follow-up of a prospectively randomized radiostereometry (RSA study on uncemented cup fixation, two pairs of stereo radiographs and a CT scan of 46 hips were compared. Tantalum beads, inserted during the primary operation, were detected in the CT volume and the stereo radiographs and used to produce datasets of 3D coordinates. The limit of agreement between the combined CT and RSA datasets was calculated in the same way as the precision of the double RSA examination. The precision of RSA corresponding to the 99% confidence interval was 1.36°, 1.36°, and 0.60° for X-, Y-, and Z-rotation and 0.40, 0.17, and 0.37 mm for X-, Y-, and Z-translation. The limit of agreement between CT and RSA was 1.51°, 2.17°, and 1.05° for rotation and 0.59, 0.56, and 0.74 mm for translation. The differences between CT and RSA are close to the described normal 99% confidence interval for precision in RSA: 0.3° to 2° for rotation and 0.15 to 0.6 mm for translation. We conclude that measurements using CT and RSA are comparable and that CT can be used for migration studies for longitudinal evaluations of patients with RSA markers.

  10. Clinical implications of eye deviation on admission CT examination of acute ischaemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payabvash, S; Qureshi, I; Qureshi, A I

    2016-12-01

    To determine the frequency and prognostic value of eye deviation detected on the admission computed tomography (CT) of acute ischaemic stroke patients. The clinical and imaging data from the Albumin in Acute Stroke (ALIAS) Trials 1 and 2 were analysed. Two reviewers evaluated all admission CT images for the presence of eye deviation, and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). The admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and 3-month modified Rankin scale (mRs) scores were ascertained. Disability or death was defined as mRS score >2, at 3-month follow-up. Of 1,223 patients included in the present series, 352 (28.8%) had rightward and 331 (27.1%) had leftward eye deviation on admission CT. Patients with eye deviation on CT had higher admission NIHSS score and larger middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarct volume (based on ASPECTS). The presence of eye deviation on CT was associated with higher rates of haemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours (19.8% versus 13.5%, p=0.004), and higher rates of disability or death at 3-month follow-up (53.1% versus 35.7%, pMediation analysis showed that radiological eye deviation relation with higher rate of disability or death is predominantly due to its association with higher admission NIHSS scores, lower ASPECTS, and to a lesser extent patients' older age. The presence of eye deviation on CT examination of acute ischaemic stroke patients is associated with larger anterior circulation stroke volumes, higher risk of 24-hour haemorrhagic transformation, and 3-month disability or death. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient doses in CT examinations in 18 countries: initial results from International Atomic Energy Agency projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhogora, W E; Ahmed, N A; Beganovic, A; Benider, A; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Gershan, V; Gershkevitsh, E; Grupetta, E; Kharita, M H; Manatrakul, N; Milakovic, M; Ohno, K; Ben Omrane, L; Ptacek, J; Schandorf, C; Shabaan, M S; Stoyanov, D; Toutaoui, N; Wambani, J S; Rehani, M M

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this prospective study at 73 facilities in 18 countries in Africa, Asia and Eastern Europe was to investigate if the CT doses to adult patients in developing countries are higher than international standards. The dose assessment was performed in terms of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) and dose length product (DLP) for chest, chest (high resolution), lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis CT examinations using standard methods. Except in one case, the mean CTDIw values were below diagnostic reference level (DRL) while for DLP, 17 % of situations were above DRLs. The resulting CT images were of adequate quality for diagnosis. The CTDIw and DLP data presented herein are largely similar to those from two recent national surveys. The study has shown a stronger need to create awareness and training of radiology personnel as well as monitoring of radiation doses in many developing countries so as to conform to the ALARA principle.

  12. Patient doses in CT examinations in Switzerland: Implementation of national diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treier, R.; Aroua, A.; Verdun, F. R.; Samara, E.; Stuessi, A.; Trueb, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were established for 21 indication-based CT examinations for adults in Switzerland. One hundred and seventy-nine of 225 computed tomography (CT) scanners operated in hospitals and private radiology institutes were audited on-site and patient doses were collected. For each CT scanner, a correction factor was calculated expressing the deviation of the measured weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI) to the nominal weighted CTDI as displayed on the workstation. Patient doses were corrected by this factor providing a realistic basis for establishing national DRLs. Results showed large variations in doses between different radiology departments in Switzerland, especially for examinations of the petrous bone, pelvis, lower limbs and heart. This indicates that the concept of DRLs has not yet been correctly applied for CT examinations in clinical routine. A close collaboration of all stakeholders is mandatory to assure an effective radiation protection of patients. On-site audits will be intensified to further establish the concept of DRLs in Switzerland. (authors)

  13. Thyroid doses and risk to paediatric patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Tipnis, Sameer; Huda, Walter [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Tavernier, Joshua [Medical University of South Carolina, College of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-07-15

    To estimate thyroid doses and cancer risk for paediatric patients undergoing neck computed tomography (CT). We used average CTDI{sub vol} (mGy) values from 75 paediatric neck CT examinations to estimate thyroid dose in a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom (ImPACT Patient CT Dosimetry Calculator). Patient dose was estimated by modelling the neck as mass equivalent water cylinder. A patient size correction factor was obtained using published relative dose data as a function of water cylinder size. Additional correction factors included scan length and radiation intensity variation secondary to tube-current modulation. The mean water cylinder diameter that modelled the neck was 14 ± 3.5 cm. The mathematical anthropomorphic phantom has a 16.5-cm neck, and for a constant CT exposure, would have thyroid doses that are 13-17 % lower than the average paediatric patient. CTDI{sub vol} was independent of age and sex. The average thyroid doses were 31 ± 18 mGy (males) and 34 ± 15 mGy (females). Thyroid cancer incidence risk was highest for infant females (0.2 %), lowest for teenage males (0.01 %). Estimated absorbed thyroid doses in paediatric neck CT did not significantly vary with age and gender. However, the corresponding thyroid cancer risk is determined by gender and age. (orig.)

  14. Thyroid doses and risk to paediatric patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Tipnis, Sameer; Huda, Walter; Tavernier, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    To estimate thyroid doses and cancer risk for paediatric patients undergoing neck computed tomography (CT). We used average CTDI vol (mGy) values from 75 paediatric neck CT examinations to estimate thyroid dose in a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom (ImPACT Patient CT Dosimetry Calculator). Patient dose was estimated by modelling the neck as mass equivalent water cylinder. A patient size correction factor was obtained using published relative dose data as a function of water cylinder size. Additional correction factors included scan length and radiation intensity variation secondary to tube-current modulation. The mean water cylinder diameter that modelled the neck was 14 ± 3.5 cm. The mathematical anthropomorphic phantom has a 16.5-cm neck, and for a constant CT exposure, would have thyroid doses that are 13-17 % lower than the average paediatric patient. CTDI vol was independent of age and sex. The average thyroid doses were 31 ± 18 mGy (males) and 34 ± 15 mGy (females). Thyroid cancer incidence risk was highest for infant females (0.2 %), lowest for teenage males (0.01 %). Estimated absorbed thyroid doses in paediatric neck CT did not significantly vary with age and gender. However, the corresponding thyroid cancer risk is determined by gender and age. (orig.)

  15. Indication-based diagnostic reference levels for adult CT-examinations in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajunen, A

    2015-07-01

    A diagnostic reference level (DRL) is a predefined dose level, which should not be exceeded in an examination that is conducted appropriately on an average-sized patient. Since dose from only one examination should not be compared with a DRL, the average dose from a good sample of at least 10 average-sized patients should be compared. The previous DRLs for computed tomography (CT)-examinations for adults in Finland were issued in 2007 and only covered examinations conducted on a particular body region. Because the image quality requirements, and thus the dose needed, vary between different indications, there has been a call for indication-based DRLs for CT. The new indication-based DRLs for CT came into effect on June 2013. They are based on a dose survey performed in 2012. Doses were collected from examinations conducted on a particular body region, based on some indication and from some special examination types. The DRLs were set according to the third quartile approach. On average, the DRLs for a particular body region dropped ∼ 20 % from the previous DRLs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. CT volumetry of lumbar vertebral bodies in patients with hypoplasia L5 and bilateral spondylolysis and in normal controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, Guido E.; Demaerel, Philippe; Keyzer, Frederik de; Willems, Endry

    2012-01-01

    To examine the feasibility and results of calculating the volume of lumbar vertebral bodies in normal patients and patients with suspected hypoplasia of L5. Lumbar multi-detector CT was performed in 38 patients with bilateral spondylolysis and hypoplasia of L5 and in 38 normal patients. Lumbar vertebral body volume of L3, L4 and L5 was measured by CT volumetry with a semi-automated program, created with MeVisLab. In the control group, the average vertebral body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 35.93 (±7.33), 36.34 (±7.13) for L4 and 34.63 (±6.88) for L5. In patients with suspected hypoplasia L5 the average body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 36.85 (±7.37), 36.90 (±6.99) for L4 and 33.14 (±6.57) for L5. The difference in mean vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups was statistically not significant. However, there was a statistically significant difference of the ratio L5/L4 (P < 0.001) between both groups: the mean ratio L5/L4 in the control group was 95.3 ± 3.9%, the ratio for the hypoplastic L5 group was 89.9 ± 6.3%. There was no significant difference in the vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups due to inter-patient variability. However, the relation between the body volume of L5 and L4 is significantly different between both groups. The volume of the vertebral body of L5 proved to be on average 10.2% smaller than the volume of L4 in the group with hypoplasia L5 versus 4.7% in the control group. (orig.)

  17. CT volumetry of lumbar vertebral bodies in patients with hypoplasia L5 and bilateral spondylolysis and in normal controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, Guido E.; Demaerel, Philippe; Keyzer, Frederik de [UZ Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Willems, Endry [ZOL, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    To examine the feasibility and results of calculating the volume of lumbar vertebral bodies in normal patients and patients with suspected hypoplasia of L5. Lumbar multi-detector CT was performed in 38 patients with bilateral spondylolysis and hypoplasia of L5 and in 38 normal patients. Lumbar vertebral body volume of L3, L4 and L5 was measured by CT volumetry with a semi-automated program, created with MeVisLab. In the control group, the average vertebral body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 35.93 ({+-}7.33), 36.34 ({+-}7.13) for L4 and 34.63 ({+-}6.88) for L5. In patients with suspected hypoplasia L5 the average body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 36.85 ({+-}7.37), 36.90 ({+-}6.99) for L4 and 33.14 ({+-}6.57) for L5. The difference in mean vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups was statistically not significant. However, there was a statistically significant difference of the ratio L5/L4 (P < 0.001) between both groups: the mean ratio L5/L4 in the control group was 95.3 {+-} 3.9%, the ratio for the hypoplastic L5 group was 89.9 {+-} 6.3%. There was no significant difference in the vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups due to inter-patient variability. However, the relation between the body volume of L5 and L4 is significantly different between both groups. The volume of the vertebral body of L5 proved to be on average 10.2% smaller than the volume of L4 in the group with hypoplasia L5 versus 4.7% in the control group. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of the usefulness of bismuth shields in PET/CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Lee, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Kung, Sik Nam; Lee, Tae Soo

    2014-01-01

    Recently with CT developed, various studies for reduction of exposure dose is underway. Study of bismuth shields in these studies is actively underway, and has already been applied in the clinical. However, the application of the PET/CT examination was not activated. Therefore, through this study, depending on the application of bismuth shields in the PET/CT examination, we identify the quality of the image and the impact on the Standard Uptake Value (SUV). In this study, to apply to the shielding of the breast, by using the bismuth shields that contains 0.06 mm Pb ingredients, was applied to the PET/CT GEMINI TF 64 (Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, USA). Phantom experiments using the NEMA IEC Body Phantom, images were acquired according to the presence or absence of bismuth shields apply. Also, When applying, images were obtained by varying the spacing 0, 1, 2 cm each image set to the interest range in the depth of the phantom by using EBW-NM ver.1.0. When image of the PET Emission acquires, the SUV was in increased depending on the use of bismuth shields, difference in the depth to the surface from deep in the phantom increasingly SUV increased (P<0.005). Also, when using shields, as the more gab decreased, SUV is more increased (P<0.005). Through this study, PET/CT examination by using of bismuth shields which is used as purpose of reduction dose. When using shields, the difference of SUV resulting from the application of bismuth shields exist and that difference when gab is decrease and surface is wider. Therefore, setting spacing of shield should be considered, if considering the reduction of the variation of SUV and image quality, disease of deep organs should be a priority rather than superficial organ disease. Use of bismuth shielding factor considering the standard clinical examination, decrease unnecessary exposure can be expected to be considered

  19. The use of CT-scanning at the medicolegal external postmortem examination and at the forensic autopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Can CT-scanning of deceased at the medico legal external examination improve the selection of cases to autopsy? Is CT-scanning a substitute or a supplement to the traditional forensic autopsy? Material: In 2006 60 deceased individuals from Southern Denmark (counties of Fyn...... and Sønderjylland) (15 females and 45 males) were CT-scanned before autopsy. Method: A double-blind prospective investigation of CT-scanning in autopsy cases. A multislice spiral CT-scanner (Siemens Somatom Spirit) was used. Data from the CT-scanning and the autopsy were registered in a computer database...... and compared. Results: The scanning could be performed in 10 minutes per case. In approximately a third of the cases the cause of death could be established by CT-scanning alone. CT-scanning was found to be most useful in cases of traumatic death, and was superior to autopsy in visualizing fractures...

  20. Effective and organ doses from common CT examinations in one general hospital in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramian, Daryoush; Hashemi, Bijan

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: It is well known that the main portion of artificial sources of ionizing radiation to human results from X-ray imaging techniques. However, reports carried out in various countries have indicated that most of their cumulative doses from artificial sources are due to CT examinations. Hence assessing doses resulted from CT examinations is highly recommended by national and international radiation protection agencies. The aim of this research has been to estimate the effective and organ doses in an average human according to 103 and 60 ICRP tissue weighting factor for six common protocols of Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) machine in a comprehensive training general hospital in Tehran/Iran. Methods: To calculate the patients' effective dose, the CT-Expo2.2 software was used. Organs/tissues and effective doses were determined for about 20 patients (totally 122 patients) for every one of six typical CT protocols of the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis and spine exams. In addition, the CT dosimetry index (CTDI) was measured in the standard 16 and 32 cm phantoms by using a calibrated pencil ionization chamber for the six protocols and by taking the average value of CT scan parameters used in the hospital compared with the CTDI values displayed on the console device of the machine. Results: The values of the effective dose based on the ICRP 103 tissue weighting factor were: 0.6, 2.0, 3.2, 4.2, 2.8, and 3.9 mSv and based on the ICRP 60 tissue weighting factor were: 0.9, 1.4, 3, 7.9, 4.8 and 5.1 mSv for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis, spine CT exams respectively. Relative differences between those values were -22, 21, 23, -6, -31 and 16 percent for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis, spine CT exams, respectively. The average value of CTDIv calculated for each protocol was: 27.32 ± 0.9, 18.08 ± 2.0, 7.36 ± 2.6, 8.84 ± 1.7, 9.13 ± 1.5, 10.42 ± 0.8 mGy for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis and spine CT exams, respectively

  1. How accurate is size-specific dose estimate in pediatric body CT examinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmazyn, Boaz; Ai, Huisi; Klahr, Paul; Ouyang, Fangqian; Jennings, S Gregory

    2016-08-01

    Size-specific dose estimate is gaining increased acceptance as the preferred index of CT dose in children. However it was developed based on non-clinical data. To compare the accuracy of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) based on geometric and body weight measures in pediatric chest and abdomen CT scans, versus the more accurate [Formula: see text] (mean SSDE based on water-equivalent diameter). We retrospectively identified 50 consecutive children (age CT examination and 50 children who underwent abdomen CT. We measured anteroposterior diameter (DAP) and lateral diameter (DLAT) at the central slice (of scan length) of each patient and calculated DAP+LAT (anteroposterior diameter plus lateral diameter) and DED (effective diameter) for each patient. We calculated the following in each child: (1) SSDEs based on DAP, DLAT, DAP+LAT, DED, and body weight, and (2) SSDE based on software calculation of mean water-equivalent diameter ([Formula: see text] adopted standard within our study). We used intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis to compare agreement between the SSDEs and [Formula: see text]. Gender and age distribution were similar between chest and abdomen CT groups; mean body weight was 37 kg for both groups, with ranges of 6-130 kg (chest) and 8-107 kg (abdomen). SSDEs had very strong agreement (ICC>0.9) with [Formula: see text]. SSDEs based on DLAT had 95% limits of agreement of up to 43% with [Formula: see text]. SSDEs based on other parameters (body weight, DAP, DAP+LAT, DED) had 95% limits of agreement of up to 25%. Differences between SSDEs calculated using various indications of patient size (geometric indices and patient weight) and the more accurate [Formula: see text] calculated using proprietary software were generally small, with the possible exception for lateral diameter, and provide acceptable dose estimates for body CT in children.

  2. Multislice CT of the auditory ossicles and ossicular ligaments. Delineation of normal anatomy and diagnosis of congenital anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shigeru; Tozaki, Hiromitu; Miyazaki, Hidemi

    2001-01-01

    By using four detector rows with 0.5 mm collimation, high resolution isotropic voxel data throughout the middle ear can be obtained with Multislice Helical CT (MSCT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of MSCT in demonstrating the auditory ossicles and ossicular ligaments and in the diagnosis of congenital ossicular anomalies. Thirty normal middle ears and 23 ear of 20 patients with suspicious congenital ossicular anomalies were examined. Axial images and multiplanar images were reconstructed. In the normal group, the images were evaluated based on scores for the visualization of the anatomical structure of the auditory ossicles and ossicular ligaments. In the group with anomalies, the findings suggesting ossicular anomalies were referenced and the prevalence was conjectured. Visualization of the auditory ossicles and ossicular ligaments was 98.3%-100% and 78.3%-100%, respectively. Congenital ossicular anomalies were detected in 20 ears (87.0%). MSCT is an accurate method for demonstrating minute and complicated 3D structures of the middle ear, and is found to be a technique of choice for diagnosis of ossicular anomalies. (author)

  3. Dose reduction using bismuth shielding during paediatric CT examinations in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbelcova, L.; Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.

    2011-01-01

    Considering the massive increase of computer tomography (CT) examinations in Slovakia during the last 10 y, it can be expected that a higher radiation load may be observed in the Slovak population. Since child population is more sensitive to radiation than adult population, a monitoring has started to see how high the radiation dose is for paediatric patients during CT examinations in chosen departments in Slovakia. The CT examination of the head is one of the most frequently done examinations in Slovakian departments and that is why measurements were done to clarify how usage of bismuth shields for eyes and thyroid can affect the eye and thyroid doses. For simulation, 215 thermoluminescent dosimeters were exposed on anthropomorphic phantom of a child with and without usage of bismuth shields. The result was that only two of the three chosen departments confirmed a reduction. On the other hand, one of the departments confirmed that the reduction can be up to 56-65 %, which is significant. (authors)

  4. EFFECTIVE DOSES RADIATION TO THE PATIENTS IN EXAMINATIONS PERFORMED IN THREE CT SCANNERS IN BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Mônica Silva Costa Janson; Dos Santos, Alair Augusto Sarmet Moreira Damas; Fonseca, GIuliana Vasconcelos De Souza; Lodi, Caio Silva

    2017-11-01

    This work aimed to analyze the effective doses radiation, estimated from the dose-length product, in 4821 examinations carried out in three CT scanners (named as A, B and C) during the period of December 1st 2013 to 30th November 2014 and compare them, with 95% confidence interval, with typical values for the CT practice described in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report # 96 (2008). The mean values of effective doses found in the A, B and C equipments were, respectively, 1.55, 2.09 and 1.30 mSv, in head; 7.75, 9.01 and 10.45 mSv in abdomen/pelvis; and 3.87, 7.94 and 3.92 mSv in chest examinations. There were significantly different among each service, except between the A and C equipments in the chest examinations (p = 0.7148). Only the B equipment performed CT scans with effective doses above the US typical values, for head and chest examinations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Low-dose dynamic myocardial perfusion CT image reconstruction using pre-contrast normal-dose CT scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Changfei; Han, Ce; Gan, Guanghui; Deng, Zhenxiang; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Zheng, Xiaomin; Xie, Congying; Jin, Xiance

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion CT (DMP-CT) imaging provides quantitative functional information for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease by calculating myocardial perfusion hemodynamic parameter (MPHP) maps. However, the level of radiation delivered by dynamic sequential scan protocol can be potentially high. The purpose of this work is to develop a pre-contrast normal-dose scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria to improve the image quality of DMP-CT with a low-mAs CT acquisition. For simplicity, the present approach was termed as ‘PWLS-ndiSTV’. Specifically, the ndiSTV regularization takes into account the spatial-temporal structure information of DMP-CT data and further exploits the higher order derivatives of the objective images to enhance denoising performance. Subsequently, an effective optimization algorithm based on the split-Bregman approach was adopted to minimize the associative objective function. Evaluations with modified dynamic XCAT phantom and preclinical porcine datasets have demonstrated that the proposed PWLS-ndiSTV approach can achieve promising gains over other existing approaches in terms of noise-induced artifacts mitigation, edge details preservation, and accurate MPHP maps calculation.

  6. Normal uptake of 18F-FDG in the testis. An assessment by PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Sugimura, Kazuro; Nakamoto, Yuji; Senda, Michio; Onishi, Yumiko; Okizuka, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the physiological uptake of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) by an apparently normal testis with combined positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) and its correlation with age, blood glucose level, and testicular volume. The testicular uptake of 18 F-FDG, expressed as the standardized uptake value (SUV), was measured on PET/CT images in 203 men. The correlation between SUV and age, blood glucose level, and testicular volume was assessed. The SUV in the total of 406 testes was 2.44±0.45 (range 1.23-3.85). The SUV was 2.81±0.43 (2.28-3.85) for 30-39 years (n=12), 2.63±0.45 (1.77-3.75) for 40-49 years (n=64), 2.46±0.35 (1.44-3.15) for 50-59 years (n=82), 2.51±0.41 (1.50-3.46) for 60-69 years (n=86), 2.43±0.47 (1.42-3.29) for 70-79 years (n=86), and 2.18±0.45 (1.23-3.03) for 80-89 years (n=76). When we calculated the mean SUV of bilateral testes in each patient, there were significant statistical differences between those in the age group of 30-39 years and 80-89 years, 40-49 years and 80-89 years, and 50-60 years and 80-89 years, when using an unpaired test with Bonferroni correction. The laterality index (|L-R|/(L+R) x 2) in 203 men was 0.066±0.067 (0-0.522). There was a mild correlation between the mean SUV and age (r=-0.284, P<0.001) as well as between the mean SUV and mean volume (r=+0.368, P<0.001). There was no correlation between the mean SUV and glucose blood level (r=-0.065, P=0.358). Some uptake of FDG is observed in the normal testis and declines slightly with age. Physiological FDG uptake in the testis should not be confused with pathological accumulation. (author)

  7. Contrast medium enhancement of soft tissues and brain in CT examinations of dogs

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlicek, M

    2000-01-01

    CT is a x-ray based method which shows less contrast for soft tissue as has been known from radiography. Therefore, it is necessary to use intravenously administered iodine contrast media to detect and localize tumors, fistulas or other pathologic lesions. Usually contrast medium is administered manually which yields random patterns of media distribution due to varying application pressure during varying administration time, therefore enhancement of parenchymous organs could not be used to the optimum extent. The use of an automatic injection pump guarantees the necessary constancy during the examination procedure to undoubtedly detect pathologic enhancement of organs in the CT-image as known from human medicine. The standards which are expected of the injection pump and the contrast media are: a good contrast enhancement, a good accumulation in the examined organs, an accumulation, which lasts long enough during the diagnostic phase, and a rapid excretion without side effects. Because of the short scan time ...

  8. Axial CT of the brain compared with other clinical methods of examination in neuropaediatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.

    1979-01-01

    CT of the neurocranium and EEC were carried out in 53 children aged 10 weeks to 15.5 years. In most of the children, also plain-film X-rays of the skull, echoencephalography, scintiscans of the brain, cerebral angiography and, in a few cases, pneumoencephalography were carried out. The methods of examination were comparatively evaluated for neoplastic, inflammatory, congenital and degenerative diseases and cerebral attacks. (APR) [de

  9. The efficacy of low-dose helical CT screening as an option for health examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazuma; Hara, Shigeko; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Fujii, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the results of low-dose helical CT screening as an option for health examinations. From November 2002 to October 2005, CT screening was performed in 2,306 individuals (men 1,766, women 540, mean age 56.1 years). Among them, 71 individuals (3.1%) were diagnosed as having active thoracic diseases consisting of 14 neoplasms and 57 non-neoplastic diseases. Of 14 patients with neoplastic lesions, 13 had lung cancer, 1 of whom had double primary lung cancer, and 1 had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. The mean diameter of the 14 lung cancers was 14.4 mm. The histology of these lesions was adenocarcinoma in 13 and squamous cell carcinoma in 1. The pathological stage was IA in 12 patients and IIA in 1. All patients underwent surgical resection. On the other hand, emphysema was diagnosed in 40 asymptomatic individuals based on CT and spirometry, and smoking cessation was strongly implemented for those who were current smokers. CT screening is useful for detecting not only early lung cancer but also non-neoplastic lung diseases. (author)

  10. Effective dose evaluation of multidetector CT examinations: influence of the ICRP recommendation in 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Shimono, Tetsunori; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Osamu

    2009-12-01

    We compared effective doses for recent computed tomography (CT) examinations calculated based on International Commission on Radiological Protection publication number 103 (ICRP 103) with those calculated based on ICRP publication number 60 (ICRP 60), and considered the usefulness of the effective dose in CT dose evaluation. After placing radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLDs) inside or outside an anthropomorphic phantom, we examined from the chest to the pelvis, cardiac, and cranial regions of the phantom. The absorbed dose was calculated by multiplying calibrated dose values of RPLD by the mass energy coefficient ratio. The effective dose was calculated as the sum total of the value for each tissue, which was multiplied by the equivalent dose according to the tissue weighting factor recommended in ICRP 103 and ICRP 60. Calculated effective doses based on ICRP 103 were different by –11% to +82% compared with those based on ICRP 60. The values of absorbed doses for selective tissues were relatively higher than the values for the effective dose. The effective dose represents only a mean dose value for an average human. Therefore, assessing the absolute dose of particular individuals in CT examinations based exclusively on the effective dose is not recommended.

  11. SU-F-I-01: Normalized Mean Glandular Dose Values for Dedicated Breast CT Using Realistic Breast-Shaped Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A [Department of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Boone, J [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Engeering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate normalized mean glandular dose values for dedicated breast CT (DgN-CT) using breast CT-derived phantoms and compare to estimations using cylindrical phantoms. Methods: Segmented breast CT (bCT) volume data sets (N=219) were used to measure effective diameter profiles and were grouped into quintiles by volume. The profiles were averaged within each quintile to represent the range of breast sizes found clinically. These profiles were then used to generate five voxelized computational phantoms (V1, V2, V3, V4, V5 for the small to large phantom sizes, respectively), and loaded into the MCNP6 lattice geometry to simulate normalized mean glandular dose coefficients (DgN-CT) using the system specifications of the Doheny-prototype bCT scanner in our laboratory. The DgN-CT coefficients derived from the bCT-derived breast-shaped phantoms were compared to those generated using a simpler cylindrical phantom using a constant volume, and the following constraints: (1) Length=1.5*radius; (2) radius determined at chest wall (Rcw), and (3) radius determined at the phantom center-of-mass (Rcm). Results: The change in Dg-NCT coefficients averaged across all phantom sizes, was - 0.5%, 19.8%, and 1.3%, for constraints 1–3, respectively. This suggests that the cylindrical assumption is a good approximation if the radius is taken at the breast center-of-mass, but using the radius at the chest wall results in an underestimation of the glandular dose. Conclusion: The DgN-CT coefficients for bCT-derived phantoms were compared against the assumption of a cylindrical phantom and proved to be essentially equivalent when the cylinder radius was set to r=1.5/L or Rcm. While this suggests that for dosimetry applications a patient’s breast can be approximated as a cylinder (if the correct radius is applied), this assumes a homogenous composition of breast tissue and the results may be different if the realistic heterogeneous distribution of glandular tissue is considered

  12. Projected outcomes using different nodule sizes to define a positive CT lung cancer screening examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierada, David S; Pinsky, Paul; Nath, Hrudaya; Chiles, Caroline; Duan, Fenghai; Aberle, Denise R

    2014-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer has been associated with a high frequency of false positive results because of the high prevalence of indeterminate but usually benign small pulmonary nodules. The acceptability of reducing false-positive rates and diagnostic evaluations by increasing the nodule size threshold for a positive screen depends on the projected balance between benefits and risks. We examined data from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) to estimate screening CT performance and outcomes for scans with nodules above the 4mm NLST threshold used to classify a CT screen as positive. Outcomes assessed included screening results, subsequent diagnostic tests performed, lung cancer histology and stage distribution, and lung cancer mortality. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for the different nodule size thresholds. All statistical tests were two-sided. In 64% of positive screens (11598/18141), the largest nodule was 7 mm or less in greatest transverse diameter. By increasing the threshold, the percentages of lung cancer diagnoses that would have been missed or delayed and false positives that would have been avoided progressively increased, for example from 1.0% and 15.8% at a 5 mm threshold to 10.5% and 65.8% at an 8 mm threshold, respectively. The projected reductions in postscreening follow-up CT scans and invasive procedures also increased as the threshold was raised. Differences across nodules sizes for lung cancer histology and stage distribution were small but statistically significant. There were no differences across nodule sizes in survival or mortality. Raising the nodule size threshold for a positive screen would substantially reduce false-positive CT screenings and medical resource utilization with a variable impact on screening outcomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Doses in pediatric patients undergoing chest and abdomen CT examinations. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jornada, Tiago S.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive method of image production that imparts significant doses to a patient, it is expected that pediatric CT examinations will increase the risk of induced cancer in children. In this study the effective doses in a five year-old child submitted to chest or abdomen CT scans were assessed for comparison purposes. The CTEXPO computed program was used with data from routine protocols of a 0 to 13 year-old children in two public hospitals in Belo Horizonte. Hospital A used a Siemens Dual-Slice unit with 80 kV, 41 mA and pitch 2 for chest or abdomen; hospital B used a Multislice GE unit with 120 kV, 45 mA and pitch 1 for chest and 120 kV, 55 mA. and pitch 1 for abdomen. Results of effective doses in a five year-old child were 1.7 and 1.0 mSv in hospital A and 9.1 and 7.2 mSv in hospital B, for chest and abdomen, respectively. Results were compared to the reference effective doses of 7.2 and 5.0 mSv for chest and abdomen respectively that were derived from the air kerma length product values given in ICRP publication 87. Results of hospital A showed that low dose exposures also can be achieved in CT scans of children. Results showed that even a hospital with a modern facility (hospital B) can provided doses higher than reference values if protocols are not adjusted for children. Preliminary results suggested that there is a room for optimizing children exposure submitted to CT scans. (author)

  14. Normal width of the anterior commissure of true vocal cord in Korea adults measured by helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woo Young; Lim, Dong Hoon; Moon, Jang Il; Ko, Yong Seok; Byeon, Joo Nam; Oh, Jae Hee

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the mean width of anterior commissure of true vocal cord in Korean adults by measuring its dimension on spiral CT scans. We reviewed the CT scans of 53 Korean adults(age range, 23-73years; mean age 39.2 years;M:F=3D41:12) without laryngeal disorders. Soiral CT scanning was performed around the anterior commissure with 1mm slice thickness and table incrementation for 15 seconds. The anteroposterior width of the anterior commissure was measured on CT scan where the true vocal cord and arytenoid, cricoid and thyroid cartilages were all present. We determined the mean width of the anterior commissure and whether there was a relationship between age and the width of the anterior commissure. The width of the anterior commissure was between 0.9mm and 2.3mm;mean width was 1.60±0.38mm(mean±SD). Using two SDs above the mean would have defined 2.36mm as the upper limit of normal width. Statistically, no significant correlation existed between the age and the width of the anterior commissure(p>0.05). An awareuess of the normal width range of the anterior commissure in Korean adults evaluated by spiral CT enhances the possibility of early detection of invasion of the anterior commissure by glottic cancer.=20

  15. Effects of Propranolol on the Left Ventricular Volume of Normal Subjects During CT Coronary Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Yuan Heng; Jaw, Fu Shan [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yung Cheng; Jeng, Chin Ming [Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Peng, Shinn Forng [National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (CN)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of propranolol on the left ventricular (LV) volume during CT coronary angiography. The LV volume of 252 normal Chinese subjects (126 subjects with propranolol medication and 126 age- and gender-matched Chinese subjects without medication) was estimated using 64 slices multi-detector CT (MDCT). The heart rate difference was analyzed by the logistic linear regression model with variables that included gender, age, body height, body weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the dosage of propranolol. The following global LV functional parameters were calculated: the real-end diastolic volume (EDV), the real-end systolic volume (ESV) and the real-ejection fraction (EF). The female subjects had a greater decrease of heart rate after taking propranolol. The difference of heart rate was negatively correlated with the dosage of propranolol. The real-EDV, the real-ESV and the real-EF ranged from 48.1 to 109 mL/m2, 6.1 to 57.1 mL/m2 and 41% to 88%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the SBP and DBP between the groups without and with propranolol medication (123 {+-} 17 and 80 {+-} 10 mmHg; 120 {+-} 14 and 80 {+-} 11 mmHg, respectively). The real-EDV showed no significant difference between these two groups, but the real-ESV and real-EF showed significant differences between these two groups (69.4 {+-} 9.3 and 70.6 {+-} 8.9 mL/m2; 23.5 {+-} 5.7 and 25.6 {+-} 3.7 mL/m2, 66.5 {+-} 5.1% and 63.5 {+-} 4.6%, respectively). The difference of heart rate is significantly influenced by gender and the dosage of propranolol. Propranolol will also increase the ESV, which contributes to a decreased EF, while the SBP, DBP and EDV are not statistically changed.

  16. Effects of Propranolol on the Left Ventricular Volume of Normal Subjects During CT Coronary Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, Yuan Heng; Jaw, Fu Shan; Wang, Yung Cheng; Jeng, Chin Ming; Peng, Shinn Forng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of propranolol on the left ventricular (LV) volume during CT coronary angiography. The LV volume of 252 normal Chinese subjects (126 subjects with propranolol medication and 126 age- and gender-matched Chinese subjects without medication) was estimated using 64 slices multi-detector CT (MDCT). The heart rate difference was analyzed by the logistic linear regression model with variables that included gender, age, body height, body weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the dosage of propranolol. The following global LV functional parameters were calculated: the real-end diastolic volume (EDV), the real-end systolic volume (ESV) and the real-ejection fraction (EF). The female subjects had a greater decrease of heart rate after taking propranolol. The difference of heart rate was negatively correlated with the dosage of propranolol. The real-EDV, the real-ESV and the real-EF ranged from 48.1 to 109 mL/m2, 6.1 to 57.1 mL/m2 and 41% to 88%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the SBP and DBP between the groups without and with propranolol medication (123 ± 17 and 80 ± 10 mmHg; 120 ± 14 and 80 ± 11 mmHg, respectively). The real-EDV showed no significant difference between these two groups, but the real-ESV and real-EF showed significant differences between these two groups (69.4 ± 9.3 and 70.6 ± 8.9 mL/m2; 23.5 ± 5.7 and 25.6 ± 3.7 mL/m2, 66.5 ± 5.1% and 63.5 ± 4.6%, respectively). The difference of heart rate is significantly influenced by gender and the dosage of propranolol. Propranolol will also increase the ESV, which contributes to a decreased EF, while the SBP, DBP and EDV are not statistically changed.

  17. Longitudinal tube modulation for chest and abdominal CT examinations: impact on effective patient doses calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, F.; Michielsen, K.; Depuydt, M.; Jacobs, J.; Nens, J.; Lemmens, K.; Oyen, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: In multi-slice CT, manufacturers have implemented automatic tube current modulation (TCM) algorithms. These adjust tube current in the x-y plane (angular modulation) and/or along the z-axis (z-axis modulation) according to the size and attenuation of the scanned body part. Current methods for estimating effective dose (ED) values in CT do not account for such new developments. This study investigated the need to take TCM into account when calculating ED values, using clinical data. Methods: The effect of TCM algorithms as implemented on a GE BrightSpeed 16, a Philips Brilliance 64 and a Siemens Sensation 64 CT scanners was investigated. Here, only z-axis modulation was addressed, considering thorax and abdomen CT examinations collected from 534 adult patients. Commercially available CT dosimetry software (CT expo v.1.7) was used to compute EDTCM (ED accounting for TCM) as the sum of ED of successive slices. A two-step approach was chosen: first we estimated the relative contribution of each slice assuming a constant tube current. Next a weighted average was taken based upon the slice specific tube current value. EDTCM was than compared to patient ED estimated using average mA of all slices. Results and Conclusions: The proposed method is relatively simple and uses as input: the parameters of each protocol, a fitted polynomial function of weighting factors for each slice along the scan length and mA values of the individual patient examination. Results show that z-axis modulation does not have a strong impact on ED for the Siemens and the GE scanner (difference ranges from -4.1 to 3.3 percent); for the Philips scanner the effect was more important, (difference ranges from -8.5 to 6.9 percent), but still all median values approached zero (except for one case, where the median reached -5.6%), suggesting that ED calculation using average mA is in general a good approximation for EDTCM. Higher difference values for the Philips scanner are due to a stronger

  18. Measurements of the ionising radiation level at a nuclear medicine facility performing PET/CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulik, P.; Kowalska, M.; Golnik, N.; Budzynska, A.; Dziuk, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radiation level measurements at workplaces in a nuclear medicine facility performing PET/ CT examinations. This study meticulously determines the staff radiation exposure in a PET/CT facility by tracking the path of patient movement. The measurements of the instantaneous radiation exposure were performed using an electronic radiometer with a proportional counter that was equipped with the option of recording the results on line. The measurements allowed for visualisation of the staff's instantaneous exposure caused by a patient walking through the department after the administration of 18 F-FDG. An estimation of low doses associated with each working step and the exposure during a routine day in the department was possible. The measurements were completed by determining the average radiation level using highly sensitive thermoluminescent detectors. (authors)

  19. Doses from pediatric CT examinations in Norway: are pediatric scan protocols developed and in daily use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friberg, Eva G.

    2008-01-01

    Doses to pediatric patients from CT examinations are known to be unnecessarily high if scan protocols developed for adult patients are adopted. This overexposure is most often not recognized by the operating radiographer, due to the digital behavior of the imaging system. Use of optimized size-specific pediatric scan protocols is therefore essential to keep the doses at an appropriate level. The aim of this study was to investigate the doses to pediatric patients from CT examinations and to evaluate the level of optimization of the scan protocols. Patient data, applied scan parameters together with the dose parameters volume computed tomography dose index (CTD vol ) and dose length product (DLP) for examinations of the head, chest and abdomen were collected by means of a questionnaire from five university hospitals. The effective dose was estimated from the total DLP by use of region-specific conversion coefficients (E DLP ). Totally 136, 108 and 82 questionnaires were received for examinations of the head, chest and abdomen, respectively. Large variations in patient doses between the hospitals were observed, addressing the need for optimization of the scan protocols in general. Most of the hospitals applied successive lower mAs with decreasing patient age for all scan areas, while the use of lower tube voltage for small patients and a higher tube voltage for large patients were more rarely. This indicates the presence, to a certain level, of size specific scan protocols at some Norwegian hospitals. Focus on developing size-specific scan protocols for pediatric patients are important to reduce the doses and risks associated with pediatric CT examinations. (author)

  20. Diagnostic Reference Levels and Monitoring Practice Can Help Reduce Patient Dose From CT Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkopi, Elena; Duffy, Susan; Abdolell, Mohamed; Manos, Daria

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish provincial diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) and to determine whether this process may help reduce the patient radiation dose from the most frequently performed CT examinations. We investigated the following CT examinations: head, chest, low-dose chest, abdomen and pelvis, and chest, abdomen, and pelvis examinations. The sample for each protocol included 15 patients of average body weight (mean [± SD], 70 ± 20 kg). The differences in dose between scanners were evaluated using one-way ANOVA. Correlations between dose, scanner age, and the number of detector rows were assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A sample of abdominal and chest examinations were randomized and blinded for review by experienced radiologists who graded diagnostic image quality. Provincial DRLs were calculated as the 75th percentile of patient dose distributions. For hospitals with doses exceeding the DRLs, dose reduction was recommended, followed by another survey. The initial survey included data of 1185 patients, and an additional 180 patients were surveyed after protocol optimization. The differences between the mean values of the dose distributions from each scanner were statistically significant (p examinations. The variation was greatest for low-dose chest CT, with a greater than fivefold difference in the mean dose values noted between scanners. A very weak correlation was found between dose and scanner age or the number of detector rows. Analysis of image quality revealed no statistically significant differences in any scoring categories, with the exception of the noise category in abdominal imaging. Implementation of the DRLs allowed a reduction in patient dose of up to 41% as a result of a protocol change. Establishing provincial DRLs allows an effective reduction in patient dose without resulting in degradation of image quality.

  1. Evaluating doses of multi-slice CT in brain examinations using various methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Chih; Lai, Te-Jen; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Hsun; Tseng, Yen-Ling; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2017-12-01

    The effective dose (H E ) and organ or tissue equivalent dose (H T ) of a Rando phantom undergoing two brain computed tomography (CT) examination protocols were evaluated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100H) and dose length product (DLP) methods. TLDs were inserted into the correlated positions of an organ or tissue of Rando phantom, such as thyroid, brain, and salivary gland, using (A) axial scan: scanning the maxillae ranging from external auditory meatus to the parietal bone, and (B) helical scan: scanning from the mandible to the parietal bone. CT examinations were performed on a Philips computer tomography (Brilliance CT) at Lukang Christian Hospital. TLDs were measured using a Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. The HT of organ and tissue during the two protocols was discussed. H E were calculated using ICRP 60 and 103 at 2.67 ± 0.18 and 1.89 ± 0.23 mSv based on an axial scan, and 4.70 ± 0.38 and 4.39 ± 0.37 mSv based on a helical scan, respectively. In the DLP method, H E was estimated from CTDI vol that was recorded directly from the console display of the CT unit and then calculated using AAPM 96. Finally, experimental results are compared with those in literature. Radiologists should choose and adjust protocols to prevent unnecessary radiation to patients and satisfying the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle. These findings will be valuable to patients, physicians, radiologists, and the public.

  2. Size-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates in contiguous axial and helical head CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Kyle; Bostani, Maryam; Cagnon, Chris; Zankl, Maria; Sepahdari, Ali R; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2014-12-01

    AAPM Task Group 204 introduced size-specific dose estimates for pediatric and adult patients undergoing body CT examinations. This investigation extends that work to head CT exams by using Monte Carlo simulations to develop size-specific, scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients. Using eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to the brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial and helical scans for 64-slice multidetector CT scanners from four major manufacturers. For each patient model and scan mode, scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients were calculated by normalizing organ dose by scanner-specific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaging across all scanners. Head size was measured using both geometric and attenuation-based size metrics. Head perimeter and effective diameter (ED), both geometric size metrics, were measured directly from the GSF data at the first slice superior to the eyes. Because the GSF models' pixel data are provided in terms of organ identification numbers instead of CT numbers, an indirect estimate of water equivalent diameter (WED), an attenuation-based size metric, was determined based on the relationships between WED and both ED and perimeter for a sample of patient data. Correlations between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the various patient size metrics were then explored. The analysis of the patient data revealed a best-fit linear relationship (R(2) of 0.87) between ED and WED across a wide variety of patient sizes. Using this relationship along with ED determined from the GSF data, WED was estimated for each GSF model. An exponential relationship between CTDIvol normalized organ dose and WED was observed for both contiguous axial and helical scanning. For head perimeter and ED measured directly from the GSF data, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol normalized organ dose and patient size was

  3. Radiation Doses in Consecutive CT Examinations from Five University of California Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Moghadassi, Michelle; Wilson, Nicole; Nelson, Thomas R; Boone, John M; Cagnon, Christopher H; Gould, Robert; Hall, David J; Krishnam, Mayil; Lamba, Ramit; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Seibert, Anthony; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2015-10-01

    To summarize data on computed tomographic (CT) radiation doses collected from consecutive CT examinations performed at 12 facilities that can contribute to the creation of reference levels. The study was approved by the institutional review boards of the collaborating institutions and was compliant with HIPAA. Radiation dose metrics were prospectively and electronically collected from 199 656 consecutive CT examinations in 83 181 adults and 3871 consecutive CT examinations in 2609 children at the five University of California medical centers during 2013. The median volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose, along with the interquartile range (IQR), were calculated separately for adults and children and stratified according to anatomic region. Distributions for DLP and effective dose are reported for single-phase examinations, multiphase examinations, and all examinations. For adults, the median CTDIvol was 50 mGy (IQR, 37-62 mGy) for the head, 12 mGy (IQR, 7-17 mGy) for the chest, and 12 mGy (IQR, 8-17 mGy) for the abdomen. The median DLPs for single-phase, multiphase, and all examinations, respectively, were as follows: head, 880 mGy · cm (IQR, 640-1120 mGy · cm), 1550 mGy · cm (IQR, 1150-2130 mGy · cm), and 960 mGy · cm (IQR, 690-1300 mGy · cm); chest, 420 mGy · cm (IQR, 260-610 mGy · cm), 880 mGy · cm (IQR, 570-1430 mGy · cm), and 550 mGy · cm (IQR 320-830 mGy · cm); and abdomen, 580 mGy · cm (IQR, 360-860 mGy · cm), 1220 mGy · cm (IQR, 850-1790 mGy · cm), and 960 mGy · cm (IQR, 600-1460 mGy · cm). Median effective doses for single-phase, multiphase, and all examinations, respectively, were as follows: head, 2 mSv (IQR, 1-3 mSv), 4 mSv (IQR, 3-8 mSv), and 2 mSv (IQR, 2-3 mSv); chest, 9 mSv (IQR, 5-13 mSv), 18 mSv (IQR, 12-29 mSv), and 11 mSv (IQR, 6-18 mSv); and abdomen, 10 mSv (IQR, 6-16 mSv), 22 mSv (IQR, 15-32 mSv), and 17 mSv (IQR, 11-26 mSv). In general, values for children were approximately 50% those

  4. Estimation of effective dose from limited cone beam X-ray CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazuo; Arai, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Koji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry; Nishizawa, Kanae

    2000-12-01

    The limited cone beam X-ray CT (Ortho-CT) was developed on the basis of multi-functional panoramic apparatus, SCANORA (Soredex Co. Helsinki Finland). The imaging intensifier (I.I.) was built in this apparatus as a X-ray detection device instead of X-ray film. The signal provided from I.I. was converted from analog into digital by an analog-digital converter and image reconstitution was done as a three-directional image of the dimensions 3.8 cm of width, 3.0 cm height and 3.8 cm depth with the personal computer. The 3DX Multi image micro CT'' (3DX) was developed along similar lines by MORITA Co., Ltd. (Kyoto, JAPAN). In this study, the stochastic effect on organ and tissue caused by examinations using Ortho-CT and 3DX was measured. The effective dose was estimated according to the recommendation of ICRP60 and was compared with those of panoramic radiography and computed tomography. The irradiation conditions were as follows: 85 kV, 10 mA with the filtration of 3 mmAl and added 1 mmCu for Ortho-CT, and 80 kV, 2 mA and the filtration of 3.1 mmAL for 3DX. The measurement of organ and tissue dose was performed using an anthropomorphic Rando woman phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Co., Stanfora, CN), as well as by using two different type of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD); Panasonic UD-170A (BeO) and UD-110S (CaSO{sub 4}: Tm). The UD-170A was for dose measurement of the inner useful X-ray beams, while the UD-110S was for outer beams. The measured organ and tissue were those recommended with ICRP60 (gonad, breast, bone marrow, lung, thyroid gland, esophagus, stomach, colon, liver, bladder, skin, brain, thymus, adrenal, kidney, spleen, pancrease, upper large intestine, uterus, eyes and major salivary gland). The imaging by Orhto-CT was made in the left maxillary 1st molar, left mandibular 1st molar and temporomandibular joint. 3DX measurement was made in the maxillary incisor region and middle ear regions other than the regions mentioned above. The skin

  5. The Use of CT Scans in Estimating Age at Death by Examining the Extent of Ectocranial Suture Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Kristen Leigh; Villa, Chiara; Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We examined the utility of CT scans in the evaluation of degree of ectocranial suture closure. Five cranial points (left and right midcoronal positions, left and right midlambdoidal positions, and the lambda) were evaluated in 231 CT scans using a three-point scoring system (open, partial closed,...

  6. Estimation of patient dose in 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FDOPA PET/CT examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To estimate specific organ and effective doses to patients resulting from the 18 F-FDG ( 18 F-2-deoxy-D-glucose and 18 F-FDOPA (6-fluoro-( 18 F-L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine PET/CT examinations for whole body and brain. Materials and Methods: Three protocols for whole body and three for brain PET/CT were used. The CTDI values were measured using standard head and body CT phantoms and also computed using a software CT-Expo for dose evaluation from the CT component. OLINDA software based on MIRD method was used for estimating doses from the PET component of the PET/CT examination. Results: The organ doses from 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FDOPA whole body and brain PET/CT studies were estimated. The total effective dose from a typical protocol of whole body PET/CT examination was 14.4 mSv for females and 11.8 mSv for male patients from 18 F-FDG, whereas it was 11 mSv for female and 9.1 mSv for male patients from 18 F-FDOPA. The total effective doses from a typical protocol for PET/CT studies of brain was 6.5 mSv for females and 5.1 mSv for males from 18 F-FDG whereas it was 3.7 mSv for females and 2.8 mSv for males from 18 F-FDOPA. Conclusions: The effective radiation doses from whole body PET/CT examination was approximately 4-8 times higher than the background radiation dose from both 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FDOPA scans, while it was 1-3 times the background radiation dose from PET/CT scans of brain.

  7. Estimation of patient dose in (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Aruna; Jaimini, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; D'Souza, Maria; Sharma, Rajnish; Mishra, Anil K; Mondal, Anupam; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2013-01-01

    To estimate specific organ and effective doses to patients resulting from the (18)F-FDG ((18)F-2-deoxy-D-glucose) and (18)F-FDOPA (6-fluoro-((18)F)-L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) PET/CT examinations for whole body and brain. Three protocols for whole body and three for brain PET/CT were used. The CTDI values were measured using standard head and body CT phantoms and also computed using a software CT-Expo for dose evaluation from the CT component. OLINDA software based on MIRD method was used for estimating doses from the PET component of the PET/CT examination. The organ doses from (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FDOPA whole body and brain PET/CT studies were estimated. The total effective dose from a typical protocol of whole body PET/CT examination was 14.4 mSv for females and 11.8 mSv for male patients from (18)F-FDG, whereas it was 11 mSv for female and 9.1 mSv for male patients from (18)F-FDOPA. The total effective doses from a typical protocol for PET/CT studies of brain was 6.5 mSv for females and 5.1 mSv for males from (18)F-FDG whereas it was 3.7 mSv for females and 2.8 mSv for males from (18)F-FDOPA. The effective radiation doses from whole body PET/CT examination was approximately 4-8 times higher than the background radiation dose from both (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FDOPA scans, while it was 1-3 times the background radiation dose from PET/CT scans of brain.

  8. Sensation of smell and taste during intravenous injection of iodinated contrast media in CT examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Naoto; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Nagasawa, Naoki; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Suto, Takayuki; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the incidence and types of sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of five kinds of contrast media (CM) in CT examinations. Methods: 735 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) between 14 March 2016 and 5 April 2016 were enrolled. Medical staff asked patients whether they felt heat sensation and sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of CM (one of the following: iopromide, iomeprol, iopamidol, iohexol and ioversol) after their CE-CT. If the patients stated having felt the sensation of smell or taste, they were also asked what kind of smell or taste they sensed. Next, 30 ml of each CM was poured into high-purity pet cups for radiological technologists to smell directly. Radiological technologists were asked whether or not each CM had any smell. Results: The sensations of smell and taste incidence for iopromide were 24.3% and 18.9%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those for other CM (p < 0.05). The highest incidence of the sensation of smell was medicine-ish, and the most frequently noted taste was bitterness. All radiological technologists could directly smell only iopromide, which has an ether group on a side chain and fewer hydroxyl groups. Conclusion: Iopromide showed a higher incidence of sensation of smell and taste than other CM. Advances in knowledge: This was the first investigation of sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of CM, and a specific CM showed a higher incidence, which is suspected to be due to its chemical structure. PMID:27805431

  9. Sensation of smell and taste during intravenous injection of iodinated contrast media in CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Naoto; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Nagasawa, Naoki; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Suto, Takayuki; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2017-01-01

    To assess the incidence and types of sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of five kinds of contrast media (CM) in CT examinations. 735 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) between 14 March 2016 and 5 April 2016 were enrolled. Medical staff asked patients whether they felt heat sensation and sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of CM (one of the following: iopromide, iomeprol, iopamidol, iohexol and ioversol) after their CE-CT. If the patients stated having felt the sensation of smell or taste, they were also asked what kind of smell or taste they sensed. Next, 30 ml of each CM was poured into high-purity pet cups for radiological technologists to smell directly. Radiological technologists were asked whether or not each CM had any smell. The sensations of smell and taste incidence for iopromide were 24.3% and 18.9%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those for other CM (p smell was medicine-ish, and the most frequently noted taste was bitterness. All radiological technologists could directly smell only iopromide, which has an ether group on a side chain and fewer hydroxyl groups. Iopromide showed a higher incidence of sensation of smell and taste than other CM. Advances in knowledge: This was the first investigation of sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of CM, and a specific CM showed a higher incidence, which is suspected to be due to its chemical structure.

  10. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  11. Results of a questionnaire survey on window setting and FOV on CT images of examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzui, Maya; Asano, Kazushige; Goto, Takahiro; Sekitani, Toshinori; Tsujioka, Katsumi; Kawaguchi, Daisuke; Narumi, Tatsuki

    2008-01-01

    The use of CT as a general examination has spread widely and is even used in small institutions. However, it is difficult to determine the current situation of each institution. Therefore, we employed a questionnaire to investigate the current situation of a variety of institutions. From the results of the questionnaire, we determined that the window setting was difficult for beginner technologists. In addition, in many institutions, radiological technologists did not always use the same display field of view (FOV) for the same patient. From this questionnaire, we were able to determine the present conditions in each institution. We consider these results very useful. (author)

  12. Osteometrical and CT examination of the Japanese wolf [Canis hodophilax] skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, H.; Obara, I.; Yoshida, T.; Kurohmaru, M.; Hayshi, Y.; Suzuki, N.

    1997-01-01

    The skulls of Japanese wolf (Canis hodophilax) were osteometrically examined and compared with those of Akita-Inu. The skull total length was not statistically different between two species. However, significant differences were demonstrated between two species in some ratios concerning the frontal bone. CT examination was carried out in the Japanese wolf skull. The data indicated that the frontal sinus is not be largely developed and compressed in the dorso-ventral direction in parasagittal area. The narrow frontal sinus fitted to external shape of the frontal bone. The cribriform plate had a well-developed complicated structure in a caudal part of the ethmoid bone. These data will be useful to examine the respiratory function and the olfactory sense in the Japanese wolf

  13. Time evolution of regional CT density changes in normal lung after IMRT for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Bentzen, Søren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the clinical radiobiology of radiation induced lung disease in terms of regional computed tomography (CT) density changes following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 387 follow-up CT scans in 131 NSCLC patients receiving IMRT to a prescribed dose of 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. The dose-dependent temporal evolution of the density change was analyzed using a two-component model, a superposition of an early, transient component and a late, persistent component. Results: The CT density of healthy lung tissue was observed to increase significantly (p 12 months. Conclusions: The radiobiology of lung injury may be analyzed in terms of CT density change. The initial transient change in density is consistent with radiation pneumonitis, while the subsequent stabilization of the density is consistent with pulmonary fibrosis

  14. An assessment of the dose received by children from CT examinations along with the quality control parameters from a conventional CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghyani, T.; Hashemi Malayeri, B.; Hashemi, H.; Sharafi, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    In 2000, the UNSCEAR reported that CT constitutes 5% of all the medical x-ray examinations and it contributes 34% of the resultant collective dose worldwide. Children are more sensitive to the ionizing radiations than adults. So, routine quality control tests are expected to be carried out periodically on the CT scanners. The aim of this research was to estimate the effective doses received by the children below two years of age from routine CT examinations carried out at an educational imaging center in Tehran. It was also aimed to evaluate the quality control parameters of the mentioned CT scanner at the same time. Materials and Methods: In this study, the Computed Tomography Dose Index were measured at the central axis of the CT gantry in air and in the standard quality control phantoms of the head and body (as recommended by the FDA) using a pencil ionization chamber and LiF TLD pellets for a single scan. By using the measured Computed Tomography Dose Index values and the IrnPACT software, the effective doses were calculated for every routine CT examination protocol. In this study, the quality control parameters such as noise, CT number calibration, high and low contrast resolution and the flatness of the CT image were also evaluated. These parameters were also measured using standard procedures and test objects. Results: The effective dose estimated in this research ranged from 2.05 to 21.45 and 2.05 to 15.7 mSv for the female and male children, respectively. The measured values of the Computed Tomography Dose Index in the standard head and body phantoms were 20.6) 2.01 and 11.13 f 1.04 mGy1100 mAs, respectively. The high and low contrast resolution was estimated to be 0.8 mm and 1.0 rnm, respectively. Conclusion: The estimated values of the effective doses in this research were less than the values reported for the Netherlands, the USA, Germany and were comparable with the values reported in the UK. The measured Computed Tomography Dose Index values were 11

  15. Estimation of patient dose in abdominal CT examination in some Sudanese hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Ebthal Adam Shikhalden

    2016-04-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. The aim of this study was to estimate radiation doses in abdomen CT examinations of patients in two Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 80 CT examinations and included all age groups ( adults and pediatric). The results from the two hospitals were compared with each other as well as with the IAEA guidance level for this particular investigation. The estimation of radiation doses were carried out by calculating volume dose index (CTD1vol), dose length product (DLP), doses to some organs of interest and effective dose (E) using the software program C T EXPO V2.1 . The study showed that the mean DLP of the one hospitals ASH is 1736.7 mGy.cm which is by far much higher than that for the other hospital NMDC which stands at 185.3 mGy.cm, as well as higher than the IAEA level which is 696 mGy.cm. The study showed that the mean CTD1vol for patients in ASH is 36.2 mGy which again higher than that for the other hospital which is 3.9 mGy and higher than the IAEA level which is 10.9 mGy calculating the effective dose for patients in the two hospitals reveals that the mean effective dose of patient in one hospital (ASH) is 26.25 mSv, which is quite high compared with other hospital (NMDC), which has the mean value of 2.8 mGv and also higher than the IAEA level from this investigation which is 7.6 mSv. Regarding organ doses, the study showed that organ doses in hospital ASH are always higher than that calculated in hospital NMDC and the highest doses in both hospital were delivered to the kidneys with mean values of 50.24 mGy and 5045 mGy for the two hospitals respectively. The study showed that there is an urgent need for optimizing patient doses in such CT examinations. This can be ensured by providing training and retraining for workers and conducting quality control measurements and preventive maintenance regularly so

  16. ESTIMATION OF FEMALE RADIATION DOSES AND BREAST CANCER RISK FROM CHEST CT EXAMINATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahham, Adnan; ALMasri, Hussein; Kameel, Saleh

    2017-12-11

    Breast organ doses, effective doses and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of breast cancer from chest CT scans are presented for 200 female patients surveyed from 10 hospitals in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Palestine. Patient data were collected and organized in a database from May to November 2016. Data include age (15-80 years), weight, height, and calculated body mass index. Exposure data were also recorded for every examination. Exposure data includes milliampere-second (mAs), X-ray tube kilovoltage (kVp), computed tomography dose index, dose length product, manufacturer, name and type of operated CT scanner. Organ and effective doses were evaluated using a web-based commercially available Monte Carlo software: VirtualDose™CT, a product of Virtual Phantoms, Inc. The software utilizes male and female tissue equivalent phantoms of all ages and sizes including pregnant patients. The corresponding phantom was selected for every patient according to patient's tomographic parameters. Calculated organ doses were used to estimate the LAR of breast cancer according to BEIR VII Phase 2 report. It was found that radiation doses resulting from the same exam vary widely between different hospitals, depending on the parameters used and the type of scanner. For all patients, the breast organ dose ranged from 6.5 to 28 mGy per examination, with an average breast organ dose of 15 mGy. The effective dose from chest CT scan per examination ranged from 3 to 14.7 mSv with an average of 7 mSv. For younger females (15-29 years), the LAR of breast cancer risk was estimated to be around 0.05%. For older female patients (60-79 years), the risk was ~0.001%. It was found that LAR decreases remarkably with patient's age. Values obtained in this study vary between hospitals, they are generally low and consistent with other studies reported worldwide. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Does iterative reconstruction lower CT radiation dose: evaluation of 15,000 examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Peter B; Renger, Bernhard; Fiebich, Martin; Münzel, Daniela; Fingerle, Alexander A; Rummeny, Ernst J; Dobritz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of 15,000 computed tomography (CT) examinations to investigate if iterative reconstruction (IR) reduces sustainably radiation exposure. Information from 15,000 CT examinations was collected, including all aspects of the exams such as scan parameter, patient information, and reconstruction instructions. The examinations were acquired between January 2010 and December 2012, while after 15 months a first generation IR algorithm was installed. To collect the necessary information from PACS, RIS, MPPS and structured reports a Dose Monitoring System was developed. To harvest all possible information an optical character recognition system was integrated, for example to collect information from the screenshot CT-dose report. The tool transfers all data to a database for further processing such as the calculation of effective dose and organ doses. To evaluate if IR provides a sustainable dose reduction, the effective dose values were statistically analyzed with respect to protocol type, diagnostic indication, and patient population. IR has the potential to reduce radiation dose significantly. Before clinical introduction of IR the average effective dose was 10.1±7.8mSv and with IR 8.9±7.1mSv (p*=0.01). Especially in CTA, with the possibility to use kV reduction protocols, such as in aortic CTAs (before IR: average14.2±7.8mSv; median11.4mSv /with IR:average9.9±7.4mSv; median7.4mSv), or pulmonary CTAs (before IR: average9.7±6.2mSV; median7.7mSv /with IR: average6.4±4.7mSv; median4.8mSv) the dose reduction effect is significant(p*=0.01). On the contrary for unenhanced low-dose scans of the cranial (for example sinuses) the reduction is not significant (before IR:average6.6±5.8mSv; median3.9mSv/with IR:average6.0±3.1mSV; median3.2mSv). The dose aspect remains a priority in CT research. Iterative reconstruction algorithms reduce sustainably and significantly radiation dose in the clinical routine. Our results illustrate that not only in studies with a limited

  18. Content analysis of physical examination templates in electronic health records using SNOMED CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Chen, Rong; Højen, Anne Randorff; Elberg, Pia

    2014-10-01

    Most electronic health record (EHR) systems are built on proprietary information models and terminology, which makes achieving semantic interoperability a challenge. Solving interoperability problems requires well-defined standards. In contrast, the need to support clinical work practice requires a local customization of EHR systems. Consequently, contrasting goals may be evident in EHR template design because customization means that local EHR organizations can define their own templates, whereas standardization implies consensus at some level. To explore the complexity of balancing these two goals, this study analyzes the differences and similarities between templates in use today. A similarity analysis was developed on the basis of SNOMED CT. The analysis was performed on four physical examination templates from Denmark and Sweden. The semantic relationships in SNOMED CT were used to quantify similarities and differences. Moreover, the analysis used these identified similarities to investigate the common content of a physical examination template. The analysis showed that there were both similarities and differences in physical examination templates, and the size of the templates varied from 18 to 49 fields. In the SNOMED CT analysis, exact matches and terminology similarities were represented in all template pairs. The number of exact matches ranged from 7 to 24. Moreover, the number of unrelated fields differed a lot from 1/18 to 22/35. Cross-country comparisons tended to have more unrelated content than within-country comparisons. On the basis of identified similarities, it was possible to define the common content of a physical examination. Nevertheless, a complete view on the physical examination required the inclusion of both exact matches and terminology similarities. This study revealed that a core set of items representing the physical examination templates can be generated when the analysis takes into account not only exact matches but also terminology

  19. Cardiac-CT and Cardiac-MR examinations cost analysis, based on data of four Italian Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze, Maurizio; Lorenzin, Giuseppe; Francesconi, Andrea; Cademartiri, Filippo; Casagranda, Giulia; Fusaro, Michele; Ligabue, Guido; Zanetti, Giovanna; Spanti, Demetrio; De Cobelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    To establish the appropriate number of Cardiac-CT and Cardio-MR examinations, to determine an economically justified and sustainable investment in these two technologies, for an exclusive cardiologic use. From July 2013 to July 2014, through a survey in four different Italian Departments of Radiology, data on the costs of Cardiac-CT and Cardiac-MR examinations were collected. For the evaluation of the costs of examinations, it was used an analytical accounting system, considering only the direct costs (consumables, health personnel work time, equipment amortization/maintenance) and other costs (utilities, services, etc.). Indirect costs (general costs) were not assessed. It was made a simulation, assuming an exclusive use of the CT and MR equipments for Cardiac-CT and Cardiac-MR examinations, calculating the annual number necessary to arrive at the Break Even Point (BEP: the point at which cost or expenses and revenue are equal). On the basis of the CT costs, in order to reach the BEP, performing only Cardiac-CT examinations, an average of 2641-2752 examinations/year is needed. The annual time commitment of the Medical Professional to ensure the number of examinations to reach the BEP is 2625-2750 h/year, equivalent to two Medical Doctors in a Cardiology Department. The recent Cardiac-CT Italian Registry, in the period January-June 2011, reports a number of examinations of 3455 patients in 47 different Centers, distributed throughout the whole national territory. With regard to MR, in order to reach the BEP, performing only Cardiac-MR examinations, an average of 2435-3123 examinations/year is needed. The annual time commitment of the Medical Professional to ensure the number of examinations to reach the BEP is 2437-3125 h/year, equivalent to two Medical Doctors in a Cardiology Department. The recent Cardiac-MR Italian Registry reports a number of examinations of 3776 patients in 40 Centers, distributed throughout the whole national territory. This research has

  20. Learning to interpret the extracardiac findings on coronary CT angiography examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Shawn D; Rissing, Stacy; Mahenthiran, Jothiharan; Achenbach, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) plays an important role in the identification of coronary artery disease in low- to intermediate-risk patients. Even with a "restrictive" field of view, coronary CTA data sets will include visualization of structures adjacent to the heart, including the thoracic great vessels, pericardium, mediastinum, lungs, and bones. CT images enable detailed assessment of these structures, at times identifying a potential noncoronary cause of the patient's presenting symptom. The reported incidence of extracardiac findings on coronary CTA is as high as 53%-67%. Complete evaluation of the examination requires scrutiny of the soft tissues, lung tissues, and bones, both in the chest and adjacent abdomen. It is important to adjust the CT window display settings at various stages of the interpretation process to evaluate all potential extracardiac disease. Although in-depth radiology training would be required to correctly identify and interpret all anomalies, this article serves as an overview and guide to evaluation of the extracardiac structures included on a coronary CTA examination. Correct interpretation of extracardiac findings is critical because a false positive interpretation can lead to unnecessary testing and treatment that can be as harmful as a false negative interpretation. Most importantly, if the cardiac findings do not explain the patient's symptoms, an alternative cause should be specifically sought to appropriately manage the patient. Copyright © 2012 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevillano, D.; Espana, M. L.; Castro, P.; Minguez, C.; Albi, G.; Garcia, E.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations when automatic exposure control techniques are used. The influence in the radiation dose and the image quality has been evaluated with and without the breast shield in the scoutview. In addition the radiation dose in shielded and non-shielded areas has been compared. Measurements were made in a 16 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA phantom simulating a newborn, and older children were simulated controlling the maximum intensities allowed by the automatic exposure control system AutomA. The highest dose reduction (59%) was obtained with AutomA system and when the breast shield is not used in the scoutview. This reduction in the radiation dose does not mean a significant increase of noise level. The use of the breast shield in the scoutview yielded an increase in the radiation dose in non-shielded areas. The use of bismuth breast shield is recommended only after the scoutview in order to optimise the radiation dose in CT chest paediatric examination when using automatic exposure control AutomA. (Author)

  2. [Determination of the effective dose for CT examinations and influence of the setup parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, F; Roth, J

    2007-01-01

    CT examinations are considered to be high dose applications in radiation diagnostics. Consequently, radiation exposure and its potential reduction are an important issue. The aim of this paper is to determine effective doses for CT examinations under clinical conditions. The effective doses were determined from organ dose measurements with an optimal amount of effort. The measured point doses in the various organs in an anthropomorphic phantom were weighted with respect to morphology and location in the radiation field and were averaged to obtain the organ doses. These doses together with the individual radiation sensitivities were able to be used to calculate the effective dose. The following examinations were taken into consideration: thorax, abdomen and skull. Only one parameter was changed for each measurement (the high voltage of the X-ray tube, the pitch, the collimation, or the automatic adjustment of the tube current to correct the individual absorption in the phantom). The effective doses for the thorax examinations were between 5 and 7 mSv, and for the abdomen between 8 and 15 mSv depending on the technique and parameters. In some of the organs the organ doses can be in excess of 25 mSv. Our results were compared to the corresponding results of two commercial computer programs for dose calculations. The calculated effective doses generally showed lower values. It is possible to determine the effective dose from 24-point dose measurements by optimizing the choice of measuring location in the phantom. The individual adaptation of parameters such as tube voltage, exposure, pitch, collimated slice thickness, and investigation volume must be taken into consideration from case to case.

  3. Visualization of normal and abnormal inner ear with volume rendering technique using multislice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hui; Han Ping; Liang Bo; Lei Ziqiao; Liu Fang; Tian Zhiliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of the volume rendering technique to display the normal and abnormal inner ear structures. Methods: Forty normal earand 61 abnormal inner ears (40 congenital inner ear malformations, 7 labyrinthitis ossificans, and 14 inner ear erosion caused by cholesteatomas) were examined with a MSCT scanner. Axial imaging were performed using the following parameters: 120 kV, 100 mAs, 0.75 mm slice thickness, a pitch factor of 1. The axial images of interested ears were reconstructed with 0.1 mm reconstruction increment and a FOV of 50 mm. The 3D reconstructions were done with volume rendering technique on the workstation. Results: In the subjects without ear disorders a high quality 3D visualization of the inner ear could be achieved. In the patients with inner ear' disorders all inner ear malformations could be clearly displayed on 3D images as follows: (1) Michel deformity (one ear): There was complete absence of all cochlear and vestibular structures. (2) common cavity deformity (3 ears): The cochlea and vestibule were represented by a cystic cavity and couldn't be differentiated from each other. (3)incomplete partition type I (3 ears): The cochlea lacked the entire modiolus and cribriform area, resulting in a cystic appearance. (4) incomplete partition type II (Mondini deformity) (5 ears): The cochlea consisted of 1.5 turns, in which the middle and apical turns coalesced to form a cystic apex. (5) vestibular and semicircular canal malformations (14 ears): Cochlea was normal, vestibule dilated, semicircular canals were absent, hypoplastic or enlarged. (6) dilated vestibular aqueduct (14 ears): The vestibular aqueduct was bell-mouthed. In 7 patients with labyrinthifis ossificans, 3D images failed to clearly show the completeinner ears in 4 ears because of too high ossifications in the membranous labyrinth. In the other 3 ears volume rendering could display the thin cochlea basal turn and the intermittent semicircular canals. In the patients

  4. Meningoencephalitis and new onset of seizures in an patient with normal brain CT and multiple lesions on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Jose E.; Spichler, Anne; Oliveira, Augusto C.P. de; Lomar, Andre Villela [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2004-02-01

    Toxoplasmic encephalitis is the most common cerebral mass lesion in patients with AIDS. The definitive diagnosis requires direct demonstration of the tachyzoite form of Toxoplasma gondii in cerebral tissue. The presumptive diagnosis is based on serology, clinical and radiological features, and on response to anti-Toxoplasma therapy. Typically, patients have a subacute presentation of focal neurological signs, with multiple lesions in computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the neurological and CT scan spectrum is broad. We report a case of toxoplasmic encephalitis in a heterosexual man without prior history of HIV infection. He was admitted with four days of headache, confusion, and new onset of seizures. His brain CT disclosed no alterations and MRI revealed multiple lesions. Empirical specific anti-Toxoplasma therapy was initiated and the patient experienced excellent clinical and radiological improvement. His HIV tests were positive and the CD{sub 4}{sup +} cell count was 74 cells/ml (8.5 %). On follow up, three months later, the general state of the patient was good, without neurological sequelae and with a normal MRI. We concluded that toxoplasmic encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis in sexually active individuals, including cases without prior history or suspicion of HIV infection, and no abnormalities on CT scan. (author)

  5. The Normal Value of Tibial Tubercle Trochlear Groove Distance in Patients With Normal Knee Examinations Using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sobhanardekani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Patellar instability is a multifactorial common knee pathology that has a high recurrence rate, and the symptoms continue and ultimately predispose the patient to chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. Tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (TTTG is very important in the assessment of patellofemoral joint instability. The purpose of this study was to report the normal value of TTTG in males and females in different age groups and to assess the reliability of MRI in measuring TTTG. All patients presenting with knee pain and normal examinations of the knee joint, with a normal MRI report, referring to Shahid Sadoughi hospital of Yazd, Iran, from April 2014 to September 2014, were included in the study. MR images were studied once by two radiologists and for the second time by one radiologist. Mean value of TTTG was reported for males and females and in three age groups. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was calculated. A total of 98 patients were eligible to evaluate during 6 months (68 male and 30 female. Mean TTTG was 10.9±2.5 mm in total, which was 10.8±2.8 mm and 11.3±2.3 mm in males and females, respectively (P>0.05. Mean TTTG in males ≤30 years, 30-50 years and, ≥51-year-old were 10.8±2.6 mm, 10.8±2.7 mm, and 10.8±2.6 mm, respectively; that was 12.1±3.4 mm, 11.4±1.9 mm, and 10.5±1.7 mm in females ≤30 years, 31-50 years and, ≥51-year-old, respectively (95% CI. The coefficient of variation was <10% for both intra- and interobserver analysis. The results of the present study showed no significant difference in TTTG value between males and females in different age groups. In addition, it demonstrated that MRI is a reliable method in assessment of TTTG and identified normal value for TTTG at 10.9±2.5 mm.

  6. The development of a guidance level for patient dose for CT examinations in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J. H.; Cha, S. H.; Lee, K. Y.; Shin, D. C.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, K. H.; Cho, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to analyse the state of patient doses in the field of computed tomography (CT) examinations in the Republic of Korea. All survey data including the CT applications and patient dose details were obtained from general hospitals registered in the Korean Hospital Association. The systematic analysis of the patient dose survey gives target values of the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI w ) and the dose-length product (DLP). The targeted CTDI w values were 69, 69, 31, 19, 44, 25, 24, 20, 2, 19 and 19 mGy for the brain non-contrast enhancement (BNCE), brain contrast enhancement (BCE), neck, chest, spine, liver, pancreas, stomach, kidneys, abdomen routine and abdomen trauma protocols, respectively. The targeted DLP values were 1056, 2112, 762, 1234, 1338, 2794, 2742, 2378, 2836, 1844 and 1939 mGy cm for the BNCE, BCE, neck, chest, spine, liver, pancreas, stomach, kidneys, abdomen routine and abdomen trauma protocols, respectively. Comparing with the EUR recommendation, especially in the DLP, the adjustment of the total scan phase frequency and the shortening of the scan phase in each scan phase are needed to reduce the patients radiation exposure to international standards. (authors)

  7. Double reading of current chest CT examinations: Clinical importance of changes to radiology reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Peter M; Stavem, Knut; Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Bjerke, Gisle; Hurlen, Petter; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Dahl, Fredrik A; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Double reading reduces interpretation errors and increases sensitivity. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals submit 39% of computed tomography (CT) reports for quality assurance by double reading. Our objective was to estimate the proportion of radiology reports that were changed during double reading and to assess the potential clinical impact of these changes. In this retrospective cross-sectional study we acquired preliminary and final reports from 1023 consecutive double read chest CT examinations conducted at five public hospitals. The preliminary and final reports were compared for changes in content. Three experienced pulmonologists independently rated the clinical importance of these changes. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged, or decreased. Changes were classified as clinically important in 91 (9%) of 1023 reports. Of these: 3 were critical (demanding immediate action), 15 were major (implying a change in treatment) and 73 were intermediate (affecting subsequent investigations). More clinically important changes were made to urgent examinations and less to female first readers. Chest radiologist made more clinically important changes than other second readers. The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 73 (80%) of the clinically important changes. A 9% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and targeting a selection of urgent cases prospectively may increase the yield of discrepant cases and reduce harm to patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Results of the Austrian CT dose study 2010. Typical effective doses of the most frequent CT examinations; Ergebnisse der Oesterreichischen CT-Dosisstudie 2010. Effektive Dosen der haeufigsten CT-Untersuchungen und Unterschiede zwischen Anwendern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homolka, Peter; Leithner, Robert; Billinger, Jochen [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Zentrum fuer Medizinische Physik und Biomedizinische Technik; Gruber, Michael [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To determine typical doses from common CT examinations of standard sized adult patients and their variability between CT operators for common CT indications. Materials and Methods: In a nationwide Austrian CT dose survey doses from approx. 10,000 common CT examinations of adults during 2009 and 2010 were collected and 'typical' radiation doses to the 'average patient', which turned out to have 75.6 kg body mass, calculated. Conversion coefficients from DLP to effective dose were determined and effective doses calculated according to ICRP 103. Variations of typically applied doses to the 'average patient' were expressed as ratios between 90{sup th} and 10{sup th} percentile (inter-percentile width, IPW90/10), 1st and 3{sup rd} quartile (IPW75/25), and Maximum/Minimum. Results: Median effective doses to the average patients for standard head and neck scans were 1.8 mSv (cervical spine), 1.9 mSv (brain: trauma/bleeding, stroke) to 2.2 mSv (brain: masses) with typical variation between facilities of a factor 2.5 (IPW90/10) and 1.7 (IPW75/25). In the thorax region doses were 6.4 to 6.8 mSv (pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and inflammation, oncologic scans), the variation between facilities was by a factor of 2.1 (IPW90/10) and 1.5 (IPW75/25), respectively. In the abdominal region median effective doses from 6.5 mSv (kidney stone search) to 22 mSv (liver lesions) were found (acute abdomen, staging/metastases, lumbar spine: 9-12 mSv; oncologic abdomen plus chest 16 mSv; renal tumor 20 mSv). Variation factors between facilities were on average for abdominal scans 2.7 (IPW90/10) and 1.8 (IPW75/25). Conclusion: Variations between CT operators are generally moderate for most operators, but in some indications the ratio between the minimum and the maximum of average dose to the typical standard patients exceeds a factor of 4 or even 5. Therefore, comparing average doses to Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) and optimizing protocols need to

  9. Normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  10. The evaluation of radioprotection with low dose CT scanning in normal rabbits brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuqing; Gong Shenchu; Wang Tianle; Shen Yunxia; Cui Lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine wheather a lower radiation dose technique and various pitch could be used in CT of the rabbits' brain without jeopardizing the diagnostic accuracy of the images, and determine the evaluation of radioprotection with low dose CT scanning. Methods: Fifteen rabbits underwent CT using 200 mAs, 110 mAs or 70 mAs,and pitch 1.0 or 1.5. Anatomy details and the confidence level in reaching a diagnosis were evaluated by two radiologists in a double-blinded manner using a 4-point scoring system. The CTDI w of every group were compared. Results: For both reader there was no statistically significant difference between 6 group total score of 1-6 anatomical detail and each of 6 anatomical detail although score for each of 6 anatomical detail. The CTDI w of 70 mAs, in pitch 1.5 group decreased about 76.7%. Conclusion: Radiation dose reduction in brain CT is feasible in clinical use, and quality of images can be re- served. It plays an important role in radiation protection. (authors)

  11. Focal breast lesions in clinical CT examinations of the chest. A retrospective analysis; Senologische Befunde bei CT-Untersuchungen des Thorax. Eine retrospektive Auswertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Houbois, Christian; Grinstein, Olga; Borggrefe, Jan; Puesken, Michael; Maintz, David [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostical and Interventional Radiology; Hanstein, Bettina; Malter, Wolfram [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Breast Center and Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Hellmich, Martin [Cologne Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2017-10-15

    Based on radiological reports, the percentage of breast cancers visualized as incidental findings in routine CT examinations is estimated at ≤2%. In view of the rising number of CT examinations and the high prevalence of breast cancer, it was the goal of the present study to verify the frequency and image morphology of false-negative senological CT findings. All first contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest in adult female patients carried out in 2012 were retrospectively included. A senior radiologist systematically assessed the presence of breast lesions on all CT images using the BI-RADS system. All BI-RADS ≥3 notations were evaluated by a second senior radiologist. A consensus was obtained in case of differing BI-RADS assessments. Reference diagnoses were elaborated based on all available clinical, radiological and pathological data. The findings of the CT reports were classified according to the BI-RADS system and were compared with the retrospective consensus findings as well as with the reference diagnoses. The range of indications comprised a broad spectrum including staging and follow-up examinations of solid tumors/lymphoma (N = 701, 59.9 %) and vascular (190, 16.2 %), inflammatory (48, 4.1 %) and pulmonologic (22, 1.9 %) issues. BI-RADS 1/2 classifications were present in 92.5 % and BI-RADS 6 classifications were assessed in 1.7 % of the 1170 included examinations. 68 patients (5.8 %) had at least one lesion retrospectively classified as BI-RADS 3 - 5. The histological potential was known in 57 of these lesions as benign (46, 3.9 %) or malignant (11, 0.9 %). 13 BI-RADS 4/5 consensus assessments (1.1 %) were false-positive. 2 of the 10 lesions classified as being malignant based on the further clinical and radiological course were not mentioned in the written CT reports (0.2 %). Both false-negative CT reports were therapeutically and prognostically irrelevant. The relative frequency of BI-RADS 3 - 5 findings was 5.8 %. It reflects the situation

  12. Improved assessment of mediastinal and pulmonary pathologies in combined staging CT examinations using a fast-speed acquisition dual-source CT protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Franziska M; Holzner, Veronica; Meinel, Felix G; Armbruster, Marco; Brandlhuber, Martina; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H

    2017-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Dual-Source CT (DSCT) and to evaluate the clinical utility in chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT studies. 45 cancer patients with two follow-up combined chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations (maximally ±10 kV difference in tube potential) were included. The first scan had to be performed with our standard protocol (fixed pitch 0.6), the second one using a novel fast-speed DSCT protocol (fixed pitch 1.55). Effective doses (ED) were calculated, noise measurements performed. Scan times were compared, motion artefacts and the diagnostic confidence rated in consensus reading. ED for the standard and fast-speed scans was 9.1 (7.0-11.1) mSv and 9.2 (7.4-12.8) mSv, respectively (P = 0.075). Image noise was comparable (abdomen; all P > 0.05) or reduced for fast-speed CTs (trachea, P = 0.001; ascending aorta, P CT examinations is performed within 2 seconds scan time and eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can thus be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. Abdominal image quality remains excellent. • Fast dual-source CT provides chest/abdomen/pelvis staging examinations within 2 seconds scan time. • The sevenfold scan time reduction eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. • Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can now be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. • The coverage of the peripheral soft tissues is comparable to single-source CT. • Fast and large-volume oncologic DSCT can be performed with 9 mSv effective dose.

  13. Contrast medium enhancement of soft tissues and brain in CT examinations of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlicek, M.

    2000-11-01

    CT is an x-ray based method which shows less contrast for soft tissue as has been known from radiography. Therefore, it is necessary to use intravenously administered iodine contrast media to detect and localize tumors, fistulas or other pathologic lesions. Usually contrast medium is administered manually which yields random patterns of media distribution due to varying application pressure during varying administration time, therefore enhancement of parenchymous organs could not be used to the optimum extent. The use of an automatic injection pump guarantees the necessary constancy during the examination procedure to undoubtedly detect pathologic enhancement of organs in the CT-image as known from human medicine. The standards which are expected of the injection pump and the contrast media are: a good contrast enhancement, a good accumulation in the examined organs, an accumulation, which lasts long enough during the diagnostic phase, and a rapid excretion without side effects. Because of the short scan time of the modern CT-scanner, the best contrast enhancement can be administered by a short bolus injection, which can be applied by the automatic injection pump with a defined flow and a defined quantity of contrast media. This guarantees a good enhancement in the chosen region for the duration of the scan. The main aim of this study is to find a standardized flow and quantity of contrast media for defined regions and organs considering the speed of the scanner. In a subsequent step, the existing scan-protocols are then updated using the newly found information. This study showed, that CT examination of the head and brain in middle-sized dogs can be administered with a flow of 0.5 ml/s and a dose of 2 ml of contrast medium per kg weight. The contrast enhancement of the brain is caused by the enhancement of the vessels, the parenchym is free of contrast media - brain shows a low increase of density. Only if the blood-brain-barrier is destroyed, it is possible that

  14. Contrast medium enhancement of soft tissues and brain in CT examinations of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlicek, M.

    2000-11-01

    CT is a x-ray based method which shows less contrast for soft tissue as has been known from radiography. Therefore, it is necessary to use intravenously administered iodine contrast media to detect and localize tumors, fistulas or other pathologic lesions. Usually contrast medium is administered manually which yields random patterns of media distribution due to varying application pressure during varying administration time, therefore enhancement of parenchymous organs could not be used to the optimum extent. The use of an automatic injection pump guarantees the necessary constancy during the examination procedure to undoubtedly detect pathologic enhancement of organs in the CT-image as known from human medicine. The standards which are expected of the injection pump and the contrast media are: a good contrast enhancement, a good accumulation in the examined organs, an accumulation, which lasts long enough during the diagnostic phase, and a rapid excretion without side effects. Because of the short scan time of the modern CT-scanner, the best contrast enhancement can be administered by a short bolus injection, which can be applied by the automatic injection pump with a defined flow and a defined quantity of contrast media. This guarantees a good enhancement in the chosen region for the duration of the scan. The main aim of this study is to find a standardized flow and quantity of contrast media for defined regions and organs considering the speed of the scanner. In a subsequent step, the existing scan-protocols are then updated using the newly found information. This study showed, that CT examination of the head and brain in middle-sized dogs can be administered with a flow of 0.5 ml/s and a dose of 2 ml of contrast medium per kg weight. The contrast enhancement of the brain is caused by the enhancement of the vessels, the parenchym is free of contrast media - brain shows a low increase of density. Only if the blood-brain-barrier is destroyed, it is possible that

  15. Comparing subjective and objective image quality at two different radiation exposure ranges of the paranasal sinus CT examinations using a volumetric 320-row detector CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirimoglu, Berhan; Sade, Recep; Sakat, Muhammed Sedat; Ogul, Hayri; Eren, Suat; Kantarci, Mecit

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate image quality of protocol including 135 kVp, 5 mAs and 80 kVp, 5 mAs in the paranasal sinus CT examinations using single volumetric 320-row multidetector CT technique. From September to December 2016, both of our control group including 135 kVp and 5 mAs and our study group including 80 kVp and 5 mAs paranasal CT protocols were simultaneously performed on 40 patients using single volumetric 320-row multidetector CT device. Image quality for bony structures, air-filled structures and soft tissues were independently assessed for each group by three blinded observers using a 3-point grading scale (0 = not diagnostic, 1 = partially diagnostic, 2 = diagnostic). Objective image quality was also performed by region of interests were placed on axial soft tissue reconstructions in both eye bulbs, retrobulbar fat and maxillary sinuses to obtain different values for aqueous tissue, soft tissue and air, respectively. Effective dose was calculated from the dose-length product. The effective radiation dose which calculated for the control group scans was 0.037 ± 0.003 mSv. But, it was 0.0099 ± 0.001 mSv for the study group scans. The effective radiation dose of study group was statistically significant lower than control group (p doses, image qualities were sufficient for evaluating all the bony structures, air-filled structures and soft tissues except for eye muscle, retrobulbar fat and eye bulb. Our results present that our protocols for study and control group provide significant dose reduction without the loss of diagnostic image quality for paranasal sinus CT. Paranasal sinus CT imaging can be performed at very low radiation exposure maintaining high image quality using a single volume 320-row detector CT device using 135 kVp and 5 mAs.

  16. Automated method to compute Evans index for diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus on brain CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriyuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Ohmura, Tomomi; Matsuyama, Eri; Toyoshima, Hideto

    2017-03-01

    The early diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) considered as a treatable dementia is important. The iNPH causes enlargement of lateral ventricles (LVs). The degree of the enlargement of the LVs on CT or MR images is evaluated by using a diagnostic imaging criterion, Evans index. Evans index is defined as the ratio of the maximal width of frontal horns (FH) of the LVs to the maximal width of the inner skull (IS). Evans index is the most commonly used parameter for the evaluation of ventricular enlargement. However, manual measurement of Evans index is a time-consuming process. In this study, we present an automated method to compute Evans index on brain CT images. The algorithm of the method consisted of five major steps: standardization of CT data to an atlas, extraction of FH and IS regions, the search for the outmost points of bilateral FH regions, determination of the maximal widths of both the FH and the IS, and calculation of Evans index. The standardization to the atlas was performed by using linear affine transformation and non-linear wrapping techniques. The FH regions were segmented by using a three dimensional region growing technique. This scheme was applied to CT scans from 44 subjects, including 13 iNPH patients. The average difference in Evans index between the proposed method and manual measurement was 0.01 (1.6%), and the correlation coefficient of these data for the Evans index was 0.98. Therefore, this computerized method may have the potential to accurately compute Evans index for the diagnosis of iNPH on CT images.

  17. Semiquantitative Assessment of18F-FDG Uptake in the Normal Skeleton: Comparison Between PET/CT and Time-of-Flight Simultaneous PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Xu, Guofan; Jamali, Mehran; Holley, Dawn; Barkhodari, Amir; Zaharchuk, Greg; Iagaru, Andrei

    2017-11-01

    Differences in the attenuation correction methods used in PET/CT scanners versus the newly introduced whole-body simultaneous PET/MRI reportedly result in differences in standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the normal skeleton. The aim of the study was to compare the semiquantitative FDG uptake in the normal skeleton using time-of-flight (TOF) PET/MRI versus PET/CT with and without TOF. Participants received a single FDG injection and underwent non-TOF and TOF PET/CT (n = 23) or non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI (n = 50). Mean SUV (SUV mean ) and maximum SUV (SUV max ) were measured from all PET scans for nine normal regions of the skeleton. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were used to evaluate the SUV max and SUV mean of normal skeleton between non-TOF and TOF PET/CT, as well as between non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI. In addition, percentage differences in SUV max and SUV mean of the normal skeleton between non-TOF and TOF PET/CT and between non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI were evaluated. The SUV max and SUV mean in the normal skeleton significantly increased between non-TOF and TOF PET/CT, but they significantly decreased between non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI. The SUV max and SUV mean in normal skeleton showed good correlation between non-TOF PET/CT and TOF PET/MRI (SUV max , r = 0.88; SUV mean , r = 0.91) and showed a similar trend between non-TOF and TOF PET/CT (SUV max , r = 0.88; SUV mean , r = 0.94). In the normal skeleton, SUV max and SUV mean showed high correlations between PET/MRI and PET/CT. The MRI attenuation correction used in TOF PET/MRI provides reliable semiquantitative measurements in the normal skeleton.

  18. Normal physiologic and Benign foci with F-18 FDG avidity on PET/CT in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ah; Lee, Kwang Man; Choi, Un Jong; Kim, Hun Soo; Kim, Hye Won; Song, Jeong Hoon [College of Medicine, Wonkwnag University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiologic and benign F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avid foci in patients with breast cancer. On 309 F-18 FDG PET/CT scans of 241 women with breast cancer, the hypermetabolic lesions compared with the surrounding normal region were evaluated retrospectively. Available reports of other relevant radiological imaging medical records, and follow-up PET/CT were reviewed for explanations of the abnormal uptake. Among the 70 physiologic foci, muscular uptake of the lower neck following the surgical and/or radiation therapy of ipsilateral breast (29%), hypermetabolic ovaries (16%) and uterine (10%) uptake during the ovulatory and menstrual phases during the normal menstrual cycle were identified, and also hypermetabolic brown fat in cold-induced thermogenesis (7%), non-specific bowel uptake (35%) were observed. Among the 147 benign lesions, sequelae of the chest wall and breasts following surgical and/or radiation therapy, were often observed (27%). Hypermetabolic thyroid glands were noted as adenomas and chronic thyroiditis (18%). Reactive hyperplasia of cervical or mediastinal lymph nodes (32%), degenerative osteoarthritis and healed fractures (15%), hypermetabolic benign lung lesions (6%) were observed. Altered physiologic and benign F-18 FDG uptake in the cervical muscle and chest wall following ipsilateral breast surgery or radiotherapy were common, and also normal physiologic uptake in ovary and uterus, brown fat, thyroid were considered as predominant findings in women patients with breast cancer. Knowledge of these findings might aid in the interpretation of FDG PET/CT in patients with breast cancer

  19. To evaluate vascular complications of transplant kidney examined by multislice spiral CT angiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Qian; Fan Miao; Luo Xiaomei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) in vascular complications of transplant kidney. Methods: Six transplant kidneys were undergone enhanced MSCT scanning postoperation. MPR, CPR, VR and VP reformation were performed to observe transplant kidney's parenchyma, renal artery, and renal vein. To analysis all the reconstruction technique and find the advantage and shortage of them. Results: One case showed enhanced function of transplant kidney decreased. Vascular stenosis was found in one case and false aneurysm was found in another transplant kidney. Transplant kidney were enhanced normal in the left three cases. MPR couldn't reconstruct all the tortuous vessel of renal hilus in one plane. But all six cases could expose the vessel of renal hilus very clearly in coronal section and sagittal plane of CPR. Six cases of VR could observe the vessel direction and lesions outside vessel through rotate the reconstruction image. VP could see through inside the vessel of transplant kidney. Conclusion: MSCTA has an important role as an imaging technique to evaluate vascular complications of transplant kidney, it can replace DSA. (authors)

  20. Organ dose measurement using Optically Stimulated Luminescence Detector (OSLD) during CT examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Muhammad; Alothmany, Nazeeh; Abdulrahman Kinsara, Abdulraheem

    2017-10-01

    This study provides detailed information regarding the imaging doses to patient radiosensitive organs from a kilovoltage computed tomography (CT) scan procedure using OSLD. The study reports discrepancies between the measured dose and the calculated dose from the ImPACT scan, as well as a comparison with the dose from a chest X-ray radiography procedure. OSLDs were inserted in several organs, including the brain, eyes, thyroid, lung, heart, spinal cord, breast, spleen, stomach, liver and ovaries, of the RANDO phantom. Standard clinical scanning protocols were used for each individual site, including the brain, thyroid, lung, breast, stomach, liver and ovaries. The measured absorbed doses were then compared with the simulated dose obtained from the ImPACT scan. Additionally, the equivalent doses for each organ were calculated and compared with the dose from a chest X-ray radiography procedure. Absorbed organ doses measured by OSLD in the RANDO phantom of up to 17 mGy depend on the organ scanned and the scanning protocols used. A maximum 9.82% difference was observed between the target organ dose measured by OSLD and the results from the ImPACT scan. The maximum equivalent organ dose measured during this experiment was equal to 99.899 times the equivalent dose from a chest X-ray radiography procedure. The discrepancies between the measured dose with the OSLD and the calculated dose from the ImPACT scan were within 10%. This report recommends the use of OSLD for measuring the absorbed organ dose during CT examination.

  1. Coronary imaging quality in routine ECG-gated multidetector CT examinations of the entire thorax: preliminary experience with a 64-slice CT system in 133 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delhaye, Damien; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Salem, Randa; Teisseire, Antoine; Khalil, Chadi; Remy, Jacques; Delannoy-Deken, Valerie; Duhamel, Alain

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate image quality in the assessment of the coronary arteries during routine ECG-gated multidetector CT (MDCT) of the chest. One hundred and thirty three patients in sinus rhythm underwent an ECG-gated CT angiographic examination of the entire chest without β-blockers with a 64-slice CT system. In 127 patients (95%), it was possible to assess the coronary arteries partially or totally; coronary artery imaging failed in six patients (5%), leading to a detailed description of the coronary arteries in 127 patients. Considering ten coronary artery segments per patient, 75% of coronary segments were assessable (948/1270 segments). When the distal segments were excluded from the analysis (i.e., seven coronary segments evaluated per patient), the percentage of assessable segments was 86% (768/889 proximal and mid coronary segments) and reached 93% (474/508) when assessing proximal segments exclusively. The mean number of assessable segments was significantly higher in patients with a heart rate ≤80 bpm (n=95) than in patients with a heart rate >80 bpm (n=38) (p<0.002). Proximal and mid-coronary segments can be adequately assessed during a whole-chest ECG-gated CT angiographic examination without administration of β-blockers in patients with a heart rate below 80 bpm. (orig.)

  2. Pulley system in the fingers: normal anatomy and simulated lesions in cadavers at MR imaging, CT, and US with and without contrast material distention of the tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauger, O; Chung, C B; Lektrakul, N; Botte, M J; Trudell, D; Boutin, R D; Resnick, D

    2000-10-01

    To describe the normal anatomy of the finger flexor tendon pulley system, with anatomic correlation, and to define criteria to diagnose pulley abnormalities with different imaging modalities. Three groups of cadaveric fingers underwent computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and ultrasonography (US). The normal anatomy of the pulley system was studied at extension and flexion without and with MR tenography. Pulley lengths were measured, and anatomic correlation was performed. Pulley lesions were created and studied at flexion, extension, and forced flexion. Two radiologists reviewed the studies in blinded fashion. MR imaging demonstrated A2 (proximal phalanx) and A4 (middle phalanx) pulleys in 12 (100%) of 12 cases, without and with tenography. MR tenography showed the A3 (proximal interphalangeal) and A5 (distal interphalangeal) pulleys in 10 (83%) and nine (75%) cases, respectively. US showed the A2 pulley in all cases and the A4 pulley in eight (67%). CT did not allow direct pulley visualization. No significant differences in pulley lengths were measured at MR, US, or pathologic examination (P: =.512). Direct lesion diagnosis was possible with MR imaging and US in 79%-100% of cases, depending on lesion type. Indirect diagnosis was successful with all methods with forced flexion. MR imaging and US provide means of direct finger pulley system evaluation.

  3. Normal thymus in adults: appearance on CT and associations with age, sex, BMI and smoking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Tetsuro [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka-Sayama (Japan); Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Gao, Wei [Boston University School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Dupuis, Josee [Boston University School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute' s Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA (United States); Hunninghake, Gary M.; Washko, George R. [Harvard Medical School, The Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Murakami, Takamichi [Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka-Sayama (Japan); O' Connor, George T. [The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute' s Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA (United States); Boston University School of Medicine, Pulmonary Center and Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate CT appearance and size of the thymus in association with participant characteristics. 2540 supposedly healthy participants (mean age 58.9 years, 51 % female) were evaluated for the CT appearance of thymic glands with four-point scores (according to the ratio of fat and soft tissue), size and morphology. These were correlated with participants' age, sex, BMI and smoking history. Of 2540 participants, 1869 (74 %) showed complete fatty replacement of the thymus (Score 0), 463 (18 %) predominantly fatty attenuation (Score 1), 172 (7 %) half fatty and half soft-tissue attenuation (Score 2) and 36 (1 %) solid thymic gland with predominantly soft-tissue attenuation (Score 3). Female participants showed less fatty degeneration of the thymus with higher thymic scores within age 40-69 years (P < 0.001). Participants with lower thymic scores showed higher BMI (P < 0.001) and were more likely to be former smokers (P < 0.001) with higher pack-years (P = 0.04). Visual assessment with four-point thymic scores revealed a sex difference in the fatty degeneration of the thymus with age. Women show significantly higher thymic scores, suggesting less fat content of the thymus, during age 40-69 years. Cigarette smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty replacement of the thymus. (orig.)

  4. Normal thymus in adults: appearance on CT and associations with age, sex, BMI and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Tetsuro; Nishino, Mizuki; Gao, Wei; Dupuis, Josée; Hunninghake, Gary M; Murakami, Takamichi; Washko, George R; O'Connor, George T; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    To investigate CT appearance and size of the thymus in association with participant characteristics. 2540 supposedly healthy participants (mean age 58.9 years, 51 % female) were evaluated for the CT appearance of thymic glands with four-point scores (according to the ratio of fat and soft tissue), size and morphology. These were correlated with participants' age, sex, BMI and smoking history. Of 2540 participants, 1869 (74 %) showed complete fatty replacement of the thymus (Score 0), 463 (18 %) predominantly fatty attenuation (Score 1), 172 (7 %) half fatty and half soft-tissue attenuation (Score 2) and 36 (1 %) solid thymic gland with predominantly soft-tissue attenuation (Score 3). Female participants showed less fatty degeneration of the thymus with higher thymic scores within age 40-69 years (P thymus with age. Women show significantly higher thymic scores, suggesting less fat content of the thymus, during age 40-69 years. Cigarette smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty replacement of the thymus. 74% of participants (mean age 58.9 years) demonstrated complete fatty thymus. Women show less fatty thymus compared to men at ages 40-69 years. Smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty degeneration in thymus.

  5. Normal thymus in adults: appearance on CT and associations with age, sex, BMI and smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Tetsuro; Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto; Gao, Wei; Dupuis, Josee; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Washko, George R.; Murakami, Takamichi; O'Connor, George T.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate CT appearance and size of the thymus in association with participant characteristics. 2540 supposedly healthy participants (mean age 58.9 years, 51 % female) were evaluated for the CT appearance of thymic glands with four-point scores (according to the ratio of fat and soft tissue), size and morphology. These were correlated with participants' age, sex, BMI and smoking history. Of 2540 participants, 1869 (74 %) showed complete fatty replacement of the thymus (Score 0), 463 (18 %) predominantly fatty attenuation (Score 1), 172 (7 %) half fatty and half soft-tissue attenuation (Score 2) and 36 (1 %) solid thymic gland with predominantly soft-tissue attenuation (Score 3). Female participants showed less fatty degeneration of the thymus with higher thymic scores within age 40-69 years (P < 0.001). Participants with lower thymic scores showed higher BMI (P < 0.001) and were more likely to be former smokers (P < 0.001) with higher pack-years (P = 0.04). Visual assessment with four-point thymic scores revealed a sex difference in the fatty degeneration of the thymus with age. Women show significantly higher thymic scores, suggesting less fat content of the thymus, during age 40-69 years. Cigarette smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty replacement of the thymus. (orig.)

  6. Characteristics of images of angiographically proven normal coronary arteries acquired by adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT with CT attenuation correction changed stepwise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Haruki; Kozono, Nami; Tanakamaru, Yoshiki; Idei, Naomi; Ohashi, Norihiko; Ohtsubo, Hideki; Okada, Takenori; Yasunobu, Yuji; Kaseda, Shunichi

    2015-04-01

    Although several studies have shown the diagnostic and prognostic value of CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD), this issue remains a matter of debate. To clarify the characteristics of CT-AC SPECT images that might potentially improve diagnostic performance, we analyzed images acquired using adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT equipped with IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT (SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT) from patients with angiographically proven normal coronary arteries after changing the CT attenuation correction (CT-AC) in a stepwise manner. We enrolled 72 patients (Male 36, Female 36) with normal coronary arteries according to findings of invasive coronary angiography or CT-angiography within three months after a SPECT/CT study. Projection images were reconstructed at CT-AC values of (-), 40, 60, 80 and 100 % using a CT number conversion program according to our definition and analyzed using polar maps according to sex. CT attenuation corrected segments were located from the mid- and apical-inferior spread through the mid- and apical-septal regions and finally to the basal-anterior and basal- and mid-lateral regions in males, and from the mid-inferior region through the mid-septal and mid-anterior, and mid-lateral regions in females as the CT-AC values increased. Segments with maximal mean counts shifted from the apical-anterior to mid-anterolateral region under both stress and rest conditions in males, whereas such segments shifted from the apical-septal to the mid-anteroseptal region under both stress and rest conditions in females. We clarified which part of the myocardium and to which degree CT-AC affects it in adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT images by changing the CT-AC value stepwise. We also identified sex-specific shifts of segments with maximal mean counts that changed as

  7. Three-dimensional CT examination of the mastication system in the giant anteater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hideki; Niizawa, Nobuharu; Komiya, Teruyuki; Kawada, Shinichiro; Kimura, Junpei; Itou, Takuya; Koie, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takeo

    2007-10-01

    The gross anatomy of the mastication system of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) was examined by means of three-dimensional image analysis. The anteater rotates the mandibles medially and laterally to control its tongue when it is elongated and to house it when it is relaxed. Three-dimensional CT image analysis demonstrated that the shape and size of the oral cavity changes drastically when the mandibles are rotated. The oral cavity expands bilaterally when the dorsal part of the mandibles bend medially. Macroscopic observations and muscle-weight data supported the observation that the superficial temporal and medial pterygoid muscles act as the main medial and lateral rotators of the mandible, respectively. The low height of the mandibular ramus and the incomplete zygomatic arch in this species represent adaptations for the rotational movement of the mandibles, since they both contribute to the medially oriented transmission of force from the temporal muscles and to preventing collision between the mandibles and the cranium during the rotational movement.

  8. A systematic review of the need for MRI for the clearance of cervical spine injury in obtunded blunt trauma patients after normal cervical spine CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Iyore Ao; Moukalled, Ahmad; Yu, Elizabeth; Tulman, David B; Bergese, Sergio D; Jones, Christian D; Stawicki, Stanislaw Pa; Evans, David C

    2014-10-01

    Clearance of cervical spine injury (CSI) in the obtunded or comatose blunt trauma patient remains controversial. In patients with unreliable physical examination and no evidence of CSI on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine (CS-MRI) is the typical follow-up study. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that CS-MRI is unnecessary with negative findings on a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scan. This review article systematically analyzes current literature to address the controversies surrounding clearance of CSI in obtunded blunt trauma patients. A literature search through MEDLINE database was conducted using all databases on the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) for keywords: "cervical spine injury," "obtunded," and "MRI." The search was limited to studies published within the last 10 years and with populations of patients older than 18 years old. Eleven studies were included in the analysis yielding data on 1535 patients. CS-MRI detected abnormalities in 256 patients (16.6%). The abnormalities reported on CS-MRI resulted in prolonged rigid c-collar immobilization in 74 patients (4.9%). Eleven patients (0.7%) had unstable injury detected on CS-MRI alone that required surgical intervention. In the obtunded blunt trauma patient with unreliable clinical examination and a normal CT scan, there is still a role for CS-MRI in detecting clinically significant injuries when MRI resources are available. However, when a reliable clinical exam reveals intact gross motor function, CS-MRI may be unnecessary.

  9. A systematic review of the need for MRI for the clearance of cervical spine injury in obtunded blunt trauma patients after normal cervical spine CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyore AO James

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clearance of cervical spine injury (CSI in the obtunded or comatose blunt trauma patient remains controversial. In patients with unreliable physical examination and no evidence of CSI on computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine (CS-MRI is the typical follow-up study. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that CS-MRI is unnecessary with negative findings on a multi-detector CT (MDCT scan. This review article systematically analyzes current literature to address the controversies surrounding clearance of CSI in obtunded blunt trauma patients. A literature search through MEDLINE database was conducted using all databases on the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI website (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov for keywords: "cervical spine injury," "obtunded," and "MRI." The search was limited to studies published within the last 10 years and with populations of patients older than 18 years old. Eleven studies were included in the analysis yielding data on 1535 patients. CS-MRI detected abnormalities in 256 patients (16.6%. The abnormalities reported on CS-MRI resulted in prolonged rigid c-collar immobilization in 74 patients (4.9%. Eleven patients (0.7% had unstable injury detected on CS-MRI alone that required surgical intervention. In the obtunded blunt trauma patient with unreliable clinical examination and a normal CT scan, there is still a role for CS-MRI in detecting clinically significant injuries when MRI resources are available. However, when a reliable clinical exam reveals intact gross motor function, CS-MRI may be unnecessary.

  10. Estimates of effective dose in adult CT examinations using toshiba and Siemens 16 slice scanner in some Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Suhair Ahmed Al Amin

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate effective dose (E) in adult CT examinations for toshiba and Siemens 16 slice using CT. Exp version 2.5 software. using of CT in medical diagnosis delivers effective dose (E) to patients which are relatively high in comparison with those of other diagnostic radiology procedures. In order to achieve these objectives, data of CT scanner has been collected from two hospitals (RUH and YH). Data collected included equipment information and scan parameters for individual patients, who were used to assess dose. 252 adult patients underwent head, sinus, abdomen, pelvis and CTU CT examinations. The CTDI w , CTDI v ol, DLP, patient effective dose and organ doses were evaluated, using CT exposure parameters and CT Exp version 2.5 software. A large variation of mean effective dose and organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning manufacture and protocols used in different hospitals and scan length. The mean effective dose in this study in the brain, PNS, abdomen, pelvis, and CTU were 3.02 mSv, 0.97 mSv, 5.58 mSv, 3.36 mSv and 15.88 mSv respectively, and organ equivalent doses presented in this study for the eye lens (for head), lungs and thymus, liver, kidney and small intestine (for abdomen), bladder, uterus and gonads (for pelvis), were 62.9 mSv, 39.5 mSv, 34.1 mSv, 35.4 mSv, 53.9 mSv, 52.6 mSv, 58.1 mSv, 37 mSv, and 34.6 mSv, respectively. These values were more mostly comparable to and slightly higher than the values of effective doses reported from similar studies the United Kingdom, Western Australia, Iran and Sudan. It was concluded that patient effective dose and organ doses could be substantially minimized through careful selection of scanning parameters based on clinical indications of study, patient size, and body region being examined. Additional dose reduction to superficial organs would require the use of shielding materials. (Author)

  11. Nondestructive Analysis of Astromaterials by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis for PET Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Allen, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    An integral part of any sample return mission is the initial description and classification of returned samples by the preliminary examination team (PET). The goal of the PET is to characterize and classify returned samples and make this information available to the larger research community who then conduct more in-depth studies on the samples. The PET tries to minimize the impact their work has on the sample suite, which has in the past limited the PET work to largely visual, nonquantitative measurements (e.g., optical microscopy). More modern techniques can also be utilized by a PET to nondestructively characterize astromaterials in much more rigorous way. Here we discuss our recent investigations into the applications of micro-CT and micro-XRF analyses with Apollo samples and ANSMET meteorites and assess the usefulness of these techniques in future PET. Results: The application of micro computerized tomography (micro-CT) to astromaterials is not a new concept. The technique involves scanning samples with high-energy x-rays and constructing 3-dimensional images of the density of materials within the sample. The technique can routinely measure large samples (up to approx. 2700 cu cm) with a small individual voxel size (approx. 30 cu m), and has the sensitivity to distinguish the major rock forming minerals and identify clast populations within brecciated samples. We have recently run a test sample of a terrestrial breccia with a carbonate matrix and multiple igneous clast lithologies. The test results are promising and we will soon analyze a approx. 600 g piece of Apollo sample 14321 to map out the clast population within the sample. Benchtop micro x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) instruments can rapidly scan large areas (approx. 100 sq cm) with a small pixel size (approx. 25 microns) and measure the (semi) quantitative composition of largely unprepared surfaces for all elements between Be and U, often with sensitivity on the order of a approx. 100 ppm. Our recent

  12. Non-trauma-associated additional findings in whole-body CT examinations in patients with multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffstetter, P.; Herold, T.; Daneschnejad, M.; Zorger, N.; Jung, E.M.; Feuerbach, S.; Schreyer, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: whole-body CT scans for patients with multiple trauma represent an increasingly accepted first diagnostic tool. The multidetector approach in particular provides appropriate diagnostic algorithms for detecting nearly all relevant traumatic findings in a short time with a high grade of sensitivity and specificity. Non-trauma-associated additional findings are commonly depicted based on these CT examinations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the number and quality of these additional findings in consecutive patients with multiple trauma. Materials and methods: between 3/04 and 8/06 we scanned 304 patients according to our dedicated multiple trauma protocol. The examination protocol includes a head scan without intravenous contrast followed by a whole-body scan including the neck, thorax and abdomen acquired by a 16-row CT Scanner (Siemens, Sensation 16). The CT scans were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists with respect to non-trauma-associated findings. Lesions were assessed according to their clinical relevance (highly relevant, moderately relevant, not relevant). For patients with highly relevant findings, additional follow-up research was performed. Results: The average age was 43 years (range 3 - 92). 236 of the patients were male (77.6%), 68 female (22.4%). 153 patients (50.3%) had additional non-trauma-associated findings. In 20 cases (6.6%) lesions with high clinical relevance were detected (e.g. carcinoma of the kidney or the ovary). In 71 patients (23.4%) findings with moderate relevance were described. In 63 patients (20.7%) additional findings without major relevance were diagnosed. Conclusion: Whole-body CT scans of patients randomized by a trauma show a considerable number of non-trauma-associated additional findings. In about 30% of cases, these findings are clinically relevant because further diagnostic workup or treatment in the short or medium-term is needed. The results of these analyses emphasize the diagnostic value of CT

  13. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of normal kidney in a rabbit model: correlation with CT and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Kin, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Hun [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and safety of using a cooled-tip electrode to perform percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of kidney tissue in rabbits, and to evaluate the ability of CT to reveal the appearance and extent of tissue necrosis during follow-up after ablation. Using ultrasound guidance, a 17-G cooled-tip electrode was inserted into the right lower portion of the kidney in 26 New Zealand White rabbits. Radiofrequency was applied for 2 mins, and biphasic helical CT scanning was used to assess tissue destruction and the presence or absence of complications immediately after the procedure and at 24 hrs, 2 and 3 days, and 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 weeks. The study had three phases: acute (immediately killed : N=10); subacute (killed at 24 hrs (n=3), 2 days (n=3), 3 days (n=1) : N=7); chronic (killed at 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=2), 4 weeks (n=1), 7 weeks (n=1): N=8). After the animals were killed, their kidneys were histopathologically examined and the radiologic and pathologic findings of lesion size and configuration were correlated. In each instance, ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablations of the lower pole of the kidney were technically successful. Contrast-enhanced biphasic helical CT revealed regions of hypoattenuation devoid of parenchymal enhancement, and these correlated closely with true pathologic lesion size (r=0.884; p>0.05). In subacute and chronic models, CT scanning revealed gradual spontaneous resorption of the ablated lesion and the presence of perilesional calcification. Histopathologically, in the acute phase the ablated lesion showed coagulative necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells, and in the chronic phase there was clear cut necrosis of glomeruli, tubules and renal interstitium, with diminishing inflammatory response and peripheral fibrotic tissue formation. Ultrasound-guided renal radiofrequency ablation is technically feasible and safe. In addition, the avascular lesion measured at contrast-enhanced helical CT closely correlated with

  14. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of normal kidney in a rabbit model: correlation with CT and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Kin, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2002-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and safety of using a cooled-tip electrode to perform percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of kidney tissue in rabbits, and to evaluate the ability of CT to reveal the appearance and extent of tissue necrosis during follow-up after ablation. Using ultrasound guidance, a 17-G cooled-tip electrode was inserted into the right lower portion of the kidney in 26 New Zealand White rabbits. Radiofrequency was applied for 2 mins, and biphasic helical CT scanning was used to assess tissue destruction and the presence or absence of complications immediately after the procedure and at 24 hrs, 2 and 3 days, and 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 weeks. The study had three phases: acute (immediately killed : N=10); subacute (killed at 24 hrs (n=3), 2 days (n=3), 3 days (n=1) : N=7); chronic (killed at 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=2), 4 weeks (n=1), 7 weeks (n=1): N=8). After the animals were killed, their kidneys were histopathologically examined and the radiologic and pathologic findings of lesion size and configuration were correlated. In each instance, ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablations of the lower pole of the kidney were technically successful. Contrast-enhanced biphasic helical CT revealed regions of hypoattenuation devoid of parenchymal enhancement, and these correlated closely with true pathologic lesion size (r=0.884; p>0.05). In subacute and chronic models, CT scanning revealed gradual spontaneous resorption of the ablated lesion and the presence of perilesional calcification. Histopathologically, in the acute phase the ablated lesion showed coagulative necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells, and in the chronic phase there was clear cut necrosis of glomeruli, tubules and renal interstitium, with diminishing inflammatory response and peripheral fibrotic tissue formation. Ultrasound-guided renal radiofrequency ablation is technically feasible and safe. In addition, the avascular lesion measured at contrast-enhanced helical CT closely correlated with

  15. Diagnostic reference levels for common computed tomography (CT) examinations: results from the first Nigerian nationwide dose survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpo, Ernest U; Adejoh, Thomas; Akwo, Judith D; Emeka, Owujekwe C; Modu, Ali A; Abba, Mohammed; Adesina, Kudirat A; Omiyi, David O; Chiegwu, Uche H

    2018-01-29

    To explore doses from common adult computed tomography (CT) examinations and propose national diagnostic reference levels (nDRLs) for Nigeria. This retrospective study was approved by the Nnamdi Azikiwe University and University Teaching Hospital Institutional Review Boards (IRB: NAUTH/CS/66/Vol8/84) and involved dose surveys of adult CT examinations across the six geographical regions of Nigeria and Abuja from January 2016 to August 2017. Dose data of adult head, chest and abdomen/pelvis CT examinations were extracted from patient folders. The median, 75th and 25th percentile CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) and dose-length-product (DLP) were computed for each of these procedures. Effective doses (E) for these examinations were estimated using the k conversion factor as described in the ICRP publication 103 (E DLP  =  k × DLP ). The proposed 75th percentile CTDI vol for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis are 61 mGy, 17 mGy, and 20 mGy, respectively. The corresponding DLPs are 1310 mGy.cm, 735 mGy.cm, and 1486 mGy.cm respectively. The effective doses were 2.75 mSv (head), 10.29 mSv (chest), and 22.29 mSv (abdomen/pelvis). Findings demonstrate wide dose variations within and across centres in Nigeria. The results also show CTDI vol comparable to international standards, but considerably higher DLP and effective doses.

  16. Improved assessment of mediastinal and pulmonary pathologies in combined staging CT examinations using a fast-speed acquisition dual-source CT protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Holzner, Veronica; Meinel, Felix G.; Armbruster, Marco; Brandlhuber, Martina; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Dual-Source CT (DSCT) and to evaluate the clinical utility in chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT studies. 45 cancer patients with two follow-up combined chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations (maximally ±10 kV difference in tube potential) were included. The first scan had to be performed with our standard protocol (fixed pitch 0.6), the second one using a novel fast-speed DSCT protocol (fixed pitch 1.55). Effective doses (ED) were calculated, noise measurements performed. Scan times were compared, motion artefacts and the diagnostic confidence rated in consensus reading. ED for the standard and fast-speed scans was 9.1 (7.0-11.1) mSv and 9.2 (7.4-12.8) mSv, respectively (P = 0.075). Image noise was comparable (abdomen; all P > 0.05) or reduced for fast-speed CTs (trachea, P = 0.001; ascending aorta, P < 0.001). Motion artefacts of the heart/the ascending aorta (all P < 0.001) and breathing artefacts (P < 0.031) were reduced in fast DSCT. The diagnostic confidence for the evaluation of mediastinal (P < 0.001) and pulmonary (P = 0.008) pathologies was improved for fast DSCT. Fast DSCT for chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations is performed within 2 seconds scan time and eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can thus be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. Abdominal image quality remains excellent. (orig.)

  17. Modeling the effects of age and gender on normal pediatric brain metabolism using F18-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Sophie; Martineau, Patrick J; Levasseur, Marc-André; Lambert, Raymond

    2017-12-28

    Normal databases of pediatric brain metabolism are uncommon, as local brain metabolism evolves significantly with age throughout childhood, limiting their clinical applicability. The aim of this study was to develop mathematical models of regional relative brain metabolism (RRBM) using pediatric F18-FluoroDeoxyGlucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with Computed Tomography (CT) data of normal pediatric brains, accounting for gender and age. Methods: PET/CT brain acquisitions were obtained from 88 neurologically-normal subjects, aged 6 months to 18 years. Subjects were assigned to either development ( n = 59) or validation groups ( n = 29). For each subject, commercially available software (NeuroQTM) was used to quantify the relative metabolism of 47 separate brain regions using whole-brain normalized (WBN) and pons normalized (PN) activity. The effects of age on RRBM were modeled using multiple linear and non-linear mathematical equations and the significance of gender was assessed using the Student t-test. Optimal models were selected using the Akaike Information Criterion. Mean predicted values and 95% prediction intervals were derived for all regions. Model predictions were compared to the validation data set and mean predicted error was calculated for all regions using both WBN and PN models. Results: As a function of age, optimal models of RRBM were linear for 7 regions, quadratic for 13, cubic for 6, logarithmic for 12, power for 7, and modified power laws for 4regions using WBN data; linearfor 9 regions, quadratic for 27, cubic for 2, logarithmic for 5 and power for 2 using PN data. Gender differences were found to be statistically significant only in the posterior cingulate cortex for the WBN data. Comparing our models to the validation group resulted in 94.3% of regions falling within the 95% prediction interval for WBN and 94.1% for PN. For all the brain regions in the validation group, the percentage of error in prediction was 3 ± 0.96% using

  18. Results of the Gravity Stress Examination in the Normal Patient Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastifer, James R; Jaykel, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    In ankle fractures, the result of a gravity stress radiographic examination is clinically used to determine if a patient may need surgical intervention. The purpose of this study is to report the results of a gravity stress examination in the normal patient population. Fifty study participants were prospectively enrolled and complete ankle radiographs were obtained, including a nonweightbearing gravity stress examination. The mean medial clear space in the gravity stress view was 3.6 mm. This compared to a mean medial clear space of 3.3 mm, and 3.1 mm in the anteroposterior and mortise views. These values were statistically significantly different from the gravity stress view (  P = .006 and P stress radiographs (  P = .22). No participant had medial clear space widening with gravity stress to more than 5.2 mm or an increase in their widening by more than 0.2 mm. In conclusion, this study helps guide surgeons by providing normative radiographic data for a gravity stress examination and supports the notion that measureable medial clear space widening or talar tilt on gravity stress examination represents an unstable injury. Level II: Prospective.

  19. Evaluation of diagnostic reference dose levels in CT- scan examinations of adolescence in Tehran: a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzalipour R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, a CT scan examination play an important role in disease diagnosis and thus allocates a significant dose of medical X-ray examinations. One of the important principles in the use of ionizing radiations is to observe radiation protection principles. Evaluating patient's absorbed dose and implementing the strategies for reducing dose are prior in safety issues. To achieve this purpose, sufficient studies should be performed in this regard. Therefore, patient's absorbed dose and the factors affecting have been studied in this research. This study aims to present and develop an acceptable level of absorbed dose in CT scan examinations.Methods: Diagnostic reference dose level in the adult age group (older than 15 years has been studied in eleven CT scan centers in Tehran. For this purpose, CT scan examinations prevalent in above-mentioned centers were chosen and Weighted Computed Tomography dose index (CTDIw and dose length product (DLP parameters were studied. Standard phantoms with 16 and 32 diameters of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA origin have been used in the centers for CT scan calibration process. CTDIw third quartile has been considered as the diagnostic reference dose level (DRL.Results: Rate of diagnostic reference dose in the adult age group (older than 15 years for the head, sinus, lungs, abdomen and pelvis are 50.87, 38.27, 8.05 and 9.11 mg, respectively. Dose measurements made in this survey have been used to set up local DRLs and can be used as a template for national DRLs.Conclusion: Value of diagnostic reference dose for the head examinations is more than the other parts and diagnostic reference dose in Tehran city in the Adult age group and the protocols compared is less than national reference dose.

  20. Assessment of normal left atrial appendage anatomy and function over gender and ages by dynamic cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucebci, Samy; Velasco, Stephane; Duboe, Pier-Olivier; Tasu, Jean-Pierre [University of Poitiers, University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Poitiers (France); Pambrun, Thomas [University of Poitiers, University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Poitiers (France); Ingrand, Pierre [University of Poitiers, University Institute of Public Health, Poitiers (France)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate variations in anatomy and function according to age and gender using cardiac computed tomography (CT) in a large prospective cohort of healthy patients. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is considered the most frequent site of intracardiac thrombus formation. However, variations in normal in vivo anatomy and function according to age and gender remain largely unknown. Three-dimensional (3D) cardiac reconstructions of the LAA were performed from CT scans of 193 consecutive patients. Parameters measured included LAA number of lobes, anatomical position of the LAA tip, angulation measured between the proximal and distal portions, minimum (iVol{sub min}) and maximum (iVol{sub max}) volumes indexed to body surface area (BSA), and ejection fraction (LAAEF). Relationship with age was assessed for each parameter. We found that men had longer and wider LAAs. The iVol{sub min} and iVol{sub max} increased by 0.23 and 0.19 ml per decade, respectively, while LAAEF decreased by 2 % per decade in both sexes. Although LAA volumes increase, LAAEF decreases with age in both sexes. (orig.)

  1. CT-based patient modeling for head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: Manual versus automatic normal-tissue-segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, René F.; Fortunati, Valerio; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Clinical trials have shown that hyperthermia, as adjuvant to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, improves treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent head and neck (H and N) carcinoma. Hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) guided H and N hyperthermia is being investigated, which requires patient specific 3D patient models derived from Computed Tomography (CT)-images. To decide whether a recently developed automatic-segmentation algorithm can be introduced in the clinic, we compared the impact of manual- and automatic normal-tissue-segmentation variations on HTP quality. Material and methods: CT images of seven patients were segmented automatically and manually by four observers, to study inter-observer and intra-observer geometrical variation. To determine the impact of this variation on HTP quality, HTP was performed using the automatic and manual segmentation of each observer, for each patient. This impact was compared to other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. varying gridsizes and dielectric tissue properties. Results: Despite geometrical variations, manual and automatic generated 3D patient models resulted in an equal, i.e. 1%, variation in HTP quality. This variation was minor with respect to the total of other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. 11.7%. Conclusions: Automatically generated 3D patient models can be introduced in the clinic for H and N HTP

  2. Incidence of tendon entrapment and dislocation with calcaneus and pilon fractures on CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresley, Jonathan [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Subhawong, Ty K.; Singer, Adam D.; Clifford, Paul D. [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-07-15

    To examine the association between tibial pilon and calcaneal fracture classification and tendon entrapment or dislocation. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive CT scans with calcaneal or pilon fractures from 5 years at a level 1 trauma center. We categorized calcaneal fractures according to the Sanders classification, and pilon fractures according to the Ruedi and Allgower and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Osteosynthesefragen-Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO-OTA) classifications. Ankle tendons were assessed for dislocation or entrapment. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis with significance at p < 0.05. A total of 312 fractures (91 pilon only, 193 calcaneal only, and 14 ankles with ipsilateral pilon and calcaneal fractures) were identified in 273 patients. Twenty-two pilon, 42 calcaneal, and nine combination fractures were associated with 99 occurrences of tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Such findings were associated with multiple fractures (p = 0.002). Multifragmentary pilon fractures were associated with posterior tibial and flexor digitorum longus tendon entrapment (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0003 for Ruedi/Allgower and AO-OTA, respectively), and multifragmentary Sanders type 3 or 4 calcaneal fractures were associated with superior peroneal retinacular injury (p = 0.0473) compared to simple fracture patterns. Thirty-nine percent of tendon entrapments or retinacular injuries were prospectively identified, 85 % by musculoskeletal radiologists (p < 0.0001). Approximately 25 % of calcaneal and pilon fractures were retrospectively identified to contain posteromedial tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Radiologists should meticulously search for such injuries, particularly when analyzing multifragmentary and multiple fractures. (orig.)

  3. Incidence of tendon entrapment and dislocation with calcaneus and pilon fractures on CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresley, Jonathan; Subhawong, Ty K.; Singer, Adam D.; Clifford, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    To examine the association between tibial pilon and calcaneal fracture classification and tendon entrapment or dislocation. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive CT scans with calcaneal or pilon fractures from 5 years at a level 1 trauma center. We categorized calcaneal fractures according to the Sanders classification, and pilon fractures according to the Ruedi and Allgower and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Osteosynthesefragen-Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO-OTA) classifications. Ankle tendons were assessed for dislocation or entrapment. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis with significance at p < 0.05. A total of 312 fractures (91 pilon only, 193 calcaneal only, and 14 ankles with ipsilateral pilon and calcaneal fractures) were identified in 273 patients. Twenty-two pilon, 42 calcaneal, and nine combination fractures were associated with 99 occurrences of tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Such findings were associated with multiple fractures (p = 0.002). Multifragmentary pilon fractures were associated with posterior tibial and flexor digitorum longus tendon entrapment (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0003 for Ruedi/Allgower and AO-OTA, respectively), and multifragmentary Sanders type 3 or 4 calcaneal fractures were associated with superior peroneal retinacular injury (p = 0.0473) compared to simple fracture patterns. Thirty-nine percent of tendon entrapments or retinacular injuries were prospectively identified, 85 % by musculoskeletal radiologists (p < 0.0001). Approximately 25 % of calcaneal and pilon fractures were retrospectively identified to contain posteromedial tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Radiologists should meticulously search for such injuries, particularly when analyzing multifragmentary and multiple fractures. (orig.)

  4. Automated temporal tracking and segmentation of lymphoma on serial CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Jiajing; Greenspan, Hayit; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: It is challenging to reproducibly measure and compare cancer lesions on numerous follow-up studies; the process is time-consuming and error-prone. In this paper, we show a method to automatically and reproducibly identify and segment abnormal lymph nodes in serial computed tomography (CT) exams. Methods: Our method leverages initial identification of enlarged (abnormal) lymph nodes in the baseline scan. We then identify an approximate region for the node in the follow-up scans using nonrigid image registration. The baseline scan is also used to locate regions of normal, non-nodal tissue surrounding the lymph node and to map them onto the follow-up scans, in order to reduce the search space to locate the lymph node on the follow-up scans. Adaptive region-growing and clustering algorithms are then used to obtain the final contours for segmentation. We applied our method to 24 distinct enlarged lymph nodes at multiple time points from 14 patients. The scan at the earlier time point was used as the baseline scan to be used in evaluating the follow-up scan, resulting in 70 total test cases (e.g., a series of scans obtained at 4 time points results in 3 test cases). For each of the 70 cases, a ''reference standard'' was obtained by manual segmentation by a radiologist. Assessment according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) using our method agreed with RECIST assessments made using the reference standard segmentations in all test cases, and by calculating node overlap ratio and Hausdorff distance between the computer and radiologist-generated contours. Results: Compared to the reference standard, our method made the correct RECIST assessment for all 70 cases. The average overlap ratio was 80.7 {+-} 9.7% s.d., and the average Hausdorff distance was 3.2 {+-} 1.8 mm s.d. The concordance correlation between automated and manual segmentations was 0.978 (95% confidence interval 0.962, 0.984). The 100% agreement in our sample

  5. Is liver perfusion CT reproducible? A study on intra- and interobserver agreement of normal hepatic haemodynamic parameters obtained with two different software packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Torres, Ulysses S; Torres, Lucas Rios; Bekhor, Daniel; Saito Filho, Celso Fernando; Racy, Douglas Jorge; Faggioni, Lorenzo; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the agreement between the measurements of perfusion CT parameters in normal livers by using two different software packages. This retrospective study was based on 78 liver perfusion CT examinations acquired for detecting suspected liver metastasis. Patients with any morphological or functional hepatic abnormalities were excluded. The final analysis included 37 patients (59.7 ± 14.9 y). Two readers (1 and 2) independently measured perfusion parameters using different software packages from two major manufacturers (A and B). Arterial perfusion (AP) and portal perfusion (PP) were determined using the dual-input vascular one-compartmental model. Inter-reader agreement for each package and intrareader agreement between both packages were assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman statistics. Inter-reader agreement was substantial for AP using software A (ICC = 0.82) and B (ICC = 0.85-0.86), fair for PP using software A (ICC = 0.44) and fair to moderate for PP using software B (ICC = 0.56-0.77). Intrareader agreement between software A and B ranged from slight to moderate (ICC = 0.32-0.62) for readers 1 and 2 considering the AP parameters, and from fair to moderate (ICC = 0.40-0.69) for readers 1 and 2 considering the PP parameters. At best there was only moderate agreement between both software packages, resulting in some uncertainty and suboptimal reproducibility. Advances in knowledge: Software-dependent factors may contribute to variance in perfusion measurements, demanding further technical improvements. AP measurements seem to be the most reproducible parameter to be adopted when evaluating liver perfusion CT.

  6. An EGS4-ready tomographic computational model of a 14-year-old female torso for calculating organ doses from CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.; School of Physics and Electronic Systems Engineering, University of South Australia, The Levels Campus, Mawson Lakes, South Australia, 5095; Pattison, J.

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-four consecutive CT scans have been used to construct a tomographic computational model of a 14-year-old female torso suitable for the determination of organ doses from CT. The model, known as ADELAIDE, is in the form of an input file compatible with user codes based on XYZDOS.MOR from the readily available EGS4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. ADELAIDE's dimensions are close to the Australian averages for her age so the model is representative of a 14-year-old girl. The realistic anatomy in the model differs considerably from that in Cristy's 15-year-old mathematical computational model by having realistically shaped organs that are appropriately located within a real external contour. Average absorbed dose to organs from simulated CT examinations of the chest and abdomen have been calculated for ADELAIDE using EGS4 within a geometry specific to the General Electric Hi-Speed Advantage CT scanner and using an x-ray spectrum calculated using data from the scanner's x-ray tube. The simulations include the scanner's beam shaping filter and patient table. It is suggested that the resulting values have fewer possible sources of uncertainty than organ doses derived from dose coefficients calculated for a MIRD style model with mathematical anatomy and a spectrum that may not match that of the scanner. The organ doses were normalized using the scanner's CTDI measured free-in-air and an EGS4 simulation of the CTDI measurement. Effective dose to the torso from 26-slice chest and 24-slice abdomen examinations (at 120 kV, 200 mAs, 7 mm slices) is 4.6±0.1mSv and 4.3±0.1mSv respectively. (author)

  7. MO-DE-207A-09: Low-Dose CT Image Reconstruction Via Learning From Different Patient Normal-Dose Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H; Xing, L; Liang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a novel low-dose CT (LdCT) image reconstruction strategy for lung CT imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: The proposed approach consists of four steps: (1) use the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) method to reconstruct the LdCT image; (2) calculate structure similarity (SSIM) index between the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image and a set of normal-dose CT (NdCT) images, and select the NdCT image with the highest SSIM as the learning source; (3) segment the NdCT source image into lung and outside tissue regions via simple thresholding, and adopt multiple linear regression to learn high-order Markov random field (MRF) pattern for each tissue region in the NdCT source image; (4) segment the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image into lung and outside regions as well, and apply the learnt MRF prior in each tissue region for statistical iterative reconstruction of the LdCT image following the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) framework. Quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local binary pattern (LBP) and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) metrics. Results: It was observed that lung and outside tissue regions have different MRF patterns predicted from the NdCT. Visual inspection showed that our method obviously outperformed the traditional FBP method. Comparing with the region-smoothing PWLS method, our method has, in average, 13% increase in SNR, 15% decrease in LBP difference, and 12% decrease in HOG difference from reference standard for all regions of interest, which indicated the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of image resolution and texture preservation. Conclusion: We proposed a novel LdCT image reconstruction method by learning similar image characteristics from a set of NdCT images, and the to-be-learnt NdCT image does not need to be scans from the same subject. This approach is particularly important for enhancing image quality in radiation therapy.

  8. MO-DE-207A-09: Low-Dose CT Image Reconstruction Via Learning From Different Patient Normal-Dose Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, H; Xing, L [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Liang, Z [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel low-dose CT (LdCT) image reconstruction strategy for lung CT imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: The proposed approach consists of four steps: (1) use the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) method to reconstruct the LdCT image; (2) calculate structure similarity (SSIM) index between the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image and a set of normal-dose CT (NdCT) images, and select the NdCT image with the highest SSIM as the learning source; (3) segment the NdCT source image into lung and outside tissue regions via simple thresholding, and adopt multiple linear regression to learn high-order Markov random field (MRF) pattern for each tissue region in the NdCT source image; (4) segment the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image into lung and outside regions as well, and apply the learnt MRF prior in each tissue region for statistical iterative reconstruction of the LdCT image following the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) framework. Quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local binary pattern (LBP) and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) metrics. Results: It was observed that lung and outside tissue regions have different MRF patterns predicted from the NdCT. Visual inspection showed that our method obviously outperformed the traditional FBP method. Comparing with the region-smoothing PWLS method, our method has, in average, 13% increase in SNR, 15% decrease in LBP difference, and 12% decrease in HOG difference from reference standard for all regions of interest, which indicated the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of image resolution and texture preservation. Conclusion: We proposed a novel LdCT image reconstruction method by learning similar image characteristics from a set of NdCT images, and the to-be-learnt NdCT image does not need to be scans from the same subject. This approach is particularly important for enhancing image quality in radiation therapy.

  9. Evaluation of shielding capability of controlled area for CT examination room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Asada, Yasuki; Nakai, Takayo; Takeuchi, Kichito; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Koga, Sukehiko

    2002-01-01

    With the revision of the law in April, 2001, the effective dose at the boundary of the controlled area was set at 1.3 mSv/3M. Whether the shielding capability of the CT room satisfied the provisions of the law or not was confirmed by actual measurements. Both thermo luminescence dosemeter (TLD) and electronic dosemeter were used to measure the radiation doses. The shielding capability of the gantry was studied both inside and outside the room for a week as a basic experiment. On the basis of the data thus obtained doses accumulated in 3 months were estimated. According to the results of 3 month-measurement, the doses outside the wall of the CT room were about 200μ Sv. This numerical value was comparable to the background level of the evaluation point. The results above assured that the shielding capability of the CT room satisfied the provisions of the law well. (author)

  10. Effectiveness of combined use of imprint cytological and histological examination in CT-guided tissue-core biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Kajiwara, Kenji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu [Tokai University Hachioji Hospital, Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan); Kakizawa, Hideaki [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Naka-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Toyoda, Naoyuki [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); National Hospital Organisation Kure Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the combination of imprint cytology and histology in tissue-core percutaneous biopsy under real-time computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Between October 2009 and June 2013, 156 percutaneous needle biopsies were performed in our institution. Those obtained by tissue-core biopsy underwent both imprint cytological and histological examinations routinely after touch imprint cytology was performed on site to evaluate the samples' sufficiency for cytological and pathological examination. Final diagnosis was confirmed by independent surgical pathology, independent culture results or clinical follow-up. Rates of adequate specimens and precise diagnosis, by combined cytological and histological examination were 100 % (156/156) and 96.2 % (150/156), by cytology 94.4 % (152/156) and 83.3 % (130/156) and by histology 99.3 % (155/156) and 92.3 % (144/156). Precise diagnosis was achieved by combined examinations in 94.7 % (89/94) of thoracic lesions, 97.6 % (40/41) of musculoskeletal lesions, and 100 % (21/21) of abdominal, pelvic and retroperitoneal lesions. In all 104 lesions diagnosed as malignant by CT-guided biopsy and in 30 of 52 diagnosed as benign, specific cell types could be proved by combined examinations. Combined imprint cytology and histology performed after on-site touch imprint cytological evaluation improved the diagnostic ability of CT fluoroscopically guided biopsy. (orig.)

  11. MR-urography and CT-urography: principles, examination techniques, applications; MR-Urographie und CT-Urographie: Prinzipien, Untersuchungstechniken, Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Adam, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Staatz, G.; Wildberger, J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2003-02-01

    MR-urography (MRU) and CT-urography (CTU) provide refined imaging of the upper urinary tract not achievable with conventional intravenous urography (IVU). The traditional MR-urographic technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T{sub 2}-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences for obtaining static fluid images of the urinary tract independent of the excretory renal function. T{sub 2}-weighted MR-urograms have proved to be excellent in visualizing the dilated urinary tract, even in non-excreting kidneys. In contrast, T{sub 1}-weighted MRU reflects the excretory renal function and displays the urine flow through the upper tract after renal excretion of an intravenously administered gadolinium chelate. The gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized with fast T{sub 1}-weighted 3D-gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of gadolinium in the collecting system and for avoiding susceptibility artifacts (T{sub 2}*-effects) in the urine. T{sub 1}-weighted excretory MRU provides impressive urograms of both non-dilated and obstructed collecting systems in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. Multislice-CT-urography (MS-CTU) is also an excretory urography like T{sub 1}-weighted MRU. Furthermore, MS-CTU can be combined with low-dose furosemide for accelerated passage of excreted contrast material obviating the need for abdominal compression. CT-urography is limited by its radiation burden and the nephrotoxicity of radiographic contrast media. Combining MRU or MS-CTU with conventional MRI or CT offers several applications, e.g., diagnosis of intrinsic and extrinsic tumors. Meanwhile, MRU has replaced IVU in pediatric uroradiology and is also recommended for the assessment of renal transplants. MS-CTU may provide valuable information in chronic urolithiasis, especially if associated with a distorted urinary tract anatomy. Both MRU and MS-CTU will play an important role in

  12. Do physical examination and CT-scan measures of femoral neck anteversion and tibial torsion relate to each other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeux, Morgan; Mahy, Jessica; Graham, H Kerr

    2014-01-01

    Informed clinical decision making for femoral and/or tibial de-rotation osteotomies requires accurate measurement of patient function through gait analysis and anatomy through physical examination of bony torsions. Validity of gait analysis has been extensively studied; however, controversy remains regarding the accuracy of physical examination measurements of femoral and tibial torsion. Comparison between CT-scans and physical examination measurements of femoral neck anteversion (FNA) and external tibial torsion (ETT) were retrospectively obtained for 98 (FNA) and 64 (ETT) patients who attended a tertiary hospital for instrumented gait analysis between 2007 and 2010. The physical examination methods studied for femoral neck anteversion were the trochanteric prominence angle test (TPAT) and the maximum hip rotation arc midpoint (Arc midpoint) and for external tibial torsion the transmalleolar axis (TMA). Results showed that all physical examination measurements statistically differed to the CT-scans (bias(standard deviation): -2(14) for TPAT, -10(12) for Arc midpoint and -16(9) for TMA). Bland and Altman plots showed that method disagreements increased with increasing bony torsions in all cases but notably for TPAT. Regression analysis showed that only TMA and CT-scan measurement of external tibial torsion demonstrated good (R(2)=57%) correlation. Correlations for both TPAT (R(2)=14%) and Arc midpoint (R(2)=39%) with CT-scan measurements of FNA were limited. We conclude that physical examination should be considered as screening techniques rather than definitive measurement methods for FNA and ETT. Further research is required to develop more accurate measurement methods to accompany instrumented gait analysis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Computed tomography for the detection of distal radioulnar joint instability: normal variation and reliability of four CT scoring systems in 46 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijffels, Mathieu; Krijnen, Pieta; Schipper, Inger [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Surgery-Trauma Surgery, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Stomp, Wouter; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    The diagnosis of distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability is clinically challenging. Computed tomography (CT) may aid in the diagnosis, but the reliability and normal variation for DRUJ translation on CT have not been established in detail. The aim of this study was to evaluate inter- and intraobserver agreement and normal ranges of CT scoring methods for determination of DRUJ translation in both posttraumatic and uninjured wrists. Patients with a conservatively treated, unilateral distal radius fracture were included. CT scans of both wrists were evaluated independently, by two readers using the radioulnar line method, subluxation ratio method, epicenter method and radioulnar ratio method. The inter- and intraobserver agreement was assessed and normal values were determined based on the uninjured wrists. Ninety-two wrist CTs (mean age: 56.5 years, SD: 17.0, mean follow-up 4.2 years, SD: 0.5) were evaluated. Interobserver agreement was best for the epicenter method [ICC = 0.73, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.65-0.79]. Intraobserver agreement was almost perfect for the radioulnar line method (ICC = 0.82, 95 % CI 0.77-0.87). Each method showed a wide normal range for normal DRUJ translation. Normal range for the epicenter method is -0.35 to -0.06 in pronation and -0.11 to 0.19 in supination. DRUJ translation on CT in pro- and supination can be reliably evaluated in both normal and posttraumatic wrists, however with large normal variation. The epicenter method seems the most reliable. Scanning of both wrists might be helpful to prevent the radiological overdiagnosis of instability. (orig.)

  14. A practical approach to radiological evaluation of CT lung cancer screening examinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Xueqian; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON) was launched to investigate whether screening for lung cancer by low-dose multidetector computed tomography (CT) in high-risk patients will lead

  15. [Effective dose in X-ray examinations: comparison between spiral CT and urography in the study of renal colic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Denaro, M; Bregant, P; Cupardo, F; De Guarrini, F; Rimondini, A; Pozzi Mucelli, R

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose in patients with renal colic undergoing spiral CT examination and IVU examination, and to verify the ability of the systems to measure the effective dose. Dose measurements were carried out for both diagnostic techniques by employing an anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) fitted inside the phantom. The data so obtained were compared with dose estimations based on published tables, which allow to obtain the effective dose on the basis of the experimental value of common dose indicators, the performance of the equipment and the setting of the acquisition parameters for such examinations. The absorbed dose inside the phantom had an homogeneous distribution during the spiral CT examination, while during the IVU there were significant differences in the absorbed dose between different zones of the body, due to the geometry of the x-ray beam. The mean effective dose, which corresponds to the average of values absorbed by males and females, measured by TLD dosimeters for spiral CT examination was 3.3 time that for IVU. For both spiral CT and IVU the dose to the male was significantly lower than that to the female, owing to the anatomic position of female gonads that are completely exposed to the x-ray radiations during the study, while male gonads lie outside of the exposed area. Both methods for estimating the effective dose in spiral CT, based on CTDI value, significantly underestimated the value derived from experimental TLDs measurement. The evaluation of effective dose in IVU, based on the measurement of the skin dose in air, overestimated the measurement performed by TLDs. Dose measurement performed by TLD dosimeters fitted inside an anthropomorphic phantom has the advantage of calculating experimentally the absorbed dose in different anatomic districts. However, the method is quite difficult, and introduces some imprecisions due to the simplified morphology of the phantom and the

  16. Establishment of a comprehensive set of regional DRLs for CT by means of electronic X-ray examination records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, P; Dunn, A F; Moores, B M; Murphy, J; Wilde, R

    2015-03-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has indicated that the diagnostic reference level (DRL) has the optimisation of protection as its objective for diagnostic and interventional procedures [International Commission on Radiological Protection. Protection against ionising radiation from external sources: ICRP Report 105 (2007)]. An important aim of this paper was to demonstrate a straightforward and cost-effective mechanism for undertaking patient dose audits that can be employed in the production of local and regional DRLs for use by medical physics experts in the provision of scientific support services to diagnostic radiology. The process developed employs electronic X-ray examination records obtained from multiple hospital sites transferred to a central processing and reporting facility. Results of a large-scale audit of patient doses resulting from CT examinations are presented. Doses are expressed in terms of dose length product (DLP) and were collected by remotely accessing electronic examination records held in hospital radiology information systems. Data were collected from 18 hospital sites involving up to 123 different types of examinations covering an ∼18-month period from July 2011 to December 2012. In total, 177 000 CT examination records were collected. Values have been validated against equivalent records obtained from digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) header data and found to be in excellent statistical agreement. Extremely large variations in DLP values were noted for many examinations when data for all scanners were pooled. Results are discussed in relation to other surveys and differences highlighted in terms of the variations in methodologies employed and the numbers of examination records investigated. A mechanism for establishing DRLs is proposed, which could help to unify mechanisms for establishing DRLs for CT examinations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  17. A fully automated calculation of size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) in thoracic and head CT examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.; Widita, R.; Arif, I.; Dougherty, G.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to automatically calculate and then investigate the size- specific dose estimate (SSDE) in thoracic and head CT examinations undertaken using standard imaging protocols. The effective diameter (Deff ), the water equivalent diameter (Dw ), and the SSDE were calculated automatically from patient images. We investigated sixteen adult patients who underwent a CT head examination and thirty adult patients who underwent a CT thorax examination. Our results showed that the Dw value in the thoracic region was 4.5% lower than the value of Deff , while the Dw value in the head region was 8.6% higher than the value of Deff . The relationships between diameter (Deff and Dw ) and CTDIvol were distinctive. In the head region, decreasing the patient diameter resulted in a constant CTDIvol due to the tube current modulation (TCM) being off, while in the thoracic region decreasing the patient diameter resulted in a decrease in value of CTDIvol due to TCM being on. In the head region, decreasing the patient diameter resulted in an increase in the value of SSDE, while in the thoracic region decreasing the patient diameter resulted in a decrease in the value of SSDE.

  18. Sprial CT cholangiography. A new technique in the examination of the biliary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabada, T.; Martinez-Berganza, M.T.; Cozcolluela, R.; Sarria, L.; Soto, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A number of techniques, including ultrasonography, intravenous cholangiography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatorgraphy, intraoperative cholangiography and conventional computerized tomography, have been employed in the study of the biliary tract. CT cholangiography involves a spiral technique used to study the hepatobiliary region after administration of a cholangiographic contrast material, which permits subsequent multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions. Spiral CT cholangiography is a recently introduced, noninvasive technique that provides a good image of the complex biliary anatomy, and it is a reliable method for the detection of both choledocholithiasis and intrahepatic calculi. This technique may play an important role in the preoperative study of patients scheduled to underg laparoscopic cholecystectomy and in the assessment of the complications that develop after cholecystectomy. (Author) 42 refs

  19. The value of CT measurement of normal human mandible, hyoid and the airway area at the hyoid level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changliang; Zhang Jia; Ge Pingjiang; Zhang Siyi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the normal value and clinical significance of the lengths and angles of both mandible and hyoid, and their relationship with cervical vertebra as well as the transverse area of the airway at the hyoid level using CT. Methods: Several lines and angles on the CT images were measured in 68 normal subjects. Line A was the length between both free ends of the mandible; line B was the distance from the body of the mandible to line A; Line C was the distance from line A to the anterior aspect of the cervical vertebra. α 1 was the angle between the middle of mandible body and its two free ends. Line a was the distance between two free ends of greater horn of hyoid bone. Line b was the distance from hyoid to line a. Line c was the distance from line a to the cervical vertebra. α 2 was the angle between the middle of hyoid body and its two free ends. S stood for the area of the airway at the hyoid level. SPSS 11.5 statistical analysis package was used to analyze the results. Results: The average and median distance/angle of various measurements were as follows: line A was (89.28±5.90) mm and 88.70 mm, line B was (62.61±5.78) mm and 62.50 mm, line C was (9.29±3.29) mm and 4.20 mm, α 1 was (71.25±6.77) degree and 71.05 degree, line a was (38.69 ± 6.07) mm and 39.90 mm, line b was (28.79 ± 4.37) mm and 28.50 mm, line c was (1.91 ± 3.03) mm and 1.75 mm, α 2 was (68.47 ± 15.71) degree and 66.95 degree. The average S was (436.14 ± 160.37) mm 2 and median was 431.75 mm 2 . Conclusion: It is easy to measure the three lines and the two angles of mandible and hyoid. The measurement is of vital importance in the diagnosis and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

  20. Computed tomography (CT) findings of the pleural metastasis effusion: the examination of 100 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, J. J.; Alonso, S.; Gil, S.; Fernandez, F.; Lloret, M.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) findings in a series of 100 pleural metastasis effusions. A retrospective study was carried out that consisted of assessing the CT images of 100 malignant pleural metastasis effusions, evaluating the amount of the effusion, its distribution, the presence of swelling or nodules in the different pleural surfaces, the existence and the characteristics of the extrapleural fat and the changes in other locations different to the pleural cavity, mainly the mediastinum and the pulmonary parenchyma. The effusion was located in 12 patients. The amount of the effusion was slight in 14% and massive in 10% of the sick patients. Pleural nodules were detected in 19% of the studies, in all those that affected the costal parental pleura, being less frequent in the other pleural surfaces. The costal parental pleura was swollen in 43% of the sick patients. 52 sick patients did not have any swelling nor pleural nodules, with the pleural effusion being the only sign of pleural metastasis. Changes in the rest of the thorax were frequent in relation to the malignant illness that causes the effusion and appeared in 67% of the sick patients. The patients with pleural effusions of malignant etiology showed variable CT findings, that in general were non-specific, and in almost half the cases no pleural changes can be seen apart from the effusion. (Author) 13 refs

  1. Mapping of treatment-induced apoptosis in normal structures: 99mTc-Hynic-rh-annexin V SPECT and CT image fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartachova, Marina S.; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Haas, Rick L. M.; Hoebers, Frank J. P.; van den Brekel, Michiel W.; van Zandwijk, Nico; van Herk, Marcel; Verheij, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to map treatment-induced (99m)Tc-Hynic-rh-annexin V uptake in normal tissues using co-registration of SPECT and CT. METHODS: Nineteen patients (11 male, 8 female, mean age 57 years) with various malignant tumours (12 lymphomas, four non-small cell lung cancers

  2. Cognitive Deficits in Healthy Elderly Population With "Normal" Scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votruba, Kristen L; Persad, Carol; Giordani, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether healthy older adults with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores above 23 exhibit cognitive impairment on neuropsychological tests. Participants completed the MMSE and a neuropsychological battery including tests of 10 domains. Results were compared to published normative data. On neuropsychological testing, participants performed well on measures of naming and recall but showed mild to moderate impairment in working memory and processing speed and marked impairment in inhibition, sustained attention, and executive functioning. Almost everyone (91%) scored at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean in at least 1 domain. The median number of domains in which individuals scored below 1 SD was 3.0 of 10.0, whereas over 21% scored below 1 SD in 5 domains or more. With the strictest of definitions for impairment, 20% of this population scored below 2.0 SDs below the norm in at least 2 domains, a necessary condition for a diagnosis of dementia. The finding that cognitive impairment, particularly in attention and executive functioning, is found in healthy older persons who perform well on the MMSE has clinical and research implications in terms of emphasizing normal variability in performance and early identification of possible impairment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. CT colonography for preoperative examination of the proximal colon using a transanal drainage tube for acute malignant colonic obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kazuaki; Hirano, Yuji; Oono, Keisuke; Sasaki, Kazunori; Someya, Tetsufumi; Harada, Keisuke; Ezoe, Eiri; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Hirata, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of CT colonography for preoperative examination of the proximal colon using a transanal drainage tube in patients with acute colon obstruction caused by colorectal cancer. Ten patients who received initial treatment for acute malignant colon obstruction at our hospital between June 2004 and December 2008 were studied. In these patients, elective surgery was possible after transanal drainage tube insertion, and the colon on the oral side from the cancer lesion was examined using a drainage tube. Air was injected through the tube into the oral side of the colon, and CT colonography was assessed for the presence or absence of lesions on the oral side. The images of the oral side of the colon were good enough to allow adequate interpretation in 9 of the 10 patients. In the first patient, the visualization of the area near the lesion was somewhat fair, although the right side colon was well visualized. There were no complications associated with this examination. The present preoperative examination using a transanal drainage tube was useful for determining the extent of intestinal resection when patients were not candidates for colonoscopy or barium enema examination. (author)

  4. Evaluation of First-Ray Mobility in Patients with Hallux Valgus Using Weight-Bearing CT and a 3-D Analysis System: A Comparison with Normal Feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tadashi; Kubota, Makoto; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Marumo, Keishi

    2017-02-01

    Some physicians report that patients with hallux valgus have hypermobility at the tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint of the first ray and 3-dimensional (3-D) deformity. With use of non-weight-bearing and weight-bearing computed tomography (CT), we evaluated the 3-D mobility of each joint of the first ray in feet with hallux valgus compared with normal feet. Ten feet of 10 patients with hallux valgus and 10 feet of 10 healthy volunteers with no foot disorders were examined. All participants were women. Weight-bearing (a load equivalent to body weight) and non-weight-bearing CT scans were made with use of a device that we developed. Orthogonal coordinate axes were set and a 3-D model was reconstructed. Each joint of the first ray was aligned with the respective proximal bone, and 3-D displacement of the distal bone relative to the proximal bone under loading was quantified. At the talonavicular joint, significantly greater dorsiflexion of the navicular relative to the talus was observed in the hallux valgus group compared with the control group. At the medial cuneonavicular joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater eversion and abduction of the medial cuneiform relative to the navicular. At the first TMT joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater dorsiflexion, inversion, and adduction of the first metatarsal relative to the medial cuneiform. At the first metatarsophalangeal joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater eversion and abduction of the first proximal phalanx relative to the first metatarsal (all p hallux valgus.

  5. Ovarian Cancer: Prevalence in Incidental Simple Adnexal Cysts Initially Identified in CT Examinations of the Abdomen and Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Johannes; Brook, Olga R; Fang, Jieming; Brook, Alexander; Levine, Deborah

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the rate of malignancy in incidentally detected simple adnexal cysts at computed tomography (CT) to determine if simple-appearing cysts require follow-up. Materials and Methods In this HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved retrospective cohort study, an institutional database was searched for abdominal and pelvic CT studies performed between June 2003 and December 2010 in women reported to have adnexal cysts. Adnexal cyst characterization was determined by prospective report description as well as image review by a research fellow and by a fellowship-trained abdominal radiologist for examinations with disagreement between the original report and the research fellow's assessment. Patients with known ovarian cysts or ovarian cancer at time of the index CT examination were excluded. Clinical outcome was assessed by using follow-up imaging studies, medical records, and the state cancer registry. Benign outcome was determined by benign findings at surgery, a decrease in size or resolution of a simple-appearing cyst at follow-up imaging, or stability of the cyst for at least 1 year. Descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results Among 42 111 women who underwent abdominal and pelvic CT examinations in the study period, 2763 (6.6%; 95% CI: 6.3%, 6.8%) (mean age, 48.1 years ± 18.1; range, 15-102 years) had a newly detected finding of ovarian cyst described in the body or impression section of the report. Median cyst size was 3.1 cm (range, 0.8-20.0 cm). Eighteen (0.7%; 95% CI: 0.4%, 1.0%) of 2763 patients were found to have ovarian cancer after an average follow-up of 5.1 years ± 3.8 (range, 0-12.8 years). None (95% CI: 0%, 0.4%) of 1031 women with simple-appearing cysts were given a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. This included none (95% CI: 0%, 0.4%) of 904 women with simple-appearing cysts with an adequate reference standard for benign outcome. Conclusion The prevalence of previously unknown adnexal

  6. Capability of differentiating smokers with normal pulmonary function from COPD patients: a comparison of CT pulmonary volume analysis and MR perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Li; Xia, Yi; Guan, Yu; Yu, Hong; Liu, Shi-yuan [Changzheng Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Tie-feng; Li, Bing [Changzheng Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Department of Respiration Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2013-05-15

    To compare CT volume analysis with MR perfusion imaging in differentiating smokers with normal pulmonary function (controls) from COPD patients. Sixty-two COPD patients and 17 controls were included. The total lung volume (TLV), total emphysema volume (TEV) and emphysema index (EI) were quantified by CT. MR perfusion evaluated positive enhancement integral (PEI), maximum slope of increase (MSI), maximum slope of decrease (MSD), signal enhancement ratio (SER) and signal intensity ratio (R{sub SI}) of perfusion defects to normal lung. There were 19 class I, 17 class II, 14 class III and 12 class IV COPD patients. No differences were observed in TLV, TEV and EI between control and class I COPD. The control was different from class II, III and IV COPD in TEV and EI. The control was different from each class of COPD in R{sub SI,} MSI, PEI and MSD. Differences were found in R{sub SI} between class I and III, I and IV, and II and IV COPD. Amongst controls, MR detected perfusion defects more frequently than CT detected emphysema. Compared with CT, MR perfusion imaging shows higher potential to distinguish controls from mild COPD and appears more sensitive in identifying abnormalities amongst smokers with normal pulmonary function (controls). (orig.)

  7. Radiation exposure of ovarian cancer patients: contribution of CT examinations performed on different MDCT (16 and 64 slices) scanners and image quality evaluation: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality.CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability.Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients' weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality.The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT.Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams.

  8. Computed tomography of the calcaneus: normal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, L.; Wulff, K.

    1985-01-01

    The normal sectional anatomy of the calcaneus was studied as the background for interpretation of computed tomography (CT) of fractures. Multiplanar CT examination of the normal calcaneus was obtained, and sections were matched with a simplified anatomic model. Sectional anatomy in the four most important planes is described. This facilitates three-dimensional understanding of the calcaneus from sections and interpretation of CT sections obtained in any atypical plane

  9. Body Size-Specific Organ and Effective Doses of Chest CT Screening Examinations of the National Lung Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Flynn, Michael J; Judy, Phillip F; Cody, Dianna D; Bolch, Wesley E; Kruger, Randell L

    2017-05-01

    We calculated body size-specific organ and effective doses for 23,734 participants in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) using a CT dose calculator. We collected participant-specific technical parameters of 23,734 participants who underwent CT in the clinical trial. For each participant, we calculated two sets of organ doses using two methods. First, we computed body size-specific organ and effective doses using the National Cancer Institute CT (NCICT) dosimetry program, which is based on dose coefficients derived from a library of body size-dependent adult male and female computational phantoms. We then recalculated organ and effective doses using dose coefficients from reference size phantoms for all examinations to investigate potential errors caused by the lack of body size consideration in the dose calculations. The underweight participants (body mass index [BMI; weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters] dose (median, 4.93 mGy) than the obese participants (BMI > 30) (3.90 mGy). Thyroid doses were approximately 1.3- to 1.6-fold greater than the lung doses (6.3-6.5 mGy). The reference phantom-based dose calculation underestimates the body size-specific lung dose by up to 50% for the underweight participants and overestimates that value by up to 200% for the overweight participants. The median effective dose ranges from 2.01 mSv in obese participants to 2.80 mSv in underweight participants. Body size-specific organ and effective doses were computed for 23,734 NLST participants who underwent low-dose CT screening. The use of reference size phantoms can lead to significant errors in organ dose estimates when body size is not considered in the dose assessment.

  10. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, 8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  11. Effect of patient size, anatomical location and modulation strength on dose delivered and image-quality on CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greffier, Joel; Larbi, Ahmed; Macri, Francesco; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Pereira, Fabricio

    2017-01-01

    To study the effect of patient size, anatomical location and modulation strength (MS) on image-quality and delivered dose of CT scans acquired with automatic-exposure control system (AEC). Four anthropomorphic phantoms (three paediatric and one thin adult) were studied, and normal and obese adults were simulated by placing bolus plates around the adult phantom. Thorax and abdomen pelvis CT were performed using an AEC system equipped with five possible MS. Modulated tube current (mAs mod ) was compared to Reference mAs and image-noise was assessed. Effective-mAs were lower than Reference-mAs for all but the obese phantom. However, reversal points were estimated for an effective diameter of 27.8 cm in thorax and 26.9 cm in abdomen pelvis scans, beyond which the patterns of MS were inverted. mAs mod were dependent on attenuation differences among distinct anatomical location. Finally, dose delivered was associated to the mAs mod and patient s size, with both affecting image-quality. (authors)

  12. Challenges in microarray class discovery: a comprehensive examination of normalization, gene selection and clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Cluster analysis, and in particular hierarchical clustering, is widely used to extract information from gene expression data. The aim is to discover new classes, or sub-classes, of either individuals or genes. Performing a cluster analysis commonly involve decisions on how to; handle missing values, standardize the data and select genes. In addition, pre-processing, involving various types of filtration and normalization procedures, can have an effect on the ability to discover biologically relevant classes. Here we consider cluster analysis in a broad sense and perform a comprehensive evaluation that covers several aspects of cluster analyses, including normalization. Result We evaluated 2780 cluster analysis methods on seven publicly available 2-channel microarray data sets with common reference designs. Each cluster analysis method differed in data normalization (5 normalizations were considered), missing value imputation (2), standardization of data (2), gene selection (19) or clustering method (11). The cluster analyses are evaluated using known classes, such as cancer types, and the adjusted Rand index. The performances of the different analyses vary between the data sets and it is difficult to give general recommendations. However, normalization, gene selection and clustering method are all variables that have a significant impact on the performance. In particular, gene selection is important and it is generally necessary to include a relatively large number of genes in order to get good performance. Selecting genes with high standard deviation or using principal component analysis are shown to be the preferred gene selection methods. Hierarchical clustering using Ward's method, k-means clustering and Mclust are the clustering methods considered in this paper that achieves the highest adjusted Rand. Normalization can have a significant positive impact on the ability to cluster individuals, and there are indications that background correction is

  13. Challenges in microarray class discovery: a comprehensive examination of normalization, gene selection and clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landfors Mattias

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster analysis, and in particular hierarchical clustering, is widely used to extract information from gene expression data. The aim is to discover new classes, or sub-classes, of either individuals or genes. Performing a cluster analysis commonly involve decisions on how to; handle missing values, standardize the data and select genes. In addition, pre-processing, involving various types of filtration and normalization procedures, can have an effect on the ability to discover biologically relevant classes. Here we consider cluster analysis in a broad sense and perform a comprehensive evaluation that covers several aspects of cluster analyses, including normalization. Result We evaluated 2780 cluster analysis methods on seven publicly available 2-channel microarray data sets with common reference designs. Each cluster analysis method differed in data normalization (5 normalizations were considered, missing value imputation (2, standardization of data (2, gene selection (19 or clustering method (11. The cluster analyses are evaluated using known classes, such as cancer types, and the adjusted Rand index. The performances of the different analyses vary between the data sets and it is difficult to give general recommendations. However, normalization, gene selection and clustering method are all variables that have a significant impact on the performance. In particular, gene selection is important and it is generally necessary to include a relatively large number of genes in order to get good performance. Selecting genes with high standard deviation or using principal component analysis are shown to be the preferred gene selection methods. Hierarchical clustering using Ward's method, k-means clustering and Mclust are the clustering methods considered in this paper that achieves the highest adjusted Rand. Normalization can have a significant positive impact on the ability to cluster individuals, and there are indications that

  14. Xenon contrast CT-CBF scanning of the brain differentiates normal age-related changes from multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Shaw, T.G.; Kandula, P.; Rogers, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and partition coefficients (L lambda) were measured during inhalation of stable xenon gas with serial CT scanning among normal volunteers (N . 15), individuals with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N . 10), and persons with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, N . 8). Mean gray matter flow values were reduced in both MID and SDAT. Age-related declines in LCBF values in normals were marked in frontal cortex and basal ganglia. LCBF values were decreased beyond normals in frontal and temporal cortices and thalamus in MID and SDAT, in basal ganglia only in MID. Unlike SDAT and age-matched normals, L lambda values were reduced in fronto-temporal cortex and thalamus in MID. Multifocal nature of lesions in MID was apparent. Coefficients of variation for LCBFs were greater in MID compared with SDAT and/or age-matched normals

  15. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M.K.A.; Bakar, K.A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A.W; Saripan, M.I.; Bradley, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose. - Highlights: • Using TLD-100 dosimeters and a RANDO phantom 5 CT thorax protocol organ doses were assessed. • The specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation of protocols differed with approach. • Organ dose was observed to decrease in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. • E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, lower by ~8% compared to the universal k factor.

  16. Radiation dose evaluation in tomosynthesis and C-arm cone-beam CT examinations with an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shuji; Aoyama, Takahiko; Oda, Nobuhiro; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate organ dose and the effective dose to patients undergoing tomosynthesis (TS) and C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations and to compare the doses to those in multidetector CT (MDCT) scans. Patient doses were measured with small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, 48 in number, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. The doses in head, chest, abdomen, and hip-joint TS, and in head and abdomen C-arm CBCT were evaluated for routine protocols on Shimadzu TS and C-arm CBCT systems, and the doses in MDCT with the same scan regions as in TS and CBCT were on Toshiba 64-detector-row CT scanners. In TS examination of the head, chest, abdomen, and hip-joint, organ doses for organs within scan ranges were 1-4 mGy, and effective doses were 0.07 mSv for the head scan and around 1 mSv for other scans. In C-arm CBCT examinations of the head and abdomen, organ doses within scan range were 2-37 mGy, and effective doses were 1.2 mSv for the head scan and 4-5 mSv for abdominal scans. Effective doses in TS examinations were approximately a factor of 10 lower, while the doses in CBCT examinations were nearly the same level, compared to the doses in the corresponding MDCT examinations. TS examinations with low doses and excellent resolutions in coronal images compared to recent MDCT would widely be used in tomographic examinations of the chest, abdomen, pelvis, skeletal-joints, and knee instead of MDCT examinations with significantly high doses. Since patient dose in C-arm CBCT was nearly the same level as that in recent MDCT, the same consideration for high radiation dose would be required for the use of CBCT.

  17. Safety and patient comfort with iodixanol: a postmarketing surveillance study in 9515 patients undergoing diagnostic CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeussler, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Iodinated radiographic contrast media are considered safe diagnostic drugs with a low incidence of adverse drug reactions. Purpose: To determine prospectively the incidence and nature of immediate and delayed adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of iodixanol for contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in routine practice in nonselected patients, and to assess patient comfort (pain and sensations of heat or coldness). Material and Methods: Patient characteristics (including demographics, risk factors, indication for CT, and status of the vein used to administer iodixanol) and aspects of iodixanol administration (including dose and volume) were documented on a standardized case report form. Patients were asked to report immediate (during the visit) or delayed (occurring up to 7 days after administration of iodixanol) adverse reactions; those deemed related or possibly related to iodixanol were documented on a standardized adverse drug reaction form. Discomfort was rated by patients on a scale of 0-10 for pain, heat, and coldness; individual scores were combined into a composite score (0-30). Results: Evaluable documentation was provided for 9515 patients in 77 centers across Germany. Adverse drug reactions were reported in 70 patients (0.74%), including hypersensitivity reactions in 55 patients. Thirty patients experienced immediate reactions and 40 experienced delayed reactions. Serious adverse drug reactions were evident in five patients (0.05%). Patients with allergic diathesis appeared to be at increased risk of immediate and delayed adverse drug reactions. Discomfort was generally mild, with 72% of patients reporting a composite score of 0-3. Conclusion: In the outpatient setting, where it is often difficult to properly assess patients for specific risk factors, it was reassuring that iodixanol demonstrated an excellent safety profile in over 9500 patients undergoing diagnostic CT examinations. There were no unexpected serious

  18. Examining the subcortical infarcts in the era of acute multimodality CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy Tan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lacunar infarcts have been characterized as small subcortical infarcts, resulting from in situ microatheroma or lipohyalinosis in small vessels. Based on this hypothesis, such infarcts should not be associated with large areas of perfusion deficits extending beyond subcortical regions to involve cortical regions. By contrast, selected small subcortical infarcts, as defined by MR imaging in the subacute or chronic stage, may initially have large perfusion deficits or related large vessel occlusions. These infarcts with ‘lacunar’ phenotype may also be caused by disease in the parent vessel and may have very different stroke mechanisms from small vessel disease. Our aim was to describe differences in imaging characteristics between patients with small subcortical infarction with ‘lacunar phenotype’ from those with lacunar mechanism. Methods: Patients undergoing acute CT Perfusion/angiography (CTP/CTA within 6 hours of symptom onset and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for ischaemic stroke were included (2009-2013. A lacunar infarct was defined as a single subcortical infarct (SSI ≤20 mm on follow-up MRI. Presence of perfusion deficits, vessel occlusion and infarct dimensions were compared between lacunar infarcts and other topographical infarct types. Results: Overall, 182 patients (mean age 66.4±15.3 years, 66% male were included. SSI occurred in 31 (17% patients. Of these, 12 (39% patients had a perfusion deficit compared with those with any cortical infarction (120/142, 67%, and the smallest SSI with a perfusion deficit had a diameter of <5mm. The majority of patients with SSI (8/12, 66.7% had a relevant vessel occlusion. A quarter of SSIs had a large-artery stroke mechanism evident on acute CTP/CTA. Lacunar mechanism was present in 3/8 patients with corona radiata, 5/10 lentiform nucleus, 5/6 posterior limb of internal capsule PLIC, 3/5 thalamic infarcts and 1/2 miscellaneous locations. There was a trend toward

  19. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B; Grossbach, A; Gruber-Rouh, T; Zangos, S; Vogl, Th J; Eichler, K

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26-292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic errors and additional need for CT. Instead, a single abdominal low

  20. Image quality and age-specific dose estimation in head and chest CT examinations with organ-based tube-current modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Yamauchi, M; Imai, K; Ikeda, M; Aoyama, T

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an organ-based tube-current modulation (OBTCM) system on image quality and age-specific dose in head and chest CT examinations. Image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image entropy were assessed using statistical and entropy analyses. Radiation doses for newborn, 6-y-old child and adult phantoms were measured with in-phantom dosimetry systems. The quality of CT images obtained with OBTCM was not different from that obtained without OBTCM. In head CT scans, the eye lens dose decreased by 20-33 % using OBTCM. In chest CT scans, breast dose decreased by 5-32 % using OBTCM. Posterior skin dose, however, increased by 11-20 % using OBTCM in head and chest CT scans. The reduction of effective dose using OBTCM was negligibly small. Detailed image quality and dose information provided in this study can be effectively used for OBTCM application.

  1. Radiation dose from X-ray examinations of impacted canines: cone beam CT vs two-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadesjö, Nils; Lynds, Randi; Nilsson, Mats; Shi, Xie-Qi

    2018-02-01

    To compare the radiation dose to children examined for impacted canines, using two-dimensional (2D) examinations (panoramic and periapical radiographs) and cone beam CT (CBCT). Organ doses were determined using an anthropomorphic 10-year-old child phantom. Two CBCT devices, a ProMax3D and a NewTom5G, were examined using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For the panoramic radiograph, a Promax device was used and for periapical radiographs, a Prostyle device with a ProSensor digital sensor was used. Both the panoramic and the intraoral devices were examined using Gafchromic-QR2 dosimetric film placed between the phantom slices. ProMax3D and NewTom5G resulted in an effective dose of 88 µSv and 170 µSv respectively. A panoramic radiograph resulted in an effective dose of 4.1 µSv, while a periapical radiograph resulted in an effective dose of 0.6 µSv and 0.7 µSv using a maxillary lateral projection and central maxillary incisor projection respectively. The effective dose from CBCT ranged from 140 times higher dose (NewTom5G compared to two periapical radiographs) to 15 times higher dose (ProMax3D compared to three periapical and one panoramic radiograph) than a 2D examination.

  2. SU-F-P-45: Clinical Experience with Radiation Dose Reduction of CT Examinations Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V [Baylor Scott and White Healthcare System, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, J [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have been adopted by medical centers in the past several years. IR has a potential to substantially reduce patient dose while maintaining or improving image quality. This study characterizes dose reductions in clinical settings for CT examinations using IR. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed dose information from patients who underwent abdomen/pelvis CT examinations with and without contrast media in multiple locations of our Healthcare system. A total of 743 patients scanned with ASIR on 64 slice GE lightspeed VCTs at three sites, and 30 patients scanned with SAFIRE on a Siemens 128 slice Definition Flash in one site was retrieved. For comparison, patient data (n=291) from a GE scanner and patient data (n=61) from two Siemens scanners where filtered back-projection (FBP) was used was collected retrospectively. 30% and 10% ASIR, and SAFIRE Level 2 was used. CTDIvol, Dose-length-product (DLP), weight and height from all patients was recorded. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated accordingly. To convert CTDIvol to SSDE, AP and lateral dimensions at the mid-liver level was measured for each patient. Results: Compared with FBP, 30% ASIR reduces dose by 44.1% (SSDE: 12.19mGy vs. 21.83mGy), while 10% ASIR reduced dose by 20.6% (SSDE 17.32mGy vs. 21.83). Use of SAFIRE reduced dose by 61.4% (SSDE: 8.77mGy vs. 22.7mGy). The geometric mean for patients scanned with ASIR was larger than for patients scanned with FBP (geometric mean is 297.48 mmm vs. 284.76 mm). The same trend was observed for the Siemens scanner where SAFIRE was used (geometric mean: 316 mm with SAFIRE vs. 239 mm with FBP). Patient size differences suggest that further dose reduction is possible. Conclusion: Our data confirmed that in clinical practice IR can significantly reduce dose to patients who undergo CT examinations, while meeting diagnostic requirements for image quality.

  3. Scapholunate kinematics of asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists using four-dimensional CT examinations: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demehri, Shadpour; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Morelli, John N.; Thakur, Uma; Eng, John [Johns Hopkins University, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lifchez, Scott D.; Shores, Jaimie T. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Means, Kenneth R. [MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, The Curtis National Hand Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Using four-dimensional CT scan (4DCT), we aimed at showing the kinematics of scapholunate (SL) interval in asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists with inconclusive radiographic findings. This is an IRB approved, HIPPA compliant, retrospective study. Patients suspected of SL interosseous ligament (SLIL) injuries were referred for further evaluation of chronic wrist pain (>3 months). Twelve wrists (11 subjects) with chronic symptoms and inconclusive plain radiographs and 10 asymptomatic wrists (in 10 different subjects) were scanned using 4DCT. The minimum SL interval was measured during three wrist motions: relaxed-to-clenched fist, flexion-to-extension, and radial-to-ulnar-deviation. Changes were recorded using double-oblique multiplanar reformation technique. We extracted the normal limits of the SL interval as measured by dynamic CT scanning during active motion in asymptomatic wrists. In asymptomatic wrists, the average SL interval was observed to be smaller than 1 mm during all motions. In symptomatic wrists, during exams performed with clenched fist (SL interval (mean ± SD) = 2.53 ± 1.19 mm), extension (2.54 ± 1.48 mm) or ulnar deviation (2.06 ± 1.12 mm), the average SL interval was more than 2 mm. In contrast to symptomatic wrists, no significant change in SL interval measurements was detected during wrist motions in asymptomatic wrists. There was a mild to moderate correlation between SL interval change and presence/absence of symptoms (point-biserial correlation coefficients: 0.29-0.55). In patients with wrist pain suspicious for SLIL injury and inconclusive radiographs, SL interval increase can be detected with 4DCT in the symptomatic wrist compared to the asymptomatic wrist. (orig.)

  4. Research and development of the system for group examination of lung cancer by helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    For the ultimate purpose of heavy particle therapy of lung cancer at an early stage, the system in the title with low dose radiation has been investigated by cooperation of NIRS (as a leading part) and medical/industrial facilities all over the country. The project started essentially in 1984 and has been continuing at 2003. This book described Results hitherto and Materials for application to medical care at disaster (Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster in 1995) together with reference materials. Results contain all fields of nuclear medicine and of imaging involved in examination/diagnosis of lung cancer, achieved by NIRS, by Health management center and Faculty of Medicine, Chiba University and Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association in Chiba, by the 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Fac. Med., Chiba Univ., by Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, by Nippon Med. School, Arakawa-ku cancer protection center and Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. of Health Sciences, by Hitachi health management center, by Fukui Med. College, by Hitachi Medical Corp., by NTT research laboratories, and by Toyohashi Univ. of Technology. The Materials involve Process and summary of conducting the medical care activities, Improvement of the examination automobile, Supplementary equipments and measures for legal problems, System for the medical care activities, Record of the examination automobile activities, Problems in future, and Completion of the medical activities. Reference materials are related with the Materials above. (N.I.)

  5. CT number of the fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroko; Kawai, Takeshi; Kanasaki, Yoshiki; Akagi, Hiroaki

    1981-01-01

    This report is studied on CT number and CT images of the eight cases with fatty liver. Five of these cases showed the reversal of densities of the liver and vessels. In these cases, the diagnoses of the fatty liver were easible. In other cases, the diagnoses were possible only by comparison of the CT number of the liver and spleen because the CT number of normal liver were higher than those of the spleen. In the results which we examined the correlation of the CT number and specific gravities of the blood, normal saline, distilled water, mayonnaise, eatable iol, ethyl alcohol and lard, we observed the linear relationship between CT number and specific gravities. And so, we think that the diagnosis of the fatty liver and the degree of fatty infiltration can be guessed by the CT number of the liver and spleen. (author)

  6. Nondestructive Analysis of Apollo Samples by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis: A PET Style Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    An integral part of any sample return mission is the initial description and classification of returned samples by the preliminary examination team (PET). The goal of a PET is to characterize and classify the returned samples, making this information available to the general research community who can then conduct more in-depth studies on the samples. A PET strives to minimize the impact their work has on the sample suite, which often limits the PET work to largely visual measurements and observations like optical microscopy. More modern techniques can also be utilized by future PET to nondestructively characterize astromaterials in a more rigorous way. Here we present our recent analyses of Apollo samples 14321 and 14305 by micro-CT and micro-XRF (respectively), assess the potential for discovery of "new" Apollo samples for scientific study, and evaluate the usefulness of these techniques in future PET efforts.

  7. Normal Lung Quantification in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Pattern: The Impact of Threshold-based Volumetric CT Analysis for the Staging of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Ohkubo

    Full Text Available Although several computer-aided computed tomography (CT analysis methods have been reported to objectively assess the disease severity and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, it is unclear which method is most practical. A universal severity classification system has not yet been adopted for IPF.The purpose of this study was to test the correlation between quantitative-CT indices and lung physiology variables and to determine the ability of such indices to predict disease severity in IPF.A total of 27 IPF patients showing radiological UIP pattern on high-resolution (HR CT were retrospectively enrolled. Staging of IPF was performed according to two classification systems: the Japanese and GAP (gender, age, and physiology staging systems. CT images were assessed using a commercially available CT imaging analysis workstation, and the whole-lung mean CT value (MCT, the normally attenuated lung volume as defined from -950 HU to -701 Hounsfield unit (NL, the volume of the whole lung (WL, and the percentage of NL to WL (NL%, were calculated.CT indices (MCT, WL, and NL closely correlated with lung physiology variables. Among them, NL strongly correlated with forced vital capacity (FVC (r = 0.92, P <0.0001. NL% showed a large area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detecting patients in the moderate or advanced stages of IPF. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that NL% is significantly more useful than the percentages of predicted FVC and predicted diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (Japanese stage II/III/IV [odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence intervals (CI, 0.48 to 0.92; P < 0.01]; III/IV [odds ratio. 0.80; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.96; P < 0.01]; GAP stage II/III [odds ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.97; P < 0.05].The measurement of NL% by threshold-based volumetric CT analysis may help improve IPF staging.

  8. Upper gastrointestinal examinations: a radiographic study of clinically normal Beagle puppies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyabayashi, T.; Morgan, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 24 upper gastrointestinal examinations were performed on four weanling beagle puppies over six weeks, using liquid barium (10 ml/kg body weight of 60 per cent w/v barium sulphate suspension] and barium food (8 g/kg of crushed kibble dog food and 7 ml/kg body weight of 60 per cent w/v barium sulphate suspension) as contrast media. The radiographic appearance was similar to that noted in adult dogs except for the consistent location of the pylorus on or near the midline. Duodenal pseudoulcers were seen more often with liquid barium and the caecal shadows were identified more often with the longer examination time with barium food. The stomach of the puppies appeared to have discriminatory emptying function; that is, semi-solid food was emptied from the stomach at a slower rate (210 to 450 minutes) than liquid (60 to 90 minutes). Solid meals emptied faster in puppies than in adult dogs. Dosages of 13 to 15 mg/kg body weight for the liquid barium examination and 14 g of ground kibble and 16 ml of barium sulphate suspension per m2 of body surface area for the barium food examination are suggested as more appropriate for contrast studies in puppies

  9. CSF gusher in cochlear implantation: The risk of missing CT evidence of a cochlear base defect in the presence of otherwise normal cochlear anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabbarzade, Cavid; Sennaroglu, Levent; Süslü, Nilda

    2015-07-01

    Intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakages from the cochleostomy site - known as gushers - are a serious complication of cochlear implantation surgery in cases of congenital deafness. They occur as the result of abnormal communication between CSF in the internal auditory canal and perilymph in the cochlea. Gushers are well recognized as occurring in a proportion of cases in which there is a clearly visible congenital malformation of the cochlea. In this report, we describe two cases in which pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scanning of the cochlea was initially reported as normal but gushers occurred during cochlear implant surgery. In both cases, more detailed review of the CT scans (peroperatively in the first case, pre-operatively in the second case) showed a defect at the cochlear base, in the absence of any other cochlear malformation. The aim of this paper is to draw attention to the risk of missing this abnormality and to encourage careful inspection of the cochlear base on CT scans in all cases, even when the rest of the cochlear appears normal.

  10. Normal Anatomical Features and Variations of the Vertebrobasilar Circulation and Its Branches: An Analysis with 64-Detector Row CT and 3T MR Angiographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Veysel; Bozkurt, Yalcin; Hamcan, Salih; Sari, Sebahattin; Akgun, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the normal anatomical features and variations of the vertebrobasilar circulation and its branches in patients who underwent multidetector computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiographies of the brain. Methods. 135 patients (male, 83 and female, 52; mean age, 50.1 years) who underwent CT (n = 71) or MR (n = 64) angiographies of the vertebrobasilar vasculature for various reasons were analyzed retrospectively. The right and left distal vertebral arteries (VAs), posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICAs), anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICAs), superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs), posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs), and posterior communicating arteries (PCoAs) were analyzed individually. Results. In 24.4% of the cases (33/135) right PICA, in 19.3% of the cases (26/135) left PICA, in 17.8% of the cases (24/135) right AICA, and in 18.5% of the cases (25/135) left AICA were absent. In cases without PICA or AICA, there was a statistically significant, moderately or well-developed AICA or PICA on the same side, respectively (P < 0.001). The most common variation was isolated absence of right PICA and was seen in 17.8% of the cases. Conclusions. The anatomic features of the branches of the vertebrobasilar circulation may be different from well-known normal anatomy. CT and MR angiographies allow a precise and detailed evaluation of vertebrobasilar circulation. PMID:24023533

  11. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - a potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M

    2011-01-01

    Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose....

  12. The influence of genistein on free radicals in normal dermal fibroblasts and keloid fibroblasts examined by EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurzak, Magdalena; Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Normal and keloid fibroblasts were examined using X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The effect of genistein on the concentration of free radicals in both normal dermal and keloid fibroblasts after ultraviolet irradiation was investigated. The highest concentration of free radicals was seen in keloid fibroblasts, with normal fibroblasts containing a lower concentration. The concentration of free radicals in both normal and keloid fibroblasts was altered in a concentration-dependent manner by the presence of genistein. The change in intra-cellular free radical concentration after the ultraviolet irradiation of both normal and keloid fibroblasts is also discussed. The antioxidant properties of genistein, using its 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging activity as a model, were tested, and the effect of ultraviolet irradiation on its interaction with free radicals was examined. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of DPPH showed quenching by genistein. The interaction of genistein with DPPH free radicals in the absence of ultraviolet irradiation was shown to be slow, but this interaction was much faster under ultraviolet irradiation. Ultraviolet irradiation enhanced the free radical-scavenging activity of genistein.

  13. CT and MR imaging of the kidney and adrenal glands: CT of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, E.

    1987-01-01

    Because of its high diagnostic yield, safety, and cost-effectiveness, CT has become a major imaging technique for evaluating the kidney. CT is highly accurate for determining the nature and extent of renal masses, and this has become the main indication for renal CT. However, CT is also valuable in assessing patients with renal cystic disease, trauma, inflammatory disease, infarction, hemorrhage and hydronephrosis of unknown cause. This presentation reviews the normal CT anatomy of the kidneys and the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis of all these conditions. Examination techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on avoiding diagnostic pitfalls and tailoring the examination to the nature of the clinical problem. CT findings in various renal disorders are compared with those of other imaging techniques, particularly US and angiography, and the place of CT in the diagnostic approach to these disorders is considered

  14. CT slice proximity rotary table and elevator for examining large objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastronardi, R.; DeCew, A.; McMahon, D.

    1984-01-01

    In a Computerized Tomography system for examining large objects, e.g. rocket motors, the problem of avoiding errors due to the heavy load is met by a support structure comprising a large bearing and an elongated cup-like support attached to the inner race of the bearing and extending coaxially away from the bearing for supporting the object and for rotating that object about the axis of the bearing. Spacers or an elevator are provided adjacent the bottom of the support for selectively translating the object along said axis. An X-ray source is positioned to beam X-rays through the object at a diametral plane closely adjacent to one face of the bearing, and a detector is provided to determine the X-ray opacity of a slice of said object closely adjacent to the bearing. The source and detector, or alternatively the bearing and cup-like support, are mounted for translation in a direction transverse to the beam direction. The support structure may be oriented vertically within a pit located below the floor of a building structure, with the bearing, source and detector being located above the floor. (author)

  15. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  16. Discrepancy in reporting among specialist registrars and the role of a paediatric neuroradiologist in reporting paediatric CT head examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraja, S.; Ullah, Q.; Lee, K.J.; Bickle, I.; Hon, L.Q.; Griffiths, P.D.; Raghavan, A.; Flynn, P.; Connolly, D.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the discrepancy rate among specialist registrars (SPR) to assess whether seniority had a bearing on the discrepancy rate. To investigate which were the commonly missed abnormalities and the consequences for teaching purposes. To investigate the role of a specialist consultant neuroradiologist in reporting paediatric head computed tomography examinations. Materials and methods: The study was carried out over a 9-month period at the regional paediatric hospital during which time 270 CT head examinations were reported. Reporting in the department is carried out by one of the five general paediatric radiologists (GR) and also a specialist paediatric neuroradiologist (NR). The NR was considered the reference standard, who corroborated in areas of discrepancy with a second senior NR for this study. Of the 270 examinations, 260 were reported by the paediatric NR, 160 were reported by the SPR, GR, and NR, and 51 were reported by an SPR and the NR. In addition, four were reported by the GR and the NR, 45 by the NR only, seven by the GR only, and three cases were reported by the GR and an SPR. The discrepancy rates were calculated for GR versus NR, and SPR versus NR. All the discrepancies were re-evaluated by a second senior NR and confirmed in all cases. The reports of the SPR were further scrutinized. The trainees of training years 1-3 were considered junior and 4-5 were considered senior. Results: There was a discrepancy in 26/164 cases (15.9%) reported by the GR and NR. There was a discrepancy in 59/211 cases (28%) reported by an SPR and NR. The chi-squared test (two-sided) showed a significant difference (p = 0.005) between the two groups. There was a discrepancy in 36/118 cases (30.5%) reported by the junior SPR and NR. There was a discrepancy in 23/93 cases (24.7%) reported by a senior SPR and NR. The chi-squared test (two-sided) showed a non-significant difference (p = 0.353) between the two groups. Conclusion: The performance of the SPR was

  17. When overweight is the normal weight: an examination of obesity using a social media internet database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Kuebler

    Full Text Available Using a large social media database, Yahoo Answers, we explored postings to an online forum in which posters asked whether their height and weight qualify themselves as "skinny," "thin," "fat," or "obese" over time and across forum topics. We used these data to better understand whether a higher-than-average body mass index (BMI in one's county might, in some ways, be protective for one's mental and physical health. For instance, we explored whether higher proportions of obese people in one's county predicts lower levels of bullying or "am I fat?" questions from those with a normal BMI relative to his/her actual BMI. Most women asking whether they were themselves fat/obese were not actually fat/obese. Both men and women who were actually overweight/obese were significantly more likely in the future to ask for advice about bullying than thinner individuals. Moreover, as mean county-level BMI increased, bullying decreased and then increased again (in a U-shape curve. Regardless of where they lived, posters who asked "am I fat?" who had a BMI in the healthy range were more likely than other posters to subsequently post on health problems, but the proportions of such posters also declined greatly as county-level BMI increased. Our findings suggest that obese people residing in counties with higher levels of BMI may have better physical and mental health than obese people living in counties with lower levels of BMI by some measures, but these improvements are modest.

  18. Thin-section CT in the examination of cervical disc herniation. A prospective study with 1-mm axial and helical images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkko, E. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland); Laehde, S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland); Heiskari, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    1996-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to determine whether thin-section high-resolution CT imaging could replace MR imaging and/or myelography in preoperative evaluation of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. A total of 120 patients, referred for cervical myelography (n=107) or MR imaging (n=13), were further examined with 1-mm non-contrast CT of the suspected disc space, including at least the next cephalic and caudal interspaces. Thirty-seven patients underwent Cloward`s operation, at which 32 were found to have disc herniation. The sensitivities of CT (n=37), myelography (n=29), and MR imaging (n=8) were 66%, 84%, and 86%, respectively. The corresponding figures for false-positives were 8%, 10%, and 13%. Artefacts caused by wide shoulders in the 1-mm CT images were estimated to have contributed to a false-negative finding in 8 cases. The remaining 3 false-negatives were retrospectively considered evaluation errors. The true-positive CT findings usually presented with a local disc bulge measuring over 80 HU in density. Local ligamentous hypertropy presented an indistinguishable finding in 3 cases, yielding false-positive CT findings. Conventional thin-section CT is considered a usable alternative for the evaluation of suspected cervical disc herniations in selected patients. Stocky patients with wide shoulders and a short neck are not suitable candidates, even when new generation equipment is available. (orig.).

  19. Thin-section CT in the examination of cervical disc herniation. A prospective study with 1-mm axial and helical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkko, E.; Laehde, S.; Heiskari, M.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to determine whether thin-section high-resolution CT imaging could replace MR imaging and/or myelography in preoperative evaluation of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. A total of 120 patients, referred for cervical myelography (n=107) or MR imaging (n=13), were further examined with 1-mm non-contrast CT of the suspected disc space, including at least the next cephalic and caudal interspaces. Thirty-seven patients underwent Cloward's operation, at which 32 were found to have disc herniation. The sensitivities of CT (n=37), myelography (n=29), and MR imaging (n=8) were 66%, 84%, and 86%, respectively. The corresponding figures for false-positives were 8%, 10%, and 13%. Artefacts caused by wide shoulders in the 1-mm CT images were estimated to have contributed to a false-negative finding in 8 cases. The remaining 3 false-negatives were retrospectively considered evaluation errors. The true-positive CT findings usually presented with a local disc bulge measuring over 80 HU in density. Local ligamentous hypertropy presented an indistinguishable finding in 3 cases, yielding false-positive CT findings. Conventional thin-section CT is considered a usable alternative for the evaluation of suspected cervical disc herniations in selected patients. Stocky patients with wide shoulders and a short neck are not suitable candidates, even when new generation equipment is available. (orig.)

  20. Contrasting the Role of xCT and GLT-1 Upregulation in the Ability of Ceftriaxone to Attenuate the Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Cocaine Seeking and Normalize AMPA Receptor Subunit Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCrosse, Amber L; O'Donovan, Sinead M; Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T; McCullumsmith, Robert E; Reissner, Kathryn J; Schwendt, Marek; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2017-06-14

    Long-term treatment with ceftriaxone attenuates the reinstatement of cocaine seeking while increasing the function of the glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and system xC- (Sxc) in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc). Sxc contributes the majority of nonsynaptic extracellular glutamate in the NAc, while GLT-1 is responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake. Here we used antisense to decrease the expression of GLT-1 and xCT (a catalytic subunit of Sxc) to determine the relative importance of both proteins in mediating the ability of ceftriaxone to prevent cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking and normalize glutamatergic proteins in the NAc of rats. Intra-NAc xCT knockdown prevented ceftriaxone from attenuating reinstatement and from upregulating GLT-1 and resulted in increased surface expression of AMPA receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2. Intra-NAc GLT-1 knockdown also prevented ceftriaxone from attenuating reinstatement and from upregulating xCT expression, without affecting GluA1 and GluA2 expression. In the absence of cocaine or ceftriaxone treatment, xCT knockdown in the NAc increased the expression of both GluA1 and GluA2 without affecting GLT-1 expression while GLT-1 knockdown had no effect. PCR and immunoprecipitation of GLT-1 revealed that ceftriaxone does not upregulate GLT-1 and xCT through a transcriptional mechanism, and their coregulation by ceftriaxone is not mediated by physical interaction. These data support important and distinct roles for xCT and GLT-1 in the actions of ceftriaxone and add to a body of literature finding evidence for coregulation of these transporters. Our results also point to xCT expression and subsequent basal glutamate levels as being a key mediator of AMPA receptor expression in the NAc. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ceftriaxone attenuates the reinstatement of cocaine, alcohol, and heroin seeking. The mechanism of action of this behavioral effect has been attributed to glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and xCT (a catalytic subunit

  1. Integrated FDG-PET/CT vs. standard radiological examinations: Comparison of capability for assessment of postoperative recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Daisuke; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Nogami, Munenobu; Onishi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Keiko; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively and directly compare diagnostic capabilities of whole-body integrated FDG-PET/CT and standard radiologic examination for assessment of recurrence in postoperative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Materials and methods: A total of 92 consecutive pathologically diagnosed NSCLC patients (65 males, 27 females; mean age, 71 years) underwent pathologically and surgically proven complete resection, followed by prospective whole-body FDG-PET/CT and standard radiological examinations. Final diagnosis of recurrence was based on the results of more than 1 year of follow-up and/or pathological examinations. On both methods, the probability of recurrence was assessed in each patient by using a five-point visual scoring system, and the each final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. Kappa analyses were performed to determine inter-observer agreement for both methods, and ROC analyses were used to compare capability of the two methods for assessment of postoperative recurrence on a per-patient basis. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were also compared between PET/CT and standard radiological examination by means of McNemar's test. Results: All inter-observer agreements were almost perfect (integrated PET/CT: κ = 0.89; standard radiological examination: κ = 0.81). There were no statistically significant differences in area under the curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy between integrated FDG-PET/CT and standard radiologic examinations (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Integrated FDG-PET/CT can be used for assessment of postoperative recurrence in NSCLC patients with accuracy as good as that of standard radiological examinations.

  2. Normalized Mini-Mental State Examination for assessing cognitive change in population-based brain aging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, Viviane; Amieva, Hélène; Andrieu, Sandrine; Dufouil, Carole; Berr, Claudine; Dartigues, Jean-François; Jacqmin-Gadda, Hélène; Proust-Lima, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is widely used in population-based longitudinal studies to quantify cognitive change. However, its poor metrological properties, mainly ceiling/floor effects and varying sensitivity to change, have largely restricted its usefulness. We propose a normalizing transformation that corrects these properties, and makes possible the use of standard statistical methods to analyze change in MMSE scores. The normalizing transformation designed to correct at best the metrological properties of MMSE was estimated and validated on two population-based studies (n = 4,889, 20-year follow-up) by cross-validation. The transformation was also validated on two external studies with heterogeneous samples mixing normal and pathological aging, and samples including only demented subjects. The normalizing transformation provided correct inference in contrast with models analyzing the change in crude MMSE that most often lead to biased estimates of risk factors and incorrect conclusions. Cognitive change can be easily and properly assessed with the normalized MMSE using standard statistical methods such as linear (mixed) models. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Experimental and imaging techniques for examining fibrin clot structures in normal and diseased states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Natalie K; Keegan, Philip M; Platt, Manu O; Averett, Rodney D

    2015-04-01

    Fibrin is an extracellular matrix protein that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of blood clots. Much research has been done on fibrin in the past years to include the investigation of synthesis, structure-function, and lysis of clots. However, there is still much unknown about the morphological and structural features of clots that ensue from patients with disease. In this research study, experimental techniques are presented that allow for the examination of morphological differences of abnormal clot structures due to diseased states such as diabetes and sickle cell anemia. Our study focuses on the preparation and evaluation of fibrin clots in order to assess morphological differences using various experimental assays and confocal microscopy. In addition, a method is also described that allows for continuous, real-time calculation of lysis rates in fibrin clots. The techniques described herein are important for researchers and clinicians seeking to elucidate comorbid thrombotic pathologies such as myocardial infarctions, ischemic heart disease, and strokes in patients with diabetes or sickle cell disease.

  4. Normative values for CT-based texture analysis of vertebral bodies in dual X-ray absorptiometry-confirmed, normally mineralized subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannil, Manoj; Eberhard, Matthias; Becker, Anton S.; Alkadhi, Hatem; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Schoenenberg, Denise; Osterhoff, Georg [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Frey, Diana P. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland); Konukoglu, Ender [Computer Vision Laboratory, Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-11-15

    To develop age-, gender-, and regional-specific normative values for texture analysis (TA) of spinal computed tomography (CT) in subjects with normal bone mineral density (BMD), as defined by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to determine age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences. In this retrospective, IRB-approved study, TA was performed on sagittal CT bone images of the thoracic and lumbar spine using dedicated software (MaZda) in 141 individuals with normal DXA BMD findings. Numbers of female and male subjects were balanced in each of six age decades. Three hundred and five TA features were analyzed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae using free-hand regions-of-interest. Intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficients were calculated for determining intra- and inter-observer agreement of each feature. Further dimension reduction was performed with correlation analyses. The TA features with an ICC < 0.81 indicating compromised intra- and inter-observer agreement and with Pearson correlation scores r > 0.8 with other features were excluded from further analysis for dimension reduction. From the remaining 31 texture features, a significant correlation with age was found for the features mean (r = -0.489, p < 0.001), variance (r = -0.681, p < 0.001), kurtosis (r = 0.273, p < 0.001), and WavEnLL{sub s}4 (r = 0.273, p < 0.001). Significant differences were found between genders for various higher-level texture features (p < 0.001). Regional differences among the thoracic spine, thoracic-lumbar junction, and lumbar spine were found for most TA features (p < 0.021). This study established normative values of TA features on CT images of the spine and showed age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences in individuals with normal BMD as defined by DXA. (orig.)

  5. Normative values for CT-based texture analysis of vertebral bodies in dual X-ray absorptiometry-confirmed, normally mineralized subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannil, Manoj; Eberhard, Matthias; Becker, Anton S.; Alkadhi, Hatem; Guggenberger, Roman; Schoenenberg, Denise; Osterhoff, Georg; Frey, Diana P.; Konukoglu, Ender

    2017-01-01

    To develop age-, gender-, and regional-specific normative values for texture analysis (TA) of spinal computed tomography (CT) in subjects with normal bone mineral density (BMD), as defined by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to determine age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences. In this retrospective, IRB-approved study, TA was performed on sagittal CT bone images of the thoracic and lumbar spine using dedicated software (MaZda) in 141 individuals with normal DXA BMD findings. Numbers of female and male subjects were balanced in each of six age decades. Three hundred and five TA features were analyzed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae using free-hand regions-of-interest. Intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficients were calculated for determining intra- and inter-observer agreement of each feature. Further dimension reduction was performed with correlation analyses. The TA features with an ICC < 0.81 indicating compromised intra- and inter-observer agreement and with Pearson correlation scores r > 0.8 with other features were excluded from further analysis for dimension reduction. From the remaining 31 texture features, a significant correlation with age was found for the features mean (r = -0.489, p < 0.001), variance (r = -0.681, p < 0.001), kurtosis (r = 0.273, p < 0.001), and WavEnLL s 4 (r = 0.273, p < 0.001). Significant differences were found between genders for various higher-level texture features (p < 0.001). Regional differences among the thoracic spine, thoracic-lumbar junction, and lumbar spine were found for most TA features (p < 0.021). This study established normative values of TA features on CT images of the spine and showed age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences in individuals with normal BMD as defined by DXA. (orig.)

  6. Value of Perfusion CT, Transcranial Doppler Sonography, and Neurological Examination to Detect Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, E.; Raslan, F.; Stetter, Ch.; Lee, J.Y.; Solymosi, L.; Ernestus, R.I.; Vince, G.H.; Westermaier, Th.; Pham, M.; Solymosi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background. If detected in time, delayed cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be treated by balloon angioplasty or chemical vasospasmolysis in order to enhance cerebral blood flow (CBF) and protect the brain from ischemic damage. This study was conceived to compare the diagnostic accuracy of detailed neurological examination, Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD), and Perfusion-CT (PCT) to detect angiographic vasospasm. Methods. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of delayed ischemic neurological deterioration (DIND), pathological findings on PCT-maps, and accelerations of the mean flow velocity (MVF) were calculated. Results. The accuracy of DIND to predict angiographic vasospasm was 0.88. An acceleration of MFV in TCD (>140 cm/s) had an accuracy of 0.64, positive PCT-findings of 0.69 with a higher sensitivity, and negative predictive value than TCD. Interpretation. Neurological assessment at close intervals is the most sensitive and specific parameter for cerebral vasospasm. PCT has a higher accuracy, sensitivity and negative predictive value than TCD. If detailed neurological evaluation is possible, it should be the leading parameter in the management and treatment decisions. If patients are not amenable to detailed neurological examination, PCT at regular intervals is a helpful tool to diagnose secondary vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH

  7. An experimental study on the effect of mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol injected into normal liver of rabbit : CT features and histopathologic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mee Ran; Kim, Yun Hwan; Cha, In Ho; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuk; Um, Soon Ho; Choi, Young Hee

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the safety and usefulness of Lipiodol-percutaneous transhepatic ethanol injection(LPEI) and to determine the appropriate concentration of Lipiodol during L-PEI. This was achieved by evalvating CT findings and histopathologic changes according to the concentration of Lipiodol, amount of ethanol, and the time interval after injection into normal rabbit liver. This experimental study involved 18 New Zealand rabbits under US guidance. They were divided into five groups according to injected materials; two rabbits with 0.4cc of normal saline(group I), six with 0.4cc of ethanol in the left hepatic lobe(group II), and 0.4cc of Lipiodol in the right hepatic lobe(group III), five rabbits with 5% Lipiodol-ethanol(5% vol. of Lipiodol+95% vol. of ethanol), 0.2cc in the right hepatic lobe, and 0.4cc in the left(group IV); and five rabbits with 10% Lipiodol-ethanol as per group IV(group V). CT was performed immediately, one week, two weeks, and three-four weeks after injection, and pathologic specimens were obtained on the third day(acute phase) and during the third or fourth week(chronic phase) after injection. On CT, intrahepatic localization of the L-PEI injection site was well demonstrated as a focal high attenuated area which gradually decreased in attenuation on follow up CT. The opacification of the inferior vena cava by Lipiodol, the linear distribution of Lipiodol along portal veins or fissures, and peritoneal leakage were clearly demonstrated in groups III-V, though the effects gradually disappeared during follow-up CT. There was no remarkable difference in gross CT attenuation between group IV and group V. The main pathologic findings during the acute phase of group II were coagulation necrosis surrounded by macrophage, inflammatory reaction, and early periportal and subcapsular fibrosis. The findings in group IV and V were similar to those in group II and additional fat vacuole accumulations in the necrotic area were also seen. During the chronic phase

  8. Motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME: intervariation study of normal sperm and sperm with large nuclear vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruffi Ricardo LR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME was developed only as a selection criterion, its application as a method for classifying sperm morphology may represent an improvement in evaluation of semen quality, with potential clinical repercussions. The present study aimed to evaluate individual variations in the motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME analysis after a time interval. Methods Two semen samples were obtained from 240 men from an unselected group of couples undergoing infertility investigation and treatment. Mean time interval between the two semen evaluations was 119 +/- 102 days. No clinical or surgical treatment was realized between the two observations. Spermatozoa were analyzed at greater than or equal to 8400× magnification by inverted microscope equipped with DIC/Nomarski differential interference contrast optics. At least 200 motile spermatozoa per semen sample were evaluated and percentages of normal spermatozoa and spermatozoa with large nuclear vacuoles (LNV/one or more vacuoles occupying >50% of the sperm nuclear area were determined. A spermatozoon was classified as morphologically normal when it exhibited a normal nucleus (smooth, symmetric and oval nucleus, width 3.28 +/- 0.20 μm, length 4.75 +/- 0.20 μm/absence of vacuoles occupying >4% of nuclear area as well as acrosome, post-acrosomal lamina, neck and tail, besides not presenting cytoplasm around the head. One examiner, blinded to subject identity, performed the entire study. Results Mean percentages of morphologically normal and LNV spermatozoa were identical in the two MSOME analyses (1.6 +/- 2.2% vs. 1.6 +/- 2.1% P = 0.83 and 25.2 +/- 19.2% vs. 26.1 +/- 19.0% P = 0.31, respectively. Regression analysis between the two samples revealed significant positive correlation for morphologically normal and for LNV spermatozoa (r = 0.57 95% CI:0.47-0.65 P P Conclusions The significant positive correlation and

  9. Head CT: Image quality improvement of posterior fossa and radiation dose reduction with ASiR - comparative studies of CT head examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzinski, Maciej; Waszczuk, Lukasz; Sasiadek, Marek J. [Wroclaw Medical University, Department of General Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate head CT protocol developed to improve visibility of the brainstem and cerebellum, lower bone-related artefacts in the posterior fossa and maintain patient radioprotection. A paired comparison of head CT performed without Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR) and a clinically indicated follow-up with 40 % ASiR was acquired in one group of 55 patients. Patients were scanned in the axial mode with different scanner settings for the brain and the posterior fossa. Objective image quality analysis was performed with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subjective image quality analysis was based on brain structure visibility and evaluation of the artefacts. We achieved 19 % reduction of total DLP and significantly better image quality of posterior fossa structures. SNR for white and grey matter in the cerebellum were 34 % to 36 % higher, respectively, CNR was improved by 142 % and subjective analyses were better for images with ASiR. When imaging parameters are set independently for the brain and the posterior fossa imaging, ASiR has a great potential to improve CT performance: image quality of the brainstem and cerebellum is improved, and radiation dose for the brain as well as total radiation dose are reduced. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of normal anatomy of oral cavity in open-mouth view with CT and MRI; comparison with closed-mouth view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Ho; Kim, Seong Min; Cheon, Bont Jin; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk

    2001-01-01

    When MRI and CT of the oral cavity utilize the traditional closed-mouth approach, direct contact between the tongue and surrounding structures may give rise to difficulty in recognizing the anatomy involved and demonstrating the possible presence of pathologic features. We describe a more appropriate scan technique, involving open-mouthed imaging, which may be used to demonstrate the anatomy of the oral cavity in detail. Axial and coronal MR imaging and axial CT scanning were performed in 14 healthy volunteers, using both the closed and open-mouth approach. For the latter, a mouth-piece was put in place prior to examination. In all volunteers, open-mouth MR and CT examinations involved the same parameters as the corresponding closed-mouth procedures. The CT and MR images obtained by each method were compared, particular attention being paid to the presence and symmetry of motion artifact of the tongue and the extent of air space in the oral cavity. Comparative imaging analysis was based on the recognition of 13 structures around the boundaries of the mouth. For statistical analysis, student's test was used and a p value<0.05 was considered significant. Due to symmetry of the tongue, a less severe motion artifact, and increased air space in the oral cavity, the open-mouth method produced excellent images. The axial and coronal MR images thus obtained were superior in terms of demarcation of the inferior surface and dortsum of the tongue, gingiva, buccal surface and buccal vestivule to those obtained with the mouth closed (p<0.05). In addition, axial MR images obtained with the mouth open showed better demarcation of structures at the lingual margin and anterior belly of the digastric muscle (p<0.05), while coronal MR images of the base of the tongue, surface of the hard palate, soft palate, and uvula, were also superior (p<0.05). Open-mouth CT provided better images at the lingual margin, dorsum of the tongue and buccal surface than the closed-mouth approach (p<0

  11. Analysis of normal anatomy of oral cavity in open-mouth view with CT and MRI; comparison with closed-mouth view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Ho; Kim, Seong Min; Cheon, Bont Jin; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin Univ. College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    When MRI and CT of the oral cavity utilize the traditional closed-mouth approach, direct contact between the tongue and surrounding structures may give rise to difficulty in recognizing the anatomy involved and demonstrating the possible presence of pathologic features. We describe a more appropriate scan technique, involving open-mouthed imaging, which may be used to demonstrate the anatomy of the oral cavity in detail. Axial and coronal MR imaging and axial CT scanning were performed in 14 healthy volunteers, using both the closed and open-mouth approach. For the latter, a mouth-piece was put in place prior to examination. In all volunteers, open-mouth MR and CT examinations involved the same parameters as the corresponding closed-mouth procedures. The CT and MR images obtained by each method were compared, particular attention being paid to the presence and symmetry of motion artifact of the tongue and the extent of air space in the oral cavity. Comparative imaging analysis was based on the recognition of 13 structures around the boundaries of the mouth. For statistical analysis, student's test was used and a p value<0.05 was considered significant. Due to symmetry of the tongue, a less severe motion artifact, and increased air space in the oral cavity, the open-mouth method produced excellent images. The axial and coronal MR images thus obtained were superior in terms of demarcation of the inferior surface and dortsum of the tongue, gingiva, buccal surface and buccal vestivule to those obtained with the mouth closed (p<0.05). In addition, axial MR images obtained with the mouth open showed better demarcation of structures at the lingual margin and anterior belly of the digastric muscle (p<0.05), while coronal MR images of the base of the tongue, surface of the hard palate, soft palate, and uvula, were also superior (p<0.05). Open-mouth CT provided better images at the lingual margin, dorsum of the tongue and buccal surface than the closed-mouth approach (p

  12. High-risk clinical target volume delineation in CT-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy - Impact of information from FIGO stage with or without systematic inclusion of 3D documentation of clinical gynecological examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegazy, Neamat [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Medical Univ. of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Poetter Rickard; Kirisits, Christian [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel; Federico, Mario; Sturdza, Alina; Nesvacil, Nicole [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], e-mail: nicole.nesvacil@meduniwien.ac.at

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to improve computed tomography (CT)-based high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) delineation protocols for cervix cancer patients, in settings without any access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of brachytherapy. Therefore the value of a systematic integration of comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) documentation of repetitive gynecological examination for CT-based HR CTV delineation protocols, in addition to information from FIGO staging, was investigated. In addition to a comparison between reference MRI contours and two different CT-based contouring methods (using complementary information from FIGO staging with or without additional 3D clinical drawings), the use of standardized uterine heights was also investigated. Material and methods: Thirty-five cervix cancer patients with CT- and MR-images and 3D clinical drawings at time of diagnosis and brachytherapy were included. HR CTV{sub stage} was based on CT information and FIGO stage. HR CTV{sub stage} {sub +3Dclin} was contoured on CT using FIGO stage and 3D clinical drawing. Standardized HR CTV heights were: 1/1, 2/3 and 1/2 of uterine height. MRI-based HR CTV was delineated independently. Resulting widths, thicknesses, heights, and volumes of HR CTV{sub stage}, HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} and MRI-based HR CTV contours were compared. Results: The overall normalized volume ratios (mean{+-}SD of CT/MRI{sub ref} volume) of HR CTV{sub stage} and HR{sub stage+3Dclin} were 2.6 ({+-}0.6) and 2.1 ({+-}0.4) for 1/1 and 2.3 ({+-}0.5) and 1.8 ({+-}0.4), for 2/3, and 1.9 ({+-}0.5) and 1.5 ({+-}0.3), for 1/2 of uterine height. The mean normalized widths were 1.5{+-}0.2 and 1.2{+-}0.2 for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin}, respectively (p < 0.05). The mean normalized heights for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} were both 1.7{+-}0.4 for 1/1 (p < 0.05.), 1.3{+-}0.3 for 2/3 (p < 0.05) and 1.1{+-}0.3 for 1/2 of uterine height. Conclusion: CT-based HR

  13. A normal colposcopy examination fails to provide psychological reassurance for women who have had low-grade abnormal cervical cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, S C; Sharp, L; Little, J; Gray, N M; Walker, L G; Whynes, D K; Cruickshank, M E

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide, each year, large numbers of women are referred for colposcopy following low-grade abnormal cervical cytology. Many have no visible abnormality on examination. The risk of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (CIN2/3) in these women is low. It is unknown whether, for women, a normal colposcopy resolves the anxiety which often follows the receipt of an abnormal cytology result. We investigated the prevalence of adverse psychological outcomes over 30 months following a normal colposcopy. This cohort study was nested within the UK TOMBOLA randomized controlled trial. Women aged 20-59 years, with recent low-grade cytology, who had a satisfactory colposcopy examination and normal transformation zone, completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Process Outcome Specific Measure (POSM) at recruitment and during follow-up (12, 18, 24 and 30 months post-recruitment). Outcomes included percentages reporting significant anxiety (HADS anxiety subscale score ≥11), significant depression (HADS depression subscale score ≥8) or worries about the result of the next cytology test, cervical cancer, having sex, future fertility and general health at each time point (point prevalence) and during follow-up (cumulative prevalence). The study included 727 women. All psychological measures (except depression) had high prevalence at recruitment, falling substantially by 12 months. During follow-up, the cumulative prevalence of significant anxiety was 27% and significant depression was 21%. The most frequently reported worry was that the next cytology test would be abnormal (cumulative prevalence of 71%; point prevalence of ≥50% at 12 and 18 months). The cumulative prevalence values of worries about cervical cancer, having sex and future fertility were 33%, 20% and 16%, respectively. For some women who have low-grade cytology, a normal colposcopy does not appear to provide psychological reassurance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Comparison of dual-energy CT-derived iodine content and iodine overlay of normal, inflammatory and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma cervical lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Ahmed M; Razek, A A; Kerl, J Matthias; Nour-Eldin, N E; Bauer, Ralf; Vogl, Thomas J

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate whether dual-energy computed tomography (DECT)-derived iodine content and iodine overlay could differentiate between normal, inflammatory and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cervical lymph nodes. This study was approved by the institutional review board. Sixteen patients with normal lymph nodes, 20 patients with enlarged nodes draining deep cervical inflammations and 23 patients with pathologically proved metastatic SCC nodes who underwent contrast enhanced DECT were retrospectively identified. Iodine content and overlay of 36 normal, 43 inflammatory and 52 metastatic lymph nodes were calculated using circular regions of interest and compared among the three groups. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of iodine content and overlay for diagnosis of metastatic nodes. Iodine content (mg/ml) was significantly lower for metastatic lymph nodes (2.34 ± 0.45) than for normal (2.86 ± 0.37) and inflammatory (3.53 ± 0.56) lymph nodes, P overlay (HU) was also significantly lower for metastatic lymph nodes (47 ± 11.6) than normal (57.4 ± 8.2) and inflammatory nodes (69.3 ± 11.5), P overlay were 0.923 and 0.896. DECT-derived iodine content and overlay differ significantly among normal, inflammatory and metastatic SCC cervical lymph nodes. • Derived iodine content can be calculated from contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT. • Derived iodine content and iodine overlay could help characterise cervical lymph nodes. • Iodine parameters were significantly lower in metastatic lymph nodes than normal/inflammatory lymph nodes. • Iodine content appears more sensitive than iodine overlay for lymph node characterisation.

  15. A new radiological examination for tumor in the internal auditory canal by combination of air CT cisternography and target imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Akira; Shiga, Itsuo; Kanzaki, Hitoshi

    1982-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of progressive right hearing disturbance and tinnitus. An x-ray film of the skull demonstrated dilatation of the right internal auditory canal. Intravcnously enhanced CT didn't reveal any tumor in the right cerebellopontine angle. An intracanalicular tumor was demonstrated by air CT cisternography with target imaging, and confirmed by surgery. This method is useful for the radiological evaluation of the intracanalicular tumors. (author)

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on newborns, infants and older children. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ... your child for the CT examination. top of page What does the CT equipment look like? The CT ...

  17. Usefulness of air as oraI contrast material at CT examination in patient with post-operative gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Ki Whang

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) with gastric luminal distention using effervescent granules in patients with previous subtotal gastrectomy for the evaluation of the stomach, anastomotic site and jejunum, and to compare its findings with those of spiral CT using oral contrast media in the same patients. Thirty-one patients (M:F = 25:6, mean age; 58 years) with previous subtotal gastrectomy, who underwent both spiral CT using oral contrast media and MDCT using effervescent granules, were studied. The distensibility of the gastric lumen, anastomotic site and jejunal lumen was graded as either poor, fair or good. The thickening or mass of the gastric and small bowel wall was also evaluated. The distensibility of the gastric lumen, anastomotic site and jejunal lumen were better demonstrated by MDCT using effervescent granules than by spiral CT using an oral contrast agent (p<0.005). The distensibility of the stomach and jejunum was similar in 14 cases (45.2%) on spiral CT and 16 cases (51.6%) on MDCT. The anastomotic site was better demonstrated when effervescent granules were used than when oral contrast media was used in 21 cases (67.7%). No cases of poor distention of the stomach or anastomotic site were detected when using effervescent granules. Follow-up MDCT using effervescent granules showed better distensibility of the gastric lumen, anastomotic site and jejunal lumen than spiral CT using oral contrast media in all of the patients having undergone subtotal gastrectomy

  18. Autotraction in lumbar disc herniation with CT examination before and after treatment, showing no change in appearance of the herniated tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljunggren, A.E.; Eldvik, O.P.

    1986-09-01

    Fifteen hospitalized patients who were candidates for lumbar disc surgery, were examined by CT before and after one week with autotraction therapy. Seven patients had to be operated upon, wheras complete or considerable reduction of clinical signs and symptoms was registered in eight patients. CT did not show change in size, shape or position of the prolapse in any patient shortly after the traction or after 3 months in 4 of the unoperated cases The reason for clinical improvement after traction in some patiens is still a matter of conjecture.

  19. Diagnosis and evaluation of surveying examination by intracranial tumor in dogs CT; Diagnostico e avaliacao topografica de neoplasias intracranianas pelo exame de TC em caes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaldini, Andre Fonseca; Santos, Debora Rodrigues dos; Oliveira, Juliana Messias; Abreu, Felipe Andrei Suarez; Wallace, Verena; Pacheco, Eduardo Nelson da Silva, E-mail: andreromaldini@gmail.com [Hospital Santa Ines de Sao Paulo, Santana, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) revolutionized image diagnostic in veterinary medicine and currently can be considered one of the most useful tools for the imaging evaluation of intracranial tumor in dogs. Computed tomography of the brain in small animals allows visualization of intracranial tumor, compression of adjacent structures such as cerebral parenchyma, falx or lateral ventricles, and evaluate secondary hemorrhages and edema. The CT imaging provides essential information to indicate the surgical approach for a possible tumor resection or biopsy, including the correct location and boundaries structures involved, and also can be used to monitor the clinical treatment. However, only histopathological examination is able to confirm the final diagnosis. (author)

  20. The diagnostic value of axial loading imaging of the lumbar spine during CT and MR examination in patients with degeneration disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Xinwei; Yin Jianzhong; Xia Shuang; Chen Xinjuan; Wu Shengyong; Qi Ji

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the diagnostic value of axial loading imaging of the lumbar spine during CT and MRI examination in patients with degenerative disorders. Methods: One hundred patients were examined in psoas-relaxed position (PRP) and axially compressed in extension (ACE) supine position of the lumbar spine. Forty patients were examined with CT and 60 patients were with MRI. If a significant decrease (>15 mm 2 ) of dural sac cross-sectional area to values smaller than 75 mm 2 was found during examination in axial loading, or if a suspected disc herniation, narrow lateral recess, narrow intervertebral foramen, or intraspinal synovial cyst changed to being obvious at the axial loading examination, they were regarded as additional information. Results: After axial loading CT examination, AVI was found in 16 of 40 patients. A significant decrease of dural sac area was found in 13 patients. Intervertebral disc herniation was more severe in 7 patients, lateral recess or intervertebral foramen narrowed in 4 patients, no intraspinal synovial cyst was found. After axial loading MRI examination, AVI was found in 19 of 60 patients. A significant decrease of dural sac area was found in 13 patients. Intervertebral disc herniation became severe in 10 patients, lateral recess or intervertebral foramen narrowed in 8 patients, no intraspinal synovial cyst was found. AVI was found in 32 of 79(40.5%) patients with sciatica and 2 of 20(10.0%) patients with low back pain (χ 2 =7.45 P<0.05). Conclusion: Compared with PRP examination, the ACE of CT or MRI can reflect the status of disc, dural sac and lateral recess or intervertebral foramen of the lumbar spine in the erect position. (authors)

  1. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - A potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Nielsen, Morten; Brink, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Background: Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose. Methods: A total of 665 CBCTs in 65 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT/VMAT to 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. For each patient, CBCT lung density changes during the treatment course were related to the locally delivered dose. Results: A dose response is observed for the patient population at the end of the treatment course. However, the observed dose response is highly variable among patients. Density changes at 10th and 20th fraction are clearly correlated to those observed at the end of the treatment course. Conclusions: CBCT density changes in healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy correlate with the locally delivered dose and can be detected relatively early during the treatment. If these density changes are correlated to subsequent clinical toxicity this assay could form the basis for biological adaptive radiotherapy.

  2. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-03: Preliminary Study of Size-Specific Dose Estimates in Adult Abdomenal CT Examinations in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H; Hu, Y [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Y [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to investigate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) for routine adult abdominal CT examinations in Taiwan. Methods: A national survey was conducted in Taiwan in 2014 to investigate SSDEs for routine adult abdominal CT examinations. The hospitals involved in this study provided CT images of their typical patients. The CT image in the level of the middle liver was selected to record the corresponding tube current, slice mAs or effective mAs. The image was also used to estimate the dimensions of patient as measuring the lengths in the anterior to posterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) directions. The effective diameter was then calculated from AP and LAT, and used to look up conversion factors in the AAPM 204 report. The volume CTDI (CTDIvol) for each CT unit was measured on sites using a 32-cm cylindrical standard dose phantom and a calibrated pencil-type ionization chamber. Individual patient’s SSDEs were then calculated from the corresponding SSDE conversion factor and the CTDIvol. Results: The study cohort included 111 CT units. The ratio of turning on automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or not is 88:23. Effective diameters are 258.7±25.1 mm (167–366 mm). 99.3% of typical patients selected by each hospital have smaller effective diameter than the 32-cm dosimetry phantom. Adult abdomenal SSDE is 17.5 ± 8.8 mGy (1.9-58 mGy). The SSDE seems to decrease as the effective diameter increases as the ATCM turns off, and independent with the effective diameter as the ATCM turns on. Conclusion: The SSDE for typical patients in Taiwan was investigated. We continue to complete this investigation in 2015 to include more valid data to establish SSDE reference level in Taiwan. This study was financially supported by the Atomic Energy Council in Taiwan.

  3. Multi-Detector CT Findings of the Normal Appendix in Children: Evaluation of the Position, Diameter, and Presence or Absence of Intraluminal Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Woon Ju; Kim, Jong Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    To assess the usefulness of multi-detector CT (MDCT) with multiplanar reformations (MPR) for the evaluation of the position, diameter and presence or absence of intraluminal gas in the normal appendix in children. From 2007 to 2010, we retrospectively analyzed the MDCT images of normal appendices in 133 children, and evaluated the position, diameter, and presence or absence of intraluminal gas in the appendix. Among the 133 appendices, type I (postileal and medial paracecal position) was found in 64 children, type II (subcecal position) in 22, type III (retrocecal and retrocolic/laterocolic position) in 15, type IV (preileal and medial colic position) in 16, and type V (lower pelvic position) in 16 children. The mean diameter was 5.8 mm {+-} 1.2 (SD) (range; 3.2-8.7 mm). There was a high correlation between the appendiceal diameter and age (p = 0.000).There was no statistically significant difference in the appendiceal diameter between boys and girls (p = 0.470). Intraluminal gas was found in 115 appendices and there was no statistically significant correlation between the appendiceal diameter and intraluminal gas (p = 0.502). The MDCT with MPR was useful for the evaluation of the normal appendices in children. The procedure may be useful for the diagnosis of equivocal or unusual appendicitis in children.

  4. Axial skeletal CT densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampmann, L.E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Roentgen ray a precise and accurate assessment of bone mineral content has been a challenge to many investigators. A number of methods have been developed but no one satisfied. Considering its technical possibilities computed tomography is very promising in determination of bone mineral content (BMC). The new modality enables BMC estimations in the axial skeletal trabecular bone. CT densitometry can be performed on a normal commercially available third generation whole body CT scanner. No dedicated device in a special clinical set-up is necessary. In this study 106 patients, most of them clinically suspected of osteoporosis, were examined. The new method CT densitometry has been evaluated. The results have been correlated to alternative BMC determination methods. (Auth.)

  5. Is higher body temperature beneficial in ischemic stroke patients with normal admission CT angiography of the cerebral arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Khanevski, Andrej; Nacu, Aliona; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    Low body temperature is considered beneficial in ischemic stroke due to neuroprotective mechanisms, yet some studies suggest that higher temperatures may improve clot lysis and outcomes in stroke patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The effect of increased body temperature in stroke patients treated with tPA and with normal computed tomography angiography (CTA) on admission is unknown. We hypothesized a beneficial effect of higher body temperature in the absence of visible clots on CTA, possibly due to enhanced lysis of small, peripheral clots. Patients with ischemic stroke admitted to our Stroke Unit between February 2006 and April 2013 were prospectively registered in a database (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). Ischemic stroke patients treated with tPA with normal CTA of the cerebral arteries were included. Outcomes were assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) after 1 week. An excellent outcome was defined as mRS=0, and a favorable outcome as mRS=0-1. A total of 172 patients were included, of which 48 (27.9%) had an admission body temperature ≥37.0°C, and 124 (72.1%) had a body temperature temperature ≥37.0°C was independently associated with excellent outcomes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-6.46; P=0.014) and favorable outcomes (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.13-4.98; P=0.015) when adjusted for confounders. We found an association between higher admission body temperature and improved outcome in tPA-treated stroke patients with normal admission CTA of the cerebral arteries. This may suggest a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis in the absence of visible clots on CTA.

  6. CT angiography and CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeters, T. van

    2016-01-01

    CT angiography and CT perfusion are used in patients with acute ischemic stroke for diagnostic purposes and to select patients for treatment. In this thesis, the reproducibility of CT angiography and CT perfusion is examined, the additional value of CT angiography and CT perfusion for stroke outcome

  7. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Bria M; Brady, Samuel L; Mirro, Amy E; Kaufman, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5-55 kg). Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF(organ)(SSDE)) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The [CF(organ)(SSDE)) were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5-55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. Individual CF(organ)(SSDE) were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7-1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7-1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1-0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF(organ)(SSDE), was compared to previously published pediatric patient doses that accounted for

  8. A prospective study on the risk of contrast induced nephropathy in the patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baocui; Zhang Yudong; Zhao Kai; Wang Xiaoying; Jiang Xuexiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) among different patient groups after contrast agent injection. Methods: A total of 1243 patients were included in this study (male = 694, female = 549). The SCr level one week before and 72 hours after the CT examination and the incidence of CIN were recorded and comparison was made among groups according to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), the history of high blood pressure (HBP), diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease (CKD), chronic heart failure (CHF), tumor, nephrotoxicity drug (NTD) usage. The frequency, type, dose and injection velocity of the contrast media (CM) were also recorded. Multivariate predictors of CIN were identified by Logistic regression using step-wise selection with entry and exit criteria of P < 0.10, results were tabulated as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Among 1243 consecutive patients, the incidence of CIN was 5.5% (68/1243). Patients with a history of HBP, DM, CHF, CKD or tumor presented with higher incidence of CIN than that of controls (5.9%, 51/868 vs. 4.5%, 17/375). CIN developed in 9 of 203 patients (4.4%, 9/203) with CKD and in 59 of 1040 patients (5.7%, 59/1040) without CKD. There was no significant difference between the two groups (χ 2 = 0.51, P = 0.30). In CKD (-) group, the incidence of CIN was higher in females, patients with DM and patients using LOCM than those of males, DM (-) and using low osmolality contrast medium (IOCM) (P < 0.05), but there was no statistical significance in CKD (+) group. Logistic regression analysis showed that women, age ≥ 75 years, DM, LOCM, NTD, tumor, the time of using CM more than once per month were the most significant predictors of CIN (OR > 1). Conclusion: Women, age ≥ 75 years, LOCM, NTD, tumor, and the frequency of using CM more than once per month were more likely to develop CIN. (authors)

  9. Refixation of Osteochondral Fractures by an Ultrasound-Activated Pin System - An Ovine In Vivo Examination Using CT and Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, Neumann; A P, Schulz; S, Breer; A, Unger; B, Kienast

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondral injuries, if not treated appropriately, often lead to severe osteoarthritis of the affected joint. Without refixation of the osteochondral fragment, human cartilage only repairs these defects imperfectly. All existing refixation systems for chondral defects have disadvantages, for instance bad MRI quality in the postoperative follow-up or low anchoring forces. To address the problem of reduced stability in resorbable implants, ultrasound-activated pins were developed. By ultrasound-activated melting of the tip of these implants a higher anchoring is assumed. Aim of the study was to investigate, if ultrasound-activated pins can provide a secure refixation of osteochondral fractures comparing to conventional screw and conventional, resorbable pin osteosynthesis. CT scans and scanning electron microscopy should proovegood refixation results with no further tissue damage by the melting of the ultrasound-activated pins in comparison to conventional osteosynthesis. Femoral osteochondral fragments in sheep were refixated with ultrasound-activated pins (SonicPin™), Ethipins(®) and screws (Asnis™). The quality of the refixated fragments was examined after three month of full weight bearing by CT scans and scanning electron microscopy of the cartilage surface. The CT examination found almost no statistically significant difference in the quality of refixation between the three different implants used. Concerning the CT morphology, ultrasound-activated pins demonstrated at least the same quality in refixation of osteochondral fragments as conventional resorbable pins or screws. The scanning electron microscopy showed no major surface damage by the three implants, especially any postulated cartilage damage induced by the heat of the ultrasound-activated pin. The screws protruded above the cartilage surface, which may affect the opposingtibial surface. Using CT scans and scanning electron microscopy, the SonicPin™, the Ethipin(®) and screws were at least

  10. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 with a novel multifocal collimator SPECT/CT: IQ-SPECT versus conventional protocols in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Wakabayash, Hiroshi; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-06-01

    A novel multifocal collimator, IQ-SPECT (Siemens) consists of SMARTZOOM, cardio-centric and 3D iterative SPECT reconstruction and makes it possible to perform MPI scans in a short time. The aims are to delineate the normal uptake in thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT in each acquisition method and to compare the distribution between new and conventional protocol, especially in patients with normal imaging. Forty patients (eight women, mean age of 75 years) who underwent myocardial perfusion imaging were included in the study. All patients underwent one-day protocol perfusion scan after an adenosine-stress test and at rest after administering (201)Tl and showed normal results. Acquisition was performed on a Symbia T6 equipped with a conventional dual-headed gamma camera system (Siemens ECAM) and with a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator. Imaging was performed with a conventional system followed by IQ-SPECT/computed tomography (CT). Reconstruction was performed with or without X-ray CT-derived attenuation correction (AC). Two nuclear physicians blinded to clinical information interpreted all myocardial perfusion images. A semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion was analyzed by a 17-segment model with a 5-point visual scoring. The uptake of each segment was measured and left ventricular functions were analyzed by QPS software. IQ-SPECT provided good or excellent image quality. The quality of IQ-SPECT images without AC was similar to those of conventional LEHR study. Mid-inferior defect score (0.3 ± 0.5) in the conventional LEHR study was increased significantly in IQ-SPECT with AC (0 ± 0). IQ-SPECT with AC improved the mid-inferior decreased perfusion shown in conventional images. The apical tracer count in IQ-SPECT with AC was decreased compared to that in LEHR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7, p IQ-SPECT was significantly higher than that from the LEHR collimator (p = 0.0009). The images of IQ-SPECT acquired in a short time are equivalent to that of conventional LEHR

  11. Diagnostic imaging of maxillofacial lesions with CT and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, J

    1990-01-01

    Normal anatomy of the maxillofacial regions is clearly shown by both CT and MRI. The use of dental devices causes deterioration in CT and MRI of the tongue and oral floor. A high-resolution bone window display is highly useful in examining bony structures. Contrast CT is useful in diagnosis of tumorous, inflammatory, and vascular lesions. MRI shows the extensions of tumors more clearly than CT, and MRI enhanced with Gd-DTPA is very useful in determining tumor extensions into bony structures. Both CT and MRI should be used in diagnosis of maxillofacial lesions.

  12. Vertebral artery variations and osseous anomaly at the C1-2 level diagnosed by 3D CT angiography in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakao, Norimitsu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro [Aichi Medical University, Department of Spine Center, Aichi (Japan); Aichi Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Takayasu, Masakazu [Aichi Medical University, Department of Spine Center, Aichi (Japan); Nishimura, Manabu [Aichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Riew, K.D. [Washington University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States); Imagama, Shiro [Nagoya University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Aichi Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The craniovertebral junction is anatomically complicated. Representative vertebral artery (VA) variations include the persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA), fenestration of the VA above and below C1 (FEN), posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) from C1/2, and high-riding VA (HRVA). The ponticulus posticus (PP) is a well-known osseous anomaly at C1. Although those anomalies are frequent in patients with cervical deformity, the prevalence of these in subjects with normal cervical spines is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the variations and prevalence of vascular and osseous anomalies based on three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D CT) angiography in patients without any cervical diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Klippel-Feil syndrome, or Down syndrome. Eligible subjects were patients who underwent 3D CT angiography by the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Internal Medicine from January 2009 to October 2013 in our institution. The authors defined a HRVA as a C2 pedicle with a maximum diameter of 4 mm or less. Among 480 subjects with a mean age of 63.1 years, 387 patients were eligible. One hundred and eighteen subjects were female, and 269 were male. HRVA was observed in 10.1 % of patients (39 out of 387 cases), FIA in 1.8 % (7 cases), FEN in 1.3 % (5 cases), and PICA in 1.3 % (5 cases). PP was observed in 6.2 % of patients (24 cases). According to past reports, many VA anomalies could be attributed to congenital or acquired conditions (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis). However, VA anomalies appear to exist even in patients without any such cervical diseases. (orig.)

  13. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L., E-mail: samuel.brady@stjude.org; Kaufman, Robert A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Mirro, Amy E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  14. SU-F-I-36: In-Utero Dose Measurements Within Postmortem Subjects for Estimating Fetal Doses in Pregnant Patients Examined with Pulmonary Embolism, Trauma, and Appendicitis CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnharski, I; Quails, N; Carranza, C; Correa, N; Bidari, S; Bickelhaup, M; Rill, L; Arreola, M [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The imaging of pregnant patients is medically necessary in certain clinical situations. The purpose of this work was to directly measure uterine doses in a cadaver scanned with CT protocols commonly performed on pregnant patients in order to estimate fetal dose and assess potential risk. Method: One postmortem subject was scanned on a 320-slice CT scanner with standard pulmonary embolism, trauma, and appendicitis protocols. All protocols were performed with the scan parameters and ranges currently used in clinical practice. Exams were performed both with and without iterative reconstruction to highlight the dose savings potential. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) were inserted into the uterus in order to approximate fetal doses. Results: In the pulmonary embolism CT protocol, the uterus is outside of the primary beam, and the dose to the uterus was under 1 mGy. In the trauma and appendicitis protocols, the uterus is in the primary beam, the fetal dose estimates were 30.5 mGy for the trauma protocol, and 20.6 mGy for the appendicitis protocol. Iterative reconstruction reduced fetal doses by 30%, with uterine doses at 21.3 for the trauma and 14.3 mGy for the appendicitis protocol. Conclusion: Fetal doses were under 1 mGy when exposed to scatter radiation, and under 50 mGy when exposed to primary radiation with the trauma and appendicitis protocols. Consistent with the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), these doses exhibit a negligible risk to the fetus, with only a small increased risk of cancer. Still, CT scans are not recommended during pregnancy unless the benefits of the exam clearly outweigh the potential risk. Furthermore, when possible, pregnant patients should be examined on CT scanners equipped with iterative reconstruction in order to keep patient doses as low as reasonable achievable.

  15. SU-F-I-36: In-Utero Dose Measurements Within Postmortem Subjects for Estimating Fetal Doses in Pregnant Patients Examined with Pulmonary Embolism, Trauma, and Appendicitis CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipnharski, I; Quails, N; Carranza, C; Correa, N; Bidari, S; Bickelhaup, M; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The imaging of pregnant patients is medically necessary in certain clinical situations. The purpose of this work was to directly measure uterine doses in a cadaver scanned with CT protocols commonly performed on pregnant patients in order to estimate fetal dose and assess potential risk. Method: One postmortem subject was scanned on a 320-slice CT scanner with standard pulmonary embolism, trauma, and appendicitis protocols. All protocols were performed with the scan parameters and ranges currently used in clinical practice. Exams were performed both with and without iterative reconstruction to highlight the dose savings potential. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) were inserted into the uterus in order to approximate fetal doses. Results: In the pulmonary embolism CT protocol, the uterus is outside of the primary beam, and the dose to the uterus was under 1 mGy. In the trauma and appendicitis protocols, the uterus is in the primary beam, the fetal dose estimates were 30.5 mGy for the trauma protocol, and 20.6 mGy for the appendicitis protocol. Iterative reconstruction reduced fetal doses by 30%, with uterine doses at 21.3 for the trauma and 14.3 mGy for the appendicitis protocol. Conclusion: Fetal doses were under 1 mGy when exposed to scatter radiation, and under 50 mGy when exposed to primary radiation with the trauma and appendicitis protocols. Consistent with the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), these doses exhibit a negligible risk to the fetus, with only a small increased risk of cancer. Still, CT scans are not recommended during pregnancy unless the benefits of the exam clearly outweigh the potential risk. Furthermore, when possible, pregnant patients should be examined on CT scanners equipped with iterative reconstruction in order to keep patient doses as low as reasonable achievable.

  16. Examination of muscle composition and motor unit behavior of the first dorsal interosseous of normal and overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan Daniel; Sterczala, Adam J; Trevino, Michael A; Herda, Trent J

    2018-02-07

    Examine differences between normal weight (NW) and overweight (OW) children aged 8 to 10 years in strength, muscle composition, and motor unit (MU) behavior of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Ultrasonography determined muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), subcutaneous fat (sFAT), and echo intensity (EI). MU behavior was assessed during isometric muscle actions at 20% and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) by analyzing EMG amplitude (EMGRMS) and relationships between mean firing rates (MFR), recruitment thresholds (RT), MU action potential amplitudes (MUAPSIZE) and durations (MUAPTIME). The OW group had significantly greater EI than the NW group (P=0.002, NW=47.99{plus minus}6.01 AU, OW=58.90{plus minus}10.63 AU) with no differences between groups for CSA (P=0.688) or MVC force (P=0.790). MUAPSIZES were larger for NW than OW in relation to RT (P=0.002), and for MUs expressing similar MFRs (P=0.011). There were no significant differences (P=0.279-0.969) between groups for slopes or y-intercepts from the MFR vs. RT relationships. MUAPTIMES were larger in OW (P=0.015) and EMGRMS was attenuated in OW compared to NW (P=0.034), however, there were no significant correlations (P=0.133‒0.164, r=0.270‒0.291) between sFAT and EMGRMS. In a muscle that does not support body mass, the OW children had smaller MUAPSIZES as well as greater EI although anatomical CSA was similar. This contradicts previous studies examining larger limb muscles. Despite evidence of smaller MUs, the OW children had similar isometric strength in comparison to NW children.

  17. Histomorphologic examination of skeletal muscle preparations does not differentiate between malignant hyperthermia-susceptible and -normal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Breunig, Franziska; Wappler, Frank; Hagel, Christian; von Richthofen, Verena; Fiege, Marko; Weisshorn, Ralf; Stavrou, Dimitrios; Schulte am Esch, Jochen

    2004-04-01

    It has been suggested that malignant hyperthermia (MH) can be diagnosed by specific myopathologic alterations. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are characteristic myopathologic changes in skeletal muscles of MH-susceptible (MHS) compared with MH-normal (MHN) patients. Four hundred forty patients with clinical suspicion of MH were classified as MHN, MH equivocal (MHE), or MHS by the in vitro contracture test with halothane and caffeine. In addition, a small muscle sample excised from each patient was analyzed by histologic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and computer-aided morphometric methods. MHN was diagnosed in 243 patients, MHE was diagnosed in 65, and MHS was diagnosed in 132. No myopathologic abnormalities were found in 53.5% of the MHN, 53.9% of the MHE, and 56.1% of the MHS patients. Thirty-five percent of all patients showed one, 9.8% showed two, and only 0.9% showed three different pathologic findings within skeletal muscle preparations. The frequency of pathologic findings did not differ between the MHN and the MHS patients; only fiber type I predominance was observed more often in MHN. MHE patients could not be assigned to a diagnostic group by detection of myopathologic alterations. In six clinically unaffected patients, a former unrecognized myopathy, such as central core disease, was diagnosed. This disease is characterized by a specific alteration (cores). Histologic differences between MHS and MHN statuses could not be demonstrated in this study. Histopathologic examinations can neither improve the diagnosis of MH nor contribute to a better definition of the MH status. However, histopathologic examinations might be useful to detect formerly unrecognized specific myopathies.

  18. Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies: Application to the Tyrolean Iceman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Stephanie; Pernter, Patrizia; Piombino-Mascali, Dario; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Zesch, Stephanie; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Hotz, Gerhard; Zink, Albert R

    2017-12-01

    Purpose  Soft tissues make a skeleton into a mummy and they allow for a diagnosis beyond osteology. Following the approach of structured reporting in clinical radiology, a recently developed checklist was used to evaluate the soft tissue preservation status of the Tyrolean Iceman using computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this study was to apply the "Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies" to the Tyrolean Iceman, and to compare the Iceman's soft tissue preservation score to the scores calculated for other mummies. Materials and Methods  A whole-body (CT) (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) consisting of five scans, performed in January 2013 in the Department of Radiodiagnostics, Central Hospital, Bolzano, was used (slice thickness 0.6 mm; kilovolt ranging from 80 to 140). For standardized evaluation the "CT Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in Human Mummies" was used. Results  All checkpoints under category "A. Soft Tissues of Head and Musculoskeletal System" and more than half in category "B. Organs and Organ Systems" were observed. The scoring system accounted for a total score of 153 (out of 200). The comparison of the scores between the Iceman and three mummy collections from Vilnius, Lithuania, and Palermo, Sicily, as well as one Egyptian mummy resulted in overall higher soft tissue preservation scores for the Iceman. Conclusion  Application of the checklist allowed for standardized assessment and documentation of the Iceman's soft tissue preservation status. The scoring system allowed for a quantitative comparison between the Iceman and other mummies. The Iceman showed remarkable soft tissue preservation. Key Points   · The approach of structured reporting can be transferred to paleoradiology.. · The checklist allowed for standardized soft tissue assessment and documentation.. · The scoring system

  19. Incidental lung nodules on CT examinations of the abdomen: Prevalence and reporting rates in the PACS era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, Maria Francesca [Radiologia III - Azienda Ospedaliera Pol. S.Orsola-Malpighi, via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy); Bartalena, Tommaso, E-mail: t.bartalena@email.i [Radiologia III - Azienda Ospedaliera Pol. S.Orsola-Malpighi, via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy); Giannelli, Giovanni; Rinaldi, Giovanni [Radiologia III - Azienda Ospedaliera Pol. S.Orsola-Malpighi, via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy); Sverzellati, Nicola [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche, sezione di Radiologia - Universita di Parma, via Gramsci 14 - 43100 Parma (Italy); Canini, Romeo [Dipartimento Clinico di Scienze Radiologiche ed Istocitopatologiche, divisione di Diagnostica per Immagini - Universita di Bologna, via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy); Gavelli, Giampaolo [Servizio di Diagnostica per Immagini, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (I.R.S.T.), via Piero Maroncelli, 40 - 47014 Meldola (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Objectives: To retrospectively evaluate prevalence, reporting rates and clinical implications of incidental pulmonary nodules detected in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) abdominal studies. Materials and methods: Abdominal MDCT studies of 243 consecutive patients, 94 of whom had a history of cancer, were evaluated. Lung bases included in the scan were reviewed on a PACS workstation with different window settings and post-processing techniques. Nodules were classified according to their density (calcified, solid noncalcified, non-solid, part-solid) and size (<4 mm; 4-6 mm; 6-8 mm; >8 mm). The study findings were compared with the corresponding radiologic reports. Previous of following CT studies, when available from the PACS, were also reviewed to evaluate changes in number and size of the detected nodules. Results: An average of 8.2 cm of lung parenchyma was imaged in each patient. 213 noncalcified nodules (NCNs) were identified in 95 patients (39.1%) but only 8 patients (8.4%) had it mentioned in the final report. Comparison CT studies were available for 44 out of the 95 positive patients showing disappearance of the nodules in 2 cases, no interval change in 26 and progression in size and/or number in 16 patients, in whom a final diagnosis of metastasis or primary lung cancers was achieved. Conclusion: Radiologists tend to overlook lung portions on abdominal CT studies. Underreporting may affect patient care and have medico-legal implications since images are permanently stored in digital format on PACS and CD-ROMs. Management of the discovered nodules should be tailored to the clinical situation of the patient, and particular care should be reserved to patients with oncologic history.

  20. [Comparison of Organ Dose Calculation Using Monte Carlo Simulation and In-phantom Dosimetry in CT Examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchijima, Akiko; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Akio

    Direct measurement of each patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) is not possible. Most methods to estimate patient organ dose is using Monte Carlo simulation with dedicated software. However, the method and the relative differences between organ dose simulation and measurement is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare organ doses evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation with doses evaluated by in-phantom dosimetry. The simulation software Radimetrics (Bayer) was used for the calculation of organ dose. Measurement was performed with radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLD) set at various organ positions within RANDO phantom. To evaluate difference of CT scanner, two different CT scanners were used in this study. Angular dependence of RPLD and measurement of effective energy were performed for each scanner. The comparison of simulation and measurement was evaluated by relative differences. In the results, angular dependence of RPLD at two scanners was 31.6±0.45 mGy for SOMATOM Definition Flash and 29.2±0.18 mGy for LightSpeed VCT. The organ dose was 42.2 mGy (range, 29.9-52.7 mGy) by measurements and 37.7 mGy (range, 27.9-48.1 mGy) by simulations. The relative differences of organ dose between measurement and simulation were 13%, excluding of breast's 42%. We found that organ dose by simulation was lower than by measurement. In conclusion, the results of relative differences will be useful for evaluating organ doses for individual patients by simulation software Radimetrics.

  1. Thyroid lymphography-computed tomography (TLG-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Koukichi

    1992-01-01

    There are several useful diagnostic examinations for thyroid disease. The diagnostic value of CT in thyroid disease is still controvertial, although CT has become a routine clinical examination, since the plain CT does not always identify tumors accurately. In this paper, we introduce for the first time thyroid lymphography-computed tomography (TLG-CT) which may improve the diagnostic value of CT. The technique combines CT with thyroid lymphography. We performed TLG-CT in 92 patients with various thyroid diseases and 20 normal controls and classified the radiological features into the following 6 types: entire (normal thyroid); moth-eaten (Hashimoto's thyroiditis); defect (follicular adenoma and adenomatous goiter); lobate (papillary carcinoma); localized (various thyroid diseases); and extrathyroid defect (parathyroid tumor). In addition, we examined the relationship between TLG-CT type and the macroscopic appearance of the cut surface of the thyroid and lymph node metastasis in 20 patients with papillary carcinoma. The results suggest that papillary TLG-CT type carcinomas have a high incidence of lymph node metastasis. Our preliminary results suggest that TLG-CT is a potentially valuable diagnostic tool in the detection of thyroid disease and the assessment of the pathologic diagnosis as well as lymph node metastasis. (author)

  2. Comparison of image quality and visibility of normal and abnormal findings at submillisievert chest CT using filtered back projection, iterative model reconstruction (IMR) and iDose{sup 4}™

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, Azien, E-mail: a.laqmani@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Avanesov, Maxim; Butscheidt, Sebastian; Kurfürst, Maximilian [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Sehner, Susanne [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Schmidt-Holtz, Jakob; Derlin, Thorsten; Behzadi, Cyrus [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Nagel, Hans D. [Science & Technology for Radiology, Fritz-Reuter-Weg 5f, 21244 Buchholz, Germany, (Germany); Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To compare both image quality and visibility of normal and abnormal findings at submillisievert chest CT (smSv-CT) using filtered back projection (FBP) and the two different iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques iterative model reconstruction (IMR) and iDose{sup 4}™. Materials and methods: This institutional review board approved study was based on retrospective interpretation of clinically indicated acquired data. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. 81 patients with suspected pneumonia underwent smSv-CT (Brilliance iCT, Philips Healthcare; mean effective dose: 0.86 ± 0.2 mSv). Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR techniques iDose{sup 4}™ and IMR (Philips Healthcare) at various iteration levels. Objective image noise (OIN) was measured. Two experienced readers independently assessed all images for image noise, image appearance and visibility of normal anatomic and abnormal findings. A random intercept model was used for statistical analysis. Results: Compared to FBP and iDose{sup 4}™, IMR reduced OIN up to 88% and 72%, respectively (p < 0.001). A mild blotchy image appearance was seen in IMR images, affecting diagnostic confidence. iDose{sup 4}™ images provided satisfactory to good image quality for visibility of normal and abnormal findings and were superior to FBP (p < 0.001). IMR images were significantly inferior for visibility of normal structures compared to iDose{sup 4}™, while being superior for visibility of abnormal findings except for reticular pattern (p < 0.001). Conclusion: IMR results for visibility of normal and abnormal lung findings are heterogeneous, indicating that IMR may not represent a priority technique for clinical routine. iDose{sup 4}™ represents a suitable method for evaluation of lung tissue at submillisievert chest CT.

  3. Comparison of image quality and visibility of normal and abnormal findings at submillisievert chest CT using filtered back projection, iterative model reconstruction (IMR) and iDose4™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laqmani, Azien; Avanesov, Maxim; Butscheidt, Sebastian; Kurfürst, Maximilian; Sehner, Susanne; Schmidt-Holtz, Jakob; Derlin, Thorsten; Behzadi, Cyrus; Nagel, Hans D; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2016-11-01

    To compare both image quality and visibility of normal and abnormal findings at submillisievert chest CT (smSv-CT) using filtered back projection (FBP) and the two different iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques iterative model reconstruction (IMR) and iDose 4 ™. This institutional review board approved study was based on retrospective interpretation of clinically indicated acquired data. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. 81 patients with suspected pneumonia underwent smSv-CT (Brilliance iCT, Philips Healthcare; mean effective dose: 0.86±0.2mSv). Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR techniques iDose 4 ™ and IMR (Philips Healthcare) at various iteration levels. Objective image noise (OIN) was measured. Two experienced readers independently assessed all images for image noise, image appearance and visibility of normal anatomic and abnormal findings. A random intercept model was used for statistical analysis. Compared to FBP and iDose 4 ™, IMR reduced OIN up to 88% and 72%, respectively (p<0.001). A mild blotchy image appearance was seen in IMR images, affecting diagnostic confidence. iDose 4 ™ images provided satisfactory to good image quality for visibility of normal and abnormal findings and were superior to FBP (p<0.001). IMR images were significantly inferior for visibility of normal structures compared to iDose 4 ™, while being superior for visibility of abnormal findings except for reticular pattern (p<0.001). IMR results for visibility of normal and abnormal lung findings are heterogeneous, indicating that IMR may not represent a priority technique for clinical routine. iDose 4 ™ represents a suitable method for evaluation of lung tissue at submillisievert chest CT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Early evaluation of cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglu) with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and clinical assessment in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) patients before and after ventricular shunt placement: preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Lavalle, Mariadea; Leccisotti, Lucia; Giordano, Alessandro [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Rome (Italy); Mangiola, Annunziato; De Bonis, Pasquale; Anile, Carmelo [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Institute of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy); Indovina, Luca [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Institute of Physics, Rome (Italy); Marra, Camillo [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Institute of Neurology, Rome (Italy); Pelliccioni, Armando [Istituto Nazionale per l' Assicurazione contro gli Infortuni sul Lavoro (INAIL), Rome (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    We evaluated the relationships between the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglu) measured by dynamic {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and the clinical and neuropsychological assessment before and after the surgical procedure in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) patients. Eleven selected INPH patients underwent clinical assessment (modified Rankin scale, Krauss scale, Larsson categorization system and Stein-Langfitt scale), cognitive evaluation (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE) and dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan 3 days before and 1 week after ventricular shunt placement. After shunting, the global CMRglu significantly increased (2.95 {+-} 0.44 vs 4.38 {+-} 0.68, p = 10{sup -7}) in all INPH patients with a mean percentage value of 48.7%. After shunting, no significant change was found in the Evans ratio whereas a significant decrease in all clinical scale scores was observed. Only a slight reduction in the MMSE was found. After shunting, a significant correlation between the global CMRglu value and clinical assessment was found (R {sup 2} = 0.75, p = 0.024); indeed all clinical scale scores varied (decreasing) and the CMRglu value also varied (increasing) in all INPH patients. Our preliminary data show that changes in the CMRglu are promptly reversible after surgery and that there is a relationship between the early metabolic changes and clinical symptoms, independently from the simultaneous changes in the ventricular size. The remarkable and prompt improvement in the global CMRglu and in symptoms may also have important implications for the current concept of ''neuronal plasticity'' and for the cells' reactivity in order to recover their metabolic function. (orig.)

  5. Observation of the human fetal corpses with maxillofacial malformations. 1. CT and MRI examinations of the fetal cleft lip and/or palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Chikara; Nakano, Yoko; Shigematsu, Shiro

    1999-01-01

    Of the various types of congenital malformations, the cleft lip and/or palate is one of the most frequent. Observation of human fetal corpses exhibiting cleft lip and palate is very important to research on its onset of its mechanism and development. In recent years, some of researchers have performed clinical studies on prenatal diagnosis and surgical treatment for the entirety. However, there have hardly been any reports on detailed observations of the maxillofacial structure of a fetus with cleft lip and palate. We seized an opportunity of observing the maxillofacial structure of fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate using three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) and MR imaging as non-disjunctive methods. In the present study, nine fetal corpses having cleft lip and/or palate were examined. The results were as follows: CT and MRI were useful for non-invasive observation of the maxillofacial structure, including soft tissues. Because the osseous tissues of young fetus tissue is not fully mature, observation of bone structures was slightly difficult. When corpses were immersed in formalin for a long time, osseous tissue was decalcified, thus making it difficult to obtain clear images. We could observe the details of the maxillofacial structures such as the alveolar process, the hard palate, the maxillary sinus, the nasal cavity, the nasal bone, and the vomer, in some of the cases. 3D-CT and MR findings observed in the fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate should provide some basement of the imaging diagnosis of congenital disorder. (author))

  6. Observation of the human fetal corpses with maxillofacial malformations. 1. CT and MRI examinations of the fetal cleft lip and/or palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Chikara; Nakano, Yoko; Shigematsu, Shiro [Tokyo Dental Coll., Chiba (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-06-01

    Of the various types of congenital malformations, the cleft lip and/or palate is one of the most frequent. Observation of human fetal corpses exhibiting cleft lip and palate is very important to research on its onset of its mechanism and development. In recent years, some of researchers have performed clinical studies on prenatal diagnosis and surgical treatment for the entirey. However, there have hardly been any reports on detailed observations of the maxillofacial structure of a fetus with cleft lip and palate. We seized an opportunity of observing the maxillofacial structure of fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate using three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) and MR imaging as non-disjunctive methods. In the present study, nine fetal corpses having cleft lip and/or palate were examined. The results were as follows: CT and MRI were useful for non-invasive observation of the maxillofacial structure, including soft tissues. Because the osseous tissues of young fetus tissue is not fully mature, observation of bone structures was slightly difficult. When corpses were immersed in formalin for a long time, osseous tissue was decalcified, thus making it difficult to obtain clear images. We could observe the details of the maxillofacial structures such as the alveolar process, the hard palate, the maxillary sinus, the nasal cavity, the nasal bone, and the vomer, in some of the cases. 3D-CT and MR findings observed in the fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate should provide some basement of the imaging diagnosis of congenital disorder. (author)

  7. Checklist and scoring system for the assessment of soft tissue preservation in CT examinations of human mummies. Application to the Tyrolean Iceman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzer, Stephanie [Trauma Center Murnau (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Trauma Center Murnau and Paracelsus Medical Univ. Salzburg, Murnau (Germany). Inst. of Biomechanics; Pernter, Patrizia [Central Hospital, Bozen (Italy). Dept. of Radiodiagnostics; Piombino-Mascali, Dario; Jankauskas, Rimantas [Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania). Dept. of Anatomy, Histology and Anthropology; Zesch, Stephanie; Rosendahl, Wilfried [Reiss-Engelhorn Museen, Mannheim (Germany). German Mummy Project; Hotz, Gerhard [Natural History Museum of Basel (Switzerland). Anthropology; Zink, Albert R. [EURAC-Institute for Mummies and the Iceman, Bolzano (Italy)

    2017-12-15

    Soft tissues make a skeleton into a mummy and they allow for a diagnosis beyond osteology. Following the approach of structured reporting in clinical radiology, a recently developed checklist was used to evaluate the soft tissue preservation status of the Tyrolean Iceman using computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this study was to apply the ''Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies'' to the Tyrolean Iceman, and to compare the Iceman's soft tissue preservation score to the scores calculated for other mummies. A whole-body (CT) (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) consisting of five scans, performed in January 2013 in the Department of Radiodiagnostics, Central Hospital, Bolzano, was used (slice thickness 0.6mm; kilovolt ranging from80 to 140). For standardized evaluation the ''CT Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in Human Mummies'' was used. All checkpoints under category ''A. Soft Tissues of Head and Musculoskeletal System'' and more than half in category ''B. Organs and Organ Systems'' were observed. The scoring system accounted for a total score of 153 (out of 200). The comparison of the scores between the Iceman and three mummy collections from Vilnius, Lithuania, and Palermo, Sicily, as well as one Egyptian mummy resulted in overall higher soft tissue preservation scores for the Iceman. Application of the checklist allowed for standardized assessment and documentation of the Iceman's soft tissue preservation status. The scoring system allowed for a quantitative comparison between the Iceman and other mummies. The Iceman showed remarkable soft tissue preservation.

  8. Checklist and scoring system for the assessment of soft tissue preservation in CT examinations of human mummies. Application to the Tyrolean Iceman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Soft tissues make a skeleton into a mummy and they allow for a diagnosis beyond osteology. Following the approach of structured reporting in clinical radiology, a recently developed checklist was used to evaluate the soft tissue preservation status of the Tyrolean Iceman using computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this study was to apply the ''Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies'' to the Tyrolean Iceman, and to compare the Iceman's soft tissue preservation score to the scores calculated for other mummies. A whole-body (CT) (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) consisting of five scans, performed in January 2013 in the Department of Radiodiagnostics, Central Hospital, Bolzano, was used (slice thickness 0.6mm; kilovolt ranging from80 to 140). For standardized evaluation the ''CT Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in Human Mummies'' was used. All checkpoints under category ''A. Soft Tissues of Head and Musculoskeletal System'' and more than half in category ''B. Organs and Organ Systems'' were observed. The scoring system accounted for a total score of 153 (out of 200). The comparison of the scores between the Iceman and three mummy collections from Vilnius, Lithuania, and Palermo, Sicily, as well as one Egyptian mummy resulted in overall higher soft tissue preservation scores for the Iceman. Application of the checklist allowed for standardized assessment and documentation of the Iceman's soft tissue preservation status. The scoring system allowed for a quantitative comparison between the Iceman and other mummies. The Iceman showed remarkable soft tissue preservation.

  9. SU-E-I-40: Effective Dose Normalized to Dose Length Product for Pediatric and Adult Reference Phantoms in Computed Tomography Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamart, S; Kim, K; Bolch, W; Lee, C

    2012-06-01

    To develop a set of conversion factors from dose length product (DLP) to effective dose (E) for pediatric and adult reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations. This study used 12 hybrid computational phantoms representing reference pediatric and adult individuals in compliance with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference data. The phantoms were combined with a model of the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner, to compute organ doses from CT examinations using a radiation transport code, MCNPX2.7. Effective doses based on ICRP 60 and 103 tissue weighting factors were calculated. The DLP was derived from the scan length and Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI)vol. The resulting DLP-to-E conversion factors were analyzed. The results consist in a set of DLP-to-E conversion factors for head, chest, abdomen, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis CT examinations for newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old and adult reference phantoms, for 80, 100 and 120 kVp and for ICRP 60 and 103 tissue weighting factors. The DLP-to-E factors decrease with smaller tube potential, with the greatest decrease for the head examinations for which values at 80 kVp are 20% smaller than at 120 kVp on average. The ICRP 103 weighting factors, compared to ICRP 60, Result in variations of DLP-to-E from 0.8 to 1.2-fold with a systematic increase for the chest, 1.14- fold on average, due to the increased breast weighting factor. The DLP-to-E factors for the body examinations are relatively similar to each other but 5 to 12-fold higher than for the head exam. The factors decrease with age until 15 years and then slightly increase for adult except for head. An updated set of DLP-to-E conversion factors were established based on more realistic human phantoms and provide an improved accuracy to obtain effective dose from DLP for patients undergoing CT examinations. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. CT manifestation of hepatic toxoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Qing; Yang Yaying; Bao Yanming; He Bo; Wang Kechao; Song Guangyi; Lu Lin; Wang Xiaoli

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT manifestation of hepatic toxoplasmosis, and to provide image basis for its clinical diagnosis. Methods: Three patients with hepatic toxoplasmosis were examined by abdomen MSCT (pre- and post-contrast), and were confirmed by laboratory exams. The images were analyzed with information of clinical manifestation. Results: The positive appearances included the enlargement of liver, patches of multiple scattered low densities. Post-contrast lesions appearances: (1) No significant enhancement. (2) No significant occupying effection, and normal vessels inserting lesion occasionally. Conclusion: CT manifestation of hepar toxoplasmosis are some characteristic. But the diagnosis was made by a combination both clinical manifestation and laboratory exams. (authors)

  11. Perfusion CT of the Brain and Liver and of Lung Tumors: Use of Monte Carlo Simulation for Patient Dose Estimation for Examinations With a Cone-Beam 320-MDCT Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Maria; Geleijns, Jacob; Joemai, Raoul M S; Salvadó, Marçal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the patient dose from perfusion CT examinations of the brain, lung tumors, and the liver on a cone-beam 320-MDCT scanner using a Monte Carlo simulation and the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). A Monte Carlo simulation based on the Electron Gamma Shower Version 4 package code was used to calculate organ doses and the effective dose in the reference computational phantoms for an adult man and adult woman as published by the ICRP. Three perfusion CT acquisition protocols--brain, lung tumor, and liver perfusion--were evaluated. Additionally, dose assessments were performed for the skin and for the eye lens. Conversion factors were obtained to estimate effective doses and organ doses from the volume CT dose index and dose-length product. The sex-averaged effective doses were approximately 4 mSv for perfusion CT of the brain and were between 23 and 26 mSv for the perfusion CT body protocols. The eye lens dose from the brain perfusion CT examination was approximately 153 mGy. The sex-averaged peak entrance skin dose (ESD) was 255 mGy for the brain perfusion CT studies, 157 mGy for the lung tumor perfusion CT studies, and 172 mGy for the liver perfusion CT studies. The perfusion CT protocols for imaging the brain, lung tumors, and the liver performed on a 320-MDCT scanner yielded patient doses that are safely below the threshold doses for deterministic effects. The eye lens dose, peak ESD, and effective doses can be estimated for other clinical perfusion CT examinations from the conversion factors that were derived in this study.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child for the CT examination. top of page What does the CT equipment look like? The CT scanner is typically a large machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the center. A moveable ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ... the technologist verifies that the images are of high enough quality for accurate interpretation. The CT examination ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Torso FDG-PET Scans by Using Anatomical Standardization of Normal Cases from Thorough Physical Examinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hara

    Full Text Available Understanding of standardized uptake value (SUV of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET depends on the background accumulations of glucose because the SUV often varies the status of patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a new method for quantitative analysis of SUV of FDG-PET scan images. The method included an anatomical standardization and a statistical comparison with normal cases by using Z-score that are often used in SPM or 3D-SSP approach for brain function analysis. Our scheme consisted of two approaches, which included the construction of a normal model and the determination of the SUV scores as Z-score index for measuring the abnormality of an FDG-PET scan image. To construct the normal torso model, all of the normal images were registered into one shape, which indicated the normal range of SUV at all voxels. The image deformation process consisted of a whole body rigid registration of shoulder to bladder region and liver registration and a non-linear registration of body surface by using the thin-plate spline technique. In order to validate usefulness of our method, we segment suspicious regions on FDG-PET images manually, and obtained the Z-scores of the regions based on the corresponding voxels that stores the mean and the standard deviations from the normal model. We collected 243 (143 males and 100 females normal cases to construct the normal model. We also extracted 432 abnormal spots from 63 abnormal cases (73 cancer lesions to validate the Z-scores. The Z-scores of 417 out of 432 abnormal spots were higher than 2.0, which statistically indicated the severity of the spots. In conclusions, the Z-scores obtained by our computerized scheme with anatomical standardization of torso region would be useful for visualization and detection of subtle lesions on FDG-PET scan images even when the SUV may not clearly show an abnormality.

  16. What is the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwanseop [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kwanseop@hallym.or.kr; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Jeon, Eui Yong; Koh, Sung Hye [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kwangseon [Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The objective of our study was to estimate the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after abdominoplevic CT. A total of 104 patients initially underwent abdominopelvic CT before appendix US due to acute abdominal pain. All CT examinations were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of acute appendicitis. The findings of appendix on CT were classified into five categories (definite appendicitis, probably appendicitis, equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, probably not appendicitis, and normal looking appendix). Appendix US images and their radiologic reports were also evaluated retrospectively. Then, CT and US findings were correlated with clinical or pathologic diagnosis. Three all patients with definite appendicitis initially on CT again showed US findings of appendicitis. In the 32 patients of probably appendicitis on CT, US showed normal looking appendix in seven patients (21.8%, 7 of 32) who improved with medical treatment and discharged. In the 16 patients of equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, US showed appendicitis in seven patients (43.8%, 7 of 16) and normal looking appendix in nine patients. In the 12 patients of probably not appendicitis on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in two patients (16.7%, 2 of 12). In the 41 patients of normal looking appendix on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in five patients (12.2%, 5 of 41). US reevaluation enables us to avoid misdiagnosis of appendicitis on CT and improve diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis.

  17. [Examination of the enzymatic functions of the normal liver in black Africans (Apropos of 50 Senegalese cases)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankale, M; Diop, B; Agbetra, M; Seck, I; Noujaim, S; Jacqueson, M

    1977-01-01

    In order to establish the hepatic enzymogram in healthy African black people, four enzymes have been studied in 50 apparently healthy male Africans: transaminases (GOT, GPT), alcaline phosphatases, ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT). The findings do not show any difference with the usually admitted levels in European countries, except for alcaline phosphatases which are situated at the upper limit of the normal.

  18. Does negative retroperitoneal CT in adolescents with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma preclude the need of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection?; A tomografia de retroperitoneo normal em adolescentes com rabdomiossarcoma paratesticular afasta necessidade de linfadenectomia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damazio, Eulalio [Hospital Lucano, Teresina (PI) (Brazil); Caran, Eliana [Instituto de Oncologia Pediatrica, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - UNIFESP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ortiz, Valdemar; Macedo Junior, Antonio, E-mail: macedo.dcir@epm.br [Departamento de Urologia, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - UNIFESP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    We report on a 16-year-old male with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma who underwent retroperitoneal lymph node dissection due to a stage I tumor (normal retroperitoneal computed tomography). The surgical finding was three enlarged nodes, positive for metastatic disease. Patient was referred to adjuvant chemotherapy. This case suggests that the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group IV protocol is subject to questions regarding adolescents with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma, and that negative retroperitoneal CT does not preclude the need of lymph node dissection. (author)

  19. Biometric correspondence between reface computerized facial approximations and CT-derived ground truth skin surface models objectively examined using an automated facial recognition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Connie L; Monson, Keith L

    2018-05-01

    This study employed an automated facial recognition system as a means of objectively evaluating biometric correspondence between a ReFace facial approximation and the computed tomography (CT) derived ground truth skin surface of the same individual. High rates of biometric correspondence were observed, irrespective of rank class (R k ) or demographic cohort examined. Overall, 48% of the test subjects' ReFace approximation probes (n=96) were matched to his or her corresponding ground truth skin surface image at R 1 , a rank indicating a high degree of biometric correspondence and a potential positive identification. Identification rates improved with each successively broader rank class (R 10 =85%, R 25 =96%, and R 50 =99%), with 100% identification by R 57 . A sharp increase (39% mean increase) in identification rates was observed between R 1 and R 10 across most rank classes and demographic cohorts. In contrast, significantly lower (pidentification rates were observed between R 10 and R 25 (8% mean increase) and R 25 and R 50 (3% mean increase). No significant (p>0.05) performance differences were observed across demographic cohorts or CT scan protocols. Performance measures observed in this research suggest that ReFace approximations are biometrically similar to the actual faces of the approximated individuals and, therefore, may have potential operational utility in contexts in which computerized approximations are utilized as probes in automated facial recognition systems. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Panzer

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a checklist for standardized assessment of soft tissue preservation in human mummies based on whole-body computed tomography examinations, and to add a scoring system to facilitate quantitative comparison of mummies. Computed tomography examinations of 23 mummies from the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily (17 adults, 6 children; 17 anthropogenically and 6 naturally mummified and 7 mummies from the crypt of the Dominican Church of the Holy Spirit of Vilnius, Lithuania (5 adults, 2 children; all naturally mummified were used to develop the checklist following previously published guidelines. The scoring system was developed by assigning equal scores for checkpoints with equivalent quality. The checklist was evaluated by intra- and inter-observer reliability. The finalized checklist was applied to compare the groups of anthropogenically and naturally mummified bodies. The finalized checklist contains 97 checkpoints and was divided into two main categories, "A. Soft Tissues of Head and Musculoskeletal System" and "B. Organs and Organ Systems", each including various subcategories. The complete checklist had an intra-observer reliability of 98% and an inter-observer reliability of 93%. Statistical comparison revealed significantly higher values in anthropogenically compared to naturally mummified bodies for the total score and for three subcategories. In conclusion, the developed checklist allows for a standardized assessment and documentation of soft tissue preservation in whole-body computed tomography examinations of human mummies. The scoring system facilitates a quantitative comparison of the soft tissue preservation status between single mummies or mummy collections.

  1. Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Stephanie; Mc Coy, Mark R; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Piombino-Mascali, Dario; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Zink, Albert R; Augat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a checklist for standardized assessment of soft tissue preservation in human mummies based on whole-body computed tomography examinations, and to add a scoring system to facilitate quantitative comparison of mummies. Computed tomography examinations of 23 mummies from the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily (17 adults, 6 children; 17 anthropogenically and 6 naturally mummified) and 7 mummies from the crypt of the Dominican Church of the Holy Spirit of Vilnius, Lithuania (5 adults, 2 children; all naturally mummified) were used to develop the checklist following previously published guidelines. The scoring system was developed by assigning equal scores for checkpoints with equivalent quality. The checklist was evaluated by intra- and inter-observer reliability. The finalized checklist was applied to compare the groups of anthropogenically and naturally mummified bodies. The finalized checklist contains 97 checkpoints and was divided into two main categories, "A. Soft Tissues of Head and Musculoskeletal System" and "B. Organs and Organ Systems", each including various subcategories. The complete checklist had an intra-observer reliability of 98% and an inter-observer reliability of 93%. Statistical comparison revealed significantly higher values in anthropogenically compared to naturally mummified bodies for the total score and for three subcategories. In conclusion, the developed checklist allows for a standardized assessment and documentation of soft tissue preservation in whole-body computed tomography examinations of human mummies. The scoring system facilitates a quantitative comparison of the soft tissue preservation status between single mummies or mummy collections.

  2. Prenatal examination of the area and morphology of the atrioventricular valves using four-dimensional ultrasound in normal and abnormal hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, B.M.E.; Uittenbogaard, L.B.; Tromp, C.H.N.; Schaefer, S.S.; Heymans, M.W.; van Vugt, J.M.G.; Haak, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our aim is to evaluate the feasibility to examine the morphology and area of the atrioventricular (AV) valves in normal fetuses and fetuses with cardiac defects using spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC). Methods: Atrioventricular valves were analyzed longitudinally in STIC volumes of

  3. Prenatal examination of the area and morphology of the atrioventricular valves using four-dimensional ultrasound in normal and abnormal hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, B.M.; Uittenbogaard, L.B.; Tromp, C.H.; Schaefer, S.S.; Heymans, M.W.; Vugt, J.M.G. van; Haak, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim is to evaluate the feasibility to examine the morphology and area of the atrioventricular (AV) valves in normal fetuses and fetuses with cardiac defects using spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC). METHODS: Atrioventricular valves were analyzed longitudinally in STIC volumes of

  4. CT in three cases of syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Sakuta, Manabu; Yagishita, Akira; Inoue, Kiyoharu.

    1983-01-01

    We presented the results of our experience with metrizamide computed tomographic myelography (MCTM) and myelography in three cases of syringomyelia. In case 1, MCTM revealed Chiari malformation, even though this malformation was not clear in the myelography. In case 3, Chiari malformation was apparent in MCTM and in the myelography. In case 1, CT of the spinal cord without enhancement (plain CT) showed a syrinx in the cervical spinal cord, and MCTM made the syrinx clearer with enhancement. MCTM also demonstrated a cavity at the levels of Th 6 and L 1 of the vertebra. In case 2, a syrinx was disclosed in MCTM, in spite of normal myelography. In case 3, myelography demonstrated a spinal cord swelling. MCTM made a syrinx less clear than plain CT. Not only MCTM but also plain CT is an excellent method for the recognition of syringomyelia. The non-invasive plain CT is the first choice of the examinations in cases with syrinogomyelia, because MCTM may make a syrinx obscure. CT and MCTM have to be performed at many levels of the spinal cord in case with syringomyelia. CT or MCTM may demonstrate a syrinx or a cavity at the levels of the spinal cord, where no syrinx is suspected to exist by clinical features, as well as at the levels appearing normal in the myelography. (author)

  5. Experimental examination of tunneling paths in SiGe/Si gate-normal tunneling field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, S.; von den Driesch, N.; Strangio, S.; Schulte-Braucks, C.; Rieger, T.; Narimani, K.; Buca, D.; Mantl, S.; Zhao, Q. T.

    2017-12-01

    The benefits of a gate-normal tunneling architecture in enhancing the on-current and average subthreshold swing of tunneling field-effect transistors were scrutinized in experiment through careful physical analysis of a Si0.50Ge0.50/Si heterostructure. In accordance with theoretical predictions, it is confirmed that the on-current is governed by line tunneling scaling with the source-gate overlap area of our devices. Our analysis identifies the early onset of parasitic diagonal tunneling paths as most detrimental for a low average subthreshold swing. By counter doping the channel, this onset can be shifted favorably, permitting low average subthreshold swings down to 87 mV/dec over four decades of drain current and high on-off current ratios exceeding 106.

  6. Expanded Normal Weight Obesity and Insulin Resistance in US Adults of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keilah E. Martinez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to expand the evaluation of normal weight obesity (NWO and its association with insulin resistance using an NHANES (1999–2006 sample of US adults. A cross-sectional study including 5983 men and women (50.8% was conducted. Body fat percentage (BF% was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Expanded normal weight obesity (eNWO categories, pairings of BMI and body fat percentage classifications, were created using standard cut-points for BMI and sex-specific median for BF%. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR levels were used to index insulin resistance. Mean ± SE values were BMI: 27.9 ± 0.2 (women and 27.8 ± 0.1 (men; body fat percentage: 40.5 ± 0.2 (women and 27.8 ± 0.2 (men; and HOMA-IR: 2.04 ± 0.05 (women and 2.47 ± 0.09 (men. HOMA-IR differed systematically and in a dose-response fashion across all levels of the eNWO categories (F=291.3, P<0.0001. As BMI levels increased, HOMA-IR increased significantly, and within each BMI category, higher levels of body fat were associated with higher levels of HOMA-IR. Both high BMI and high BF% were strongly related to insulin resistance. Insulin resistance appears to increase incrementally according to BMI levels primarily and body fat levels secondarily. Including a precise measure of body fat with BMI adds little to the utility of BMI in the prediction of insulin resistance.

  7. Neck after total laryngectomy: CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSantis, D.J.; Balfe, D.M.; Hayden, R.E.; Sagel, S.S.; Sessions, D.; Lee, J.K.T.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomographic scans in 23 patients who had undergone total laryngectomy were analyzed retrospectively to determine normal postoperative appearance and to evaluate the role of CT in assessing recurrent neoplasm. Nine patients without clinical evidence of recurrence illustrated the normal postoperative changes: a round or ovoid neopharynx connecting the base of the tongue with the cervical esophagus and intact fat planes surrounding the neopharynx, neurovascular bundles, and sternocleidomastoid muscles. In the 12 patients with recurrent neoplasm, the CT manifestations included masses involving the internal jugular lymph node chain, tracheostomy site, or paratracheal region. CT supplemented physical examination and indirect mirror examination, providing data regarding presence and extent of recurrent tumor and aiding in planning the mode and scope of therapy

  8. Non-small cell carcinoma: Comparison of postoperative intra- and extrathoracic recurrence assessment capability of qualitatively and/or quantitatively assessed FDG-PET/CT and standard radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yumiko; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Nogami, Munenobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Keiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the capability of integrated FDG-PET/CT for assessment of postoperative intra- and extrathoracic recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with that of standard radiological examinations. Materials and methods: A total of 121 consecutive pathologically diagnosed NSCLC patients (80 males, 41 females; mean age, 71 years) underwent pathologically and surgically confirmed complete resection, followed by prospective integrated FDG-PET/CT and standard radiological examinations. Final diagnosis of recurrence was based on the results of more than 12 months of follow-up and/or pathological examinations. The probability of recurrence was assessed with either method for each patient by using 5-point visual scoring system, and final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. ROC analysis was used to compare the capability of the two methods for assessment of postoperative recurrence on a per-patient basis. The ROC-based positive test was used to determine optimal cut-off value for FDG uptake measurement at a site suspected on the basis of qualitatively assessed PET/CT. Finally, sensitivities, specificities and accuracies of all methods were compared by means of McNemar's test. Results: Areas under the curve of qualitatively assessed PET/CT and standard radiological examinations showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). At an optimal cut-off value of 2.5, specificity and accuracy of quantitatively and qualitatively assessed PET/CT were significantly higher than those of qualitatively assessed PET/CT and standard radiological examinations (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Accuracy of assessment of postoperative intra- and extrathoracic recurrence in NSCLC patients by qualitative and/or quantitative FDG-PET/CT is equivalent to or higher than that by standard radiological examinations.

  9. Thyroid CT number and its relationship to iodine concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Y.; Konishi, J.; Harioka, T.; Misaki, T.; Endo, K.; Torizuka, K.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty-seven patients with thyroid disease and 24 normal controls were examined with computed tomography (CT). The mean CT number (Hounsfield units +/- SD) in the normal controls (118.1 +/- 12.2) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the mean CT number in patients with diseased thyroids, except for 2 cases of simple goiter (CT numbers 113, 132). The Graves disease (69.5 +/- 17.6) amd Hishimoto thyroiditis (61.4 +/- 9.1) were significaantly higher than those in patients with adenoma (41.7 +/- 10.6, p < 0.001), cyst (33.1 +/- 14.8, p < 0.001), or cancer (48.7 +/- 13, p < 0.01). In 14 patients studied, a significant correlation was observed between thyroid CT numbers and the iodine concentration of the tissue (r = 0.889; p < 0.001)

  10. The ExPeCT (Examining Exercise, Prostate Cancer and Circulating Tumour Cells) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheill, Gráinne; Brady, Lauren; Guinan, Emer; Hayes, Brian; Casey, Orla; Greene, John; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Cahill, Fidelma; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Peat, Nicola; Rudman, Sarah; Hussey, Juliette; Cunningham, Moya; Grogan, Liam; Lynch, Thomas; Manecksha, Rustom P; McCaffrey, John; Mucci, Lorelei; Sheils, Orla; O'Leary, John; O'Donnell, Dearbhaile M; McDermott, Ray; Finn, Stephen

    2017-10-04

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the second most common cancer in Ireland. Many men present with locally advanced or metastatic cancer for whom curative surgery is inappropriate. Advanced cancer patients are encouraged to remain physically active and therefore there is a need to investigate how patients with metastatic disease tolerate physical activity programmes. Physical activity reduces levels of systemic inflammatory mediators and so an aerobic exercise intervention may represent an accessible and cost-effective means of ameliorating the pro-inflammatory effects of obesity and subsequently decrease poor cancer-specific outcomes in this patient population. This study will assess the feasibility and safety of introducing a structured aerobic exercise intervention to an advanced cancer population. This study will also examine if the evasion of immune editing by circulating tumour cells (CTCs) is an exercise-modifiable mechanism in obese men with prostate cancer. This international multicentre prospective study will recruit men with metastatic prostate cancer. Participants will be recruited from centres in Dublin (Ireland) and London (UK). Participants will be divided into exposed and non-exposed groups based on body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m 2 and randomised to intervention and control groups. The exercise group will undertake a regular supervised aerobic exercise programme, whereas the control group will not. Exercise intensity will be prescribed based on a target heart rate monitored by a polar heart rate monitor. Blood samples will be taken at recruitment and at 3 and 6 months to examine the primary endpoint of platelet cloaking of CTCs. Participants will complete a detailed questionnaire to assess quality of life (QoL) and other parameters at each visit. The overall aim of the ExPeCT trial is to examine the relationship between PrCa, exercise, obesity, and systemic inflammation, and to improve the overall QoL in men with advanced disease. Results will

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the CT technologist or nurse at the time of the CT examination. If your child has ... detectors rotate around the patient. At the same time, the examination table is moving through the scanner, ...

  12. CT doses in cylindrical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, J.V.; Huda, W.

    1995-01-01

    A single CT scan of thickness T in a cylindrical phantom produces a three-dimensional dose distribution, which depends primarily on the photon energy spectrum, the x-ray beam shaping filter and the size and composition of the irradiated phantom. Monte Carlo simulations employing monoenergetic photons were employed to investigate the effect of each of these factors on phantom dose distributions. The fractional energies scattered, imparted and transmitted through the CT phantom were calculated. A dose index (D(r)), which is a function of phantom radius r, was computed. Phantom materials investigated included lung, fat, water, soft tissue, acrylic and bone with calculations performed for head (160 mm diameter) and body (320 mm diameter) phantoms. All dose and energy imparted data generated for CT phantoms were normalized using an 'in air' dose (D air ), which is defined as the axial dose (in acrylic) at the isocentre in the absence of any phantom. Results obtained show how CT parameters impact on doses in cylindrical phantoms. These dosimetry data are likely to be useful to estimate energy imparted to phantoms (and patients) undergoing CT examinations. (author)

  13. TH-E-BRF-04: Characterizing the Response of Texture-Based CT Image Features for Quantification of Radiation-Induced Normal Lung Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, S; Court, L; Briere, T; Martel, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation induced lung damage (RILD) is an important dose-limiting toxicity for patients treated with radiation therapy. Scoring systems for RILD are subjective and limit our ability to find robust predictors of toxicity. We investigate the dose and time-related response for texture-based lung CT image features that serve as potential quantitative measures of RILD. Methods: Pre- and post-RT diagnostic imaging studies were collected for retrospective analysis of 21 patients treated with photon or proton radiotherapy for NSCLC. Total lung and selected isodose contours (0–5, 5–15, 15–25Gy, etc.) were deformably registered from the treatment planning scan to the pre-RT and available follow-up CT studies for each patient. A CT image analysis framework was utilized to extract 3698 unique texture-based features (including co-occurrence and run length matrices) for each region of interest defined by the isodose contours and the total lung volume. Linear mixed models were fit to determine the relationship between feature change (relative to pre-RT), planned dose and time post-RT. Results: Seventy-three follow-up CT scans from 21 patients (median: 3 scans/patient) were analyzed to describe CT image feature change. At the p=0.05 level, dose affected feature change in 2706 (73.1%) of the available features. Similarly, time affected feature change in 408 (11.0%) of the available features. Both dose and time were significant predictors of feature change in a total of 231 (6.2%) of the extracted image features. Conclusion: Characterizing the dose and time-related response of a large number of texture-based CT image features is the first step toward identifying objective measures of lung toxicity necessary for assessment and prediction of RILD. There is evidence that numerous features are sensitive to both the radiation dose and time after RT. Beyond characterizing feature response, further investigation is warranted to determine the utility of these features as

  14. Relationship between abdominal obesity and alcohol drinking pattern in normal-weight, middle-aged adults: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kye-Yeung; Park, Hoon-Ki; Hwang, Hwan-Sik

    2017-08-01

    Abdominal obesity is associated with obesity-related health risks regardless of body weight. The present study aimed to determine whether alcohol drinking pattern is associated with abdominal obesity in normal-weight, middle-aged adults. Cross-sectional study using complex sampling design analyses. The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which was conducted from 2008 to 2013. Normal-weight participants aged 40-69 years with BMI of 18·5-25·0 kg/m2 (n 11 289, 4491 men and 6798 women) were included. Abdominal obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥90 cm for men or ≥85 cm for women. Alcohol drinking pattern was assessed by self-report on questionnaires. Among 11 289 normal-weight participants, 7·9 % (n 379) of men and 7·6 % (n 609) of women had abdominal obesity. Both men and women who consumed a higher quantity of alcohol per drinking occasion had higher odds (OR; 95 % CI) for abdominal obesity compared with individuals who consumed fewer than 2 drinks (1·86; 1·04, 3·32 for ≥10 drinks/typical occasion in men; and 3·28; 1·13, 9·46 in women). Men who binge drink every day had higher odds for abdominal obesity (2·10; 1·21, 3·63). In both sexes, frequency of alcohol drinking was not associated with normal-weight abdominal obesity. Our study showed that the amount of alcohol drinking per occasion influenced abdominal obesity in normal-weight, middle-aged individuals that may have impacted obesity-related health risks. Healthy alcohol drinking habits need to be controlled for prevention of abdominal obesity even among persons with normal weight.

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays ... time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a ... conventional x-rays, CT scanning provides very detailed images of many ...

  16. Estimation of patient radiation dose from whole body 18F- FDG PET/CT examination in cancer imaging: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, M. H.; Nordin, A. J.; Saad, F. F. Ahmad; Fattah Azman, A. Z.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to estimate the radiation effective dose resulting from whole body fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18F-FDG PET) scanning as compared to conservative Computed Tomography (CT) techniques in evaluating oncology patients. We reviewed 19 oncology patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT at our centre for cancer staging. Internal and external doses were estimated using radioactivity of injected FDG and volume CT Dose Index (CTDIvol), respectively with employment of the published and modified dose coefficients. The median differences of dose among the conservative CT and PET protocols were determined using Kruskal Wallis test with p effective doses of non-contrasted CT, contrasted CT and PET scanning protocols were 7.50 (9.35) mSv, 9.76 (3.67) mSv and 6.30 (1.20) mSv, respectively, resulting in the total dose of 21.46 (8.58) mSv. Statistically significant difference was observed in the median effective dose between the three protocols (p effective doses of whole body 18F-FDG PET technique may be effective the lowest amongst the conventional CT imaging techniques.

  17. Induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing 18F-FDG PET/CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, Matthias S.; Brand, Michael; Wuest, Wolfgang; Anders, Katharina; Uder, Michael; Kuefner, Michael A.; Kuwert, Torsten; Prante, Olaf; Schmidt, Daniela; Maschauer, Simone; Semelka, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing positron emission tomography (PET)/CT using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy and to differentiate between 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and CT-induced DNA lesions. This study was approved by the local Ethics Committee and complies with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) requirements. After written informed consent was obtained, 33 patients underwent whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT (3 MBq/kg body weight, 170/100 reference mAs at 120 kV). The FDG PET and CT portions were performed as an initial CT immediately followed by the PET. Blood samples were obtained before, at various time points following 18 F-FDG application and up to 24 h after the CT scan. Distinct foci representing DSBs were quantified in isolated lymphocytes using fluorescence microscopy after staining against the phosphorylated histone variant γ-H2AX. The DSB values at the various time points were significantly different (p 18 F-FDG administration (median excess foci 0.11/cell, range 0.06-0.27/cell) and 5 min after CT (median excess foci 0.17/cell, range 0.05-0.54/cell). A significant correlation between CT-induced DSBs and dose length product was obtained (ρ = 0.898, p 18 F-FDG injection and 5 min after CT. The radionuclide contributes considerably to the total DSB induction in this setting. (orig.)

  18. 18F-FDG PET/CT qualitative and quantitative evaluation in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients for detection of malignant transformation: comparison of early to delayed imaging with and without liver activity normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirindel, Alin; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Wahl, Richard

    2015-03-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT has shown increased accuracy, compared with morphologic imaging, in differentiating malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) from benign neurofibromas (BNFs) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Delayed (18)F-FDG PET imaging typically enhances malignant tumor to background. Our goal was to compare the effectiveness of early (1-h) and delayed (4-h) (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in differentiating MPNSTs from BNFs in patients with NF1, with and without liver activity normalization. NF1 patients presenting new symptoms or enlarging lesions were clinically evaluated with early and delayed (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging. SULmax (maximum standardized uptake value derived for lean body) and SULmax/liver (lesion uptake adjusted to mean liver activity) were obtained for all sites identified with abnormal metabolic activity. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations, including receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) comparison of early and delayed imaging sessions, were performed. Histopathology and clinical follow-up (1-9 y) were considered as a gold standard. Forty-one NF1 patients with early and delayed (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were identified, and 93 lesions were retrospectively analyzed, representing 24 MPNSTs (all histologically confirmed) and 69 BNFs (26 histologically confirmed). Qualitative evaluation on early imaging showed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for separating MPNSTs from BNFs of 91%, 84%, 67%, and 96% versus 91%, 81%, 63%, and 96%, respectively, on 4-h delayed imaging. The mean SULmax was significantly higher for MPNSTs than BNFs on both early scans (6.5 vs. 2.0, P Qualitative interpretation of (18)F-FDG PET/CT discriminates MPNSTs from BNFs in NF1 patients with similar accuracy on both early and delayed imaging. Quantitative data showed better sensitivity on delayed acquisition and best test specificity with lesion SULmax normalization to liver activity, more so than with delayed

  19. iPad-based primary 2D reading of CT angiography examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, L; Neri, E; Bargellini, I; Scalise, P; Calcagni, F; Mantarro, A; D'Ippolito, G; Bartolozzi, C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the iPad (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) for two-dimensional (2D) reading of CT angiography (CTA) studies performed for suspected acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. 24 CTA examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding confirmed (19/24, 79.2%) or ruled out (5/24, 20.8%) by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively reviewed by three independent readers on a commercial picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation and on an iPad with Retina Display® 64 GB (Apple Inc.). The time needed to complete reading of every CTA examination was recorded, as well as the rate of detection of arterial bleeding and identification of suspected bleeding arteries on both devices. Overall, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values for bleeding detection were not significantly different while using the iPad and workstation (0.774 vs 0.847, 0.947 vs 0.895, 0.6 vs 0.8, 0.9 vs 0.944 and 0.750 vs 0.667, respectively; p > 0.05). In DSA-positive cases, the iPad and workstation allowed correct identification of the bleeding source in 17/19 cases (89.5%) and 15/19 cases (78.9%), respectively (p > 0.05). Finally, the time needed to complete reading of every CTA study was significantly shorter using the iPad (169 ± 74 vs 222 ± 70 s, respectively; p iPad-based preliminary 2D reading of CTA studies has comparable diagnostic accuracy for detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can be significantly faster. The iPad could be used by on-call interventional radiologists for immediate decision on percutaneous embolization in patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  20. Optimization of automated segmentation of monkeypox virus-induced lung lesions from normal lung CT images using hard C-means algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Thomasson, David; Avila, Nilo A.; Hufton, Jennifer; Senseney, Justin; Johnson, Reed F.; Dyall, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Monkeypox virus is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that results in up to 10% mortality in humans. Knowledge of clinical manifestations and temporal progression of monkeypox disease is limited to data collected from rare outbreaks in remote regions of Central and West Africa. Clinical observations show that monkeypox infection resembles variola infection. Given the limited capability to study monkeypox disease in humans, characterization of the disease in animal models is required. A previous work focused on the identification of inflammatory patterns using PET/CT image modality in two non-human primates previously inoculated with the virus. In this work we extended techniques used in computer-aided detection of lung tumors to identify inflammatory lesions from monkeypox virus infection and their progression using CT images. Accurate estimation of partial volumes of lung lesions via segmentation is difficult because of poor discrimination between blood vessels, diseased regions, and outer structures. We used hard C-means algorithm in conjunction with landmark based registration to estimate the extent of monkeypox virus induced disease before inoculation and after disease progression. Automated estimation is in close agreement with manual segmentation.

  1. Frequency and topography of lesions of the femoro-tibial cartilage at spiral CT arthrography of the knee: a study in patients with normal knee radiographs and without history of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vande Berg, B.C.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Malghem, J.

    2002-01-01

    To determine the frequency and topography of cartilage lesions involving the femoro-tibial joints in patients with normal knee radiographs and without a remembered history of trauma.Design and patients. A radiologist retrospectively reviewed the dual-detector spiral CT knee arthrograms performed in 209 consecutive patients (mean age 37.6 years) with normal knee radiographs. Images were analyzed for the presence, grade (Noyes classification system) and location of cartilage lesions, the location being designated by dividing each articular surface into a grid of 16 parts.Results. Fifty-three percent of knees had cartilage lesions of grade 2A or higher that involved articular surfaces to a variable extent: lateral tibial plateau (31%), medial femoral condyle (27%), medial tibial plateau (14%) and lateral femoral condyle (5%). Areas of the posterior half of the lateral tibial plateau and of the inner half of the medial femoral condyle were statistically more frequently involved than their counterparts (P<0.0001). The bare area of the medial tibial plateau, but not that of the lateral tibial plateau, was more frequently involved than the corresponding meniscus-covered area (P<0.0001).Conclusion. Cartilage lesions of grade 2A or higher, detected at spiral CT arthrography in 53% of the knees, predominantly involved the posterior half of the lateral tibial plateau, the inner half of the medial femoral condyle and the bare area of the medial tibial plateau. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of dual-energy CT-derived iodine content and iodine overlay of normal, inflammatory and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma cervical lymph nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, Ahmed M. [Johan Wolfgang Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main, Hessen (Germany); Mansoura University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mansoura (Egypt); Razek, A.A. [Mansoura University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mansoura (Egypt); Kerl, J.M.; Nour-Eldin, N.E.; Bauer, Ralf; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johan Wolfgang Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main, Hessen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate whether dual-energy computed tomography (DECT)-derived iodine content and iodine overlay could differentiate between normal, inflammatory and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cervical lymph nodes. This study was approved by the institutional review board. Sixteen patients with normal lymph nodes, 20 patients with enlarged nodes draining deep cervical inflammations and 23 patients with pathologically proved metastatic SCC nodes who underwent contrast enhanced DECT were retrospectively identified. Iodine content and overlay of 36 normal, 43 inflammatory and 52 metastatic lymph nodes were calculated using circular regions of interest and compared among the three groups. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of iodine content and overlay for diagnosis of metastatic nodes. Iodine content (mg/ml) was significantly lower for metastatic lymph nodes (2.34 ± 0.45) than for normal (2.86 ± 0.37) and inflammatory (3.53 ± 0.56) lymph nodes, P < 0.0001. Iodine overlay (HU) was also significantly lower for metastatic lymph nodes (47 ± 11.6) than normal (57.4 ± 8.2) and inflammatory nodes (69.3 ± 11.5), P < 0.0001. The areas under the ROC curve for iodine content and iodine overlay were 0.923 and 0.896. DECT-derived iodine content and overlay differ significantly among normal, inflammatory and metastatic SCC cervical lymph nodes. (orig.)

  3. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barwick, Tara D. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Lyons, O.T.A.; Waltham, M. [King' s College London, BHF Centre of Research Excellence and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at King' s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mikhaeel, N.G. [Guy' s and St Thomas' Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Oncology, London (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, M.J. [King' s Health Partners, Clinical PET Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal (<3 cm diameter) controls from the same population was assessed. Infra-renal aortic wall FDG uptake was assessed using visual analysis; maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUV{sub max} was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls

  4. CT cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsili, A.

    2012-01-01

    for bladder lesion detection, greatly improving the diagnostic performance of the MDCT cystoscopy in the detection of small-sized tumors. Other limitations are the inability of the technique to provide information about the colour and texture of the bladder mucosa and to produce tissue for histologic examination. For these reasons, at present CT cystoscopy cannot totally replace conventional cystoscopy. The technique is mainly indicated for patients in whom cystoscopy is difficult to perform, contraindicated or unsatisfactory in interpretation. CT cystoscopy can also be used for the long-term follow-up of patients with bladder carcinomas. The high diagnostic performance of the technique in the detection of bladder malignancies may obviate conventional cystoscopy if virtual cystoscopy has negative findings

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Using a multidetector CT unit to examine ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast ...

  6. Induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Brand, Michael; Wuest, Wolfgang; Anders, Katharina; Uder, Michael; Kuefner, Michael A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Kuwert, Torsten; Prante, Olaf; Schmidt, Daniela; Maschauer, Simone [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in blood lymphocytes of patients undergoing positron emission tomography (PET)/CT using {gamma}-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy and to differentiate between {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and CT-induced DNA lesions. This study was approved by the local Ethics Committee and complies with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) requirements. After written informed consent was obtained, 33 patients underwent whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (3 MBq/kg body weight, 170/100 reference mAs at 120 kV). The FDG PET and CT portions were performed as an initial CT immediately followed by the PET. Blood samples were obtained before, at various time points following {sup 18}F-FDG application and up to 24 h after the CT scan. Distinct foci representing DSBs were quantified in isolated lymphocytes using fluorescence microscopy after staining against the phosphorylated histone variant {gamma}-H2AX. The DSB values at the various time points were significantly different (p < 0.001). The median baseline level was 0.08/cell (range 0.06-0.12/cell). Peaks of radiation-induced DSBs were found 30 min after {sup 18}F-FDG administration (median excess foci 0.11/cell, range 0.06-0.27/cell) and 5 min after CT (median excess foci 0.17/cell, range 0.05-0.54/cell). A significant correlation between CT-induced DSBs and dose length product was obtained ({rho} = 0.898, p < 0.001). After 24 h DSB values were still slightly but significantly elevated (median foci 0.11/cell, range 0.10-0.14/cell, p = 0.003) compared to pre-exposure levels. PET/CT-induced DSBs can be monitored using {gamma}-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy. Peak values may be obtained 30 min after {sup 18}F-FDG injection and 5 min after CT. The radionuclide contributes considerably to the total DSB induction in this setting. (orig.)

  7. Cerebral metastases from lung carcinoma: neurological and CT correlation: work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Richmond, B.D.; Klatte, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    To determine the role of brain CT in neurologically asymptomatic lung cancer patients a review was made of the CT and clinical findings in 279 patients. Brain metastases were found in 94.5% of patients with specific abnormal neurological findings, 26.6% of patients with vague neurological signs and symptoms, 11% of patients with oat cell carcinoma and a normal neurological examination, and 40% of patients with adenocarcinoma and a normal neurological examination. Brain metastasis was not seen on CT in the 29 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and a normal neurological examination. It is concluded that brain CT is useful for the detection of occult brain metastases, particularly oat cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, in neurologically asymptomatic lung cancer patients

  8. MO-E-17A-04: Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE) Provides a Simple Method to Calculate Organ Dose for Pediatric CT Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B; Brady, S; Kaufman, R; Mirro, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) mean age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE

  9. MO-E-17A-04: Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE) Provides a Simple Method to Calculate Organ Dose for Pediatric CT Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B; Brady, S; Kaufman, R [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Mirro, A [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) mean age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.

  10. CT appearance of focal fatty infiltration of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halvorsen, R.A.; Korobkin, M.; Ram, P.C.; Thompson, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    Focal fatty infiltration of the liver is an entity that may be confused with liver metastasis on computed tomography (CT). The imaging results and medical records of 16 patients with CT appearance suggestive of focal fatty liver were reviewed, three of whom had the simultaneous presence of metastitic liver disease. Focal fatty liver often has a distinctive appearance with CT, usually with a nonspherical shape, absence of mass effect, and density close to water. Liver metastases are usually round or oval, and unless cystic or necrotic, they have CT attenuation values closer to normal liver parenchyma than water. A radionuclide liver scan almost always resolves any confusion about the differential diagnosis of focal fatty liver: a well defined focus of photon deficiency is due to neoplasm rather than focal fatty infiltration. Sonography sometimes helps to confirm the CT impression, but may be misleading if the diagnosis of focal or diffuse fatty infiltration is not suspected before the examination

  11. Pulmonary CT findings in acute mercury vapour exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Sato, Kimihiko; Heianna, Jyouiti; Hirano, Yoshinori; Omachi, Kohiti; Izumi, Jyunichi; Watarai, Jiro

    2001-01-01

    AIM: We describe the pulmonary computed tomography (CT) findings in acute mercury poisoning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Initial (n= 8) and follow-up (n= 6) chest CT examinations in eight patients exposed to mercury vapour while cutting pipes in a sulphuric acid plant were reviewed. Of the eight patients, two were asymptomatic and had normal CT results, two were asymptomatic but had abnormalities on CT, and four had both acute symptoms and positive CT results. The patients were all men whose ages ranged from 37 to 54 years (mean, 49 years). RESULTS: Poorly defined nodules were present in five of six patients with positive CT findings, present alone in two patients or as part of a mixed pattern in three. They were random in distribution. Alveolar consolidation (n= 3) and areas of ground-glass opacity (n= 4) were observed and were more prominent in the most severely affected patients with the highest blood and urine level of mercury, predominantly in the upper and/or middle zone. These abnormal findings on CT resolved with (n= 1) or without (n= 5) steroid therapy. Pathological findings (n= 1) demonstrated acute interstitial changes predominantly with oedema. CONCLUSION: We report CT findings in eight patients acutely exposed to mercury vapour. The pulmonary injury was reversible on CT in these cases. Hashimoto, M. (2001)

  12. Computerized tomography (CT) in patients with head injuries. Relation between CT scans and clinical findings in 96 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espersen, J.O.; Petersen, O.F. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Neurosurgery GF; Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. Neuroradiology P)

    1981-01-01

    In a retrospective series of 144 patients with cranial trauma admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery, 96 were initially examined by CT. The initial clinical assessment, operative findings, if any, and the clinical course were compared to the results of the primary CT scan. In patients presenting lateralizing deficits, 49% had lesions on the expected side, and 23% on the opposite side. Thirty-one per cent of brain stem affected patients had a supratentorial mass lesion requiring craniotomy. Three decerebrate patients who died had an initially normal CT scan. Thirty craniotomies were performed on the basis of the CT scans, and six cases deviated from the expected, but no case showed a false positive indication for surgery. The final diagnosis was in accordance with the initial clinical diagnosis, and with the initial CT scan in 44% and 84%, respectively, of all cases.

  13. The value of CT and EEG in cases of posttraumatic epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisner, T.; Zeiler, K.; Wessely, P.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the clinical neurological investigation were compared with those of electroencephalography (EEG) and computed tomography (CT) in 64 patients suffering from verified posttraumatic epilepsy. Only 18 patients (28%) showed central neurological features with corresponding focal disorders on CT (15 cases) and EEG (11 cases). EEG results were normal in 12 cases (19%), CT in 14 cases (22%). The combined application of both methods led to positive results in 94% on the part of at least one accessory examination. The clinical neurological investigation as well as the EEG and CT were normal in only 3 cases, although the traumatic etiology of epilepsy was beyond doubt. In addition to the clinical neurological investigation, EEG and CT are most important accessory examinations for the diagnosis and followup studies in cases of posttraumatic epilepsy. (orig.) [de

  14. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I tube x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml -1 at 1.2 ml min -1 ) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel (∼85 μm) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid arteries and major cerebral blood vessels

  15. Free prostate-specific antigen improves prostate cancer detection in a high-risk population of men with a normal total PSA and digitalrectal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzo, Robert G; Pinover, Wayne H; Horwitz, Eric M; Parlanti, Alicia; Mazzoni, Susan; Raysor, Susan; Mirchandani, Ila; Greenberg, Richard E; Pollack, Alan; Hanks, Gerald E; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah

    2003-04-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding optimal prostate cancer screening parameters for high-risk populations. The purpose of this study is to report the use of percent free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as an indication for biopsy in men at increased risk for developing prostate cancer who have a normal digital rectal examination (DRE) and total PSA level between 2 and 4 ng/mL. African-American men and men with at least one first-degree relative with prostate cancer are eligible for enrollment into the Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program (PRAP) at our institution. Between October 1996 and April 2002, 310 asymptomatic high-risk men with no history of prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) were screened in the PRAP with DRE and total PSA. Percent free PSA was obtained in men with a total PSA between 2 and 10 ng/mL. Men with a normal DRE and total PSA between 2 and 4 ng/mL were advised to undergo transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsies of the prostate if the percent free PSA was less than 27%. Other indications for biopsy included an abnormal DRE or a total PSA greater than 4 ng/mL. The primary endpoint evaluated was prostate cancer detection in high-risk men with a benign prostate examination, a normal total PSA between 2 and 4 ng/mL, and percent free PSA less than 27%. Of the 310 men, 174 (56%) were African American and 202 (65%) had at least one first-degree relative with prostate cancer. Sixty-two of the 310 men were referred for prostate biopsy, and 40 of 62 had biopsy performed. Twenty-one of 40 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer for a cancer detection rate of 53% in all men undergoing biopsy and an overall cancer detection rate of 6.8% in this high-risk population. Thirty-seven high-risk men (median age 54 years) with a total PSA level between 2 and 4 ng/mL (median 2.7 ng/mL) and a normal DRE were found to have a percent free PSA level of less than 27% (median 16%, range 8% to 25%). Twenty

  16. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging ...

  20. Assessment of pediatric near-drowning victims: is there a role for cranial CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, C.; Brown, T.; Frewen, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that CT examinations of the brain in children soon after near-drowning incidents are not helpful in predicting clinical outcome and are not necessary. The clinical and CT findings of 19 pediatric near-drowning victims were reviewed for correlation with clinical and neurologic outcome. As expected, a normal initial CT scan was poorly predictive of outcome, whereas an abnormal CT scan in the initial 36 h following an immersion incident was associated with a dismal prognosis. Three children with abnormal initial CT examinations were identified and all died within 3 days of admission. A CT scan performed in the immediate near-drowning period, therefore, may be helpful in identifying some patients who have sustained severe neurologic injury. (orig.)

  1. Computerized tomography and head growth curve infantile macrocephaly with normal psychomotor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eda, Isematsu; Kitahara, Tadashi; Takashima, Sachio; Takeshita, Kenzo

    1982-01-01

    Macrocephaly was defined as a head measuring larger than 98th percentile. We have evaluated CT findings and head growth curves in 25 infants with large heads. Ten (40%) of 25 infants with large heads were normal developmentally and neurologically. Five (20%) of those were mentally retarded. The other 10 infants (40%) included hydrocephalus (4 cases), malformation syndrome (3 cases), brain tumor (1 case), metabolic disorder (1 case) and degenerative disorder (1 case). Their head growth curves were typed as (I), (II) and (III): Type (I) (excessive head growth curve to 2 SDs above normal); Type (II) (head growth curve gradually approached to 2 SDs above normal); Type (III) (head growth curve parallel to 2 SDs above normal). Ten of macrocephaly with normal psychomotor development were studied clinically and radiologically in details. They were all male. CT pictures of those showed normal or various abnormal findings: ventricular dilatations, wide frontal and temporal subdural spaces, wide interhemispheric fissures, wide cerebral sulci, and large sylvian fissures. CT findings in 2 of those, which because normal after repeated CT examinations, resembled benign subdural collection. CT findings in one of those were external hydrocephalus. Head growth curves were obtained from 8 of those. Six cases revealed type (II) and two cases did type (III). The remaining 2 cases could not be followed up. We consider that CT findings of infants showed macrocephaly with normal psychomotor development reveals normal or various abnormal (ventricular dilatations, benign subdural collection, external hydrocephalus) and their head growth curves are not at least excessive. Infants with mental retardation showed similar CT findings and head growth curves as those with normal psychomotor development. It was difficult to distinguish normal from mentally retarded infants by either CT findings or head growth curves. (author)

  2. CT findings after normal and unsuccessful functional endoscopic sinus surgery; Ruolod della tomografia computerizzata dopo chirurgia funzionale dei seni paranasali: rilievi normali e valutazioni degli insuccessi chirurgici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scribano, E.; Ascenti, G.; Bellinvia, A.; Mazziotti, S.; Lamberto, S. [Messina Univ., Messina (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Radiologiche; Cascio, F. [Messina Univ., Messina (Italy). Ist. di Otorinolaringoiatria

    1999-09-01

    The paper investigates the functional endoscopic sinus surgery with the Messer-linger's technique which treats benign or inflammatory diseases of paranasal sinuses resistant to medical therapy. The goal of this type of surgery is to open the obstructed sinus ostia and restore normal aeration and mucociliary clearance. The computerized tomography permits an accurate assessment of extension and results of functional endoscopic sinus surgery. [Italian] L'articolo discute l'uso della tecnica di Messerklinger nella chirurgia funzionale endoscopica dei seni paranasali per il trattamento delle malattie benigne e delle infiammazioni croniche. Essa disostruisce gli osti sinusali ripristinando la normale areazione e la pulizia mucociliare. La tomografia computerizzata consente di valutare l'estensione e i risultati del trattamento chirurgico funzionale, soprattutto nel caso di insuccesso terapeutico, rilevando malattia nasosinusale ricorrente e-o recidiva.

  3. The accuracy of CT and tumor markers in the detection of a recurrent ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Yukari; Ishida, Jiro; Kotake, Fumio; Hirose, Masahiro; Kawana, Koji; Abe, Kimihiko; Amino, Saburo; Negishi, Yoshiyuki; Akiya, Kiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-three patients previously diagnosed as having ovarian cancer were examined with both serum tumor markers (CA 125, CA 19-9, TPA, IAP, AFP) and a pelvic CT scan. The tumor markers predict the clinical outcome more accurately than the CT scan. Further, the tumor markers showed a clear correlation with the clinical course. But in one case, however, the tumor markers were seen to reduce below the normal level from chemotherapy, while the CT scan showed a tumor mass. Thus, both, a CT scan and tumor marker assays are felt to be indispensable for detecting the recurrence of an ovarian cancer. (author)

  4. Helical CT imaging of clinically suspected appendicitis: Correlation of CT and histological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, S.K.; Chan, L.P.; Yeo, A

    2002-08-01

    PURPOSE: The diagnosis of appendicitis is traditionally made on the basis of clinical findings supported by laboratory results. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy and feasibility of using a relatively new technique of computed tomography (CT) using only colonic contrast medium. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 50 patients clinically diagnosed as having appendicitis were prospectively examined before surgery with thin-collimation helical CT from the L3 level to the acetabular roof with only rectally administered colon contrast medium. The hard copy CT images were reviewed jointly by two radiologists and a consensus was reached for each patient. The results were then compared with the surgical and histological findings at appendicectomy. RESULTS: There were 35 true-positives, one false-positive, 12 true-negatives and two false-negatives for CT. This yielded an accuracy of 94%, sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 92%, positive predictive value of 97% and negative predictive value of 86%. The appendix was identified in 45 patients (90%) and obscured by an inflammatory mass in the remaining five. An alternative diagnosis was found in 10 of 12 normal CT examinations (83%). CONCLUSION: Helical CT with rectal contrast medium is a quick, well tolerated and accurate test to diagnose appendicitis. It can offer alternative, possibly non-surgical diagnosis in patients who would otherwise have undergone laparotomy. Wong, S.K. et al. (2002)

  5. CT urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkin, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-11-15

    With the advent of multidetector row CT scanners, evaluation of the urothelium of the entire urinary tract with high-resolution thin sections during a single breath-hold has become a reality. Multidetector CT urography (MDCTU) is a single examination that allows evaluation of potential urinary tract calculi, renal parenchymal masses, and both benign and malignant urothelial lesions. Initial results with this new technique are encouraging. Current investigations of MDCTU focus on methods to improve opacification and distension of the upper urinary tract - the collecting systems, pelvis, and ureters. The role of abdominal compression, infusion of saline and/or furosemide, and optimal time delay of excretory phase imaging is being explored. Upper tract urothelial malignancies, including small lesions less the 5 mmin diameter, can be detected with high sensitivity. Methods to reduce radiation exposure are being explored, including split-bolus contrast injection techniques that combine nephrographic and excretory phases into a single phase. It is likely that in the near future, radiological evaluation of significant unexplained hematuria or of known or prior urothelial malignancy will consist of a single examination - MDCTU. (orig.)

  6. Possibilities for exposure reduction in computed tomography examination of acute chest pain; Moeglichkeiten der Dosisreduktion bei CT-Untersuchungen des akuten Thoraxschmerzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H.C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Electrocardiogram-gated (ECG) computed tomography (CT) investigations can be accompanied by high amounts of radiation exposure. This is particularly true for the investigation of patients with unclear and acute chest pain. The common approach in patients with acute chest pain is standard spiral CT of the chest. The chest pain or triple-rule-out CT protocol is a relatively new ECG-gated protocol of the entire chest. This article reviews and discusses different techniques for the CT investigation of patients with acute chest pain. By applying the appropriate scan technique, the radiation exposure for an ECG-gated protocol must not necessarily be higher than a standard chest CT scan Aortic pathologies are far better depicted by ECG-gated scan protocols and depending on the heart rate coronary artery disease can also be detected at the same time. The use of ECG-triggered scans will not support the diagnostics of the pulmonary arteries. However, in unspecific chest pain an ECG-triggered scan protocol can provide information on the differential diagnosis. (orig.) [German] EKG-getriggerte CT-Untersuchungen koennen mit einer relativ hohen Strahlenexposition einhergehen. Dies gilt im besonderen Masse fuer die Untersuchung des gesamten Thorax bei Patienten mit unklarem akutem Thoraxschmerz. Bisher wurden Untersuchungen bei Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz in Spiraltechnik ohne EKG-Triggerung durchgefuehrt. Das ''Chest-pain-'' oder ''Triple-rule-out''-Protokoll ist ein neues EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll des gesamten Thorax. Im vorliegenden Artikel werden verschiedene Techniken zur CT-Untersuchung von Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz vorgestellt und besprochen. Mit der richtigen Untersuchungstechnik muss die Strahlenexposition fuer ein EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll nicht hoeher sein als eine Standarduntersuchung ohne EKG. Mit einem EKG-getriggerten Untersuchungsprotokoll laesst sich die Aorta in Hinblick auf

  7. Clinical observation of the adverse drug reactions caused by non-ionic iodinated contrast media: results from 109,255 cases who underwent enhanced CT examination in Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Chen, J; Zhang, L; Liu, H; Wang, S; Chen, X; Fang, J; Wang, S; Zhang, W

    2015-03-01

    To analyse the pattern and factors that influence the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) induced by non-ionic iodinated contrast media and to evaluate their safety profiles. Data from 109,255 cases who underwent enhanced CT examination from 1 January 2008 to 31 August 2013 were analysed. ADRs were classified according to the criteria issued by the American College of Radiology and the Chinese Society of Radiology. A total of 375 (0.34%) patients had ADRs, including 281 mild (0.26%); 80 moderate (0.07%); and 14 severe (0.01%) ADRs; no death was found. 302 (80.53%) of the ADRs occurred within 15 min after examination. Patients aged 40-49 years (204 cases, 0.43%; p contrast media are mainly mild ones, while moderate or severe ADRs are relatively rare, suggesting that enhanced CT examination with non-ionic iodinated contrast media is highly safe, and severe adverse events will seldom occur under appropriate care. The study included 109,255 patients enrolled in various types of enhanced CT examinations, which could reflect ADR conditions and regulations in Chinese population accurately and reliably.

  8. Age-related changes in CT attenuation of the thymus in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklair-Levy, M.; Agid, R.; Sella, T.; Strauss-Liviatan, N.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    2000-01-01

    Background. The CT appearance of the normal and abnormal thymus and its age-related changes have been described. However, there is no information regarding the change in thymus CT attenuation values in children. Objective. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the normal CT attenuation of the thymus in infants and children and discover when the decline begins. Materials and methods. CT attenuation values of the thymus were retrospectively evaluated in 152 children between ages of 1 day and up to 14 years. For each patient the mean value of the CT thymus attenuation was calculated and compared to CT attenuation of the chest wall and cardiac muscles. We also examined the correlation between thymic attenuation, gender, and disease. The statistical analysis used was multivariate linear regression. Results. CT attenuation of the thymus declines with age, beginning only after the 1st year of life. The thymus is more hyperdense than the chest wall and cardiac muscles in infants less than 1 year. The thymus is denser in males than females. In malignant conditions, in infants less than 1 year, thymus CT attenuation is decreased. In older children thymus attenuation was similar to that for the chest wall and cardiac muscles. Conclusion. The decline in thymic CT attenuation with age is consistent with fatty infiltration of the gland. The measurements given in this report can serve as a basis for comparison to determine whether the thymus of a young child is normal or pathological. (orig.)

  9. Age-related changes in CT attenuation of the thymus in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklair-Levy, M.; Agid, R.; Sella, T.; Strauss-Liviatan, N.; Bar-Ziv, J. [Department of Radiology, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2000-08-01

    Background. The CT appearance of the normal and abnormal thymus and its age-related changes have been described. However, there is no information regarding the change in thymus CT attenuation values in children. Objective. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the normal CT attenuation of the thymus in infants and children and discover when the decline begins. Materials and methods. CT attenuation values of the thymus were retrospectively evaluated in 152 children between ages of 1 day and up to 14 years. For each patient the mean value of the CT thymus attenuation was calculated and compared to CT attenuation of the chest wall and cardiac muscles. We also examined the correlation between thymic attenuation, gender, and disease. The statistical analysis used was multivariate linear regression. Results. CT attenuation of the thymus declines with age, beginning only after the 1st year of life. The thymus is more hyperdense than the chest wall and cardiac muscles in infants less than 1 year. The thymus is denser in males than females. In malignant conditions, in infants less than 1 year, thymus CT attenuation is decreased. In older children thymus attenuation was similar to that for the chest wall and cardiac muscles. Conclusion. The decline in thymic CT attenuation with age is consistent with fatty infiltration of the gland. The measurements given in this report can serve as a basis for comparison to determine whether the thymus of a young child is normal or pathological. (orig.)

  10. Results of diagnosis of pancreatic cancer by computed tomography (CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, K.; Okuaki, K.; Ito, M.; Katakura, T.; Suzuki, K. (Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1981-08-01

    Results of examination of pancreatic diseases, especially pancreatic cancer, conducted by CT during the past 3 years are summarized. The EMI CT Type 5000 or 5005 were used. During the 3 years from September 1976 to August 1979, a total of 1961 patients were examined by CT, and the upper abdomen was examined in 772 of these patients. In 97 patients, positive findings were obtained in the CT image of the pancreas. In 52 of these patients, the findings were confirmed operatively or by autopsy. Though cancer of the pancreas was diagnosed by CT in 30 patients, it was confirmed in 20 by surgical operation and in 1 by autopsy. Of the 9 misdiagnosed cases, 4 were cases of infiltration of the pancreas by carcinoma of the stomach or bile duct, and the other 5 were one case each of lipoma of the abdominal wall, normal pancreas, hyperplasia of Langerhans's islets of the pancreas tail, abscess between the pancreas and the posterior wall of the stomach, and choledocholithiasis. A case diagnosed by CT as cholelithiasis was a carcinoma measuring 5 x 5 x 6 cm located on the head of the pancreas, complicated by choledocholithiasis. The 22 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas were 9 with lesions less than 3.5 x 3.0 x 3.0 cm in size who could be radically operated, 6 who underwent exploratory laparotomy or autopsy, and 7 in whom operation was impossible. False negative and false positive CT results are also discussed.

  11. Results of diagnosis of pancreatic cancer by computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kazue; Okuaki, Koji; Ito, Masami; Katakura, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Kenji

    1981-01-01

    Results of examination of pancreatic diseases, especially pancreatic cancer, conducted by CT during the past 3 years are summarized. The EMI CT Type 5000 or 5005 were used. During the 3 years from September 1976 to August 1979, a total of 1961 patients were examined by CT, and the upper abdomen was examined in 772 of these patients. In 97 patients, positive findings were obtained in the CT image of the pancreas. In 52 of these patients, the findings were confirmed operatively or by autopsy. Though cancer of the pancreas was diagnosed by CT in 30 patients, it was confirmed in 20 by surgical operation and in 1 by autopsy. Of the 9 misdiagnosed cases, 4 were cases of infiltration of the pancreas by carcinoma of the stomach or bile duct, and the other 5 were one case each of lipoma of the abdominal wall, normal pancreas, hyperplasia of Langerhans's islets of the pancreas tail, abscess between the pancreas and the posterior wall of the stomach, and choledocholithiasis. A case diagnosed by CT as cholelithiasis was a carcinoma measuring 5 x 5 x 6 cm located on the head of the pancreas, complicated by choledocholithiasis. The 22 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas were 9 with lesions less than 3.5 x 3.0 x 3.0 cm in size who could be radically operated, 6 who underwent exploratory laparotomy or autopsy, and 7 in whom operation was impossible. False negative and false positive CT results are also discussed. (author)

  12. CT enteroclysis in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, M.; Annabhani, A.; Sasiadek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The role of CT enteroclysis is gaining on importance in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. The aim of the study was to present own experiences in CT enteroclysis application, with the use of a 64-detector CT unit. Material/Methods: CT enteroclyses were performed in 60 patients: 53 with the suspicion of the Crohns disease, 2 suspected for carcinoid, 1 with suspicion of the fistula between the small bowel and the bladder, 2 suspected for the tumor of the ileo-caecal region, and in 1 case, the aim of examination was to carry out an evaluation of the postsurgical state of the bowel-bowel anastomosis. We used own endoscopic technique of catheter insertion into the bowel, which shortens the examination time and improves patients comfort. Results: The catheter was correctly introduced into the small bowel in 58 patients (endoscopy had to be repeated in 4 cases). Only 2 examinations failed, because patients refused repeated endoscopy. Radiological signs of the Crohns disease were found in 50 out of 53 patients. In the 3 remaining patients, the appearance of the small bowel was normal. In 5 non-Crohns disease patients, CT enteroclysis enabled a good visualization of the pathology (tumors, fistula). Conclusions: CT enteroclysis with the use of the 64-detector CT unit is a valuable method in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. It could supplement or precede capsule endoscopy. (authors)

  13. Measurements of angles of the normal auditory ossicles relative to the reference plane and image reconstruction technique for obtaining optimal sections of the ossicles in high-resolution multiplanar reconstruction using a multislice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Naoko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Kenji; Takasu, Akihiko; Naito, Kensei

    2005-01-01

    Using high-resolution isotropic volume data obtained by 0.5 mm, 4-row multislice CT, cross-sectional observation of the auditory ossicles is possible from any desired direction without difficulty in high-resolution multiplanar reconstruction (HR-MPR) images, also distortion-free three-dimensional images of the ossicles are generated in three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) images. We measured angles of fifty normal ossicles relative to the reference plane, which has been defined as a plane through the bilateral infraorbital margins to the middle portion of the external auditory canal. Based on the results of angle measurement, four optimal sections of the ossicles for efficient viewing to the ossicular chain were identified. To understand the position of the angle measurement and the four sections, the ossicles and the reference plane were reconstructed in the 3D-CT images. As the result of observation of the ossicles and the reference plane, the malleus was parallel to the incudal long process and perpendicular to the reference plane. As the results of angle measurement, the mean angle of the tympanic portion of the facial nerve relative to the reference plane in the sagittal plane was found to be 17 deg, and the mean angle of the stapedial crura relative to the reference plane in the sagittal plane was found to be 6 deg. The mean angle of the stapes relative to the reference plane in the coronal plane was 44 deg, and the mean angle of the incudal long process relative to the stapes in the coronal plane was 89 deg. In 80% of ears, the stapes extended straight from the incudal long process. Image reconstruction technique for viewing four sections of the ossicles was investigated. Firstly, the image of the malleal head and the incudal short process was identified in the axial plane. Secondly, an image of the malleus along the malleal manubrium was reconstructed in the coronal plane. Thirdly, the image of the incudal long process was seen immediately behind the malletis image

  14. The Effect of Therapy Oriented CT in Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se

    1987-01-01

    The success of radiation therapy depends on exact treatment of the tumor with significant high dose for maximizing local control and excluding the normal tissues for minimizing unwanted complications. To achieve these goals, correct estimation of target volume in three dimension, exact dose distribution in tumor and normal critical structures and correction of tissue inhomogeneity are required. The effect of therapy oriented CT (planning CT) were compared with conventional simulation method in necessity of planning change, set dose, and proper distribution of tumor dose. Of 365 new patients examined, planning CT was performed in 104 patients (28%). Treatment planning was changed in 47% of head and neck tumor, 79% of intrathoracic tumor and 63% of abdominal tumor. In breast cancer and musculoskeletal tumors, planning CT was recommended for selection of adequate energy and calculation of exact dose to critical structures such as kidney or spinal cord. The average difference of tumor doses between CT planning and conventional simulation was 10% in intrathoracic and intra-abdominal tumors but 20% in head and neck tumors which suggested that tumor dose may be overestimated in conventional simulation. Although some limitations and disadvantages including the cost and irradiation during CT are still criticizing, our study showed that CT planning is very helpful in radiotherapy planning

  15. EEG and CT findings of infant partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Kumanomido, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Makoto; Ueoka, Kiyotaka

    1981-01-01

    Examination of EEG and cranial CT were performed in 19 cases of partial seizures with elementary symptomatology (PSES), 6 cases of partial seizures with complex symptomatology (PSCS), and 17 cases of benign focal pilepsy of childhood with Rolandic spikes (BFECRS). The results were as follows. 1) In 16 of 19 cases of PSES (84%), various abnormal CT findings such as localized cerebral atrophy (7 cases), localized cerebral atrophy complicated with porencephaly (4 cases), porencephaly alone (2 cases), and diffuse cerebral atrophy (3 cases) were found. 2) Of 6 cases of PSCS localized cerebral atrophy was found in 3 cases, porencephaly in one case, and localized calcification in one case. Normal CT findings were obtained in one case. 3) In comparison of EEG findings with CT findings in 25 cases of partial seizures CT findings correlated with the basic waves rather than the paroxysmal ones. 4) The fact that CT findings in patients with BFECRS were mostly normal suggests the functional origin of the seizures. 5) CT was valuable in partial seizures for detecting underlying disorders and predicting the prognosis. (Ueda, J.)

  16. Image quality and radiation dose of single heartbeat 640-slice coronary CT angiography: A comparison between patients with chronic Atrial Fibrillation and subjects in normal sinus rhythm by propensity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiotherapy, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Gennarelli, Antonio; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Felli, Valentina; Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiology, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Gravina, Giovanni Luca [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiotherapy, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiology, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Atrial Fibrillation (AF) may affect CCTA image quality. •We compare the results of single heartbeat CCTA in subjects with chronic AF and in sinus rhythm. •Single heartbeat CCTA may be feasible also in subjects with cAF and HR <72 bpm. •In cAF patients with heart rate higher than 72 bpm, CCTA has more movement-associated artefacts. •Mean effective dose of single heartbeat CCTA in cAF group was higher than in sinus rhythm one. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of single heartbeat 640-slice coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with chronic Atrial Fibrillation (cAF) in comparison with subjects in normal sinus rhythm. Methods: A cohort of 71 patients with cAF was matched with 71 subjects in normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and HR ≤ 65 bpm using a matched by propensity analysis. All subjects underwent a single heartbeat CCTA with prospective gating. In subjects with cAF, we manually established the acquisition of data only from a single heartbeat. Mean effective dose and image quality, with both objective and subjective measures, were assessed. Results: 96.4% of all segments in the cAF group had diagnostic image quality. The rate of subjects with at least one non-diagnostic segment was 14% and 2.8% (p = 0.031) in the cAF and NRS groups, respectively. In the cAF group, the percentage of patients with at least one non-diagnostic segment for acquisition HR ≤ 72 was 1.8% (1/55), and it did not significantly differ from the NSR group (2.8%; 2/71) (p = 1.0). Objective quality parameters did not show a statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean effective dose was 4.24 ± 1.24 mSv in the cAF group and 2.67 ± 0.5 mSv in the sinus rhythm group (p < 0.0001) with an increase by 59% in the cAF group with respect to the SNR group. Conclusions: A single heartbeat acquisition protocol with a 640-slice prospectively ECG-triggered CT angiography may be feasible in patients with cAF and HR below 72

  17. Software of automatic calculation of efficient dose for the CT scanning examinations realised for children;Logiciel de calcul automatique de la dose efficace pour les examens scanographiques realises chez l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guegan, C.; Nadour, A.; Alison, M.; Sebag, G.

    2009-10-15

    Objective: to know the efficient dose that will allow to compare the induced irradiation to natural irradiation. To know this magnitude in order to sensitize the medical profession and the patient. To know a software allowing to calculate the efficient dose in function of the organ explored by a multislice scanner. Messages to remember: This software is easy to use and allows to get easily an equivalent dose (in natural irradiation) for a pediatric CT scanning examination (Phillips, Brillance 64). (N.C.)

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and should be left at ... of the examination the same way that it affects photographs. If contrast material is used, depending on ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and should be left at ... of the examination the same way that it affects photographs. If contrast material is used, depending on ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... small amount of radiation is aimed at and passes through the part of the body being examined, ... of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may be asked to hold your breath ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... small amount of radiation is aimed at and passes through the part of the body being examined, ... of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may be asked to hold your breath ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... small amount of radiation is aimed at and passes through the part of the body being examined, ... of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may be asked to hold your breath ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT ... very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT ... very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT ... very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... seconds, and even faster in small children. Such speed is beneficial for all patients but especially children, ... pain is caused by infection and inflammation, the speed, ease and accuracy of a CT examination can ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ... of many areas of the body, particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. A diagnosis determined by ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ... of many areas of the body, particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. A diagnosis determined by ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... should always inform their physician and the CT technologist if there is any possibility that they may ... located in a separate control room, where the technologist operates the scanner and monitors your examination in ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to obtain images. For children, the CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...