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Sample records for normal ct examinations

  1. CT study of the ethmoid labyrinth: technique of examination and normal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvoisin, B.; Schnyder, P.; Chapuis, L.; Agrifoglio, A.; Krayenbuehl, M.

    1990-01-01

    These recent years, conservative endoscopic surgical treatments for inflammatory ethmoid disease have gained popularity and prompted a need for an optimal preoperative radiologic study. For this purpose, the routinely used axial and coronal CT slices are not sufficient. In our Center, the ethmoid labyrinth is studied with planes determined by the axis of drainage of all ethmoid cells. This axis corresponds to the axis of the nasofrontal duct, which is approximately angulated 50 sup(0) cephalad relative to the canto-meatal line (CML). We perform routinely CT sections in the planes CML sup(+) and CML -40 (which are respectively parallel and perpendicular to the nasofrontal duct axis). The normal anatomy of the ethmoid labyrinth is illustrated by sequential CT slices in these two planes. (author)

  2. Normal cranial CT anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, M.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    The human brain consists of well-known anatomical components. Some parts of these components have been shown to be concerned with certain functions. A complete cranial CT examination consists of a series of several slices obtained in a sequence usually from the base to the vertex of the cranial vault, in the axial mode. The ultimate goal of this chapter is to pinpoint those slices that depict a given anatomical structure or several structures that deal with a given function. To achieve this goal, the discussion of CT cranial anatomy is presented in three sections

  3. CT examination of the kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Youji; Ishida, Ken; Arita, Takeshi; Ishine, Kenji; Tezen, Takashi; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    1985-01-01

    Plain CT scanning of the kidney was performed in 16 patients with renal failure whose basic renal disorder had been not necessarily known beforehand. The findings of the CT examination were composed of renal atrophy of various degree (12 cases), cystic lesions (8 cases), polycystic renal disease (one case), nephrosclerosis (2 cases), hydronephrosis (2 cases), ureter and renal stones (one case), and normal CT profile (2 cases). Being based on these CT findings and other clinical informations, basic renal disorders could be either presumed or confirmed. It was concluded that plain CT scanning of the kidney was useful to decide a method of treatment and to estimate prognosis in patients with renal failure. (author)

  4. CT and MRI normal findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.

    1998-01-01

    This book gives answers to questions frequently heard especially from trainees and doctors not specialising in the field of radiology: Is that a normal finding? How do I decide? What are the objective criteria? The information presented is three-fold. The normal findings of the usual CT and MRI examinations are shown with high-quality pictures serving as a reference, with inscribed important additional information on measures, angles and other criteria describing the normal conditions. These criteria are further explained and evaluated in accompanying texts which also teach the systematic approach for individual picture analysis, and include a check list of major aspects, as a didactic guide for learning. The book is primarily intended for students, radiographers, radiology trainees and doctors from other medical fields, but radiology specialists will also find useful details of help in special cases. (orig./CB) [de

  5. CT in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Katsuzo; Nogaki, Hidekazu; Noda, Masaya; Kusunoki, Tadaki; Tamaki, Norihiko

    1981-01-01

    CT scans were obtained on 33 patients (age 73y. to 31y.) with the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus. In each case, the diagnosis was made on the basis of the symptoms, CT and cisternographic findings. Underlying diseases of normal pressure hydrocephalus are ruptured aneurysms (21 cases), arteriovenous malformations (2 cases), head trauma (1 case), cerebrovascular accidents (1 case) and idiopathie (8 cases). Sixteen of 33 patients showed marked improvement, five, moderate or minimal improvement, and twelve, no change. The results were compared with CT findings and clinical response to shunting. CT findings were classified into five types, bases on the degree of periventricular hypodensity (P.V.H.), the extent of brain damage by underlying diseases, and the degree of cortical atrophy. In 17 cases of type (I), CT shows the presence of P.V.H. with or without minimal frontal lobe damage and no cortical atrophy. The good surgical improvements were achieved in all cases of type (I) by shunting. In 4 cases of type (II), CT shows the presence of P.V.H. and severe brain damage without cortical atrophy. The fair clinical improvements were achieved in 2 cases (50%) by shunting. In one case of type (III), CT shows the absence of P.V.H. without brain damage nor cortical atrophy. No clinical improvement was obtained by shunting in this type. In 9 cases of type (IV) with mild cortical atrophy, the fair clinical improvement was achieved in two cases (22%) and no improvement in 7 cases. In 2 cases of type (V) with moderate or marked cortical atrophy, no clinical improvement was obtained by shunting. In conclusion, it appeared from the present study that there was a good correlation between the result of shunting and the type of CT, and clinical response to shunting operation might be predicted by classification of CT findings. (author)

  6. Normal pediatric postmortem CT appearances

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    Klein, Willemijn M.; Bosboom, Dennis G.H.; Koopmanschap, Desiree H.J.L.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Nikkels, Peter G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijn, Rick R. van [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-04-01

    Postmortem radiology is a rapidly developing specialty that is increasingly used as an adjunct to or substitute for conventional autopsy. The goal is to find patterns of disease and possibly the cause of death. Postmortem CT images bring to light processes of decomposition most radiologists are unfamiliar with. These postmortem changes, such as the formation of gas and edema, should not be mistaken for pathological processes that occur in living persons. In this review we discuss the normal postmortem thoraco-abdominal changes and how these appear on CT images, as well as how to differentiate these findings from those of pathological processes. (orig.)

  7. Normal CT anatomy of the calcaneus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mun Gyu; Kang, Heung Sik

    1986-01-01

    Normal sectional anatomy of the calcaneus with multiplanar CT examination was studied in 5 volunteers as the background for interpretation of various abnormalities. Major 3 sectional anatomy including plantar, coronal, sagittal and additional tuberosity planes are described. With CT examination of the calcaneus, 1. More detailed anatomy of 3 facets of subtalar joint (anterior, middle, and posterior facet) can be well visualized. 2. Its clinical applications in the tarsal trauma, tarsal coalition, subtalar infection, degenerative arthritis, club foot, pes planus and tarsal tumor could provide much more information's, which not obtained by conventional radiographic studies.

  8. Cranial MR imaging and cerebral 99mTc HM-PAO-SPECT in patients with subacute or chronic severe closed head injury and normal CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, L.; Wimberger, D.; Oder, W.; Kramer, J.; Schindler, E.; Podreka, I.; Imhof, H.

    1993-01-01

    Eighteen patients in the subacute or chronic state following severe closed head injury with normal cranial CT scans were examined by MR and 99m Tc HM-PAO SPECT. Correlations were sought between these 2 imaging modalities and the clinical outcome, as defined by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOX) score. Both MR and SPECT revealed cerebral damage in all patients examined but structural and functional alterations did not coincide topographically in 64.9% of lesions. Nevertheless, complementary injury patterns suggesting poor recovery were found; cortical contusions and diffuse axonal injury (MR) in conjunction with cortical and thalamic hypoperfusion (SPECT) were noticed in 8 out of 12 patients with unfavorable outcome (GOS = III and IV). The synthesis of MR and SPECT information clearly enhanced the ability both to accurately assess posttraumatic brain damage and to improve patients' outcome prediction. (au) (18 refs.)

  9. Cranial MR imaging and cerebral 99mTc HM-PAO-SPECT in patients with subacute or chronic severe closed head injury and normal CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, L.; Wimberger, D.; Oder, W.; Kramer, J.; Schindler, E.; Podreka, I.; Imhof, H.

    1993-01-01

    Eighteen patients in the subacute or chronic state following severe closed head injury with normal cranial CT scans were examined by MR and 99m Tc HM-PAO SPECT. Correlations were sought between these 2 imaging modalities and the clinical outcome, as defined by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score. Both MR and SPECT revealed cerebral damage in all patients examined but structural and functional alterations did not coincide topographically in 64.9% of lesions. Nevertheless, complementary injury patterns suggesting poor recovery were found; cortical contusions and diffuse axonal injury (MR) in conjunction with cortical and thalamic hypoperfusion (SPECT) were noticed in 8 out of 12 patients with unfavorable outcome (GOS=III and IV). The synthesis of MR and SPECT information clearly enhanced the ability both to accurately assess posttraumatic brain damage and to improve patients' outcome prediction. (orig.)

  10. Cranial MR imaging and cerebral [sup 99m]Tc HM-PAO-SPECT in patients with subacute or chronic severe closed head injury and normal CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L.; Wimberger, D.; Oder, W.; Kramer, J.; Schindler, E.; Podreka, I.; Imhof, H.

    1993-11-01

    Eighteen patients in the subacute or chronic state following severe closed head injury with normal cranial CT scans were examined by MR and [sup 99m]Tc HM-PAO SPECT. Correlations were sought between these 2 imaging modalities and the clinical outcome, as defined by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOX) score. Both MR and SPECT revealed cerebral damage in all patients examined but structural and functional alterations did not coincide topographically in 64.9% of lesions. Nevertheless, complementary injury patterns suggesting poor recovery were found; cortical contusions and diffuse axonal injury (MR) in conjunction with cortical and thalamic hypoperfusion (SPECT) were noticed in 8 out of 12 patients with unfavorable outcome (GOS = III and IV). The synthesis of MR and SPECT information clearly enhanced the ability both to accurately assess posttraumatic brain damage and to improve patients' outcome prediction. (au) (18 refs.).

  11. Normal CT in infants and children

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    Takao, T; Okuno, T; Ito, M; Konishi, Y; Yoshioka, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-10-01

    There have been several reports as to normal CT in children. However, they included children with convulsions as normal subjects. In our experience, children with convulsions have an enlargement of the subdural space in the frontal region. Therefore, we studied CT in children without convulsions. Of the 10,000 patients examined with EMI 1000 or EMI 1010 at Kyoto Univ. Hospital from 1976 to 1979, 110 children could be classified into the following types according to their symptoms: 1) Type-1 head injury, without abnormalities in CT resulting from this injury, 2) non-migraining headaches, and 3) others without CT abnormalities who were routinely examined. Previous studies have shown that the enlargement of the subdural space in the frontal region was not abnormal under one year. However, the present study has shown that it was not dilated in children without convulsions. We stressed the usefulness of our newly calculated basal cistern index, because the SD was small and could be readily indentified (this index was under 0.29 in most cases; their SD's were 0.04 in those under one year and 0.02 over one year). The other data were not so different from those of previous studies.

  12. Normal CT in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Tatsuo; Okuno, Takehiko; Ito, Masatoshi; Konishi, Yukuo; Yoshioka, Mieko

    1980-01-01

    There have been several reports as to normal CT in children. However, they included children with convulsions as normal subjects. In our experience, children with convulsions have an enlargement of the subdural space in the frontal region. Therefore, we studied CT in children without convulsions. Of the 10,000 patients examined with EMI 1000 or EMI 1010 at Kyoto Univ. Hospital from 1976 to 1979, 110 children could be classified into the following types according to their symptoms: 1) Type-1 head injury, without abnormalities in CT resulting from this injury, 2) non-migraining headaches, and 3) others with on CT abnormalities who were routinely examined. Previous studies have shown that the enlargement of the subdural space in the frontal region was not abnormal under one year. However, the present study has shown that it was not dilated in children without convulsions. We stressed the usefulness of our newly calculated basal cistern index, because the SD was small and could be readily indentified (this index was under 0.29 in most cases; their SD's were 0.04 in those under one year and 0.02 over one year). The other data were not so different from those of previous studies. (J.P.N.)

  13. CT examinations in older patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciuk, J.; Peters, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 2,878 unselected subsequent CT examinations carried out in 1984 were analyzed retrospectively. All studies were performed in a university hospital with a centralized department of diagnostic radiology. Most of the patients investigated were hospitalized; there were only 12% outpatients. Of the patients studied 12.6% were older than 65 years and 20.5% older than 60; 17.7% were emergency cases and patients between 16 and 25 years of age represented the largest fraction. In all other age groups the relative distribution between emergency cases and regular studies revealed no significant differences. There was no statistically significant difference between the older age group (patients older than 65 years) and the total population of this study in almost all items investigated, i.e., no differences in CT examination time and no differences in preparation time (time between two CT studies). The rate of abdominal CT examinations was 7% higher in the older age group, while the relative distribution of all other CT examinations was again comparable to the total population under study. Thus, the expected increase in patients in the older age group does not measurably prolong the CT examination time. This statement applies to a major referral center with a high percentage of inpatients. (orig.) [de

  14. Normal CT anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiroga, O.; Matozzi, F.; Beranger, M.; Nazarian, S.; Salamon, G.; Gambarelli, J.

    1982-01-01

    To analyse the anatomo-radiological correlation of the spine and spinal cord, 22 formalized, frozen anatomical specimens corresponding to different regions of the spinal column (8 cervical, 5 dorsal, and 9 lumbar) were studied by CT scans on axial, sagittal and coronal planes and by contact radiography after they were cut into anatomical slices in order to clarify the normal CT anatomy of the spinal column. The results obtained from CT patient scans, performed exclusively on the axial plane, were compared with those obtained from the anatomical specimens (both CT and contrast radiography). High resolution CT programs were used, enabling us to obtain better individualization of the normal structures contained in the spinal column. Direct sagittal and coronal sections were performed on the specimens in order to get further anatomo-radiological information. Enhanced CT studies of the specimens were also available because of the air already present in the subarachnoid spaces. Excellent visualization was obtained of bone structures, soft tissue and the spinal cord. High CT resolution of the spine appeares to be an excellent neuroradiological procedure to study the spine and spinal cord. A metrizamide CT scan is, however, necessary when a normal unenhanced CT scan is insufficient for diagnosis and when the spinal cord is not clearly visible, as often happens at the cervical level. Clinical findings are certainly very useful to ascertain the exact CT level and to limit the radiation exposure. (orig.)

  15. Normal and pathologic CT anatomy of the mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, A.G.; Hanafee, W.H.; Mancuso, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis and management of a wide variety of facial lesions has been amply demonstrated. While a number of studies have focused on CT anatomy of the paranasal sinuses, nose, and nasopharynx, none has concentrated on the mandible. Although the mandible is difficult to image because of its complex, curving surfaces and the presence of artifact-producing amalgam fillings or restorations, CT of the mandible can nevertheless be highly informative in selected cases. This pictorial essay depicts normal gross and CT anatomy of the mandible and presents a series of cases that illustrate the utility of CT in examining mandibular lesions

  16. CT and MRI normal findings; CT- und MRT-Normalbefunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E. [Caritas-Krankenhaus, Dillingen (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    This book gives answers to questions frequently heard especially from trainees and doctors not specialising in the field of radiology: Is that a normal finding? How do I decide? What are the objective criteria? The information presented is three-fold. The normal findings of the usual CT and MRI examinations are shwon with high-quality pictures serving as a reference, with inscribed important additional information on measures, angles and other criteria describing the normal conditions. These criteria are further explained and evaluated in accompanying texts which also teach the systematic approach for individual picture analysis, and include a check list of major aspects, as a didactic guide for learning. The book is primarily intended for students, radiographers, radiology trainees and doctors from other medical fields, but radiology specialists will also find useful details of help in special cases. (orig./CB) [German] Normalbefunde sind die haeufigsten Befunde ueberhaupt. Also kein Problem? Doch. Besonders Radiologen in der Ausbildung und Aerzte aus anderen Fachgebieten stellen sich immer wieder die entscheidende Frage: Ist das normal? Woran kann ich das erkennen? Wie kann ich das objektivieren? Dieses Buch leistet dreierlei: 1. Es zeigt klassische Normalbefunde der gaengigen CT- und MRT-Untersuchungen in hoher Abbildungsqualitaet als Referenz. Direkt in die Aufnahmen eingezeichnet sind wichtige Daten: Masse, Winkel und andere Kriterien des Normalen. Sie werden im Text nochmals zusammengefasst, erklaert und bewertet. 2. Es lehrt die Systematik der Bildbetrachtung - wie schaue ich mir ein Bild an, welche Strukturen betrachte ich in welcher Reihenfolge und worauf muss ich dabei besonders achten? Dies alles in Form einer uebersichtlichen Checkliste zu jeder Aufnahme. 3. Es gibt eine Befundformulierung vor, die sich wiederum an dem Schema der Bildanalyse orientiert, alle Kriterien des Normalen definiert und dadurch auch ein wichtiges didaktisches Element darstellt

  17. CT of Normal Developmental and Variant Anatomy of the Pediatric Skull: Distinguishing Trauma from Normality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idriz, Sanjin; Patel, Jaymin H; Ameli Renani, Seyed; Allan, Rosemary; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice has been increasing rapidly, with the number of CT examinations performed in adults and children rising by 10% per year in England. Because the radiology community strives to reduce the radiation dose associated with pediatric examinations, external factors, including guidelines for pediatric head injury, are raising expectations for use of cranial CT in the pediatric population. Thus, radiologists are increasingly likely to encounter pediatric head CT examinations in daily practice. The variable appearance of cranial sutures at different ages can be confusing for inexperienced readers of radiologic images. The evolution of multidetector CT with thin-section acquisition increases the clarity of some of these sutures, which may be misinterpreted as fractures. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the pediatric skull, how it changes with age, and normal variants can assist in translating the increased resolution of multidetector CT into more accurate detection of fractures and confident determination of normality, thereby reducing prolonged hospitalization of children with normal developmental structures that have been misinterpreted as fractures. More important, the potential morbidity and mortality related to false-negative interpretation of fractures as normal sutures may be avoided. The authors describe the normal anatomy of all standard pediatric sutures, common variants, and sutural mimics, thereby providing an accurate and safe framework for CT evaluation of skull trauma in pediatric patients. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  18. Indications for chest CT. Retrospective study of cases with normal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in thoracic radiology is now well appreciated, and the number of chest CTs has greatly increased. There are, however, many chest CT cases that are completely or almost completely normal. Indications for chest CT should be re-evaluated considering the cost and radiation exposure associated with the examination. Reviewing the reports of 4930 chest CT examinations performed in three hospitals during the period of two years, the author found 620 (12.6%) negative CT examinations. In 312 of the 620, the CT was requested because of 'abnormal shadow' on chest radiograph. When the same chest radiographs were re-evaluated by two radiologists, no abnormality was noted in 257 cases (82.4%). CT examinations were considered justified in only 55 cases (17.6%). There was a significant difference in the frequency of normal chest CT examinations between the university hospital and two other hospitals. The causes of false positive interpretation of chest radiographs were analyzed, and it was felt that fundamental knowledge necessary to interpret chest radiographs was lacking. The importance of close cooperation between clinicians and radiologists should be emphasized. (author)

  19. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence

  20. CT assessment of normal splenic size in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.; Cavouras, D.

    1994-01-01

    The size of the normal spleen was estimated by CT in 153 children, examined with indication unrelated to splenic disease. In each patient the width, thickness, length and volume of the spleen were calculated. Measurements were also normalized to the transverse diameter of the body of the first lumbar vertebra. The spleen underwent significant growth during the first 4 years of life and reached maximum size at the age of 13. There were no differences in splenic volume between boys and girls. Splenic thickness correlated best with normal splenic volume. The strongest correlation was also found between splenic thickness and volume in a group of 45 children with clinically evident splenomegaly. Splenic thickness, an easy-to-use measurement, may be employed in everyday practice to represent splenic volume on CT. (orig.)

  1. Possibilities of CT examinations by chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ftacnikova, B.

    1994-01-01

    Chest trauma represents the most frequent associated injury in multiply injured patients. The success of treatment depends also on prompt and effective diagnosis and extent of the injuries, on quality interdisciplinary approach. Author presents contributions of computed tomography (CT) in the management of 77 critically injured patients. Attention is focused on the efficacy of CT examination routinely employed in the setting of thoracic trauma and its relationship to following rationalization of treatment. CT scans of thorax is modality of choice for evaluating patients with occult pneumothorax, chest wall deformity of rib fractures, early diagnosis of lung contusion and laceration. (author). 13 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  2. Standardized CT examination of the multitraumatized patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidner, B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden)]|[Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Huddinge University Hospital (Sweden); Adiels, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden); Aspelin, P. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Huddinge University Hospital (Sweden); Gullstrand, P.; Wallen, S. [Department of Surgery, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a standardized non-helical-CT protocol including head, body and proximal extremities in order to achieve a good time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy in the initial radiological evaluation of the multitraumatized patient. A total of 111 circulatory stable blunt trauma patients, brought in to a trauma level II-III hospital, were examined according to a standardized CT protocol. After examining the head with contiguous 10-mm slices without IV contrast medium injection, the trunk was examined with 10-mm slices every 30 mm through thorax-abdomen-pelvis with IV contrast medium enhancement (occasionally modified). All data in the medical reports were collected and used as ``end-point``, and the outcome of the CT examination was compared with this final diagnosis. Mean examination time was 20 min (range 12-32 min). In total, 55 head injuries, 89 thoracic injuries, 27 abdominal/pelvic injuries and 62 fractures were found. Computed tomography correctly identified the injuries, except one brain stem injury, one contusion/rupture of the heart, one hepatic injury, two intestinal injuries, eight vertebral injuries and one joint dislocation. A standardized non-helical-CT examination of the head and body may be achieved in 20 min. Its diagnostic accuracy was high, except for vertebral column injuries, which is why we recommend it as the method of choice for initial radiological examination of multitraumatized patients. When available, helical scanning would improve both examination speed and accuracy. (orig.) With 6 figs., 40 refs.

  3. CT numbers of liver and spleen in normal children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kim

    2002-01-01

    To determine the mean liver CT numbers, and differences between liver and spleen, and liver and back muscle CT numbers in normal children, and to correlate the findings with sex and age. One hundred and five normal children aged 2-14 years underwent pre-contrast CT scanning. Mean CT numbers of the liver, spleen, and back muscles were calculated, as well as the differences in CT numbers between the liver and spleen (liver-spleen CT numbers), and between the liver-back muscle CT numbers were 70.22±6.51 HU, 53.28±3.57 HU, 17.13±6.57 HU, and 11.88±5.94 HU, respectively. Mean liver CT numbers and the difference between liver and back muscle CT numbers were not different by age. By sex, all the CT numbers did not vary according to age. The sex of a subject did not affect the CT number. The children's mean liver CT number was 70.22±6.51 HU and the difference between liver and spleen CT numbers was 17.13±6.57 HU. Younger children had higher liver CT and liver-spleen CT numbers than older children. No CT numbers varied according to sex

  4. Is primary care access to CT brain examinations effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamore, R.E.; Wright, D.; Britton, I.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Primary care access to CT head examinations could enable common neurological conditions to be managed within primary care. Outcome data from the first 8 years of a local service were used to identify effective referral criteria. METHODS: Primary care head CT results from 1 March 1995 to 31 October 2003 were categorized as normal, incidental or significant findings. Normal reports were cross-referenced for referral to secondary care. Case notes with incidental or significant CT findings were reviewed for secondary care attendance and outcome. RESULTS: Records of 1403/1645 CT head examinations (85%) were available for review. Of these 1403, 951 (67.8%) returned normal findings, 317 (22.6%) incidental findings and 135 (9.6%) significant findings. The commonest indication for referral was investigation of headaches (46.6%). Of the total 533 patients under 50 years of age, 13 (2.4%) yielded significant findings and all 13 showed other features in addition to headache. Of 314 cases presenting with focal neurology, 83 (26.4%) showed significant findings. 314 patients were referred from primary to secondary care. 189 had normal scans and 74 had findings described as incidental. 60% of secondary care referrals were for normal CT scans. In patients with focal neurology, 90 of 314 were referred, allowing 71% to be managed in primary care. Yield was also 0% for headaches, dizziness, visual disturbance or nausea and vomiting. CONCLUSION: Primary care access to CT brain examinations is effective for patients with focal neurology, neurological symptoms or a known malignancy, but not for patients aged less than 50 years, or with uncomplicated headaches, dizziness or diplopia

  5. Is primary care access to CT brain examinations effective?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benamore, R.E. [Department of Radiology, Pilgrim Hospital, Boston (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rachelbenamore@doctors.org.uk; Wright, D. [Department of Radiology, Pilgrim Hospital, Boston (United Kingdom); Britton, I. [Department of Radiology, Pilgrim Hospital, Boston (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    AIM: Primary care access to CT head examinations could enable common neurological conditions to be managed within primary care. Outcome data from the first 8 years of a local service were used to identify effective referral criteria. METHODS: Primary care head CT results from 1 March 1995 to 31 October 2003 were categorized as normal, incidental or significant findings. Normal reports were cross-referenced for referral to secondary care. Case notes with incidental or significant CT findings were reviewed for secondary care attendance and outcome. RESULTS: Records of 1403/1645 CT head examinations (85%) were available for review. Of these 1403, 951 (67.8%) returned normal findings, 317 (22.6%) incidental findings and 135 (9.6%) significant findings. The commonest indication for referral was investigation of headaches (46.6%). Of the total 533 patients under 50 years of age, 13 (2.4%) yielded significant findings and all 13 showed other features in addition to headache. Of 314 cases presenting with focal neurology, 83 (26.4%) showed significant findings. 314 patients were referred from primary to secondary care. 189 had normal scans and 74 had findings described as incidental. 60% of secondary care referrals were for normal CT scans. In patients with focal neurology, 90 of 314 were referred, allowing 71% to be managed in primary care. Yield was also 0% for headaches, dizziness, visual disturbance or nausea and vomiting. CONCLUSION: Primary care access to CT brain examinations is effective for patients with focal neurology, neurological symptoms or a known malignancy, but not for patients aged less than 50 years, or with uncomplicated headaches, dizziness or diplopia.

  6. Computer tomography (CT) finding of normal pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chi Ja; Kim, Byung Tae; Lee, Jeung Suk

    1983-01-01

    Conventional radiology of the pancreas are too often unsatisfactory. It is well known that the whole body CT is very useful in identifying retroperitoneal pathology. The authors intended to present normal pancreatic morphology and data for preparation of basis for interpretation of abnormalities. We results were as follows; 1. There were 36 male and 24 female patients, and their ages ranged from 7 to 78 years. 2. 1) The organs adjacent pancreas were stomach, inferior vena cava, duodenum, caudate lobe of the liver left kidney, left adrenal gland, superior mesenteric vessels, spleen. 2) In 19 patients, pancreatic tail at the level of left kidney in the transverse plane, it was either ventral in 13 (68%), ventromedial in 2 (19%), ventrolateral in 4 (21%) to left kidney, in the other 41 patients, it was cranial to the upper pole of left kidney, ventral in 25 (61%), ventromedial in 1 (2%), ventrolateral in 15 (37%). 3) Pancreatic tail was cranial to the pancreatic body, 3 cm cranial in 2 (4%), 2-3 cm in 5 (8%), 1-2 cm in 6 (10%), less than 1 cm in 11 (18%). In the other, caudal in 3 (5%). 4) Pancreatic tail was cranial to the level of the splenic hilum in 36 (60%), 0-2 cm caudal in 24 (40%). 3. Pancreatic shape was uniform tapering form in 37 (62%), lobulated form in 23 (38%). 4. Pancreatic orientation was horizontal in 13 (22%), vertical 56 (76%), S-shaped in 1 (2%). 5. Pancreatic margin was smooth in 22 (37%), lobulated in 38 (63%). 6. In most patients, pancreas was uniform in density. 7. Pancreatic size was 0.5 ± 0.1 in measurement ratio of the head in 48 (80%), 0.4 ± 0.1 of the body in 49 (88%), 0.5 ± 0.1 of the tail in 47 (78%)

  7. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  8. Cushing's syndrome with an apparently normal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahos, L.; Strigaris, K.; Aliferopoulos, D.; Pontifex, G.

    1981-01-01

    A case of Cushing's syndrome is described in which the CT scan was considered as normal. The diagnosis was established with selective venography and blood sampling and was verified surgically. (orig.)

  9. Synthetic ossicular replacements: Normal and abnormal CT appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, J.D.; Zwillenberg, S.; Berger, A.S.; Granoff, D.W.; Popky, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Numerous synthetic ossicular replacements are currently in use. The TORP conducts sound from the newly formed tympanic membrane to the oval window; the PORP is used when the stapes superstructure is maintained, being interposed between the tympanic membrane and the stapes capitulum. In 12 patients the surgical results of ossicular replacement procedures were good, which gave the author the opportunity to study the normal CT appearance. In an additional 10 patients CT was performed before surgical revision. Using CT, they have been able to diagnose subluxation and fibrous tissue fixation. In two patients the CT appearance was unremarkable, but at surgery lateralization of the graft was found, with a nonfunctioning interface

  10. CT quantification of lung and airways in normal Korean subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Song Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Shin, Hye Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gong Yong; Li, Yuan Zhe [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To measure and compare the quantitative parameters of the lungs and airways in Korean never-smokers and current or former smokers (“ever-smokers”). Never-smokers (n = 119) and ever-smokers (n = 45) who had normal spirometry and visually normal chest computed tomography (CT) results were retrospectively enrolled in this study. For quantitative CT analyses, the low attenuation area (LAA) of LAA{sub I-950}, LAA{sub E-856}, CT attenuation value at the 15th percentile, mean lung attenuation (MLA), bronchial wall thickness of inner perimeter of a 10 mm diameter airway (Pi10), total lung capacity (TLC{sub CT}), and functional residual capacity (FRC{sub CT}) were calculated based on inspiratory and expiratory CT images. To compare the results between groups according to age, sex, and smoking history, independent t test, one way ANOVA, correlation test, and simple and multiple regression analyses were performed. The values of attenuation parameters and volume on inspiratory and expiratory quantitative computed tomography (QCT) were significantly different between males and females (p < 0.001). The MLA and the 15th percentile value on inspiratory QCT were significantly lower in the ever-smoker group than in the never-smoker group (p < 0.05). On expiratory QCT, all lung attenuation parameters were significantly different according to the age range (p < 0.05). Pi10 in ever-smokers was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (r = −0.455, p = 0.003). In simple and multivariate regression analyses, TLC{sub CT}, FRC{sub CT}, and age showed significant associations with lung attenuation (p < 0.05), and only TLC{sub CT} was significantly associated with inspiratory Pi10. In Korean subjects with normal spirometry and visually normal chest CT, there may be significant differences in QCT parameters according to sex, age, and smoking history.

  11. CT of the normal and pathologic stapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veillon, F.; Meriot, P.; Bintner, M.; Baur, P.; Bourjat, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on CT in the pathologic stapes. The radiologic aspect of the stapes was analyzed in 287 patients with noncholesteatomatous chronic otitis media (n = 46), cholesteatoma (n = 162), malformations (n = 52), and otosclerosis (n = 27) by using axial and, occasionally, coronal sections. Two CT scanners (M1 and M2) that differ in spatial resolution were used. The radiologic and surgical results are presented. In chronic cholesteatomous otitis, we analyzed two populations, P1 and P2. In the P1 population, (n = 92), studied on the M1 unit, there was stapes destruction in 39% (n = 36), versus 38% (n = 27) in the P2 population (n = 70), studied on the M2 unit. In P1, the diagnostic sensitivity was 97% and specificity was 78%. In P2, the sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 95%. The specificity of P2 was greater than that of P1 because of the smaller number of false-positive diagnoses with the M2 unit. Equivalent results are obtained in the malformation (n = 29) and trauma (n = 16) cases. In stapedo-vestibular otosclerosis, studied only with M2, the sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 100%

  12. Patient dose in CT fluoroscopy examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Masanao; Kataoka, Yumi; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kato, Ryoichi; Katada, Kazuhiro; Asada, Yasuki; Suzuki, Shoichi

    2008-01-01

    CT fluoroscopy(CTF) results in a high dose for the area under investigation in comparison with other types of examination. On the basis of data from April 2005 to March 2008, we measured the X-ray doses at the target site in CTF of the lungs, lumbar vertebrae, and pelvis as well as the X-ray dose to the female reproductive organs, and calculated the effective dose. The CT equipment used was an Aquilion 16. TLDs were inserted into an anthropomorphic phantom in positions corresponding to the target sites and the reproductive organs. Standard tube voltage and tube current were used as measurement conditions, and the scanning time used was the average value for each type of examination during the two years. Dose measurements were taken in the following order: scanography, helical scan, CTF, helical scan. X-ray element calibration was carried out through reciprocal comparison made between an ionization chamber dosimeter corrected according to government standards and the TLD for each tube voltage used for measurement. Dose estimation software was used to calculate the effective doses. During the two years there were 136 CTF examinations. These included 43 scans of the lungs, 13 of lumbar vertebrae, and 18 of the pelvis. The X-ray doses were 0.1 mGy at both the ovaries and the uterus for lung scans, 2 mGy at the ovaries and 1 mGy at the uterus for lumbar vertebrae scans, and 40 mGy at the ovaries and 20 mGy at the uterus for pelvic scans. The effective dose was highest for the lumbar vertebrae, followed by the lungs and finally the pelvis. (author)

  13. CT identification of bronchopulmonary segments: 50 normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbourne, D.; Vock, P.; Godwin, J.D.; Silverman, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of the fissures, segmental bronchi and arteries, bronchopulmonary segments, and peripheral pulmonary parenchyma was made from computed tomographic (CT) scans of 50 patients with normal chest radiographs. Seventy percent of the segmental bronchi and 76% of the segmental arteries were identified. Arteries could be traced to their sixth- and seventh-order branches; their orientation to the plane of the CT section allowed gross identification and localization of bronchopulmonary segments

  14. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.)

  15. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology); Baleriaux, D.; Christophe, C. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology))

    1992-02-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.).

  16. Measurement of normal cervical spinal cord in metrizamide CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fumio; Koyama, Tsunemaro; Aii, Heihachirou

    1985-01-01

    The shape of the spinal cord is the most important factor in diagnosis of spinal disorders by metrizamide CT myelography (met. CT). Even in cases where the spinal cord looks normal in shape its size might be abnormal, for example in cases with spinal cord atrophy, syringomyelia, intramedullary tumor and several other conditions. In detecting the slightest abnormality in such cases, it is absolutely necessary to have in hand the knowledge of the nomal size of the spinal cord at each level. We measured, therefore, the sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord in 55 patients with no known lesions on met. CT (Fig. 1). Comparing our results with those by others, we found some differences as to the size of the spinal cord. We assume that these differences are due to the differences in resolution of the CT scanners used. The size of the spinal cord tends to measure larger with a CT scanner with high resolution than with others. Previous authors reported that the size of the spinal cord would vary by window center settings. Our experimental results indicate, however, that window center settings do not significantly affect the measurements. It is concluded that the normal values of the spinal cord dimensions at each level somewhat differ by CT equipments used. One should have normal values with one's own equipment in hand in order to take full advantage of this sophisticated diagnostic technique. (author)

  17. CT appearance of the normal appendix in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamburrini, Stefania; Brunetti, Arturo; Brown, Michele; Sirlin, Claude B.; Casola, Giovanna

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify (1) the normal range of the appendix on computed tomography (CT), (2) the correlation of patient age and sex with the visibility and appearance of the appendix on CT, and (3) the normal variations in wall thickness, intraluminal content, and location of the appendix. Three hundred seventy-two outpatients underwent abdominopelvic CT. The scans were reviewed on the picture archiving and communication system and appendiceal outer-to-outer wall diameter, wall thickness, location, content and its correlation with appendix diameter were analyzed. The appendix was visualized in 305/372 patients. Its location relative to the cecum was highly variable. The diameter range was 3-10 mm; in 42% of cases the diameter was greater than 6 mm. When the intraluminal content (185/305) was visualized, the diameter was slightly superior to the mean (p=0.0156). In 329 CT scans in which oral contrast material was given, the appendix was filled by contrast material in 74/329 patients. The appendix wall thickness was measurable in 22/305 patients (average 0.15 cm). There is significant overlap between the normal and abnormal CT appearance of the appendix. Consequently the diagnosis of acute appendicitis should be based not only on the appearance of the appendix but also on the presence of secondary signs. (orig.)

  18. Postmortem abdominal CT: Assessing normal cadaveric modifications and pathological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, P.; Carlier, R.; Roffi, F.; Ezra, J.; Chaillot, P.F.; Duchat, F.; Huynh-Charlier, I.; Lorin de la Grandmaison, G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the interest of postmortem non-enhanced computer tomography (CT) for abdominal lesions in a forensic context of suspicions death and to list the different radiological cadaveric modifications occurring normally at abdominal stage, which must be known by non forensic radiologists in case of any postmortem exam. Materials and methods: 30 cadavers have been submitted to a body CT-scan without injection of contrast material. CT exams were reviewed by two independent radiologists and radiological findings were compared with forensic autopsy data. Results: False positive CT findings included physiological postmortem transudates misdiagnosed with intra-abdominal bleedings, and putrefaction gas misdiagnosed with gas embolism, aeroporty, aerobily, digestive parietal pneumatosis. Incidentalomas without any role in death process were also reported. False negative CT findings included small contusions, vascular thromboses, acute infarcts foci, non radio-opaque foreign bodies. Normal cadaveric modifications were due to livor mortis and putrefaction, and are seen quickly (some hours) after death. Conclusion: The non forensic radiologist should be familiar with the normal abdominal postmortem features in order to avoid misdiagnoses, and detect informative lesions which can help and guide the forensic practitioner or the clinical physician.

  19. Normal CT characteristics of the thymus in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simanovsky, Natalia, E-mail: natalias@hadassah.org.il [Department of Medical Imaging, Hadassah - Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel); Hiller, Nurith; Loubashevsky, Natali; Rozovsky, Katya [Department of Medical Imaging, Hadassah - Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2012-11-15

    Background: The thymus changes with age. Its shape and the proportion of solid tissue and fat vary between individuals, yet there is no comprehensive work describing the size and morphology of the normal thymus on CT. As a result, many adults with some preserved soft tissue in the thymus may undergo extensive work-up to exclude mediastinal tumor. Our aim was to quantify CT characteristics of the normal thymus in an adult population. Methods: CT chest scans of 194 trauma patients aged 14-78 years (mean 52.6 years), were retrospectively reviewed. The density, volume, shape and predominant side of the thymus were recorded for 56 patients in whom some solid tissue was preserved. Statistical analysis of these characteristics according to the patient age and gender was performed. Results: Thymic density and volume decreased progressively with age. No solid tissue component was seen in the thymus in patients older than 54 years. In the majority of patients, the thymus had an arrowhead shape, with middle position. However, great variability in thymic shape and border were noted. There was a highly significant relationship between density and patient age (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: We hope that our work will help in the definition of normal thymic CT parameters in adults, help to prevent unnecessary and expensive imaging procedures, and reduce patient exposure to ionizing radiation.

  20. Normal CT characteristics of the thymus in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith; Loubashevsky, Natali; Rozovsky, Katya

    2012-01-01

    Background: The thymus changes with age. Its shape and the proportion of solid tissue and fat vary between individuals, yet there is no comprehensive work describing the size and morphology of the normal thymus on CT. As a result, many adults with some preserved soft tissue in the thymus may undergo extensive work-up to exclude mediastinal tumor. Our aim was to quantify CT characteristics of the normal thymus in an adult population. Methods: CT chest scans of 194 trauma patients aged 14–78 years (mean 52.6 years), were retrospectively reviewed. The density, volume, shape and predominant side of the thymus were recorded for 56 patients in whom some solid tissue was preserved. Statistical analysis of these characteristics according to the patient age and gender was performed. Results: Thymic density and volume decreased progressively with age. No solid tissue component was seen in the thymus in patients older than 54 years. In the majority of patients, the thymus had an arrowhead shape, with middle position. However, great variability in thymic shape and border were noted. There was a highly significant relationship between density and patient age (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: We hope that our work will help in the definition of normal thymic CT parameters in adults, help to prevent unnecessary and expensive imaging procedures, and reduce patient exposure to ionizing radiation.

  1. CT quantification of lung and airways in normal Korean subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Song Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Shin, Hye Soo; Jin, Gong Yong; Li, Yuan Zhe

    2017-01-01

    To measure and compare the quantitative parameters of the lungs and airways in Korean never-smokers and current or former smokers (“ever-smokers”). Never-smokers (n = 119) and ever-smokers (n = 45) who had normal spirometry and visually normal chest computed tomography (CT) results were retrospectively enrolled in this study. For quantitative CT analyses, the low attenuation area (LAA) of LAA_I_-_9_5_0, LAA_E_-_8_5_6, CT attenuation value at the 15th percentile, mean lung attenuation (MLA), bronchial wall thickness of inner perimeter of a 10 mm diameter airway (Pi10), total lung capacity (TLC_C_T), and functional residual capacity (FRC_C_T) were calculated based on inspiratory and expiratory CT images. To compare the results between groups according to age, sex, and smoking history, independent t test, one way ANOVA, correlation test, and simple and multiple regression analyses were performed. The values of attenuation parameters and volume on inspiratory and expiratory quantitative computed tomography (QCT) were significantly different between males and females (p < 0.001). The MLA and the 15th percentile value on inspiratory QCT were significantly lower in the ever-smoker group than in the never-smoker group (p < 0.05). On expiratory QCT, all lung attenuation parameters were significantly different according to the age range (p < 0.05). Pi10 in ever-smokers was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (r = −0.455, p = 0.003). In simple and multivariate regression analyses, TLC_C_T, FRC_C_T, and age showed significant associations with lung attenuation (p < 0.05), and only TLC_C_T was significantly associated with inspiratory Pi10. In Korean subjects with normal spirometry and visually normal chest CT, there may be significant differences in QCT parameters according to sex, age, and smoking history

  2. Computer tomographic examination of the thymus. Normal and pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, C.; Dinkel, E.; Wimmer, B.; Grosser, G.; Schildge, J.

    1987-09-01

    The diagnostic value of CT in follicular thymic hyperplasia and in thymomas in 8 patients with myasthenia gravis and in 12 patients without myasthenia gravis suffering from thymic tumors was evaluated by correlating CT-findings to surgical results and pathological-histological findings. Thymic size of the six patients with histologically proven follicular hyperplasia were scattered within the normal range, but half of them were at the upper limit. Thymic tumors were differentiated between invasive and non invasive tumors by CT staging. Solid tumors with different histology could not be further classified; the attenuation values ranging from 15-55 HU were the same in tumors, follicular hyperplasia and normal thymus.

  3. Normal sacroiliac joint: a CT study of asymptomatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogler, J.B. III; Brown, W.H.; Helms, C.A.; Genant, H.K.

    1984-01-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joints of 45 asymptomatic subjects were prospectively studied to define better the normal appearance of SI joints on CT scans and therby attach appropriate significance to CT signs of sacroiliitis. Joint space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, erosions, ankylosis, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and symmetry were evaluted. The results indicate that the SI joints demonstrate symmetry in patients under the age of 30 (100% of subjects in this age group). Those CT findings of sacroiliitis that occurred infrequently in the asymptomatic population, and hence may represent good indicators of sacroiliac disease, include increased sacral subchondral sclerosis in subjects under the age of 40 (11%), bilateral or unilateral uniform joint space of less than 2 mm (2% or 0%, respectively), erosions (2%), and intraarticular ankylosis (0%)

  4. CT in normal pressure hydrocephalus. Correlation between CT and clinical response to shunting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, K.; Nogaki, H.; Noda, M.; Kusunoki, T.; Tamaki, N. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-02-01

    CT scans were obtained on 33 patients (age 73y. to 31y.) with the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus. In each case, the diagnosis was made on the basis of the symptoms, CT and cisternographic findings. Underlying diseases of normal pressure hydrocephalus are ruptured aneurysms (21 cases), arteriovenous malformations (2 cases), head trauma (1 case), cerebrovascular accidents (1 case) and idiopathie (8 cases). Sixteen of 33 patients showed marked improvement, five, moderate or minimal improvement, and twelve, no change. The results were compared with CT findings and clinical response to shunting. CT findings were classified into five types, bases on the degree of periventricular hypodensity (P.V.H.), the extent of brain damage by underlying diseases, and the degree of cortical atrophy. In 17 cases of type (I), CT shows the presence of P.V.H. with or without minimal frontal lobe damage and no cortical atrophy. The good surgical improvements were achieved in all cases of type (I) by shunting. In 4 cases of type (II), CT shows the presence of P.V.H. and severe brain damage without cortical atrophy. The fair clinical improvements were achieved in 2 cases (50%) by shunting. In one case of type (III), CT shows the absence of P.V.H. without brain damage nor cortical atrophy. No clinical improvement was obtained by shunting in this type. In 9 cases of type (IV) with mild cortical atrophy, the fair clinical improvement was achieved in two cases (22%) and no improvement in 7 cases. In 2 cases of type (V) with moderate or marked cortical atrophy, no clinical improvement was obtained by shunting. In conclusion, it appeared from the present study that there was a good correlation between the result of shunting and the type of CT, and clinical response to shunting operation might be predicted by classification of CT findings.

  5. Dose optimization in CT examination of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojreh, A.; Prosch, H.

    2012-01-01

    Problems arise due to the increased clinical use of computed tomography (CT) and the high radiosensitivity of children. The ALARA concept (as low as reasonably achievable) prevails in pediatric radiology. Justified indications and full utilization of available dose optimization methods. Medical physicists and the manufacturers should support pediatric radiology in the implementation of the ALARA concept. The referring physicians and radiology staff should be integrated into training programs. Sufficient diagnostic image quality is paramount and not the pretty images. (orig.) [de

  6. Anticlockwise swirl of mesenteric vessels: A normal CT appearance, retrospective analysis of 200 pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S., E-mail: sodhiks@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Bhatia, Anmol, E-mail: anmol_bhatia26@yahoo.co.in [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Saxena, Akshay K., E-mail: fatakshay@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Rao, Katragadda L.N., E-mail: klnrao@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Menon, Prema, E-mail: menonprema@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Khandelwal, Niranjan, E-mail: khandelwaln@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Objective: The counterclockwise rotation of the SMV on SMA is a normal and non-specific finding, which results in an incomplete swirl formation on CT scans. However, it has a potential to be misinterpreted as ‘midgut volvulus’ resulting in serious clinical implications. The study was done to determine the frequency and degree of counterclockwise rotation of the SMV on SMA on CT in normal otherwise asymptomatic pediatric patients undergoing CT scan. Methods: In this IRB approved study, we retrospectively analyzed abdominal CT scan examinations of 200 consecutive pediatric patients (age range of 11 days to 18 years), which were performed for different clinical indications over a period of 10 months. They were evaluated for the absence or presence and degree of counterclockwise rotation of the mesenteric vessels. Results: Of the 200 patients, 128 (64%) patients showed no clockwise or anticlockwise rotation of mesenteric vessels. Counterclockwise rotation of SMV on SMA was seen in 72 (36%) patients. Further, the degree of rotation of vessels was also calculated, based on the criteria proposed by the authors. Conclusions: The counterclockwise rotation of SMV on SMA gives an appearance of mesenteric whirlpool in otherwise normal mesenteric vessels and can be misinterpreted as midgut volvulus. It is a normal CT appearance and is due to a variation in branching pattern of mesenteric vessels. Awareness of this normal branching pattern of mesenteric vessels is important to avoid an inadvertent laparotomy.

  7. Anticlockwise swirl of mesenteric vessels: A normal CT appearance, retrospective analysis of 200 pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S.; Bhatia, Anmol; Saxena, Akshay K.; Rao, Katragadda L.N.; Menon, Prema; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The counterclockwise rotation of the SMV on SMA is a normal and non-specific finding, which results in an incomplete swirl formation on CT scans. However, it has a potential to be misinterpreted as ‘midgut volvulus’ resulting in serious clinical implications. The study was done to determine the frequency and degree of counterclockwise rotation of the SMV on SMA on CT in normal otherwise asymptomatic pediatric patients undergoing CT scan. Methods: In this IRB approved study, we retrospectively analyzed abdominal CT scan examinations of 200 consecutive pediatric patients (age range of 11 days to 18 years), which were performed for different clinical indications over a period of 10 months. They were evaluated for the absence or presence and degree of counterclockwise rotation of the mesenteric vessels. Results: Of the 200 patients, 128 (64%) patients showed no clockwise or anticlockwise rotation of mesenteric vessels. Counterclockwise rotation of SMV on SMA was seen in 72 (36%) patients. Further, the degree of rotation of vessels was also calculated, based on the criteria proposed by the authors. Conclusions: The counterclockwise rotation of SMV on SMA gives an appearance of mesenteric whirlpool in otherwise normal mesenteric vessels and can be misinterpreted as midgut volvulus. It is a normal CT appearance and is due to a variation in branching pattern of mesenteric vessels. Awareness of this normal branching pattern of mesenteric vessels is important to avoid an inadvertent laparotomy

  8. MR and CT imaging of pulmonary valved conduits in children and adolescents: normal appearance and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenisch, Estelle V.; Alamo, Leonor T.; Gudinchet, Francois [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sekarski, Nicole [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hurni, Michel [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The Contegra registered is a conduit made from the bovine jugular vein and then interposed between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery. It is used for cardiac malformations in the reconstruction of right ventricular outflow tract. To describe both normal and pathological appearances of the Contegra registered in radiological imaging, to describe imaging of complications and to define the role of CT and MRI in postoperative follow-up. Forty-three examinations of 24 patients (17 boys and 7 girls; mean age: 10.8 years old) with Contegra registered conduits were reviewed. Anatomical description and measurements of the conduits were performed. Pathological items examined included stenosis, dilatation, plicature or twist, thrombus or vegetations, calcifications and valvular regurgitation. Findings were correlated to the echographic gradient through the conduit when available. CT and MR work-up showed Contegra registered stenosis (n = 12), dilatation (n = 9) and plicature or twist (n = 7). CT displayed thrombus or vegetations in the Contegra registered in three clinically infected patients. Calcifications of the conduit were present at CT in 12 patients and valvular regurgitation in three patients. The comparison between CT and/or MR results showed a good correlation between the echographic gradient and the presence of stenosis in the Contegra registered. CT and MR bring additional information about permeability and postoperative anatomy especially when echocardiography is inconclusive. Both techniques depict the normal appearance of the conduit, and allow comparison and precise evaluation of changes in the postoperative follow-up. (orig.)

  9. Normal development of paranasal sinuses in children: A CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Park, Eui Dong; Choi, Pil Youb; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Chung, Sung Hoon; Chung, Hae Gyeong

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the normal development of the paranasal sinuses in children with CT, authors prospectively studied with brain CT scans of 260 children without known sinus disease, ranging image from 7 days to 16 years. Maximal anteroposterior and transverse diameters(mm) and maximal cross- sectional area(mm 2 ) of both sides of the maxillary sinus were measured with the aid of computer device. As to the ethmoidal and spheroidal sinuses, we simply documented the presence of the aplastic ethmoidal sinus and calculated the age-incidence of the spheroidal sinus pneumatization, respectively.There noted three phases in the development of the maxillary sinus. The anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the maxillary sinus increased nearly in parallel. The former was always greater than the latter. In no cases was the edathamil sinus aplastic and almost all sinuses were pneumatized even in infants as early as 7 old days. CT identified the conchal pattern of sphenoidal sinus pneumatization infants as early as 11 days old. Sphenoidal sinus pneumatization was seen in 38% of the children under the age of 1 year, 82% of the children between the age of 1 and 2 years, and almost all children older than 2 years. The anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the maxillary sinus seem to reach the adult size by 8 years of age, and the conchal pattern of sphemoidal sinus pneumatization can be recognized earlier with CT than on the plain radiographs

  10. Fractal Dimension Of CT Images Of Normal Parotid Glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Min Suk; You, Dong Soo

    1999-01-01

    This study was to investigate the age and sex differences of the fractal dimension of the normal parotid glands in the digitized CT images. The six groups, which were composed of 42 men and women from 20's, 40's and 60's and over were picked. Each group contained seven people of the same sex. The normal parotid CT images were digitized, and their fractal dimensions were calculated using Scion Image PC program. The mean of fractal dimensions in males was 1.7292 (+/-0.0588) and 1.6329 (+/-0.0425) in females. The mean of fractal dimensions in young males was 1.7617, 1.7328 in middle males, and 1.6933 in old males. The mean of fractal dimensions in young females was 1.6318, 1.6365 in middle females, and 1.6303 in old females. There was no statistical difference in fractal dimension between left and right parotid gland of the same subject (p>0.05). Fractal dimensions in male were decreased in older group (p 0.05). The fractal dimension of parotid glands in the digitized CT images will be useful to evaluate the age and sex differences.

  11. Normal CT measurement of sellar and juxtasellar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Hyun; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun

    1988-01-01

    The thorough knowledge of precise anatomy of the sellar, parasellar and suprasellar regions and of normal computed tomographic (CT) features in those areas are very important because there are many tiny but essential structures in which pathology makes only minute changes and so meticulous investigations are required. We performed direct coronal thin section CT scan of sellar and juxtasellar regions in 58 cases in order to evaluate normal CT features such as CT densities, shapes and sizes of normal sellar and juxtasellar structures. The results obtained are as follows: 1.The CT densities of pituitary glands were 87 ± 23 in anterior lobe and 69 ± 22 in posterior lobe. The latter was significantly less dense than the former. Posterior lobes could be identified as oval low density area in sagittal reconstruction in 18/58 (31%). Mean pituitary height was 6.5 ± 1.5mm. In young females of childbearing age, mean height was 7.0 ± 1.7mm. Upper margins of pituitary glands were flat in 29 cases (50%), upward convex in 16 cases (28%), and upward concave in 13 cases (22%). Upper margins of pituitary glands were upward convex in 8/15 (53%) of young female of childbearing age. Pituitary densities were homogeneous in 36 cases (77%) and heterogeneous in 7 cases (15%), and 4 cases (7%) show focal pituitary low density that is greater than 3mm in diameter. 2.Moderate to severe degree of cisternal herniation was found in 10 cases (17%): only 1 case before the age of 30, and 9 cases after the age of 30. 3.The lateral margins of cavernous sinus were bilaterally flat in 42 cases (72%), bilaterally convex in 3 cases (5%), unilaterally convex in 12 cases (21%), and unilaterally concave only in 1 case (2%). The third cranial nerves were found as symmetric filling defects in superolateral aspect of anterior cavernous sinus in most of the cases, the maximal size of which was 2.7 ± 0.9mm in diameter and did not exceed 3.5mm. The other cranial nerves were less frequently identified as

  12. Techniques and radiation dose in CT examinations of adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elameen, S. E. A.

    2010-06-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation dose to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lake of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose. The aim of this study was to measure radiation doses in CT examination of the adults in three Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 160 CT examination carried out in 3 hospitals (3 CT scanners). Effective dose was calculated for each examination using CT dose indices. exposure related parameters and CT D1- to- effective dose conversion factors. CT air kerma index (CT D1) and dose length products (DLP) determined were below the established international reference dose levels. The mean effective doses in this study for the head, chest, and abdomen are 0.82, 3.7 and 5.4 mGy respectively. These values were observed that the effective dose per examination was lower in Sudan than in other countries. The report of a CT survey done in these centers indicates that the mean DLP values for adult patients were ranged from 272-460 mGy cm (head) 195-995 mGy cm (chest), 270-459 mGy cm (abdomen). There are a number of observed parameters that greatly need optimization, such as minimize the scan length, without missing any vital anatomical regions, modulation of exposure parameters (kV, mA, exposure time, and slice thickness) based on patient size and age. Another possible method is through use of contrast media only to optimize diagnostic yield. The last possible method is the use of radio protective materials for protection however, in order to achieve the above optimization strategies: there is great demand to educate CT personnel on the effects of scan parameter settings on radiation dose to patients and image quality required for accurate diagnosis. (Author)

  13. Hyaline cartilage thickness in radiographically normal cadaveric hips: comparison of spiral CT arthrographic and macroscopic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyler, Annabelle; Bousson, Valérie; Bergot, Catherine; Polivka, Marc; Leveque, Eric; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2007-02-01

    To assess spiral multidetector computed tomographic (CT) arthrography for the depiction of cartilage thickness in hips without cartilage loss, with evaluation of anatomic slices as the reference standard. Permission to perform imaging studies in cadaveric specimens of individuals who had willed their bodies to science was obtained from the institutional review board. Two independent observers measured the femoral and acetabular hyaline cartilage thickness of 12 radiographically normal cadaveric hips (from six women and five men; age range at death, 52-98 years; mean, 76.5 years) on spiral multidetector CT arthrographic reformations and on coronal anatomic slices. Regions of cartilage loss at gross or histologic examination were excluded. CT arthrographic and anatomic measurements in the coronal plane were compared by using Bland-Altman representation and a paired t test. Differences between mean cartilage thicknesses at the points of measurement were tested by means of analysis of variance. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. At CT arthrography, mean cartilage thickness ranged from 0.32 to 2.53 mm on the femoral head and from 0.95 to 3.13 mm on the acetabulum. Observers underestimated cartilage thickness in the coronal plane by 0.30 mm +/- 0.52 (mean +/- standard error) at CT arthrography (P cartilage thicknesses at the different measurement points was significant for coronal spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement of the femoral head and acetabulum and for sagittal and transverse CT arthrography of the femoral head (P cartilage thickness from the periphery to the center of the joint ("gradients") were found by means of spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement. Spiral multidetector CT arthrography depicts cartilage thickness gradients in radiographically normal cadaveric hips. (c) RSNA, 2007.

  14. Radiation dose and cancer risk from pediatric CT examinations on 64-slice CT: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shiting; Law, Martin Wai-Ming; Huang Bingsheng; Ng, Sherry; Li Ziping; Meng Quanfei; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To measure the radiation dose from CT scans in an anthropomorphic phantom using a 64-slice MDCT, and to estimate the associated cancer risk. Materials and methods: Organ doses were measured with a 5-year-old phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Four protocols; head CT, thorax CT, abdomen CT and pelvis CT were studied. Cancer risks, in the form of lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence, were estimated by linear extrapolation using the organ radiation doses and the LAR data. Results: The effective doses for head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis CT, were 0.7 mSv, 3.5 mSv, 3.0 mSv, 1.3 mSv respectively. The organs with the highest dose were; for head CT, salivary gland (22.33 mGy); for thorax CT, breast (7.89 mGy); for abdomen CT, colon (6.62 mGy); for pelvis CT, bladder (4.28 mGy). The corresponding LARs for boys and girls were 0.015-0.053% and 0.034-0.155% respectively. The organs with highest LARs were; for head CT, thyroid gland (0.003% for boys, 0.015% for girls); for thorax CT, lung for boys (0.014%) and breast for girls (0.069%); for abdomen CT, colon for boys (0.017%) and lung for girls (0.016%); for pelvis CT, bladder for both boys and girls (0.008%). Conclusion: The effective doses from these common pediatric CT examinations ranged from 0.7 mSv to 3.5 mSv and the associated lifetime cancer risks were found to be up to 0.16%, with some organs of higher radiosensitivity including breast, thyroid gland, colon and lungs.

  15. Estimating cancer risks to adults undergoing body CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; He, W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to estimate cancer risks from the amount of radiation used to perform body computed tomography (CT) examination. The ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator was used to compute values of organ doses for adult body CT examinations. The radiation used to perform each examination was quantified by the dose-length product (DLP). Patient organ doses were converted into corresponding age and sex dependent cancer risks using data from BEIR VII. Results are presented for cancer risks per unit DLP and unit effective dose for 11 sensitive organs, as well as estimates of the contribution from 'other organs'. For patients who differ from a standard sized adult, correction factors based on the patient weight and antero-posterior dimension are provided to adjust organ doses and the corresponding risks. At constant incident radiation intensity, for CT examinations that include the chest, risks for females are markedly higher than those for males, whereas for examinations that include the pelvis, risks in males were slightly higher than those in females. In abdominal CT scans, risks for males and female patients are very similar. For abdominal CT scans, increasing the patient age from 20 to 80 resulted in a reduction in patient risks of nearly a factor of 5. The average cancer risk for chest/abdomen/pelvis CT examinations was ∼26 % higher than the cancer risk caused by 'sensitive organs'. Doses and radiation risks in 80 kg adults were ∼10 % lower than those in 70 kg patients. Cancer risks in body CT can be estimated from the examination DLP by accounting for sex, age, as well as patient physical characteristics. (authors)

  16. CT attenuation in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.S.; Pearlson, G.D.; Goldfinger, A.D.; Tune, L.E.; Heyler, G.

    1986-01-01

    113 screened normal volunteers aged 18-85 and 50 elderly demented individuals meeting NINCDS/ADRDA criteria for probable senile dementia of the Alzheimer type, (SDAT), received a non-contrast x-CT head scan on a single 512x512 matrix Siemens Somatom DR3 Scanner. Scanning parameters (KV,MA) were kept constant, and the authors used a specially designed head holder to ensure a uniform scanning angle. Standard 8mm thick cuts, at zero degrees to the supra-orbito-meatal line, were taken through the entire brain. A ''phantom'' consisting of plastics of several different attenuation values was scanned before each patient as a reference to correct for any numerical drift in the scanner. Both patients and controls were scanned during the same sessions to eliminate possible systematic bias, and a single CT technologist carried out all scanning. Numerical CT data were collected on magnetic tape for analysis on a specially designed image processing system. Software was used to read CT density data from the 512x512 matrix scanner output tapes and to transfer the resulting image in standardized format to hard disk on the processing system. This system consists of a PDP-11-34 computer, linked to a Gould DeAnza IP-5000 image processors, hard disk system and tape drive. Once transferred to disk, images were rated blindly to subject identity or diagnosis by another 2 separate raters using a computer-linked cursor, and digitizer tablet. These numerical attenuation data from various anatomically defined regions of interest, (ROI's), were then corrected for head size using a regression model

  17. Evaluation of normal brain CT scan in Korean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Suh, J. H.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-06-15

    The safety of procedure combined with wealth of information have resulted in rapid acceptance of CT as a practical and reliable neurodignostic technique. To understand the alternation in tissue density and associated displacement and distortion caused by pathologic lesion in CT, it is necessary to have clear understanding of normal anatomical landmark. For the purpose of establishing normative criteria in Korean for comparative diagnosis, 500 normal CT scan without neurologic sign were studied. The brief results are follows; 1. Among many ventricular index measured for lateral ventricle, the bifrontal CVI is more sensitive and easily determined. Ventricular size increased with age, especially after 6th decade but no difference with sex. 2. Mean width of third ventricle is 5 mm ({+-} 0.3), more wider in male (male; 5.2 mm, female; 4.5 mm) and increased with age. 2. Mean width of fourth ventricle is 13 mm ({+-} 1.3), without difference in age and sex. The shape of ventricle is variable form of triangle. The position of ventricle relative to Twining's line can be determined, so ratio of distance from tuberculum sellae to center of fourth ventricle to Twining's line is between 0.46-0.52. 4. Suprasellar cistern is visible in 89.7% of scan and shape of cistern is found to be pentagonal (73.3%), hexagonal (23.0%) and tetragonal (3.7%). 5. Choroid plexus can be identified in 90% and asymmetrical in 4%. 45% of identified choroid plexus can be visible on scan without contrast enhancement, and more frequently visible in older age.

  18. Evaluation of normal brain CT scan in Koreans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Suh, J. H.; Park, C. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The safety of procedure combined with wealth of information have resulted in rapid acceptance of CT as a practical and reliable neurodiagnostic technique. To understand the alternation in tissue density and associated displacement and distortion caused by pathologic lesion in CT, it is necessary to have clear understanding of normal anatomical landmark. For the purpose of establishing normartive criteria in Koreans for comparative diagnosis, 500 normal CT scan without neurologic sign were studied. The brief results are follows; 1. Among many ventricular index measured for lateral ventricle, the bifrontal CVI is more sensitive and easily determined. Ventricular size increased with age, especially after 6th decade but no difference with sex. 2. Mean width of third ventricle is 5mm( ± 0.3), more wider in male (male; 5.2mm, female; 4.5mm) and increased with age. 3. Mean width of fourth ventricle is 13mm( ± 1.3), without difference in age and sex. The shape of ventricle is variable form of triangle. The position of ventricle relative to Twining's line can be determined, so ratio of distance from tuberculum sellae to center of fourth ventricle to Twining's line is between 0.46-0.52. 4. Suprasellar cistern is visible in 89.7% of scan and shape of cistern is found to be pentagonal (73.3%), hexagonal (23.0%) and tetragonal (3.7%). 5. Choroid plexus can be identified in 90% and asymetrical in 4%. 45% of identified choroid plexus can be visible on scan without contrast enhancement, and more frequently visible in older age

  19. Evaluation of normal brain CT scan in Korean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Suh, J. H.; Park, C. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The safety of procedure combined with wealth of information have resulted in rapid acceptance of CT as a practical and reliable neurodignostic technique. To understand the alternation in tissue density and associated displacement and distortion caused by pathologic lesion in CT, it is necessary to have clear understanding of normal anatomical landmark. For the purpose of establishing normative criteria in Korean for comparative diagnosis, 500 normal CT scan without neurologic sign were studied. The brief results are follows; 1. Among many ventricular index measured for lateral ventricle, the bifrontal CVI is more sensitive and easily determined. Ventricular size increased with age, especially after 6th decade but no difference with sex. 2. Mean width of third ventricle is 5 mm (± 0.3), more wider in male (male; 5.2 mm, female; 4.5 mm) and increased with age. 2. Mean width of fourth ventricle is 13 mm (± 1.3), without difference in age and sex. The shape of ventricle is variable form of triangle. The position of ventricle relative to Twining's line can be determined, so ratio of distance from tuberculum sellae to center of fourth ventricle to Twining's line is between 0.46-0.52. 4. Suprasellar cistern is visible in 89.7% of scan and shape of cistern is found to be pentagonal (73.3%), hexagonal (23.0%) and tetragonal (3.7%). 5. Choroid plexus can be identified in 90% and asymmetrical in 4%. 45% of identified choroid plexus can be visible on scan without contrast enhancement, and more frequently visible in older age

  20. CT and MR imaging of the normal and pathologic conditions of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Lorenz E-mail: jaeger@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well established imaging modalities to examine the facial nerve as well as the course of the facial nerve itself. High spatial resolution is guaranteed not only in the x- and y-axis, but also in the z-axis using multislice spiral CT. With this technique, reformatted multiplanar images in oblique planes, avoiding additional examinations in the coronal plane, facilitate the delineation of the facial nerve canal. This is beneficial in patients with temporal bone trauma, malformation or osseous changes. MR has a superior soft-tissue contrast to CT that enables imaging of the facial nerve itself. Therefore the normal facial nerve as well as pathologic changes of the facial nerve is readily visualized from the brain stem to the parotid gland. This review article presents anatomy, pathology and imaging strategies in the diagnostics of the facial nerve.

  1. Estimates of effective dose in adult CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mustafa Awad Elhaj.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of study was to estimate effective dose (E) in adult CT examinations for Toshiba X64 slice using CT. Exp version 2.5 software in Sudan. Using of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. lack of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. In order to achieve these objectives, data of CT-scanner has been collected from three hospitals ( ANH, ZSH and MMH). Data collected included equipment information and scan parameters for individual patients, who were used to asses. 300 adult patients underwent head, chest, abdomen-pelvis and peivis CT examinations. The CT1_w , CTD1_vol, DLP, patient effective dos and organ doses were estimated, using CT exposure parameters and CT Exp version 2.5 software. A large variation of mean effective dose and organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scan length. The mean effective dose in this study in the Brain, PNS, Chest, pulmonary, Abdomen-pelvis, Pelvis, KUB and CTU were 3.2 mSv, 2.6 mSv, 18.9 mSv 17.6 mSv 27.1 mSv, 11.2 mSv, 9.6 mSv and 23.7 mSv respectively, and organ equivalent, doses presented in this study in this study for the eye lens (for head), lungs and thymus ( for chest) , liver, kidney and small intest ( for abdomen t-pelvis), bladder, uterus and gonads ( for pelvis), were 62.9 mSv, 39.5 mSv, 34.1 mSv, 53.9 mSv, 52.6 mSv, 58.1 mSv, 37 mSv, and 34.6 mSv, respectively. These values were mostly comparable to and slightly higher than the values of effective doses reported from similar studies the United Kingdom, Tanzania, Australia, Canada and Sudan. It was concluded that patient effective dose and organ doses could be substantially minimized through careful selection of scanning parameters based on clinical indications of study, patient size, and body

  2. Patient doses from CT examinations in the United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The main goal of the study was to estimate effective patient doses from the 6 most common CT examinations for different types of CT scanners within the United Arab Emirates. The results were used to assess future trends in patient CT doses following rapid replacement of axial and single-slice spiral scanners by multi-slice scanners. At present all three types of scanner technology exist: axial, spiral and multi-slice with axial scanners being gradually replaced by multi-slice scanners as the medical infrastructure of the country is modernized. Altogether there are more than 30 CT scanners in the country with a population of 4 million. Out of these 11 scanners are 16-slice models with tube-current modulation system. The majority of larger United Arab Emirates hospitals have at least two CT scanners: a single slice and 4 or 16-slice scanner. The survey was carried out with data collection forms distributed to the majority of CT scanner users in the United Arab Emirates hospitals, both private and government. Effective doses for different examinations were calculated from T.L.D. measurements using an Alderson Rando phantom simulating an average size patient. Our results show that effective doses to patients initially increased with the introduction of 4-slice scanners. Multi-slice scanners with 16 and more slices have tube-current modulation system as a standard. It is routinely used by radiographers in almost all examinations resulting in patient dose reduction up to 40 % in certain examinations. Another factor affecting population dose is the increased number of patients examined using multi-slice scanners. In the United Arab Emirates there was an increase of more than 30 % in the annual number of patients examined using multi-slice scanners in comparison to single-slice scanners. This fact is attributed to the ease and speed of operation of multi-slice scanners. Rapid increase in number of CT examinations is of concern. Medical

  3. Clinically relevant incidental cardiovascular findings in CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, P.; Fahnert, J.; Kahn, T.; Surov, A.; Schramm, D.; Bach, A.G.

    2017-01-01

    Incidental cardiovascular findings are a frequent phenomenon in computed tomography (CT) examinations. As the result of a dedicated PubMed search this article gives a systemic overview of the current literature on the most important incidental cardiovascular findings, their prevalence and clinical relevance. The majority of incidental cardiovascular findings are of only low clinical relevance; however, highly relevant incidental findings, such as aortic aneurysms, thromboses and thromboembolic events can also occasionally be found, especially in oncology patients. The scans from every CT examination should also be investigated for incidental findings as they can be of decisive importance for the further clinical management of patients, depending on their clinical relevance. (orig.) [de

  4. Extravasation of contrast medium during CT examination: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-31

    Extravasation of contrast medium during CT examination: An observational casecontrol study. ... Methods: every incident of extravasation which occurred between March 2012 and March 31, 2013 was recorded in an extravasation form. Ethics Committee approval was obtained and the patients gave their consent to ...

  5. Respiratory management of CT-transmission for accuracy fusion in PET/CT. A comparison between normal expiration and free breathing in 600 experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Atsushi; Takiguchi, Tomohiro; Tamura, Shintaro; Ohashi, Takashi; Miwa, Kenta; Akimoto, Kenta; Wagatsuma, Kei

    2010-01-01

    Image misregistration can occur in fusion positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, because of motion artifacts caused by the management of respiration. The standard imaging protocol of the CT component of PET/CT is normal expiration (NormExp) or free breathing (FB). The objective of this study was to compare NormExp and FB for the optimal breathing protocol for PET/CT scans. A total of 600 consecutive patients were examined using lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT. CT was acquired during NormExp (id est (i.e.), the level reached when the patient exhaled without forcing expiration and then held the breath) in 300 patients and during FB in 300 patients. The profile of liver measured along body axis was assessed. The distance of profile centers between the PET image and the CT image was measured. The misalignment between profile centers (PET) and profile centers (CT) was compared between NormExp and FB using the histogram of patients. An F test was used to test if the variances of two misalignments are equal. Next, the relationship between misalignment and age was evaluated in two managements of respiration. There was no significant difference between NormExp and FB in the histogram. However, significant misalignments (>10 cm) were found with NormExp. Patient age may have influenced the mismatch. FB is recommended for geriatric patients during acquisition of attenuation correction CT data sets. (author)

  6. CT and MR findings in retinoblastoma : correlation with histopathologic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Son Won; Han, Moon Hee; Chi, Je G.; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Yeon Mee; Chung, Jin Haeng; Yu, In Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate histopathologic correlation of the component of the lesion on CT and MR of retinoblastomas. Gross pathologic findings of 24 enucleated eyeballs in 24 patients with retinoblastomas were compared with preoperative CT (n=19) and MR (n=5) findings. In eight eyeballs, in which there were findings other than mass, histopathologic findings were reviewed and correlated with image findings. Retinal detachment and subretinal hemorrhage which were not detected on CT were demonstrated in two of eight eyeballs on histopathologic examination. In one eyeball, retinal detachment and subretinal effusion were detected on both CT and in a pathologic specimen. In two eyeballs with peripheral heterogeneous MR enhancement of the masses, tumor necrosis and calcification were demonstrated in the central non-emhancing portion of the mass, In two eveballs, linear soft tissue along the retina apart from the main mass were revealed as tumor spread along the retinal surface. In one patient, retinal thickening on MR was presumed to be an MR artifact and no lesion was found in the gross specimen. On CT, retinal detachment and subretinal hemorrhage associated with retinoblastoma can mimic mass, and tumor spread along the retinal surface can be seen as a linear retinal lesion. On MR, tumor necrosis and calcification can be a cause of heterogeneous enhancement

  7. Optimization of pediatric examinations in a multislice helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ombada, T. H. A.

    2010-12-01

    Radiological protection of pediatric patients undergoing medical imaging procedures involving ionizing radiation has always received special attention. This is due to the fact that children have higher radiation sensitivity and increased likelihood for radiation-induced cancer manifesting in many more years of their life than adults. In computed tomography (CT), such attention is more important because of the potential of relatively higher radiation doses during these procedures. Such high doses are possible with technological developments where volume scanning using faster multi-slice CT systems is now preferred to conventional CT equipment. The task of this study is to assess the optimization of paediatric doses in multi-slice CT examinations. It was carried out in Alrebat University Hospital for 31 pediatric patients, 43 examinations (27 head examination and 16 body (chest, abdomen and pelvis) examinations). Data were collected for scan parameters (kV, m As, pitch, scan length, number of slices and slice thickness) and doses displayed in monitor (CTDI v ol and DLP) for head examinations and body (chest, abdomen and pelvis) examinations. For head CT, displayed CTDI v ol ranged from 1.56 to 69.12 mGy, calculated value from 2.10 to 70.93 mGy. Displayed DLP ranged from 53 to 1817 mGy.cm, calculated from 95.30 to 1532.16 mGy. cm. For body examination, the range of displayed CTDI from 1.63 to 3.92 mGy, calculated value from 2.22 to 5.34 mGy. Displayed DLP ranged from 34 to 194 mGy.cm, for calculated from 45.89 to 161.98 mGy. cm. The calculated values are in agreement with reference study dose values although there are some high values in this study for some examinations, this variation or difference may attribute to variation in pediatric ages (9 days- 15 years), scan length and m As values. There is variation between calculated and displayed values. more optimization for CT doses is needed. (Author)

  8. Optimization of pediatric examinations in a multislice helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ombada, T H. A. [Atomic Energy Council, Sudan Academy of Sciences (SAS), Khartoum (Sudan)

    2010-12-15

    Radiological protection of pediatric patients undergoing medical imaging procedures involving ionizing radiation has always received special attention. This is due to the fact that children have higher radiation sensitivity and increased likelihood for radiation-induced cancer manifesting in many more years of their life than adults. In computed tomography (CT), such attention is more important because of the potential of relatively higher radiation doses during these procedures. Such high doses are possible with technological developments where volume scanning using faster multi-slice CT systems is now preferred to conventional CT equipment. The task of this study is to assess the optimization of paediatric doses in multi-slice CT examinations. It was carried out in Alrebat University Hospital for 31 pediatric patients, 43 examinations (27 head examination and 16 body (chest, abdomen and pelvis) examinations). Data were collected for scan parameters (kV, m As, pitch, scan length, number of slices and slice thickness) and doses displayed in monitor (CTDI{sub v}ol and DLP) for head examinations and body (chest, abdomen and pelvis) examinations. For head CT, displayed CTDI{sub v}ol ranged from 1.56 to 69.12 mGy, calculated value from 2.10 to 70.93 mGy. Displayed DLP ranged from 53 to 1817 mGy.cm, calculated from 95.30 to 1532.16 mGy. cm. For body examination, the range of displayed CTDI from 1.63 to 3.92 mGy, calculated value from 2.22 to 5.34 mGy. Displayed DLP ranged from 34 to 194 mGy.cm, for calculated from 45.89 to 161.98 mGy. cm. The calculated values are in agreement with reference study dose values although there are some high values in this study for some examinations, this variation or difference may attribute to variation in pediatric ages (9 days- 15 years), scan length and m As values. There is variation between calculated and displayed values. more optimization for CT doses is needed. (Author)

  9. Variation in quantitative CT air trapping in heavy smokers on repeat CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mets, Onno M.; Gietema, Hester A.; Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, Postbus 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Isgum, Ivana; Mol, Christian P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zanen, Pieter [University Medical Center Utrecht, Pulmonology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, Postbus 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    To determine the variation in quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of air trapping in low-dose chest CTs of heavy smokers. We analysed 45 subjects from a lung cancer screening trial, examined by CT twice within 3 months. Inspiratory and expiratory low-dose CT was obtained using breath hold instructions. CT air trapping was defined as the percentage of voxels in expiratory CT with an attenuation below -856 HU (EXP{sub -856}) and the expiratory to inspiratory ratio of mean lung density (E/I-ratio{sub MLD}). Variation was determined using limits of agreement, defined as 1.96 times the standard deviation of the mean difference. The effect of both lung volume correction and breath hold reproducibility was determined. The limits of agreement for uncorrected CT air trapping measurements were -15.0 to 11.7 % (EXP{sub -856}) and -9.8 to 8.0 % (E/I-ratio{sub MLD}). Good breath hold reproducibility significantly narrowed the limits for EXP{sub -856} (-10.7 to 7.5 %, P = 0.002), but not for E/I-ratio{sub MLD} (-9.2 to 7.9 %, P = 0.75). Statistical lung volume correction did not improve the limits for EXP{sub -856} (-12.5 to 8.8 %, P = 0.12) and E/I-ratio{sub MLD} (-7.5 to 5.8 %, P = 0.17). Quantitative air trapping measures on low-dose CT of heavy smokers show considerable variation on repeat CT examinations, regardless of lung volume correction or reproducible breath holds. (orig.)

  10. CT Densitometry of the Lung in Healthy Nonsmokers with Normal Pulmonary Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Tack Sun; Chae, Eun Jin; Seo, Joon Beom; Jung, Young Ju; Oh, Yeon Mok; Lee, Sang Do [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the upper normal limit of low attenuation area in healthy nonsmokers. A total of 36 nonsmokers with normal pulmonary function test underwent a CT scan. Six thresholds (-980 --930 HU) on inspiration CT and two thresholds (-950 and -910 HU) on expiration CT were used for obtaining low attenuation area. The mean lung density was obtained on both inspiration CT and expiration CT. Descriptive statistics of low attenuation area and the mean lung density, evaluation of difference of low attenuation area and the mean lung density in both sex and age groups, analysis of the relationship between demographic information and CT parameters were performed. Upper normal limit for low attenuation area was 12.96% on inspiration CT (-950 HU) and 9.48% on expiration CT (-910 HU). Upper normal limit for the mean lung density was -837.58 HU on inspiration CT and 686.82 HU on expiration CT. Low attenuation area and the mean lung density showed no significant differences in both sex and age groups. Body mass index (BMI) was negatively correlated with low attenuation area on inspiration CT (-950 HU, r = -0.398, p = 0.016) and positively correlated with the mean lung density on inspiration CT (r 0.539, p = 0.001) and expiration CT (r = 0.432, p = 0.009). Age and body surface area were not correlated with low attenuation area or the mean lung density. Low attenuation area on CT densitometry of the lung could be found in healthy nonsmokers with normal pulmonary function, and showed negative association with BMI. Reference values, such as range and upper normal limit for low attenuation area in healthy subjects could be helpful in quantitative analysis and follow up of early emphysema, using CT densitometry of the lung.

  11. Development of a method to estimate organ doses for pediatric CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Antonios E., E-mail: apapadak@pagni.gr; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Heraklion, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1352, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for estimating doses to primarily exposed organs in pediatric CT by taking into account patient size and automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Methods: A Monte Carlo CT dosimetry software package, which creates patient-specific voxelized phantoms, accurately simulates CT exposures, and generates dose images depicting the energy imparted on the exposed volume, was used. Routine head, thorax, and abdomen/pelvis CT examinations in 92 pediatric patients, ranging from 1-month to 14-yr-old (49 boys and 43 girls), were simulated on a 64-slice CT scanner. Two sets of simulations were performed in each patient using (i) a fixed tube current (FTC) value over the entire examination length and (ii) the ATCM profile extracted from the DICOM header of the reconstructed images. Normalized to CTDI{sub vol} organ dose was derived for all primary irradiated radiosensitive organs. Normalized dose data were correlated to patient’s water equivalent diameter using log-transformed linear regression analysis. Results: The maximum percent difference in normalized organ dose between FTC and ATCM acquisitions was 10% for eyes in head, 26% for thymus in thorax, and 76% for kidneys in abdomen/pelvis. In most of the organs, the correlation between dose and water equivalent diameter was significantly improved in ATCM compared to FTC acquisitions (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The proposed method employs size specific CTDI{sub vol}-normalized organ dose coefficients for ATCM-activated and FTC acquisitions in pediatric CT. These coefficients are substantially different between ATCM and FTC modes of operation and enable a more accurate assessment of patient-specific organ dose in the clinical setting.

  12. Patient dosimetry study of a paediatric CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hranitzky, C.; Stadtmann, H.

    2011-01-01

    Dosimetry studies are of increasing interest in diagnostic high-dose applications such as computed tomography especially for examinations of children. A routine CT scan protocol for paediatric head and neck imaging was investigated at a new multi-detector CT scanner using LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) and a 0.125 cm 3 thimble ionization chamber. Calibrations of the detectors in terms of absorbed dose to water were carried out at the Dosimetry Laboratory Seibersdorf in standard radiation fields. The dosimetry method was validated in the spiral CT X-ray field by comparing TLD and ionization chamber measurement results in cylindrical PMMA phantoms. Absorbed dose results were within stated uncertainties. An anthropomorphic phantom representing a child of about 5 years was loaded with TLD chips at various organ and tissue positions in the head and neck region as well as at some critical organ locations. Organ dose values were calculated from TLD based average absorbed dose with about 5% total uncertainty, e.g. 22 mGy (eyes), 21 mGy (thyroid), 19 mGy (brain), 3.4 mGy (thymus), and 0.03 mGy (testes). For comparison purposes an effective dose of 1.9 mSv was estimated for the investigated paediatric CT examination based on ICRP-103 age-independent tissue-weighting factors.

  13. Estimating effective doses to children from CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heron, J.C.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Assessing doses to patients in diagnostic radiology is an integral part of implementing optimisation of radiation protection. Sources of normalised data are available for estimating doses to adults undergoing CT examinations, but for children this is not the case. This paper describes a simple method for estimating effective doses arising from paediatric CT examinations. First the effective dose to an adult is calculated, having anatomically matched the scanned regions of the child and the adult and also matched the irradiation conditions. A conversion factor is then applied to the adult effective dose, based on the region of the body being scanned - head, upper or lower trunk. This conversion factor is the child-to-adult ratio of the ratios of effective dose per entrance air kerma (in the absence of the patient) at the FAD. The values of these conversion factors were calculated by deriving effective dose per entrance air kerma at the FAD for new-born, 1, 5, 10, 15 and adult phantoms using four projections (AP, PA, left and right laterals) over a range of beam qualities and FADs.The program PCXMC was used for this purpose. Results to date suggest that the conversion factors to give effective doses for children undergoing CT examinations of the upper trunk are approximately 1.3, 1.2, 1.15, 1.1 and 1.05 for ages 0, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years respectively; CT of the lower trunk - 1.4, 1.3, 1.2, 1.2, 1.1; and CT of the head - 2.3, 2.0, 1.5, 1.3, 1.1. The dependence of these factors on beam quality (HVL from 4 to 10 mm Al) is less than 10%, with harder beams resulting in slightly smaller conversion factors. Dependence on FAD is also less than 10%. Major sources of uncertainties in the conversion factors include matching anatomical regions across the phantoms, and the presence of beam divergence in the z-direction when deriving the factors. The method described provides a simple means of estimating effective doses arising from paediatric CT examinations with

  14. Exposure dose to gonad and its reduction in CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Menju, Mina; Nakazawa, Masato

    2006-01-01

    Exposure doses to gonad (ovary and uterus) due to scattering at the ordinary CT examinations of head, breast, and abdomen (liver) were measured and their reductions by the protective apron usually used in clinic were evaluated by comparison of the given and International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) data for risk assessment. Multi-slice helical/scanno-helical CT for the regions under ordinary diagnostic conditions was done by the apparatus Toshiba Aquilion 16 for the human body phantom (Alderson) with or without the apron (Hagoromo) equivalent to 0.25 mm thick lead. Doses inside and outside the beam flux were measured by the thermoluminescent dosimeter, of which data were corrected by Radcal Model 300 ionization chamber. The doses in the gonad due to scattering were found to be in the range from 0.01 (head CT) to 1 (liver CT) mGy and to be reduced in 20-30% by the apron. Found dose were far smaller than the ICRP threshold values for inducing teratosis and infertality. (T.I.)

  15. Virtual CT-colonoscopy. Examination technique, limitations, and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, P.; Dessl, A.; Giacomuzzi, S.M.; Stoehr, B.; Stoeger, A.; Bodner, G.; Buchberger, W.

    1997-01-01

    Virtual CT-colonoscopy is a post-processing method which allows for reconstruction of inner bowel surface structures from helical CT datasets. The reconstructed images simulate the views which are known from fiberoptic endoscopy. Since colorectal cancer is the second main cause of death in USA and Europe today and since recent screening recommendations are often ignored by the public, a non-invasive or minimal-invasive procedure for colonic evaluation would offer some benefits. Virtual CT-colonoscopy generally involves three essential steps: patient preparation with cleansing of the bowel and administration of an air enema, helical CT-examination by using appropriate scan parameters, and interactive 3D rendering of the volume dataset. Although recent studies have demonstrated that polypoid lesions of about 5 mm size are well detectable and although virtual colonoscopy offers many advantages over fiberoptic endoscopy, some technical and clinical limitations must still be noted. Thus, the current inability of virtual colonoscopy to provide texture and color leads to problems in identifying flat lesions; the presence of retained or adherent fecal matter may result to false positive diagnosis and collapsed segments of bowel may cause problems as they cannot subsequently be evaluated during image reconstruction. Virtual endoscopy is still in its infancy and further technical and clinical development are necessary. (orig./AJ) [de

  16. CT examination of expanding processes in cerebellopontine angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.; Kvicala, V.; Faltynova, E.

    1988-01-01

    A contribution is evaluated of computerized tomography to the diagnosis of expanding processes localized in the pontocerebellar corner of posterior cranial fossa, particularly neurinomas of n. statoacousticus. In cases of expanding processes in this region, especially in minor expansions, CT examination must be performed in a specially selected way, always after the intravenous administration of a contrast agent. The diagnosis of small neurinomas of n. statoacousticus, localized mostly in intracanalicullar portion, in the external auditory duct proved to be particularly difficult. In these cases, computerized pneumomeatography proved to be of a particular value; CT examination of the internal auditory duct and its neighbourhood was performed after previous filling of this region with air which, in most cases, well differentiated expansions into adjacent structures. It is confirmed in agreement with reports in the literature, that in cases of serious clinical suspicion and negative or controversial finding by classical CT examination, computerized pneumomeatography is the method of choice in the diagnosis of small isodense neurinomas of nervus statoacousticus. (author). 10 refs

  17. National Survey on Justification of CT-examinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, Anja; Leitz, Wolfram; Richter, Sven

    2009-02-15

    All examinations in diagnostic radiology shall be justified to avoid unnecessary irradiation of the patients. The objective of the study was to investigate the degree of justification for CT-examinations in Sweden. Referrals for all examinations performed during one day were retrospectively evaluated by a group of physicians. The study was designed and conducted by a project group lead by prof. Haakan Jorulf. The authors of this report have derived the results and conclusions on the basis of the data and are responsible for the content of this report. The principle result was that approximately 20 % of all examinations were not justified. The degree of justification varied strongly with organ examined, moderately with prescriber affiliation and weakly with geographical region. If unjustified examinations could be avoided a large dose reduction for the population would be achieved. This study shows that there is a need for improvements and the authority will continue to work with this issue

  18. National Survey on Justification of CT-examinations in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, Anja; Leitz, Wolfram; Richter, Sven

    2009-02-01

    All examinations in diagnostic radiology shall be justified to avoid unnecessary irradiation of the patients. The objective of the study was to investigate the degree of justification for CT-examinations in Sweden. Referrals for all examinations performed during one day were retrospectively evaluated by a group of physicians. The study was designed and conducted by a project group lead by prof. Haakan Jorulf. The authors of this report have derived the results and conclusions on the basis of the data and are responsible for the content of this report. The principle result was that approximately 20 % of all examinations were not justified. The degree of justification varied strongly with organ examined, moderately with prescriber affiliation and weakly with geographical region. If unjustified examinations could be avoided a large dose reduction for the population would be achieved. This study shows that there is a need for improvements and the authority will continue to work with this issue

  19. Patient doses in chest CT examinations: Comparison of various CT scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božović Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from study on patient exposure level in chest CT examinations. CT scanners used in this study were various Siemens and General Electric (GE models. Data on patient doses were collected for adult and pediatric patients. Doses measured for adult patients were lower then those determined as Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL for Europe, while doses for pediatric patients were similar to those found in published data. As for the manufactures, slightly higher doses were measured on GE devices, both for adult and pediatric patients.

  20. Brain parenchymal density measurements by CT in demented subjects and normal controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, M.; Danziger, W.L.; Chi, D.; Hughes, C.P.; Coben, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Parachymal density measurements of 14 regions of gray and white matter from each cerebral hemisphere were made from CT scans of 25 subjects who had varying degrees of dementia as measured by a global Clinical Dementia Rating, and also from CT scans of 33 normal control subjects. There were few significant differences between the two groups in the mean density value for each of the regions examined, although several individual psychometric tests did correlate with density changes. Moreover, for six regions in the cerebral cortex, and for one region in the thalamus of each hemisphere, we found no significant correlation between the gray-white matter density difference and dementia. There was, however, a loss of the discriminability between the gray and white matter with an increase in the size of the ventricles. These findings may be attributed to the loss of white matter volume

  1. Parkinsonian Symptomatology May Correlate with CT Findings before and after Shunting in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuaki Ishii

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the characteristics of Parkinsonian features assessed by the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS and determine their correlations with the computed tomography (CT findings in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH. The total score and the scores for arising from chair, gait, postural stability, and body hypokinesia in the motor examination section of UPDRS were significantly improved after shunt operations. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that postural stability was the determinant of the gait domain score of the iNPH grading scale. The canonical correlation analysis between the CT findings and the shunt-responsive Parkinsonian features indicated that Evans index rather than midbrain diameters had a large influence on the postural stability. Thus, the pathophysiology of postural instability as a cardinal feature of gait disturbance may be associated with impaired frontal projections close to the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles in the iNPH patients.

  2. Radiation doses in head CT examinations in Serbia: comparison among different CT units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arandjic, D.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Bozovic, P.; Stankovic, J.; Hadnadjev, D.; Stojanovic, S.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid increase in number of Computed Tomography (CT) examinations has been observed world wide. As haed CT is the most frequent CT examination, the purpose of this study was to collect and analyse patient doses in children and adults in different CT units for this procedure. The study included 8 CT units from three manufacturers (Siemens, Toshiba and General Electric). Data for adults and pediatric patients were collected in terms of CTDIvol and DLP values. The doses were estimated as a mean value of 10 patients on each CT unit. For pediatrics, doses were collected for four age groups (0-1year, >1-5years, >5-10years and >10-15years). Comparing different manufacturers and the same number of detector rows it was observed that, in case of 16 slices units, doses were very similar on Siemens and General Electric scanner. CTDIvol and DLP on Siemens scanner were 60 mGy and 1066 mGy·cm, respectively, while on General Electric those values were 66 mGy and 1050 mGy·cm. However, this trend was not observed in case of 64 slices units. CTDIvol and DLP values collected on Toshiba were much higher (177 mGy and 2109 mGy·cm) than in case of Siemens scanner (59 mGy and 1060 mGy·cm). Doses on 16 and 64 slices Siemens scanners were very similar, while on 4 slices were higher. Except in two units, doses were were in line with DRLs. In case of pediatrics, doses increase with patient age and again Siemens scanner showed the lowest values while the highest were observed on Toshiba. (authors)

  3. Examination of CT-AEC when the positioning changes after planning of CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaki, Tooru; Yamazaki, Shoichi

    2009-01-01

    CT-automatic exposure control (AEC) controls tube current collecting information of the subject from positioning shooting. Because of this, we consider that CT-AEC does not get to operate properly if the body position of the test subject changes after the positioning shooting. However, we often experience in body positions of test subjects after the positioning shooting. In cases like this, we measured by using a phantom again to see how they affect the tube current value and standard deviation (SD) value comparing them to the normal scan where a body position does not change. As a result of the measurement, there was an impact on CT-AEC that optimization of tube current becomes insufficient if the body position of a test subject changes. As the image quality is deteriorated and radiation exposure increases because of this, taking positioning shooting again is required on the part of users and it's desirable on the part of manufacturers to develop CT-AEC that can be controlled with high accuracy. (author)

  4. On the use of Monte Carlo-derived dosimetric data in the estimation of patient dose from CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the applicability and appropriateness of Monte Carlo-derived normalized data to provide accurate estimations of patient dose from computed tomography (CT) exposures. Monte Carlo methodology and mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms were used to simulate standard patient CT examinations of the head, thorax, abdomen, and trunk performed on a multislice CT scanner. Phantoms were generated to simulate the average adult individual and two individuals with different body sizes. Normalized dose values for all radiosensitive organs and normalized effective dose values were calculated for standard axial and spiral CT examinations. Discrepancies in CT dosimetry using Monte Carlo-derived coefficients originating from the use of: (a) Conversion coefficients derived for axial CT exposures, (b) a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom of standard body size to derive conversion coefficients, and (c) data derived for a specific CT scanner to estimate patient dose from CT examinations performed on a different scanner, were separately evaluated. The percentage differences between the normalized organ dose values derived for contiguous axial scans and the corresponding values derived for spiral scans with pitch=1 and the same total scanning length were up to 10%, while the corresponding percentage differences in normalized effective dose values were less than 0.7% for all standard CT examinations. The normalized organ dose values for standard spiral CT examinations with pitch 0.5-1.5 were found to differ from the corresponding values derived for contiguous axial scans divided by the pitch, by less than 14% while the corresponding percentage differences in normalized effective dose values were less than 1% for all standard CT examinations. Normalized effective dose values for the standard contiguous axial CT examinations derived by Monte Carlo simulation were found to considerably decrease with increasing body size of the mathematical phantom

  5. Clinically relevant incidental cardiovascular findings in CT examinations; Klinisch relevante kardiovaskulaere Zufallsbefunde bei CT-Untersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, P.; Fahnert, J.; Kahn, T.; Surov, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany); Schramm, D.; Bach, A.G. [Universitaetsklinikum Halle (Saale), Klinik fuer Radiologie, Halle (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Incidental cardiovascular findings are a frequent phenomenon in computed tomography (CT) examinations. As the result of a dedicated PubMed search this article gives a systemic overview of the current literature on the most important incidental cardiovascular findings, their prevalence and clinical relevance. The majority of incidental cardiovascular findings are of only low clinical relevance; however, highly relevant incidental findings, such as aortic aneurysms, thromboses and thromboembolic events can also occasionally be found, especially in oncology patients. The scans from every CT examination should also be investigated for incidental findings as they can be of decisive importance for the further clinical management of patients, depending on their clinical relevance. (orig.) [German] Inzidentelle kardiovaskulaere Befunde sind ein haeufiges Phaenomen bei CT-Untersuchungen. Mit dieser Arbeit soll nach gezielter PubMed-Recherche ein systematischer Literaturueberblick ueber die wichtigsten kardiovaskulaeren Zufallsbefunde sowie deren Haeufigkeit und klinische Relevanz gegeben werden. Die Mehrzahl der inzidentellen kardiovaskulaeren Befunde sind klinisch nur von untergeordneter Bedeutung, allerdings werden immer wieder auch hochgradig relevante Zufallsbefunde wie beispielsweise Aortenaneurysmata oder - gerade bei onkologischen Patienten - Thrombosen und thrombembolische Ereignisse detektiert. Jede CT-Untersuchung sollte gezielt nach inzidentellen Befunden durchsucht werden, da diese je nach klinischer Relevanz von entscheidender Bedeutung fuer das weitere klinische Management des Patienten sein koennen. (orig.)

  6. Normal mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes evaluated by 5 mm slice bolus injection CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takako; Tsukada, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Naoya; Akita, Shinichi; Oda, Junichi; Sakai, Kunio

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the number and size of normal mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes by 5 mm slice bolus injection CT (12 patients), compared with 10 mm slice CT (12 patients). More lymph nodes were clearly demonstrated by 5 mm slice CT than by 10 mm slice CT. Especially left-sided tracheobronchial (no.4), subaortic (no.5), subcarinal (no.7) and hilar lymph nodes were clearly visible. We concluded 5 mm slice bolus injection CT was useful to evaluate mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. (author)

  7. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong; Lee, Young Hwan

    1994-01-01

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions

  8. Likelihood of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in patients with normal unenhanced CT, CSF xanthochromia on spectrophotometry and negative CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, A K; Turner, H E; Deans, K A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage, a normal noncontrast computed tomography (CT) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evidence of haemoglobin breakdown products often undergo CT angiography (CTA). If this is normal, then invasive catheter angiography may be offered. In current clinical practice, haemoglobin breakdown products are detected by spectrophotometry rather than visible xanthochromia, and CTA is performed on multidetector scanners. The aim of this study was to determine if such patients should still have a catheter angiography, given the associated risks. Patients positive for CSF spectrophotometry (n=26) were retrospectively identified from the clinical biochemistry information system and imaging data from the electronic radiology records were reviewed. Discharge letters were consulted to relate the biochemistry and radiology results to the final diagnosis. 15 patients with CT angiography were found. Nine patients had normal CT angiography. No causative aneurysms had been missed. One patient had small, coincidental aneurysms missed on initial reading of the CTA. The likelihood of a clinically significant aneurysm in a patient who is CT negative, lumbar puncture positive and CTA negative is low. Double reporting of negative CT angiograms may be advisable.

  9. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: normal anatomy and technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvoisin, B.; Schnyder, P.; Klaus, E.; Jacques, B.

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is common. This entity is most often consecutive to internal derangements of the TMJ, which are not recognizable on plain films and tomograms. TMJ arthrography has proved a valuable tool in diagnosing these abnormalities. The technique of examination and normal arthrographic anatomy are reviewed. (author) [pt

  10. CT of the lesser pelvis - normal and abnormal anatomy, indications, results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrich, W.; Friedmann, G.

    1981-01-01

    385 abnormal computer tomograms of the organs in the lesser pelvis were analysed; the normal anatomy, indications for CT and its value are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the relevance of the computer tomographic information for treatment. (orig.) [de

  11. Comparison of SUVs normalized by lean body mass determined by CT with those normalized by lean body mass estimated by predictive equations in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Dae Weung [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Standardized uptake values (SUVs)normalized by lean body mass (LBM)determined by CT were compared with those normalized by LBM estimated using predictive equations (PEs)in normal liver, spleen, and aorta using {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F FDG)positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)was conducted on 453 patients. LBM determined by CT was defined in 3 ways (LBM{sup CT1}-3). Five PEs were used for comparison (LBM{sup PE1}-5). Tissue SUV normalized by LBM (SUL) was calculated using LBM from each method (SUL{sup CT1}-3, SUL{sup PE1}-5). Agreement between methods was assessed by Bland Altman analysis. Percentage difference and percentage error were also calculated. For all liver SUL{sup CTS} vs. liver SUL{sup PES} except liver SUL{sup PE3}, the range of biases, SDs of percentage difference and percentage errors were -0.17-0.24 SUL, 6.15-10.17%, and 25.07-38.91%, respectively. For liver SUL{sup CTs} vs. liver SUL{sup PE3}, the corresponding figures were 0.47-0.69 SUL, 10.90-11.25%, and 50.85-51.55%, respectively, showing the largest percentage errors and positive biases. Irrespective of magnitudes of the biases, large percentage errors of 25.07-51.55% were observed between liver SUL{sup CT1}-3 and liver SUL{sup PE1}-5. The results of spleen and aorta SUL{sup CTs} and SUL{sup PEs} comparison were almost identical to those for liver. The present study demonstrated substantial errors in individual SUL{sup PEs} compared with SUL{sup CTs} as a reference value. Normalization of SUV by LBM determined by CT rather than PEs may be a useful approach to reduce errors in individual SUL{sup PEs}.

  12. Comparison of SUVs normalized by lean body mass determined by CT with those normalized by lean body mass estimated by predictive equations in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Dae Weung

    2012-01-01

    Standardized uptake values (SUVs)normalized by lean body mass (LBM)determined by CT were compared with those normalized by LBM estimated using predictive equations (PEs)in normal liver, spleen, and aorta using 18 F FDG PET/CT. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F FDG)positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)was conducted on 453 patients. LBM determined by CT was defined in 3 ways (LBM CT1 -3). Five PEs were used for comparison (LBM PE1 -5). Tissue SUV normalized by LBM (SUL) was calculated using LBM from each method (SUL CT1 -3, SUL PE1 -5). Agreement between methods was assessed by Bland Altman analysis. Percentage difference and percentage error were also calculated. For all liver SUL CTS vs. liver SUL PES except liver SUL PE3 , the range of biases, SDs of percentage difference and percentage errors were -0.17-0.24 SUL, 6.15-10.17%, and 25.07-38.91%, respectively. For liver SUL CTs vs. liver SUL PE3 , the corresponding figures were 0.47-0.69 SUL, 10.90-11.25%, and 50.85-51.55%, respectively, showing the largest percentage errors and positive biases. Irrespective of magnitudes of the biases, large percentage errors of 25.07-51.55% were observed between liver SUL CT1 -3 and liver SUL PE1 -5. The results of spleen and aorta SUL CTs and SUL PEs comparison were almost identical to those for liver. The present study demonstrated substantial errors in individual SUL PEs compared with SUL CTs as a reference value. Normalization of SUV by LBM determined by CT rather than PEs may be a useful approach to reduce errors in individual SUL PEs

  13. Evaluation of changes in vertebral body density following administration of contrast medium during routine CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janicek, M.; Bruna, J.; Stenhova, H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of depicting changes in the density of spongiosis of the vertebral body in normal patients after intravenous administration of a bolus of 40 ml 60% Diazetrizoate in the course of a routine CT examination. The average increase in density immediately after the administration of the contrast medium is 12 H (8%), in the course of 10 minutes is reduced to 5 H (4%) against the initial values in native examination. These average changes are statistically significant, in individual patients, however, the increase in density following the administration of a contrast medium fluctuates considerably (from 0.7% to 10%). Only systematic comparison with various pathological conditions will make it possible to assess the possibilities of the evaluation of the structure of the vertebral body in routine CT with the administration of a contrast medium into the blood flow. (author)

  14. CT attenuation in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, I.K.; Mun, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    Management and practice of radiology have become complex in part because of an increasing number of different imaging modalities, scattered locations of these imaging systems and an increasing volume of stored data. The number of different imaging systems increased dramatically during the last 10 years. From simpler days of plane view roentgenograph and fluoroscopy we now have CT, MRI, DSA, Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine and others. In the practice of radiology, physician, radiologists and referring physicians alike need to view many multimodality images in a convenient and efficient way. Digital imaging network (DIN) or picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is a topic of great interest in recent years to address the issues of managing the vast amount of digital radiological image data. Out of many issues in PACS, only a limited but critical issue of integrating CT scanners into a network are discussed. While there now is an interface standard, complete integration of a digital imaging system such as CT to a network is hampered by several factors. The standard is new and it has not been fully implemented by all the parties. The standard is designed with a great deal of flexibility such that even after the ''standard'' is implemented full communication may not be possible due to the differences in detail. Theoretically it is possible to transfer image data from any i/o subsystems of a given computer to any i/o subsystems of any other computer. However, in the absence of ACR/NEMA implementations practical considerations limit user's choices. A number of options with associated advantages and disadvantages are given

  15. Endoscopic mode for three-dimensional CT display of normal and pathologic laryngeal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Yumoto, Eiji; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Ochi, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    The recent development of helical (spiral) computed tomography allows collection of volumetric data to obtain high quality three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed images. The authors applied the 3D CT endoscopic imaging technique to asses normal and pathologic laryngeal structures. The latter included trauma, vocal fold atrophy, cancer of the larynx and recurrent nerve palsy. This technique was able to show normal laryngeal structures and characteristic findings of each pathology. The 3D CT endoscopic images can be rotated around any axis, allowing optimal depiction of pathologic lesion. The use of 3D CT endoscopic technique provides the display of the location and extent of pathology and affords accurate therapeutic planning. (author)

  16. Measurement of four chambers' volumes and ventricular masses by cardiac CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Motomasa; Naito, Hiroaki; Ohta, Mitsushige; Kozuka, Takahiro; Kito, Yoshitsugu

    1983-01-01

    Using cardiac computed tomography (CT), the ''mean'' volume of each cardiac chamber and both ventricular masses were calculated from summation of a sliced volume by ungated scans obtained using rapid sequential scanning covering the whole heart. 1. Estimation of a normal value of each chamber's volume was attempted in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease and with normal heart function. The ''mean'' volume of the right atrium (RAMV), right ventricle (RVMV), and left atrium (LAMV) was 22.3 +- 6.5, 40.3 +- 6.5 and 28.7 +- 8.2ml/m 2 , respectively. 2. In 54 patients with valvular heart diseases, each chamber's volume obrained by CT was compared with the grade of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) estimated by ultrasonic Doppler technique or the grade of mitral regurgitation (MR) by left ventriculography (LVG). The RAMV (234 +- 119 ml/m 2 ) and the RVMV (101 +- 39 ml/m 2 ) were markedly increased in patients with severe TR (grade 3 to 4) (p 2 ) was also increased in patients with severe mitral regurgitation (grade 3 to 4) (p<0.01). 3. In 46 patients with valvular heart diseases, the LVMV by CT was well correlated with end-diastolic volume (EDV) obtained by LVG (r=0.92), and the LVEDVs by ECG gated CT and by LVG showed a fairly good correlation (r=0.95). 4. CT examination was performed before and after surgery in 17 patients with MR or TR for evaluation of the change of chamber volumes. The mean reduction ratio (MRR) of the RAMV after tricuspid annuloplasty, the LVMV after mitral valve plasty, and the LAMV after left atrial plication was 44%, 41%, and 60%, respectively. (author)

  17. Normal anatomy of the lymphatic system in the CT-image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrich, W.; Peters, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate a pathologic process of a lymphatic node, detailed knowledge is required of the normal anatomy of the lumphatic system in an axial CT image. The anatomy is demonstrated in a comparative study before and after lymphography with CT-scans of patients with normal lymphadenographs. Hereby it appears that with the high-resolution scanning method and favourable imaging conditions even small lymphatic nodes can be differentiated without a lymphographic contrast technique. However, nerves and vessels cannot be differentiated. The extreme variability in the size of normal lymphatic nodes makes the differentiation of pathologic processes very difficult. (orig.) [de

  18. Dose conversion coefficients for paediatric CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlattl, H; Zankl, M; Becker, J; Hoeschen, C

    2012-01-01

    A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in paediatric CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of paediatric models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDI vol for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the impact of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDI vol leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage. (paper)

  19. Multidetector CT angiography of renal vasculature: normal anatomy and variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerkvatan, Aysel; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cumhur, Turhan; Oelcer, Tuelay

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the variations in renal vascular anatomy is important before laparoscopic donor or partial nephrectomy and vascular reconstruction for renal artery stenosis or abdominal aortic aneurysm. Recently, multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography has become a principal imaging investigation for assessment of the renal vasculature and has challenged the role of conventional angiography. It is an excellent imaging technique because it is a fast and non-invasive tool that provides highly accurate and detailed evaluation of normal renal vascular anatomy and variants. The number, size and course of the renal arteries and veins are easily identified by MDCT angiography. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate MDCT angiographic appearance of normal anatomy and common variants of the renal vasculature. (orig.)

  20. Multidetector CT angiography of renal vasculature: normal anatomy and variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerkvatan, Aysel; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cumhur, Turhan; Oelcer, Tuelay [Tuerkiye Yueksek ihtisas Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    Knowledge of the variations in renal vascular anatomy is important before laparoscopic donor or partial nephrectomy and vascular reconstruction for renal artery stenosis or abdominal aortic aneurysm. Recently, multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography has become a principal imaging investigation for assessment of the renal vasculature and has challenged the role of conventional angiography. It is an excellent imaging technique because it is a fast and non-invasive tool that provides highly accurate and detailed evaluation of normal renal vascular anatomy and variants. The number, size and course of the renal arteries and veins are easily identified by MDCT angiography. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate MDCT angiographic appearance of normal anatomy and common variants of the renal vasculature. (orig.)

  1. CT examination of the temporal bones for cochlear implantation; Badanie CT kosci skroniowych u osob przygotowanych do operacji wszczepu slimakowego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szyfter, W.; Szymiec, E.; Pruszewicz, A.; Szmeja, Z.; Paprzycki, W.; Sekula, A.; Przybylska, J. [Klinika Otolaryngologii, Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    CT examinations of temporal bones were performed in 31 deaf patients from qualify diagnostic stage prepared for cochlear implants. Essential for surgical treatment anatomic details were estimated, especially canalis spiralis cochleae was paid to attention. In our group, 8 patients had some CT changes (abnormal findings) which corresponded to different stages of obliteration the cochlea. The majority of patients lost the hearing because of meningitis. In 6 implanted patients CT scan was compared with surgical findings. During the operation 1 patient with patent cochlea on CT scan had partially ossified basal turn. (author) 16 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Choi, Jiin

    2015-01-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  3. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jiin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  4. Normal and pathologically altered oculomotoric muscles in CT picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvicala, V.; Balakova, H. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia). Fakulta Vseobecneho Lekarstvi)

    1984-03-01

    Computerized tomography reliably visualizes oculomotoric muscles, particularly in coronary projection. 21 patients were examined where computerized tomography of the orbit showed disorders of oculomotoric muscles. Thyreoprivic ophthalmopathy (8 patients) was manifest by non-symmetric irregular thickening of muscles, whose density was unhomogeneously higher. In acromegaly (3 patients) the thickening of the muscles was less, affecting all muscles to a similar degree. Inflammatory and tumorous processes always affected only one oculomotoric muscle.

  5. Development of PC based Monte Carlo simulations for the calculation of scanner-specific normalized organ doses from CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J. T. M.; Shrimpton, P. C.; Zankl, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the simulation of contemporary computed tomography (CT) scanners using Monte Carlo calculation methods to derive normalized organ doses, which enable hospital physicists to estimate typical organ and effective doses for CT examinations. The hardware used in a small PC-cluster at the Health Protection Agency (HPA) for these calculations is described. Investigations concerning optimization of software, including the radiation transport codes MCNP5 and MCNPX, and the Intel and PGI FORTRAN compilers, are presented in relation to results and calculation speed. Differences in approach for modelling the X-ray source are described and their influences are analysed. Comparisons with previously published calculations at HPA from the early 1990's proved satisfactory for the purposes of quality assurance and are presented in terms of organ dose ratios for whole body exposure and differences in organ location. Influences on normalized effective dose are discussed in relation to choice of cross section library, CT scanner technology (contemporary multi slice versus single slice), definition for effective dose (1990 and 2007 versions) and anthropomorphic phantom (mathematical and voxel). The results illustrate the practical need for the updated scanner-specific dose coefficients presently being calculated at HPA, in order to facilitate improved dosimetry for contemporary CT practice. (authors)

  6. Dental CT: examination technique, radiation load and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenglinger, F.X.; Muhr, T.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally oral surgeons and dentists have evaluated the jaws using intraoral films and panoramic radiographs. The involvement of radiologists has been limited. In the past few years dedicated CT-software-programs developed to evaluate dental implant patients have provided a new look at the jaws. The complex anatomy is described and identified on human skulls and on axial, panoramic, and cross-sectional images. With this anatomic description Dental-CT-scans are used to demonstrate the anatomy of maxilla and the mandible. An overview of the technique of Dental-CT is provided, furthermore the radiation dose of different organs is explained. Suggestions to reduce these doses by simple modifications of the recommended protocols are given. (orig.) [de

  7. Results of CT brain examinations in cerebrovascular emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinta, Z.; Dolansky, J.; Sorfova, J.; Jerie, T.

    1987-01-01

    Experience is briefly reported with CT (computerized tomography) diagnosis of cerebrovascular emergencies. It is pointed out that the introduction of computerized tomography greatly improved and made more accurate the diagnosis of focal ischemias and revealed significant differences in the foci of ischemia in hypertension patients and atherosclerosis patients without hypertension, and showed a higher incidence of intracerebral and subarachnoidal hemorrhages than previously thought. It is believed that knowledge gained thanks to CT (computerized tomography) will be of benefit to the primary and secondary prevention of cerebrovascular ischemias. (L.O.). 1 fig., 5 refs

  8. Results of CT brain examinations in cerebrovascular emergency. [computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinta, Z; Dolansky, J; Sorfova, J; Jerie, T

    1987-07-01

    Experience is briefly reported with CT (computerized tomography) diagnosis of cerebrovascular emergencies. It is pointed out that the introduction of computerized tomography greatly improved and made more accurate the diagnosis of focal ischemias and revealed significant differences in the foci of ischemia in hypertension patients and atherosclerosis patients without hypertension, and showed a higher incidence of intracerebral and subarachnoidal hemorrhages than previously thought. It is believed that knowledge gained thanks to CT (computerized tomography) will be of benefit to the primary and secondary prevention of cerebrovascular ischemias. (L.O.). 1 fig., 5 refs.

  9. Usefulness of normal saline for sealing the needle track after CT-guided lung biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Du, Y.; Luo, T.Y.; Yang, H.F.; Yu, J.H.; Xu, X.X.; Zheng, H.J.; Li, B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the use of normal saline for sealing the needle track can reduce the incidence of pneumothorax and chest tube placement after computed tomography (CT)-guided lung biopsy. Materials and methods: A prospective, randomised, controlled trial enrolling 322 patients was conducted. All patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: those in whom the needle track was not sealed with normal saline (n=161, Group A) and those who did receive normal saline (n=161, Group B). CT-guided biopsy was performed with coaxial technique. Normal saline, which ranged from 1–3 ml, was injected while the trocar needle was being withdrawn. Patient characteristics, lesion, and procedure variables were analysed as potential risk variables for occurrence of pneumothorax and chest tube placement. Results: The incidence of pneumothorax was 26.1% in Group A and 6.2% in Group B (p<0.001). Nine patients in Group A and one patient in Group B required chest tube placement (p=0.010). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, smaller lesion size, greater needle–pleural angle, longer lesion–pleural distance, presence of emphysema, and no sealing the needle track with normal saline were significantly associated with an increased risk of pneumothorax, and that the latter three factors were also associated with an increased risk of pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement. Conlusion: Normal saline for sealing the needle track significantly reduces the incidence of pneumothorax and prevents subsequent chest tube placement after CT-guided lung biopsy. - Highlights: • Normal saline is an effective sealant for use in lung biopsy. • This technique reduced the incidence of pneumothorax and chest tube placement. • This technique should be recommended for CT-guided lung biopsy.

  10. Trends in examination frequency and collective effective doses from computed tomography (CT) procedures in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, S. B. I.

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to estimate the examination frequency and collective dose to population from CT procedures in Sudan. To calculate the annual collective dose from CT examinations a survey was done at 10 hospitals providing data of examinations frequency per day. The data of effective dose have been obtained from pervious study on effective dose per CT examination in Sudan. Then the annual examination frequency and annual collective effective dose had been calculated and discussed providing that the annual collective effective dose from CT examinations is (1482 man.Sv). The highest percentage examination frequency was for head examination (40%). The highest percentage contribution to the total collective dose from CT examinations was for abdomen examinations (32%). The calculated annual examination frequency and annual collective effective dose had been compared with the results of literature and international studies to evaluate the estimated values. The calculated annual collective dose from CT examinations is much lower comparing with the results presented in the literature. The study offers an insight on the examination frequency and the percentage of the risk from different standard radiographic examination within the country. (Author)

  11. Measurement of normal auditory ossicles by high-resolusion CT with application of normal criteria to disease cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Jyoko

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to define criteria for the normal position of ossicles and to apply them in patients with rhinolaryngologically or pathologically confirmed diseases. Ossicles were measured on high-resolution CT images of 300 middle ears, including 241 normal ears and 59 diseased ears, in a total of 203 subjects. Angles A, B, and C to the baseline between the most lateral margins of bilateral internal auditory canals, and distance ratio b/a were defined as measurement items. Normal angles A, B, and C and distance ratio b/a ranged from 19 deg to 59 deg, 101 deg to 145 deg, 51 deg to 89 deg, and 0.49 to 0.51, respectively. Based on these criteria, all of these items were within the normal range in 30/34 (88.2 %) ears for otitis media and mastoiditis. One or more items showed far abnormal values (standard deviation; more than 3) in 5/7 (71.4 %) ears for cholesteatoma and 4/4 (100 %) ears for external ear anomaly. These normal measurements may aid in evaluating the position of auditory ossicles especially in the case of cholesteatoma and auditory ossicle abnormality. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Measurement of normal auditory ossicles by high-resolusion CT with application of normal criteria to disease cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Jyoko

    1988-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to define criteria for the normal position of ossicles and to apply them in patients with rhinolaryngologically or pathologically confirmed diseases. Ossicles were measured on high-resolution CT images of 300 middle ears, including 241 normal ears and 59 diseased ears, in a total of 203 subjects. Angles A, B, and C to the baseline between the most lateral margins of bilateral internal auditory canals, and distance ratio b/a were defined as measurement items. Normal angles A, B, and C and distance ratio b/a ranged from 19 deg to 59 deg, 101 deg to 145 deg, 51 deg to 89 deg, and 0.49 to 0.51, respectively. Based on these criteria, all of these items were within the normal range in 30/34 (88.2 %) ears for otitis media and mastoiditis. One or more items showed far abnormal values (standard deviation; more than 3) in 5/7 (71.4 %) ears for cholesteatoma and 4/4 (100 %) ears for external ear anomaly. These normal measurements may aid in evaluating the position of auditory ossicles especially in the case of cholesteatoma and auditory ossicle abnormality. (Namekawa, K.).

  13. The clinical evaluation of CT and radionuclide examination in renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Wataru; Ishida, Hirofumi; Shirakawa, Shigetoshi; Shintaku, Takao; Funaki, Ryo

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twelve cases of renal diseases were studied by computed tomography (CT) using EMI 5005/12. Of them, 60 were examined by both CT and renal scintigraphy, and comparatively evaluated. The CT units were checked before and after the contrast enhancement. Renal scintigrams were obtained by gamma cameras (PHO/GAMMA HP 6406, PHO/GAMMA LFOV) using 99 M Tc-DMSA. CT was especially useful in diagnosing the renal cysts and the hydronephrosis. Cysts in other organs (liver, spleen and pancreas) were simultaneously ascertained in polycystic diseases. CT was not helpful in diagnosing nephritis and diabetic nephropathy. Floating kidney and horse-shoe kidney were difficult to diagnose with CT. The renal scintigram was the reflection of the renal function, and was relatively more useful than CT in diagnosing horse-shoe kidney, floating kidney and nephritis, while it was not useful for non-functioning kidneys. (author)

  14. Dental CT: examination technique, radiation load and anatomy; Dental-CT: Untersuchungstechnik, Strahlenbelastung und Anatomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenglinger, F.X.; Muhr, T. [AKH Wels (Austria). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Krennmair, G. [Praxis fuer Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde und Implantologie, Marchtrenk (Austria)

    1999-12-01

    Traditionally oral surgeons and dentists have evaluated the jaws using intraoral films and panoramic radiographs. The involvement of radiologists has been limited. In the past few years dedicated CT-software-programs developed to evaluate dental implant patients have provided a new look at the jaws. The complex anatomy is described and identified on human skulls and on axial, panoramic, and cross-sectional images. With this anatomic description Dental-CT-scans are used to demonstrate the anatomy of maxilla and the mandible. An overview of the technique of Dental-CT is provided, furthermore the radiation dose of different organs is explained. Suggestions to reduce these doses by simple modifications of the recommended protocols are given. (orig.) [German] Die Einfuehrung im Bereich der Computertomographiesoftware (Dental-CT) ermoeglicht dem Radiologen zusaetzlich zu den ueblichen, von den Zahnaerzten durchgefuehrten Roentgenuntersuchungen eine ueberlagerungs- und verzerrungsfreie Darstellung des Ober- und Unterkiefers. In der Implantologie ist mit dieser Darstellung eine exakte Planung moeglich. Weiterhin haben sich Duennschicht-CT-Untersuchungen auch bei der Abklaerung von Zysten, Tumoren, Frakturen, tiefen Parodontitiden und retinierten Zaehnen bewaehrt. In dieser Zeit wird ein Ueberblick ueber die Anatomie, die Untersuchungstechnik des Dental-CT und die auftretende Strahlenbelastung gegeben. Basierend auf rezente Literaturangaben kann eine Reduktion der absorbierten Dosis bei gleichbleibender Bildqualitaet durch einfache Protokollmodifikationen erzielt werden. (orig.)

  15. Examination of jaws and teeth using Dental CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov, Vl.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to establish a new method for dental imaging using Dental CT. Dental computer assisted tomography represents valuable addition to the diagnostics spectrum for planning oral and maxillofacial surgery. High resolution spiral CT and specially designed computer software allow representation of the jaws in different planes that are easy to match. The further allow the display of very small structures relevant to oral surgical interventions and reveal their spatial relationship in three dimensions. Dental CT is indicated, when clinical and conventional radiological techniques will not allow exact interpretation of the situation. It is modern oral implantology that primarily benefits from computer software enabling the assessment of surgical sites in the pre surgical phase. Such planning was not yet possible using two dimensional radiographic techniques. The dental-implantological part expects from radiography sharply defined contours of the external bony contours and the mandibular canal, exactly defined relation between slices and planes, no distortion in the ortho-radial planes, tools for reliable measurements of distances, angles and volumes, possibility to transmit pictures electronically or on hardcopy without loss of quality. Thus communication between dentists and radiologists may and must be intensified and supported by usage of modern telecommunication systems. (author)

  16. Maltese CT doses for commonly performed examinations demonstrate alignment with published DRLs across europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarb, F.; McEntee, M.; Rainford, L.

    2012-01-01

    This work recommends dose reference levels (DRLs) for abdomen, chest and head computerised tomography (CT) examinations in Malta as the first step towards national CT dose optimisation. Third quartiles volume CT dose index values for abdomen: 12.1 mGy, chest: 13.1 mGy and head: 41 mGy and third quartile dose-length product values for abdomen: 539.4, chest: 492 and head: 736 mGy cm -1 are recommended as Maltese DRLs derived from this first Maltese CT dose survey. These values compare well with DRLs of other European countries indicating that CT scanning in Malta is consistent with standards of good practice. Further work to minimise dose without affecting image quality and extending the establishment of DRLs for other CT examinations is recommended. (authors)

  17. Comparative study of patellar subluxation syndrome and normal group using axial radiography and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, Mamoru; Tomonaga, Kunio; Egawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Gotoh, Shoji; Mihara, Shigeru (Nagasaki Municipal Hospital (Japan))

    1989-10-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the 20 knees of 10 females with normal knee joints (age, 22-35 years) and on 7 knees of 7 patients with subluxation syndrome (age, 15-24 years), using axial radiography and CT. In axial radiography where the angle of knee flexion was 30 deg or 60 deg, no significant difference was recognized between the two groups with respect to tilting angle, patellofemoral angle, congruence angle and lateral shift. However, a significant difference was found using CT. Thus, CT was considered useful for diagnosis. Because of these results, all 7 cases underwent surgery for detachment of the lateral side and tightening of the medial side. Three cases underwent shifting of the tibial tuberosity to the anteromedial side, resulting in a favourable outcome. Here, we report the study. (author).

  18. Comparative study of patellar subluxation syndrome and normal group using axial radiography and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Mamoru; Tomonaga, Kunio; Egawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Gotoh, Shoji; Mihara, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the 20 knees of 10 females with normal knee joints (age, 22-35 years) and on 7 knees of 7 patients with subluxation syndrome (age, 15-24 years), using axial radiography and CT. In axial radiography where the angle of knee flexion was 30 deg or 60 deg, no significant difference was recognized between the two groups with respect to tilting angle, patellofemoral angle, congruence angle and lateral shift. However, a significant difference was found using CT. Thus, CT was considered useful for diagnosis. Because of these results, all 7 cases underwent surgery for detachment of the lateral side and tightening of the medial side. Three cases underwent shifting of the tibial tuberosity to the anteromedial side, resulting in a favourable outcome. Here, we report the study. (author)

  19. The diagnostic importance of the recognition of the inferior Vena cava abnormalities on CT-examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouliamos, A.; Striggaris, K.; Haliasos, N.; Vlahos, N.; Pontifex, G.

    1981-01-01

    Two unusual variations of the Vena cava inferior, as shown by CT examinations, are reported and characteristic X-rays, as well as CT scans, are presented. The first case shows an IVC course to the left of the aorta and the second case absence of the intrahepatic portion of the IVC with azygos continuation. Difficulties in the differential diagnosis are analyzed and discussed, both demonstrated by plain X-rays and CT scans. (orig.) [de

  20. Diagnostic importance of the recognition of the inferior Vena cava abnormalities on CT-examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouliamos, A.; Striggaris, K.; Haliasos, N.; Vlahos, N.; Pontifex, G.

    1981-09-01

    Two unusual variations of the Vena cava inferior, as shown by CT examinations, are reported and characteristic X-rays, as well as CT scans, are presented. The first case shows an IVC course to the left of the aorta and the second case absence of the intrahepatic portion of the IVC with azygos continuation. Difficulties in the differential diagnosis are analyzed and discussed, both demonstrated by plain X-rays and CT scans.

  1. Evaluation of the robustness of the preprocessing technique improving reversible compressibility of CT images: Tested on various CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Chang Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Gu, Bon Seung; Lee, Jong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Ki [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To modify the preprocessing technique, which was previously proposed, improving compressibility of computed tomography (CT) images to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts and to evaluate the robustness of the technique in terms of segmentation correctness and increase in reversible compression ratio (CR) for various CT examinations.Methods: This study had institutional review board approval with waiver of informed patient consent. A preprocessing technique was previously proposed to improve the compressibility of CT images by replacing pixel values outside the body region with a constant value resulting in maximizing data redundancy. Since the technique was developed aiming at only chest CT images, the authors modified the segmentation method to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts. The modified version was evaluated as follows. In randomly selected 368 CT examinations (352 787 images), each image was preprocessed by using the modified preprocessing technique. Radiologists visually confirmed whether the segmented region covers the body region or not. The images with and without the preprocessing were reversibly compressed using Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), JPEG2000 two-dimensional (2D), and JPEG2000 three-dimensional (3D) compressions. The percentage increase in CR per examination (CR{sub I}) was measured.Results: The rate of correct segmentation was 100.0% (95% CI: 99.9%, 100.0%) for all the examinations. The median of CR{sub I} were 26.1% (95% CI: 24.9%, 27.1%), 40.2% (38.5%, 41.1%), and 34.5% (32.7%, 36.2%) in JPEG, JPEG2000 2D, and JPEG2000 3D, respectively.Conclusions: In various CT examinations, the modified preprocessing technique can increase in the CR by 25% or more without concerning about degradation of diagnostic information.

  2. A study on normal value of eyeball protrusion in Korean adult using CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chi Sung; Chang, Kee Hyun

    1984-01-01

    CT may be valuably used in determination of proptosis. Normal value of eyeball protrusion was measured in normal Koreans using CT. Among 86 Koreans, 26 have normal both eyes, but 60 have one normal eye with one abnormal eye (chiefly, proptosis and and eyeball tumor). The results of 112 eyes are as follows: Absolute measurement of 'a', that is, the distance between cornea and IZL (interzygomatic line) is 16.0±3.4 mm in male (for 63 eye), 15.7±4.0 mm in female for 49 eyes. Ratio of 'a' over 'A' (A-P diameter of eyeball) is 57±12% is male (for 63 eye), 57±14% in female (for 49 eye) Discrepancy of eyeball protrusion between both eyes is 0.67±1.5 mm (for 26 adults). Practically, normal range of eyeball prtotrusion ('a') is 12.6 mm < male < 19.4 mm, 11.7 mm < female < 19.7 mm. 'a/A' ratio over 70% and over 2mm discrepancy between both eyes are also suggested as genuine exophthalmos

  3. Automated image-matching technique for comparative diagnosis of the liver on CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Eiichiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Tsushima, Yoshito; Matsui, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    When interpreting enhanced computer tomography (CT) images of the upper abdomen, radiologists visually select a set of images of the same anatomical positions from two or more CT image series (i.e., non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT images at arterial and delayed phase) to depict and to characterize any abnormalities. The same process is also necessary to create subtraction images by computer. We have developed an automated image selection system using a template-matching technique that allows the recognition of image sets at the same anatomical position from two CT image series. Using the template-matching technique, we compared several anatomical structures in each CT image at the same anatomical position. As the position of the liver may shift according to respiratory movement, not only the shape of the liver but also the gallbladder and other prominent structures included in the CT images were compared to allow appropriate selection of a set of CT images. This novel technique was applied in 11 upper abdominal CT examinations. In CT images with a slice thickness of 7.0 or 7.5 mm, the percentage of image sets selected correctly by the automated procedure was 86.6±15.3% per case. In CT images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, the percentages of correct selection of image sets by the automated procedure were 79.4±12.4% (non-enhanced and arterial-phase CT images) and 86.4±10.1% (arterial- and delayed-phase CT images). This automated method is useful for assisting in interpreting CT images and in creating digital subtraction images. (author)

  4. CT examination of segmental liver transplants from living donors. Anatomy and pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupski, G.; Maas, R.; Rogiers, X.; Burdelski, M.; Broelsch, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    A lack of suitable pediatric donors and significantly better results than conventional transplantation have contributed to the steady increase in the number of segmental liver transplants from living donors throughout the world. This article describes the diagnostic impact of axial CT scans following transplantation in a retrospective evaluation of 18 CT examinations of 10 children with an average age of two years. Both spiral and conventional CT scans permit precise visualization of the postoperative anatomy of the upper abdomen that is more distinct than the images provided by ultrasonic scans. Thus, CT scans better facilitate detection of pathological findings. In 60% of the patients (67% of the examinations), the CT scan permitted a definite diagnosis; in the remaining cases, no morphological correlate to the clinical and laboratory findings was detected. In addition to traditional ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography represents a further noninvasive imaging technique for postoperative diagnostics following segmental liver transplants from living donors. (orig.) [de

  5. Normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients for flat-panel CT breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, Samta C; Glick, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    The development of new digital mammography techniques such as dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis and CT breast imaging will require investigation of optimal camera design parameters and optimal imaging acquisition parameters. In optimizing these acquisition protocols and imaging systems it is important to have knowledge of the radiation dose to the breast. This study presents a methodology for estimating the normalized glandular dose to the uncompressed breast using the geometry proposed for flat-panel CT breast imaging. The simulation uses the GEANT 3 Monte Carlo code to model x-ray transport and absorption within the breast phantom. The Monte Carlo software was validated for breast dosimetry by comparing results of the normalized glandular dose (DgN) values of the compressed breast to those reported in the literature. The normalized glandular dose was then estimated for a range of breast diameters from 10 cm to 18 cm using an uncompressed breast model with a homogeneous composition of adipose and glandular tissue, and for monoenergetic x-rays from 10 keV to 120 keV. These data were fit providing expressions for the normalized glandular dose. Using these expressions for the DgN coefficients and input variables such as the diameter, height and composition of the breast phantom, the mean glandular dose for any spectra can be estimated. A computer program to provide normalized glandular dose values has been made available online. In addition, figures displaying energy deposition maps are presented to better understand the spatial distribution of dose in CT breast imaging

  6. Assessment of effective dose from cone beam CT imaging in SPECT/CT examination in comparison with other modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonkopi, Elena; Ross, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiation dose from the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) component of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) examinations and to compare it with the radiopharmaceutical related dose as well as dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Effective dose (ED) from computed tomography (CT) was estimated using dose-length product values and anatomy-specific conversion factors. The contribution from the SPECT component was evaluated using ED per unit administered activity for the radiopharmaceuticals listed in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publications 80 and 106. With the exception of cardiac studies (0.11 mSv), the CBCT dose (3.96-6.04 mSv) was similar to that from the radiopharmaceutical accounting for 29-56 % of the total ED from the examination. In comparison with MDCT examinations, the CBCT dose was 48 and 42 % lower for abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis scans, respectively, while in the chest the CBCT scan resulted in higher dose (23 %). Radiation dose from the CT component should be taken into consideration when evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose. (authors)

  7. Interval lung cancer after a negative CT screening examination: CT findings and outcomes in National Lung Screening Trial participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierada, David S.; Pinsky, Paul F.; Duan, Fenghai; Garg, Kavita; Hart, Eric M.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Nath, Hrudaya; Watts, Jubal R.; Aberle, Denise R.

    2017-01-01

    This study retrospectively analyses the screening CT examinations and outcomes of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants who had interval lung cancer diagnosed within 1 year after a negative CT screen and before the next annual screen. The screening CTs of all 44 participants diagnosed with interval lung cancer (cases) were matched with negative CT screens of participants who did not develop lung cancer (controls). A majority consensus process was used to classify each CT screen as positive or negative according to the NLST criteria and to estimate the likelihood that any abnormalities detected retrospectively were due to lung cancer. By retrospective review, 40/44 cases (91%) and 17/44 controls (39%) met the NLST criteria for a positive screen (P < 0.001). Cases had higher estimated likelihood of lung cancer (P < 0.001). Abnormalities included pulmonary nodules ≥4 mm (n = 16), mediastinal (n = 8) and hilar (n = 6) masses, and bronchial lesions (n = 6). Cancers were stage III or IV at diagnosis in 32/44 cases (73%); 37/44 patients (84%) died of lung cancer, compared to 225/649 (35%) for all screen-detected cancers (P < 0.0001). Most cases met the NLST criteria for a positive screen. Awareness of missed abnormalities and interpretation errors may aid lung cancer identification in CT screening. (orig.)

  8. Interval lung cancer after a negative CT screening examination: CT findings and outcomes in National Lung Screening Trial participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierada, David S. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Pinsky, Paul F. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Duan, Fenghai [Brown University School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Sciences, Providence, RI (United States); Garg, Kavita [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Mail Stop F726, Box 6510, Aurora, CO (United States); Hart, Eric M. [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kazerooni, Ella A. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nath, Hrudaya; Watts, Jubal R. [University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Department of Radiology-JTN370, Birmingham, AL (United States); Aberle, Denise R. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This study retrospectively analyses the screening CT examinations and outcomes of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants who had interval lung cancer diagnosed within 1 year after a negative CT screen and before the next annual screen. The screening CTs of all 44 participants diagnosed with interval lung cancer (cases) were matched with negative CT screens of participants who did not develop lung cancer (controls). A majority consensus process was used to classify each CT screen as positive or negative according to the NLST criteria and to estimate the likelihood that any abnormalities detected retrospectively were due to lung cancer. By retrospective review, 40/44 cases (91%) and 17/44 controls (39%) met the NLST criteria for a positive screen (P < 0.001). Cases had higher estimated likelihood of lung cancer (P < 0.001). Abnormalities included pulmonary nodules ≥4 mm (n = 16), mediastinal (n = 8) and hilar (n = 6) masses, and bronchial lesions (n = 6). Cancers were stage III or IV at diagnosis in 32/44 cases (73%); 37/44 patients (84%) died of lung cancer, compared to 225/649 (35%) for all screen-detected cancers (P < 0.0001). Most cases met the NLST criteria for a positive screen. Awareness of missed abnormalities and interpretation errors may aid lung cancer identification in CT screening. (orig.)

  9. Normal mediastinal lymph node size and shape; CT and cadaver study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Chung Kie; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan

    1985-01-01

    With the view point of size, shape and arrangement pattern, authors present normal mediastinal lymph node from the analysis of 61 cases of CT scan and multidirectional section of 2 cadavers. The result were as follows: 1. Transverse diameter of the lymph nodes, demonstrated in cadaver section, was 3 to 6mm in upper paratracheal area and 5 to 14mm in juxta-carinal and AP-window area. Arrangement of the lymph nodes showed tendency of longitudinal direction in lower paratracheal, and juxtacarinal area, while that of AP window showed tendency of AP direction as long axis. 2. Mean and the largest size of the lymph nodes demonstrated in CT scan were 3.7mm, 8mm in upper paratracheal area, and 6mm, 12mm in lower paratracheal area, and 7.1mm, 14mm in juxtacarinal area, and 6.3mm and 11mm in aorticopulmonary window area. 3. Size of the lymph nodes in CT scan showed linear increasing tendency according to increasing age (y=0.32, p<0.005). 4. Shape of the lymph nodes in CT scan were mostly round in upper paratracheal area while that of aorticopulmonary window showed higher incidence of oval and elongated shape. 5. Recommended size criterior of abnormal lymph node is 10mm in upper paratracheal area and 15mm in the other area

  10. Automated estimation of abdominal effective diameter for body size normalization of CT dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Phillip M

    2013-06-01

    Most CT dose data aggregation methods do not currently adjust dose values for patient size. This work proposes a simple heuristic for reliably computing an effective diameter of a patient from an abdominal CT image. Evaluation of this method on 106 patients scanned on Philips Brilliance 64 and Brilliance Big Bore scanners demonstrates close correspondence between computed and manually measured patient effective diameters, with a mean absolute error of 1.0 cm (error range +2.2 to -0.4 cm). This level of correspondence was also demonstrated for 60 patients on Siemens, General Electric, and Toshiba scanners. A calculated effective diameter in the middle slice of an abdominal CT study was found to be a close approximation of the mean calculated effective diameter for the study, with a mean absolute error of approximately 1.0 cm (error range +3.5 to -2.2 cm). Furthermore, the mean absolute error for an adjusted mean volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) using a mid-study calculated effective diameter, versus a mean per-slice adjusted CTDIvol based on the calculated effective diameter of each slice, was 0.59 mGy (error range 1.64 to -3.12 mGy). These results are used to calculate approximate normalized dose length product values in an abdominal CT dose database of 12,506 studies.

  11. Three-dimensional CT features of occipital squama normal anatomy, anatomic variations and fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jungang; Li Xin; Wang Chunxiang; Zhang Lin; Guo Wanhua

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 3D CT features of normal anatomy, anatomic variations and fractures of occipital squama. Methods: The 3D CT features on MIP, VR images were analyzed retrospectively in 589 pediatric cases. The normal anatomy, anatomic variations and fractures of occipital squama were observed respectively, and the differential diagnostic features including the individual location, appearance and extension were analyzed. Results: Four hundred and thirty-three patients (75.2%) showed normal anatomy, including 154 patients with adult occipital anatomical features, 279 patients with posterior intraoccipital synchondrosis, and 37 patients with Kerckring-supraoccipital synchondrosis. When cases with recent trauma history were excluded, 113 patients (19.1%) showed anatomic variants, including unpenetrating sutures and penetrating sutures. The former could be subdivided to Mendosal sutures in 23 cases, superior median fissures in 19 cases, and midline supraoccipital fissures in 4 cases, while the latter could be subdivided to the interparietal bone variations in 54 cases, wormian bones in 23 cases, and accessory bones in 7 cases. Two or more variations coexisted in 33 cases. The occipital squama fractures were shown in 34 cases (5.6%), including linear fractures in 27 cases, comminuted fractures in 3 cases, with depression fracture in one case, separation of cranial sutures in 3 cases, and other fractures associated with variants in 3 cases. The fractures were sharp, or jagged, without limitation of the occification. Conclusion: There are different 3D CT features of normal anatomy, anatomic variations and fractures of occipital squama in children, which are important for making the accurate diagnosis. (authors)

  12. Is energy imparted a good measure of the radiation risk associated with CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.

    1984-01-01

    The dose distribution in a Rando phantom has been measured for typical EMI 5005 CT scans of the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. These dose distributions have been used to generate quantitative estimates of the somatic and genetic radiation risks associated with these CT examinations and also to measure the total energy imparted during each scan. A comparison has been made between the radiation risk estimates and the energy imparted measurements. The energy imparted measurements are not a good indicator of the somatic and/or genetic risks when one type of CT scan is compared with another. However, for a given type of scan, the energy imparted may be a reasonable indicator of the relative somatic risks associated with different CT examinations. Considerable care should be taken when interpreting and using any measured value of energy imparted in a radiological examination since published values of the risk per unit energy imparted can significantly underestimate the radiation risk. (author)

  13. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17.6%, 23.8%]) of cases, and no corresponding abnormalities in 38

  14. Water enema CT examination of rectum cancer by reduced amount of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palko, A.; Gyulai, Cs.; Fedinecz, N.; Balogh, A.; Nagy, F.

    2000-01-01

    To define whether volume of water, administered during water enema CT (WE-CT) for local staging of rectal cancer, may be reduced without compromising the diagnostic value of the examination. Materials and Methods: 29 patients with rectum cancer underwent preoperative WE-CT. Contrast-enhanced CT (equilibrium phase) measurements were performed after i.v. injection of smooth muscle relaxant and rectal administration of 400 - 500 ml lukewarm tap water. Quality of the obtained scans was evaluated and the images were analyzed for depth of tumor invasion. Results of the CT examinations were compared to findings at surgery. Results: Despite reduced dose of water enema, 19/29 examinations were of excellent quality, 6/29 good, and 4/29 poor, but still diagnostic. We achieved sensitivity (90.1), specificity (70.1) and accuracy (86.2) in differentiating tumors confined to the bowel wall from those extending beyond it. Conclusion: Large volume of water enema administered during CT examination of the rectum may cause complaints and increases the risk of complications. Our results prove that using lower amount of water does not impair the quality of examination and accuracy of local staging of rectum carcinomas. (orig.) [de

  15. CT assessment of the correlation between clinical examination and bone involvement in oral malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Marco Antonio Portela; Oliveira, Ilka Regina Souza; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmao Paraiso; Kuruoshi, Marcia Etsuko

    2009-01-01

    Oral cancers have a tendency to invade the surrounding bone structures, and this has a direct influence on the treatment management and on outcomes. The objective of this study was to correlate the clinical parameters (location, clinical presentation and TNM staging) of oral malignant tumors that can be associated with a potential of bone invasion and determine the accuracy of clinical examination to predict bone involvement, using computed tomography (CT). Twenty five patients, with oral malignant tumors were submitted to clinical and CT examinations. CT was considered the standard parameter to evaluate the presence of bone involvement. Clinical assessment of location, presentation form and TNM staging of the tumors were then compared to the CT findings in predicting bone involvement. Bone involvement was observed in 68% of the cases. It was predicted that tumors located in the retromolar trigone and hard palate, with a clinical aspect of infiltrative ulcer or nodule and classified in stage IV had a high potential to cause bone involvement. The clinical examination assessment of these tumors showed to be a valuable tool to predict bone invasion, with high sensitivity (82%) and specificity (87.5%), based on the results found in the CT images. No statistical significance was found between the CT and clinical examinations regarding bone involvement. The identification of some clinical parameters such as location, clinical presentation, and TNM stage, associated with a detailed clinical examination, was considered a valuable tool for the assessment of bone destruction by oral malignant tumors. (author)

  16. Is it possible to make a diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus on MRI/CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ohwaki, Hisayuki; Matsumoto, Atsuhito

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, Japanese guidelines for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) were created to diagnose it more precisely and treat it more effectively. The guidelines suggested the importance of a tight cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space at the high convexity area. We reviewed MRI/CT findings in 38 cases of probable iNPH during Jan. 1998 to Dec. 2003. We noted the tightness in the interhemispheric fissure on axial MRI/CT view. Thirty-three cases were shunt-responsive among 38 cases (shunt effectiveness: 86.8%). MRI/CT findings of iNPH on axial view were classified into typical, almost typical and atypical. Major findings of typical cases showed: 1) ventricular dilatation, 2) tight interhemispheric fissure, 3) dilated Sylvian fissure. Almost all of the typical cases were a little bit questionable on findings for 2) and/or 3). Atypical cases showed an absence of finding 2) or showed aqueductal stenosis. Among 33 the shunt-responding cases, ten cases (30%) were typical, 16 cases (49%) were almost typical and seven cases were atypical. Among the 5 cases of non-responders, they were divided into 2, 2 and 1 cases, respectively. Atypical cases included 2 cases of aqueductal stenosis and 5 cases of open interhemispheric fissure; the latter were difficult to differentiate form brain atrophy. Thus, about 80% of iNPH cases could be diagnosed or highly suspected on axial MRI/CT findings. Although MRI/CT findings were not definitive for making a diagnosis of iNPH, they were highly useful to idenitify patients for a CSF tap test. (author)

  17. Three-phase CT examination of the pancreatobiliary region using multislice CT with 1-mm collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shigeki; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Koujiro; Iwano, Shingo; Satake, Hiroko; Ota, Toyohiro; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement and accuracy of imaging of the circulatory phase in the first-pass, second-pass, and third-pass acquisitions in the pancreato-biliary region with 1-mm collimation obtained by multislice computed tomography (CT). In 53 patients, two sequential acquisitions from the porta hepatis to the pancreas were performed during a single breath-hold, followed by a third-pass acquisition including the liver beginning 15 sec after the second-pass acquisition. Contrast enhancement in each acquisition was measured in the aorta, portal vein and its branches, and pancreas. Four experienced radiologists graded using four-point scoring whether or not each acquisition was appropriate for imaging of the arterial phase, pancreatic phase, and portal venous phase. Aortic enhancement was highest at the beginning of the second-pass acquisition. The portal and splenic veins and pancreas showed maximum enhancement in the second-pass acquisition, while the superior mesenteric vein showed maximum enhancement in the third-pass acquisition. In the visual assessment, significantly higher grades were achieved in the first-pass, second-pass, and third-pass acquisitions with regard to imaging of the arterial phase, pancreatic phase, and portal venous phase, respectively. Multislice CT permits the acquisition of three distinct circulatory phases (arterial, pancreatic, and portal venous phases) in the pancreatobiliary region with 1-mm collimation. (author)

  18. Observation of normal appearance and wall thickness of esophagus on CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Fan; Mao Jingfang; Ding Jinquan; Yang Huanjun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to observe the appearance of normal esophagus, measure and record the thickness of esophageal wall in order to offer reference for estimating esophageal wall abnormalities and delineating gross tumor target of esophageal carcinomas on CT images. Materials and methods: From September 2006 to February 2007, 110 consecutive CT films from adult patients without esophageal diseases were collected and studied. On CT images the entire esophagus was divided into cervical, thoracic, retrocardiac and intraabdominal segments. The appearance of esophagus was described when the esophagus contracted or dilated. Thickness of esophageal wall and diameters of esophageal cavities were measured by hard-copy reading with a magnifying glass. Age, sex and the thickness of subcutaneous fat of each patient were recorded. Results: It was observed that the esophagus presented both contracted and dilated status on CT images. In each segment there were certain portions of esophagus in complete contraction or dilatation. 47 images (42.7%) showed contracted esophagus in each segment available for measurement. The largest wall thickness when esophagus was in contraction and dilatation was 4.70 (95%CI: 4.44-4.95) mm and 2.11 (95%CI: 2.00-2.23) mm, respectively. When contracting, the intraabdominal esophagus was thicker than the cervical, thoracic and retrocardiac parts, and the average thickness was 5.68 (95%CI: 5.28-6.09) mm, 4.67 (95%CI: 4.36-4.86) mm, 4.56 (95%CI: 4.31-4.87) mm, and 4.05 (95%CI: 3.71-4.21) mm, respectively. When the esophagus was dilating, the average esophageal wall thickness was between 1.87 and 2.70 mm. The thickest part was cervical esophagus. Thickness of esophageal wall was larger in males than that of females (5.26 mm vs. 4.34 mm p < 0.001). Age and the thickness of subcutaneous fat had no significant impact on the thickness of esophageal wall (p-value was 0.056 and 0.173, respectively). Conclusion: The Observation of normal appearance and

  19. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging of 100 normal adrenal gland cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhiguo; Qu Wanying; Yao Zhiming; Zheng Jianguo; Song Renhe; Liu Xiuqin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to obtain the 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake characteristics in normal adrenal gland as the criteria to diagnose abnormal glucose metabolism in ad- renal gland by 18 F-FDG PET or PET/CT imaging. Methods: One hundred healthy persons underwent 18 F- FDG PET/CT imaging in this study. The images were reviewed by visual judgement and measured by stand-ardized uptake value (SUV). With reference to normal liver, the uptake of adrenal gland was scored from 0 to 3, namely, 0=no uptake, 1=less than the uptake of normal liver, 2=equal to the uptake of normal liver, 3=more than the uptake of normal liver. SUV was measured on the trans-axial images. The regions of interest (ROIs) of adrenal glands and livers were manually drawn based on the CT images. Both average SUV (SUV avg ) and maximum SUV(SUV max ) were calculated. Results: (1) By visual judgment, 94% and 91% of left and right normal adrenal glands had uptake intensity less than that of livers. (2) The SUV avg of left and right adrenal glands were 1.39 and 1.65, and the SUV max 1.98 and 2.19, respectively with the up- per limit of 95% confidence interval (Cf). (3)The ratios of left and right adrenal glands SUV avg to livers SUV avg were 0.65 and 0.75 and left and right adrenal glands SUV max to livers SUV max were 0.76 and 0.83 respectively with the upper limit of 95% CI. (4)The uptake of right adrenal gland was higher than that of the left. (5)There was no significant difference of the SUVs between men and women, except that right ad- renal gland SUV max of men was higher than that of women. (6) There was no significant difference in 18 F- FDG uptake between persons younger and elder than 60 years old. Conclusion: The physiological FDG uptake of the adrenal gland in normal healthy individuals is generally lower than that of liver. (authors)

  20. Phase- and size-adjusted CT cut-off for differentiating neoplastic lesions from normal colon in contrast-enhanced CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luboldt, W.; Kroll, M.; Wetter, A.; Vogl, T.J.; Toussaint, T.L.; Hoepffner, N.; Holzer, K.; Kluge, A.

    2004-01-01

    A computed tomography (CT) cut-off for differentiating neoplastic lesions (polyps/carcinoma) from normal colon in contrast-enhanced CT colonography (CTC) relating to the contrast phase and lesion size is determined. CT values of 64 colonic lesions (27 polyps 0 . The slope m was determined by linear regression in the correlation (lesion ∝[xA + (1 - x)V]//H) and the Y-intercept y 0 by the minimal shift of the line needed to maximize the accuracy of separating the colonic wall from the lesions. The CT value of the lesions correlated best with the intermediate phase: 0.4A+ 0.6V(r=0.8 for polyps ≥10 mm, r=0.6 for carcinomas, r=0.4 for polyps <10 mm). The accuracy in the differentiation between lesions and normal colonic wall increased with the height implemented as divisor, reached 91% and was obtained by the dynamic cut-off described by the formula: cut-off(A,V,H) = 1.1[0.4A + 0.6V]/H + 69.8. The CT value of colonic polyps or carcinomas can be increased extrinsically by scanning in the phase in which 0.4A + 0.6V reaches its maximum. Differentiating lesions from normal colon based on CT values is possible in contrast-enhanced CTC and improves when the cut-off is adjusted (normalized) to the contrast phase and lesion size. (orig.)

  1. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhalisa, H., E-mail: dhalisa82@gmail.com; Rafidah, Z. [Kluster Oncology Science and Radiology, Advanced Medical Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Bertam, Penang (Malaysia); Mohamad, A. S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute, No 4 Jalan P7, Presint 7, Putrajaya (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  2. Normal anatomy of the female pelvis in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated with reformatted CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, O.C.; Cooke, J.C.; Parsons, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Axial CT is used in assessing gynecologic malignancies. Accurate delineation of local tumor extent in carcinoma of the cervix is important in initial staging and in planning subsequent management. A modified scanning technique produces reformatted coronal and sagittal images, which demonstrate additional valuable information about the cardinal ligaments, parametria, ureters, boundaries between the cervix, bladder, and rectum, and extension to vagina and uterus. This information is illustrated by representative axial, coronal, and sagittal scans. Familiarity with normal appearances is essential to allow correct interpretation of pathology

  3. Spatial Distribution of Iron Within the Normal Human Liver Using Dual-Source Dual-Energy CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadia, Andres F; Grant, Katharine L; Carey, Kathleen E; Bolch, Wesley E; Morin, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Explore the potential of dual-source dual-energy (DSDE) computed tomography (CT) to retrospectively analyze the uniformity of iron distribution and establish iron concentration ranges and distribution patterns found in healthy livers. Ten mixtures consisting of an iron nitrate solution and deionized water were prepared in test tubes and scanned using a DSDE 128-slice CT system. Iron images were derived from a 3-material decomposition algorithm (optimized for the quantification of iron). A conversion factor (mg Fe/mL per Hounsfield unit) was calculated from this phantom study as the quotient of known tube concentrations and their corresponding CT values. Retrospective analysis was performed of patients who had undergone DSDE imaging for renal stones. Thirty-seven patients with normal liver function were randomly selected (mean age, 52.5 years). The examinations were processed for iron concentration. Multiple regions of interest were analyzed, and iron concentration (mg Fe/mL) and distribution was reported. The mean conversion factor obtained from the phantom study was 0.15 mg Fe/mL per Hounsfield unit. Whole-liver mean iron concentrations yielded a range of 0.0 to 2.91 mg Fe/mL, with 94.6% (35/37) of the patients exhibiting mean concentrations below 1.0 mg Fe/mL. The most important finding was that iron concentration was not uniform and patients exhibited regionally high concentrations (36/37). These regions of higher concentration were observed to be dominant in the middle-to-upper part of the liver (75%), medially (72.2%), and anteriorly (83.3%). Dual-source dual-energy CT can be used to assess the uniformity of iron distribution in healthy subjects. Applying similar techniques to unhealthy livers, future research may focus on the impact of hepatic iron content and distribution for noninvasive assessment in diseased subjects.

  4. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  5. CT findings of normal pancreatic tail: variety of morphology and location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hye Seung; Son, San Hoo; Moon, Gae Hyuk; Kim, Hu Ho; Gong Jae Chul; Yang Jae Boum [Inchon Christian Hospital, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mee Sook [Jaesung Hospital. (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-01

    To determine the morphology and location of normal pancreatic tail, as seen on abdominal CT. A hundred and one patients without pancreatic disease underwent CT scanning. We then determined how to relate the location of the pancreatic tail with the splenic hilum, left kidney, and pancreatic body. We compared the thickness of the tail with that of the body and analysed of the morphology of the tail. Seventy-seven percent of all pancreatic tails were located below the splenic hilum, with 59% of this proportion located 1 to 2 cm below. Fifty percent of tails were located at the level of the uppermost quarter of the left kidney, and a further 27% at the level of the second quarter; 75 % were located in the ventrolateral portion of this kidney and 23% in the ventral portion. In 48% of patients, the pancreatic tail and body were the same thickness, and in a further 48 %, the tail was thicker than the body. In 34% of patients, the tail showed focal bulging, and in another 32%, it tapered smoothly. Forty seven percent of tails were located below the pancreatic body and a further 37% were found at the same level as the body. Abdominal CT scans showed differing morphology and location of the pancreatic tail. The recognition of these variations will diminish speculation as to their true nature. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Exposure to radiation in whole body and skull CT examinations depending upon parameters determined by the technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebach, B.J.O.; Makoski, H.B.; Ewen, K.

    1983-01-01

    The article gives the organ doses for whole body CT examinations of the thoracic region, the upper abdomen, the mesogastric and pelvic regions as well as of the lumbar vertebral column and for CT scanning of the skull. The examinations were performed using in Alderson-Rando phantom with the whole body computer thomograph Somatom DR2 supplied by Siemens and with the skull computer tomograph Siretom 2000, also supplied by Siemens, It was found that the magnitude of radiation exposure of the patient depends not only on instrument-specific properties, but also to a very large measure on the examination parameters and techniques which can vary considerably from one clinic to another. (orig.) [de

  7. Normal wall thickness and tumorous changes in the gastrointestinal tract demonstrated by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, M.; Gmelin, E.; Borgis, K.J.; Neubauer, B.

    1991-01-01

    55 patients with tumours of the gastroinstinal tract were ecamined by CT, using a paraffin emulsion as a negative oral contrast medium. These were compared with 119 normal patients. The appearance of normal and tumour bearing portions of the gut wall against the contrast medium was studied. Under hypotonic conditions the gut wall could regularly be distinguished from surrounding organs and gut content. Mural thickness of the oesophagus > 7 mm and of the stomach and colon > 8 mm must be regarded as abnormal. Benign diseases cannot be distinguished from malignant conditions on the basis of wall thickness. Artifacts, such as are caused by positive oral contrast, were of less significance when using paraffin emulsion. (orig.) [de

  8. TU-CD-BRB-01: Normal Lung CT Texture Features Improve Predictive Models for Radiation Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, S; Briere, T; Court, L; Martel, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Existing normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for radiation pneumonitis (RP) traditionally rely on dosimetric and clinical data but are limited in terms of performance and generalizability. Extraction of pre-treatment image features provides a potential new category of data that can improve NTCP models for RP. We consider quantitative measures of total lung CT intensity and texture in a framework for prediction of RP. Methods: Available clinical and dosimetric data was collected for 198 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. Intensity- and texture-based image features were extracted from the T50 phase of the 4D-CT acquired for treatment planning. A total of 3888 features (15 clinical, 175 dosimetric, and 3698 image features) were gathered and considered candidate predictors for modeling of RP grade≥3. A baseline logistic regression model with mean lung dose (MLD) was first considered. Additionally, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) logistic regression was applied to the set of clinical and dosimetric features, and subsequently to the full set of clinical, dosimetric, and image features. Model performance was assessed by comparing area under the curve (AUC). Results: A simple logistic fit of MLD was an inadequate model of the data (AUC∼0.5). Including clinical and dosimetric parameters within the framework of the LASSO resulted in improved performance (AUC=0.648). Analysis of the full cohort of clinical, dosimetric, and image features provided further and significant improvement in model performance (AUC=0.727). Conclusions: To achieve significant gains in predictive modeling of RP, new categories of data should be considered in addition to clinical and dosimetric features. We have successfully incorporated CT image features into a framework for modeling RP and have demonstrated improved predictive performance. Validation and further investigation of CT image features in the context of RP NTCP

  9. Automatic Classification of Normal and Cancer Lung CT Images Using Multiscale AM-FM Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Magdy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided diagnostic (CAD systems provide fast and reliable diagnosis for medical images. In this paper, CAD system is proposed to analyze and automatically segment the lungs and classify each lung into normal or cancer. Using 70 different patients’ lung CT dataset, Wiener filtering on the original CT images is applied firstly as a preprocessing step. Secondly, we combine histogram analysis with thresholding and morphological operations to segment the lung regions and extract each lung separately. Amplitude-Modulation Frequency-Modulation (AM-FM method thirdly, has been used to extract features for ROIs. Then, the significant AM-FM features have been selected using Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR for classification step. Finally, K-nearest neighbour (KNN, support vector machine (SVM, naïve Bayes, and linear classifiers have been used with the selected AM-FM features. The performance of each classifier in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity is evaluated. The results indicate that our proposed CAD system succeeded to differentiate between normal and cancer lungs and achieved 95% accuracy in case of the linear classifier.

  10. Normal appearance and size of the diaphragmatic crura in children: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brengle, M.; Cohen, M.D.; Katz, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose. The objectives of the study were to document the normal CT appearance and size of the crura of the diaphragm in children. Materials and methods. The CT scans of 80 children (0-15 years) were reviewed. The children were divided into eight age groups. The maximal transverse diameters of the right and left crura were measured. They were normalized by comparison with the transverse and anterior-posterior diameters of the 12th thoracic vertebra (T12) and the transverse abdominal diameter at T12. The crura were also evaluated as to whether their contour was smooth or nodular. Results. The diaphragmatic crura of smaller children appear large, relative to body size and the diameters of the T12 vertebral body, compared with those in older children. Crural width does not increase significantly with age. Additionally, the crura were found to have a greater tendency to be nodular in appearance in children under the age of 5 years than in older children. Conclusion. Diaphragmatic crura are more nodular and larger relative to body size in younger children. (orig.). With 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Low contrast media volume in pre-TAVI CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Madeleine; Turek, Jakub; Mihl, Casper; Reinartz, Sebastian D; Gohmann, Robin F; Nijssen, Estelle C; Kats, Suzanne; van Ommen, Vincent G; Kietselaer, Bas L J H; Wildberger, Joachim E; Das, Marco

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate image quality using reduced contrast media (CM) volume in pre-TAVI assessment. Forty-seven consecutive patients referred for pre-TAVI examination were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: group 1 BMI  28 kg/m(2) (n = 18). Patients received a combined scan protocol: retrospective ECG-gated helical CTA of the aortic root (80kVp) followed by a high-pitch spiral CTA (group 1: 70 kV; group 2: 80 kVp) from aortic arch to femoral arteries. All patients received one bolus of CM (300 mgI/ml): group 1: volume = 40 ml; flow rate = 3 ml/s, group 2: volume = 53 ml; flow rate = 4 ml/s. Attenuation values (HU) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured at the levels of the aortic root (helical) and peripheral arteries (high-pitch). Diagnostic image quality was considered sufficient at attenuation values > 250HU and CNR > 10. Diagnostic image quality for TAVI measurements was obtained in 46 patients. Mean attenuation values and CNR (HU ± SD) at the aortic root (helical) were: group 1: 381 ± 65HU and 13 ± 8; group 2: 442 ± 68HU and 10 ± 5. At the peripheral arteries (high-pitch), mean values were: group 1: 430 ± 117HU and 11 ± 6; group 2: 389 ± 102HU and 13 ± 6. CM volume can be substantially reduced using low kVp protocols, while maintaining sufficient image quality for the evaluation of aortic root and peripheral access sites. • Image quality could be maintained using low kVp scan protocols. • Low kVp protocols reduce contrast media volume by 34-67 %. • Less contrast media volume lowers the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy.

  12. Imaging of blunt pancreatic trauma: The value of initial and sequential CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szmigielski, W.; Darweesh, A.; Kassem, H.; Alhilli, S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the value of initial, repeated and sequential computed tomography (CT) in patients with blunt pancreatic trauma, and then define and correlate CT findings with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), ultrasound (US), both laboratory and surgical findings. This retrospective study covers an eight-year period from 1999 to 2007. The material includes 21 patients (17 males and 4 females) with confirmed pancreatic injury. CT was performed on admission in all cases and in 15 cases follow-up CT was performed from 24 hrs to 14 days later. US was performed in 9 cases, ERCP in 8 cases and MRCP in one case. Serum amylase level was obtained at the admission in all cases. The CT at admission was positive in 17 patients (81.0%); the diagnosis was missed in 4 patients (19.0%), all performed on single row spiral CT. In all these four cases repeated CT was positive. ERCP showed rupture of the main pancreatic duct in 7 cases, one was inconclusive. One MRCP was positive. The serum amylase was elevated in 14 cases (66.7%) Specific CT features in initial and repeated examinations together were: organ fracture - 33.3%, swelling - 38.1%, haematoma/ contusion - 38.1%, fluid between splenic vein and pancreas - 19.0%. Non-specific features were: thickening of anterior-renal fascia- 23.8%, fluid in lesser sac - 28.6%, extra peritoneal fluid - 42.9%, associated splenic injury -14.3% and intraperitoneal fluid - 38.1%. On retrospective analysis, two out of four false negative CT results could have been avoided. No correlation between the CT features and the outcome of surgical and conservative management could be found in this study. A proper technique and accurate reading of images are mandatory for the diagnosis of pancreatic injury. When CT performed on admission is negative and there is abdominal pain and an elevated serum amylase, CT examination should be repeated within 24-48 hours

  13. Morphological analysis of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals using CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Ohmori, K.; Takatsu, T.; Teramoto, T.; Ishida, Y.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-01-01

    To verify the conventional concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'', we performed a morphological analysis of the relations of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals. The sagittal diameter, area and circularity of the three structures, and the dispersion of each parameter, were examined on axial sections of CT myelograms of 36 normal subjects. The spinal canal was narrowest at C4, followed by C5, while the spinal cord was largest at C4/5. The area and circularity of the cervical spinal cord were not significantly correlated with any parameter of the spinal canal nor with the sagittal diameter and area of the dural tube at any level examined, and the spinal cord showed less individual variation than the bony canal. Compression of the spinal cord might be expected whenever the sagittal diameter of the spinal canal is below the lower limit of normal, that is about 12 mm on plain radiographs. Thus, we concluded that the concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'' was reasonable and acceptable. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs

  14. The influence of CT control examinations on the irradiation planning for patients with cerebral metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haumann, S.

    1986-01-01

    The thesis is aimed at reviewing a therapy plan worked out previously for the treatment of patients with cerebral metastases, and at studying computerized tomography for its potential benefit in the planning and implementation of radiotherapy. 61 patients were irradiated and examined neurologically and by CT before, during and after treatment, thus allowing a thorough-going analysis of the findings. CT evaluations differentiated between the change of volume and the number of metastases as well as the change of the extension of perifocal oedema. Our experience shows a dose of 30 Gy related to the centre of the skull to be sufficient, on the one hand, in order to determine by CT whether or not the existing intracerebral tumour metastases of the patient concerned will be accessible by radiotherapy at all, and, on the other hand, to destroy metastases smaller than 5 mm which cannot be detected by CT. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Consideration of the usefulness of a size-specific dose estimate in pediatric CT examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Obara, Hideki; Ono, Shuichi; Saito, Yoko; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2018-04-05

    Computed tomography (CT) has recently been utilized in various medical settings, and technological advances have resulted in its widespread use. However, medical radiation exposure associated with CT scans accounts for the largest share of examinations using radiation; thus, it is important to understand the organ dose and effective dose in detail. The CT dose index and dose-length product are used to evaluate the organ dose. However, evaluations using these indicators fail to consider the age and body type of patients. In this study, we evaluated the effective dose based on the CT examination data of 753 patients examined at our hospital using the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) method, which can calculate the exposure dose with consideration of the physique of a patient. The results showed a large correlation between the SSDE conversion factor and physique, with a larger exposure dose in patients with a small physique when a single scan is considered. Especially for children, the SSDE conversion factor was found to be 2 or more. In addition, the patient exposed to the largest dose in this study was a 10-year-old, who received 40.4 mSv (five series/examination). In the future, for estimating exposure using the SSDE method and in cohort studies, the diagnostic reference level of SSDE should be determined and a low-exposure imaging protocol should be developed to predict the risk of CT exposure and to maintain the quality of diagnosis with better radiation protection of patients.

  16. Evaluation of the knowledge of physicians prescribing CT examinations on the radiation protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervaise, A.; Pernin, M.; Naulet, P.; Portron, Y.; Lapierre-Combes, M.; Esperabe-Vignau, F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the knowledge of physicians prescribing CT examinations on the radiation protection of patients. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was distributed to all clinicians on medical staff who prescribe CT examinations. Several questions related to their prescription pattern and their knowledge of radiation protection. Results: Forty-four questionnaires were analyzed. While 70% of physicians claimed that they considered the risks from exposure to ionizing radiation when prescribing a CT examination, only 25% informed their patients about those risks. Knowledge of the radiation dose delivered during CT evaluation of the abdomen and pelvis was poorly understood and the risks related to small doses of radiation were grossly underestimated. Finally, only a third of clinicians had received training with regards to radiation protection. Conclusion: While most clinicians claim that they consider the risks from exposure to ionizing radiation when prescribing a CT examination, the risks are either not well known or not known at all. Increased formation of clinicians with regards to the radiation protection of patients, maybe through a dedicated clinical rotation while in medical school, could be a solution to improve the knowledge of hospital clinicians with regards to radiation protection. (authors)

  17. [Evaluation of the knowledge of physicians prescribing CT examinations on the radiation protection of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervaise, A; Esperabe-Vignau, F; Pernin, M; Naulet, P; Portron, Y; Lapierre-Combes, M

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the knowledge of physicians prescribing CT examinations on the radiation protection of patients. A questionnaire was distributed to all clinicians on medical staff who prescribe CT examinations. Several questions related to their prescription pattern and their knowledge of radiation protection. Forty-four questionnaires were analyzed. While 70% of physicians claimed that they considered the risks from exposure to ionizing radiation when prescribing a CT examination, only 25% informed their patients about those risks. Knowledge of the radiation dose delivered during CT evaluation of the abdomen and pelvis was poorly understood and the risks related to small doses of radiation were grossly underestimated. Finally, only a third of clinicians had received training with regards to radiation protection. While most clinicians claim that they consider the risks from exposure to ionizing radiation when prescribing a CT examination, the risks are either not well known or not known at all. Increased formation of clinicians with regards to the radiation protection of patients, maybe through a dedicated clinical rotation while in medical school, could be a solution to improve the knowledge of hospital clinicians with regards to radiation protection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS and Éditions françaises de radiologie. All rights reserved.

  18. Significance of pelvic CT examination for the diagnosis of the distal colonic and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Takeshi

    1984-01-01

    Pelvic CT examination was performed in preoperative 40 patients and postoperrative 51 patients of the distal colonic and rectal carcinoma. CT study expect for the decision of the depth of invasion and the detection of lymphnode metastasis, or the location of recurrence. Diagnostic accuracy rate of the depth of invasion was 68.6% in tumors of sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid, and upper rectum, and 78.9% in lower rectum, and anal canal. These rate were superior to those of selective angiographic examination. Diagnostic accuracy rate for lymphnode metastasis was 73.0%. CT examination could define the lymphnode swelling, but could not define if those were metastasis or not. Furthermore, CT-angiography was beneficial for the estimation of the depth of invasion. The differentiation between local recurrent tumor and granulomatous mass in the perineum after abdomino-perineal resection is the most important problem, however, the further studies are necessary to obtain the definite criteria of differential diagnosis. Above results support that CT examination should be used routinely in the distal colonic and rectal cancer patients. (author)

  19. A study of requested CT head examinations and their positive yield rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coakley, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Requests for CT examinations are ever increasing, partly due to the excellent clinical information they can provide for patient management and partly due to a perceived need for 'evidence' that everything has been done to diagnose a patient correctly. This has led to many CT examinations being done on patients where many of the radiology community does not necessarily feel CT will yield a positive finding, i.e. in their eyes - a possible unjustified use of radiation. To determine whether this was in fact true, or merely a perception, a study was performed by medical imaging and physics staff at the Royal Brisbane Hospital to determine statistics of positive yield for CT head exams. 600 CT head examinations from the Emergency Department at the Royal Brisbane Hospital were retrospectively examined and their findings were tabulated under various clinical categories to determine positive yield statistics. These categories were also tabulated with the radiologists advice as to whether they would have expected a positive finding. For several categories the positive yield for CT head exams was so low as to be considered negligible. Other categories, although low were still considered significant. These will be presented to the emergency department along with a suggested protocol for requesting CT head exams. It was unfortunate that this study had to be performed to prove to clinical staff that medical imaging staff members do in general have an excellent idea of what will show up in an x-ray and what will not! However, it was useful to be able to categorise 'positive yield' statistics into such specific classes. The next step is to try and communicate these findings to staff to create more trust and better communication between departments. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  20. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  1. Development of age-specific Japanese physical phantoms for dose evaluation in infant CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C.; Fujii, K.; Imai, K.; Ikeda, M.; Akahane, K.; Obara, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Narai, K.; Katsu, T.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary to the previous development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms, the authors designed Japanese torso phantoms for dose assessment in infant computed tomography (CT) examinations and completed a Japanese 3-y-old head-torso phantom. For design of age-specific torso phantoms (0, 0.5, 1 and 3 y old), anatomical structures were measured from CT images of Japanese infant patients. From the CT morphometry, it was found that rib cages of Japanese infants were smaller than those in Europeans and Americans. Radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters were used for dose measurement of a 3-y-old head-torso phantom. To examine the validity of the developed phantom, organ and effective doses by the in-phantom dosimetry system were compared with simulation values in a web-based CT dose calculation system (WAZA-ARI). The differences in doses between the two systems were <20 % at the doses of organs within scan regions and effective doses in head, chest and abdomino-pelvic CT examinations. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of the radiation doses in newborn patients submitted to CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza Santos, William; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Belinato, Walmir; Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scans available to the population is increasing, as well as the complexity of such exams. As a result, the radiation doses are increasing as well. Considering the population exposed to CT exams, pediatric patients are considerably more sensitive to radiation than adults. They have a longer life expectancy than adults, and may receive a higher radiation dose than necessary if the CT scan settings are not adjusted for their smaller body size. As a result of these considerations, the risk of developing cancer is of great concern when newborn patients are involved. The objective of this work was to study the radiation doses on radiosensitive organs of newborn patients undergoing a whole body CT examination, utilizing Monte Carlo simulations. The novelty of this work is the use of pediatric virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, developed at the Department of Nuclear Energy at the Federal University of Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE). The CT equipment utilized during the simulations was a Discovery VCT GE PET/CT system, with a tube voltage of 140 kVp. The X-ray spectrum of this CT scanner was generated by the SRS-78 software, which takes into account the X-ray beam energy used in PET/CT procedures. The absorbed organ doses were computed employing the F6 tally (MeV/g). The results were converted to dose coefficients (mGy/100 mA) for all the structures, considering all employed beams. The highest dose coefficients values were obtained for the brain and the thyroid. This work provides useful information regarding the risks involving ionizing radiation in newborn patients, employing a new and reliable technique. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of the radiation doses in newborn patients submitted to CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza Santos, William; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (IPENCNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP, (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA, (Brazil); Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG, (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scans available to the population is increasing, as well as the complexity of such exams. As a result, the radiation doses are increasing as well. Considering the population exposed to CT exams, pediatric patients are considerably more sensitive to radiation than adults. They have a longer life expectancy than adults, and may receive a higher radiation dose than necessary if the CT scan settings are not adjusted for their smaller body size. As a result of these considerations, the risk of developing cancer is of great concern when newborn patients are involved. The objective of this work was to study the radiation doses on radiosensitive organs of newborn patients undergoing a whole body CT examination, utilizing Monte Carlo simulations. The novelty of this work is the use of pediatric virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, developed at the Department of Nuclear Energy at the Federal University of Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE). The CT equipment utilized during the simulations was a Discovery VCT GE PET/CT system, with a tube voltage of 140 kVp. The X-ray spectrum of this CT scanner was generated by the SRS-78 software, which takes into account the X-ray beam energy used in PET/CT procedures. The absorbed organ doses were computed employing the F6 tally (MeV/g). The results were converted to dose coefficients (mGy/100 mA) for all the structures, considering all employed beams. The highest dose coefficients values were obtained for the brain and the thyroid. This work provides useful information regarding the risks involving ionizing radiation in newborn patients, employing a new and reliable technique. (authors)

  4. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: reducing dose while preserving image quality in the pediatric head CT examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Colin D; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Baer, Aaron H; Parmar, Hemant A

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade there has been escalating concern regarding the increasing radiation exposure stemming from CT exams, particularly in children. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is a relatively new and promising tool to reduce radiation dose while preserving image quality. While encouraging results have been found in adult head and chest and body imaging, validation of this technique in pediatric population is limited. The objective of our study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and radiation dose of pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR compared to pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR in a large patient population. Retrospective analysis was performed on 82 pediatric head CT examinations. This group included 33 pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR and 49 pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR. Computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) was recorded on all examinations. Quantitative analysis consisted of standardized measurement of attenuation and the standard deviation at the bilateral centrum semiovale and cerebellar white matter to evaluate objective noise. Qualitative analysis consisted of independent assessment by two radiologists in a blinded manner of gray-white differentiation, sharpness and overall diagnostic quality. The average CTDIvol value of the ASIR group was 21.8 mGy (SD = 4.0) while the average CTDIvol for the non-ASIR group was 29.7 mGy (SD = 13.8), reflecting a statistically significant reduction in CTDIvol in the ASIR group (P ASIR group as compared to the 3- to 12-year-old non-ASIR group (21.5 mGy vs. 30.0 mGy; P = 0.004) as well as statistically significant reductions in CTDI for the >12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the >12-year-old non-ASIR group (29.7 mGy vs. 49.9 mGy; P = 0.0002). Quantitative analysis revealed no significant difference in the homogeneity of variance in the ASIR group compared to the non-ASIR group. Radiologist assessment of

  5. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: reducing dose while preserving image quality in the pediatric head CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Colin D.; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Baer, Aaron H.; Parmar, Hemant A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Over the last decade there has been escalating concern regarding the increasing radiation exposure stemming from CT exams, particularly in children. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is a relatively new and promising tool to reduce radiation dose while preserving image quality. While encouraging results have been found in adult head and chest and body imaging, validation of this technique in pediatric population is limited. The objective of our study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and radiation dose of pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR compared to pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR in a large patient population. Retrospective analysis was performed on 82 pediatric head CT examinations. This group included 33 pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR and 49 pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) was recorded on all examinations. Quantitative analysis consisted of standardized measurement of attenuation and the standard deviation at the bilateral centrum semiovale and cerebellar white matter to evaluate objective noise. Qualitative analysis consisted of independent assessment by two radiologists in a blinded manner of gray-white differentiation, sharpness and overall diagnostic quality. The average CTDI{sub vol} value of the ASIR group was 21.8 mGy (SD = 4.0) while the average CTDI{sub vol} for the non-ASIR group was 29.7 mGy (SD = 13.8), reflecting a statistically significant reduction in CTDI{sub vol} in the ASIR group (P < 0.01). There were statistically significant reductions in CTDI for the 3- to 12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the 3- to 12-year-old non-ASIR group (21.5 mGy vs. 30.0 mGy; P = 0.004) as well as statistically significant reductions in CTDI for the >12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the >12-year-old non-ASIR group (29.7 mGy vs. 49.9 mGy; P = 0.0002). Quantitative analysis revealed no significant difference in the

  6. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: reducing dose while preserving image quality in the pediatric head CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, Colin D.; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Baer, Aaron H.; Parmar, Hemant A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been escalating concern regarding the increasing radiation exposure stemming from CT exams, particularly in children. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is a relatively new and promising tool to reduce radiation dose while preserving image quality. While encouraging results have been found in adult head and chest and body imaging, validation of this technique in pediatric population is limited. The objective of our study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and radiation dose of pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR compared to pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR in a large patient population. Retrospective analysis was performed on 82 pediatric head CT examinations. This group included 33 pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR and 49 pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol ) was recorded on all examinations. Quantitative analysis consisted of standardized measurement of attenuation and the standard deviation at the bilateral centrum semiovale and cerebellar white matter to evaluate objective noise. Qualitative analysis consisted of independent assessment by two radiologists in a blinded manner of gray-white differentiation, sharpness and overall diagnostic quality. The average CTDI vol value of the ASIR group was 21.8 mGy (SD = 4.0) while the average CTDI vol for the non-ASIR group was 29.7 mGy (SD = 13.8), reflecting a statistically significant reduction in CTDI vol in the ASIR group (P 12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the >12-year-old non-ASIR group (29.7 mGy vs. 49.9 mGy; P = 0.0002). Quantitative analysis revealed no significant difference in the homogeneity of variance in the ASIR group compared to the non-ASIR group. Radiologist assessment of gray-white differentiation, sharpness and overall diagnostic quality in ASIR examinations was not substantially different compared to non-ASIR examinations. The use of ASIR in

  7. Normal Development of Sutures and synchondroses in the central skull base : CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Hong Gee; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kang, Jee Hee; Lee, Kyung Hee; Lim, Myung Kwan; Cho, Young Kuk; Ok, Cheol Su; Suh, Chang Hae

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the developmental patterns of the sutures and synchondroses in the central skull base. We evaluated the CT scans of 109 children (age range 29 days to 15 years) with no skull base abnormality who had undergone axial CT of the skull base with 1-mm collimation. Using a five-tier scheme, we analyzed the developmental patterns of the 18 sutures and synchondroses related to the sphenoid and occipital bones. Fusion of the sutures and synchondroses related to the sphenoid bone progressed rapidly during the first two years. Thereafter, changes in the sphenoid bone were dominated by pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus. Fusion of the synchondroses within the sphenoid body, including intersphenoidal, intrapresphenoidal, intrapostsphenoidal synchondrosis occurred early and in most cases was graded ≥3D4. Fusion of the sphenosquamosal, sphenoethmoidal, and frontosphenoidal sutures was delayed, and residual sclerosis was a common finding. Except for Kerckring-supraoccipital synchondrosis, fusion of the six sutures and synchondroses related to the occipital bone occurred more gradually than that of those related to the sphenoid bone. Among these, fusion of the occipitomastoidal suture and petro-occipital synchondrosis was the last to occur. A knowledge of the developmental patterns of sutures and synchondroses can help differentiate normal conditions from those such as fracture, osseous dysplasia, or congenital malformation, which are abnormal. Our results provide certain basic information about skull base maturity in children. (author)

  8. CT coronary angiography: examination technique, clinical results, and outlook on future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, M.; Hamm, B.

    2007-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) after intravenous contrast agent administration enables visualization of the coronary arteries with high spatial resolution (voxel sizes down to 0.5 x 0.35 x 0.35 mm3) and a short scan time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is also intensively studied with respect to the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenosis and thus the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) without radiation exposure but is not equal to MSCT at present. This article provides an overview of the historical development of CT coronary angiography from 4-slice CT to 16-slice CT and 64-slice CT. A crucial aspect of this development is the improvement in image quality resulting from shorter breath-hold periods and the reduced gantry rotation time. Other techniques that appear to considerably improve image quality and accuracy and make CT independent of patient heart rates are multisegment reconstruction and dual-source CT. Sublingual nitroglycerin as well as oral or intravenous betablocker administration should be considered in relation to the diagnostic question to be answered and the patient's heart rate. In the studies available CT coronary angiography with at least 12 simultaneous detector rows has a sensitivity of 96.9 % and a specificity of 75.3 % at the patient level. Especially the negative predictive value of CT (94.6 %) emphasizes the idea that this technique may reliably exclude CAD in patients with intermediate pretest likelihood. In the near future, 256-slice CT will allow examination of the entire heart during one heartbeat or even 4D CT scanning with simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion. Automatic or semiautomatic software tools will assume a central place in detecting and quantifying coronary artery stenoses and plaques as well as in the analysis of cardiac function in the clinical setting over the next years. Prior to its routine clinical use, the cost-effectiveness of CT coronary angiography must be determined and the

  9. CT and MR imaging of the buccal space: Normal anatomy and abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Han, Moon Hee; Moon, Min Hoan; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, In One; Chang, Kee Hyun

    2005-01-01

    The buccal space is an anatomical compartment lying anterior to the masticator space and lateral to the buccinator muscle. Since the major purpose of imaging is to define the likely anatomic origin and also the extent of a given lesion, thorough knowledge of the normal anatomy of the buccal space is essential, and this knowledge can aid the physician in narrowing down the list of possible maladies on the differential diagnosis. We illustrate here in this paper the important anatomic landmarks and typical pathologic conditions of the buccal space such as the developmental lesions and the neoplastic lesions. Knowledge of the expected pathologic conditions is useful for the radiologist when interpreting facial CT and MR images

  10. Evaluation of radiation dose in pediatric head CT examination: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhasrina Nik Din, Nik; Zainon, Rafidah; Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose in pediatric head Computed Tomography examination. It was reported that decreasing tube voltage in CT examination can reduce the dose to patients significantly. A head phantom was scanned with dual-energy CT at 80 kV and 120 kV. The tube current was set using automatic exposure control mode and manual setting. The pitch was adjusted to 1.4, 1.45 and 1.5 while the slice thickness was set at 5 mm. The dose was measured based on CT Dose Index (CTDI). Results from this study have shown that the image noise increases substantially with low tube voltage. The average dose was 2.60 mGy at CT imaging parameters of 80 kV and 10 - 30 mAs. The dose increases up to 17.19 mGy when the CT tube voltage increases to 120 kV. With the reduction of tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV, the radiation dose can be reduced by 12.1% to 15.1% without degradation of contrast-to-noise ratio.

  11. An investigation into CT radiation dose variations for head examinations on matched equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarb, Francis; Foley, Shane; Toomey, Rachel; Rainford, Louise; Holm, Susanne; Evanoff, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated radiation dose and image quality differences for computed tomography (CT) head examinations across centres with matched CT equipment. Radiation dose records and imaging protocols currently employed across three European university teaching hospitals were collated, compared and coded as Centres A, B and C from specification matched CT equipment models. Patient scans (n = 40) obtained from Centres A and C were evaluated for image quality, based on the visualisation of Commission of European Community (CEC) image quality criteria using visual grading characteristic (VGC) analysis, where American Board of Radiology examiners (n = 11) stated their confidence in identifying anatomical criteria. Mean doses in terms of CT dose index (CTDI vol -mGy) and dose length product (DLP-mGy cm) were as follows: Centre A-33.12 mGy and 461.45 mGy cm; Centre B -101 mGy (base)/32 mGy (cerebrum) and 762 mGy cm and Centre C-71.98 mGy and 1047.26 mGy cm, showing a significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) in DLP across centres. VGC analysis indicated better visualisation of CEC criteria on Centre C images (VGC AUC 0.225). All three imaging protocols are routinely used clinically, and image quality is acceptable in each centre. Clinical centres with identical model CT scanners have variously customised their protocols achieving a range of dose savings and still resulting in clinically acceptable image quality. (authors)

  12. Estimation of organ doses and risk of cancer associated with CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Nagla Nooraldaim

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study to estimate the organ closes and risk of cancer associated with CT examinations in Khartoum state, where the study conducted in three hospitals; Alzytouna , royal scan and Royal Care. From April to November 2017, and the data collected from 120 patients, 40 patents from each hospital undergoing CT brain and abdomen examinations. The data were entered to CT - Expo version 2.4 software for calculation the effective dose and organ dose and by Xray risk web site for calculate the risk factor associated with CT examinations. Results have shown the values of effective dose that found 9.73 mSv for all patients and for female and male 9.9 mSv respectively. The effective dose from Brain examinations in three hospitals Alzytouna Royal scan and Royal Care was 16.9 mSv, 3.7 mSv, 3.8 mSv respectively, and from abdomen examinations was 4.2 mSv, 7.6 mSv, 22.2 mSv respectively. Comparing te effective dose from the hospitals, for Ct. Brain in Alzytouna hospital was higher than other hospitals; and for CT Abdomen in Royal Care hospital was higher than other hospitals, but still under the risk levels according to the ICRP report. For organ doses results, the most organs exposed from CT. brain was brain, salivary gland, thyroid gland, Bone marrow, Bone surface, Extra thoracic tissue, Eye lens and oral mucosa received ( 70,2, 66.4,15.04, 10.9, 24.9, 14.8,89.5,65.07) mSv respectively. The most organs exposed from CT. Abdomen were liver, stomach, low, Large intestine, Bladder, Bone surface, upper , Large intestine, spleen, kidney, small intestine and prostate received (16.53, 12.8, 33.43, 41.01,20.5, 38.4, 14.7, 28.9, 37.5,30.5 ) mSv respectively. This study found that te ability of cancer induced i the female was higher from the male; dut to body component of the female. (Author)

  13. Migration abnormalities in cerebral malformations - evaluation of CT and MR examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Sehlen, S.; Terwey, B.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with abnormalities of migration were examined with CT and MRI. Thirteen patients had heterotopia, ten patients had agyria/pachygyria, two with unilateral schizencephaly and three with hemimegalencephaly. MRI proved markedly superior because of its wider contrast range and its ability to obtain various imaging planes. The various conditions are described in detail. (orig.) [de

  14. CT examination after intrathecal or intraventricular application of metrizamide in 110 patients for neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakow, D.

    1983-01-01

    The CT scans were done in 110 patients for examination of the liquor carrying cerebral brain compartments, especially the cisterns, after intrathecal application of the radiopaque medium metrizamide. The properties of the medium are explained in detail. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Focal breast lesions in clinical CT examinations of the chest. A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Houbois, Christian; Grinstein, Olga; Borggrefe, Jan; Puesken, Michael; Maintz, David; Hanstein, Bettina; Malter, Wolfram; Hellmich, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Based on radiological reports, the percentage of breast cancers visualized as incidental findings in routine CT examinations is estimated at ≤2%. In view of the rising number of CT examinations and the high prevalence of breast cancer, it was the goal of the present study to verify the frequency and image morphology of false-negative senological CT findings. All first contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest in adult female patients carried out in 2012 were retrospectively included. A senior radiologist systematically assessed the presence of breast lesions on all CT images using the BI-RADS system. All BI-RADS ≥3 notations were evaluated by a second senior radiologist. A consensus was obtained in case of differing BI-RADS assessments. Reference diagnoses were elaborated based on all available clinical, radiological and pathological data. The findings of the CT reports were classified according to the BI-RADS system and were compared with the retrospective consensus findings as well as with the reference diagnoses. The range of indications comprised a broad spectrum including staging and follow-up examinations of solid tumors/lymphoma (N = 701, 59.9 %) and vascular (190, 16.2 %), inflammatory (48, 4.1 %) and pulmonologic (22, 1.9 %) issues. BI-RADS 1/2 classifications were present in 92.5 % and BI-RADS 6 classifications were assessed in 1.7 % of the 1170 included examinations. 68 patients (5.8 %) had at least one lesion retrospectively classified as BI-RADS 3 - 5. The histological potential was known in 57 of these lesions as benign (46, 3.9 %) or malignant (11, 0.9 %). 13 BI-RADS 4/5 consensus assessments (1.1 %) were false-positive. 2 of the 10 lesions classified as being malignant based on the further clinical and radiological course were not mentioned in the written CT reports (0.2 %). Both false-negative CT reports were therapeutically and prognostically irrelevant. The relative frequency of BI-RADS 3 - 5 findings was 5.8 %. It reflects the situation

  16. Are CT Scans a Satisfactory Substitute for the Follow-Up of RSA Migration Studies of Uncemented Cups? A Comparison of RSA Double Examinations and CT Datasets of 46 Total Hip Arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Volker; Maguire, Gerald Q; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Nilsson, Kjell G; Olivecrona, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    As part of the 14-year follow-up of a prospectively randomized radiostereometry (RSA) study on uncemented cup fixation, two pairs of stereo radiographs and a CT scan of 46 hips were compared. Tantalum beads, inserted during the primary operation, were detected in the CT volume and the stereo radiographs and used to produce datasets of 3D coordinates. The limit of agreement between the combined CT and RSA datasets was calculated in the same way as the precision of the double RSA examination. The precision of RSA corresponding to the 99% confidence interval was 1.36°, 1.36°, and 0.60° for X -, Y -, and Z -rotation and 0.40, 0.17, and 0.37 mm for X -, Y -, and Z -translation. The limit of agreement between CT and RSA was 1.51°, 2.17°, and 1.05° for rotation and 0.59, 0.56, and 0.74 mm for translation. The differences between CT and RSA are close to the described normal 99% confidence interval for precision in RSA: 0.3° to 2° for rotation and 0.15 to 0.6 mm for translation. We conclude that measurements using CT and RSA are comparable and that CT can be used for migration studies for longitudinal evaluations of patients with RSA markers.

  17. CT volumetry of lumbar vertebral bodies in patients with hypoplasia L5 and bilateral spondylolysis and in normal controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, Guido E.; Demaerel, Philippe; Keyzer, Frederik de; Willems, Endry

    2012-01-01

    To examine the feasibility and results of calculating the volume of lumbar vertebral bodies in normal patients and patients with suspected hypoplasia of L5. Lumbar multi-detector CT was performed in 38 patients with bilateral spondylolysis and hypoplasia of L5 and in 38 normal patients. Lumbar vertebral body volume of L3, L4 and L5 was measured by CT volumetry with a semi-automated program, created with MeVisLab. In the control group, the average vertebral body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 35.93 (±7.33), 36.34 (±7.13) for L4 and 34.63 (±6.88) for L5. In patients with suspected hypoplasia L5 the average body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 36.85 (±7.37), 36.90 (±6.99) for L4 and 33.14 (±6.57) for L5. The difference in mean vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups was statistically not significant. However, there was a statistically significant difference of the ratio L5/L4 (P < 0.001) between both groups: the mean ratio L5/L4 in the control group was 95.3 ± 3.9%, the ratio for the hypoplastic L5 group was 89.9 ± 6.3%. There was no significant difference in the vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups due to inter-patient variability. However, the relation between the body volume of L5 and L4 is significantly different between both groups. The volume of the vertebral body of L5 proved to be on average 10.2% smaller than the volume of L4 in the group with hypoplasia L5 versus 4.7% in the control group. (orig.)

  18. CT volumetry of lumbar vertebral bodies in patients with hypoplasia L5 and bilateral spondylolysis and in normal controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, Guido E.; Demaerel, Philippe; Keyzer, Frederik de [UZ Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Willems, Endry [ZOL, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    To examine the feasibility and results of calculating the volume of lumbar vertebral bodies in normal patients and patients with suspected hypoplasia of L5. Lumbar multi-detector CT was performed in 38 patients with bilateral spondylolysis and hypoplasia of L5 and in 38 normal patients. Lumbar vertebral body volume of L3, L4 and L5 was measured by CT volumetry with a semi-automated program, created with MeVisLab. In the control group, the average vertebral body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 35.93 ({+-}7.33), 36.34 ({+-}7.13) for L4 and 34.63 ({+-}6.88) for L5. In patients with suspected hypoplasia L5 the average body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 36.85 ({+-}7.37), 36.90 ({+-}6.99) for L4 and 33.14 ({+-}6.57) for L5. The difference in mean vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups was statistically not significant. However, there was a statistically significant difference of the ratio L5/L4 (P < 0.001) between both groups: the mean ratio L5/L4 in the control group was 95.3 {+-} 3.9%, the ratio for the hypoplastic L5 group was 89.9 {+-} 6.3%. There was no significant difference in the vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups due to inter-patient variability. However, the relation between the body volume of L5 and L4 is significantly different between both groups. The volume of the vertebral body of L5 proved to be on average 10.2% smaller than the volume of L4 in the group with hypoplasia L5 versus 4.7% in the control group. (orig.)

  19. CT-based attenuation correction and resolution compensation for I-123 IMP brain SPECT normal database: a multicenter phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Yoshitaka; Ichihara, Takashi; Uno, Masaki; Ishiguro, Masanobu; Ito, Kengo; Kato, Katsuhiko; Sakuma, Hajime; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2018-03-19

    Statistical image analysis of brain SPECT images has improved diagnostic accuracy for brain disorders. However, the results of statistical analysis vary depending on the institution even when they use a common normal database (NDB), due to different intrinsic spatial resolutions or correction methods. The present study aimed to evaluate the correction of spatial resolution differences between equipment and examine the differences in skull bone attenuation to construct a common NDB for use in multicenter settings. The proposed acquisition and processing protocols were those routinely used at each participating center with additional triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction (SC) and computed tomography (CT) based attenuation correction (CTAC). A multicenter phantom study was conducted on six imaging systems in five centers, with either single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or SPECT/CT, and two brain phantoms. The gray/white matter I-123 activity ratio in the brain phantoms was 4, and they were enclosed in either an artificial adult male skull, 1300 Hounsfield units (HU), a female skull, 850 HU, or an acrylic cover. The cut-off frequency of the Butterworth filters was adjusted so that the spatial resolution was unified to a 17.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM), that of the lowest resolution system. The gray-to-white matter count ratios were measured from SPECT images and compared with the actual activity ratio. In addition, mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation images were calculated after normalization and anatomical standardization to evaluate the variability of the NDB. The gray-to-white matter count ratio error without SC and attenuation correction (AC) was significantly larger for higher bone densities (p correction. The proposed protocol showed potential for constructing an appropriate common NDB from SPECT images with SC, AC and spatial resolution compensation.

  20. Patient doses in CT examinations in Switzerland: Implementation of national diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treier, R.; Aroua, A.; Verdun, F. R.; Samara, E.; Stuessi, A.; Trueb, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were established for 21 indication-based CT examinations for adults in Switzerland. One hundred and seventy-nine of 225 computed tomography (CT) scanners operated in hospitals and private radiology institutes were audited on-site and patient doses were collected. For each CT scanner, a correction factor was calculated expressing the deviation of the measured weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI) to the nominal weighted CTDI as displayed on the workstation. Patient doses were corrected by this factor providing a realistic basis for establishing national DRLs. Results showed large variations in doses between different radiology departments in Switzerland, especially for examinations of the petrous bone, pelvis, lower limbs and heart. This indicates that the concept of DRLs has not yet been correctly applied for CT examinations in clinical routine. A close collaboration of all stakeholders is mandatory to assure an effective radiation protection of patients. On-site audits will be intensified to further establish the concept of DRLs in Switzerland. (authors)

  1. Assessment of absorbed dose to the ovaries of patients undergoing pelvic CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakoli, H.M.B. [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: Although Computed Tomography (CT) procedures constitute about 5% of the total diagnostic radiology procedures but are responsible for about 40% of the total ionizing radiation dose to the general population. As the dose is high especially in the CT of female pelvis, genetic radiation risk is also considerable. Materials and Methods: Radiation doses to the ovaries of the patients undergoing CT examination of the pelvis were measured from 9 different CT scanners available in Isfahan city. For each CT scanner 20 patients were selected. Measurement of organ dose was performed using TLD method. Results and Discussions: Mean and S.D. of absorbed dose to the ovaries from Shimadzo 2500 were 56.6 2.8; from GE Max 640 were 36.8 1.7; from GE Sytec 3000 were 36.6 1.8; from GE Sytec 4000 were 36.6 2.6; from Piker were 38.4 2.1; from Shimadzo 4500 were 36.4 1.2 and from Shimadzo 7800TE 28.2 1.5. Associated risks due to the measured dose are discussed. (author)

  2. Thyroid doses and risk to paediatric patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Tipnis, Sameer; Huda, Walter [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Tavernier, Joshua [Medical University of South Carolina, College of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-07-15

    To estimate thyroid doses and cancer risk for paediatric patients undergoing neck computed tomography (CT). We used average CTDI{sub vol} (mGy) values from 75 paediatric neck CT examinations to estimate thyroid dose in a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom (ImPACT Patient CT Dosimetry Calculator). Patient dose was estimated by modelling the neck as mass equivalent water cylinder. A patient size correction factor was obtained using published relative dose data as a function of water cylinder size. Additional correction factors included scan length and radiation intensity variation secondary to tube-current modulation. The mean water cylinder diameter that modelled the neck was 14 ± 3.5 cm. The mathematical anthropomorphic phantom has a 16.5-cm neck, and for a constant CT exposure, would have thyroid doses that are 13-17 % lower than the average paediatric patient. CTDI{sub vol} was independent of age and sex. The average thyroid doses were 31 ± 18 mGy (males) and 34 ± 15 mGy (females). Thyroid cancer incidence risk was highest for infant females (0.2 %), lowest for teenage males (0.01 %). Estimated absorbed thyroid doses in paediatric neck CT did not significantly vary with age and gender. However, the corresponding thyroid cancer risk is determined by gender and age. (orig.)

  3. CT findings of intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct: Assessment with multiphase contrast-enhanced examination using multi-detector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, H., E-mail: ogawa.hiroshi@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, S. [Department of Radiology, Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Suzuki, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ota, T. [Department of Radiology, Aichi Medical University Hospital, Nagakute Aichi (Japan); Naganawa, S. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB), a neoplasm that is considered to be the biliary counterpart of pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Materials and methods: Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated multiphase contrast-enhanced CT images with 0.5 or 1 mm collimation in 37 consecutive patients with resected IPNB diagnosed by a single pathologist. The CT findings were correlated with the pathological findings concerning invasion of the surrounding organs and vessels. Results: All patients showed bile duct dilatation. An intraductal mass was detected in 36 patients and the following findings were observed: extensive infiltration along the bile duct more than 20 mm (n = 32), compared with normal hepatic parenchyma, isodense or hyperdense during the late arterial phase (n = 31), not hyperdense during the portal-venous and delayed phases (n = 36), and intense enhancement rim at the base of the mass during the portal-venous or delayed phase (n = 27). Parenchymal invasion of the surrounding organs was seen in eight of 16 tumours showing irregular or bulging margins. Vascular invasion was false positive in four of eight tumours. Conclusions: IPNB exhibits relatively characteristic findings with multiphase contrast-enhanced examination using MDCT. A tendency to overestimate invasion of the surrounding organs and vessels was seen.

  4. CT measurement of normal pericardial thickness in adults on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Woo; Park, Chan Sup; Jeon, Yong Sun; Bae, In Young; Choi, Sung Gyu; Koo, Jin Hoe; Chung, Won Kyun

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish, using computed tomography, the normal thickness of the pericardium in adults. Materials and Methods: CT scans of 50 patients, including sections through the level of the heart, were reviewed. Patients were excluded if there were any suspicions of pericardial abnormality such as infectious or neoplastic diseases. Twenty-four of the 50 were men and 26 were women; their mean age was 47.0(range,18-76) years. We measured pericardial thickness at the level of the right ventricle, interventricular septum and left ventricle, and also compared pericardial thickness in terms of age and sex. Results: In all patients, the pericardium was observed in the right ventricular region; in 41 (82%) at the interventricular septum; and in 41 (82%) along the left ventricle. The mean thickness of normal pericardium at the level of the right ventricle, interventricular septum, and left ventricle was 1.8 mm ± 0.5 mm, 1.8 mm ± 0.4 mm, and 1.7 mm ± 0.5 mm, respectively. No statistically significant correlation was apparent between pericardial thickness and age group (p > 0.63, ANOVA test). Mean pericardial thickness was 1.9 mm ± 0.6 mm in males and 1.7 mm ± 0.4 mm in females; thus, no statistically significant correlation was apparent between pericardial thickness and sex (p >0.29, Student's t-test). Conclusion: The pericardium was best visualized in sections through the right ventricle.The mean thickness of normal pericardium was 1.8 mm ± 0.5 mm and pericardial thickness did not differ according to age or sex

  5. Poster — Thur Eve — 06: Dose assessment of cone beam CT imaging protocols as part of SPECT/CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkopi, E; Ross, AA [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, CDHA (Canada); Department of Radiology, Dalhousie University (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrance dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  6. Multislice CT of the auditory ossicles and ossicular ligaments. Delineation of normal anatomy and diagnosis of congenital anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shigeru; Tozaki, Hiromitu; Miyazaki, Hidemi

    2001-01-01

    By using four detector rows with 0.5 mm collimation, high resolution isotropic voxel data throughout the middle ear can be obtained with Multislice Helical CT (MSCT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of MSCT in demonstrating the auditory ossicles and ossicular ligaments and in the diagnosis of congenital ossicular anomalies. Thirty normal middle ears and 23 ear of 20 patients with suspicious congenital ossicular anomalies were examined. Axial images and multiplanar images were reconstructed. In the normal group, the images were evaluated based on scores for the visualization of the anatomical structure of the auditory ossicles and ossicular ligaments. In the group with anomalies, the findings suggesting ossicular anomalies were referenced and the prevalence was conjectured. Visualization of the auditory ossicles and ossicular ligaments was 98.3%-100% and 78.3%-100%, respectively. Congenital ossicular anomalies were detected in 20 ears (87.0%). MSCT is an accurate method for demonstrating minute and complicated 3D structures of the middle ear, and is found to be a technique of choice for diagnosis of ossicular anomalies. (author)

  7. Effective and organ doses from common CT examinations in one general hospital in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramian, Daryoush; Hashemi, Bijan

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: It is well known that the main portion of artificial sources of ionizing radiation to human results from X-ray imaging techniques. However, reports carried out in various countries have indicated that most of their cumulative doses from artificial sources are due to CT examinations. Hence assessing doses resulted from CT examinations is highly recommended by national and international radiation protection agencies. The aim of this research has been to estimate the effective and organ doses in an average human according to 103 and 60 ICRP tissue weighting factor for six common protocols of Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) machine in a comprehensive training general hospital in Tehran/Iran. Methods: To calculate the patients' effective dose, the CT-Expo2.2 software was used. Organs/tissues and effective doses were determined for about 20 patients (totally 122 patients) for every one of six typical CT protocols of the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis and spine exams. In addition, the CT dosimetry index (CTDI) was measured in the standard 16 and 32 cm phantoms by using a calibrated pencil ionization chamber for the six protocols and by taking the average value of CT scan parameters used in the hospital compared with the CTDI values displayed on the console device of the machine. Results: The values of the effective dose based on the ICRP 103 tissue weighting factor were: 0.6, 2.0, 3.2, 4.2, 2.8, and 3.9 mSv and based on the ICRP 60 tissue weighting factor were: 0.9, 1.4, 3, 7.9, 4.8 and 5.1 mSv for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis, spine CT exams respectively. Relative differences between those values were -22, 21, 23, -6, -31 and 16 percent for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis, spine CT exams, respectively. The average value of CTDIv calculated for each protocol was: 27.32 ± 0.9, 18.08 ± 2.0, 7.36 ± 2.6, 8.84 ± 1.7, 9.13 ± 1.5, 10.42 ± 0.8 mGy for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis and spine CT exams, respectively

  8. Radiation exposure of lens, thyroid gland and testis in anthropomorphic phantom during CT examination and its protective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Suhua; Weng Zhigen; Wu Caifa

    1995-01-01

    The SMN-I anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate patients and to estimate the radiation exposure of lens, thyroid gland and testes during CT examination according to hospital routine managements. The results show that the X-ray radiation doses received by the organs mentioned above are different in good and no protection shelter. Therefore, during CT examination it's of great significance to take a good protective shelter for organs which are near the CT scanning areas

  9. Value of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT imaging in patients with TIA or acute stroke and normal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, K.; Brass, L.M.; Hoffer, P.B.; Gottschalk, A.; Smith, E.O.; Rehm, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the value of Tc-99m HMPAO single photon emission CT (SPECT) imaging, 51 patients with transient, acute, or chronic cerebrovascular disease were studied. Seventeen patients presented with recent transient ischemic attack (TIA) or acute stroke and underwent SPECT imaging and CT within 72 hours of presentation. SPECT image interpretation was independent of clinical history and CT findings. Four patients with acute stroke and eight patients with TIA had normal CT findings. All patients with acute stroke (three nonlacunar, one lacunar infarct) and three of eight patients with TIA also showed perfusion abnormalities on Tc-99m HMPAO scans. Thus, Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT may be useful in the early diagnosis and subtype determination of acute stroke and in the evaluation of TIA

  10. Normal uptake of 18F-FDG in the testis. An assessment by PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Sugimura, Kazuro; Nakamoto, Yuji; Senda, Michio; Onishi, Yumiko; Okizuka, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the physiological uptake of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) by an apparently normal testis with combined positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) and its correlation with age, blood glucose level, and testicular volume. The testicular uptake of 18 F-FDG, expressed as the standardized uptake value (SUV), was measured on PET/CT images in 203 men. The correlation between SUV and age, blood glucose level, and testicular volume was assessed. The SUV in the total of 406 testes was 2.44±0.45 (range 1.23-3.85). The SUV was 2.81±0.43 (2.28-3.85) for 30-39 years (n=12), 2.63±0.45 (1.77-3.75) for 40-49 years (n=64), 2.46±0.35 (1.44-3.15) for 50-59 years (n=82), 2.51±0.41 (1.50-3.46) for 60-69 years (n=86), 2.43±0.47 (1.42-3.29) for 70-79 years (n=86), and 2.18±0.45 (1.23-3.03) for 80-89 years (n=76). When we calculated the mean SUV of bilateral testes in each patient, there were significant statistical differences between those in the age group of 30-39 years and 80-89 years, 40-49 years and 80-89 years, and 50-60 years and 80-89 years, when using an unpaired test with Bonferroni correction. The laterality index (|L-R|/(L+R) x 2) in 203 men was 0.066±0.067 (0-0.522). There was a mild correlation between the mean SUV and age (r=-0.284, P<0.001) as well as between the mean SUV and mean volume (r=+0.368, P<0.001). There was no correlation between the mean SUV and glucose blood level (r=-0.065, P=0.358). Some uptake of FDG is observed in the normal testis and declines slightly with age. Physiological FDG uptake in the testis should not be confused with pathological accumulation. (author)

  11. Sedation of children for MR or CT imaging examination using chloral hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jong Gi; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung

    1994-01-01

    Pediatric sedation is an important factor for obtaining the images of good quality. We performed this study to analyze the efficacy of our sedation protocol using chloral hydrate. We collected prospectively 151 sedation records of children(1 day-15 years old), who were sedated with chloral hydrate for MR(n=112) or CT(n=39) studies. We initially administered 50 mg/Kg orally(n=94) or rectally(n=57) 30 minutes before the scheduled examinations, and then administered additional dose (second dose: 25-35 mg/Kg, third dose: 10-15 mg/Kg) to patients whom initial dose failed to sedate. Satisfactory sedation was achieved by initial administration in 109 patients(72%) without significant difference between oral(per oral; P. O.) and rectal(per rectal: P.R.) administration. Second dose was required in 28% and third dose in 5%. MR and CT examinations required second dose in 36(32%) and 6 patients(15%), respectively. P.O. -patients vomited in 5%. P.R. -patients defecated in 22% after initial administration. There were no other serious complications. Time interval from the drug administration to the start of examinations was 33 minutes in initial-dose-group and 64 minutes in additional-dose-group. Two patients could not complete MR examination due to early arousal. Prolonged sedation, requiring more than 30 minutes for alertness after MR and CT examinations, was encountered in twenty(18%) and two patients(5%) respectively. Our protocol using chloral hydrate(P.O. or P.R.) is thought to be an effective and safe method for pediatric sedation for MR or CT imaging

  12. 'Peripheric' pancreatic cysts: performance of CT scan, MRI and endoscopy according to final pathological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duconseil, P; Turrini, O; Ewald, J; Soussan, J; Sarran, A; Gasmi, M; Moutardier, V; Delpero, J R

    2015-06-01

    To assess the accuracy of pre-operative staging in patients with peripheral pancreatic cystic neoplasms (pPCNs). From 2005 to 2011, 148 patients underwent a pancreatectomy for pPCNs. The pre-operative examination methods of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) were compared for their ability to predict the suggested diagnosis accurately, and the definitive diagnosis was affirmed by pathological examination. A mural nodule was detected in 34 patients (23%): only 1 patient (3%) had an invasive pPCN at the final histological examination. A biopsy was performed in 79 patients (53%) during EUS: in 55 patients (70%), the biopsy could not conclude a diagnosis; the biopsy provided the correct and wrong diagnosis in 19 patients (24%) and 5 patients (6%), respectively. A correct diagnosis was affirmed by CT, EUS and pancreatic MRI in 60 (41%), 103 (74%) and 80 (86%) patients (when comparing EUS and MRI; P = 0.03), respectively. The positive predictive values (PPVs) of CT, EUS and MRI were 70%, 75% and 87%, respectively. Pancreatic MRI appears to be the most appropriate examination to diagnose pPCNs accurately. EUS alone had a poor PPV. Mural nodules in a PCN should not be considered an indisputable sign of pPCN invasiveness. © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  13. Dose reduction using bismuth shielding during paediatric CT examinations in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbelcova, L.; Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.

    2011-01-01

    Considering the massive increase of computer tomography (CT) examinations in Slovakia during the last 10 y, it can be expected that a higher radiation load may be observed in the Slovak population. Since child population is more sensitive to radiation than adult population, a monitoring has started to see how high the radiation dose is for paediatric patients during CT examinations in chosen departments in Slovakia. The CT examination of the head is one of the most frequently done examinations in Slovakian departments and that is why measurements were done to clarify how usage of bismuth shields for eyes and thyroid can affect the eye and thyroid doses. For simulation, 215 thermoluminescent dosimeters were exposed on anthropomorphic phantom of a child with and without usage of bismuth shields. The result was that only two of the three chosen departments confirmed a reduction. On the other hand, one of the departments confirmed that the reduction can be up to 56-65 %, which is significant. (authors)

  14. Serial quantitative CT evaluation for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) using Gaussian Histogram Normalized Correlation (GHNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Tae; Ogura, Takashi; Nishimura, Junichi; Asakura, Akira; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Yazawa, Takuya; Inoue, Tomio

    2006-01-01

    We assessed serial changes in high-resolution CT findings quantitatively using originally developed software Gaussian Histogram Normalized Correlation (GHNC) in 15 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Mean follow-up period was 1.4 years. The volume of honeycombing increased with 0.8±0.9%TLC (predicted Total lung capacity) per year, the normal lung volume reduced by 4.1±7.3%TLC per year. GHNC is useful for the quantitative evaluation. (author)

  15. Effect of tube current modulation for dose estimation using a simulation tool on body CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Ai; Matsunaga, Yuta; Kobayashi, Masanao; Suzuki, Shoichi; Matsubara, Kosuke; Chida, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tube current modulation for dose estimation of a body computed tomography (CT) examination using a simulation tool. The authors also compared longitudinal variations in tube current values between iterative reconstruction (IR) and filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithms. One hundred patients underwent body CT examinations. The tube current values around 10 organ regions were recorded longitudinally from tube current information. The organ and effective doses were simulated by average tube current values and longitudinal modulated tube current values. The organ doses for the bladder and breast estimated by longitudinal modulated tube current values were 20 % higher and 25 % lower than those estimated using the average tube current values, respectively. The differences in effective doses were small (mean, 0.7 mSv). The longitudinal variations in tube current values were almost the same for the IR and FBP algorithms. (authors)

  16. Quantitative analysis of spinal curvature in 3D: application to CT images of normal spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-04-07

    The purpose of this study is to present a framework for quantitative analysis of spinal curvature in 3D. In order to study the properties of such complex 3D structures, we propose two descriptors that capture the characteristics of spinal curvature in 3D. The descriptors are the geometric curvature (GC) and curvature angle (CA), which are independent of the orientation and size of spine anatomy. We demonstrate the two descriptors that characterize the spinal curvature in 3D on 30 computed tomography (CT) images of normal spine and on a scoliotic spine. The descriptors are determined from 3D vertebral body lines, which are obtained by two different methods. The first method is based on the least-squares technique that approximates the manually identified vertebra centroids, while the second method searches for vertebra centroids in an automated optimization scheme, based on computer-assisted image analysis. Polynomial functions of the fourth and fifth degree were used for the description of normal and scoliotic spinal curvature in 3D, respectively. The mean distance to vertebra centroids was 1.1 mm ({+-}0.6 mm) for the first and 2.1 mm ({+-}1.4 mm) for the second method. The distributions of GC and CA values were obtained along the 30 images of normal spine at each vertebral level and show that maximal thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar junction (TJ) and maximal lumbar lordosis (LL) on average occur at T3/T4, T12/L1 and L4/L5, respectively. The main advantage of GC and CA is that the measurements are independent of the orientation and size of the spine, thus allowing objective intra- and inter-subject comparisons. The positions of maximal TK, TJ and maximal LL can be easily identified by observing the GC and CA distributions at different vertebral levels. The obtained courses of the GC and CA for the scoliotic spine were compared to the distributions of GC and CA for the normal spines. The significant difference in values indicates that the descriptors of GC and

  17. Quantitative analysis of spinal curvature in 3D: application to CT images of normal spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a framework for quantitative analysis of spinal curvature in 3D. In order to study the properties of such complex 3D structures, we propose two descriptors that capture the characteristics of spinal curvature in 3D. The descriptors are the geometric curvature (GC) and curvature angle (CA), which are independent of the orientation and size of spine anatomy. We demonstrate the two descriptors that characterize the spinal curvature in 3D on 30 computed tomography (CT) images of normal spine and on a scoliotic spine. The descriptors are determined from 3D vertebral body lines, which are obtained by two different methods. The first method is based on the least-squares technique that approximates the manually identified vertebra centroids, while the second method searches for vertebra centroids in an automated optimization scheme, based on computer-assisted image analysis. Polynomial functions of the fourth and fifth degree were used for the description of normal and scoliotic spinal curvature in 3D, respectively. The mean distance to vertebra centroids was 1.1 mm (±0.6 mm) for the first and 2.1 mm (±1.4 mm) for the second method. The distributions of GC and CA values were obtained along the 30 images of normal spine at each vertebral level and show that maximal thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar junction (TJ) and maximal lumbar lordosis (LL) on average occur at T3/T4, T12/L1 and L4/L5, respectively. The main advantage of GC and CA is that the measurements are independent of the orientation and size of the spine, thus allowing objective intra- and inter-subject comparisons. The positions of maximal TK, TJ and maximal LL can be easily identified by observing the GC and CA distributions at different vertebral levels. The obtained courses of the GC and CA for the scoliotic spine were compared to the distributions of GC and CA for the normal spines. The significant difference in values indicates that the descriptors of GC and CA

  18. Axial CT of the brain compared with other clinical methods of examination in neuropaediatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.

    1979-01-01

    CT of the neurocranium and EEC were carried out in 53 children aged 10 weeks to 15.5 years. In most of the children, also plain-film X-rays of the skull, echoencephalography, scintiscans of the brain, cerebral angiography and, in a few cases, pneumoencephalography were carried out. The methods of examination were comparatively evaluated for neoplastic, inflammatory, congenital and degenerative diseases and cerebral attacks. (APR) [de

  19. 18F-FDG PET-CT pattern in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Townley

    Full Text Available Background: Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is an important and treatable cause of neurologic impairment. Diagnosis is complicated due to symptoms overlapping with other age related disorders. The pathophysiology underlying iNPH is not well understood. We explored FDG-PET abnormalities in iNPH patients in order to determine if FDG-PET may serve as a biomarker to differentiate iNPH from common neurodegenerative disorders. Methods: We retrospectively compared 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging patterns from seven iNPH patients (mean age 74 ± 6 years to age and sex matched controls, as well as patients diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer's disease dementia (AD, Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB and Parkinson's Disease Dementia (PDD, and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD. Partial volume corrected and uncorrected images were reviewed separately. Results: Patients with iNPH, when compared to controls, AD, DLB/PDD, and bvFTD, had significant regional hypometabolism in the dorsal striatum, involving the caudate and putamen bilaterally. These results remained highly significant after partial volume correction. Conclusions: In this study, we report a FDG-PET pattern of hypometabolism in iNPH involving the caudate and putamen with preserved cortical metabolism. This pattern may differentiate iNPH from degenerative diseases and has the potential to serve as a biomarker for iNPH in future studies. These findings also further our understanding of the pathophysiology underlying the iNPH clinical presentation. Keywords: FDG-PET, Normal pressure hydrocephalus, Hypometabolism, Caudate, Biomarker

  20. Visual grading characteristics and ordinal regression analysis during optimisation of CT head examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarb, Francis; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate visual grading characteristics (VGC) and ordinal regression analysis during head CT optimisation as a potential alternative to visual grading assessment (VGA), traditionally employed to score anatomical visualisation. Patient images (n = 66) were obtained using current and optimised imaging protocols from two CT suites: a 16-slice scanner at the national Maltese centre for trauma and a 64-slice scanner in a private centre. Local resident radiologists (n = 6) performed VGA followed by VGC and ordinal regression analysis. VGC alone indicated that optimised protocols had similar image quality as current protocols. Ordinal logistic regression analysis provided an in-depth evaluation, criterion by criterion allowing the selective implementation of the protocols. The local radiology review panel supported the implementation of optimised protocols for brain CT examinations (including trauma) in one centre, achieving radiation dose reductions ranging from 24 % to 36 %. In the second centre a 29 % reduction in radiation dose was achieved for follow-up cases. The combined use of VGC and ordinal logistic regression analysis led to clinical decisions being taken on the implementation of the optimised protocols. This improved method of image quality analysis provided the evidence to support imaging protocol optimisation, resulting in significant radiation dose savings. • There is need for scientifically based image quality evaluation during CT optimisation. • VGC and ordinal regression analysis in combination led to better informed clinical decisions. • VGC and ordinal regression analysis led to dose reductions without compromising diagnostic efficacy.

  1. The efficacy of low-dose helical CT screening as an option for health examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazuma; Hara, Shigeko; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Fujii, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the results of low-dose helical CT screening as an option for health examinations. From November 2002 to October 2005, CT screening was performed in 2,306 individuals (men 1,766, women 540, mean age 56.1 years). Among them, 71 individuals (3.1%) were diagnosed as having active thoracic diseases consisting of 14 neoplasms and 57 non-neoplastic diseases. Of 14 patients with neoplastic lesions, 13 had lung cancer, 1 of whom had double primary lung cancer, and 1 had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. The mean diameter of the 14 lung cancers was 14.4 mm. The histology of these lesions was adenocarcinoma in 13 and squamous cell carcinoma in 1. The pathological stage was IA in 12 patients and IIA in 1. All patients underwent surgical resection. On the other hand, emphysema was diagnosed in 40 asymptomatic individuals based on CT and spirometry, and smoking cessation was strongly implemented for those who were current smokers. CT screening is useful for detecting not only early lung cancer but also non-neoplastic lung diseases. (author)

  2. Examination of the fine interstitial changes of pneumoconiosis with high resolution computed tomography (HR-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Masamitsu; Miyazaki, Nobuyoshi; Harada, Susumu; Nakata, Hajime

    1986-01-01

    High resolution CT was performed in 14 patients with fine interstitial changes of pneumoconiosis and Review image was evaluated for the diagnostic accuracy as compared with conventional chest roentgenogram. Of the 14 Patients in the study, 7 were divided category 1 by the ILO U/C classification, 4 were category 2, 3 were category 3. Studies of lung function showed obstructive ventilatory disturbance characterized by moderate reduction in FEV 1.0% (58.6 ± 16.5 %) and V25/H (0.34 ± 0.24 l/sec/m). HR-CT defined more sensitive in the presence of fine lung nodules than conventional X-p, and showed high contrast interfaces provided by the aerated lung. HR-CT was also of value in detecting bulla, bleb, peripleural changes and hilar lymphadenopathy. Radiologic-pathologic correlation was examined on tne specimens of transbronchial lung biopsy in 4 patients, and revealed the diagnostic usefullness of HR-CT. (author)

  3. 18F-FDG PET-CT pattern in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Ryan A; Botha, Hugo; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Petersen, Ronald C; Senjem, Matthew L; Knopman, David S; Lowe, Val; Jack, Clifford R; Jones, David T

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is an important and treatable cause of neurologic impairment. Diagnosis is complicated due to symptoms overlapping with other age related disorders. The pathophysiology underlying iNPH is not well understood. We explored FDG-PET abnormalities in iNPH patients in order to determine if FDG-PET may serve as a biomarker to differentiate iNPH from common neurodegenerative disorders. We retrospectively compared 18 F-FDG PET-CT imaging patterns from seven iNPH patients (mean age 74 ± 6 years) to age and sex matched controls, as well as patients diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer's disease dementia (AD), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's Disease Dementia (PDD), and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Partial volume corrected and uncorrected images were reviewed separately. Patients with iNPH, when compared to controls, AD, DLB/PDD, and bvFTD, had significant regional hypometabolism in the dorsal striatum, involving the caudate and putamen bilaterally. These results remained highly significant after partial volume correction. In this study, we report a FDG-PET pattern of hypometabolism in iNPH involving the caudate and putamen with preserved cortical metabolism. This pattern may differentiate iNPH from degenerative diseases and has the potential to serve as a biomarker for iNPH in future studies. These findings also further our understanding of the pathophysiology underlying the iNPH clinical presentation.

  4. SU-F-I-01: Normalized Mean Glandular Dose Values for Dedicated Breast CT Using Realistic Breast-Shaped Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A [Department of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Boone, J [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Engeering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate normalized mean glandular dose values for dedicated breast CT (DgN-CT) using breast CT-derived phantoms and compare to estimations using cylindrical phantoms. Methods: Segmented breast CT (bCT) volume data sets (N=219) were used to measure effective diameter profiles and were grouped into quintiles by volume. The profiles were averaged within each quintile to represent the range of breast sizes found clinically. These profiles were then used to generate five voxelized computational phantoms (V1, V2, V3, V4, V5 for the small to large phantom sizes, respectively), and loaded into the MCNP6 lattice geometry to simulate normalized mean glandular dose coefficients (DgN-CT) using the system specifications of the Doheny-prototype bCT scanner in our laboratory. The DgN-CT coefficients derived from the bCT-derived breast-shaped phantoms were compared to those generated using a simpler cylindrical phantom using a constant volume, and the following constraints: (1) Length=1.5*radius; (2) radius determined at chest wall (Rcw), and (3) radius determined at the phantom center-of-mass (Rcm). Results: The change in Dg-NCT coefficients averaged across all phantom sizes, was - 0.5%, 19.8%, and 1.3%, for constraints 1–3, respectively. This suggests that the cylindrical assumption is a good approximation if the radius is taken at the breast center-of-mass, but using the radius at the chest wall results in an underestimation of the glandular dose. Conclusion: The DgN-CT coefficients for bCT-derived phantoms were compared against the assumption of a cylindrical phantom and proved to be essentially equivalent when the cylinder radius was set to r=1.5/L or Rcm. While this suggests that for dosimetry applications a patient’s breast can be approximated as a cylinder (if the correct radius is applied), this assumes a homogenous composition of breast tissue and the results may be different if the realistic heterogeneous distribution of glandular tissue is considered

  5. Normal width of the anterior commissure of true vocal cord in Korea adults measured by helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woo Young; Lim, Dong Hoon; Moon, Jang Il; Ko, Yong Seok; Byeon, Joo Nam; Oh, Jae Hee

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the mean width of anterior commissure of true vocal cord in Korean adults by measuring its dimension on spiral CT scans. We reviewed the CT scans of 53 Korean adults(age range, 23-73years; mean age 39.2 years;M:F=3D41:12) without laryngeal disorders. Soiral CT scanning was performed around the anterior commissure with 1mm slice thickness and table incrementation for 15 seconds. The anteroposterior width of the anterior commissure was measured on CT scan where the true vocal cord and arytenoid, cricoid and thyroid cartilages were all present. We determined the mean width of the anterior commissure and whether there was a relationship between age and the width of the anterior commissure. The width of the anterior commissure was between 0.9mm and 2.3mm;mean width was 1.60±0.38mm(mean±SD). Using two SDs above the mean would have defined 2.36mm as the upper limit of normal width. Statistically, no significant correlation existed between the age and the width of the anterior commissure(p>0.05). An awareuess of the normal width range of the anterior commissure in Korean adults evaluated by spiral CT enhances the possibility of early detection of invasion of the anterior commissure by glottic cancer.=20

  6. Normal uptake of F-18 FDG in the testis as assessed by PET/CT in a pediatric study population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethals, I.; Vriendt, C.D.; Hoste, P.; Smeets, P.; Ham, H.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between the F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the normal testis as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET)-CT and patient age in a pediatric study population. The study population consisted of 22 subjects aged between 9 and 17 years. For these subjects 42 PET-CT scans were available for analysis. The testis was identified on the CT images. Mean standard uptake values and testicular volume were calculated based on manually drawn regions-of-interest over the organ. The correlation between mean standardized uptake value (SUV) and age as well as between testicular volume and age was calculated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. A strong and statistically significant positive correlation between F-18 FDG uptake in the testis and age was documented. The correlation coefficient was 0.406 in the analysis based on 42 PET-CT studies (p=0.005). The correlation between tracer uptake and age was reassessed based on 22 PET-CT studies including the last recorded PET-CT scan per patient. The correlation coefficient was 0.409 (p=0.05). In addition, based on 22 PET-CT scans, a strong and statistically significant positive correlation between testicular volume and age was documented (r=0.67, p<0.001). Whereas it was previously shown that in adult men there was a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between F-18 FDG uptake in the normal testis and age, we found a strong and statistically significant positive correlation in children and teenage boys. (author)

  7. Computation of thyroid doses and carcinogenic radiation risks to patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; Spampinato, M. V.; Tipnis, S. V.; Magill, D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how differences in patient anatomy and CT technical factors in neck CT impact on thyroid doses and the corresponding carcinogenic risks. The CTDI vol and dose-length product used in 11 consecutive neck CT studies, as well as data on automatic exposure control (AEC) tube current variation(s) from the image DICOM header, were recorded. For each CT image that included the thyroid, the mass equivalent water cylinder was estimated based on the patient cross-sectional area and average relative attenuation coefficient (Hounsfield unit, HU). Patient thyroid doses were estimated by accounting for radiation intensity at the location of the patient's thyroid, patient size and the scan length. Thyroid doses were used to estimate thyroid cancer risks as a function of patient demographics using risk factors in BEIR VII. The length of the thyroid glands ranged from 21 to 54 mm with an average length of 42±12 mm. Water cylinder diameters corresponding to the central slice through the patient thyroid ranged from 18 to 32 cm with a mean of 25±5 cm. The average CTDI vol (32-cm phantom) used to perform these scans was 26±6 mGy, but the use of an AEC increased the tube current by an average of 44 % at the thyroid mid-point. Thyroid doses ranged from 29 to 80 mGy, with an average of 55±19 mGy. A 20-y-old female receiving the highest thyroid dose of 80 mGy would have a thyroid cancer risk of nearly 0.1 %, but radiation risks decreased very rapidly with increasing patient age. The key factors that affect thyroid doses in neck CT examinations are the radiation intensity at the thyroid location and the size of the patient. The corresponding patient thyroid cancer risk is markedly influenced by patient sex and age. (authors)

  8. Doses in pediatric patients undergoing chest and abdomen CT examinations. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jornada, Tiago S.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive method of image production that imparts significant doses to a patient, it is expected that pediatric CT examinations will increase the risk of induced cancer in children. In this study the effective doses in a five year-old child submitted to chest or abdomen CT scans were assessed for comparison purposes. The CTEXPO computed program was used with data from routine protocols of a 0 to 13 year-old children in two public hospitals in Belo Horizonte. Hospital A used a Siemens Dual-Slice unit with 80 kV, 41 mA and pitch 2 for chest or abdomen; hospital B used a Multislice GE unit with 120 kV, 45 mA and pitch 1 for chest and 120 kV, 55 mA. and pitch 1 for abdomen. Results of effective doses in a five year-old child were 1.7 and 1.0 mSv in hospital A and 9.1 and 7.2 mSv in hospital B, for chest and abdomen, respectively. Results were compared to the reference effective doses of 7.2 and 5.0 mSv for chest and abdomen respectively that were derived from the air kerma length product values given in ICRP publication 87. Results of hospital A showed that low dose exposures also can be achieved in CT scans of children. Results showed that even a hospital with a modern facility (hospital B) can provided doses higher than reference values if protocols are not adjusted for children. Preliminary results suggested that there is a room for optimizing children exposure submitted to CT scans. (author)

  9. Examination of hepatic dynamic CT images following infusion of high-concentration contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeyama, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Takaki; Kinebuchi, Yuko; Kitahara, Tadashi; Ohbuchi, Masao; Shinjyo, Hidenori; Ohgiya, Yoshimitsu

    2008-01-01

    There are scarce examinations on the integrated effects of given iodine weight (mgI) and its rate (mgI/sec) on the quality and diagnostic accuracy in the hepatic contrast CT imaging while the former is known to affect the image of parenchyma and the latter, of arterial systems. The purpose of this study is to analyze and evaluate the effects qualitatively and quantitatively in hepatic dynamic CT images of patients with moderate body weight in whom different concentrations of I are given at the same flux rate and total weight. Patients having chronic hepatitis suspicious of carcinoma, or cirrhosis were 52-84 years old (M 50/F 55, b. wt. 50-65 kg) and were randomly divided in A and B group. A group received infusion of 25 sec in the right elbow vein of iopamidol, 300 mgI/100 mL, and B group, 370 mgI/80 mL: the I flux of ca. 1.2 gI/sec and total I of ca. 30 gI. Before and at 25 (early arterial phase), 40 (late art. phase), 70 (portal vein) and 180 (equilibrium) sec after infusion, CT images were obtained with the machine Light Speed select (GE Healthcare), Housfield Units before and after enhancing were used for quantitative evaluation, three experts qualitatively read images, and PACS system in Synapse 3.1.0 (Fuji Film Med.) was used for observation of tumor nodules if present. Neither qualitative nor quantitative differences were found in these CT images of the 4 phases and use of high-concentration contrast media was confirmed to be possible for lowered infusion rate. Authors also pointed out the importance of care for radiation exposure in this CT technique. (R.T.)

  10. Effects of Propranolol on the Left Ventricular Volume of Normal Subjects During CT Coronary Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, Yuan Heng; Jaw, Fu Shan; Wang, Yung Cheng; Jeng, Chin Ming; Peng, Shinn Forng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of propranolol on the left ventricular (LV) volume during CT coronary angiography. The LV volume of 252 normal Chinese subjects (126 subjects with propranolol medication and 126 age- and gender-matched Chinese subjects without medication) was estimated using 64 slices multi-detector CT (MDCT). The heart rate difference was analyzed by the logistic linear regression model with variables that included gender, age, body height, body weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the dosage of propranolol. The following global LV functional parameters were calculated: the real-end diastolic volume (EDV), the real-end systolic volume (ESV) and the real-ejection fraction (EF). The female subjects had a greater decrease of heart rate after taking propranolol. The difference of heart rate was negatively correlated with the dosage of propranolol. The real-EDV, the real-ESV and the real-EF ranged from 48.1 to 109 mL/m2, 6.1 to 57.1 mL/m2 and 41% to 88%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the SBP and DBP between the groups without and with propranolol medication (123 ± 17 and 80 ± 10 mmHg; 120 ± 14 and 80 ± 11 mmHg, respectively). The real-EDV showed no significant difference between these two groups, but the real-ESV and real-EF showed significant differences between these two groups (69.4 ± 9.3 and 70.6 ± 8.9 mL/m2; 23.5 ± 5.7 and 25.6 ± 3.7 mL/m2, 66.5 ± 5.1% and 63.5 ± 4.6%, respectively). The difference of heart rate is significantly influenced by gender and the dosage of propranolol. Propranolol will also increase the ESV, which contributes to a decreased EF, while the SBP, DBP and EDV are not statistically changed.

  11. MR-urography and CT-urography: principles, examination techniques, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Adam, G.; Staatz, G.; Wildberger, J.

    2003-01-01

    MR-urography (MRU) and CT-urography (CTU) provide refined imaging of the upper urinary tract not achievable with conventional intravenous urography (IVU). The traditional MR-urographic technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T 2 -weighted turbo spin-echo sequences for obtaining static fluid images of the urinary tract independent of the excretory renal function. T 2 -weighted MR-urograms have proved to be excellent in visualizing the dilated urinary tract, even in non-excreting kidneys. In contrast, T 1 -weighted MRU reflects the excretory renal function and displays the urine flow through the upper tract after renal excretion of an intravenously administered gadolinium chelate. The gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized with fast T 1 -weighted 3D-gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of gadolinium in the collecting system and for avoiding susceptibility artifacts (T 2 *-effects) in the urine. T 1 -weighted excretory MRU provides impressive urograms of both non-dilated and obstructed collecting systems in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. Multislice-CT-urography (MS-CTU) is also an excretory urography like T 1 -weighted MRU. Furthermore, MS-CTU can be combined with low-dose furosemide for accelerated passage of excreted contrast material obviating the need for abdominal compression. CT-urography is limited by its radiation burden and the nephrotoxicity of radiographic contrast media. Combining MRU or MS-CTU with conventional MRI or CT offers several applications, e.g., diagnosis of intrinsic and extrinsic tumors. Meanwhile, MRU has replaced IVU in pediatric uroradiology and is also recommended for the assessment of renal transplants. MS-CTU may provide valuable information in chronic urolithiasis, especially if associated with a distorted urinary tract anatomy. Both MRU and MS-CTU will play an important role in modern uroradiology. (orig

  12. Measurements of the ionising radiation level at a nuclear medicine facility performing PET/CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulik, P.; Kowalska, M.; Golnik, N.; Budzynska, A.; Dziuk, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radiation level measurements at workplaces in a nuclear medicine facility performing PET/ CT examinations. This study meticulously determines the staff radiation exposure in a PET/CT facility by tracking the path of patient movement. The measurements of the instantaneous radiation exposure were performed using an electronic radiometer with a proportional counter that was equipped with the option of recording the results on line. The measurements allowed for visualisation of the staff's instantaneous exposure caused by a patient walking through the department after the administration of "1"8F-FDG. An estimation of low doses associated with each working step and the exposure during a routine day in the department was possible. The measurements were completed by determining the average radiation level using highly sensitive thermoluminescent detectors. (authors)

  13. Impact of PET/CT image reconstruction methods and liver uptake normalization strategies on quantitative image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnert, Georg; Sterzer, Sergej; Kahraman, Deniz; Dietlein, Markus; Drzezga, Alexander; Kobe, Carsten [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Boellaard, Ronald [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Scheffler, Matthias; Wolf, Juergen [University Hospital of Cologne, Lung Cancer Group Cologne, Department I of Internal Medicine, Center for Integrated Oncology Cologne Bonn, Cologne (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    In oncological imaging using PET/CT, the standardized uptake value has become the most common parameter used to measure tracer accumulation. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate ultra high definition (UHD) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) PET/CT reconstructions for their potential impact on quantification. We analyzed 40 PET/CT scans of lung cancer patients who had undergone PET/CT. Standardized uptake values corrected for body weight (SUV) and lean body mass (SUL) were determined in the single hottest lesion in the lung and normalized to the liver for UHD and OSEM reconstruction. Quantitative uptake values and their normalized ratios for the two reconstruction settings were compared using the Wilcoxon test. The distribution of quantitative uptake values and their ratios in relation to the reconstruction method used were demonstrated in the form of frequency distribution curves, box-plots and scatter plots. The agreement between OSEM and UHD reconstructions was assessed through Bland-Altman analysis. A significant difference was observed after OSEM and UHD reconstruction for SUV and SUL data tested (p < 0.0005 in all cases). The mean values of the ratios after OSEM and UHD reconstruction showed equally significant differences (p < 0.0005 in all cases). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the SUV and SUL and their normalized values were, on average, up to 60 % higher after UHD reconstruction as compared to OSEM reconstruction. OSEM and HD reconstruction brought a significant difference for SUV and SUL, which remained constantly high after normalization to the liver, indicating that standardization of reconstruction and the use of comparable SUV measurements are crucial when using PET/CT. (orig.)

  14. Doses from pediatric CT examinations in Norway: are pediatric scan protocols developed and in daily use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friberg, Eva G.

    2008-01-01

    Doses to pediatric patients from CT examinations are known to be unnecessarily high if scan protocols developed for adult patients are adopted. This overexposure is most often not recognized by the operating radiographer, due to the digital behavior of the imaging system. Use of optimized size-specific pediatric scan protocols is therefore essential to keep the doses at an appropriate level. The aim of this study was to investigate the doses to pediatric patients from CT examinations and to evaluate the level of optimization of the scan protocols. Patient data, applied scan parameters together with the dose parameters volume computed tomography dose index (CTD vol ) and dose length product (DLP) for examinations of the head, chest and abdomen were collected by means of a questionnaire from five university hospitals. The effective dose was estimated from the total DLP by use of region-specific conversion coefficients (E DLP ). Totally 136, 108 and 82 questionnaires were received for examinations of the head, chest and abdomen, respectively. Large variations in patient doses between the hospitals were observed, addressing the need for optimization of the scan protocols in general. Most of the hospitals applied successive lower mAs with decreasing patient age for all scan areas, while the use of lower tube voltage for small patients and a higher tube voltage for large patients were more rarely. This indicates the presence, to a certain level, of size specific scan protocols at some Norwegian hospitals. Focus on developing size-specific scan protocols for pediatric patients are important to reduce the doses and risks associated with pediatric CT examinations. (author)

  15. Estimation of patient dose in abdominal CT examination in some Sudanese hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Ebthal Adam Shikhalden

    2016-04-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. The aim of this study was to estimate radiation doses in abdomen CT examinations of patients in two Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 80 CT examinations and included all age groups ( adults and pediatric). The results from the two hospitals were compared with each other as well as with the IAEA guidance level for this particular investigation. The estimation of radiation doses were carried out by calculating volume dose index (CTD1vol), dose length product (DLP), doses to some organs of interest and effective dose (E) using the software program "CT EXPO V2.1". The study showed that the mean DLP of the one hospitals ASH is 1736.7 mGy.cm which is by far much higher than that for the other hospital NMDC which stands at 185.3 mGy.cm, as well as higher than the IAEA level which is 696 mGy.cm. The study showed that the mean CTD1vol for patients in ASH is 36.2 mGy which again higher than that for the other hospital which is 3.9 mGy and higher than the IAEA level which is 10.9 mGy calculating the effective dose for patients in the two hospitals reveals that the mean effective dose of patient in one hospital (ASH) is 26.25 mSv, which is quite high compared with other hospital (NMDC), which has the mean value of 2.8 mGv and also higher than the IAEA level from this investigation which is 7.6 mSv. Regarding organ doses, the study showed that organ doses in hospital ASH are always higher than that calculated in hospital NMDC and the highest doses in both hospital were delivered to the kidneys with mean values of 50.24 mGy and 5045 mGy for the two hospitals respectively. The study showed that there is an urgent need for optimizing patient doses in such CT examinations. This can be ensured by providing training and retraining for workers and conducting quality control measurements and preventive maintenance regularly so

  16. Normal measurement of spinal cord and dural sac by CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ku Sub; Choi, Yo Won; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun

    1988-01-01

    The data on the normal measurement of spinal cord are essential for an objective assessment of equivocal change of spinal cord size in the various clinical settings. The present study was therefore undertaken to evaluate normal range of spinal cord dimensions in Koreas. CT myelography of the cervical and thoracic region was performed in 60 patients who had symptoms referable to lumbosacral region and then computed tomographic measurement of spinal cord and dural sac was performed. The results are as follows: 1. The anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord was maximum at C1 level (8.6±1.4mm) and minimum at T6 level (6.4±1.7mm). 2. The transverse diameter of spinal cord was maximum at C4 and C5 levels (13.3±1.6mm) and minimum at T8 (8.1±1.9mm) and T10 (8.1±1.3mm) levels. 3. The area of spinal cord was maximum at C5 level (76±16mm 2 ) and minimum at T6 (40±24mm 2 ) and T8 (40±23mm 2 ) levels. 4. The ratio of anteroposterior diameter/transverse diameter of spinal cord was smallest at C4 (0.57±0.11) and C5 (0.57±0.09) levels and largest at T12 (0.9±0.17) level. 5. The ratio of anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord/dural sac was maximum at C4 level (0.73±0.14) and minimum at T12 level (0.52±0.15). The ratio of transverse diameter of spinal cord/dural sac was maximum at C3 (0.66±0.10) and C4 (0.66±0.14) levels and minimum at T12 level (0.46±0.18). The ratio of area of spinal cord/dural sac was maximum at C3 level (0.48±0.13) and minimum at T12 level (0.29±0.20). 6. The location of cervical cord in dural sac was mainly ventral (56%) at C1 level, middle (40-73%) from C2 to C6 level and dorsal (44%) at C7 level. The location of thoracic cord in dural sac was chiefly middle (61%) at T2 level and lower thoracic level (T10: 60% and T12: 51%) and mainly ventral (59-84%) at other levels.

  17. Dose estimation of patients in CT examinations using EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation of voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.; Saito, K.

    2002-01-01

    A voxel phantom based on CT images of one Japanese male have developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Dose calculations of patients in X-ray CT examinations were performed using the voxel phantom and EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation code. The organ doses of the patients were estimated

  18. Dose estimation of patients in CT examinations using EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation of voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T. [Oita Univ., of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita-Ken (Japan); Saito, K. [JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A voxel phantom based on CT images of one Japanese male have developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Dose calculations of patients in X-ray CT examinations were performed using the voxel phantom and EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation code. The organ doses of the patients were estimated.

  19. The use of CT-scanning at the medicolegal external postmortem examination and at the forensic autopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Can CT-scanning of deceased at the medico legal external examination improve the selection of cases to autopsy? Is CT-scanning a substitute or a supplement to the traditional forensic autopsy? Material: In 2006 60 deceased individuals from Southern Denmark (counties of Fyn and Sønde...

  20. Tomography methods for diagnostic examination of cerebrovascular disease: a comparative evaluation of SPECT, PET and MR/CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, W.; Kaiser, H.J.; Weiller, C.; Altehoefer, C.; Buell, U.; Isensee, C.

    1991-01-01

    Single Photon Emissions Computerized Tomography (SPECT), Positron Emissions Tomography (PET), Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MR), and Transmission Computerized Tomography (CT) complement each other and lead to a consideration of the cerebrovascular disease under patho-physiological aspects. Indications for the combined application of functionally oriented (SPECT/PET) and morphologically oriented (CT/MR) examination methods with cerebrovascular disease are presented. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Estimation of effective dose from limited cone beam X-ray CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazuo; Arai, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Koji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry; Nishizawa, Kanae

    2000-12-01

    The limited cone beam X-ray CT (Ortho-CT) was developed on the basis of multi-functional panoramic apparatus, SCANORA (Soredex Co. Helsinki Finland). The imaging intensifier (I.I.) was built in this apparatus as a X-ray detection device instead of X-ray film. The signal provided from I.I. was converted from analog into digital by an analog-digital converter and image reconstitution was done as a three-directional image of the dimensions 3.8 cm of width, 3.0 cm height and 3.8 cm depth with the personal computer. The 3DX Multi image micro CT'' (3DX) was developed along similar lines by MORITA Co., Ltd. (Kyoto, JAPAN). In this study, the stochastic effect on organ and tissue caused by examinations using Ortho-CT and 3DX was measured. The effective dose was estimated according to the recommendation of ICRP60 and was compared with those of panoramic radiography and computed tomography. The irradiation conditions were as follows: 85 kV, 10 mA with the filtration of 3 mmAl and added 1 mmCu for Ortho-CT, and 80 kV, 2 mA and the filtration of 3.1 mmAL for 3DX. The measurement of organ and tissue dose was performed using an anthropomorphic Rando woman phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Co., Stanfora, CN), as well as by using two different type of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD); Panasonic UD-170A (BeO) and UD-110S (CaSO{sub 4}: Tm). The UD-170A was for dose measurement of the inner useful X-ray beams, while the UD-110S was for outer beams. The measured organ and tissue were those recommended with ICRP60 (gonad, breast, bone marrow, lung, thyroid gland, esophagus, stomach, colon, liver, bladder, skin, brain, thymus, adrenal, kidney, spleen, pancrease, upper large intestine, uterus, eyes and major salivary gland). The imaging by Orhto-CT was made in the left maxillary 1st molar, left mandibular 1st molar and temporomandibular joint. 3DX measurement was made in the maxillary incisor region and middle ear regions other than the regions mentioned above. The skin

  2. Optimizing US examination to detect the normal and abnormal appendix in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peletti, Adriana B.; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2006-01-01

    US detection of a normal appendix can safely rule out appendicitis. However, there is a wide range of accuracy in detection of a normal appendix. To optimize US examination to detect the normal and the abnormal appendix according to the potential positions of the appendix. This prospective study included 107 children who underwent gray-scale US scanning. Noncompressive and compressive graded sonography was performed to detect normal and abnormal appendices according to their potential positions. The maximum transverse diameter of the appendices was measured. Of the 107 children examined, 56 had a histologic diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Sonography had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 98% for the diagnosis of appendicitis. A normal appendix was visualized in 44 (86.2%) of the 51 patients without acute appendicitis, and of these 44, 43 were true-negative and 1 was false-positive. Normal and abnormal appendices, respectively, were positioned as follows: 54.4% and 39.3% were mid-pelvic; 27.2% and 28.6% were retrocecal; 11.4% and 17.8% were deep pelvic; and 6.8% and 14.3% were abdominal. US scanning according to the potential positions of the appendix was useful in the detection of normal appendices in children suspected of having appendicitis. (orig.)

  3. Estimation of patient dose in 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FDOPA PET/CT examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To estimate specific organ and effective doses to patients resulting from the 18 F-FDG ( 18 F-2-deoxy-D-glucose and 18 F-FDOPA (6-fluoro-( 18 F-L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine PET/CT examinations for whole body and brain. Materials and Methods: Three protocols for whole body and three for brain PET/CT were used. The CTDI values were measured using standard head and body CT phantoms and also computed using a software CT-Expo for dose evaluation from the CT component. OLINDA software based on MIRD method was used for estimating doses from the PET component of the PET/CT examination. Results: The organ doses from 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FDOPA whole body and brain PET/CT studies were estimated. The total effective dose from a typical protocol of whole body PET/CT examination was 14.4 mSv for females and 11.8 mSv for male patients from 18 F-FDG, whereas it was 11 mSv for female and 9.1 mSv for male patients from 18 F-FDOPA. The total effective doses from a typical protocol for PET/CT studies of brain was 6.5 mSv for females and 5.1 mSv for males from 18 F-FDG whereas it was 3.7 mSv for females and 2.8 mSv for males from 18 F-FDOPA. Conclusions: The effective radiation doses from whole body PET/CT examination was approximately 4-8 times higher than the background radiation dose from both 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FDOPA scans, while it was 1-3 times the background radiation dose from PET/CT scans of brain.

  4. Dose assessment of head CT examination by volume scanning with 320-area-detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2009-01-01

    CT with the 320-area-detector (320-ADCT), first presented in 2007, still requires further basic studies, particularly in the field of dose assessment, as the CT has been widely spread in clinic due to its many advantages compared with the usual spiral CT. In this paper, the assessment in the title was thereby done in human phantom and a patient with suspicious acute cerebral infarction under different scanning modes (non-spiral, spiral and volume) for their comparison. Machines for 320-ADCT, and non-spiral and spiral CT were Toshiba Aquilion ONE, and Aquilion 64-MD, respectively. Scanning of the phantom and patient was individually conducted under similar conditions of tube voltage/ current, rotation time and length with the same field of view with defined nominal slice thicknesses. Alderson human body phantom in which 240 thermoluminescent dosimeters were indwelled, was used; doses were read by the thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) reader model 3000 (Kyokko Co.) after scanning; and effective doses were calculated with reference to ICRP publ. 102/103 equations for patient's head to be 4.2 (64-MDCT) and 6.6 (320-ADCT) mSv, which were respectively 6.4 and 5.4 mSv when estimated using the conversion coefficient and DLP (dose length product) in the texts. It was suggested that the exposure dose at the volume scanning by 320-ADCT can be reduced in the routine examination, and in the exact diagnosis, possibly increases. These doses can be reduced further by optimization of scanning conditions by additional basic investigations. (K.T.)

  5. Basic examination of in-plane spatial resolution in multi-slice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Takanori; Kato, Hideki; Akiyama, Mitsutoshi; Murata, Katsutoshi

    2002-01-01

    In computed tomography (single-slice spiral CT, conventional CT), in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution is consistently identified as depending on the detector density of the in-plane (x-y plane). However, we considered that the in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution of multi-slice CT (MSCT) was influenced by an error in the detector's sensitivity to the Z-axis and by the frequency of use of direct row data and complementary row data when the image of spiral pitches (SP) was reconstructed. Our goal in this experiment was to analyze the relationship of the in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution of an asymmetric-type detector in MSCT to SP, tube current, and rotation time. By employing a tungsten wire phantom of 0.2 mm in diameter, we examined modulation transfer functions (MTF) by point-spread functions (PSF) of CT-images. Next, using the mean-square-root bandwidth theory, we analyzed the MTF of wire phantoms. The analysis of in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution revealed that various tube currents had no effect on the value of the mean-square-root bandwidth. However, rotation time and high spiral pitch did have an effect on mean-square-root bandwidth. Considering the results mentioned above, spiral pitch (z-axis reconstruction algorithm) had a slight effect on in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution of asymmetric-type detectors in MSCT. Accordingly, we proposed a new general view of VDDz (view/mm) in MSCT that considered view data density on the Z-axis according to spiral pitch (mm/rotation), rotation time (view/rotation), and slice collimation. (author)

  6. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  7. Sensation of smell and taste during intravenous injection of iodinated contrast media in CT examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Naoto; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Nagasawa, Naoki; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Suto, Takayuki; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the incidence and types of sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of five kinds of contrast media (CM) in CT examinations. Methods: 735 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) between 14 March 2016 and 5 April 2016 were enrolled. Medical staff asked patients whether they felt heat sensation and sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of CM (one of the following: iopromide, iomeprol, iopamidol, iohexol and ioversol) after their CE-CT. If the patients stated having felt the sensation of smell or taste, they were also asked what kind of smell or taste they sensed. Next, 30 ml of each CM was poured into high-purity pet cups for radiological technologists to smell directly. Radiological technologists were asked whether or not each CM had any smell. Results: The sensations of smell and taste incidence for iopromide were 24.3% and 18.9%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those for other CM (p < 0.05). The highest incidence of the sensation of smell was medicine-ish, and the most frequently noted taste was bitterness. All radiological technologists could directly smell only iopromide, which has an ether group on a side chain and fewer hydroxyl groups. Conclusion: Iopromide showed a higher incidence of sensation of smell and taste than other CM. Advances in knowledge: This was the first investigation of sensation of smell and taste during i.v. injection of CM, and a specific CM showed a higher incidence, which is suspected to be due to its chemical structure. PMID:27805431

  8. Time evolution of regional CT density changes in normal lung after IMRT for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Bentzen, Søren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the clinical radiobiology of radiation induced lung disease in terms of regional computed tomography (CT) density changes following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 387 follow-up CT scans in 131 NSCLC patients receiving IMRT to a prescribed dose of 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. The dose-dependent temporal evolution of the density change was analyzed using a two-component model, a superposition of an early, transient component and a late, persistent component. Results: The CT density of healthy lung tissue was observed to increase significantly (p 12 months. Conclusions: The radiobiology of lung injury may be analyzed in terms of CT density change. The initial transient change in density is consistent with radiation pneumonitis, while the subsequent stabilization of the density is consistent with pulmonary fibrosis

  9. Results of a questionnaire survey on window setting and FOV on CT images of examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzui, Maya; Asano, Kazushige; Goto, Takahiro; Sekitani, Toshinori; Tsujioka, Katsumi; Kawaguchi, Daisuke; Narumi, Tatsuki

    2008-01-01

    The use of CT as a general examination has spread widely and is even used in small institutions. However, it is difficult to determine the current situation of each institution. Therefore, we employed a questionnaire to investigate the current situation of a variety of institutions. From the results of the questionnaire, we determined that the window setting was difficult for beginner technologists. In addition, in many institutions, radiological technologists did not always use the same display field of view (FOV) for the same patient. From this questionnaire, we were able to determine the present conditions in each institution. We consider these results very useful. (author)

  10. Osteometrical and CT examination of the Japanese wolf [Canis hodophilax] skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, H.; Obara, I.; Yoshida, T.; Kurohmaru, M.; Hayshi, Y.; Suzuki, N.

    1997-01-01

    The skulls of Japanese wolf (Canis hodophilax) were osteometrically examined and compared with those of Akita-Inu. The skull total length was not statistically different between two species. However, significant differences were demonstrated between two species in some ratios concerning the frontal bone. CT examination was carried out in the Japanese wolf skull. The data indicated that the frontal sinus is not be largely developed and compressed in the dorso-ventral direction in parasagittal area. The narrow frontal sinus fitted to external shape of the frontal bone. The cribriform plate had a well-developed complicated structure in a caudal part of the ethmoid bone. These data will be useful to examine the respiratory function and the olfactory sense in the Japanese wolf

  11. The Normal Value of Tibial Tubercle Trochlear Groove Distance in Patients With Normal Knee Examinations Using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sobhanardekani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Patellar instability is a multifactorial common knee pathology that has a high recurrence rate, and the symptoms continue and ultimately predispose the patient to chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. Tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (TTTG is very important in the assessment of patellofemoral joint instability. The purpose of this study was to report the normal value of TTTG in males and females in different age groups and to assess the reliability of MRI in measuring TTTG. All patients presenting with knee pain and normal examinations of the knee joint, with a normal MRI report, referring to Shahid Sadoughi hospital of Yazd, Iran, from April 2014 to September 2014, were included in the study. MR images were studied once by two radiologists and for the second time by one radiologist. Mean value of TTTG was reported for males and females and in three age groups. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was calculated. A total of 98 patients were eligible to evaluate during 6 months (68 male and 30 female. Mean TTTG was 10.9±2.5 mm in total, which was 10.8±2.8 mm and 11.3±2.3 mm in males and females, respectively (P>0.05. Mean TTTG in males ≤30 years, 30-50 years and, ≥51-year-old were 10.8±2.6 mm, 10.8±2.7 mm, and 10.8±2.6 mm, respectively; that was 12.1±3.4 mm, 11.4±1.9 mm, and 10.5±1.7 mm in females ≤30 years, 31-50 years and, ≥51-year-old, respectively (95% CI. The coefficient of variation was <10% for both intra- and interobserver analysis. The results of the present study showed no significant difference in TTTG value between males and females in different age groups. In addition, it demonstrated that MRI is a reliable method in assessment of TTTG and identified normal value for TTTG at 10.9±2.5 mm.

  12. An assessment of the dose received by children from CT examinations along with the quality control parameters from a conventional CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghyani, T.; Hashemi Malayeri, B.; Hashemi, H.; Sharafi, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    In 2000, the UNSCEAR reported that CT constitutes 5% of all the medical x-ray examinations and it contributes 34% of the resultant collective dose worldwide. Children are more sensitive to the ionizing radiations than adults. So, routine quality control tests are expected to be carried out periodically on the CT scanners. The aim of this research was to estimate the effective doses received by the children below two years of age from routine CT examinations carried out at an educational imaging center in Tehran. It was also aimed to evaluate the quality control parameters of the mentioned CT scanner at the same time. Materials and Methods: In this study, the Computed Tomography Dose Index were measured at the central axis of the CT gantry in air and in the standard quality control phantoms of the head and body (as recommended by the FDA) using a pencil ionization chamber and LiF TLD pellets for a single scan. By using the measured Computed Tomography Dose Index values and the IrnPACT software, the effective doses were calculated for every routine CT examination protocol. In this study, the quality control parameters such as noise, CT number calibration, high and low contrast resolution and the flatness of the CT image were also evaluated. These parameters were also measured using standard procedures and test objects. Results: The effective dose estimated in this research ranged from 2.05 to 21.45 and 2.05 to 15.7 mSv for the female and male children, respectively. The measured values of the Computed Tomography Dose Index in the standard head and body phantoms were 20.6) 2.01 and 11.13 f 1.04 mGy1100 mAs, respectively. The high and low contrast resolution was estimated to be 0.8 mm and 1.0 rnm, respectively. Conclusion: The estimated values of the effective doses in this research were less than the values reported for the Netherlands, the USA, Germany and were comparable with the values reported in the UK. The measured Computed Tomography Dose Index values were 11

  13. Does iterative reconstruction lower CT radiation dose: evaluation of 15,000 examinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B Noël

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluation of 15,000 computed tomography (CT examinations to investigate if iterative reconstruction (IR reduces sustainably radiation exposure. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Information from 15,000 CT examinations was collected, including all aspects of the exams such as scan parameter, patient information, and reconstruction instructions. The examinations were acquired between January 2010 and December 2012, while after 15 months a first generation IR algorithm was installed. To collect the necessary information from PACS, RIS, MPPS and structured reports a Dose Monitoring System was developed. To harvest all possible information an optical character recognition system was integrated, for example to collect information from the screenshot CT-dose report. The tool transfers all data to a database for further processing such as the calculation of effective dose and organ doses. To evaluate if IR provides a sustainable dose reduction, the effective dose values were statistically analyzed with respect to protocol type, diagnostic indication, and patient population. RESULTS: IR has the potential to reduce radiation dose significantly. Before clinical introduction of IR the average effective dose was 10.1±7.8mSv and with IR 8.9±7.1mSv (p*=0.01. Especially in CTA, with the possibility to use kV reduction protocols, such as in aortic CTAs (before IR: average14.2±7.8mSv; median11.4mSv /with IR:average9.9±7.4mSv; median7.4mSv, or pulmonary CTAs (before IR: average9.7±6.2mSV; median7.7mSv /with IR: average6.4±4.7mSv; median4.8mSv the dose reduction effect is significant(p*=0.01. On the contrary for unenhanced low-dose scans of the cranial (for example sinuses the reduction is not significant (before IR:average6.6±5.8mSv; median3.9mSv/with IR:average6.0±3.1mSV; median3.2mSv. CONCLUSION: The dose aspect remains a priority in CT research. Iterative reconstruction algorithms reduce sustainably and significantly radiation dose in the clinical routine

  14. Content analysis of physical examination templates in electronic health records using SNOMED CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Chen, Rong; Højen, Anne Randorff; Elberg, Pia

    2014-10-01

    Most electronic health record (EHR) systems are built on proprietary information models and terminology, which makes achieving semantic interoperability a challenge. Solving interoperability problems requires well-defined standards. In contrast, the need to support clinical work practice requires a local customization of EHR systems. Consequently, contrasting goals may be evident in EHR template design because customization means that local EHR organizations can define their own templates, whereas standardization implies consensus at some level. To explore the complexity of balancing these two goals, this study analyzes the differences and similarities between templates in use today. A similarity analysis was developed on the basis of SNOMED CT. The analysis was performed on four physical examination templates from Denmark and Sweden. The semantic relationships in SNOMED CT were used to quantify similarities and differences. Moreover, the analysis used these identified similarities to investigate the common content of a physical examination template. The analysis showed that there were both similarities and differences in physical examination templates, and the size of the templates varied from 18 to 49 fields. In the SNOMED CT analysis, exact matches and terminology similarities were represented in all template pairs. The number of exact matches ranged from 7 to 24. Moreover, the number of unrelated fields differed a lot from 1/18 to 22/35. Cross-country comparisons tended to have more unrelated content than within-country comparisons. On the basis of identified similarities, it was possible to define the common content of a physical examination. Nevertheless, a complete view on the physical examination required the inclusion of both exact matches and terminology similarities. This study revealed that a core set of items representing the physical examination templates can be generated when the analysis takes into account not only exact matches but also terminology

  15. Understanding the scatter radiation distribution during C-arm CT examination. A body phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimasa, Toshiyo; Kakimi, Akihiko; Takao, Yoshinori; Sasaki, Shohei; Katayama, Yutaka; Himoto, Daisuke; Izuta, Shinichiro; Ichida, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the scatter radiation distribution during C-arm CT examination in the interventional radiography (IVR) room to show the escaped area and the radiation protective method. The C-arm rotates 200deg in 5 s. The tube voltage was 90 kV, and the entrance dose to the detector was 0.36 μGy/frame during C-arm CT examination. The scattered doses were measured each 50 cm from the isocenter like a grid pattern. The heights of the measurement were 50, 100, and 150 cm from the floor. The maximum scattered doses were 38.23 ± 0.60 μGy at 50 cm, 43.86 ± 20 μGy at 100 cm, and 25.78 ± 0.37 μGy at 150 cm. The scatter radiation distribution at 100 cm was the highest scattered dose. The operator should protect their reproductive gland, thyroid, and lens. The scattered dose was low behind the C-arm body and the bed, so they will be able to become the escaped area for staff. (author)

  16. Comparative study of colorectal carcinoma examination with four postprocessing of CT colonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyue, Luo; Kangrong, Zhou [The 3rd Affilated Hospital Sun Yat-sen Univ. of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-10-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of colorectal carcinoma examination by comparison of different postprocessing techniques such as multiplanar reformation (MPR), CT virtual colonoscopy (CTVC), shaded surface display (SSD) and Raysum. Methods: 64 patients with colorectal carcinomas underwent volume scanning using spiral CT. MPR, CTVC, SSD and Raysum images were obtained by using 4 different software in workstation. All cases were proved by surgical or CC biotic histology. The results were compared and analyzed according to the circumferential extension, length and pathologic patterns of colorectal carcinoma with MPR, CTVC, SSD and Raysum. Results: The correction rate of determination the circumferential extension of colorectal carcinoma with MPR, CTVC, SSD and Raysum were 100.0%, 82.8%, 79.7% and 79.7%, respectively. There was significant statistical difference between MPR and CTVC; The accuracy of judging the length of carcinoma were 89.1%, 76.6%, 95.3% and 100.0%, respectively. There was statistical difference between CTVC and SSD; The accuracy of showing carcinoma pathologic patterns were 81.3%, 92.2%, 71.9% and 71.0%, respectively. There was statistical difference between CTVC and SSD, too. MPR could correctly determine the circumferential extension of colorectal carcinoma. In determination the length of carcinoma, Raysum was more accurate than SSD. CTVC could be more helpful in showing carcinoma pathologic patterns. Conclusion: There were advantages and disadvantages in colorectal carcinoma examination with MPR, CTVC, SSD and Raysum, and the combination could display colorectal carcinoma more completely and comprehensively.

  17. Comparative study of colorectal carcinoma examination with four postprocessing of CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Mingyue; Zhou Kangrong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of colorectal carcinoma examination by comparison of different postprocessing techniques such as multiplanar reformation (MPR), CT virtual colonoscopy (CTVC), shaded surface display (SSD) and Raysum. Methods: 64 patients with colorectal carcinomas underwent volume scanning using spiral CT. MPR, CTVC, SSD and Raysum images were obtained by using 4 different software in workstation. All cases were proved by surgical or CC biotic histology. The results were compared and analyzed according to the circumferential extension, length and pathologic patterns of colorectal carcinoma with MPR, CTVC, SSD and Raysum. Results: The correction rate of determination the circumferential extension of colorectal carcinoma with MPR, CTVC, SSD and Raysum were 100.0%, 82.8%, 79.7% and 79.7%, respectively. There was significant statistical difference between MPR and CTVC; The accuracy of judging the length of carcinoma were 89.1%, 76.6%, 95.3% and 100.0%, respectively. There was statistical difference between CTVC and SSD; The accuracy of showing carcinoma pathologic patterns were 81.3%, 92.2%, 71.9% and 71.0%, respectively. There was statistical difference between CTVC and SSD, too. MPR could correctly determine the circumferential extension of colorectal carcinoma. In determination the length of carcinoma, Raysum was more accurate than SSD. CTVC could be more helpful in showing carcinoma pathologic patterns. Conclusion: There were advantages and disadvantages in colorectal carcinoma examination with MPR, CTVC, SSD and Raysum, and the combination could display colorectal carcinoma more completely and comprehensively

  18. Examination of hepatic contrast-enhanced CT monitored by Smart Prep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakizaki, Dai; Saito, Kazuhiro; Sakurada, Toru; Abe, Kimihiko; Suzuki, Kenji

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to obtain the time density curves of the contrast-enhanced CT of hepatic portal vein, hepatic and splenic parenchyma, and to examine the relation with age, body weight, type of liver dysfunction. Subjects were 32 patients with liver tumors or liver diseases. For this purpose, the procedure of hepatic CT was monitored by Smart Prep and the images of whole liver was taken when the level of the contrast at the hepatic portal vein reached to the enhancement threshold. The contrast medium used was Iomeprol 300. The adverse reactions by Iomeprol 300 were mild and any treatment did not need. There was no correlation age and weight with enhancement threshold at the hepatic portal vein and peak time at the splenic parenchyma. The enhancement threshold at the hepatic portal vein was various in patients with chrrhosis and chronic hepatitis, and tended to be delayed in patients with chrrhosis. The peak time of the splenic parenchyma was up to 52 seconds in all patients with chronic hepatitis. The shortage of the enhancement threshold and the increase in blood flow at arterial early phase were observed in the patients with advanced acute hepatitis. This method should be examined more cases with various hepatic diseases. (K.H.)

  19. Evaluation of the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevillano, D.; Espana, M. L.; Castro, P.; Minguez, C.; Albi, G.; Garcia, E.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations when automatic exposure control techniques are used. The influence in the radiation dose and the image quality has been evaluated with and without the breast shield in the scoutview. In addition the radiation dose in shielded and non-shielded areas has been compared. Measurements were made in a 16 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA phantom simulating a newborn, and older children were simulated controlling the maximum intensities allowed by the automatic exposure control system AutomA. The highest dose reduction (59%) was obtained with AutomA system and when the breast shield is not used in the scoutview. This reduction in the radiation dose does not mean a significant increase of noise level. The use of the breast shield in the scoutview yielded an increase in the radiation dose in non-shielded areas. The use of bismuth breast shield is recommended only after the scoutview in order to optimise the radiation dose in CT chest paediatric examination when using automatic exposure control AutomA. (Author)

  20. Visualization of normal and abnormal inner ear with volume rendering technique using multislice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hui; Han Ping; Liang Bo; Lei Ziqiao; Liu Fang; Tian Zhiliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of the volume rendering technique to display the normal and abnormal inner ear structures. Methods: Forty normal earand 61 abnormal inner ears (40 congenital inner ear malformations, 7 labyrinthitis ossificans, and 14 inner ear erosion caused by cholesteatomas) were examined with a MSCT scanner. Axial imaging were performed using the following parameters: 120 kV, 100 mAs, 0.75 mm slice thickness, a pitch factor of 1. The axial images of interested ears were reconstructed with 0.1 mm reconstruction increment and a FOV of 50 mm. The 3D reconstructions were done with volume rendering technique on the workstation. Results: In the subjects without ear disorders a high quality 3D visualization of the inner ear could be achieved. In the patients with inner ear' disorders all inner ear malformations could be clearly displayed on 3D images as follows: (1) Michel deformity (one ear): There was complete absence of all cochlear and vestibular structures. (2) common cavity deformity (3 ears): The cochlea and vestibule were represented by a cystic cavity and couldn't be differentiated from each other. (3)incomplete partition type I (3 ears): The cochlea lacked the entire modiolus and cribriform area, resulting in a cystic appearance. (4) incomplete partition type II (Mondini deformity) (5 ears): The cochlea consisted of 1.5 turns, in which the middle and apical turns coalesced to form a cystic apex. (5) vestibular and semicircular canal malformations (14 ears): Cochlea was normal, vestibule dilated, semicircular canals were absent, hypoplastic or enlarged. (6) dilated vestibular aqueduct (14 ears): The vestibular aqueduct was bell-mouthed. In 7 patients with labyrinthifis ossificans, 3D images failed to clearly show the completeinner ears in 4 ears because of too high ossifications in the membranous labyrinth. In the other 3 ears volume rendering could display the thin cochlea basal turn and the intermittent semicircular canals. In the patients

  1. Tumor and normal tissue motion in the thorax during respiration: Analysis of volumetric and positional variations using 4D CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Elisabeth; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dill, S. Vaughn; Keall, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate temporospatial variations of tumor and normal tissue during respiration in lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients, gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures were manually contoured on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Structures were evaluated for volume changes, centroid (center of mass) motion, and phase dependence of variations relative to inspiration. Only volumetrically complete structures were used for analysis (lung in 2, heart in 8, all other structures in >10 patients). Results: During respiration, the magnitude of contoured volumes varied up to 62.5% for GTVs, 25.5% for lungs, and 12.6% for hearts. The range of maximum three-dimensional centroid movement for individual patients was 1.3-24.0 mm for GTV, 2.4-7.9 mm for heart, 5.2-12.0 mm for lungs, 0.3-5.5 mm for skin markers, 2.9-10.0 mm for trachea, and 6.6-21.7 mm for diaphragm. During respiration, the centroid positions of normal structures varied relative to the centroid position of the respective GTV by 1.5-8.1 mm for heart, 2.9-9.3 mm for lungs, 1.2-9.2 mm for skin markers, 0.9-7.1 mm for trachea, and 2.7-16.4 mm for diaphragm. Conclusion: Using 4D-CT, volumetric changes, positional alterations as well as changes in the position of contoured structures relative to the GTV were observed with large variations between individual patients. Although the interpretation of 4D-CT data has considerable uncertainty because of 4D-CT artifacts, observer variations, and the limited acquisition time, the findings might have a significant impact on treatment planning

  2. Registration-based assessment of regional lung function via volumetric CT images of normal subjects vs. severe asthmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Yin, Youbing; Castro, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the use of image registration-derived variables associated with computed tomographic (CT) imaging of the lung acquired at multiple volumes. As an evaluation of the utility of such an imaging approach, we explored two groups at the extremes of population ranging from normal subjects to severe asthmatics. A mass-preserving image registration technique was employed to match CT images at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC) for assessment of regional air volume change and lung deformation between the two states. Fourteen normal subjects and thirty severe asthmatics were analyzed via image registration-derived metrics together with their pulmonary function test (PFT) and CT-based air-trapping. Relative to the normal group, the severely asthmatic group demonstrated reduced air volume change (consistent with air trapping) and more isotropic deformation in the basal lung regions while demonstrating increased air volume change associated with increased anisotropic deformation in the apical lung regions. These differences were found despite the fact that both PFT-derived TLC and FRC in the two groups were nearly 100% of predicted values. Data suggest that reduced basal-lung air volume change in severe asthmatics was compensated by increased apical-lung air volume change and that relative increase in apical-lung air volume change in severe asthmatics was accompanied by enhanced anisotropic deformation. These data suggest that CT-based deformation, assessed via inspiration vs. expiration scans, provides a tool for distinguishing differences in lung mechanics when applied to the extreme ends of a population range. PMID:23743399

  3. SU-F-R-31: Identification of Robust Normal Lung CT Texture Features for the Prediction of Radiation-Induced Lung Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, W; Riyahi, S; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Normal lung CT texture features have been used for the prediction of radiation-induced lung disease (radiation pneumonitis and radiation fibrosis). For these features to be clinically useful, they need to be relatively invariant (robust) to tumor size and not correlated with normal lung volume. Methods: The free-breathing CTs of 14 lung SBRT patients were studied. Different sizes of GTVs were simulated with spheres placed at the upper lobe and lower lobe respectively in the normal lung (contralateral to tumor). 27 texture features (9 from intensity histogram, 8 from grey-level co-occurrence matrix [GLCM] and 10 from grey-level run-length matrix [GLRM]) were extracted from [normal lung-GTV]. To measure the variability of a feature F, the relative difference D=|Fref -Fsim|/Fref*100% was calculated, where Fref was for the entire normal lung and Fsim was for [normal lung-GTV]. A feature was considered as robust if the largest non-outlier (Q3+1.5*IQR) D was less than 5%, and considered as not correlated with normal lung volume when their Pearson correlation was lower than 0.50. Results: Only 11 features were robust. All first-order intensity-histogram features (mean, max, etc.) were robust, while most higher-order features (skewness, kurtosis, etc.) were unrobust. Only two of the GLCM and four of the GLRM features were robust. Larger GTV resulted greater feature variation, this was particularly true for unrobust features. All robust features were not correlated with normal lung volume while three unrobust features showed high correlation. Excessive variations were observed in two low grey-level run features and were later identified to be from one patient with local lung diseases (atelectasis) in the normal lung. There was no dependence on GTV location. Conclusion: We identified 11 robust normal lung CT texture features that can be further examined for the prediction of radiation-induced lung disease. Interestingly, low grey-level run features identified normal

  4. CT evaluation of acetabular fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piazza, P; Girelli, G; Coran, F; Lutman, M

    1986-01-01

    The paper deals with sixteen cases of acetabular fractures studied with CT. After a short description of the normal CT findings, the different kind of fractures are reported. The usefulness of CT examination in evaluating acetabular fractures and their complications is confirmed both in conservative treatment and surgical approach.

  5. Management of radiation dose to paediatric patients undergoing CT examination at Korle-bu Teaching Hospital, Accra-Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedel, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work management of paediatric patients doses for Computed Tomography examinations have been studied at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. The assessment of the management system involved: evaluation of the frequency of examinations, comparison of techniques factors used for adult and children; estimation of CTDI w , CTDI vol , DLP and effective dose; evaluation of quality assurance and quality control programmes to optimise paediatric patient doses. The frequency of CT examinations for paediatric patients accounted for 1300 out 5200 examinations (25%) of the total examinations recorded for the year 2008 which is five times that of the East European countries, indicating an overuse of CT examinations for children not taking into account paediatric patient anatomy and the section of the body being scanned. Adult CT exposure parameters such as the KV, mAs, scan length, pitch, and collimation values were being used in paediatric CT examination. Effective dose estimated for children were higher than that for adults by factors 5.1, 1.8, 3.1 and 3.9 more for head, chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations respectively. From the questionnaire administered and dosimetry results there was no established justification policy, procedures and referral criteria for CT examination requests for children. There was no Quality Assurance Committee to see to the implementation of dose management system dedicated to paediatrics patients. There was the need for the Hospital Authorities to formulate policies in the training of CT equipment operators, radiographers and radiographers and radiologist in modern CT technology as well as in the selection of appropriate parameters tailored to individual patient size that can achieve desirable diagnostic image quality at low doses. (au)

  6. The evaluation of radioprotection with low dose CT scanning in normal rabbits brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuqing; Gong Shenchu; Wang Tianle; Shen Yunxia; Cui Lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine wheather a lower radiation dose technique and various pitch could be used in CT of the rabbits' brain without jeopardizing the diagnostic accuracy of the images, and determine the evaluation of radioprotection with low dose CT scanning. Methods: Fifteen rabbits underwent CT using 200 mAs, 110 mAs or 70 mAs,and pitch 1.0 or 1.5. Anatomy details and the confidence level in reaching a diagnosis were evaluated by two radiologists in a double-blinded manner using a 4-point scoring system. The CTDI w of every group were compared. Results: For both reader there was no statistically significant difference between 6 group total score of 1-6 anatomical detail and each of 6 anatomical detail although score for each of 6 anatomical detail. The CTDI w of 70 mAs, in pitch 1.5 group decreased about 76.7%. Conclusion: Radiation dose reduction in brain CT is feasible in clinical use, and quality of images can be re- served. It plays an important role in radiation protection. (authors)

  7. Studies on atrophy of the brain in chronic alcoholics examined by CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Keiichi; Kimura, Fumiharu; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takenaka, Masazumi; Mozai, Toshiji

    1983-01-01

    A study of atrophy of the brain using CT scan was performed in 113 patients with chronic alcoholism who had history of alcohol abuse over 150 grams in average as amount of absolute ethanol for more than ten years. They had no focal cerebral lesions such as infarction, hemorrhage or tumor, nor clinical neurological deficits. Prominent enlagement of cortical sulci and lateral ventricles was found in chronic alcoholics when compared with age-matched controls. The most remarkable change among 6 indices in all age group was enlargement of cortical sulci. The ratio of lateral ventricle area to intracranical area was more significantly increased compared with the widening of the lateral ventricle determined as a distance between two tips of bilateral frontal horns or intercaudate distance. Forty-eight of 96 patients in whom EEG was examined, showed abnormalities such as dominant slow background activities and sporadic slow bursts, which were found more frequently (25/38, 66%) in patients over 50 years of age. No correlation was found between the occurrence of EEG abnormalities and cerebral atrophy or between the degree of cerebral atrophy and the severity of hepatic dysfunction. It is concluded from our study that atrophy of the brain in chronic alcoholics may be clearly estimated by CT planimetry of the ratio of lateral ventricle area to intracranial area. (J.P.N.)

  8. Studies on atrophy of the brain in chronic alcoholics examined by CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoda, Keiichi; Kimura, Fumiharu; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takenaka, Masazumi; Mozai, Toshiji (Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan))

    1983-09-01

    A study of atrophy of the brain using CT scan was performed in 113 patients with chronic alcoholism who had history of alcohol abuse over 150 grams in average as amount of absolute ethanol for more than ten years. They had no focal cerebral lesions such as infarction, hemorrhage or tumor, nor clinical neurological deficits. Prominent enlargement of cortical sulci and lateral ventricles was found in chronic alcoholics when compared with age-matched controls. The most remarkable change among 6 indices in all age group was enlargement of cortical sulci. The ratio of lateral ventricle area to intracranical area was more significantly increased compared with the widening of the lateral ventricle determined as a distance between two tips of bilateral frontal horns or intercaudate distance. Forty-eight of 96 patients in whom EEG was examined, showed abnormalities such as dominant slow background activities and sporadic slow bursts, which were found more frequently (25/38, 66%) in patients over 50 years of age. No correlation was found between the occurrence of EEG abnormalities and cerebral atrophy or between the degree of cerebral atrophy and the severity of hepatic dysfunction. It is concluded from our study that atrophy of the brain in chronic alcoholics may be clearly estimated by CT planimetry of the ratio of lateral ventricle area to intracranial area.

  9. Focal breast lesions in clinical CT examinations of the chest. A retrospective analysis; Senologische Befunde bei CT-Untersuchungen des Thorax. Eine retrospektive Auswertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Houbois, Christian; Grinstein, Olga; Borggrefe, Jan; Puesken, Michael; Maintz, David [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostical and Interventional Radiology; Hanstein, Bettina; Malter, Wolfram [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Breast Center and Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Hellmich, Martin [Cologne Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2017-10-15

    Based on radiological reports, the percentage of breast cancers visualized as incidental findings in routine CT examinations is estimated at ≤2%. In view of the rising number of CT examinations and the high prevalence of breast cancer, it was the goal of the present study to verify the frequency and image morphology of false-negative senological CT findings. All first contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest in adult female patients carried out in 2012 were retrospectively included. A senior radiologist systematically assessed the presence of breast lesions on all CT images using the BI-RADS system. All BI-RADS ≥3 notations were evaluated by a second senior radiologist. A consensus was obtained in case of differing BI-RADS assessments. Reference diagnoses were elaborated based on all available clinical, radiological and pathological data. The findings of the CT reports were classified according to the BI-RADS system and were compared with the retrospective consensus findings as well as with the reference diagnoses. The range of indications comprised a broad spectrum including staging and follow-up examinations of solid tumors/lymphoma (N = 701, 59.9 %) and vascular (190, 16.2 %), inflammatory (48, 4.1 %) and pulmonologic (22, 1.9 %) issues. BI-RADS 1/2 classifications were present in 92.5 % and BI-RADS 6 classifications were assessed in 1.7 % of the 1170 included examinations. 68 patients (5.8 %) had at least one lesion retrospectively classified as BI-RADS 3 - 5. The histological potential was known in 57 of these lesions as benign (46, 3.9 %) or malignant (11, 0.9 %). 13 BI-RADS 4/5 consensus assessments (1.1 %) were false-positive. 2 of the 10 lesions classified as being malignant based on the further clinical and radiological course were not mentioned in the written CT reports (0.2 %). Both false-negative CT reports were therapeutically and prognostically irrelevant. The relative frequency of BI-RADS 3 - 5 findings was 5.8 %. It reflects the situation

  10. Results of the Austrian CT dose study 2010. Typical effective doses of the most frequent CT examinations; Ergebnisse der Oesterreichischen CT-Dosisstudie 2010. Effektive Dosen der haeufigsten CT-Untersuchungen und Unterschiede zwischen Anwendern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homolka, Peter; Leithner, Robert; Billinger, Jochen [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Zentrum fuer Medizinische Physik und Biomedizinische Technik; Gruber, Michael [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To determine typical doses from common CT examinations of standard sized adult patients and their variability between CT operators for common CT indications. Materials and Methods: In a nationwide Austrian CT dose survey doses from approx. 10,000 common CT examinations of adults during 2009 and 2010 were collected and 'typical' radiation doses to the 'average patient', which turned out to have 75.6 kg body mass, calculated. Conversion coefficients from DLP to effective dose were determined and effective doses calculated according to ICRP 103. Variations of typically applied doses to the 'average patient' were expressed as ratios between 90{sup th} and 10{sup th} percentile (inter-percentile width, IPW90/10), 1st and 3{sup rd} quartile (IPW75/25), and Maximum/Minimum. Results: Median effective doses to the average patients for standard head and neck scans were 1.8 mSv (cervical spine), 1.9 mSv (brain: trauma/bleeding, stroke) to 2.2 mSv (brain: masses) with typical variation between facilities of a factor 2.5 (IPW90/10) and 1.7 (IPW75/25). In the thorax region doses were 6.4 to 6.8 mSv (pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and inflammation, oncologic scans), the variation between facilities was by a factor of 2.1 (IPW90/10) and 1.5 (IPW75/25), respectively. In the abdominal region median effective doses from 6.5 mSv (kidney stone search) to 22 mSv (liver lesions) were found (acute abdomen, staging/metastases, lumbar spine: 9-12 mSv; oncologic abdomen plus chest 16 mSv; renal tumor 20 mSv). Variation factors between facilities were on average for abdominal scans 2.7 (IPW90/10) and 1.8 (IPW75/25). Conclusion: Variations between CT operators are generally moderate for most operators, but in some indications the ratio between the minimum and the maximum of average dose to the typical standard patients exceeds a factor of 4 or even 5. Therefore, comparing average doses to Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) and optimizing protocols need to

  11. Automated method to compute Evans index for diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus on brain CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriyuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Ohmura, Tomomi; Matsuyama, Eri; Toyoshima, Hideto

    2017-03-01

    The early diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) considered as a treatable dementia is important. The iNPH causes enlargement of lateral ventricles (LVs). The degree of the enlargement of the LVs on CT or MR images is evaluated by using a diagnostic imaging criterion, Evans index. Evans index is defined as the ratio of the maximal width of frontal horns (FH) of the LVs to the maximal width of the inner skull (IS). Evans index is the most commonly used parameter for the evaluation of ventricular enlargement. However, manual measurement of Evans index is a time-consuming process. In this study, we present an automated method to compute Evans index on brain CT images. The algorithm of the method consisted of five major steps: standardization of CT data to an atlas, extraction of FH and IS regions, the search for the outmost points of bilateral FH regions, determination of the maximal widths of both the FH and the IS, and calculation of Evans index. The standardization to the atlas was performed by using linear affine transformation and non-linear wrapping techniques. The FH regions were segmented by using a three dimensional region growing technique. This scheme was applied to CT scans from 44 subjects, including 13 iNPH patients. The average difference in Evans index between the proposed method and manual measurement was 0.01 (1.6%), and the correlation coefficient of these data for the Evans index was 0.98. Therefore, this computerized method may have the potential to accurately compute Evans index for the diagnosis of iNPH on CT images.

  12. Contrast medium enhancement of soft tissues and brain in CT examinations of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlicek, M.

    2000-11-01

    CT is an x-ray based method which shows less contrast for soft tissue as has been known from radiography. Therefore, it is necessary to use intravenously administered iodine contrast media to detect and localize tumors, fistulas or other pathologic lesions. Usually contrast medium is administered manually which yields random patterns of media distribution due to varying application pressure during varying administration time, therefore enhancement of parenchymous organs could not be used to the optimum extent. The use of an automatic injection pump guarantees the necessary constancy during the examination procedure to undoubtedly detect pathologic enhancement of organs in the CT-image as known from human medicine. The standards which are expected of the injection pump and the contrast media are: a good contrast enhancement, a good accumulation in the examined organs, an accumulation, which lasts long enough during the diagnostic phase, and a rapid excretion without side effects. Because of the short scan time of the modern CT-scanner, the best contrast enhancement can be administered by a short bolus injection, which can be applied by the automatic injection pump with a defined flow and a defined quantity of contrast media. This guarantees a good enhancement in the chosen region for the duration of the scan. The main aim of this study is to find a standardized flow and quantity of contrast media for defined regions and organs considering the speed of the scanner. In a subsequent step, the existing scan-protocols are then updated using the newly found information. This study showed, that CT examination of the head and brain in middle-sized dogs can be administered with a flow of 0.5 ml/s and a dose of 2 ml of contrast medium per kg weight. The contrast enhancement of the brain is caused by the enhancement of the vessels, the parenchym is free of contrast media - brain shows a low increase of density. Only if the blood-brain-barrier is destroyed, it is possible that

  13. Contrast medium enhancement of soft tissues and brain in CT examinations of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlicek, M.

    2000-11-01

    CT is a x-ray based method which shows less contrast for soft tissue as has been known from radiography. Therefore, it is necessary to use intravenously administered iodine contrast media to detect and localize tumors, fistulas or other pathologic lesions. Usually contrast medium is administered manually which yields random patterns of media distribution due to varying application pressure during varying administration time, therefore enhancement of parenchymous organs could not be used to the optimum extent. The use of an automatic injection pump guarantees the necessary constancy during the examination procedure to undoubtedly detect pathologic enhancement of organs in the CT-image as known from human medicine. The standards which are expected of the injection pump and the contrast media are: a good contrast enhancement, a good accumulation in the examined organs, an accumulation, which lasts long enough during the diagnostic phase, and a rapid excretion without side effects. Because of the short scan time of the modern CT-scanner, the best contrast enhancement can be administered by a short bolus injection, which can be applied by the automatic injection pump with a defined flow and a defined quantity of contrast media. This guarantees a good enhancement in the chosen region for the duration of the scan. The main aim of this study is to find a standardized flow and quantity of contrast media for defined regions and organs considering the speed of the scanner. In a subsequent step, the existing scan-protocols are then updated using the newly found information. This study showed, that CT examination of the head and brain in middle-sized dogs can be administered with a flow of 0.5 ml/s and a dose of 2 ml of contrast medium per kg weight. The contrast enhancement of the brain is caused by the enhancement of the vessels, the parenchym is free of contrast media - brain shows a low increase of density. Only if the blood-brain-barrier is destroyed, it is possible that

  14. TH-AB-207A-04: Assessment of Patients’ Cumulative Effective Dose From CT Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; Sepahdari, A; Beckett, K; Oshiro, T; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Joint Commission requires institutions to consider patient’s age and recent imaging exams when deciding on the most appropriate type of imaging exam. Additionally, knowing patient’s imaging history can help prevent duplicate scans. Radiation dose management software affords new opportunities to identify and utilize patients with high cumulative doses as one proxy for subsequent review of imaging history and opportunities in avoiding redundant exams. Methods: Using dose management software (Radimetrics, Bayer Healthcare) a total of 72073 CT examinations performed from Jan 2015 to Jan 2016 were examined to categorize patients with a cumulative effective dose of 100 mSv and above. This threshold was selected based on epidemiological studies on populations exposed to radiation, which demonstrate a statistical increase of cancer risk at doses above 100 mSv. Histories of patients with highest cumulative dose and highest number of exams were further investigated by a Radiologist for appropriateness of recurrent studies and potential opportunities for reduction. Results: Out of 34762 patients, 927 (2.7%) were identified with a cumulative dose of 100 mSv and above. The highest cumulative dose (842 mSv) belonged to an oncology patient who underwent 2 diagnostic exams and 9 interventional ablative CT guided procedures. The patient with highest number of exams (56 counts) and cumulative dose of 170 mSv was a 17 year old trauma patient. An imaging history review of these two patients did not suggest any superfluous scans. Conclusion: Our limited pilot study suggests that recurrent CT exams for patients with oncologic or severe trauma history may be warranted and appropriate. As a result, for future studies we will be focusing on high dose patient cohorts not associated with oncology or severe trauma. Additionally, the review process itself has suggested areas for potential improvement in patient care, including improved documentation and Radiologist involvement

  15. TH-AB-207A-04: Assessment of Patients’ Cumulative Effective Dose From CT Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; Sepahdari, A; Beckett, K; Oshiro, T; McNitt-Gray, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Joint Commission requires institutions to consider patient’s age and recent imaging exams when deciding on the most appropriate type of imaging exam. Additionally, knowing patient’s imaging history can help prevent duplicate scans. Radiation dose management software affords new opportunities to identify and utilize patients with high cumulative doses as one proxy for subsequent review of imaging history and opportunities in avoiding redundant exams. Methods: Using dose management software (Radimetrics, Bayer Healthcare) a total of 72073 CT examinations performed from Jan 2015 to Jan 2016 were examined to categorize patients with a cumulative effective dose of 100 mSv and above. This threshold was selected based on epidemiological studies on populations exposed to radiation, which demonstrate a statistical increase of cancer risk at doses above 100 mSv. Histories of patients with highest cumulative dose and highest number of exams were further investigated by a Radiologist for appropriateness of recurrent studies and potential opportunities for reduction. Results: Out of 34762 patients, 927 (2.7%) were identified with a cumulative dose of 100 mSv and above. The highest cumulative dose (842 mSv) belonged to an oncology patient who underwent 2 diagnostic exams and 9 interventional ablative CT guided procedures. The patient with highest number of exams (56 counts) and cumulative dose of 170 mSv was a 17 year old trauma patient. An imaging history review of these two patients did not suggest any superfluous scans. Conclusion: Our limited pilot study suggests that recurrent CT exams for patients with oncologic or severe trauma history may be warranted and appropriate. As a result, for future studies we will be focusing on high dose patient cohorts not associated with oncology or severe trauma. Additionally, the review process itself has suggested areas for potential improvement in patient care, including improved documentation and Radiologist involvement

  16. Normal physiologic and Benign foci with F-18 FDG avidity on PET/CT in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ah; Lee, Kwang Man; Choi, Un Jong; Kim, Hun Soo; Kim, Hye Won; Song, Jeong Hoon [College of Medicine, Wonkwnag University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiologic and benign F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avid foci in patients with breast cancer. On 309 F-18 FDG PET/CT scans of 241 women with breast cancer, the hypermetabolic lesions compared with the surrounding normal region were evaluated retrospectively. Available reports of other relevant radiological imaging medical records, and follow-up PET/CT were reviewed for explanations of the abnormal uptake. Among the 70 physiologic foci, muscular uptake of the lower neck following the surgical and/or radiation therapy of ipsilateral breast (29%), hypermetabolic ovaries (16%) and uterine (10%) uptake during the ovulatory and menstrual phases during the normal menstrual cycle were identified, and also hypermetabolic brown fat in cold-induced thermogenesis (7%), non-specific bowel uptake (35%) were observed. Among the 147 benign lesions, sequelae of the chest wall and breasts following surgical and/or radiation therapy, were often observed (27%). Hypermetabolic thyroid glands were noted as adenomas and chronic thyroiditis (18%). Reactive hyperplasia of cervical or mediastinal lymph nodes (32%), degenerative osteoarthritis and healed fractures (15%), hypermetabolic benign lung lesions (6%) were observed. Altered physiologic and benign F-18 FDG uptake in the cervical muscle and chest wall following ipsilateral breast surgery or radiotherapy were common, and also normal physiologic uptake in ovary and uterus, brown fat, thyroid were considered as predominant findings in women patients with breast cancer. Knowledge of these findings might aid in the interpretation of FDG PET/CT in patients with breast cancer

  17. Dose reduction in subsecond multislice spiral CT examination of children by online tube current modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greess, H.; Lutze, J.; Noemayr, A.; Bautz, W.; Wolf, H.; Hothorn, T.; Kalender, W.A.

    2004-01-01

    The potential of online tube current modulation in subsecond multislice spiral CT (MSCT) examinations of children to reduce the dose without a loss in image quality is investigated in a controlled patient study. The dose can be reduced for oval patient sectional view without an increase in noise if the tube current is reduced where the patient diameter and, consequently, attenuation are small. We investigated a product version of an online control for tube current in a SOMATOM Sensation 4 (Siemens, Forchheim). We evaluated image quality, noise and dose reduction for examinations with online tube current modulation in 30 MSCT of thorax/abdomen and abdomen and compared mA s for tube current modulation to the mA s in standard weight-adapted children protocols. Image quality was rated as ''very good,'' ''good,'' ''diagnostic'' and ''poor'' in a consensus by three radiologists. Noise was assessed in comparison to 24 MSCT examinations without tube current modulation measured as SD in ROIs. The dose was reduced from 26 to 43% (mean 36%), depending on the patient's geometry and weight. (orig.)

  18. To evaluate vascular complications of transplant kidney examined by multislice spiral CT angiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Qian; Fan Miao; Luo Xiaomei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) in vascular complications of transplant kidney. Methods: Six transplant kidneys were undergone enhanced MSCT scanning postoperation. MPR, CPR, VR and VP reformation were performed to observe transplant kidney's parenchyma, renal artery, and renal vein. To analysis all the reconstruction technique and find the advantage and shortage of them. Results: One case showed enhanced function of transplant kidney decreased. Vascular stenosis was found in one case and false aneurysm was found in another transplant kidney. Transplant kidney were enhanced normal in the left three cases. MPR couldn't reconstruct all the tortuous vessel of renal hilus in one plane. But all six cases could expose the vessel of renal hilus very clearly in coronal section and sagittal plane of CPR. Six cases of VR could observe the vessel direction and lesions outside vessel through rotate the reconstruction image. VP could see through inside the vessel of transplant kidney. Conclusion: MSCTA has an important role as an imaging technique to evaluate vascular complications of transplant kidney, it can replace DSA. (authors)

  19. Normal bone and soft tissue distribution of fluorine-18-sodium fluoride and artifacts on 18F-NaF PET/CT bone scan: a pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet; Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Sarikaya, Ali; Alfeeli, Mahmoud

    2017-10-01

    Fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (F-NaF) PET/CT is a relatively new and high-resolution bone imaging modality. Since the use of F-NaF PET/CT has been increasing, it is important to accurately assess the images and be aware of normal distribution and major artifacts. In this pictorial review article, we will describe the normal uptake patterns of F-NaF in the bone tissues, particularly in complex structures, as well as its physiologic soft tissue distribution and certain artifacts seen on F-NaF PET/CT images.

  20. Coronary imaging quality in routine ECG-gated multidetector CT examinations of the entire thorax: preliminary experience with a 64-slice CT system in 133 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delhaye, Damien; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Salem, Randa; Teisseire, Antoine; Khalil, Chadi; Remy, Jacques; Delannoy-Deken, Valerie; Duhamel, Alain

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate image quality in the assessment of the coronary arteries during routine ECG-gated multidetector CT (MDCT) of the chest. One hundred and thirty three patients in sinus rhythm underwent an ECG-gated CT angiographic examination of the entire chest without β-blockers with a 64-slice CT system. In 127 patients (95%), it was possible to assess the coronary arteries partially or totally; coronary artery imaging failed in six patients (5%), leading to a detailed description of the coronary arteries in 127 patients. Considering ten coronary artery segments per patient, 75% of coronary segments were assessable (948/1270 segments). When the distal segments were excluded from the analysis (i.e., seven coronary segments evaluated per patient), the percentage of assessable segments was 86% (768/889 proximal and mid coronary segments) and reached 93% (474/508) when assessing proximal segments exclusively. The mean number of assessable segments was significantly higher in patients with a heart rate ≤80 bpm (n=95) than in patients with a heart rate >80 bpm (n=38) (p<0.002). Proximal and mid-coronary segments can be adequately assessed during a whole-chest ECG-gated CT angiographic examination without administration of β-blockers in patients with a heart rate below 80 bpm. (orig.)

  1. The diagnosis of MR and CT scan for myofascitis of connective tissue disease: comparison with biopsy examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianrong; Zhou Yan; Chai Weimin; Yao Qiuying; Li Lei; Li Lan; Li Zhengyang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of MRI, CT and biopsy examinations in detecting myofascitis lesions of connective tissue disease. Methods: The study group consisted of 22 patients proven by clinical features and laboratory examination, including 8 cases of dermatomyositis (DM), 12 cases of polymyositis (PM), and 2 cases of eosinophilic fascitis. All patients received CT scan, SE-T 1 WI, SE-T 2 WI, SPIR, and CT guiding biopsy at the thigh region. Results: Biopsy detected muscular diseases in 17 cases and fascitis in 5 cases. MRI detected muscular diseases in 14 and fascitis in 9. CT detected muscular diseases in 5 and fascitis in 9. Myositis, amyotrophy, and fascitis may be alone or united in one case. Myositis (9 cases) appeared as low signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI or SPIR. Amyotrophy (9 cases) presented hyperintensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI. SPIR was more sensitive in detecting myositis than CT and T 1 WI, P < 0.05. Myositis was more frequent in cases with DM(6/8) than in cases with PM (3/12), P < 0.05. Also, myositis was more frequently encountered in active phase (7/11) than in quiescent phase (2/11). Conclusion: MRI and CT appear to be valuable in quantitatively and qualitatively estimating myofascitis of connective tissue diseases

  2. Research on the radiation doses to adults receiving from main types of medical X-ray CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Linfeng; Wang Bin; Yao Jie; Qian Aijun; Zheng Junzheng; Zhuo Weihai; Qu Liangyong

    2013-01-01

    To study and master the doses to examinees receiving from the wide spread X-CT examinations, is a key issue for strengthening the medical radiation protection. In the studies of the medical exposure levels during the Eleventh Five-Year Plan period in Shanghai, based on the brands of X-CT scanners and their distributions in different levels of hospitals, a total of 45 sets (about 30% of all) of scanners were selected for the field study. Among the 8 commonly performed examinations, the scan parameters and their relevant dosimetry information for 500 adults were collected, and their typical effective doses were estimated with the dose conversion factors. The results showed that the averages of weighted CT dose index (CTDI w ) were 55.4, 12.5 and 18.4 mGy, and the dose length products (DLP) were averaged to be 603, 294 and 415 mGy·cm, for the skull, chest and abdomen X-CT scans, respectively. The typical effective doses were estimated to be 1.4, 5.3, and 7.5 mSv for adults in the head, chest and abdomen X-CT scans, respectively. The values of CTDI w for skull scans were generally higher than those for the ear canal, eye, or sinus examinations. It is clear that the optimization between the image quality and the radiation dose should be further strengthened. Particular attentions should be paid in selecting the scanning parameters for various types of X-CT scans, and the diagnostic reference levels for X-CT examinations should be continuously improved. (authors)

  3. Radiation dose of digital tomosynthesis for sinonasal examination: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yuhara, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Mieko; Numano, Tomokazu; Abe, Shinji; Sabol, John M; Suzuki, Shigeru; Ueno, Eiko

    2012-06-01

    Using an anthropomorphic phantom, we have investigated the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis (DT) of flat-panel detector (FPD) radiography to reduce radiation dose for sinonasal examination compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). A female Rando phantom was scanned covering frontal to maxillary sinus using the clinically routine protocol by both 64-detector CT (120 kV, 200 mAs, and 1.375-pitch) and DT radiography (80 kV, 1.0 mAs per projection, 60 projections, 40° sweep, and posterior-anterior projections). Glass dosimeters were used to measure the radiation dose to internal organs including the thyroid gland, brain, submandibular gland, and the surface dose at various sites including the eyes during those scans. We compared the radiation dose to those anatomies between both modalities. In DT radiography, the doses of the thyroid gland, brain, submandibular gland, skin, and eyes were 230 ± 90 μGy, 1770 ± 560 μGy, 1400 ± 80 μGy, 1160 ± 2100 μGy, and 112 ± 6 μGy, respectively. These doses were reduced to approximately 1/5, 1/8, 1/12, 1/17, and 1/290 of the respective MDCT dose. For sinonasal examinations, DT radiography enables dramatic reduction in radiation exposure and dose to the head and neck region, particularly to the lens of the eye. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Liver perfusion CT during hepatic arteriography for the hepatocellular carcinoma: Dose reduction and quantitative evaluation for normal- and ultralow-dose protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Shingo [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, 2-1-50, Minami-Koshigaya, Koshigaya-shi, Saitama 343-8555 (Japan); Katada, Yoshiaki, E-mail: yoshiaki@dokkyomed.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, 2-1-50, Minami-Koshigaya, Koshigaya-shi, Saitama 343-8555 (Japan); Gohkyu, Masaki; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kawabata, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, 2-1-50, Minami-Koshigaya, Koshigaya-shi, Saitama 343-8555 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether substantial reduction of the computed tomography (CT) dose is possible in liver CT perfusion imaging by comparing the results of ultralow-dose CT perfusion imaging with those of conventional CT perfusion imaging the same patients and under the same conditions. Materials and methods: The study was composed following two parts: computer simulation and patients study. In computer simulation, noise was added to the images so that the standard deviation (SD) of the CT values in the liver parenchyma became various values using ImageJ. Time density curves (TDCs) were created from the simulated data, and the influence of difference in the SDs on the shapes of the TDCs was investigated. In the patient study, CT perfusion during intra-arterial injection was performed in 30 consecutive patients undergoing transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. CT perfusion images were acquired twice, at 100 mA (CTDI{sub vol}, 300 mGy) for normal and at 20 mA (CTDI{sub vol}, 60 mGy) for the ultralow radiation doses, under the same conditions. Results: No change was observed in the shape of the TDCs and peak values in the analysis of simulation images. A very good correlation was observed between the normal- and ultralow-dose CT images for all analyzed values (R{sup 2} = 0.9885 for blood flow, 0.9269 for blood volume, and 0.8424 for mean transit time). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that there was no significant difference in the analysis results of perfusion CT between ultralow-dose CT performed using 20% of the conventional dose and normal-dose CT perfusion.

  5. Normal thymus in adults: appearance on CT and associations with age, sex, BMI and smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Tetsuro; Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto; Gao, Wei; Dupuis, Josee; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Washko, George R.; Murakami, Takamichi; O'Connor, George T.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate CT appearance and size of the thymus in association with participant characteristics. 2540 supposedly healthy participants (mean age 58.9 years, 51 % female) were evaluated for the CT appearance of thymic glands with four-point scores (according to the ratio of fat and soft tissue), size and morphology. These were correlated with participants' age, sex, BMI and smoking history. Of 2540 participants, 1869 (74 %) showed complete fatty replacement of the thymus (Score 0), 463 (18 %) predominantly fatty attenuation (Score 1), 172 (7 %) half fatty and half soft-tissue attenuation (Score 2) and 36 (1 %) solid thymic gland with predominantly soft-tissue attenuation (Score 3). Female participants showed less fatty degeneration of the thymus with higher thymic scores within age 40-69 years (P < 0.001). Participants with lower thymic scores showed higher BMI (P < 0.001) and were more likely to be former smokers (P < 0.001) with higher pack-years (P = 0.04). Visual assessment with four-point thymic scores revealed a sex difference in the fatty degeneration of the thymus with age. Women show significantly higher thymic scores, suggesting less fat content of the thymus, during age 40-69 years. Cigarette smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty replacement of the thymus. (orig.)

  6. Normal lumbar spine bone mineral densities with single-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, R.E.; Ritenour, E.R.; Geis, J.R.; Thickman, D.; Freeman, K.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report trabecular spine densities determined by single-energy CT in 267 healthy women, aged 22 to 75 years. Volunteers were scanned at eight sites with use of identical fourth-generation CT scanners, postpatient calibration phantoms, and analysis software that accounts for beam hardening as a function of patient size. Results indicate that a cubic polynomial best represents the decrease in bone density (in milligrams per milliliter of K 2 HPO 4 ) with age (in years): Bone Density = 140.9 + 4.44(Age) - 0.133(Age) 2 + 0.0008(Age) 3 , with statistical significance over the best linear and quadratic polynomial fits (P < .001). The mean bone densities of healthy women above age 30 years are found to be lower by an average of 8 mg/mL than reported by Cann et al, whose data indicate that the greatest loss in trabecular bone density in healthy women occurs in the 50-59-year group, while out data indicate greatest loss in the 60-75 year age group

  7. Normal thymus in adults: appearance on CT and associations with age, sex, BMI and smoking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Tetsuro [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka-Sayama (Japan); Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Gao, Wei [Boston University School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Dupuis, Josee [Boston University School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute' s Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA (United States); Hunninghake, Gary M.; Washko, George R. [Harvard Medical School, The Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Murakami, Takamichi [Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka-Sayama (Japan); O' Connor, George T. [The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute' s Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA (United States); Boston University School of Medicine, Pulmonary Center and Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate CT appearance and size of the thymus in association with participant characteristics. 2540 supposedly healthy participants (mean age 58.9 years, 51 % female) were evaluated for the CT appearance of thymic glands with four-point scores (according to the ratio of fat and soft tissue), size and morphology. These were correlated with participants' age, sex, BMI and smoking history. Of 2540 participants, 1869 (74 %) showed complete fatty replacement of the thymus (Score 0), 463 (18 %) predominantly fatty attenuation (Score 1), 172 (7 %) half fatty and half soft-tissue attenuation (Score 2) and 36 (1 %) solid thymic gland with predominantly soft-tissue attenuation (Score 3). Female participants showed less fatty degeneration of the thymus with higher thymic scores within age 40-69 years (P < 0.001). Participants with lower thymic scores showed higher BMI (P < 0.001) and were more likely to be former smokers (P < 0.001) with higher pack-years (P = 0.04). Visual assessment with four-point thymic scores revealed a sex difference in the fatty degeneration of the thymus with age. Women show significantly higher thymic scores, suggesting less fat content of the thymus, during age 40-69 years. Cigarette smoking and high BMI are associated with advanced fatty replacement of the thymus. (orig.)

  8. Paediatric cardiac CT examinations: impact of the iterative reconstruction method ASIR on image quality - preliminary findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieville, Frederic A.; Gudinchet, Francois; Rizzo, Elena; Ou, Phalla; Brunelle, Francis; Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose exposure is of particular concern in children due to the possible harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) method is a promising new technique that reduces image noise and produces better overall image quality compared with routine-dose contrast-enhanced methods. To assess the benefits of ASIR on the diagnostic image quality in paediatric cardiac CT examinations. Four paediatric radiologists based at two major hospitals evaluated ten low-dose paediatric cardiac examinations (80 kVp, CTDI vol 4.8-7.9 mGy, DLP 37.1-178.9 mGy.cm). The average age of the cohort studied was 2.6 years (range 1 day to 7 years). Acquisitions were performed on a 64-MDCT scanner. All images were reconstructed at various ASIR percentages (0-100%). For each examination, radiologists scored 19 anatomical structures using the relative visual grading analysis method. To estimate the potential for dose reduction, acquisitions were also performed on a Catphan phantom and a paediatric phantom. The best image quality for all clinical images was obtained with 20% and 40% ASIR (p < 0.001) whereas with ASIR above 50%, image quality significantly decreased (p < 0.001). With 100% ASIR, a strong noise-free appearance of the structures reduced image conspicuity. A potential for dose reduction of about 36% is predicted for a 2- to 3-year-old child when using 40% ASIR rather than the standard filtered back-projection method. Reconstruction including 20% to 40% ASIR slightly improved the conspicuity of various paediatric cardiac structures in newborns and children with respect to conventional reconstruction (filtered back-projection) alone. (orig.)

  9. Paediatric cardiac CT examinations: impact of the iterative reconstruction method ASIR on image quality - preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieville, Frederic A. [University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Institute of Radiation Physics - Medical Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gudinchet, Francois; Rizzo, Elena [University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ou, Phalla; Brunelle, Francis [Necker Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R. [University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    Radiation dose exposure is of particular concern in children due to the possible harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) method is a promising new technique that reduces image noise and produces better overall image quality compared with routine-dose contrast-enhanced methods. To assess the benefits of ASIR on the diagnostic image quality in paediatric cardiac CT examinations. Four paediatric radiologists based at two major hospitals evaluated ten low-dose paediatric cardiac examinations (80 kVp, CTDI{sub vol} 4.8-7.9 mGy, DLP 37.1-178.9 mGy.cm). The average age of the cohort studied was 2.6 years (range 1 day to 7 years). Acquisitions were performed on a 64-MDCT scanner. All images were reconstructed at various ASIR percentages (0-100%). For each examination, radiologists scored 19 anatomical structures using the relative visual grading analysis method. To estimate the potential for dose reduction, acquisitions were also performed on a Catphan phantom and a paediatric phantom. The best image quality for all clinical images was obtained with 20% and 40% ASIR (p < 0.001) whereas with ASIR above 50%, image quality significantly decreased (p < 0.001). With 100% ASIR, a strong noise-free appearance of the structures reduced image conspicuity. A potential for dose reduction of about 36% is predicted for a 2- to 3-year-old child when using 40% ASIR rather than the standard filtered back-projection method. Reconstruction including 20% to 40% ASIR slightly improved the conspicuity of various paediatric cardiac structures in newborns and children with respect to conventional reconstruction (filtered back-projection) alone. (orig.)

  10. Atheromatous extracranial carotid arteries: CT evaluation correlated with arteriography and pathologic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeson, M.D.; Cacayorin, E.D.; Iliya, A.R.; Hodge, C.J.; Culebras, A.; Collins, G.H.; Kieffer, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic, rapid sequence, axial computed tomography (CT) was employed to evaluate the extracranial common and internal carotid arteries in 17 patients with clinical histories suggesting recent or remote ischemia in the territory supplied by the internal carotid artery. The CT findings were correlated with arteriographic observations and with gross and histologic evaluations of endarterectomy specimens. Areas of arterial wall thickening were evaluated on CT scans with regard to both degree of thickening and radiographic density (attenuation). The degree of vessel wall thickening secondary to atheromatous plaque demonstrated on CT scans corresponded closely to the severity of luminal compromise seen on arteriograms. While arteriography provides information regarding the status of the arterial lumen, CT offers the potential of accurate characterization of pathologic changes in the wall of the extracranial carotid arteries in patients with symptoms of cerebral ischemia

  11. A systematic review of the need for MRI for the clearance of cervical spine injury in obtunded blunt trauma patients after normal cervical spine CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyore AO James

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clearance of cervical spine injury (CSI in the obtunded or comatose blunt trauma patient remains controversial. In patients with unreliable physical examination and no evidence of CSI on computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine (CS-MRI is the typical follow-up study. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that CS-MRI is unnecessary with negative findings on a multi-detector CT (MDCT scan. This review article systematically analyzes current literature to address the controversies surrounding clearance of CSI in obtunded blunt trauma patients. A literature search through MEDLINE database was conducted using all databases on the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI website (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov for keywords: "cervical spine injury," "obtunded," and "MRI." The search was limited to studies published within the last 10 years and with populations of patients older than 18 years old. Eleven studies were included in the analysis yielding data on 1535 patients. CS-MRI detected abnormalities in 256 patients (16.6%. The abnormalities reported on CS-MRI resulted in prolonged rigid c-collar immobilization in 74 patients (4.9%. Eleven patients (0.7% had unstable injury detected on CS-MRI alone that required surgical intervention. In the obtunded blunt trauma patient with unreliable clinical examination and a normal CT scan, there is still a role for CS-MRI in detecting clinically significant injuries when MRI resources are available. However, when a reliable clinical exam reveals intact gross motor function, CS-MRI may be unnecessary.

  12. Normal frontal lobe gray matter-white matter CT volume ratio in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Engelhart, J.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    We attempted to establish a computed tomographic value representing the normal volume ratio of gray matter to white matter (G/W) in children in order to have a baseline for studying various developmental disorders such as white matter hypoplasia. The records of 150 children 16 years of age or younger who had normal cranial computed tomography were reviewed. From these a group of 119 were excluded for various reasons. The remaining 3 were presumed to have normal brains. Using the region of interest function for tracing gray and white matter boundaries, superior and ventral to the foramen of Munro area, measurements were determined for consecutive adjacent frontal slices. Volumes were then calculated for both gray and white matter. A volume ratio of 2.010 (sigma=0.349), G/W, was then derived from each of 31 children. The clinical value of this ratio will be determined by future investigation. (orig.)

  13. The study on three-dimensional measurement of the Human Eustachian tube examined by Multislice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Satoshi; Naito, Kensei; Fujii, Naoko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    Morphological aberration of the Eustachian tube is a significant factor of various middle ear diseases. Traditionally, cadaveric specimens have been used for studies on the morphology of Eustachian tubes. However, this approach was not too efficient, as samples were limited in number as they were difficult to obtain, and biological conditions were not reflected due to rigor mortis and atrophy during specimen preparation. We thus decided to use Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) to perform 3-dimensional (3-D) anatomic measurements of the Eustachian tube. MSCT has benefits of isotropy and high resolution, and it is useful in preparing images of any plane. Forty-eight adults were studied. For the purpose of measurement, various anatomic indices were carefully and precisely defined to identify each area on the image. Calculations based on each coordinate value enabled the measurement of length, diameter and angle of the Eustachian tube of normal adults. Therefore, measurements of the Eustachian tube, which were traditionally difficult as it is located in the deep part of the cranium, were simplified in many specimens. Mean value of total length was 39.2±3.2 mm, cartilage part length of the tube 30.0±2.7 mm and bony part 9.2±1.6 mm. Mean values of diameter of tympanic orifice were 5.2 x 3.2 mm, and pharyngeal orifice 9.7 x 4.4 mm. Mean value of angle between bony part and cartilage part was 160.9±13.6 degrees. This approach to anatomic measurement is expected to contribute greatly to investigation on various middle ear diseases. (author)

  14. Characteristics of images of angiographically proven normal coronary arteries acquired by adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT with CT attenuation correction changed stepwise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Haruki; Kozono, Nami; Tanakamaru, Yoshiki; Idei, Naomi; Ohashi, Norihiko; Ohtsubo, Hideki; Okada, Takenori; Yasunobu, Yuji; Kaseda, Shunichi

    2015-04-01

    Although several studies have shown the diagnostic and prognostic value of CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD), this issue remains a matter of debate. To clarify the characteristics of CT-AC SPECT images that might potentially improve diagnostic performance, we analyzed images acquired using adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT equipped with IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT (SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT) from patients with angiographically proven normal coronary arteries after changing the CT attenuation correction (CT-AC) in a stepwise manner. We enrolled 72 patients (Male 36, Female 36) with normal coronary arteries according to findings of invasive coronary angiography or CT-angiography within three months after a SPECT/CT study. Projection images were reconstructed at CT-AC values of (-), 40, 60, 80 and 100 % using a CT number conversion program according to our definition and analyzed using polar maps according to sex. CT attenuation corrected segments were located from the mid- and apical-inferior spread through the mid- and apical-septal regions and finally to the basal-anterior and basal- and mid-lateral regions in males, and from the mid-inferior region through the mid-septal and mid-anterior, and mid-lateral regions in females as the CT-AC values increased. Segments with maximal mean counts shifted from the apical-anterior to mid-anterolateral region under both stress and rest conditions in males, whereas such segments shifted from the apical-septal to the mid-anteroseptal region under both stress and rest conditions in females. We clarified which part of the myocardium and to which degree CT-AC affects it in adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT images by changing the CT-AC value stepwise. We also identified sex-specific shifts of segments with maximal mean counts that changed as

  15. Three-dimensional CT examination of the mastication system in the giant anteater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hideki; Niizawa, Nobuharu; Komiya, Teruyuki; Kawada, Shinichiro; Kimura, Junpei; Itou, Takuya; Koie, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takeo

    2007-10-01

    The gross anatomy of the mastication system of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) was examined by means of three-dimensional image analysis. The anteater rotates the mandibles medially and laterally to control its tongue when it is elongated and to house it when it is relaxed. Three-dimensional CT image analysis demonstrated that the shape and size of the oral cavity changes drastically when the mandibles are rotated. The oral cavity expands bilaterally when the dorsal part of the mandibles bend medially. Macroscopic observations and muscle-weight data supported the observation that the superficial temporal and medial pterygoid muscles act as the main medial and lateral rotators of the mandible, respectively. The low height of the mandibular ramus and the incomplete zygomatic arch in this species represent adaptations for the rotational movement of the mandibles, since they both contribute to the medially oriented transmission of force from the temporal muscles and to preventing collision between the mandibles and the cranium during the rotational movement.

  16. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of normal kidney in a rabbit model: correlation with CT and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Kin, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Hun [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and safety of using a cooled-tip electrode to perform percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of kidney tissue in rabbits, and to evaluate the ability of CT to reveal the appearance and extent of tissue necrosis during follow-up after ablation. Using ultrasound guidance, a 17-G cooled-tip electrode was inserted into the right lower portion of the kidney in 26 New Zealand White rabbits. Radiofrequency was applied for 2 mins, and biphasic helical CT scanning was used to assess tissue destruction and the presence or absence of complications immediately after the procedure and at 24 hrs, 2 and 3 days, and 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 weeks. The study had three phases: acute (immediately killed : N=10); subacute (killed at 24 hrs (n=3), 2 days (n=3), 3 days (n=1) : N=7); chronic (killed at 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=2), 4 weeks (n=1), 7 weeks (n=1): N=8). After the animals were killed, their kidneys were histopathologically examined and the radiologic and pathologic findings of lesion size and configuration were correlated. In each instance, ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablations of the lower pole of the kidney were technically successful. Contrast-enhanced biphasic helical CT revealed regions of hypoattenuation devoid of parenchymal enhancement, and these correlated closely with true pathologic lesion size (r=0.884; p>0.05). In subacute and chronic models, CT scanning revealed gradual spontaneous resorption of the ablated lesion and the presence of perilesional calcification. Histopathologically, in the acute phase the ablated lesion showed coagulative necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells, and in the chronic phase there was clear cut necrosis of glomeruli, tubules and renal interstitium, with diminishing inflammatory response and peripheral fibrotic tissue formation. Ultrasound-guided renal radiofrequency ablation is technically feasible and safe. In addition, the avascular lesion measured at contrast-enhanced helical CT closely correlated with

  17. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of normal kidney in a rabbit model: correlation with CT and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Kin, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2002-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and safety of using a cooled-tip electrode to perform percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of kidney tissue in rabbits, and to evaluate the ability of CT to reveal the appearance and extent of tissue necrosis during follow-up after ablation. Using ultrasound guidance, a 17-G cooled-tip electrode was inserted into the right lower portion of the kidney in 26 New Zealand White rabbits. Radiofrequency was applied for 2 mins, and biphasic helical CT scanning was used to assess tissue destruction and the presence or absence of complications immediately after the procedure and at 24 hrs, 2 and 3 days, and 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 weeks. The study had three phases: acute (immediately killed : N=10); subacute (killed at 24 hrs (n=3), 2 days (n=3), 3 days (n=1) : N=7); chronic (killed at 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=2), 4 weeks (n=1), 7 weeks (n=1): N=8). After the animals were killed, their kidneys were histopathologically examined and the radiologic and pathologic findings of lesion size and configuration were correlated. In each instance, ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablations of the lower pole of the kidney were technically successful. Contrast-enhanced biphasic helical CT revealed regions of hypoattenuation devoid of parenchymal enhancement, and these correlated closely with true pathologic lesion size (r=0.884; p>0.05). In subacute and chronic models, CT scanning revealed gradual spontaneous resorption of the ablated lesion and the presence of perilesional calcification. Histopathologically, in the acute phase the ablated lesion showed coagulative necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells, and in the chronic phase there was clear cut necrosis of glomeruli, tubules and renal interstitium, with diminishing inflammatory response and peripheral fibrotic tissue formation. Ultrasound-guided renal radiofrequency ablation is technically feasible and safe. In addition, the avascular lesion measured at contrast-enhanced helical CT closely correlated with

  18. What is the clinical significance of chest CT when the chest x-ray result is normal in patients with blunt trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, Bory; Gamarallage, Ruwan; Vairamuthu, Hemamalini; Fortman, Jonathan; Lunney, Kevin; Hendey, Gregory W; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been shown to detect more injuries than plain radiography in patients with blunt trauma, but it is unclear whether these injuries are clinically significant. This study aimed to determine the proportion of patients with normal chest x-ray (CXR) result and injury seen on CT and abnormal initial CXR result and no injury on CT and to characterize the clinical significance of injuries seen on CT as determined by a trauma expert panel. Patients with blunt trauma older than 14 years who received emergency department chest imaging as part of their evaluation at 2 urban level I trauma centers were enrolled. An expert trauma panel a priori classified thoracic injuries and subsequent interventions as major, minor, or no clinical significance. Of 3639 participants, 2848 (78.3%) had CXR alone and 791 (21.7%) had CXR and chest CT. Of 589 patients who had chest CT after a normal CXR result, 483 (82.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 78.7-84.9%]) had normal CT results, and 106 (18.0% [95% CI, 15.1%-21.3%]) had CTs diagnosing injuries-primarily rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, and incidental pneumothorax. Twelve patients had injuries classified as clinically major (2.0% [95% CI, 1.2%-3.5%]), 78 were clinically minor (13.2% [95% CI, 10.7%-16.2%]), and 16 were clinically insignificant (2.7% (95% CI, 1.7%-4.4%]). Of 202 patients with CXRs suggesting injury, 177 (87.6% [95% CI, 82.4%-91.5%]) had chest CTs confirming injury and 25 (12.4% [95% CI, 8.5%-17.6%]) had no injury on CT. Chest CT after a normal CXR result in patients with blunt trauma detects injuries, but most do not lead to changes in patient management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Computed tomography by reconstruction. Brain CT scanning. I. Basic physics, equipment, normal aspects, artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiras, J.; Palmieri, P.; Saudinos, J.; Salamon, G.

    1980-01-01

    The authors describe the physical basis, apparatus, normal images, and artefacts of computed tomography by reconstruction. Radio-anatomical sections enable clear comprehension of the computed tomography images. Other methods using computer reconstruction are outlined: tomography by Compton effect, tomography by positrons, tomography by gamma emission, tomography by protons, tomography by nuclear magnetic resonance [fr

  20. CT appearance of the duodenum and mesenteric vessels in children with normal and abnormal bowel rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, George A. [Harvard Medical School and Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Demonstration of the third duodenal segment (D3) in retroperitoneal location has been recently proposed as a method for excluding malrotation. This study was performed to determine whether a retroperitoneal third duodenal segment can reliably exclude malrotation. CTs of 38 patients with proven malrotation and 100 patients without malrotation were evaluated for the location of the duodenum/proximal small bowel, and the relationship of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) to superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The D3 segment was in normal retroperitoneal location in 100% of control patients, compared to 2.5% or (1 of 38) of patients with malrotation. Nine of 11 patients (91%) with malrotation imaged prior to surgery had the proximal bowel in an abnormal location, while all 100 control patients had it in a normal location. The SMV was in normal relationship to the SMA in 11/38 patients (29%) with malrotation, compared to 79% of normal controls. In 10 controls, a branch of the SMV was partially wrapped around the SMA, potentially mimicking partial mesenteric volvulus. A retroperitoneal location of the D3 segment makes the diagnosis of malrotation unlikely but not impossible. Additional imaging of the duodenojejunal junction or cecum may be necessary to reliably exclude intestinal malrotation. (orig.)

  1. CT appearance of the duodenum and mesenteric vessels in children with normal and abnormal bowel rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, George A.

    2011-01-01

    Demonstration of the third duodenal segment (D3) in retroperitoneal location has been recently proposed as a method for excluding malrotation. This study was performed to determine whether a retroperitoneal third duodenal segment can reliably exclude malrotation. CTs of 38 patients with proven malrotation and 100 patients without malrotation were evaluated for the location of the duodenum/proximal small bowel, and the relationship of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) to superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The D3 segment was in normal retroperitoneal location in 100% of control patients, compared to 2.5% or (1 of 38) of patients with malrotation. Nine of 11 patients (91%) with malrotation imaged prior to surgery had the proximal bowel in an abnormal location, while all 100 control patients had it in a normal location. The SMV was in normal relationship to the SMA in 11/38 patients (29%) with malrotation, compared to 79% of normal controls. In 10 controls, a branch of the SMV was partially wrapped around the SMA, potentially mimicking partial mesenteric volvulus. A retroperitoneal location of the D3 segment makes the diagnosis of malrotation unlikely but not impossible. Additional imaging of the duodenojejunal junction or cecum may be necessary to reliably exclude intestinal malrotation. (orig.)

  2. Non-trauma-associated additional findings in whole-body CT examinations in patients with multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffstetter, P.; Herold, T.; Daneschnejad, M.; Zorger, N.; Jung, E.M.; Feuerbach, S.; Schreyer, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: whole-body CT scans for patients with multiple trauma represent an increasingly accepted first diagnostic tool. The multidetector approach in particular provides appropriate diagnostic algorithms for detecting nearly all relevant traumatic findings in a short time with a high grade of sensitivity and specificity. Non-trauma-associated additional findings are commonly depicted based on these CT examinations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the number and quality of these additional findings in consecutive patients with multiple trauma. Materials and methods: between 3/04 and 8/06 we scanned 304 patients according to our dedicated multiple trauma protocol. The examination protocol includes a head scan without intravenous contrast followed by a whole-body scan including the neck, thorax and abdomen acquired by a 16-row CT Scanner (Siemens, Sensation 16). The CT scans were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists with respect to non-trauma-associated findings. Lesions were assessed according to their clinical relevance (highly relevant, moderately relevant, not relevant). For patients with highly relevant findings, additional follow-up research was performed. Results: The average age was 43 years (range 3 - 92). 236 of the patients were male (77.6%), 68 female (22.4%). 153 patients (50.3%) had additional non-trauma-associated findings. In 20 cases (6.6%) lesions with high clinical relevance were detected (e.g. carcinoma of the kidney or the ovary). In 71 patients (23.4%) findings with moderate relevance were described. In 63 patients (20.7%) additional findings without major relevance were diagnosed. Conclusion: Whole-body CT scans of patients randomized by a trauma show a considerable number of non-trauma-associated additional findings. In about 30% of cases, these findings are clinically relevant because further diagnostic workup or treatment in the short or medium-term is needed. The results of these analyses emphasize the diagnostic value of CT

  3. Nondestructive Analysis of Astromaterials by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis for PET Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Allen, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    An integral part of any sample return mission is the initial description and classification of returned samples by the preliminary examination team (PET). The goal of the PET is to characterize and classify returned samples and make this information available to the larger research community who then conduct more in-depth studies on the samples. The PET tries to minimize the impact their work has on the sample suite, which has in the past limited the PET work to largely visual, nonquantitative measurements (e.g., optical microscopy). More modern techniques can also be utilized by a PET to nondestructively characterize astromaterials in much more rigorous way. Here we discuss our recent investigations into the applications of micro-CT and micro-XRF analyses with Apollo samples and ANSMET meteorites and assess the usefulness of these techniques in future PET. Results: The application of micro computerized tomography (micro-CT) to astromaterials is not a new concept. The technique involves scanning samples with high-energy x-rays and constructing 3-dimensional images of the density of materials within the sample. The technique can routinely measure large samples (up to approx. 2700 cu cm) with a small individual voxel size (approx. 30 cu m), and has the sensitivity to distinguish the major rock forming minerals and identify clast populations within brecciated samples. We have recently run a test sample of a terrestrial breccia with a carbonate matrix and multiple igneous clast lithologies. The test results are promising and we will soon analyze a approx. 600 g piece of Apollo sample 14321 to map out the clast population within the sample. Benchtop micro x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) instruments can rapidly scan large areas (approx. 100 sq cm) with a small pixel size (approx. 25 microns) and measure the (semi) quantitative composition of largely unprepared surfaces for all elements between Be and U, often with sensitivity on the order of a approx. 100 ppm. Our recent

  4. Intravital and post-mortem CT examinations of cerebral gunshot injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, M.; Oehmichen, M.; Koenig, H.G.; Einighammer, H.; Koeln Univ.; Tuebingen Univ.; Duesseldorf Univ.

    1983-01-01

    The value of CT was assessed in 24 patients who died of cerebral gun-shot injuries and in two patients with more recent injuries in order to reconstruct the mode of injury and for adding forensic information. The post-mortem and intravital appearances are described and are compared with ultrasound rotation compound scans of the isolated brains. CT showed good agreement with pathological findings. Ultrasound produced images with an accuracy between CT and photographs of the brain specimen. Both methods are regarded as valuable additions to the pathological and forensic information concerning gunshot injuries. (orig.) [de

  5. CT angiography of the renal arteries and veins: normal anatomy and variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazırolan, Tuncay; Öz, Meryem; Türkbey, Barış; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Oğuz, Berna Sayan; Canyiğit, Murat

    2011-03-01

    Conventional angiography has long been regarded as gold standard imaging modality for evaluation of the renal vasculature. Introduction of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography had a groundbreaking impact on evaluation of the renal vessels and is gradually replacing conventional angiography as standard imaging. Herein, we review and illustrate the normal and variant anatomy of renal vessels with special emphasis on imaging protocols and reconstruction techniques in MDCT.

  6. Screening for lung cancer with digital chest radiography: sensitivity and number of secondary work-up CT examinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoop, Bartjan; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Gietema, Hester A.; de Jong, Pim A.; van Ginneken, Bram; van Klaveren, Rob J.; Prokop, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the performance of digital chest radiography for detection of lung cancer. The study had ethics committee approval, and a nested case-control design was used and included 55 patients with lung cancer detected at computed tomography (CT) and confirmed with histologic examination and a

  7. Diagnostic reference levels for common computed tomography (CT) examinations: results from the first Nigerian nationwide dose survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpo, Ernest U; Adejoh, Thomas; Akwo, Judith D; Emeka, Owujekwe C; Modu, Ali A; Abba, Mohammed; Adesina, Kudirat A; Omiyi, David O; Chiegwu, Uche H

    2018-01-29

    To explore doses from common adult computed tomography (CT) examinations and propose national diagnostic reference levels (nDRLs) for Nigeria. This retrospective study was approved by the Nnamdi Azikiwe University and University Teaching Hospital Institutional Review Boards (IRB: NAUTH/CS/66/Vol8/84) and involved dose surveys of adult CT examinations across the six geographical regions of Nigeria and Abuja from January 2016 to August 2017. Dose data of adult head, chest and abdomen/pelvis CT examinations were extracted from patient folders. The median, 75th and 25th percentile CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) and dose-length-product (DLP) were computed for each of these procedures. Effective doses (E) for these examinations were estimated using the k conversion factor as described in the ICRP publication 103 (E DLP  =  k × DLP ). The proposed 75th percentile CTDI vol for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis are 61 mGy, 17 mGy, and 20 mGy, respectively. The corresponding DLPs are 1310 mGy.cm, 735 mGy.cm, and 1486 mGy.cm respectively. The effective doses were 2.75 mSv (head), 10.29 mSv (chest), and 22.29 mSv (abdomen/pelvis). Findings demonstrate wide dose variations within and across centres in Nigeria. The results also show CTDI vol comparable to international standards, but considerably higher DLP and effective doses.

  8. Value of non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract (stone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Samir Shaaban

    2015-09-04

    Sep 4, 2015 ... detection of abdominal pathologies other than stones, whether or not simulating the clinical picture of urolithiasis, and .... detector CT Siemens Somatom Sensation, with no oral or intravenous ..... of kidney stones in children.

  9. CT-based patient modeling for head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: manual versus automatic normal-tissue-segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, René F; Fortunati, Valerio; Verduijn, Gerda M; van Walsum, Theo; Veenland, Jifke F; Paulides, Margarethus M

    2014-04-01

    Clinical trials have shown that hyperthermia, as adjuvant to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, improves treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent head and neck (H&N) carcinoma. Hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) guided H&N hyperthermia is being investigated, which requires patient specific 3D patient models derived from Computed Tomography (CT)-images. To decide whether a recently developed automatic-segmentation algorithm can be introduced in the clinic, we compared the impact of manual- and automatic normal-tissue-segmentation variations on HTP quality. CT images of seven patients were segmented automatically and manually by four observers, to study inter-observer and intra-observer geometrical variation. To determine the impact of this variation on HTP quality, HTP was performed using the automatic and manual segmentation of each observer, for each patient. This impact was compared to other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. varying gridsizes and dielectric tissue properties. Despite geometrical variations, manual and automatic generated 3D patient models resulted in an equal, i.e. 1%, variation in HTP quality. This variation was minor with respect to the total of other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. 11.7%. Automatically generated 3D patient models can be introduced in the clinic for H&N HTP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CT-based patient modeling for head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: Manual versus automatic normal-tissue-segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, René F.; Fortunati, Valerio; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Clinical trials have shown that hyperthermia, as adjuvant to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, improves treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent head and neck (H and N) carcinoma. Hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) guided H and N hyperthermia is being investigated, which requires patient specific 3D patient models derived from Computed Tomography (CT)-images. To decide whether a recently developed automatic-segmentation algorithm can be introduced in the clinic, we compared the impact of manual- and automatic normal-tissue-segmentation variations on HTP quality. Material and methods: CT images of seven patients were segmented automatically and manually by four observers, to study inter-observer and intra-observer geometrical variation. To determine the impact of this variation on HTP quality, HTP was performed using the automatic and manual segmentation of each observer, for each patient. This impact was compared to other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. varying gridsizes and dielectric tissue properties. Results: Despite geometrical variations, manual and automatic generated 3D patient models resulted in an equal, i.e. 1%, variation in HTP quality. This variation was minor with respect to the total of other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. 11.7%. Conclusions: Automatically generated 3D patient models can be introduced in the clinic for H and N HTP

  11. Assessment of normal left atrial appendage anatomy and function over gender and ages by dynamic cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucebci, Samy; Velasco, Stephane; Duboe, Pier-Olivier; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Pambrun, Thomas; Ingrand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate variations in anatomy and function according to age and gender using cardiac computed tomography (CT) in a large prospective cohort of healthy patients. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is considered the most frequent site of intracardiac thrombus formation. However, variations in normal in vivo anatomy and function according to age and gender remain largely unknown. Three-dimensional (3D) cardiac reconstructions of the LAA were performed from CT scans of 193 consecutive patients. Parameters measured included LAA number of lobes, anatomical position of the LAA tip, angulation measured between the proximal and distal portions, minimum (iVol min ) and maximum (iVol max ) volumes indexed to body surface area (BSA), and ejection fraction (LAAEF). Relationship with age was assessed for each parameter. We found that men had longer and wider LAAs. The iVol min and iVol max increased by 0.23 and 0.19 ml per decade, respectively, while LAAEF decreased by 2 % per decade in both sexes. Although LAA volumes increase, LAAEF decreases with age in both sexes. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of normal left atrial appendage anatomy and function over gender and ages by dynamic cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucebci, Samy; Velasco, Stephane; Duboe, Pier-Olivier; Tasu, Jean-Pierre [University of Poitiers, University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Poitiers (France); Pambrun, Thomas [University of Poitiers, University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Poitiers (France); Ingrand, Pierre [University of Poitiers, University Institute of Public Health, Poitiers (France)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate variations in anatomy and function according to age and gender using cardiac computed tomography (CT) in a large prospective cohort of healthy patients. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is considered the most frequent site of intracardiac thrombus formation. However, variations in normal in vivo anatomy and function according to age and gender remain largely unknown. Three-dimensional (3D) cardiac reconstructions of the LAA were performed from CT scans of 193 consecutive patients. Parameters measured included LAA number of lobes, anatomical position of the LAA tip, angulation measured between the proximal and distal portions, minimum (iVol{sub min}) and maximum (iVol{sub max}) volumes indexed to body surface area (BSA), and ejection fraction (LAAEF). Relationship with age was assessed for each parameter. We found that men had longer and wider LAAs. The iVol{sub min} and iVol{sub max} increased by 0.23 and 0.19 ml per decade, respectively, while LAAEF decreased by 2 % per decade in both sexes. Although LAA volumes increase, LAAEF decreases with age in both sexes. (orig.)

  13. Improved assessment of mediastinal and pulmonary pathologies in combined staging CT examinations using a fast-speed acquisition dual-source CT protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Holzner, Veronica; Meinel, Felix G.; Armbruster, Marco; Brandlhuber, Martina; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Dual-Source CT (DSCT) and to evaluate the clinical utility in chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT studies. 45 cancer patients with two follow-up combined chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations (maximally ±10 kV difference in tube potential) were included. The first scan had to be performed with our standard protocol (fixed pitch 0.6), the second one using a novel fast-speed DSCT protocol (fixed pitch 1.55). Effective doses (ED) were calculated, noise measurements performed. Scan times were compared, motion artefacts and the diagnostic confidence rated in consensus reading. ED for the standard and fast-speed scans was 9.1 (7.0-11.1) mSv and 9.2 (7.4-12.8) mSv, respectively (P = 0.075). Image noise was comparable (abdomen; all P > 0.05) or reduced for fast-speed CTs (trachea, P = 0.001; ascending aorta, P < 0.001). Motion artefacts of the heart/the ascending aorta (all P < 0.001) and breathing artefacts (P < 0.031) were reduced in fast DSCT. The diagnostic confidence for the evaluation of mediastinal (P < 0.001) and pulmonary (P = 0.008) pathologies was improved for fast DSCT. Fast DSCT for chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations is performed within 2 seconds scan time and eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can thus be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. Abdominal image quality remains excellent. (orig.)

  14. Is liver perfusion CT reproducible? A study on intra- and interobserver agreement of normal hepatic haemodynamic parameters obtained with two different software packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Torres, Ulysses S; Torres, Lucas Rios; Bekhor, Daniel; Saito Filho, Celso Fernando; Racy, Douglas Jorge; Faggioni, Lorenzo; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the agreement between the measurements of perfusion CT parameters in normal livers by using two different software packages. This retrospective study was based on 78 liver perfusion CT examinations acquired for detecting suspected liver metastasis. Patients with any morphological or functional hepatic abnormalities were excluded. The final analysis included 37 patients (59.7 ± 14.9 y). Two readers (1 and 2) independently measured perfusion parameters using different software packages from two major manufacturers (A and B). Arterial perfusion (AP) and portal perfusion (PP) were determined using the dual-input vascular one-compartmental model. Inter-reader agreement for each package and intrareader agreement between both packages were assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman statistics. Inter-reader agreement was substantial for AP using software A (ICC = 0.82) and B (ICC = 0.85-0.86), fair for PP using software A (ICC = 0.44) and fair to moderate for PP using software B (ICC = 0.56-0.77). Intrareader agreement between software A and B ranged from slight to moderate (ICC = 0.32-0.62) for readers 1 and 2 considering the AP parameters, and from fair to moderate (ICC = 0.40-0.69) for readers 1 and 2 considering the PP parameters. At best there was only moderate agreement between both software packages, resulting in some uncertainty and suboptimal reproducibility. Advances in knowledge: Software-dependent factors may contribute to variance in perfusion measurements, demanding further technical improvements. AP measurements seem to be the most reproducible parameter to be adopted when evaluating liver perfusion CT.

  15. Reducing Radiation Doses in Female Breast and Lung during CT Examinations of Thorax: A new Technique in two Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehnati P.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chest CT is a commonly used examination for the diagnosis of lung diseases, but a breast within the scanned field is nearly never the organ of interest. Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare the female breast and lung doses using split and standard protocols in chest CT scanning. Materials and Methods: The sliced chest and breast female phantoms were used. CT exams were performed using a single-slice (SS- and a 16 multi-slice (MS- CT scanner at 100 kVp and 120 kVp. Two different protocols, including standard and split protocols, were selected for scanning. The breast and lung doses were measured using thermo-luminescence dosimeters which were inserted into different layers of the chest and breast phantoms. The differences in breast and lung radiation doses in two protocols were studied in two scanners, analyzed by SPSS software and compared by t-test. Results: Breast dose by split scanning technique reduced 11% and 31% in SS- and MS- CT. Also, the radiation dose of lung tissue in this method decreased 18% and 54% in SS- and MS- CT, respectively. Moreover, there was a significant difference (p< 0.0001 in the breast and lung radiation doses between standard and split scanning protocols. Conclusion: The application of a split scan technique instead of standard protocol has a considerable potential to reduce breast and lung doses in SS- and MS- CT scanners. If split scanning protocol is associated with an optimum kV and MSCT, the maximum dose decline will be provided.

  16. Incidence of tendon entrapment and dislocation with calcaneus and pilon fractures on CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresley, Jonathan [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Subhawong, Ty K.; Singer, Adam D.; Clifford, Paul D. [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-07-15

    To examine the association between tibial pilon and calcaneal fracture classification and tendon entrapment or dislocation. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive CT scans with calcaneal or pilon fractures from 5 years at a level 1 trauma center. We categorized calcaneal fractures according to the Sanders classification, and pilon fractures according to the Ruedi and Allgower and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Osteosynthesefragen-Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO-OTA) classifications. Ankle tendons were assessed for dislocation or entrapment. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis with significance at p < 0.05. A total of 312 fractures (91 pilon only, 193 calcaneal only, and 14 ankles with ipsilateral pilon and calcaneal fractures) were identified in 273 patients. Twenty-two pilon, 42 calcaneal, and nine combination fractures were associated with 99 occurrences of tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Such findings were associated with multiple fractures (p = 0.002). Multifragmentary pilon fractures were associated with posterior tibial and flexor digitorum longus tendon entrapment (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0003 for Ruedi/Allgower and AO-OTA, respectively), and multifragmentary Sanders type 3 or 4 calcaneal fractures were associated with superior peroneal retinacular injury (p = 0.0473) compared to simple fracture patterns. Thirty-nine percent of tendon entrapments or retinacular injuries were prospectively identified, 85 % by musculoskeletal radiologists (p < 0.0001). Approximately 25 % of calcaneal and pilon fractures were retrospectively identified to contain posteromedial tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Radiologists should meticulously search for such injuries, particularly when analyzing multifragmentary and multiple fractures. (orig.)

  17. Incidence of tendon entrapment and dislocation with calcaneus and pilon fractures on CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresley, Jonathan; Subhawong, Ty K.; Singer, Adam D.; Clifford, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    To examine the association between tibial pilon and calcaneal fracture classification and tendon entrapment or dislocation. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive CT scans with calcaneal or pilon fractures from 5 years at a level 1 trauma center. We categorized calcaneal fractures according to the Sanders classification, and pilon fractures according to the Ruedi and Allgower and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Osteosynthesefragen-Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO-OTA) classifications. Ankle tendons were assessed for dislocation or entrapment. Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis with significance at p < 0.05. A total of 312 fractures (91 pilon only, 193 calcaneal only, and 14 ankles with ipsilateral pilon and calcaneal fractures) were identified in 273 patients. Twenty-two pilon, 42 calcaneal, and nine combination fractures were associated with 99 occurrences of tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Such findings were associated with multiple fractures (p = 0.002). Multifragmentary pilon fractures were associated with posterior tibial and flexor digitorum longus tendon entrapment (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0003 for Ruedi/Allgower and AO-OTA, respectively), and multifragmentary Sanders type 3 or 4 calcaneal fractures were associated with superior peroneal retinacular injury (p = 0.0473) compared to simple fracture patterns. Thirty-nine percent of tendon entrapments or retinacular injuries were prospectively identified, 85 % by musculoskeletal radiologists (p < 0.0001). Approximately 25 % of calcaneal and pilon fractures were retrospectively identified to contain posteromedial tendon entrapment or superior peroneal retinacular injury. Radiologists should meticulously search for such injuries, particularly when analyzing multifragmentary and multiple fractures. (orig.)

  18. Automated temporal tracking and segmentation of lymphoma on serial CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Jiajing; Greenspan, Hayit; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: It is challenging to reproducibly measure and compare cancer lesions on numerous follow-up studies; the process is time-consuming and error-prone. In this paper, we show a method to automatically and reproducibly identify and segment abnormal lymph nodes in serial computed tomography (CT) exams. Methods: Our method leverages initial identification of enlarged (abnormal) lymph nodes in the baseline scan. We then identify an approximate region for the node in the follow-up scans using nonrigid image registration. The baseline scan is also used to locate regions of normal, non-nodal tissue surrounding the lymph node and to map them onto the follow-up scans, in order to reduce the search space to locate the lymph node on the follow-up scans. Adaptive region-growing and clustering algorithms are then used to obtain the final contours for segmentation. We applied our method to 24 distinct enlarged lymph nodes at multiple time points from 14 patients. The scan at the earlier time point was used as the baseline scan to be used in evaluating the follow-up scan, resulting in 70 total test cases (e.g., a series of scans obtained at 4 time points results in 3 test cases). For each of the 70 cases, a ''reference standard'' was obtained by manual segmentation by a radiologist. Assessment according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) using our method agreed with RECIST assessments made using the reference standard segmentations in all test cases, and by calculating node overlap ratio and Hausdorff distance between the computer and radiologist-generated contours. Results: Compared to the reference standard, our method made the correct RECIST assessment for all 70 cases. The average overlap ratio was 80.7 {+-} 9.7% s.d., and the average Hausdorff distance was 3.2 {+-} 1.8 mm s.d. The concordance correlation between automated and manual segmentations was 0.978 (95% confidence interval 0.962, 0.984). The 100% agreement in our sample

  19. Mediastinal and extrapleural fat hypertrophy in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis on high-resolution CT: comparison with normal individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Kyu Ri; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lim, Kun Young; Lee, Chang Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Im, Jung Gi

    2004-01-01

    We wished to compare the amount of mediastinal and extrapleural fat on high resolution CT for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) with that of normal individuals, and we wished to evaluate the correlation between the amount of fat and the degree of pulmonary fibrosis. We selected a group of 25 patients with radiologically and clinically diagnosed IPF and we also selected another group of 25 age and gender-matched patients having no abnormalities on pulmonary function testing as well as HRCT as controls from our radiologic database search (mean age: 59 years, M:F= 11:14). We measured the area of mediastinal and extrapleural fat at the levels of the aortic arch and at the origin of the right pulmonary artery and right inferior pulmonary vein on three sections of HRCT by using software (Rapidia; 3DMED, Seoul, Korea). The total amount of fat was calculated by summing up the areas of the mediastinal and extrapleural fat, which is corrected by the body mass index; we also evaluated statistical differences between the two groups. At same sections of CT, the ratio (%) of the honeycombing area to the total areas of the lung was calculated. We evaluated the relationship between the amount of extrapleural or mediastinal fat with the ratio (%) of the honeycombing area. The total amount of fat in patients with IPF and normal individuals were 67.24±19.03 cm 2 and 32.55±11.91 cm 2 , respectively. The fat amount corrected by body mass index was 280.48±74.43 mm 2 /kg/m 2 in the IPF patients and 137.06±41.76 mm 2 /kg/m 2 in normal individuals. The differences between two groups for the total amount of fat and fat amount, as corrected for by the body mass index, were statistically significant (p<0.0001). The ratio (%) of the honeycombing area and the total amount of fat showed a moderate correlation (rho= 0.43, p=0.032). Patients with IPF have a larger amount of mediastinal and extrapleural fat than normal individuals. The hypertrophy of mediastinal and extrapleural

  20. Mediastinal and extrapleural fat hypertrophy in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis on high-resolution CT: comparison with normal individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Kyu Ri; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lim, Kun Young; Lee, Chang Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Im, Jung Gi [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01

    We wished to compare the amount of mediastinal and extrapleural fat on high resolution CT for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) with that of normal individuals, and we wished to evaluate the correlation between the amount of fat and the degree of pulmonary fibrosis. We selected a group of 25 patients with radiologically and clinically diagnosed IPF and we also selected another group of 25 age and gender-matched patients having no abnormalities on pulmonary function testing as well as HRCT as controls from our radiologic database search (mean age: 59 years, M:F= 11:14). We measured the area of mediastinal and extrapleural fat at the levels of the aortic arch and at the origin of the right pulmonary artery and right inferior pulmonary vein on three sections of HRCT by using software (Rapidia; 3DMED, Seoul, Korea). The total amount of fat was calculated by summing up the areas of the mediastinal and extrapleural fat, which is corrected by the body mass index; we also evaluated statistical differences between the two groups. At same sections of CT, the ratio (%) of the honeycombing area to the total areas of the lung was calculated. We evaluated the relationship between the amount of extrapleural or mediastinal fat with the ratio (%) of the honeycombing area. The total amount of fat in patients with IPF and normal individuals were 67.24{+-}19.03 cm{sup 2} and 32.55{+-}11.91 cm{sup 2}, respectively. The fat amount corrected by body mass index was 280.48{+-}74.43 mm{sup 2}/kg/m{sup 2} in the IPF patients and 137.06{+-}41.76 mm{sup 2}/kg/m{sup 2} in normal individuals. The differences between two groups for the total amount of fat and fat amount, as corrected for by the body mass index, were statistically significant (p<0.0001). The ratio (%) of the honeycombing area and the total amount of fat showed a moderate correlation (rho= 0.43, p=0.032). Patients with IPF have a larger amount of mediastinal and extrapleural fat than normal individuals. The

  1. An EGS4-ready tomographic computational model of a 14-year-old female torso for calculating organ doses from CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.; School of Physics and Electronic Systems Engineering, University of South Australia, The Levels Campus, Mawson Lakes, South Australia, 5095; Pattison, J.

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-four consecutive CT scans have been used to construct a tomographic computational model of a 14-year-old female torso suitable for the determination of organ doses from CT. The model, known as ADELAIDE, is in the form of an input file compatible with user codes based on XYZDOS.MOR from the readily available EGS4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. ADELAIDE's dimensions are close to the Australian averages for her age so the model is representative of a 14-year-old girl. The realistic anatomy in the model differs considerably from that in Cristy's 15-year-old mathematical computational model by having realistically shaped organs that are appropriately located within a real external contour. Average absorbed dose to organs from simulated CT examinations of the chest and abdomen have been calculated for ADELAIDE using EGS4 within a geometry specific to the General Electric Hi-Speed Advantage CT scanner and using an x-ray spectrum calculated using data from the scanner's x-ray tube. The simulations include the scanner's beam shaping filter and patient table. It is suggested that the resulting values have fewer possible sources of uncertainty than organ doses derived from dose coefficients calculated for a MIRD style model with mathematical anatomy and a spectrum that may not match that of the scanner. The organ doses were normalized using the scanner's CTDI measured free-in-air and an EGS4 simulation of the CTDI measurement. Effective dose to the torso from 26-slice chest and 24-slice abdomen examinations (at 120 kV, 200 mAs, 7 mm slices) is 4.6±0.1mSv and 4.3±0.1mSv respectively. (author)

  2. Skull-base foramina of the middle cranial fossa : assessment of normal variation with high-resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Suh, Jeong Soo; Choi, Hye Young; Ko, Eun Joo; Lee, Myung Sook

    1997-01-01

    To recognize foraminal variants of the foraminae of the skull base in the middle cranial fossa, and to thus understand and distinguish normal and potentially abnormal structures. We analysed 163 patients without intracranial disease who had undergone CT scanning. These comprised 82 men and 81 women with a mean age of 39 years (range, 4-73 years). HRCT was performed, using a GE 9800 scanner. All CT scans were obtained 6-7 slices at the base of the skull, with 1.5mm collimation at 1.5mm intervals parallel to the infraorbital line. We analysed the foraminae by closesly correlating imaging findings and established anatomic knowledge. In 45 cases (27.6%) the foramen ovale was 5-10mm in diameter and asymmetrical. Deficiency of the medial bony wall including persistent foramen lacerum medius was seen in five cases (3.1%). Confluence of the foramen ovale and the foramen spinosum was seen in 13 cases (8%) and confluence of the foramen ovale and the foramen of Vesalius in 23 (14.1%). Posterolateral groove for the accessory meningeal artery was observed in 36 cases (22%). The foramen spinosum was asymmetrical in 42 cases (25.8%). A small or absent foramen spinosum with a larger ipsilateral foramen ovale was observed in 11 cases (6.7%). Medial bony defect was seen in 16 cases (9.8%). The foramen spinosum was absent in four cases (2.5%). In 74 cases (45.4%), the foramen of Vesalius was absent; it was present unilaterally and bilaterally in 55 (33.7%) and 34 cases (20.9%), respectively. Five cases showed duplicated foramina. Canaliculus innominatus was seen in 14 cases (8.9%) and was present bilaterally in three (1.8%). HRCT clearly delineates bony structure and is well able to display the rich spectrum of anatomic variation found in the base of the skull. The recognition of these normal variants will result in a better understanding of skull base neurovascular anatomy and diminish speculation as to their true nature during the interpretation of CT images

  3. MO-DE-207A-09: Low-Dose CT Image Reconstruction Via Learning From Different Patient Normal-Dose Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, H; Xing, L [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Liang, Z [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel low-dose CT (LdCT) image reconstruction strategy for lung CT imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: The proposed approach consists of four steps: (1) use the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) method to reconstruct the LdCT image; (2) calculate structure similarity (SSIM) index between the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image and a set of normal-dose CT (NdCT) images, and select the NdCT image with the highest SSIM as the learning source; (3) segment the NdCT source image into lung and outside tissue regions via simple thresholding, and adopt multiple linear regression to learn high-order Markov random field (MRF) pattern for each tissue region in the NdCT source image; (4) segment the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image into lung and outside regions as well, and apply the learnt MRF prior in each tissue region for statistical iterative reconstruction of the LdCT image following the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) framework. Quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local binary pattern (LBP) and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) metrics. Results: It was observed that lung and outside tissue regions have different MRF patterns predicted from the NdCT. Visual inspection showed that our method obviously outperformed the traditional FBP method. Comparing with the region-smoothing PWLS method, our method has, in average, 13% increase in SNR, 15% decrease in LBP difference, and 12% decrease in HOG difference from reference standard for all regions of interest, which indicated the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of image resolution and texture preservation. Conclusion: We proposed a novel LdCT image reconstruction method by learning similar image characteristics from a set of NdCT images, and the to-be-learnt NdCT image does not need to be scans from the same subject. This approach is particularly important for enhancing image quality in radiation therapy.

  4. MO-DE-207A-09: Low-Dose CT Image Reconstruction Via Learning From Different Patient Normal-Dose Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H; Xing, L; Liang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a novel low-dose CT (LdCT) image reconstruction strategy for lung CT imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: The proposed approach consists of four steps: (1) use the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) method to reconstruct the LdCT image; (2) calculate structure similarity (SSIM) index between the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image and a set of normal-dose CT (NdCT) images, and select the NdCT image with the highest SSIM as the learning source; (3) segment the NdCT source image into lung and outside tissue regions via simple thresholding, and adopt multiple linear regression to learn high-order Markov random field (MRF) pattern for each tissue region in the NdCT source image; (4) segment the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image into lung and outside regions as well, and apply the learnt MRF prior in each tissue region for statistical iterative reconstruction of the LdCT image following the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) framework. Quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local binary pattern (LBP) and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) metrics. Results: It was observed that lung and outside tissue regions have different MRF patterns predicted from the NdCT. Visual inspection showed that our method obviously outperformed the traditional FBP method. Comparing with the region-smoothing PWLS method, our method has, in average, 13% increase in SNR, 15% decrease in LBP difference, and 12% decrease in HOG difference from reference standard for all regions of interest, which indicated the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of image resolution and texture preservation. Conclusion: We proposed a novel LdCT image reconstruction method by learning similar image characteristics from a set of NdCT images, and the to-be-learnt NdCT image does not need to be scans from the same subject. This approach is particularly important for enhancing image quality in radiation therapy.

  5. Strategy for improving the detailed examination rate for colorectal cancer screening. New approach for detailed colorectal cancer examination. Study for optimal pre-treatment for CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsushima, Toru; Fujiwara, Masanori; Nagata, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    In order to drastically improve the detailed examination rate for strategic colorectal cancer examination in Japan, it is necessary to introduce CT colonography (CTC) as a detailed examination method for colorectal cancer examination, in addition to colonoscopy (CS) which is the conventional detailed examination method. In our study, a cleansing enema/contrast solution (3% Nif-C) was prepared by adding 60 ml of a water-soluble iodine-based contrast agent (Gastrografin) and water to an oral cleansing enema agent (Niflec) in solid (powder) form to a final amount of 2000 ml. The solution was compared with a Niflec solution. In terms of patient's acceptability, more than half of the examined patients answered ''easier to drink than the Niflec solution'' or ''as easy to drink as the Niflec solution. '' Also, the Nif-C solution was comparable or superior to the Niflec solution in terms of cleansing enema effects. Regarding imaging effects essential for CTC, the CT level was found to be 200 HU or greater for any large intestine region upon CTC using the Nif-C solution. Thus, practically sufficient imaging effects were achieved. In conclusion, CTC with pretreatment involving a cleansing enema with oral administration of 3% Nif-C is superior to CS in terms of patient's acceptability. In addition, at least in view of the overseas reports on CTC, there is no particular problem in terms of diagnostic accuracy. Thus, CTC is expected to resolve various problems related to colorectal cancer examination in Japan. (author)

  6. Radiation dose exposure in patients affected by lymphoma undergoing repeat CT examinations: how to manage the radiation dose variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Dore, Antonio; Aringhieri, Giacomo; Caramella, Davide

    2018-03-01

    To assess the variability of radiation dose exposure in patients affected by lymphoma undergoing repeat CT (computed tomography) examinations and to evaluate the influence of different scan parameters on the overall radiation dose. A series of 34 patients (12 men and 22 women with a median age of 34.4 years) with lymphoma, after the initial staging CT underwent repeat follow-up CT examinations. For each patient and each repeat examination, age, sex, use of AEC system (Automated Exposure Control, i.e. current modulation), scan length, kV value, number of acquired scans (i.e. number of phases), abdominal size diameter and dose length product (DLP) were recorded. The radiation dose of just one venous phase was singled out from the DLP of the entire examination. All scan data were retrieved by our PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) by means of a dose monitoring software. Among the variables we considered, no significant difference of radiation dose was observed among patients of different ages nor concerning tube voltage. On the contrary the dose delivered to the patients varied depending on sex, scan length and usage of AEC. No significant difference was observed depending on the behaviour of technologists, while radiologists' choices had indirectly an impact on the radiation dose due to the different number of scans requested by each of them. Our results demonstrate that patients affected by lymphoma who undergo repeat whole body CT scanning may receive unnecessary overexposure. We quantified and analyzed the most relevant variables in order to provide a useful tool to manage properly CT dose variability, estimating the amount of additional radiation dose for every single significant variable. Additional scans, incorrect scan length and incorrect usage of AEC system are the most relevant cause of patient radiation exposure.

  7. Wandering carotid arteries: Reciprocating change between normal and retropharyngeal positions on serial CT studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Baba

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Positional change in the retropharyngeal carotid artery, a rare phenomenon over time, is even rarer in previous reports, and it is important to be aware of this before any neck surgical procedure. A woman in her 50s underwent an anterior maxillectomy for upper gingival cancer, without neck dissection. The patient had medical histories of diabetes mellitus and liver dysfunction, with unremarkable family histories. Serial neck contrast-enhanced computed tomography for detecting locoregional recurrence had been performed as a follow-up during 4 years. A radiological course of moving carotid arteries in serial computed tomography studies showed reciprocating positional changes (wandering between normal and retropharyngeal regions. There was no locoregional recurrence of the gingival cancer. This is the first case to describe a so-rare presentation of wandering carotid arteries. It is important for clinicians to be aware of a wandering carotid artery to avoid potentially fatal complications.

  8. The determination of patient dose from 18F-FDG PET/CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamwan, K.; Krisanachinda, A.; Pasawang, P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system has heightened the need for medical diagnosis. However, the patient dose is increasing in comparison to whole-body PET/CT dose. The aim of this study is to determine the patient effective dose in 35 oncology Thai patients with the age range of 28-60 y from PET scan using [fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and from CT scan. Cumulated activity and residence time of various organs were calculated from time-activity curves by using S-value based on the body mass. Mean organ absorbed dose and the effective dose from CT scan were calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry method and Monte Carlo simulation, respectively. The average whole-body effective doses from PET and CT were 4.40 ± 0.61 and 14.45 ± 2.82 mSv, respectively, resulting in the total patient dose of 18.85 mSv. This can be used as the reference dose in Thai patients. (authors)

  9. Computed tomography for the detection of distal radioulnar joint instability: normal variation and reliability of four CT scoring systems in 46 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijffels, Mathieu; Krijnen, Pieta; Schipper, Inger [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Surgery-Trauma Surgery, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Stomp, Wouter; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    The diagnosis of distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability is clinically challenging. Computed tomography (CT) may aid in the diagnosis, but the reliability and normal variation for DRUJ translation on CT have not been established in detail. The aim of this study was to evaluate inter- and intraobserver agreement and normal ranges of CT scoring methods for determination of DRUJ translation in both posttraumatic and uninjured wrists. Patients with a conservatively treated, unilateral distal radius fracture were included. CT scans of both wrists were evaluated independently, by two readers using the radioulnar line method, subluxation ratio method, epicenter method and radioulnar ratio method. The inter- and intraobserver agreement was assessed and normal values were determined based on the uninjured wrists. Ninety-two wrist CTs (mean age: 56.5 years, SD: 17.0, mean follow-up 4.2 years, SD: 0.5) were evaluated. Interobserver agreement was best for the epicenter method [ICC = 0.73, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.65-0.79]. Intraobserver agreement was almost perfect for the radioulnar line method (ICC = 0.82, 95 % CI 0.77-0.87). Each method showed a wide normal range for normal DRUJ translation. Normal range for the epicenter method is -0.35 to -0.06 in pronation and -0.11 to 0.19 in supination. DRUJ translation on CT in pro- and supination can be reliably evaluated in both normal and posttraumatic wrists, however with large normal variation. The epicenter method seems the most reliable. Scanning of both wrists might be helpful to prevent the radiological overdiagnosis of instability. (orig.)

  10. Effectiveness of combined use of imprint cytological and histological examination in CT-guided tissue-core biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Kajiwara, Kenji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu [Tokai University Hachioji Hospital, Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan); Kakizawa, Hideaki [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Naka-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Toyoda, Naoyuki [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); National Hospital Organisation Kure Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the combination of imprint cytology and histology in tissue-core percutaneous biopsy under real-time computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Between October 2009 and June 2013, 156 percutaneous needle biopsies were performed in our institution. Those obtained by tissue-core biopsy underwent both imprint cytological and histological examinations routinely after touch imprint cytology was performed on site to evaluate the samples' sufficiency for cytological and pathological examination. Final diagnosis was confirmed by independent surgical pathology, independent culture results or clinical follow-up. Rates of adequate specimens and precise diagnosis, by combined cytological and histological examination were 100 % (156/156) and 96.2 % (150/156), by cytology 94.4 % (152/156) and 83.3 % (130/156) and by histology 99.3 % (155/156) and 92.3 % (144/156). Precise diagnosis was achieved by combined examinations in 94.7 % (89/94) of thoracic lesions, 97.6 % (40/41) of musculoskeletal lesions, and 100 % (21/21) of abdominal, pelvic and retroperitoneal lesions. In all 104 lesions diagnosed as malignant by CT-guided biopsy and in 30 of 52 diagnosed as benign, specific cell types could be proved by combined examinations. Combined imprint cytology and histology performed after on-site touch imprint cytological evaluation improved the diagnostic ability of CT fluoroscopically guided biopsy. (orig.)

  11. Effectiveness of combined use of imprint cytological and histological examination in CT-guided tissue-core biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Kajiwara, Kenji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Toyoda, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the combination of imprint cytology and histology in tissue-core percutaneous biopsy under real-time computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Between October 2009 and June 2013, 156 percutaneous needle biopsies were performed in our institution. Those obtained by tissue-core biopsy underwent both imprint cytological and histological examinations routinely after touch imprint cytology was performed on site to evaluate the samples' sufficiency for cytological and pathological examination. Final diagnosis was confirmed by independent surgical pathology, independent culture results or clinical follow-up. Rates of adequate specimens and precise diagnosis, by combined cytological and histological examination were 100 % (156/156) and 96.2 % (150/156), by cytology 94.4 % (152/156) and 83.3 % (130/156) and by histology 99.3 % (155/156) and 92.3 % (144/156). Precise diagnosis was achieved by combined examinations in 94.7 % (89/94) of thoracic lesions, 97.6 % (40/41) of musculoskeletal lesions, and 100 % (21/21) of abdominal, pelvic and retroperitoneal lesions. In all 104 lesions diagnosed as malignant by CT-guided biopsy and in 30 of 52 diagnosed as benign, specific cell types could be proved by combined examinations. Combined imprint cytology and histology performed after on-site touch imprint cytological evaluation improved the diagnostic ability of CT fluoroscopically guided biopsy. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of shielding capability of controlled area for CT examination room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Asada, Yasuki; Nakai, Takayo; Takeuchi, Kichito; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Koga, Sukehiko

    2002-01-01

    With the revision of the law in April, 2001, the effective dose at the boundary of the controlled area was set at 1.3 mSv/3M. Whether the shielding capability of the CT room satisfied the provisions of the law or not was confirmed by actual measurements. Both thermo luminescence dosemeter (TLD) and electronic dosemeter were used to measure the radiation doses. The shielding capability of the gantry was studied both inside and outside the room for a week as a basic experiment. On the basis of the data thus obtained doses accumulated in 3 months were estimated. According to the results of 3 month-measurement, the doses outside the wall of the CT room were about 200μ Sv. This numerical value was comparable to the background level of the evaluation point. The results above assured that the shielding capability of the CT room satisfied the provisions of the law well. (author)

  13. Normal renal arterial anatomy assessed by multidetector CT angiography: are there differences between men and women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turba, Ulku Cenk; Uflacker, Renan; Bozlar, Ugur; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine renal arterial anatomy and gender differences in adults without renovascular disease using multidetector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA). MDCTA datasets of 399 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Measurements of the aortorenal diameters, the angulation of the renal ostia and pedicles as well as the distance between the origins of the renal arteries were measured. Differences in measurements between genders were tested for statistical significance using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's Chi-Square tests. A total of 798 renal arteries were available for analysis in 207 female (mean age = 52.91 years) and 192 male patients (mean age = 53.04 years). Female patients were found to have smaller aortae (at the level of the right renal ostium) and bilateral renal arteries than males (mean aortic diameter M/F = 18.33/15.89 mm, mean right renal artery ostial diameter M/F = 5.06/4.59 mm, mean left ostial renal diameter M/F = 5.14/4.66 mm) (p renal ostia level in relation to the vertebrae and the majority of renal arteries originated at the L1 and L2 levels. The longitudinal distance between right and left renal artery ostia ranged from 0 to 32 mm (mean = 4,6 mm, median = 5mm). The mean anteroposterior orientation of the right renal ostia was M/F = 29.45 degrees/28.20 degrees , and M/F = -7.96 degrees/-11.14 degrees for left renal artery ostia. The mean anteroposterior orientation of the right renal pedicle was M/F = 41.37 degrees/44.34 degrees and M/F = 42.31 degrees/43.95 degrees for the left pedicle. There are some differences in normal renal arterial anatomy between genders. Normal renal arterial information is useful not only for planning and performing of endovascular and laparoscopic urologic procedures, but also for medical device development. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Do physical examination and CT-scan measures of femoral neck anteversion and tibial torsion relate to each other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeux, Morgan; Mahy, Jessica; Graham, H Kerr

    2014-01-01

    Informed clinical decision making for femoral and/or tibial de-rotation osteotomies requires accurate measurement of patient function through gait analysis and anatomy through physical examination of bony torsions. Validity of gait analysis has been extensively studied; however, controversy remains regarding the accuracy of physical examination measurements of femoral and tibial torsion. Comparison between CT-scans and physical examination measurements of femoral neck anteversion (FNA) and external tibial torsion (ETT) were retrospectively obtained for 98 (FNA) and 64 (ETT) patients who attended a tertiary hospital for instrumented gait analysis between 2007 and 2010. The physical examination methods studied for femoral neck anteversion were the trochanteric prominence angle test (TPAT) and the maximum hip rotation arc midpoint (Arc midpoint) and for external tibial torsion the transmalleolar axis (TMA). Results showed that all physical examination measurements statistically differed to the CT-scans (bias(standard deviation): -2(14) for TPAT, -10(12) for Arc midpoint and -16(9) for TMA). Bland and Altman plots showed that method disagreements increased with increasing bony torsions in all cases but notably for TPAT. Regression analysis showed that only TMA and CT-scan measurement of external tibial torsion demonstrated good (R(2)=57%) correlation. Correlations for both TPAT (R(2)=14%) and Arc midpoint (R(2)=39%) with CT-scan measurements of FNA were limited. We conclude that physical examination should be considered as screening techniques rather than definitive measurement methods for FNA and ETT. Further research is required to develop more accurate measurement methods to accompany instrumented gait analysis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Radiation doses during chest examinations using dose modulation techniques in multislice CT scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone Roshan; Pradip Joe; Dinakran Paul; Srikanth B

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiation dose and image quality using a manual protocol and dose modulation techniques in a 6-slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT of the chest were included in the study. For the manual protocol settings, constant tube potential (kV) and tube current-time product (mAs) of 140 kV and 120 mAs, respectively, were used. The angular and z-axis dose modulation techniques utilized a constant tu...

  16. MR-urography and CT-urography: principles, examination techniques, applications; MR-Urographie und CT-Urographie: Prinzipien, Untersuchungstechniken, Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Adam, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Staatz, G.; Wildberger, J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2003-02-01

    MR-urography (MRU) and CT-urography (CTU) provide refined imaging of the upper urinary tract not achievable with conventional intravenous urography (IVU). The traditional MR-urographic technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T{sub 2}-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences for obtaining static fluid images of the urinary tract independent of the excretory renal function. T{sub 2}-weighted MR-urograms have proved to be excellent in visualizing the dilated urinary tract, even in non-excreting kidneys. In contrast, T{sub 1}-weighted MRU reflects the excretory renal function and displays the urine flow through the upper tract after renal excretion of an intravenously administered gadolinium chelate. The gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized with fast T{sub 1}-weighted 3D-gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of gadolinium in the collecting system and for avoiding susceptibility artifacts (T{sub 2}*-effects) in the urine. T{sub 1}-weighted excretory MRU provides impressive urograms of both non-dilated and obstructed collecting systems in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. Multislice-CT-urography (MS-CTU) is also an excretory urography like T{sub 1}-weighted MRU. Furthermore, MS-CTU can be combined with low-dose furosemide for accelerated passage of excreted contrast material obviating the need for abdominal compression. CT-urography is limited by its radiation burden and the nephrotoxicity of radiographic contrast media. Combining MRU or MS-CTU with conventional MRI or CT offers several applications, e.g., diagnosis of intrinsic and extrinsic tumors. Meanwhile, MRU has replaced IVU in pediatric uroradiology and is also recommended for the assessment of renal transplants. MS-CTU may provide valuable information in chronic urolithiasis, especially if associated with a distorted urinary tract anatomy. Both MRU and MS-CTU will play an important role in

  17. The paradox of vaginal examination practice during normal childbirth: Palestinian women's feelings, opinions, knowledge and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sahar J; Sundby, Johanne; Husseini, Abdullatif; Bjertness, Espen

    2012-08-28

    Vaginal examination (VE), is a frequent procedure during childbirth. It is the most accepted ways to assess progress during childbirth, but its repetition at short intervals has no value. Over years, VE continued to be plagued by a nature that implies negative feelings and experiences of women. The aim of this exploratory qualitative study was to explore women's feelings, opinions, knowledge and experiences of vaginal examinations (VE) during normal childbirth. We interviewed 176 postpartum women using semi-structured questionnaire in a Palestinian public hospital in the oPt. Descriptive statistics were conducted; frequency counts and percentages for the quantitative questions. The association between the frequency of VE and age, parity, years of education, locale and the time of delivery was tested by Chi-squared and Fisher's Exact test. The open-ended qualitative questions were read line-by-line for the content and coded. The assigned codes for all responses were entered to the SPSS statistical software version 18. As compared with WHO recommendations, VE was conducted too frequently, and by too many providers during childbirth. The proportion of women who received a 'too high' frequency of VEs during childbirth was significantly larger in primipara as compared to multipara women (P = .037). 82% of women reported pain or severe pain and 68% reported discomfort during VE. Some women reported insensitive approaches of providers, insufficient means of privacy and no respect of dignity or humanity during the exam. Palestinian women are undergoing unnecessary and frequent VEs during childbirth, conducted by several different providers and suffer pain and discomfort un-necessarily. Adhering to best evidence, VE during childbirth should be conducted only when necessary, and if possible, by the same provider. This will decrease the laboring women's unnecessary suffering from pain and discomfort. Providers should advocate for women's right to information, respect

  18. Examination of the neighborhood activation theory in normal and hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, D D; Takayanagi, S; Moshfegh, A; Noffsinger, P D; Fausti, S A

    2001-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of lexical information on word recognition among normal hearing listeners and individuals with sensorineural hearing loss. The lexical factors of interest were incorporated in the Neighborhood Activation Model (NAM). Central to this model is the concept that words are recognized relationally in the context of other phonemically similar words. NAM suggests that words in the mental lexicon are organized into similarity neighborhoods and the listener is required to select the target word from competing lexical items. Two structural characteristics of similarity neighborhoods that influence word recognition have been identified; "neighborhood density" or the number of phonemically similar words (neighbors) for a particular target item and "neighborhood frequency" or the average frequency of occurrence of all the items within a neighborhood. A third lexical factor, "word frequency" or the frequency of occurrence of a target word in the language, is assumed to optimize the word recognition process by biasing the system toward choosing a high frequency over a low frequency word. Three experiments were performed. In the initial experiments, word recognition for consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) monosyllables was assessed in young normal hearing listeners by systematically partitioning the items into the eight possible lexical conditions that could be created by two levels of the three lexical factors, word frequency (high and low), neighborhood density (high and low), and average neighborhood frequency (high and low). Neighborhood structure and word frequency were estimated computationally using a large, on-line lexicon-based Webster's Pocket Dictionary. From this program 400 highly familiar, monosyllables were selected and partitioned into eight orthogonal lexical groups (50 words/group). The 400 words were presented randomly to normal hearing listeners in speech-shaped noise (Experiment 1) and "in quiet" (Experiment 2) as

  19. Cognitive Deficits in Healthy Elderly Population With "Normal" Scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votruba, Kristen L; Persad, Carol; Giordani, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether healthy older adults with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores above 23 exhibit cognitive impairment on neuropsychological tests. Participants completed the MMSE and a neuropsychological battery including tests of 10 domains. Results were compared to published normative data. On neuropsychological testing, participants performed well on measures of naming and recall but showed mild to moderate impairment in working memory and processing speed and marked impairment in inhibition, sustained attention, and executive functioning. Almost everyone (91%) scored at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean in at least 1 domain. The median number of domains in which individuals scored below 1 SD was 3.0 of 10.0, whereas over 21% scored below 1 SD in 5 domains or more. With the strictest of definitions for impairment, 20% of this population scored below 2.0 SDs below the norm in at least 2 domains, a necessary condition for a diagnosis of dementia. The finding that cognitive impairment, particularly in attention and executive functioning, is found in healthy older persons who perform well on the MMSE has clinical and research implications in terms of emphasizing normal variability in performance and early identification of possible impairment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. A practical approach to radiological evaluation of CT lung cancer screening examinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Xueqian; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON) was launched to investigate whether screening for lung cancer by low-dose multidetector computed tomography (CT) in high-risk patients will lead

  1. Detection of colorectal masses in CT colonography: application of deep residual networks for differentiating masses from normal colon anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näppi, Janne J.; Hironaka, Toru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2018-02-01

    Even though the clinical consequences of a missed colorectal cancer far outweigh those of a missed polyp, there has been little work on computer-aided detection (CADe) for colorectal masses in CT colonography (CTC). One of the problems is that it is not clear how to manually design mathematical image-based features that could be used to differentiate effectively between masses and certain types of normal colon anatomy such as ileocecal valves (ICVs). Deep learning has demonstrated ability to automatically determine effective discriminating features in many image-based problems. Recently, residual networks (ResNets) were developed to address the practical problems of constructing deep network architectures for optimizing the performance of deep learning. In this pilot study, we compared the classification performance of a conventional 2D-convolutional ResNet (2D-ResNet) with that of a volumetric 3D-convolutional ResNet (3D-ResNet) in differentiating masses from normal colon anatomy in CTC. For the development and evaluation of the ResNets, 695 volumetric images of biopsy-proven colorectal masses, ICVs, haustral folds, and rectal tubes were sampled from 196 clinical CTC cases and divided randomly into independent training, validation, and test datasets. The training set was expanded by use of volumetric data augmentation. Our preliminary results on the 140 test samples indicate that it is feasible to train a deep volumetric 3D-ResNet for performing effective image-based discriminations in CTC. The 3D-ResNet slightly outperformed the 2D-ResNet in the discrimination of masses and normal colon anatomy, but the statistical difference between their very high classification accuracies was not significant. The highest classification accuracy was obtained by combining the mass-likelihood estimates of the 2D- and 3D-ResNets, which enabled correct classification of all of the masses.

  2. Evaluation of image quality and dose in thoracic spiral CT examination in patients with pulmonary carcinoma. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran-Blanco, L. M.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, R.; Calzado-Cantera, A.; Arenas de Pablo, A.; Baeza-Trujillo, M.; Cuevas-Ibanez, A.; Garcia-Castano, B.; Gomez-Leon, N.; Turrero-Nogues, A.; Moran-Penco, P.

    2002-01-01

    We have applied criteria for CT quality defined in the European Guidelines to a samples of thoracic CT examinations for the indication of pulmonary carcinoma of 5 institutions of the Community of Madrid that have spiral CT equipment. The selected examinations have been evaluated independently by five radiologists to determine the degree of adherence to the quality criteria for image defined in the Guidelines s for examinations of general thorax. Dosimetric measurements carried out in parallel have served to estimate the values of CT (CTDI w ) dose indices, dose-length product (DLP) and effective dose for every patient. The result show a high global adherence to the quality criteria (96%), with averages per institution being between 94% (in two institutions) and 98% (in three institutions). There are 10 of 16 criteria that are adhered to in all examinations of the sample: those which are not adhered to systematically are: two of visualization (1.1 and 1.4), with 92-96% fulfillment, and four of critical reproduction (2.6; 2.8; 2.9 and 2.10), with percentages of adherence between 91% and 96%. The average CTDI w values per institution are in the interval 12.9-19.1 mGy; those of DLP between 263 and 577 mGy cm and those of effective dose between 4.2 and 9.2 mSv. The DLP-image quality correlation in institutions with the best image quality was null in two of them and direct and moderate in the third. In both institutions with the poorest image: (Author) 20 refs

  3. (18)F-choline PET/CT pitfalls in image interpretation: an update on 300 examined patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-02-01

    F-choline PET/CT is an important diagnostic tool in the management of patients with prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this study was to describe and discuss some abnormal sites of uptake that we observed, not due to PC recurrence. Three hundred patients were submitted to F-choline PET/CT for staging or restaging of PC. Whole-body PET/CT was acquired 40 minutes after the F-choline administration. We found abnormal uptake of the tracer, not related to PC, in 48/300 patients (16%). Most of these findings were due to inflammatory processes. Furthermore, some malignant conditions, such as a case of colon cancer, a case of bladder carcinoma, and a multiple myeloma, were diagnosed. Mild uptake was also detected in some benign diseases, such as thymoma, adrenal adenoma, and sarcoidosis. Six patients showed focal brain uptake in correspondence to a meningioma. It is necessary for nuclear physicians, during clinical practice, to consider the possibility of F-choline uptake in some benign or malignant conditions for the intrinsic pharmacologic property of the tracer. An accurate medical investigation, correlative imaging with CT and/or MRI with contrast agents, laboratory data, and above all, histologic examination are often necessary for correct diagnosis.

  4. The value of CT measurement of normal human mandible, hyoid and the airway area at the hyoid level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changliang; Zhang Jia; Ge Pingjiang; Zhang Siyi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the normal value and clinical significance of the lengths and angles of both mandible and hyoid, and their relationship with cervical vertebra as well as the transverse area of the airway at the hyoid level using CT. Methods: Several lines and angles on the CT images were measured in 68 normal subjects. Line A was the length between both free ends of the mandible; line B was the distance from the body of the mandible to line A; Line C was the distance from line A to the anterior aspect of the cervical vertebra. α 1 was the angle between the middle of mandible body and its two free ends. Line a was the distance between two free ends of greater horn of hyoid bone. Line b was the distance from hyoid to line a. Line c was the distance from line a to the cervical vertebra. α 2 was the angle between the middle of hyoid body and its two free ends. S stood for the area of the airway at the hyoid level. SPSS 11.5 statistical analysis package was used to analyze the results. Results: The average and median distance/angle of various measurements were as follows: line A was (89.28±5.90) mm and 88.70 mm, line B was (62.61±5.78) mm and 62.50 mm, line C was (9.29±3.29) mm and 4.20 mm, α 1 was (71.25±6.77) degree and 71.05 degree, line a was (38.69 ± 6.07) mm and 39.90 mm, line b was (28.79 ± 4.37) mm and 28.50 mm, line c was (1.91 ± 3.03) mm and 1.75 mm, α 2 was (68.47 ± 15.71) degree and 66.95 degree. The average S was (436.14 ± 160.37) mm 2 and median was 431.75 mm 2 . Conclusion: It is easy to measure the three lines and the two angles of mandible and hyoid. The measurement is of vital importance in the diagnosis and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

  5. Emphysema Quantification Using Low Dose Chest CT: Changes in Follow-Up Examinations of Asymptomatic Smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Ho; Sun, Joo Sung; Kang, Doo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwang Joo; Park, Kyung Joo [Dept. of Pulmolary Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To evaluate the changes of emphysema quantification in a follow-up low dose CT compared with pulmonary function test (PFT) results in asymptomatic smokers. We selected 66 asymptomatic smokers (> 40 years old) who underwent a follow-up low dose CT at least one year after the first CT as well as PFT within the same time period. Emphysema quantification was performed using an automated measurement software and an emphysema index (EI) was calculated using multiple threshold values (-970--900 HU). The interval change of EI ({Delta} EI) was compared with the change in the PFT values. Mean follow-up %forced expiratory volume in 1 second (88.1), %forced vital capacity (FVC) (89.5) and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of vital capacity (3.21) were significantly lower compared with the values of initial tests (93.3, 93.1, 3.48). The mean EIs (2.4-25.6%) increased on follow-up CTs compared with initial EIs (2.1-24.5%), though the increase was not statistically significant. In a group with a follow-up period of 2 years or more (n = 32), EI significantly increased when using -900 HU as the threshold. The ({Delta} EIs were poorly correlated with the ({Delta} PFT values, but significantly correlated with ({Delta} FVC (r = -0.32--0.27). Emphysema quantification using low dose CT was not effective for the evaluation of short-term changes in less than a 2-year period, but may be used for long term follow-up series in asymptomatic smokers.

  6. Computed tomography (CT) findings of the pleural metastasis effusion: the examination of 100 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, J. J.; Alonso, S.; Gil, S.; Fernandez, F.; Lloret, M.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) findings in a series of 100 pleural metastasis effusions. A retrospective study was carried out that consisted of assessing the CT images of 100 malignant pleural metastasis effusions, evaluating the amount of the effusion, its distribution, the presence of swelling or nodules in the different pleural surfaces, the existence and the characteristics of the extrapleural fat and the changes in other locations different to the pleural cavity, mainly the mediastinum and the pulmonary parenchyma. The effusion was located in 12 patients. The amount of the effusion was slight in 14% and massive in 10% of the sick patients. Pleural nodules were detected in 19% of the studies, in all those that affected the costal parental pleura, being less frequent in the other pleural surfaces. The costal parental pleura was swollen in 43% of the sick patients. 52 sick patients did not have any swelling nor pleural nodules, with the pleural effusion being the only sign of pleural metastasis. Changes in the rest of the thorax were frequent in relation to the malignant illness that causes the effusion and appeared in 67% of the sick patients. The patients with pleural effusions of malignant etiology showed variable CT findings, that in general were non-specific, and in almost half the cases no pleural changes can be seen apart from the effusion. (Author) 13 refs

  7. Vertebral artery and osseous anomalies characteristic at the craniocervical junction diagnosed by CT and 3D CT angiography in normal Czech population: analysis of 511 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaněk, P; Bradáč, Ondřej; de Lacy, P; Konopková, R; Lacman, J; Beneš, V

    2017-07-01

    instrumentation is planned. The female sex and age over 70 years were found to be the most important factors for HRVA presence. The FIA and the FEN VA were rare in our study contrary to reports published from Asia, showing as many as a 10 % the VA presence over the starting point for C1 lateral screw. On the basis of the infrequent occurrence of these anomalies, we do not recommend routine CT angiography when upper cervical spine instrumentation in the normal population is planned.

  8. Postoperative CT in pancreas transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, F.E.; Harper, S.J.F.; Callaghan, C.J.; Shaw, A.; Godfrey, E.M.; Bradley, J.A.; Watson, C.J.E.; Pettigrew, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To examine the usage and value of computed tomography (CT) following simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplantation. Materials and methods: Indications for postoperative CT, key findings, and their influence on management were determined by retrospective analysis. Results: Ninety-eight patients underwent 313 CT examinations. Common indications for the examinations included suspected intra-abdominal collection (31.1%) and elevated serum amylase/lipase (24.1%). CT findings most frequently showed non-specific mild inflammation (27.6%), a normal scan (17.1%) and fluid collections (16.3%). High capillary blood glucose (CBG) was associated with resultant CT demonstration of graft vascular abnormalities, but otherwise, particular clinical indications were not associated with specific CT findings. Conclusion: Clinical findings in patients with SPK transplants are non-specific. The pattern of abnormalities encountered is significantly different to those seen in native pancreatic disease and demands a tailored protocol. CT enables accurate depiction of vascular abnormalities and fluid collections, thus reducing the number of surgical interventions that might otherwise be required. Elevated CBG should prompt urgent CT to exclude potentially reversible vascular complications. - Highlights: • The value of CT following simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation was assessed. • 313 CT scans were performed on 98 patients between January 2005 and August 2010. • Elevated blood glucose was associated with CT findings of graft vascular anomalities. • CT was particularly useful in directing operative versus non-operative intervention.

  9. Evaluation of First-Ray Mobility in Patients with Hallux Valgus Using Weight-Bearing CT and a 3-D Analysis System: A Comparison with Normal Feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tadashi; Kubota, Makoto; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Marumo, Keishi

    2017-02-01

    Some physicians report that patients with hallux valgus have hypermobility at the tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint of the first ray and 3-dimensional (3-D) deformity. With use of non-weight-bearing and weight-bearing computed tomography (CT), we evaluated the 3-D mobility of each joint of the first ray in feet with hallux valgus compared with normal feet. Ten feet of 10 patients with hallux valgus and 10 feet of 10 healthy volunteers with no foot disorders were examined. All participants were women. Weight-bearing (a load equivalent to body weight) and non-weight-bearing CT scans were made with use of a device that we developed. Orthogonal coordinate axes were set and a 3-D model was reconstructed. Each joint of the first ray was aligned with the respective proximal bone, and 3-D displacement of the distal bone relative to the proximal bone under loading was quantified. At the talonavicular joint, significantly greater dorsiflexion of the navicular relative to the talus was observed in the hallux valgus group compared with the control group. At the medial cuneonavicular joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater eversion and abduction of the medial cuneiform relative to the navicular. At the first TMT joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater dorsiflexion, inversion, and adduction of the first metatarsal relative to the medial cuneiform. At the first metatarsophalangeal joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater eversion and abduction of the first proximal phalanx relative to the first metatarsal (all p hallux valgus.

  10. CT colonography for preoperative examination of the proximal colon using a transanal drainage tube for acute malignant colonic obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kazuaki; Hirano, Yuji; Oono, Keisuke; Sasaki, Kazunori; Someya, Tetsufumi; Harada, Keisuke; Ezoe, Eiri; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Hirata, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of CT colonography for preoperative examination of the proximal colon using a transanal drainage tube in patients with acute colon obstruction caused by colorectal cancer. Ten patients who received initial treatment for acute malignant colon obstruction at our hospital between June 2004 and December 2008 were studied. In these patients, elective surgery was possible after transanal drainage tube insertion, and the colon on the oral side from the cancer lesion was examined using a drainage tube. Air was injected through the tube into the oral side of the colon, and CT colonography was assessed for the presence or absence of lesions on the oral side. The images of the oral side of the colon were good enough to allow adequate interpretation in 9 of the 10 patients. In the first patient, the visualization of the area near the lesion was somewhat fair, although the right side colon was well visualized. There were no complications associated with this examination. The present preoperative examination using a transanal drainage tube was useful for determining the extent of intestinal resection when patients were not candidates for colonoscopy or barium enema examination. (author)

  11. Clinical protocol for conducting a bone scintigraphy subsequent SPECT/CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovska, A.; Dimcheva, M.; Doldurova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Like any nuclear medicine study, bone scintigraphy is a diagnostic procedure associated with intravenous injection of a radioactive isotope with low activity - radiopharmaceutical. But recently in clinical practice hybrid imaging methods such as SPECT/ CT (Single Photon Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography) has necessitated, as they provide comprehensive information about the function and structure of the studied organ. Materials and methods: In the Department of Nuclear Medicine in The Specialized Hospital for Active Treatment of Oncology Diseases in Sofia it is installed a two-detector SPECT/CT gamma camera Siemens Symbia T2, on which the whole range of nuclear medicine studies in oncology practice is held: bone scintigraphy, 99mTc - MIBI scintigraphy, Lymphoscintigraphy, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, tireostsintigraphy with 131I/99mTc, dynamic nephroscintgraphy etc. The working algorithm upon choosing the clinical protocols, and setting the parameters for scanning are complied with the requirements and recommendations established by the nuclear medicine standard. The presented are results from studies of patients when after whole body bone scintigraphy, an additional SPECT/CT study was conducted for more accurate diagnostic and interpretation of the results. Results: Practical introduction of hybrid imaging methods require from technicians besides knowledge in working with radioactive sources and practical skills such as: the selection of the matrix size, number of projections, choice of trajectory - circular or elliptical, set the appropriate degree of rotation of the detector (180 or 360). Particularly important in the processing of MR images is the appropriate choice of algorithm of reconstruction: filtered backprojection or iterative reconstruction methods. In MR images processing there is no rule for the optimal filter, which is why the quality of the reconstructed image depends primarily on the experience of the operator

  12. Challenges in microarray class discovery: a comprehensive examination of normalization, gene selection and clustering

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    Landfors Mattias

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster analysis, and in particular hierarchical clustering, is widely used to extract information from gene expression data. The aim is to discover new classes, or sub-classes, of either individuals or genes. Performing a cluster analysis commonly involve decisions on how to; handle missing values, standardize the data and select genes. In addition, pre-processing, involving various types of filtration and normalization procedures, can have an effect on the ability to discover biologically relevant classes. Here we consider cluster analysis in a broad sense and perform a comprehensive evaluation that covers several aspects of cluster analyses, including normalization. Result We evaluated 2780 cluster analysis methods on seven publicly available 2-channel microarray data sets with common reference designs. Each cluster analysis method differed in data normalization (5 normalizations were considered, missing value imputation (2, standardization of data (2, gene selection (19 or clustering method (11. The cluster analyses are evaluated using known classes, such as cancer types, and the adjusted Rand index. The performances of the different analyses vary between the data sets and it is difficult to give general recommendations. However, normalization, gene selection and clustering method are all variables that have a significant impact on the performance. In particular, gene selection is important and it is generally necessary to include a relatively large number of genes in order to get good performance. Selecting genes with high standard deviation or using principal component analysis are shown to be the preferred gene selection methods. Hierarchical clustering using Ward's method, k-means clustering and Mclust are the clustering methods considered in this paper that achieves the highest adjusted Rand. Normalization can have a significant positive impact on the ability to cluster individuals, and there are indications that

  13. Challenges in microarray class discovery: a comprehensive examination of normalization, gene selection and clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Cluster analysis, and in particular hierarchical clustering, is widely used to extract information from gene expression data. The aim is to discover new classes, or sub-classes, of either individuals or genes. Performing a cluster analysis commonly involve decisions on how to; handle missing values, standardize the data and select genes. In addition, pre-processing, involving various types of filtration and normalization procedures, can have an effect on the ability to discover biologically relevant classes. Here we consider cluster analysis in a broad sense and perform a comprehensive evaluation that covers several aspects of cluster analyses, including normalization. Result We evaluated 2780 cluster analysis methods on seven publicly available 2-channel microarray data sets with common reference designs. Each cluster analysis method differed in data normalization (5 normalizations were considered), missing value imputation (2), standardization of data (2), gene selection (19) or clustering method (11). The cluster analyses are evaluated using known classes, such as cancer types, and the adjusted Rand index. The performances of the different analyses vary between the data sets and it is difficult to give general recommendations. However, normalization, gene selection and clustering method are all variables that have a significant impact on the performance. In particular, gene selection is important and it is generally necessary to include a relatively large number of genes in order to get good performance. Selecting genes with high standard deviation or using principal component analysis are shown to be the preferred gene selection methods. Hierarchical clustering using Ward's method, k-means clustering and Mclust are the clustering methods considered in this paper that achieves the highest adjusted Rand. Normalization can have a significant positive impact on the ability to cluster individuals, and there are indications that background correction is

  14. Capability of differentiating smokers with normal pulmonary function from COPD patients: a comparison of CT pulmonary volume analysis and MR perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Li; Xia, Yi; Guan, Yu; Yu, Hong; Liu, Shi-yuan [Changzheng Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Tie-feng; Li, Bing [Changzheng Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Department of Respiration Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2013-05-15

    To compare CT volume analysis with MR perfusion imaging in differentiating smokers with normal pulmonary function (controls) from COPD patients. Sixty-two COPD patients and 17 controls were included. The total lung volume (TLV), total emphysema volume (TEV) and emphysema index (EI) were quantified by CT. MR perfusion evaluated positive enhancement integral (PEI), maximum slope of increase (MSI), maximum slope of decrease (MSD), signal enhancement ratio (SER) and signal intensity ratio (R{sub SI}) of perfusion defects to normal lung. There were 19 class I, 17 class II, 14 class III and 12 class IV COPD patients. No differences were observed in TLV, TEV and EI between control and class I COPD. The control was different from class II, III and IV COPD in TEV and EI. The control was different from each class of COPD in R{sub SI,} MSI, PEI and MSD. Differences were found in R{sub SI} between class I and III, I and IV, and II and IV COPD. Amongst controls, MR detected perfusion defects more frequently than CT detected emphysema. Compared with CT, MR perfusion imaging shows higher potential to distinguish controls from mild COPD and appears more sensitive in identifying abnormalities amongst smokers with normal pulmonary function (controls). (orig.)

  15. Capability of differentiating smokers with normal pulmonary function from COPD patients: a comparison of CT pulmonary volume analysis and MR perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Li; Xia, Yi; Guan, Yu; Yu, Hong; Liu, Shi-yuan; Zhang, Tie-feng; Li, Bing

    2013-01-01

    To compare CT volume analysis with MR perfusion imaging in differentiating smokers with normal pulmonary function (controls) from COPD patients. Sixty-two COPD patients and 17 controls were included. The total lung volume (TLV), total emphysema volume (TEV) and emphysema index (EI) were quantified by CT. MR perfusion evaluated positive enhancement integral (PEI), maximum slope of increase (MSI), maximum slope of decrease (MSD), signal enhancement ratio (SER) and signal intensity ratio (R SI ) of perfusion defects to normal lung. There were 19 class I, 17 class II, 14 class III and 12 class IV COPD patients. No differences were observed in TLV, TEV and EI between control and class I COPD. The control was different from class II, III and IV COPD in TEV and EI. The control was different from each class of COPD in R SI, MSI, PEI and MSD. Differences were found in R SI between class I and III, I and IV, and II and IV COPD. Amongst controls, MR detected perfusion defects more frequently than CT detected emphysema. Compared with CT, MR perfusion imaging shows higher potential to distinguish controls from mild COPD and appears more sensitive in identifying abnormalities amongst smokers with normal pulmonary function (controls). (orig.)

  16. Radiation doses during chest examinations using dose modulation techniques in multislice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Pradip, Joe; Dinakran, Paul M.; Srikanth, B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the radiation dose and image quality using a manual protocol and dose modulation techniques in a 6-slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT of the chest were included in the study. For the manual protocol settings, constant tube potential (kV) and tube current-time product (mAs) of 140 kV and 120 mAs, respectively, were used. The angular and z-axis dose modulation techniques utilized a constant tube potential of 140 kV; mAs values were automatically selected by the machine. Effective doses were calculated using dose-length product (DLP) values and the image quality was assessed using the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio values. Mean effective doses using manual protocol for patients of weights 40-60 kg, 61-80 kg, and 81 kg and above were 8.58 mSv, 8.54 mSv, and 9.07 mSv, respectively. Mean effective doses using z-axis dose modulation for patients of weights 40-60 kg, 61-80 kg, and 81 kg and above were 4.95 mSv, 6.87 mSv, and 10.24 mSv, respectively. The SNR at the region of the liver for patients of body weight of 40-60 kg was 5.1 H, 6.2 H, and 8.8 H for manual, angular, and z-axis dose modulation, respectively. Conclusion: Dose reduction of up to 15% was achieved using angular dose modulation and of up to 42% using z-axis dose modulation, with acceptable diagnostic image quality compared to the manual protocol. (author)

  17. Radiation exposure of patients during 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Holger; Freudenberg, R.; Oehme, L.; Andreeff, M.; Wunderlich, G.; Zoephel, K.; Eisenhofer, G.; Kotzerke, J.

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the biodistribution and calculation of dosimetry of Ga-68-DOTATOC-for patients imaged in the routine clinical setting for diagnosis or exclusion of neuroendocrine tumours. Patients methods: Dynamic PET/CT-imaging (Biograph 16) was performed over 20 min in 14 patients (8 men, 6 women) after injection of (112 ± 22) MBq 68 Ga-DOTATOC followed by whole body 3D-acquisition (8 bed positions, 3 or 4 min each) 30 min p.i. and 120 min p.i., Urinary tracer elimination was measured and blood activity was derived non-invasively from the blood pool of the heart. The relevant organs for dosimetry were spleen, kidneys, liver, adrenals, urinary bladder and pituitary gland. Dosimetry was performed using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software and specific organ uptake was expressed as standardized uptake values (SUVs). Results Rapid physiological uptake of the radiotracer could be demonstrated in liver, spleen and kidneys, adrenals and pituitary gland (mean SUVs were 6, 20, 16, 10, and 4, respectively). Radiotracer elimination was exclusively via urine (16% of injected dose within 2h); no redistribution could be observed. The spleen and the kidneys received the highest radiation exposure (0.24 mSv/MBq, 0.22 mSv/MBq resp.), mean effective dose yielded 0.023 mSv/MBq. Conclusion: 68 Ga-DOTATOC is used extensively for diagnosis of somatostatin receptor positive tumours because it has several advantages over the 111 In-labelled ligand. The derived dosimetric values are lower than first approximations from the biological data of OctreoScan. The use of CT for transmission correction of the PET data delivers radiation exposure up to 1 mSv (low dose). (orig.)

  18. Normal value collection in nuclear cardiological examination: The 'cured norm' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, F.D.; Standke, R.; Hoer, G.

    1989-01-01

    As a refence a standard of 'cured norm' is proposed. The patients who come under the 'cured norm' category are those without previous myocardial infarctions and who are free of symptoms after a successful transluminal coronary angioplasty (TCA) with a normalized exercise ECG. Global and sectorial parameters of radionuclide-vetriculography (RNV) and 201 Tl-myocardial-scintigraphy ( 201 Tl-MS) are in good accordance with the published data from other authors. An improvement is found after successful TCA but results are even better in the special 'cured norm' group indicating an additional normalization. Sensitivity and specificity based on the 'cured norm' is comparable with the results published by others. From these results we conclude that the 'cured norm' is suitable for clinical use. (orig.) [de

  19. Xenon contrast CT-CBF scanning of the brain differentiates normal age-related changes from multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Shaw, T.G.; Kandula, P.; Rogers, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and partition coefficients (L lambda) were measured during inhalation of stable xenon gas with serial CT scanning among normal volunteers (N . 15), individuals with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N . 10), and persons with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, N . 8). Mean gray matter flow values were reduced in both MID and SDAT. Age-related declines in LCBF values in normals were marked in frontal cortex and basal ganglia. LCBF values were decreased beyond normals in frontal and temporal cortices and thalamus in MID and SDAT, in basal ganglia only in MID. Unlike SDAT and age-matched normals, L lambda values were reduced in fronto-temporal cortex and thalamus in MID. Multifocal nature of lesions in MID was apparent. Coefficients of variation for LCBFs were greater in MID compared with SDAT and/or age-matched normals

  20. Effect of patient size, anatomical location and modulation strength on dose delivered and image-quality on CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greffier, Joel; Larbi, Ahmed; Macri, Francesco; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Pereira, Fabricio

    2017-01-01

    To study the effect of patient size, anatomical location and modulation strength (MS) on image-quality and delivered dose of CT scans acquired with automatic-exposure control system (AEC). Four anthropomorphic phantoms (three paediatric and one thin adult) were studied, and normal and obese adults were simulated by placing bolus plates around the adult phantom. Thorax and abdomen pelvis CT were performed using an AEC system equipped with five possible MS. Modulated tube current (mAs mod ) was compared to Reference mAs and image-noise was assessed. Effective-mAs were lower than Reference-mAs for all but the obese phantom. However, reversal points were estimated for an effective diameter of 27.8 cm in thorax and 26.9 cm in abdomen pelvis scans, beyond which the patterns of MS were inverted. mAs mod were dependent on attenuation differences among distinct anatomical location. Finally, dose delivered was associated to the mAs mod and patient s size, with both affecting image-quality. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M.K.A.; Bakar, K.A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A.W; Saripan, M.I.; Bradley, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose. - Highlights: • Using TLD-100 dosimeters and a RANDO phantom 5 CT thorax protocol organ doses were assessed. • The specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation of protocols differed with approach. • Organ dose was observed to decrease in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. • E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, lower by ~8% compared to the universal k factor.

  2. Significant Suppression of CT Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Normal Human Cells by the PrC-210 Radioprotector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermusek, Frank; Benedict, Chelsea; Dreischmeier, Emma; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Jeffery, Justin J; Ranallo, Frank N; Fahl, William E

    2018-05-21

    While computed tomography (CT) is now commonly used and considered to be clinically valuable, significant DNA double-strand breaks (γ-H2AX foci) in white blood cells from adult and pediatric CT patients have been frequently reported. In this study to determine whether γ-H2AX foci and X-ray-induced naked DNA damage are suppressed by administration of the PrC-210 radioprotector, human blood samples were irradiated in a CT scanner at 50-150 mGy with or without PrC-210, and γ-H2AX foci were scored. X-ray-induced naked DNA damage was also studied, and the DNA protective efficacy of PrC-210 was compared against 12 other common "antioxidants." PrC-210 reduced CT radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci in white blood cells to near background ( P 95% DNA damage. A systemic PrC-210 dose known to confer 100% survival in irradiated mice had no discernible effect on micro-CT image signal-to-noise ratio and CT image integrity. PrC-210 suppressed DNA damage to background or near background in each of these assay systems, thus supporting its development as a radioprotector for humans in multiple radiation exposure settings.

  3. Evaluation of Rib Fractures on a Single-in-plane Image Reformation of the Rib Cage in CT Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankerl, Peter; Seuss, Hannes; Ellmann, Stephan; Cavallaro, Alexander; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of using a reformatted single-in-plane image reformation of the rib cage for the detection of rib fractures in computed tomography (CT) examinations, employing different levels of radiological experience. We retrospectively evaluated 10 consecutive patients with and 10 patients without rib fractures, whose CT scans were reformatted to a single-in-plane image reformation of the rib cage. Eight readers (two radiologists, two residents in radiology, and four interns) independently evaluated the images for the presence of rib fractures using a reformatted single-in-plane image and a multi-planar image reformation. The time limit was 30 seconds for each read. A consensus of two radiologist readings was considered as the reference standard. Diagnostic performance (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value [PPV], and negative predictive value [NPV]) was assessed and evaluated per rib and per location (anterior, lateral, posterior). To determine the time limit, we prospectively analyzed the average time it took radiologists to assess the rib cage, in a bone window setting, in 50 routine CT examinations. McNemar test was used to compare the diagnostic performances. Single image reformation was successful in all 20 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for the detection of rib fractures using the conventional multi-planar read were 77.5%, 99.2%, 89.9%, and 98.0% for radiologists; 46.3%, 99.7%, 92.5%, and 95.3% for residents; and 29.4%, 99.4%, 82.5%, and 93.9% for interns, respectively. Sensitivity, PPV, and NPV increased across all three groups of experience, using the reformatted single-in-plane image of the rib cage (radiologists: 85.0%, 98.6%, and 98.7%; residents: 80.0%, 92.8%, and 98.2%; interns: 66.9%, 89.9%, and 97.1%), whereas specificity did not change significantly (99.9%, 99.4%, and 99.3%). The diagnostic performance of the interns and residents was significantly better when

  4. Upper gastrointestinal examinations: a radiographic study of clinically normal Beagle puppies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyabayashi, T.; Morgan, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 24 upper gastrointestinal examinations were performed on four weanling beagle puppies over six weeks, using liquid barium (10 ml/kg body weight of 60 per cent w/v barium sulphate suspension] and barium food (8 g/kg of crushed kibble dog food and 7 ml/kg body weight of 60 per cent w/v barium sulphate suspension) as contrast media. The radiographic appearance was similar to that noted in adult dogs except for the consistent location of the pylorus on or near the midline. Duodenal pseudoulcers were seen more often with liquid barium and the caecal shadows were identified more often with the longer examination time with barium food. The stomach of the puppies appeared to have discriminatory emptying function; that is, semi-solid food was emptied from the stomach at a slower rate (210 to 450 minutes) than liquid (60 to 90 minutes). Solid meals emptied faster in puppies than in adult dogs. Dosages of 13 to 15 mg/kg body weight for the liquid barium examination and 14 g of ground kibble and 16 ml of barium sulphate suspension per m2 of body surface area for the barium food examination are suggested as more appropriate for contrast studies in puppies

  5. TU-F-12A-02: Quantitative Characterization of Normal Bone Marrow Proliferative Activity with FLT PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisse, N; Jeraj, R [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: [F-18]FLT PET is a tool for assessing health of bone marrow by evaluating its proliferative activity. This study establishes a baseline quantitative characterization of healthy marrow proliferation to aid in diagnosis of hematological disease. Methods: 31 patients (20 male, 11 female, 41–76 years) being treated for solid cancers with no history of hematological disease, osseous metastatic disease, or radiation therapy received pre-treatment FLT PET/CT scans. Total bone marrow was isolated from whole body FLT PET images by manually removing organs and applying a standardize uptake value (SUV) threshold of 1.0. Because adult marrow is concentrated in the axial skeleton, quantitative total bone marrow analysis (QTBMA) was used to isolate marrow in the lumbar spine, thoracic spine, sacrum, and pelvis for analysis. SUVmean, SUVmax, and SUVCV were used to quantify bone marrow proliferation. Correlations were explored between SUV and patient characteristics including age, weight, height, and BMI using the Spearman coefficient (ρ). Results: The population-averaged whole-skeleton SUVmean, SUVmax, and SUVCV were 3.0±0.6, 18.4±5.7, and 0.6±0.1, respectively. Uptake values in the axial skeleton were similar to the whole-skeleton demonstrated by SUVmean in the thoracic spine (3.6±0.6), lumbar spine (3.3±0.5), sacrum (3.0±0.6), and pelvis regions (2.8±0.5). Whole-skeleton SUVmax correlated with patient weight (ρ=0.47, p<0.01) and BMI (ρ=0.60, p<0.01), suggesting marrow activity is related to the body's burden. SUV measures in the thoracic spine, lumbar spine, sacrum, and pelvis were negatively correlated with age (ρ:−0.41 to −0.46, p≤0.02). These negative correlations reflect the fact that active marrow in the adult skeleton is localized in the axial skeleton and decreases with age. Conclusions: Normal bone marrow characterizations were determined using FLT

  6. Safety and patient comfort with iodixanol: a postmarketing surveillance study in 9515 patients undergoing diagnostic CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeussler, Marc D. (Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie und Neurologie, Praxis Mosbach, Mosbach (Germany)), e-mail: info@praxis-mosbach.de

    2010-10-15

    Background: Iodinated radiographic contrast media are considered safe diagnostic drugs with a low incidence of adverse drug reactions. Purpose: To determine prospectively the incidence and nature of immediate and delayed adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of iodixanol for contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in routine practice in nonselected patients, and to assess patient comfort (pain and sensations of heat or coldness). Material and Methods: Patient characteristics (including demographics, risk factors, indication for CT, and status of the vein used to administer iodixanol) and aspects of iodixanol administration (including dose and volume) were documented on a standardized case report form. Patients were asked to report immediate (during the visit) or delayed (occurring up to 7 days after administration of iodixanol) adverse reactions; those deemed related or possibly related to iodixanol were documented on a standardized adverse drug reaction form. Discomfort was rated by patients on a scale of 0-10 for pain, heat, and coldness; individual scores were combined into a composite score (0-30). Results: Evaluable documentation was provided for 9515 patients in 77 centers across Germany. Adverse drug reactions were reported in 70 patients (0.74%), including hypersensitivity reactions in 55 patients. Thirty patients experienced immediate reactions and 40 experienced delayed reactions. Serious adverse drug reactions were evident in five patients (0.05%). Patients with allergic diathesis appeared to be at increased risk of immediate and delayed adverse drug reactions. Discomfort was generally mild, with 72% of patients reporting a composite score of 0-3. Conclusion: In the outpatient setting, where it is often difficult to properly assess patients for specific risk factors, it was reassuring that iodixanol demonstrated an excellent safety profile in over 9500 patients undergoing diagnostic CT examinations. There were no unexpected serious

  7. Safety and patient comfort with iodixanol: a postmarketing surveillance study in 9515 patients undergoing diagnostic CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeussler, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Iodinated radiographic contrast media are considered safe diagnostic drugs with a low incidence of adverse drug reactions. Purpose: To determine prospectively the incidence and nature of immediate and delayed adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of iodixanol for contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in routine practice in nonselected patients, and to assess patient comfort (pain and sensations of heat or coldness). Material and Methods: Patient characteristics (including demographics, risk factors, indication for CT, and status of the vein used to administer iodixanol) and aspects of iodixanol administration (including dose and volume) were documented on a standardized case report form. Patients were asked to report immediate (during the visit) or delayed (occurring up to 7 days after administration of iodixanol) adverse reactions; those deemed related or possibly related to iodixanol were documented on a standardized adverse drug reaction form. Discomfort was rated by patients on a scale of 0-10 for pain, heat, and coldness; individual scores were combined into a composite score (0-30). Results: Evaluable documentation was provided for 9515 patients in 77 centers across Germany. Adverse drug reactions were reported in 70 patients (0.74%), including hypersensitivity reactions in 55 patients. Thirty patients experienced immediate reactions and 40 experienced delayed reactions. Serious adverse drug reactions were evident in five patients (0.05%). Patients with allergic diathesis appeared to be at increased risk of immediate and delayed adverse drug reactions. Discomfort was generally mild, with 72% of patients reporting a composite score of 0-3. Conclusion: In the outpatient setting, where it is often difficult to properly assess patients for specific risk factors, it was reassuring that iodixanol demonstrated an excellent safety profile in over 9500 patients undergoing diagnostic CT examinations. There were no unexpected serious

  8. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B; Grossbach, A; Gruber-Rouh, T; Zangos, S; Vogl, Th J; Eichler, K

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26-292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic errors and additional need for CT. Instead, a single abdominal low

  9. When overweight is the normal weight: an examination of obesity using a social media internet database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebler, Meghan; Yom-Tov, Elad; Pelleg, Dan; Puhl, Rebecca M; Muennig, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Using a large social media database, Yahoo Answers, we explored postings to an online forum in which posters asked whether their height and weight qualify themselves as "skinny," "thin," "fat," or "obese" over time and across forum topics. We used these data to better understand whether a higher-than-average body mass index (BMI) in one's county might, in some ways, be protective for one's mental and physical health. For instance, we explored whether higher proportions of obese people in one's county predicts lower levels of bullying or "am I fat?" questions from those with a normal BMI relative to his/her actual BMI. Most women asking whether they were themselves fat/obese were not actually fat/obese. Both men and women who were actually overweight/obese were significantly more likely in the future to ask for advice about bullying than thinner individuals. Moreover, as mean county-level BMI increased, bullying decreased and then increased again (in a U-shape curve). Regardless of where they lived, posters who asked "am I fat?" who had a BMI in the healthy range were more likely than other posters to subsequently post on health problems, but the proportions of such posters also declined greatly as county-level BMI increased. Our findings suggest that obese people residing in counties with higher levels of BMI may have better physical and mental health than obese people living in counties with lower levels of BMI by some measures, but these improvements are modest.

  10. Examining the subcortical infarcts in the era of acute multimodality CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy Tan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lacunar infarcts have been characterized as small subcortical infarcts, resulting from in situ microatheroma or lipohyalinosis in small vessels. Based on this hypothesis, such infarcts should not be associated with large areas of perfusion deficits extending beyond subcortical regions to involve cortical regions. By contrast, selected small subcortical infarcts, as defined by MR imaging in the subacute or chronic stage, may initially have large perfusion deficits or related large vessel occlusions. These infarcts with ‘lacunar’ phenotype may also be caused by disease in the parent vessel and may have very different stroke mechanisms from small vessel disease. Our aim was to describe differences in imaging characteristics between patients with small subcortical infarction with ‘lacunar phenotype’ from those with lacunar mechanism. Methods: Patients undergoing acute CT Perfusion/angiography (CTP/CTA within 6 hours of symptom onset and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for ischaemic stroke were included (2009-2013. A lacunar infarct was defined as a single subcortical infarct (SSI ≤20 mm on follow-up MRI. Presence of perfusion deficits, vessel occlusion and infarct dimensions were compared between lacunar infarcts and other topographical infarct types. Results: Overall, 182 patients (mean age 66.4±15.3 years, 66% male were included. SSI occurred in 31 (17% patients. Of these, 12 (39% patients had a perfusion deficit compared with those with any cortical infarction (120/142, 67%, and the smallest SSI with a perfusion deficit had a diameter of <5mm. The majority of patients with SSI (8/12, 66.7% had a relevant vessel occlusion. A quarter of SSIs had a large-artery stroke mechanism evident on acute CTP/CTA. Lacunar mechanism was present in 3/8 patients with corona radiata, 5/10 lentiform nucleus, 5/6 posterior limb of internal capsule PLIC, 3/5 thalamic infarcts and 1/2 miscellaneous locations. There was a trend toward

  11. Safe cervical spine clearance in adult obtunded blunt trauma patients on the basis of a normal multidetector CT scan--a meta-analysis and cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Mushahid; Elkhodair, Samer; Zaheer, Asif; Yousaf, Sohail

    2013-11-01

    A true gold standard to rule out a significant cervical spine injury in subset of blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium is still to be agreed upon. The objective of this study is to determine whether in obtunded adult patients with blunt trauma, a clinically significant injury to the cervical spine be ruled out on the basis of a normal multidetector cervical spine computed tomography. Comprehensive database search was conducted to include all the prospective and retrospective studies on blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium undergoing cervical spine multidetector CT scan as core imaging modality to "clear" the cervical spine. The studies used two main gold standards, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and/or prolonged clinical follow-up. The data was extracted to report true positive, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. Meta-analysis of sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values was performed using Meta Analyst Beta 3.13 software. We also performed a retrospective investigation comparing a robust clinical follow-up and/or cervical spine MR findings in 53 obtunded blunt trauma patients, who previously had undergone a normal multidetector CT scan of the cervical spine reported by a radiologist. A total of 10 studies involving 1850 obtunded blunt trauma patients with initial cervical spine CT scan reported as normal were included in the final meta-analysis. The cumulative negative predictive value and specificity of cervical spine CT of the ten studies was 99.7% (99.4-99.9%, 95% confidence interval). The positive predictive value and sensitivity was 93.7% (84.0-97.7%, 95% confidence interval). In the retrospective review of our obtunded blunt trauma patients, none was later diagnosed to have significant cervical spine injury that required a change in clinical management. In a blunt trauma patient with altered sensorium, a normal cervical spine CT scan is conclusive to safely rule out a clinically

  12. When overweight is the normal weight: an examination of obesity using a social media internet database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Kuebler

    Full Text Available Using a large social media database, Yahoo Answers, we explored postings to an online forum in which posters asked whether their height and weight qualify themselves as "skinny," "thin," "fat," or "obese" over time and across forum topics. We used these data to better understand whether a higher-than-average body mass index (BMI in one's county might, in some ways, be protective for one's mental and physical health. For instance, we explored whether higher proportions of obese people in one's county predicts lower levels of bullying or "am I fat?" questions from those with a normal BMI relative to his/her actual BMI. Most women asking whether they were themselves fat/obese were not actually fat/obese. Both men and women who were actually overweight/obese were significantly more likely in the future to ask for advice about bullying than thinner individuals. Moreover, as mean county-level BMI increased, bullying decreased and then increased again (in a U-shape curve. Regardless of where they lived, posters who asked "am I fat?" who had a BMI in the healthy range were more likely than other posters to subsequently post on health problems, but the proportions of such posters also declined greatly as county-level BMI increased. Our findings suggest that obese people residing in counties with higher levels of BMI may have better physical and mental health than obese people living in counties with lower levels of BMI by some measures, but these improvements are modest.

  13. Clinical evaluation of a software for automated localization of lung nodules at follow-up CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, F.; Wormanns, D.; Heindel, W.; Kohl, G.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a software algorithm for automated localization of pulmonary nodules at follow-up CT examinations of the chest and to determine factors influencing the rate of correctly matched nodules. Materials and Methods: The 'real-time automatic matching' (RAM) algorithm (Siemens LungCare TM software) was applied to 22 follow-up multirow-detector CT (MDCT) examinations in 11 patients (Siemens Somatom VolumeZoom, tube voltage 120 kVp; effective tube current 20 mAs (n=18) or 100 mAs (n=4); 4 x 1 mm detector configuration, 1.25 mm slice thickness; 0.8 mm reconstruction increment; standard lung kernel B50f) with a total of 190 lung nodules (mean diameter 6.7±3.5 mm, range 2-17 mm). The following nodule features were recorded: diameter, edge definition (well- or ill-defined), location (upper, middle or lower third; central or peripheral; right of left lung) and inspiration level (considered identical if the difference of diaphragm-apex distance between baseline and follow-up examination was 2 -test was used to describe influence of nodule features on detection rate. Influence of nodule size was assessed using Mann-Whitney-U-Test. Results: RAM correctly located 164 of 190 of all lung nodules (86.3%). Detection rate did not depend on nodule location (left vs. right lung: p=0.48; upper vs. middle vs. lower third: p=0.96; peripheral vs. central: p=0.47) or diameter (p=0.30). Influence of inspiration level was highly significant (p [de

  14. SU-F-P-45: Clinical Experience with Radiation Dose Reduction of CT Examinations Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V [Baylor Scott and White Healthcare System, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, J [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have been adopted by medical centers in the past several years. IR has a potential to substantially reduce patient dose while maintaining or improving image quality. This study characterizes dose reductions in clinical settings for CT examinations using IR. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed dose information from patients who underwent abdomen/pelvis CT examinations with and without contrast media in multiple locations of our Healthcare system. A total of 743 patients scanned with ASIR on 64 slice GE lightspeed VCTs at three sites, and 30 patients scanned with SAFIRE on a Siemens 128 slice Definition Flash in one site was retrieved. For comparison, patient data (n=291) from a GE scanner and patient data (n=61) from two Siemens scanners where filtered back-projection (FBP) was used was collected retrospectively. 30% and 10% ASIR, and SAFIRE Level 2 was used. CTDIvol, Dose-length-product (DLP), weight and height from all patients was recorded. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated accordingly. To convert CTDIvol to SSDE, AP and lateral dimensions at the mid-liver level was measured for each patient. Results: Compared with FBP, 30% ASIR reduces dose by 44.1% (SSDE: 12.19mGy vs. 21.83mGy), while 10% ASIR reduced dose by 20.6% (SSDE 17.32mGy vs. 21.83). Use of SAFIRE reduced dose by 61.4% (SSDE: 8.77mGy vs. 22.7mGy). The geometric mean for patients scanned with ASIR was larger than for patients scanned with FBP (geometric mean is 297.48 mmm vs. 284.76 mm). The same trend was observed for the Siemens scanner where SAFIRE was used (geometric mean: 316 mm with SAFIRE vs. 239 mm with FBP). Patient size differences suggest that further dose reduction is possible. Conclusion: Our data confirmed that in clinical practice IR can significantly reduce dose to patients who undergo CT examinations, while meeting diagnostic requirements for image quality.

  15. SU-F-P-45: Clinical Experience with Radiation Dose Reduction of CT Examinations Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have been adopted by medical centers in the past several years. IR has a potential to substantially reduce patient dose while maintaining or improving image quality. This study characterizes dose reductions in clinical settings for CT examinations using IR. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed dose information from patients who underwent abdomen/pelvis CT examinations with and without contrast media in multiple locations of our Healthcare system. A total of 743 patients scanned with ASIR on 64 slice GE lightspeed VCTs at three sites, and 30 patients scanned with SAFIRE on a Siemens 128 slice Definition Flash in one site was retrieved. For comparison, patient data (n=291) from a GE scanner and patient data (n=61) from two Siemens scanners where filtered back-projection (FBP) was used was collected retrospectively. 30% and 10% ASIR, and SAFIRE Level 2 was used. CTDIvol, Dose-length-product (DLP), weight and height from all patients was recorded. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated accordingly. To convert CTDIvol to SSDE, AP and lateral dimensions at the mid-liver level was measured for each patient. Results: Compared with FBP, 30% ASIR reduces dose by 44.1% (SSDE: 12.19mGy vs. 21.83mGy), while 10% ASIR reduced dose by 20.6% (SSDE 17.32mGy vs. 21.83). Use of SAFIRE reduced dose by 61.4% (SSDE: 8.77mGy vs. 22.7mGy). The geometric mean for patients scanned with ASIR was larger than for patients scanned with FBP (geometric mean is 297.48 mmm vs. 284.76 mm). The same trend was observed for the Siemens scanner where SAFIRE was used (geometric mean: 316 mm with SAFIRE vs. 239 mm with FBP). Patient size differences suggest that further dose reduction is possible. Conclusion: Our data confirmed that in clinical practice IR can significantly reduce dose to patients who undergo CT examinations, while meeting diagnostic requirements for image quality.

  16. Research and development of the system for group examination of lung cancer by helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    For the ultimate purpose of heavy particle therapy of lung cancer at an early stage, the system in the title with low dose radiation has been investigated by cooperation of NIRS (as a leading part) and medical/industrial facilities all over the country. The project started essentially in 1984 and has been continuing at 2003. This book described Results hitherto and Materials for application to medical care at disaster (Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster in 1995) together with reference materials. Results contain all fields of nuclear medicine and of imaging involved in examination/diagnosis of lung cancer, achieved by NIRS, by Health management center and Faculty of Medicine, Chiba University and Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association in Chiba, by the 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Fac. Med., Chiba Univ., by Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, by Nippon Med. School, Arakawa-ku cancer protection center and Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. of Health Sciences, by Hitachi health management center, by Fukui Med. College, by Hitachi Medical Corp., by NTT research laboratories, and by Toyohashi Univ. of Technology. The Materials involve Process and summary of conducting the medical care activities, Improvement of the examination automobile, Supplementary equipments and measures for legal problems, System for the medical care activities, Record of the examination automobile activities, Problems in future, and Completion of the medical activities. Reference materials are related with the Materials above. (N.I.)

  17. Evaluation of doses delivered during CT examination by different scanners for purposes of intercomparison and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashiru, Adam

    2017-07-01

    This research study was aimed at performing dosimetry intercomparison on different CT scanners in the diagnostic radiology departments of Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH), Sweden Ghana Medical Center (SGMC) and Global Medical and Imaging Center (GMIC). Using the standard body phantom and integrated ion chamber technique volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) and Dose-Length Product (DLPs) within the phantom were evaluated. The ion chamber technique was applied to two 16 slice Siemens and one Toshiba Aquilion one CT scanners. CTDIvol and DLP values for the standard body polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom were estimated and comparison made with corresponding console displayed values for accuracy and also to deduce a suitable method for optimization of patients and occupationally exposed worker doses. Effective doses were also calculated. An intra and inter institutional comparison of measured doses and console displayed doses were performed. Chest protocol at Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) was applied during the scanning of the phantom. Estimated CTDIvol values (mGy) were 17mGy, 24mGy and 13.1mGy for SGMC, GMIC and KBTH respectively. These values deviated from the console displayed values by 24.1%, 22.9% and 31.3% respectively. Similarly, estimated DLP values (mGy.cm) were 675mGy.cm,944mGy.cm and 419mGy.cm for SGMC, GMIC and KBTH respectively deviating from the console displayed values by 24.1%, 24.2% and 29% respectively. In terms of effective doses (E), the calculated E (mSv) values were 9.45mSv, 13.2mSv and 5.87mSv estimated from the DLPs from SGMC, GMIC and KBTH respectively using K, the anatomy-specific dose coefficient expressing effective dose normalized to DLP in a standard CT dosimetry phantom of 0.014 mSv mGy-1 cm-1. The estimated doses were compared to other selected international Dose Reference Levels (DRLs) and were within range. (au)

  18. Relevance of CT and MRI in retinoblastoma for the diagnosis of postlaminar invasion with normal-size optic nerve: a retrospective study of 150 patients with histological comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisse, Herve J.; Guesmi, Myriam; Neuenschwander, Sylvia; Aerts, Isabelle; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Savignoni, Alexia; Asselain, Bernard; Bours, Daniele; Lumbroso-Le Rouic, Livia; Desjardins, Laurence; Doz, Francois

    2007-01-01

    Detection of optic nerve invasion is mandatory in children primarily enucleated for retinoblastoma to ensure a free resection margin. To assess the accuracy of CT and MRI for the detection of postlaminar invasion in normal-size nerves. A total of 150 patients enucleated for retinoblastoma were included. Imaging data (119 CT and 46 MRI) were retrospectively reviewed and compared with histological findings. Abnormal contrast enhancement of the optic nerve was used as diagnostic criterion for invasion. The associations between postlaminar invasion and several indirect signs were also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher exact tests. Postlaminar invasion on histology was observed in 8% (12/150). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and negative and positive predictive values were 60%, 95%, 91%, 95% and 60% for MRI, and 0%, 100%, 94% and 94% (PPV not assessable) for CT, respectively. Tumour diameter was the only indirect radiological sign significantly associated with postlaminar optic nerve invasion (P=0.002). Our results suggest that MRI is more relevant than CT for preoperative detection of optic nerve invasion in patients with retinoblastoma. Tumour diameter is the only indirect sign significantly associated with postlaminar invasion. (orig.)

  19. Relevance of CT and MRI in retinoblastoma for the diagnosis of postlaminar invasion with normal-size optic nerve: a retrospective study of 150 patients with histological comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisse, Herve J.; Guesmi, Myriam; Neuenschwander, Sylvia [Institute Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Aerts, Isabelle [Institute Curie, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Sastre-Garau, Xavier [Institute Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Savignoni, Alexia; Asselain, Bernard; Bours, Daniele [Institute Curie, Department of Biostatistics, Paris (France); Lumbroso-Le Rouic, Livia; Desjardins, Laurence [Institute Curie, Department of Ocular Oncology, Paris (France); Doz, Francois [Institute Curie, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Faculty of Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Paris (France)

    2007-07-15

    Detection of optic nerve invasion is mandatory in children primarily enucleated for retinoblastoma to ensure a free resection margin. To assess the accuracy of CT and MRI for the detection of postlaminar invasion in normal-size nerves. A total of 150 patients enucleated for retinoblastoma were included. Imaging data (119 CT and 46 MRI) were retrospectively reviewed and compared with histological findings. Abnormal contrast enhancement of the optic nerve was used as diagnostic criterion for invasion. The associations between postlaminar invasion and several indirect signs were also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher exact tests. Postlaminar invasion on histology was observed in 8% (12/150). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and negative and positive predictive values were 60%, 95%, 91%, 95% and 60% for MRI, and 0%, 100%, 94% and 94% (PPV not assessable) for CT, respectively. Tumour diameter was the only indirect radiological sign significantly associated with postlaminar optic nerve invasion (P=0.002). Our results suggest that MRI is more relevant than CT for preoperative detection of optic nerve invasion in patients with retinoblastoma. Tumour diameter is the only indirect sign significantly associated with postlaminar invasion. (orig.)

  20. Normalized Mini-Mental State Examination for assessing cognitive change in population-based brain aging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, Viviane; Amieva, Hélène; Andrieu, Sandrine; Dufouil, Carole; Berr, Claudine; Dartigues, Jean-François; Jacqmin-Gadda, Hélène; Proust-Lima, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is widely used in population-based longitudinal studies to quantify cognitive change. However, its poor metrological properties, mainly ceiling/floor effects and varying sensitivity to change, have largely restricted its usefulness. We propose a normalizing transformation that corrects these properties, and makes possible the use of standard statistical methods to analyze change in MMSE scores. The normalizing transformation designed to correct at best the metrological properties of MMSE was estimated and validated on two population-based studies (n = 4,889, 20-year follow-up) by cross-validation. The transformation was also validated on two external studies with heterogeneous samples mixing normal and pathological aging, and samples including only demented subjects. The normalizing transformation provided correct inference in contrast with models analyzing the change in crude MMSE that most often lead to biased estimates of risk factors and incorrect conclusions. Cognitive change can be easily and properly assessed with the normalized MMSE using standard statistical methods such as linear (mixed) models. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Normal Lung Quantification in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Pattern: The Impact of Threshold-based Volumetric CT Analysis for the Staging of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Ohkubo

    Full Text Available Although several computer-aided computed tomography (CT analysis methods have been reported to objectively assess the disease severity and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, it is unclear which method is most practical. A universal severity classification system has not yet been adopted for IPF.The purpose of this study was to test the correlation between quantitative-CT indices and lung physiology variables and to determine the ability of such indices to predict disease severity in IPF.A total of 27 IPF patients showing radiological UIP pattern on high-resolution (HR CT were retrospectively enrolled. Staging of IPF was performed according to two classification systems: the Japanese and GAP (gender, age, and physiology staging systems. CT images were assessed using a commercially available CT imaging analysis workstation, and the whole-lung mean CT value (MCT, the normally attenuated lung volume as defined from -950 HU to -701 Hounsfield unit (NL, the volume of the whole lung (WL, and the percentage of NL to WL (NL%, were calculated.CT indices (MCT, WL, and NL closely correlated with lung physiology variables. Among them, NL strongly correlated with forced vital capacity (FVC (r = 0.92, P <0.0001. NL% showed a large area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detecting patients in the moderate or advanced stages of IPF. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that NL% is significantly more useful than the percentages of predicted FVC and predicted diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (Japanese stage II/III/IV [odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence intervals (CI, 0.48 to 0.92; P < 0.01]; III/IV [odds ratio. 0.80; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.96; P < 0.01]; GAP stage II/III [odds ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.97; P < 0.05].The measurement of NL% by threshold-based volumetric CT analysis may help improve IPF staging.

  2. Normal Lung Quantification in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Pattern: The Impact of Threshold-based Volumetric CT Analysis for the Staging of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Hirotsugu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Uemura, Takehiro; Takakuwa, Osamu; Takemura, Masaya; Maeno, Ken; Ito, Yutaka; Oguri, Tetsuya; Kazawa, Nobutaka; Mikami, Ryuji; Niimi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Although several computer-aided computed tomography (CT) analysis methods have been reported to objectively assess the disease severity and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), it is unclear which method is most practical. A universal severity classification system has not yet been adopted for IPF. The purpose of this study was to test the correlation between quantitative-CT indices and lung physiology variables and to determine the ability of such indices to predict disease severity in IPF. A total of 27 IPF patients showing radiological UIP pattern on high-resolution (HR) CT were retrospectively enrolled. Staging of IPF was performed according to two classification systems: the Japanese and GAP (gender, age, and physiology) staging systems. CT images were assessed using a commercially available CT imaging analysis workstation, and the whole-lung mean CT value (MCT), the normally attenuated lung volume as defined from -950 HU to -701 Hounsfield unit (NL), the volume of the whole lung (WL), and the percentage of NL to WL (NL%), were calculated. CT indices (MCT, WL, and NL) closely correlated with lung physiology variables. Among them, NL strongly correlated with forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = 0.92, P <0.0001). NL% showed a large area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detecting patients in the moderate or advanced stages of IPF. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that NL% is significantly more useful than the percentages of predicted FVC and predicted diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (Japanese stage II/III/IV [odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.48 to 0.92; P < 0.01]; III/IV [odds ratio. 0.80; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.96; P < 0.01]; GAP stage II/III [odds ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.97; P < 0.05]). The measurement of NL% by threshold-based volumetric CT analysis may help improve IPF staging.

  3. The effect of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on the assessment of diagnostic image quality and visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric cerebral CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Joel; Baath, Magnus; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ledenius, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) on the visualisation of anatomical structures and diagnostic image quality in paediatric cerebral computed tomography (CT) examinations. Forty paediatric patients undergoing routine cerebral CT were included in the study. The raw data from CT scans were reconstructed into stacks of 5 mm thick axial images at various levels of ASiR. Three paediatric radiologists rated six questions related to the visualisation of anatomical structures and one question on diagnostic image quality, in a blinded randomised visual grading study. The evaluated anatomical structures demonstrated enhanced visibility with increasing level of ASiR, apart from the cerebrospinal fluid space around the brain. In this study, 60 % ASiR was found to be the optimal level of ASiR for paediatric cerebral CT examinations. This shows that the commonly used 30 % ASiR may not always be the optimal level. (authors)

  4. A prospective study on the risk of contrast induced nephropathy in the patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baocui; Zhang Yudong; Zhao Kai; Wang Xiaoying; Jiang Xuexiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) among different patient groups after contrast agent injection. Methods: A total of 1243 patients were included in this study (male = 694, female = 549). The SCr level one week before and 72 hours after the CT examination and the incidence of CIN were recorded and comparison was made among groups according to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), the history of high blood pressure (HBP), diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease (CKD), chronic heart failure (CHF), tumor, nephrotoxicity drug (NTD) usage. The frequency, type, dose and injection velocity of the contrast media (CM) were also recorded. Multivariate predictors of CIN were identified by Logistic regression using step-wise selection with entry and exit criteria of P 1). Conclusion: Women, age ≥ 75 years, LOCM, NTD, tumor, and the frequency of using CM more than once per month were more likely to develop CIN. (authors)

  5. Nondestructive Analysis of Apollo Samples by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis: A PET Style Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    An integral part of any sample return mission is the initial description and classification of returned samples by the preliminary examination team (PET). The goal of a PET is to characterize and classify the returned samples, making this information available to the general research community who can then conduct more in-depth studies on the samples. A PET strives to minimize the impact their work has on the sample suite, which often limits the PET work to largely visual measurements and observations like optical microscopy. More modern techniques can also be utilized by future PET to nondestructively characterize astromaterials in a more rigorous way. Here we present our recent analyses of Apollo samples 14321 and 14305 by micro-CT and micro-XRF (respectively), assess the potential for discovery of "new" Apollo samples for scientific study, and evaluate the usefulness of these techniques in future PET efforts.

  6. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - a potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M

    2011-01-01

    Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose....

  7. CT number of the fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroko; Kawai, Takeshi; Kanasaki, Yoshiki; Akagi, Hiroaki

    1981-01-01

    This report is studied on CT number and CT images of the eight cases with fatty liver. Five of these cases showed the reversal of densities of the liver and vessels. In these cases, the diagnoses of the fatty liver were easible. In other cases, the diagnoses were possible only by comparison of the CT number of the liver and spleen because the CT number of normal liver were higher than those of the spleen. In the results which we examined the correlation of the CT number and specific gravities of the blood, normal saline, distilled water, mayonnaise, eatable iol, ethyl alcohol and lard, we observed the linear relationship between CT number and specific gravities. And so, we think that the diagnosis of the fatty liver and the degree of fatty infiltration can be guessed by the CT number of the liver and spleen. (author)

  8. Hypermetabolism of compensatory laryngeal muscles in unilateral vocal cord palsy: comparison study between speech and silence with normal subjects by co-registered PET-CT fusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, Moon Sun; Kim, Hyon Kyong; Kim, Han Su

    2006-01-01

    There are a few case report on asymmetric vocal cord uptake on FDG-PET in patients with unilateral vocal cord paralysis, which could be a potential pitfall in the interpretation of FDG-PET images. We evaluated the metabolic activity of laryngeal muscles of patients with unilateral vocal cord paralysis in comparison to normal controls during both speech and silence. Eleven patients with unilateral vocal cord palsy (thyroidectomy=7, lung cancer=1, other=3) and 12 normal controls underwent FDG-PET with usual protocol. They were divided into two groups respectively; one group read books aloud for 20 minutes (phonation group) and the other kept silence (non-phonation groups) after FDG injection. Recent neck CT scan were co-registered with FDG-PET to produce PET-CT fusion images to elaborate small laryngeal muscles. In patients with unilateral vocal cord palsy, contralateral non-paralyzed vocal cord showed hypermetabolism mainly on thyroarytenoid muscle, more intensely with phonation group (SUV=5.88±2.65) than with non-phonation group (SUV=2.30±0.39). Normal control subjects showed hypermetabolism (3.68± 0.96) in interarytenoid muscle and symmetric mild hypermetabolism in both lateral cricoarytenoid muscles in only phonation group. FDG-PET with fusion images using CT scan in patients with unilateral vocal cord paralysis showed hypermetabolism of contralateral non-paralyzed thyroarytedoid muscle, suggesting compensatory action during phonation. Phonation during FDG-PET study enhanced FDG uptake on different laryngeal muscles between patients with unilateral vocal cord paralysis and normal subjects

  9. Analysis about X-ray and CT images of pleural mesothelioma case of death. Examination about 2003 mesothelioma case of death 878 examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsuya; Kanazawa, Susumu; Kishimoto, Takumi; Genba, Kenichi; Aoe, Keisuke; Takeshima, Yukio; Inai, Kouki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated a clinical record and images for 212 examples in 878 examples diagnosed as mesothelioma in the death votes of 2003. CT images demonstrated pleural plaque to be obtained 42.0%, but in chest X-ray films only 9.8% demonstrated pleural plaque. For examination of CT findings of 117 examples, cases to present extensive irregular findings of pleura were 81.2%. Cases we made the ''no irregularity'' and ''slightness irregularity'' were 18.8%. (author)

  10. CT slice proximity rotary table and elevator for examining large objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastronardi, R.; DeCew, A.; McMahon, D.

    1984-01-01

    In a Computerized Tomography system for examining large objects, e.g. rocket motors, the problem of avoiding errors due to the heavy load is met by a support structure comprising a large bearing and an elongated cup-like support attached to the inner race of the bearing and extending coaxially away from the bearing for supporting the object and for rotating that object about the axis of the bearing. Spacers or an elevator are provided adjacent the bottom of the support for selectively translating the object along said axis. An X-ray source is positioned to beam X-rays through the object at a diametral plane closely adjacent to one face of the bearing, and a detector is provided to determine the X-ray opacity of a slice of said object closely adjacent to the bearing. The source and detector, or alternatively the bearing and cup-like support, are mounted for translation in a direction transverse to the beam direction. The support structure may be oriented vertically within a pit located below the floor of a building structure, with the bearing, source and detector being located above the floor. (author)

  11. Discrepancy in reporting among specialist registrars and the role of a paediatric neuroradiologist in reporting paediatric CT head examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraja, S.; Ullah, Q.; Lee, K.J.; Bickle, I.; Hon, L.Q.; Griffiths, P.D.; Raghavan, A.; Flynn, P.; Connolly, D.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the discrepancy rate among specialist registrars (SPR) to assess whether seniority had a bearing on the discrepancy rate. To investigate which were the commonly missed abnormalities and the consequences for teaching purposes. To investigate the role of a specialist consultant neuroradiologist in reporting paediatric head computed tomography examinations. Materials and methods: The study was carried out over a 9-month period at the regional paediatric hospital during which time 270 CT head examinations were reported. Reporting in the department is carried out by one of the five general paediatric radiologists (GR) and also a specialist paediatric neuroradiologist (NR). The NR was considered the reference standard, who corroborated in areas of discrepancy with a second senior NR for this study. Of the 270 examinations, 260 were reported by the paediatric NR, 160 were reported by the SPR, GR, and NR, and 51 were reported by an SPR and the NR. In addition, four were reported by the GR and the NR, 45 by the NR only, seven by the GR only, and three cases were reported by the GR and an SPR. The discrepancy rates were calculated for GR versus NR, and SPR versus NR. All the discrepancies were re-evaluated by a second senior NR and confirmed in all cases. The reports of the SPR were further scrutinized. The trainees of training years 1-3 were considered junior and 4-5 were considered senior. Results: There was a discrepancy in 26/164 cases (15.9%) reported by the GR and NR. There was a discrepancy in 59/211 cases (28%) reported by an SPR and NR. The chi-squared test (two-sided) showed a significant difference (p = 0.005) between the two groups. There was a discrepancy in 36/118 cases (30.5%) reported by the junior SPR and NR. There was a discrepancy in 23/93 cases (24.7%) reported by a senior SPR and NR. The chi-squared test (two-sided) showed a non-significant difference (p = 0.353) between the two groups. Conclusion: The performance of the SPR was

  12. CT and MR imaging of the kidney and adrenal glands: CT of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, E.

    1987-01-01

    Because of its high diagnostic yield, safety, and cost-effectiveness, CT has become a major imaging technique for evaluating the kidney. CT is highly accurate for determining the nature and extent of renal masses, and this has become the main indication for renal CT. However, CT is also valuable in assessing patients with renal cystic disease, trauma, inflammatory disease, infarction, hemorrhage and hydronephrosis of unknown cause. This presentation reviews the normal CT anatomy of the kidneys and the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis of all these conditions. Examination techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on avoiding diagnostic pitfalls and tailoring the examination to the nature of the clinical problem. CT findings in various renal disorders are compared with those of other imaging techniques, particularly US and angiography, and the place of CT in the diagnostic approach to these disorders is considered

  13. Attenuation changes of the normal and ischemic canine kidney. Dynamic CT scanning after intravenous contrast medium bolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaschke, W.; Lipton, M.J.; Boyd, D.P.; Cann, C.; Strauss, L.; Sievers, R.S.

    The potential of CT scanning to explore total and regional renal blood flow was evaluated in a dog model with unilateral renal artery stenosis (n=7, reduction of renal blood flow: 32-75% of base line flow). Attenuation versus time curves were generated for the renal cortex and medulla, as well as for the aorta and renal vein. A fast CT scanner was used which allowed for up to 24 scans/minute at the same level (slice thickness: 10 mm). A total of 10 ml contrast medim was injected into a peripheral vein for each scan series taken. During baseline conditions, the curve of the renal cortex and medulla demonstrated 2 peaks. The first peak was mainly related to early vascular enhancement, whereas the second peak corresponded mainly to the appearance of contrast medium in the distal convolutes and collecting ducts. Ischemia of the kidney resulted in a reduction of the first peak and a flattening of the leading edge slope. Transport of contrast medium through the extravascular compartments of the kidney was delayed during ischemia. Relative renal blood flow was obtained from the CT data by dividing peak enhancement by rise-time as assessed from the cortical curve. All measurements were related to baseline flow and validated by flow measurements using radioactive labeled microspheres (n=5). Correlation was found to be r=0.97. (orig.).

  14. Normative values for CT-based texture analysis of vertebral bodies in dual X-ray absorptiometry-confirmed, normally mineralized subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannil, Manoj; Eberhard, Matthias; Becker, Anton S.; Alkadhi, Hatem; Guggenberger, Roman; Schoenenberg, Denise; Osterhoff, Georg; Frey, Diana P.; Konukoglu, Ender

    2017-01-01

    To develop age-, gender-, and regional-specific normative values for texture analysis (TA) of spinal computed tomography (CT) in subjects with normal bone mineral density (BMD), as defined by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to determine age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences. In this retrospective, IRB-approved study, TA was performed on sagittal CT bone images of the thoracic and lumbar spine using dedicated software (MaZda) in 141 individuals with normal DXA BMD findings. Numbers of female and male subjects were balanced in each of six age decades. Three hundred and five TA features were analyzed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae using free-hand regions-of-interest. Intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficients were calculated for determining intra- and inter-observer agreement of each feature. Further dimension reduction was performed with correlation analyses. The TA features with an ICC 0.8 with other features were excluded from further analysis for dimension reduction. From the remaining 31 texture features, a significant correlation with age was found for the features mean (r = -0.489, p < 0.001), variance (r = -0.681, p < 0.001), kurtosis (r = 0.273, p < 0.001), and WavEnLL_s4 (r = 0.273, p < 0.001). Significant differences were found between genders for various higher-level texture features (p < 0.001). Regional differences among the thoracic spine, thoracic-lumbar junction, and lumbar spine were found for most TA features (p < 0.021). This study established normative values of TA features on CT images of the spine and showed age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences in individuals with normal BMD as defined by DXA. (orig.)

  15. Normative values for CT-based texture analysis of vertebral bodies in dual X-ray absorptiometry-confirmed, normally mineralized subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannil, Manoj; Eberhard, Matthias; Becker, Anton S; Schönenberg, Denise; Osterhoff, Georg; Frey, Diana P; Konukoglu, Ender; Alkadhi, Hatem; Guggenberger, Roman

    2017-11-01

    To develop age-, gender-, and regional-specific normative values for texture analysis (TA) of spinal computed tomography (CT) in subjects with normal bone mineral density (BMD), as defined by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to determine age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences. In this retrospective, IRB-approved study, TA was performed on sagittal CT bone images of the thoracic and lumbar spine using dedicated software (MaZda) in 141 individuals with normal DXA BMD findings. Numbers of female and male subjects were balanced in each of six age decades. Three hundred and five TA features were analyzed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae using free-hand regions-of-interest. Intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficients were calculated for determining intra- and inter-observer agreement of each feature. Further dimension reduction was performed with correlation analyses. The TA features with an ICC  0.8 with other features were excluded from further analysis for dimension reduction. From the remaining 31 texture features, a significant correlation with age was found for the features mean (r = -0.489, p < 0.001), variance (r = -0.681, p < 0.001), kurtosis (r = 0.273, p < 0.001), and WavEnLL_s4 (r = 0.273, p < 0.001). Significant differences were found between genders for various higher-level texture features (p < 0.001). Regional differences among the thoracic spine, thoracic-lumbar junction, and lumbar spine were found for most TA features (p < 0.021). This study established normative values of TA features on CT images of the spine and showed age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences in individuals with normal BMD as defined by DXA.

  16. Normative values for CT-based texture analysis of vertebral bodies in dual X-ray absorptiometry-confirmed, normally mineralized subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannil, Manoj; Eberhard, Matthias; Becker, Anton S.; Alkadhi, Hatem; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Schoenenberg, Denise; Osterhoff, Georg [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Frey, Diana P. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland); Konukoglu, Ender [Computer Vision Laboratory, Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-11-15

    To develop age-, gender-, and regional-specific normative values for texture analysis (TA) of spinal computed tomography (CT) in subjects with normal bone mineral density (BMD), as defined by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to determine age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences. In this retrospective, IRB-approved study, TA was performed on sagittal CT bone images of the thoracic and lumbar spine using dedicated software (MaZda) in 141 individuals with normal DXA BMD findings. Numbers of female and male subjects were balanced in each of six age decades. Three hundred and five TA features were analyzed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae using free-hand regions-of-interest. Intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficients were calculated for determining intra- and inter-observer agreement of each feature. Further dimension reduction was performed with correlation analyses. The TA features with an ICC < 0.81 indicating compromised intra- and inter-observer agreement and with Pearson correlation scores r > 0.8 with other features were excluded from further analysis for dimension reduction. From the remaining 31 texture features, a significant correlation with age was found for the features mean (r = -0.489, p < 0.001), variance (r = -0.681, p < 0.001), kurtosis (r = 0.273, p < 0.001), and WavEnLL{sub s}4 (r = 0.273, p < 0.001). Significant differences were found between genders for various higher-level texture features (p < 0.001). Regional differences among the thoracic spine, thoracic-lumbar junction, and lumbar spine were found for most TA features (p < 0.021). This study established normative values of TA features on CT images of the spine and showed age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences in individuals with normal BMD as defined by DXA. (orig.)

  17. Neuropsychological profile in Chinese patients with Parkinson's disease and normal global cognition according to Mini-Mental State Examination Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jin; Zheng, Xiyuan; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Wenhui; Cao, Hongmei; Qin, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairments have been reported to be more common in non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and education levels play an important role in intelligence. The studies on cognitive impairments in Chinese PD patients with higher education levels and normal global cognition according to Mini-Mental State Examination Score (MMSE) have not been reported. We enrolled 69 consecutive PD patients with over 6 years education levels and a MMSE score above 24 (of 30) and performed a battery of neuropsychological scales. There are extensive cognitive domain impairments in PD patients with "normal" global cognitive according to MMSE. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a highly sensitive scale to screen cognitive impairments in PD. The cutoff score of 28 on the MMSE screening for cognitive impairment in Chinese PD patients with high education levels may be more appropriate.

  18. Integrated FDG-PET/CT vs. standard radiological examinations: Comparison of capability for assessment of postoperative recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Daisuke; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Nogami, Munenobu; Onishi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Keiko; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively and directly compare diagnostic capabilities of whole-body integrated FDG-PET/CT and standard radiologic examination for assessment of recurrence in postoperative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Materials and methods: A total of 92 consecutive pathologically diagnosed NSCLC patients (65 males, 27 females; mean age, 71 years) underwent pathologically and surgically proven complete resection, followed by prospective whole-body FDG-PET/CT and standard radiological examinations. Final diagnosis of recurrence was based on the results of more than 1 year of follow-up and/or pathological examinations. On both methods, the probability of recurrence was assessed in each patient by using a five-point visual scoring system, and the each final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. Kappa analyses were performed to determine inter-observer agreement for both methods, and ROC analyses were used to compare capability of the two methods for assessment of postoperative recurrence on a per-patient basis. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were also compared between PET/CT and standard radiological examination by means of McNemar's test. Results: All inter-observer agreements were almost perfect (integrated PET/CT: κ = 0.89; standard radiological examination: κ = 0.81). There were no statistically significant differences in area under the curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy between integrated FDG-PET/CT and standard radiologic examinations (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Integrated FDG-PET/CT can be used for assessment of postoperative recurrence in NSCLC patients with accuracy as good as that of standard radiological examinations.

  19. Integrated FDG-PET/CT vs. standard radiological examinations: Comparison of capability for assessment of postoperative recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Nogami, Munenobu [Division of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2, Minatojima Minamimachi Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Onishi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Keiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimogato, Chuo, Yamanashi, 409-3898 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively and directly compare diagnostic capabilities of whole-body integrated FDG-PET/CT and standard radiologic examination for assessment of recurrence in postoperative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Materials and methods: A total of 92 consecutive pathologically diagnosed NSCLC patients (65 males, 27 females; mean age, 71 years) underwent pathologically and surgically proven complete resection, followed by prospective whole-body FDG-PET/CT and standard radiological examinations. Final diagnosis of recurrence was based on the results of more than 1 year of follow-up and/or pathological examinations. On both methods, the probability of recurrence was assessed in each patient by using a five-point visual scoring system, and the each final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. Kappa analyses were performed to determine inter-observer agreement for both methods, and ROC analyses were used to compare capability of the two methods for assessment of postoperative recurrence on a per-patient basis. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were also compared between PET/CT and standard radiological examination by means of McNemar's test. Results: All inter-observer agreements were almost perfect (integrated PET/CT: {kappa} = 0.89; standard radiological examination: {kappa} = 0.81). There were no statistically significant differences in area under the curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy between integrated FDG-PET/CT and standard radiologic examinations (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Integrated FDG-PET/CT can be used for assessment of postoperative recurrence in NSCLC patients with accuracy as good as that of standard radiological examinations.

  20. A normal colposcopy examination fails to provide psychological reassurance for women who have had low-grade abnormal cervical cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, S C; Sharp, L; Little, J; Gray, N M; Walker, L G; Whynes, D K; Cruickshank, M E

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide, each year, large numbers of women are referred for colposcopy following low-grade abnormal cervical cytology. Many have no visible abnormality on examination. The risk of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (CIN2/3) in these women is low. It is unknown whether, for women, a normal colposcopy resolves the anxiety which often follows the receipt of an abnormal cytology result. We investigated the prevalence of adverse psychological outcomes over 30 months following a normal colposcopy. This cohort study was nested within the UK TOMBOLA randomized controlled trial. Women aged 20-59 years, with recent low-grade cytology, who had a satisfactory colposcopy examination and normal transformation zone, completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Process Outcome Specific Measure (POSM) at recruitment and during follow-up (12, 18, 24 and 30 months post-recruitment). Outcomes included percentages reporting significant anxiety (HADS anxiety subscale score ≥11), significant depression (HADS depression subscale score ≥8) or worries about the result of the next cytology test, cervical cancer, having sex, future fertility and general health at each time point (point prevalence) and during follow-up (cumulative prevalence). The study included 727 women. All psychological measures (except depression) had high prevalence at recruitment, falling substantially by 12 months. During follow-up, the cumulative prevalence of significant anxiety was 27% and significant depression was 21%. The most frequently reported worry was that the next cytology test would be abnormal (cumulative prevalence of 71%; point prevalence of ≥50% at 12 and 18 months). The cumulative prevalence values of worries about cervical cancer, having sex and future fertility were 33%, 20% and 16%, respectively. For some women who have low-grade cytology, a normal colposcopy does not appear to provide psychological reassurance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nationwide survey on pediatric CT among children of public health and school nurses to examine a possibility for a follow-up study on radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K.; Ban, N.; Ojima, M.; Yoshinaga, S.; Akahane, K.; Fujii, K.; Toyota, M.; Hamada, F.; Kouriyama, C.; Akiba, S.; Kunugita, N.; Shimada, Y.; Kai, M.

    2011-01-01

    A nationwide survey was conducted in Japan on paediatric CT among children of public health and school nurses to examine a possibility for a follow-up study on radiation effects. A survey questionnaire was sent out to 3173 public primary and junior high schools and 317 public health centres during October to December in 2009. According to the collected responses, 410 (16.2 %) children received the CT scans and the total number of CT scans was 585. Most of respondents expressed a high interest in radiation health effects and an intent to participate in the epidemiological study that will follow-up the health conditions of children. This study provides information to discuss the feasibility of the epidemiological study on health effects in children who received CT scans. (authors)

  2. Value of Perfusion CT, Transcranial Doppler Sonography, and Neurological Examination to Detect Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, E.; Raslan, F.; Stetter, Ch.; Lee, J.Y.; Solymosi, L.; Ernestus, R.I.; Vince, G.H.; Westermaier, Th.; Pham, M.; Solymosi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background. If detected in time, delayed cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be treated by balloon angioplasty or chemical vasospasmolysis in order to enhance cerebral blood flow (CBF) and protect the brain from ischemic damage. This study was conceived to compare the diagnostic accuracy of detailed neurological examination, Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD), and Perfusion-CT (PCT) to detect angiographic vasospasm. Methods. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of delayed ischemic neurological deterioration (DIND), pathological findings on PCT-maps, and accelerations of the mean flow velocity (MVF) were calculated. Results. The accuracy of DIND to predict angiographic vasospasm was 0.88. An acceleration of MFV in TCD (>140 cm/s) had an accuracy of 0.64, positive PCT-findings of 0.69 with a higher sensitivity, and negative predictive value than TCD. Interpretation. Neurological assessment at close intervals is the most sensitive and specific parameter for cerebral vasospasm. PCT has a higher accuracy, sensitivity and negative predictive value than TCD. If detailed neurological evaluation is possible, it should be the leading parameter in the management and treatment decisions. If patients are not amenable to detailed neurological examination, PCT at regular intervals is a helpful tool to diagnose secondary vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH

  3. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  4. CT of the stomach and duodenum. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziedses des Plantes, B.G. Jr.; Falke, T.H.M.; Tjon Tjauw Liem, B.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is provided of the CT appearance of the normal and postoperative stomach based on a retrospective study on 262 patients. The results were compared with those of conventional barium meal examination. Detailed understanding of the CT anatomy of the normal and postoperative stomach, as well as familarity with the usual pitfalls, are imperative to guarantee correct interpretation of pathology. (orig.)

  5. The value of intraoperative ultrasound (IUS) examination for the visualization of metastatic cerebral lesions, compared with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacikowska, M.; Szczerbicki, M.; Grzesiakowska, U.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is: 1. to assess the value of intraoperative ultrasonographic examination (IUSG) in confirming intraoperatively the presence of metastatic tumours detected preoperatively by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance tomography (MRI), 2. to evaluate an accordance of the numbers, localization and dimensions of metastatic tumours recognized preoperatively (CT and MRI) with those shown by intraoperative USG, 3. to comparatively assess the images of metastatic tumours found in preoperative CT and MRI examinations and in intraoperative USG examinations. Sixteen patients were operated upon for metastatic intracranial tumours from various primary foci. All patients had diagnostic brain examinations before the operation: MRI and CT in 7 cases, only MRI in 3 cases, only CT in 6 cases. Intraoperative USG examination was done in all cases. Retrospective analysis included: 1. comparative assessment of the images of metastatic tumours in intraoperative USG versus preoperative MRI and CT findings, 2. analysis of the number, localization and dimensions of metastatic tumours detected preoperatively and in intraoperative USG examination. The comparison of the greatest dimensions of metastatic lesions measured in CT and MRI findings, and in intraoperative USG based on Student t test showed no statistically significant differences between the examinations performed, p=0.2449. No statistically significant difference were found either between the numbers of metastatic lesions detected by these methods, p=0.71830. In the analysis of the images of metastatic lesions in preoperative examinations, the non--homogenous foci with margin enhancement after administration of gadolinium or contrast medium, with inner area not enhanced (necrosis?) were found in 8 cases (10 foci lesions), and in USG in 6 cases (9 focal lesions). In one case (one lesion) USG showed that the tumour was hypo echogenic as a whole, without areola around it. Intraoperative USG examination

  6. An experimental study on the effect of mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol injected into normal liver of rabbit : CT features and histopathologic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mee Ran; Kim, Yun Hwan; Cha, In Ho; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuk; Um, Soon Ho; Choi, Young Hee

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the safety and usefulness of Lipiodol-percutaneous transhepatic ethanol injection(LPEI) and to determine the appropriate concentration of Lipiodol during L-PEI. This was achieved by evalvating CT findings and histopathologic changes according to the concentration of Lipiodol, amount of ethanol, and the time interval after injection into normal rabbit liver. This experimental study involved 18 New Zealand rabbits under US guidance. They were divided into five groups according to injected materials; two rabbits with 0.4cc of normal saline(group I), six with 0.4cc of ethanol in the left hepatic lobe(group II), and 0.4cc of Lipiodol in the right hepatic lobe(group III), five rabbits with 5% Lipiodol-ethanol(5% vol. of Lipiodol+95% vol. of ethanol), 0.2cc in the right hepatic lobe, and 0.4cc in the left(group IV); and five rabbits with 10% Lipiodol-ethanol as per group IV(group V). CT was performed immediately, one week, two weeks, and three-four weeks after injection, and pathologic specimens were obtained on the third day(acute phase) and during the third or fourth week(chronic phase) after injection. On CT, intrahepatic localization of the L-PEI injection site was well demonstrated as a focal high attenuated area which gradually decreased in attenuation on follow up CT. The opacification of the inferior vena cava by Lipiodol, the linear distribution of Lipiodol along portal veins or fissures, and peritoneal leakage were clearly demonstrated in groups III-V, though the effects gradually disappeared during follow-up CT. There was no remarkable difference in gross CT attenuation between group IV and group V. The main pathologic findings during the acute phase of group II were coagulation necrosis surrounded by macrophage, inflammatory reaction, and early periportal and subcapsular fibrosis. The findings in group IV and V were similar to those in group II and additional fat vacuole accumulations in the necrotic area were also seen. During the chronic phase

  7. Preliminary study to evaluate the validity of the mini-mental state examination in a normal population in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükdeveci, Ayse A; Kutlay, Sehim; Elhan, Atilla H; Tennant, Alan

    2005-03-01

    Although the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is widely used in clinical practice, normative scores for a healthy population have not been documented in Turkey. The aim in this study was to validate the MMSE in a healthy population and to provide normal scores. Internal construct validity of the Turkish version of MMSE among a preliminary sample of 406 normal people was assessed by Rasch unidimensional measurement model. Scores of the normal sample varied according to age and education but not according to sex. The data derived from this sample showed poor fit to the Rasch model (mean item fit, -2.082, SD 3.022). Only four of 11 items met model expectations. There was also differential item functioning by education and age for most items. Thus the internal construct validity of the Turkish MMSE in a normative sample could not be demonstrated by Rasch analysis. The scale failed modern psychometric criteria for scalability. We would therefore suggest other large normative MMSE data sets to be tested in terms of internal construct validity. If these findings are replicated, the validity of MMSE norms and their consequent use in clinical practice should be reconsidered.

  8. Paediatric cardiac CT examinations: impact of the iterative reconstruction method ASIR on image quality--preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miéville, Frédéric A; Gudinchet, François; Rizzo, Elena; Ou, Phalla; Brunelle, Francis; Bochud, François O; Verdun, Francis R

    2011-09-01

    Radiation dose exposure is of particular concern in children due to the possible harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) method is a promising new technique that reduces image noise and produces better overall image quality compared with routine-dose contrast-enhanced methods. To assess the benefits of ASIR on the diagnostic image quality in paediatric cardiac CT examinations. Four paediatric radiologists based at two major hospitals evaluated ten low-dose paediatric cardiac examinations (80 kVp, CTDI(vol) 4.8-7.9 mGy, DLP 37.1-178.9 mGy·cm). The average age of the cohort studied was 2.6 years (range 1 day to 7 years). Acquisitions were performed on a 64-MDCT scanner. All images were reconstructed at various ASIR percentages (0-100%). For each examination, radiologists scored 19 anatomical structures using the relative visual grading analysis method. To estimate the potential for dose reduction, acquisitions were also performed on a Catphan phantom and a paediatric phantom. The best image quality for all clinical images was obtained with 20% and 40% ASIR (p ASIR above 50%, image quality significantly decreased (p ASIR, a strong noise-free appearance of the structures reduced image conspicuity. A potential for dose reduction of about 36% is predicted for a 2- to 3-year-old child when using 40% ASIR rather than the standard filtered back-projection method. Reconstruction including 20% to 40% ASIR slightly improved the conspicuity of various paediatric cardiac structures in newborns and children with respect to conventional reconstruction (filtered back-projection) alone.

  9. Hypermetabolism of compensatory laryngeal muscles in unilateral vocal cord palsy: comparison study between speech and silence with normal subjects by co-registered PET-CT fusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, Moon Sun; Kim, Hyon Kyong; Kim, Han Su; Chung, Sung Min

    2005-01-01

    There are a few case reports on asymmetric vocal cord uptake on FDG-PET in patients with unilateral vocal cord paralysis, which could be a potential pitfall in the interpretation of FDG-PET images. We evaluated the metabolic activity of laryngeal muscles of patients with unilateral vocal cord paralysis in comparison to normal controls during both speech and silence. Eleven patients with iatrogenic unilateral vocal cord palsy(thyroidectomy 7, lung cancer = 1, others = 3) and 12 normal controls underwent FDG-PET with usual protocol. They were divided into two groups respectively; one group read books aloud for 20 minutes (phonation group) and the other kept silence (non-phonation groups) after FDG injection. Recent neck CT scan were co-registered with FDG-PET to produce PET-CT fusion images to elaborate small laryngeal muscles. In patients with unilateral vocal cord palsy, contralateral non-paralyzed vocal cord showed increased FDG uptake, more intense with phonation group (SUV =5.88, n =5) than non-phonation group (SUV =2.33, n =6) --mainly on thyroarytenoid muscle. Normal control subjects showed symmetric mildly increased FDG uptake (SUV=1.92, n=6) only in phonation group, which was significantly low against patient groups and was localized in lateral cricoarytenoid muscle. Hypermetabolism of contralateral thyroarytenoid muscle in patients with unilateral vocal cord paralysis could be encountered during FDG-PET imaging even with keeping silence. Phonation during FDG-PET study enhance FDG uptake on different laryngeal muscles between unilateral vocal cord paralysis and normal subjects

  10. Normal range albuminuria and metabolic syndrome in South Korea: the 2011-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Young Park

    Full Text Available It is well-known that there is a close relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS and microalbuminuria. However, some recent studies have found that even normal range albuminuria was associated with MetS and cardiometabolic risk factors. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between MetS and normal range albuminuria and to calculate the cutoff value for albuminuria that correlates with MetS in the representative fraction of Korean population.Data were obtained from the 2011-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and included 9,650 subjects aged ≥ 19 years. We measured metabolic parameters: fasting blood glucose, waist circumference, blood pressure, and lipids, and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR. The optimal ACR cutoff points for MetS were examined by the receiver operating characteristic curve. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain the prevalence of MetS and its components according to the ACR levels.The first cutoff value of ACR were 4.8 mg/g for subjects with ≥ 3 components of MetS. There was a graded association between ACR and prevalence of MetS and its components. If ACR was <4 mg/g, there was no significant increase in the prevalence of MetS or its components. From the ACR level of 4-5 mg/g, the prevalence of MetS significantly increased after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, and medications for diabetes mellitus and hypertension (odds ratio; 95% confidence intervals = 1.416; 1.041-1.926.Albuminuria within the normal range (around 5 mg/g was associated with prevalence of MetS in the Korean population.

  11. Body packers on your examination table: How helpful are plain x-ray images? A definitive low-dose CT protocol as a diagnosis tool for body packers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, B.; Grossbach, A.; Gruber-Rouh, T.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, Th. J.; Eichler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the clinical value and radiation dose of plain x-rays and CT in examining patients suspected of ingesting drug-filled packets. Materials and methods: Thirty-eight patients with suspected internal concealment of drug-filled packets who were examined with plain x-rays or CT or both were included in the study. CT studies were performed using low-dose and standard-dose techniques. All radiographic images were analysed by two radiologists regarding identification of the packets and estimating the effective radiation dose from standard- and low-dose CT versus conventional x-ray examinations. Descriptive calculations were made regarding the number and density of packs and radiation dosage. The diagnostic performance of both radiologists with standard- and low-dose CT was calculated by analysing differences in the mean number of packs found. Results: Thirty-one patients were positively identified as body packers with an average of 13 packs (min: n = 1, max: n = 58, total: n = 390); seven patients were not concealing drug packets. X-ray images were taken of 24 patients prior to CT, thus allowing a direct comparison between the two methods. The correct diagnosis was made in 42%, in 33% the radiologists were uncertain, and in 25% of drug packets were either not or wrongly identified. X-ray imaging had a positive predictive value of 20% with a negative predictive value of 81%. A total of 55 CT examinations were performed on all patients with a mean effective dose of 2 mSv (low dose) versus 9.3 mSv (standard dose). The visibility of packets on low-dose CT images compared to high-dose CT was not reduced: the radiologists identified 385 and 381 of the packets, respectively, with no difference regarding the examination technique (p = 0.24 and p = 0.253, respectively). The radiodensity of all drug-filled packets at CT ranged from 26–292 HU (mean 181.2 HU). Conclusion: X-ray imaging of supposed body packers leads to a significant risk of diagnostic

  12. Analysis of normal anatomy of oral cavity in open-mouth view with CT and MRI; comparison with closed-mouth view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Ho; Kim, Seong Min; Cheon, Bont Jin; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk

    2001-01-01

    When MRI and CT of the oral cavity utilize the traditional closed-mouth approach, direct contact between the tongue and surrounding structures may give rise to difficulty in recognizing the anatomy involved and demonstrating the possible presence of pathologic features. We describe a more appropriate scan technique, involving open-mouthed imaging, which may be used to demonstrate the anatomy of the oral cavity in detail. Axial and coronal MR imaging and axial CT scanning were performed in 14 healthy volunteers, using both the closed and open-mouth approach. For the latter, a mouth-piece was put in place prior to examination. In all volunteers, open-mouth MR and CT examinations involved the same parameters as the corresponding closed-mouth procedures. The CT and MR images obtained by each method were compared, particular attention being paid to the presence and symmetry of motion artifact of the tongue and the extent of air space in the oral cavity. Comparative imaging analysis was based on the recognition of 13 structures around the boundaries of the mouth. For statistical analysis, student's test was used and a p value<0.05 was considered significant. Due to symmetry of the tongue, a less severe motion artifact, and increased air space in the oral cavity, the open-mouth method produced excellent images. The axial and coronal MR images thus obtained were superior in terms of demarcation of the inferior surface and dortsum of the tongue, gingiva, buccal surface and buccal vestivule to those obtained with the mouth closed (p<0.05). In addition, axial MR images obtained with the mouth open showed better demarcation of structures at the lingual margin and anterior belly of the digastric muscle (p<0.05), while coronal MR images of the base of the tongue, surface of the hard palate, soft palate, and uvula, were also superior (p<0.05). Open-mouth CT provided better images at the lingual margin, dorsum of the tongue and buccal surface than the closed-mouth approach (p<0

  13. Office-based 3D-CT examined in the sitting position is useful for diagnosis of patulous eustachian tube (pET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2010-01-01

    The pET symptoms are tended to be masked in the recumbent position. CT for pET should be examined in the sitting position. CT was performed under the resting and Valsalva's condition. Completely open ET was observed in 79.2% of the pET group (n=111), but in none of the control group (n=30). The average ET-gram showed an occlusive zone (OZ) in medial to the isthmus under both conditions in only control group. Trans-tympanic silicone plug insertion was thought to be reasonable technique because of obliteration approach to isthmus. Office-based CT examined in the sitting position is useful for diagnosis and evaluation of pET. (author)

  14. Reducing the radiation dose to the eye lens region during CT brain examination: the potential beneficial effect of the combined use of bolus and a bismuth shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, C.W.K.; Chan, T.P.; Cheung, H.Y.; Wong, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Computed Tomography (CT) is the leading contributor to medical exposure to ionizing radiation. Although the use of CT brain scans for patients with head injuries and convulsions has shown a tremendous growth, it has raised substantial concerns in the general public because of the risk of radiation-induced cataracts: the current available strategies to reduce the radiation dose to the eye lens region are limited. Therefore, the present research project was initiated with the aim of evaluating the potential benefit of the combined use of bolus and a bismuth shield on reducing the radiation dose to the eye lens region during CT brain examination. Materials and methods: We conducted a series of phantom studies to measure the entrance surface dose (ESD) that is delivered to the eye lens region during CT brain examination under the effect of different scanning and shielding setups. Results: Our results indicated, during CT brain examination: (1) a drastic reduction of 92.5% in the ESD to the eye lens region was found when the CT gantry was tilted from 0 deg. (overall ESD = 30.7 mGy) to 30 deg. cranially (overall ESD = 2.4 mGy), and (2) when the CT gantry was positioned at 0 deg. (the common practice in the clinical setting), the setups with the application of a) a bismuth shield, b) a bismuth shield with a face shield (air gap), c) a bismuth shield with bolus, and d) a bismuth shield with bolus and an air gap can result in an acceptable level of image quality with a smaller overall ESD delivered to the eye lens region (overall ESD = 23.2 mGy, 24 mGy, 21 mGy and 19.9 mGy, respectively) than the setup without the bismuth shield applied (overall ESD = 30.7 mGy). Conclusion: When the primary beam scanning through the eye lens region is unavoidable during CT brain examination, the combined use of a bismuth shield with bolus and a face shield is an easy-to-use and inexpensive shielding setup to reduce the radiation dose delivered to the eye lens region while

  15. High-risk clinical target volume delineation in CT-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy - Impact of information from FIGO stage with or without systematic inclusion of 3D documentation of clinical gynecological examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegazy, Neamat [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Medical Univ. of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Poetter Rickard; Kirisits, Christian [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel; Federico, Mario; Sturdza, Alina; Nesvacil, Nicole [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], e-mail: nicole.nesvacil@meduniwien.ac.at

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to improve computed tomography (CT)-based high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) delineation protocols for cervix cancer patients, in settings without any access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of brachytherapy. Therefore the value of a systematic integration of comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) documentation of repetitive gynecological examination for CT-based HR CTV delineation protocols, in addition to information from FIGO staging, was investigated. In addition to a comparison between reference MRI contours and two different CT-based contouring methods (using complementary information from FIGO staging with or without additional 3D clinical drawings), the use of standardized uterine heights was also investigated. Material and methods: Thirty-five cervix cancer patients with CT- and MR-images and 3D clinical drawings at time of diagnosis and brachytherapy were included. HR CTV{sub stage} was based on CT information and FIGO stage. HR CTV{sub stage} {sub +3Dclin} was contoured on CT using FIGO stage and 3D clinical drawing. Standardized HR CTV heights were: 1/1, 2/3 and 1/2 of uterine height. MRI-based HR CTV was delineated independently. Resulting widths, thicknesses, heights, and volumes of HR CTV{sub stage}, HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} and MRI-based HR CTV contours were compared. Results: The overall normalized volume ratios (mean{+-}SD of CT/MRI{sub ref} volume) of HR CTV{sub stage} and HR{sub stage+3Dclin} were 2.6 ({+-}0.6) and 2.1 ({+-}0.4) for 1/1 and 2.3 ({+-}0.5) and 1.8 ({+-}0.4), for 2/3, and 1.9 ({+-}0.5) and 1.5 ({+-}0.3), for 1/2 of uterine height. The mean normalized widths were 1.5{+-}0.2 and 1.2{+-}0.2 for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin}, respectively (p < 0.05). The mean normalized heights for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} were both 1.7{+-}0.4 for 1/1 (p < 0.05.), 1.3{+-}0.3 for 2/3 (p < 0.05) and 1.1{+-}0.3 for 1/2 of uterine height. Conclusion: CT-based HR

  16. Head CT: Image quality improvement of posterior fossa and radiation dose reduction with ASiR - comparative studies of CT head examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzinski, Maciej; Waszczuk, Lukasz; Sasiadek, Marek J.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate head CT protocol developed to improve visibility of the brainstem and cerebellum, lower bone-related artefacts in the posterior fossa and maintain patient radioprotection. A paired comparison of head CT performed without Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR) and a clinically indicated follow-up with 40 % ASiR was acquired in one group of 55 patients. Patients were scanned in the axial mode with different scanner settings for the brain and the posterior fossa. Objective image quality analysis was performed with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subjective image quality analysis was based on brain structure visibility and evaluation of the artefacts. We achieved 19 % reduction of total DLP and significantly better image quality of posterior fossa structures. SNR for white and grey matter in the cerebellum were 34 % to 36 % higher, respectively, CNR was improved by 142 % and subjective analyses were better for images with ASiR. When imaging parameters are set independently for the brain and the posterior fossa imaging, ASiR has a great potential to improve CT performance: image quality of the brainstem and cerebellum is improved, and radiation dose for the brain as well as total radiation dose are reduced. (orig.)

  17. Head CT: Image quality improvement of posterior fossa and radiation dose reduction with ASiR - comparative studies of CT head examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzinski, Maciej; Waszczuk, Lukasz; Sasiadek, Marek J. [Wroclaw Medical University, Department of General Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate head CT protocol developed to improve visibility of the brainstem and cerebellum, lower bone-related artefacts in the posterior fossa and maintain patient radioprotection. A paired comparison of head CT performed without Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR) and a clinically indicated follow-up with 40 % ASiR was acquired in one group of 55 patients. Patients were scanned in the axial mode with different scanner settings for the brain and the posterior fossa. Objective image quality analysis was performed with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subjective image quality analysis was based on brain structure visibility and evaluation of the artefacts. We achieved 19 % reduction of total DLP and significantly better image quality of posterior fossa structures. SNR for white and grey matter in the cerebellum were 34 % to 36 % higher, respectively, CNR was improved by 142 % and subjective analyses were better for images with ASiR. When imaging parameters are set independently for the brain and the posterior fossa imaging, ASiR has a great potential to improve CT performance: image quality of the brainstem and cerebellum is improved, and radiation dose for the brain as well as total radiation dose are reduced. (orig.)

  18. New radiological examination for tumor in the internal auditory canal by combination of air CT cisternography and target imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, A.; Shiga, I.; Kanzaki, H. (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-07-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of progressive right hearing disturbance and tinnitus. An x-ray film of the skull demonstrated dilatation of the right internal auditory canal. Intravcnously enhanced CT didn't reveal any tumor in the right cerebellopontine angle. An intracanalicular tumor was demonstrated by air CT cisternography with target imaging, and confirmed by surgery. This method is useful for the radiological evaluation of the intracanalicular tumors.

  19. A new radiological examination for tumor in the internal auditory canal by combination of air CT cisternography and target imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Akira; Shiga, Itsuo; Kanzaki, Hitoshi

    1982-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of progressive right hearing disturbance and tinnitus. An x-ray film of the skull demonstrated dilatation of the right internal auditory canal. Intravcnously enhanced CT didn't reveal any tumor in the right cerebellopontine angle. An intracanalicular tumor was demonstrated by air CT cisternography with target imaging, and confirmed by surgery. This method is useful for the radiological evaluation of the intracanalicular tumors. (author)

  20. New radiological examination for tumor in the internal auditory canal by combination of air CT cisternography and target imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, A; Shiga, I; Kanzaki, H [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1982-07-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of progressive right hearing disturbance and tinnitus. An x-ray film of the skull demonstrated dilatation of the right internal auditory canal. Intravcnously enhanced CT didn't reveal any tumor in the right cerebellopontine angle. An intracanalicular tumor was demonstrated by air CT cisternography with target imaging, and confirmed by surgery. This method is useful for the radiological evaluation of the intracanalicular tumors.

  1. Diagnosis and evaluation of surveying examination by intracranial tumor in dogs CT; Diagnostico e avaliacao topografica de neoplasias intracranianas pelo exame de TC em caes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaldini, Andre Fonseca; Santos, Debora Rodrigues dos; Oliveira, Juliana Messias; Abreu, Felipe Andrei Suarez; Wallace, Verena; Pacheco, Eduardo Nelson da Silva, E-mail: andreromaldini@gmail.com [Hospital Santa Ines de Sao Paulo, Santana, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) revolutionized image diagnostic in veterinary medicine and currently can be considered one of the most useful tools for the imaging evaluation of intracranial tumor in dogs. Computed tomography of the brain in small animals allows visualization of intracranial tumor, compression of adjacent structures such as cerebral parenchyma, falx or lateral ventricles, and evaluate secondary hemorrhages and edema. The CT imaging provides essential information to indicate the surgical approach for a possible tumor resection or biopsy, including the correct location and boundaries structures involved, and also can be used to monitor the clinical treatment. However, only histopathological examination is able to confirm the final diagnosis. (author)

  2. Head CT: Image quality improvement of posterior fossa and radiation dose reduction with ASiR - comparative studies of CT head examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guziński, Maciej; Waszczuk, Łukasz; Sąsiadek, Marek J

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate head CT protocol developed to improve visibility of the brainstem and cerebellum, lower bone-related artefacts in the posterior fossa and maintain patient radioprotection. A paired comparison of head CT performed without Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR) and a clinically indicated follow-up with 40 % ASiR was acquired in one group of 55 patients. Patients were scanned in the axial mode with different scanner settings for the brain and the posterior fossa. Objective image quality analysis was performed with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subjective image quality analysis was based on brain structure visibility and evaluation of the artefacts. We achieved 19 % reduction of total DLP and significantly better image quality of posterior fossa structures. SNR for white and grey matter in the cerebellum were 34 % to 36 % higher, respectively, CNR was improved by 142 % and subjective analyses were better for images with ASiR. When imaging parameters are set independently for the brain and the posterior fossa imaging, ASiR has a great potential to improve CT performance: image quality of the brainstem and cerebellum is improved, and radiation dose for the brain as well as total radiation dose are reduced. •With ASiR it is possible to lower radiation dose or improve image quality •Sequentional imaging allows setting scan parameters for brain and posterior-fossa independently •We improved visibility of brainstem structures and decreased radiation dose •Total radiation dose (DLP) was decreased by 19.

  3. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk in computed tomography examinations in some selected CT facilities in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, R. K.

    2012-01-01

    The effective dose and cancer risk were determined for patients undergoing seven different types of CT examinations in two CT facilities in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. The two facilities, namely; the Diagnostic Centre Ltd and Cocoa Clinic were chosen because of their significant patient throughput. The effective dose was from patient data namely age, sex, height, weight and technique factors; namely scan length, KVp (Kilovolts peak), mAs (milliamperes per second) and CTDIv from the control console of the CT machines. The effective dose was also estimated using the dose length product (DLP) and k Coefficients which is the anatomic region specific conversion factors. The cancer risk for each patient for a particular examination was determined from the effective dose, age and sex of each patient with the help of BEIR VII. In all, a total number of 800 adult patients with 400 from each of the two CT facilities were compiled. From Diagnostic Centre Ltd, the average effective dose was 5.61mSv in the range of 1.41mSv to 13.34mSv with average BMI of 26.19kg/m 2 in the range of 16.90kg/m 2 to 48.28kg/m 2 for all types of examinations. The average cancer risk was 0.0458 Sv - 1 for 400 patients in the range of 0.0001 Sv - 1 to 0.3036 Sv -1 compared with a population of 900 patients undergoing CT examination per year. From Cocoa Clinic, the average effective dose was 3.91MSv in the range of 0.54mSv to 27.32mSv with an average BMI of 25.59 kg/m 2 in the range of 17.18kg/m 2 to 35.34kg/m 2 and the average cancer risk was 0.0371 Sv - 1 in the range of 0.0001 Sv - 1 and 0.7125 Sv -1 . Some of the values were within the range of values of typical for typical effective dose for CT examinations reported by the ICRP. It was evident from this study that the variations in scanning parameters had significant impact on the effective doses to patient for similar CT examinations among the two facilities.(au)

  4. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - A potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Nielsen, Morten; Brink, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Background: Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose. Methods: A total of 665 CBCTs in 65 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT/VMAT to 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. For each patient, CBCT lung density changes during the treatment course were related to the locally delivered dose. Results: A dose response is observed for the patient population at the end of the treatment course. However, the observed dose response is highly variable among patients. Density changes at 10th and 20th fraction are clearly correlated to those observed at the end of the treatment course. Conclusions: CBCT density changes in healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy correlate with the locally delivered dose and can be detected relatively early during the treatment. If these density changes are correlated to subsequent clinical toxicity this assay could form the basis for biological adaptive radiotherapy.

  5. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-03: Preliminary Study of Size-Specific Dose Estimates in Adult Abdomenal CT Examinations in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H; Hu, Y; Hwang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was to investigate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) for routine adult abdominal CT examinations in Taiwan. Methods: A national survey was conducted in Taiwan in 2014 to investigate SSDEs for routine adult abdominal CT examinations. The hospitals involved in this study provided CT images of their typical patients. The CT image in the level of the middle liver was selected to record the corresponding tube current, slice mAs or effective mAs. The image was also used to estimate the dimensions of patient as measuring the lengths in the anterior to posterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) directions. The effective diameter was then calculated from AP and LAT, and used to look up conversion factors in the AAPM 204 report. The volume CTDI (CTDIvol) for each CT unit was measured on sites using a 32-cm cylindrical standard dose phantom and a calibrated pencil-type ionization chamber. Individual patient’s SSDEs were then calculated from the corresponding SSDE conversion factor and the CTDIvol. Results: The study cohort included 111 CT units. The ratio of turning on automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or not is 88:23. Effective diameters are 258.7±25.1 mm (167–366 mm). 99.3% of typical patients selected by each hospital have smaller effective diameter than the 32-cm dosimetry phantom. Adult abdomenal SSDE is 17.5 ± 8.8 mGy (1.9-58 mGy). The SSDE seems to decrease as the effective diameter increases as the ATCM turns off, and independent with the effective diameter as the ATCM turns on. Conclusion: The SSDE for typical patients in Taiwan was investigated. We continue to complete this investigation in 2015 to include more valid data to establish SSDE reference level in Taiwan. This study was financially supported by the Atomic Energy Council in Taiwan

  6. Inter fraction variations in rectum and bladder volumes and dose distributions during high dose rate brachytherapy treatment of the uterine cervix investigated by repetitive CT-examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Dale, Einar; Skjoensberg, Ane; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variation of dose to organs at risk for patients receiving fractionated high dose rate gynaecological brachytherapy by using CT-based 3D treatment planning and dose-volume histograms (DVH). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix underwent three to six CT examinations (mean 4.9) during their course of high-dose-rate brachytherapy using radiographically compatible applicators. The rectal and bladder walls were delineated and DVHs were calculated. Results: Inter fraction variation of the bladder volume (CV mean =44.1%) was significantly larger than the inter fraction variation of the mean dose (CV mean =19.9%, P=0.005) and the maximum dose (CV mean =17.5%, P=0.003) of the bladder wall. The same trend was seen for rectum, although the figures were not significantly different. Performing CT examinations at four of seven brachytherapy fractions reduced the uncertainty to 4 and 7% for the bladder and rectal doses, respectively. A linear regression analysis showed a significant, negative relationship between time after treatment start and the whole bladder volume (P=0.018), whereas no correlation was found for the rectum. For both rectum and bladder a linear regression analysis revealed a significant, negative relationship between the whole volume and median dose (P<0.05). Conclusion: Preferably a CT examination should be provided at every fraction. However, this is logistically unfeasible in most institutions. To obtain reliable DVHs the patients will in the future undergo 3-4 CT examinations during the course of brachytherapy at our institution. Since this study showed an association between large bladder volumes and dose reductions, the patients will be treated with a standardized bladder volume

  7. Multi-Detector CT Findings of the Normal Appendix in Children: Evaluation of the Position, Diameter, and Presence or Absence of Intraluminal Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Woon Ju; Kim, Jong Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    To assess the usefulness of multi-detector CT (MDCT) with multiplanar reformations (MPR) for the evaluation of the position, diameter and presence or absence of intraluminal gas in the normal appendix in children. From 2007 to 2010, we retrospectively analyzed the MDCT images of normal appendices in 133 children, and evaluated the position, diameter, and presence or absence of intraluminal gas in the appendix. Among the 133 appendices, type I (postileal and medial paracecal position) was found in 64 children, type II (subcecal position) in 22, type III (retrocecal and retrocolic/laterocolic position) in 15, type IV (preileal and medial colic position) in 16, and type V (lower pelvic position) in 16 children. The mean diameter was 5.8 mm {+-} 1.2 (SD) (range; 3.2-8.7 mm). There was a high correlation between the appendiceal diameter and age (p = 0.000).There was no statistically significant difference in the appendiceal diameter between boys and girls (p = 0.470). Intraluminal gas was found in 115 appendices and there was no statistically significant correlation between the appendiceal diameter and intraluminal gas (p = 0.502). The MDCT with MPR was useful for the evaluation of the normal appendices in children. The procedure may be useful for the diagnosis of equivocal or unusual appendicitis in children.

  8. Is higher body temperature beneficial in ischemic stroke patients with normal admission CT angiography of the cerebral arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Khanevski, Andrej; Nacu, Aliona; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    Low body temperature is considered beneficial in ischemic stroke due to neuroprotective mechanisms, yet some studies suggest that higher temperatures may improve clot lysis and outcomes in stroke patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The effect of increased body temperature in stroke patients treated with tPA and with normal computed tomography angiography (CTA) on admission is unknown. We hypothesized a beneficial effect of higher body temperature in the absence of visible clots on CTA, possibly due to enhanced lysis of small, peripheral clots. Patients with ischemic stroke admitted to our Stroke Unit between February 2006 and April 2013 were prospectively registered in a database (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). Ischemic stroke patients treated with tPA with normal CTA of the cerebral arteries were included. Outcomes were assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) after 1 week. An excellent outcome was defined as mRS=0, and a favorable outcome as mRS=0-1. A total of 172 patients were included, of which 48 (27.9%) had an admission body temperature ≥37.0°C, and 124 (72.1%) had a body temperature temperature ≥37.0°C was independently associated with excellent outcomes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-6.46; P=0.014) and favorable outcomes (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.13-4.98; P=0.015) when adjusted for confounders. We found an association between higher admission body temperature and improved outcome in tPA-treated stroke patients with normal admission CTA of the cerebral arteries. This may suggest a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis in the absence of visible clots on CTA.

  9. Examination of muscle composition and motor unit behavior of the first dorsal interosseous of normal and overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan D; Sterczala, Adam J; Trevino, Michael A; Herda, Trent J

    2018-05-01

    We examined differences between normal weight (NW) and overweight (OW) children aged 8-10 yr in strength, muscle composition, and motor unit (MU) behavior of the first dorsal interosseous. Ultrasonography was used to determine muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), subcutaneous fat (sFAT), and echo intensity (EI). MU behavior was assessed during isometric muscle actions at 20% and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) by analyzing electromyography amplitude (EMG RMS ) and relationships between mean firing rates (MFR), recruitment thresholds (RT), and MU action potential amplitudes (MUAP size ) and durations (MUAP time ). The OW group had significantly greater EI than the NW group ( P = 0.002; NW, 47.99 ± 6.01 AU; OW, 58.90 ± 10.63 AU, where AU is arbitrary units) with no differences between groups for CSA ( P = 0.688) or MVC force ( P = 0.790). MUAP size was larger for NW than OW in relation to RT ( P = 0.002) and for MUs expressing similar MFRs ( P = 0.011). There were no significant differences ( P = 0.279-0.969) between groups for slopes or y-intercepts from the MFR vs. RT relationships. MUAP time was larger in OW ( P = 0.015) and EMG RMS was attenuated in OW compared with NW ( P = 0.034); however, there were no significant correlations ( P = 0.133-0.164, r = 0.270-0.291) between sFAT and EMG RMS . In a muscle that does not support body mass, the OW children had smaller MUAP size as well as greater EI, although anatomical CSA was similar. This contradicts previous studies examining larger limb muscles. Despite evidence of smaller MUs, the OW children had similar isometric strength compared with NW children. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Ultrasound data and motor unit action potential sizes suggest that overweight children have poorer muscle composition and smaller motor units in the first dorsal interosseous than normal weight children. Evidence is presented that suggests differences in action potential size cannot be explained

  10. Axial skeletal CT densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampmann, L.E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Roentgen ray a precise and accurate assessment of bone mineral content has been a challenge to many investigators. A number of methods have been developed but no one satisfied. Considering its technical possibilities computed tomography is very promising in determination of bone mineral content (BMC). The new modality enables BMC estimations in the axial skeletal trabecular bone. CT densitometry can be performed on a normal commercially available third generation whole body CT scanner. No dedicated device in a special clinical set-up is necessary. In this study 106 patients, most of them clinically suspected of osteoporosis, were examined. The new method CT densitometry has been evaluated. The results have been correlated to alternative BMC determination methods. (Auth.)

  11. The paradox of vaginal examination practice during normal childbirth: Palestinian women’s feelings, opinions, knowledge and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sahar J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaginal examination (VE, is a frequent procedure during childbirth. It is the most accepted ways to assess progress during childbirth, but its repetition at short intervals has no value. Over years, VE continued to be plagued by a nature that implies negative feelings and experiences of women. The aim of this exploratory qualitative study was to explore women’s feelings, opinions, knowledge and experiences of vaginal examinations (VE during normal childbirth. Methods We interviewed 176 postpartum women using semi-structured questionnaire in a Palestinian public hospital in the oPt. Descriptive statistics were conducted; frequency counts and percentages for the quantitative questions. The association between the frequency of VE and age, parity, years of education, locale and the time of delivery was tested by Chi-squared and Fisher’s Exact test. The open-ended qualitative questions were read line-by-line for the content and coded. The assigned codes for all responses were entered to the SPSS statistical software version 18. Results As compared with WHO recommendations, VE was conducted too frequently, and by too many providers during childbirth. The proportion of women who received a ‘too high’ frequency of VEs during childbirth was significantly larger in primipara as compared to multipara women (P = .037. 82% of women reported pain or severe pain and 68% reported discomfort during VE. Some women reported insensitive approaches of providers, insufficient means of privacy and no respect of dignity or humanity during the exam. Conclusions Palestinian women are undergoing unnecessary and frequent VEs during childbirth, conducted by several different providers and suffer pain and discomfort un-necessarily. Practice implications Adhering to best evidence, VE during childbirth should be conducted only when necessary, and if possible, by the same provider. This will decrease the laboring women’s unnecessary suffering

  12. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 with a novel multifocal collimator SPECT/CT: IQ-SPECT versus conventional protocols in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Wakabayash, Hiroshi; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-06-01

    A novel multifocal collimator, IQ-SPECT (Siemens) consists of SMARTZOOM, cardio-centric and 3D iterative SPECT reconstruction and makes it possible to perform MPI scans in a short time. The aims are to delineate the normal uptake in thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT in each acquisition method and to compare the distribution between new and conventional protocol, especially in patients with normal imaging. Forty patients (eight women, mean age of 75 years) who underwent myocardial perfusion imaging were included in the study. All patients underwent one-day protocol perfusion scan after an adenosine-stress test and at rest after administering (201)Tl and showed normal results. Acquisition was performed on a Symbia T6 equipped with a conventional dual-headed gamma camera system (Siemens ECAM) and with a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator. Imaging was performed with a conventional system followed by IQ-SPECT/computed tomography (CT). Reconstruction was performed with or without X-ray CT-derived attenuation correction (AC). Two nuclear physicians blinded to clinical information interpreted all myocardial perfusion images. A semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion was analyzed by a 17-segment model with a 5-point visual scoring. The uptake of each segment was measured and left ventricular functions were analyzed by QPS software. IQ-SPECT provided good or excellent image quality. The quality of IQ-SPECT images without AC was similar to those of conventional LEHR study. Mid-inferior defect score (0.3 ± 0.5) in the conventional LEHR study was increased significantly in IQ-SPECT with AC (0 ± 0). IQ-SPECT with AC improved the mid-inferior decreased perfusion shown in conventional images. The apical tracer count in IQ-SPECT with AC was decreased compared to that in LEHR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7, p IQ-SPECT was significantly higher than that from the LEHR collimator (p = 0.0009). The images of IQ-SPECT acquired in a short time are equivalent to that of conventional LEHR

  13. FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotter, Shane E.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Siegel, Barry A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of anal carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the anal canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved anal carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially more abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination

  14. CT-based three-dimensional kinematic comparison of dart-throwing motion between wrists with malunited distal radius and contralateral normal wrists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kim, Y.S.; Park, C.S.; Kim, K.G.; Lee, Y.H.; Gong, H.S.; Lee, H.J.; Baek, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare motion of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate in wrists with a malunited distal radius and contralateral normal wrists during dart-throwing motion (DTM) by three-dimensional kinematic studies using computed tomography (CT) images. Materials and methods: CT was performed simultaneously on both wrists in six patients with a unilateral distal radius malunion at three stepwise positions simulating DTM. Using volume registration technique, the kinematic variables of helical axis motion of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate were calculated and compared between both wrists. The helical motion of the capitate was also evaluated in a scaphoid- and lunate-based coordinate system. Results: Among the average rotation and translation of the scaphoid, lunate, and capitate during DTM, only the average rotation of the capitate was significantly different between the uninjured (88.9°) and the injured (70°) wrist (p = 0.0075). Rotation of the capitate relative to the scaphoid (26.3° versus 37.8°, p = 0.029) or lunate (39.2° versus 59.3°, p = 0.028) was smaller in the malunited wrist. The centres of helical axis motion of the three carpal bones were located more dorsally and radially in the injured wrist. Conclusions: The present study showed that decreased DTM in wrists with a distal radius malunion resulted from decreased midcarpal motion. The present study of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate in wrists with distal radius malunion might be the first to present a 3D kinematic analysis of the effect of distal radius malunion on the carpal bones

  15. Vertebral artery variations and osseous anomaly at the C1-2 level diagnosed by 3D CT angiography in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakao, Norimitsu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro [Aichi Medical University, Department of Spine Center, Aichi (Japan); Aichi Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Takayasu, Masakazu [Aichi Medical University, Department of Spine Center, Aichi (Japan); Nishimura, Manabu [Aichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Riew, K.D. [Washington University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States); Imagama, Shiro [Nagoya University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Aichi Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The craniovertebral junction is anatomically complicated. Representative vertebral artery (VA) variations include the persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA), fenestration of the VA above and below C1 (FEN), posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) from C1/2, and high-riding VA (HRVA). The ponticulus posticus (PP) is a well-known osseous anomaly at C1. Although those anomalies are frequent in patients with cervical deformity, the prevalence of these in subjects with normal cervical spines is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the variations and prevalence of vascular and osseous anomalies based on three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D CT) angiography in patients without any cervical diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Klippel-Feil syndrome, or Down syndrome. Eligible subjects were patients who underwent 3D CT angiography by the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Internal Medicine from January 2009 to October 2013 in our institution. The authors defined a HRVA as a C2 pedicle with a maximum diameter of 4 mm or less. Among 480 subjects with a mean age of 63.1 years, 387 patients were eligible. One hundred and eighteen subjects were female, and 269 were male. HRVA was observed in 10.1 % of patients (39 out of 387 cases), FIA in 1.8 % (7 cases), FEN in 1.3 % (5 cases), and PICA in 1.3 % (5 cases). PP was observed in 6.2 % of patients (24 cases). According to past reports, many VA anomalies could be attributed to congenital or acquired conditions (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis). However, VA anomalies appear to exist even in patients without any such cervical diseases. (orig.)

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or nurse at the time of the CT examination. If your child has a known contrast material ... be given to your child for the CT examination. top of page What does the CT equipment ...

  17. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and somatostatin receptor (sst1-sst5) expression in normal human tissue: correlation of sst2 mRNA and SUVmax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Christian; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Jentzen, Walter; Brandau, Wolfgang; Bockisch, Andreas; Heusner, Till A.; Antoch, Gerald; Redmann-Bischofs, Anja; Unger, Nicole; Mann, Klaus; Petersenn, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    By targeting somatostatin receptors (sst) radiopeptides have been established for both diagnosis and therapy. For physiologically normal human tissues the study provides a normative database of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and sst mRNA. A total of 120 patients were subjected to diagnostic 68 Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (age range 19-83 years). SUV max values were measured in physiologically normal tissues defined by normal morphology, absence of surgical intervention and absence of metastatic spread during clinical follow-up. Expression of sst subtypes (sst1-sst5) was measured independently in pooled adult normal human tissue by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SUV max revealed a region-specific pattern (e.g., mean ± SD, spleen 31.1 ± 10.9, kidney 16.9 ± 5.3, liver 12.8 ± 3.6, stomach 7.0 ± 3.1, head of pancreas 6.2 ± 2.3, small bowel 4.8 ± 1.8, thyroid 4.7 ± 2.2, bone 3.9 ± 1.3, large bowel 2.9 ± 0.8, muscle 2.1 ± 0.5, parotid gland 1.9 ± 0.6, axillary lymph node 0.8 ± 0.3 and lung 0.7 ± 0.3). SUV max was age independent. Gender differences were evident within the thyroid (female/male: 3.7 ± 1.6/5.5 ± 2.4, p max values exclusively correlated with sst2 expression (r = 0.846, p max with the expression of the other four subtypes. In normal human tissues 68 Ga-DOTATOC imaging has been related to the expression of sst2 at the level of mRNA. The novel normative database may improve diagnostics, monitoring and therapy of sst-expressing tumours or inflammation on a molecular basis. (orig.)

  18. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L., E-mail: samuel.brady@stjude.org; Kaufman, Robert A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Mirro, Amy E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  19. SU-F-I-36: In-Utero Dose Measurements Within Postmortem Subjects for Estimating Fetal Doses in Pregnant Patients Examined with Pulmonary Embolism, Trauma, and Appendicitis CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnharski, I; Quails, N; Carranza, C; Correa, N; Bidari, S; Bickelhaup, M; Rill, L; Arreola, M [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The imaging of pregnant patients is medically necessary in certain clinical situations. The purpose of this work was to directly measure uterine doses in a cadaver scanned with CT protocols commonly performed on pregnant patients in order to estimate fetal dose and assess potential risk. Method: One postmortem subject was scanned on a 320-slice CT scanner with standard pulmonary embolism, trauma, and appendicitis protocols. All protocols were performed with the scan parameters and ranges currently used in clinical practice. Exams were performed both with and without iterative reconstruction to highlight the dose savings potential. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) were inserted into the uterus in order to approximate fetal doses. Results: In the pulmonary embolism CT protocol, the uterus is outside of the primary beam, and the dose to the uterus was under 1 mGy. In the trauma and appendicitis protocols, the uterus is in the primary beam, the fetal dose estimates were 30.5 mGy for the trauma protocol, and 20.6 mGy for the appendicitis protocol. Iterative reconstruction reduced fetal doses by 30%, with uterine doses at 21.3 for the trauma and 14.3 mGy for the appendicitis protocol. Conclusion: Fetal doses were under 1 mGy when exposed to scatter radiation, and under 50 mGy when exposed to primary radiation with the trauma and appendicitis protocols. Consistent with the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), these doses exhibit a negligible risk to the fetus, with only a small increased risk of cancer. Still, CT scans are not recommended during pregnancy unless the benefits of the exam clearly outweigh the potential risk. Furthermore, when possible, pregnant patients should be examined on CT scanners equipped with iterative reconstruction in order to keep patient doses as low as reasonable achievable.

  20. SU-F-I-36: In-Utero Dose Measurements Within Postmortem Subjects for Estimating Fetal Doses in Pregnant Patients Examined with Pulmonary Embolism, Trauma, and Appendicitis CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipnharski, I; Quails, N; Carranza, C; Correa, N; Bidari, S; Bickelhaup, M; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The imaging of pregnant patients is medically necessary in certain clinical situations. The purpose of this work was to directly measure uterine doses in a cadaver scanned with CT protocols commonly performed on pregnant patients in order to estimate fetal dose and assess potential risk. Method: One postmortem subject was scanned on a 320-slice CT scanner with standard pulmonary embolism, trauma, and appendicitis protocols. All protocols were performed with the scan parameters and ranges currently used in clinical practice. Exams were performed both with and without iterative reconstruction to highlight the dose savings potential. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) were inserted into the uterus in order to approximate fetal doses. Results: In the pulmonary embolism CT protocol, the uterus is outside of the primary beam, and the dose to the uterus was under 1 mGy. In the trauma and appendicitis protocols, the uterus is in the primary beam, the fetal dose estimates were 30.5 mGy for the trauma protocol, and 20.6 mGy for the appendicitis protocol. Iterative reconstruction reduced fetal doses by 30%, with uterine doses at 21.3 for the trauma and 14.3 mGy for the appendicitis protocol. Conclusion: Fetal doses were under 1 mGy when exposed to scatter radiation, and under 50 mGy when exposed to primary radiation with the trauma and appendicitis protocols. Consistent with the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), these doses exhibit a negligible risk to the fetus, with only a small increased risk of cancer. Still, CT scans are not recommended during pregnancy unless the benefits of the exam clearly outweigh the potential risk. Furthermore, when possible, pregnant patients should be examined on CT scanners equipped with iterative reconstruction in order to keep patient doses as low as reasonable achievable.

  1. Assessment of clinical image quality in paediatric abdominal CT examinations: dependency on the level of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) and the type of convolution kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Joel; Baath, Magnus; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Ledenius, Kerstin; Caisander, Haakan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different combinations of convolution kernel and the level of Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR TM ) on diagnostic image quality as well as visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations. Thirty-five paediatric patients with abdominal pain with non-specified pathology undergoing abdominal CT were included in the study. Transaxial stacks of 5-mm-thick images were retrospectively reconstructed at various ASiR levels, in combination with three convolution kernels. Four paediatric radiologists rated the diagnostic image quality and the delineation of six anatomical structures in a blinded randomised visual grading study. Image quality at a given ASiR level was found to be dependent on the kernel, and a more edge-enhancing kernel benefited from a higher ASiR level. An ASiR level of 70 % together with the Soft TM or Standard TM kernel was suggested to be the optimal combination for paediatric abdominal CT examinations. (authors)

  2. ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL IMAGE QUALITY IN PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: DEPENDENCY ON THE LEVEL OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASiR) AND THE TYPE OF CONVOLUTION KERNEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Joel; Båth, Magnus; Ledenius, Kerstin; Caisander, Håkan; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different combinations of convolution kernel and the level of Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™) on diagnostic image quality as well as visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations. Thirty-five paediatric patients with abdominal pain with non-specified pathology undergoing abdominal CT were included in the study. Transaxial stacks of 5-mm-thick images were retrospectively reconstructed at various ASiR levels, in combination with three convolution kernels. Four paediatric radiologists rated the diagnostic image quality and the delineation of six anatomical structures in a blinded randomised visual grading study. Image quality at a given ASiR level was found to be dependent on the kernel, and a more edge-enhancing kernel benefitted from a higher ASiR level. An ASiR level of 70 % together with the Soft™ or Standard™ kernel was suggested to be the optimal combination for paediatric abdominal CT examinations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Dose reduction in CT examination of children by an attenuation-based on-line modulation of tube current (CARE Dose)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greess, Holger; Noemayr, Anton; Baum, Ulrich; Lell, Michael; Boewing, Bernhard; Bautz, Werner A.; Wolf, Heiko; Kalender, Willi

    2002-01-01

    In a controlled patient study we investigated the potential of attenuation-based on-line modulation of the tube current to reduce milliampere values (mAs) in CT examinations of children without loss of image quality. mAs can be reduced for non-circular patient cross sections without an increase in noise if tube current is reduced at those angular positions where the patient diameter and, consequently, attenuation are small. We investigated a technical approach with an attenuation-based on-line control for the tube current realised as a work-in-progress implementation. The CT projection data are analysed in real time to determine optimal mAs values for each projection angle. We evaluated mAs reduction for 100 spiral CT examinations with attenuation-based on-line modulation of the tube current in a group of children. Two radiologists evaluated image quality by visual interpretation in consensus. We compared the mAs values read from the CT scanner with preset mAs of a standard protocol. Four different scan regions were examined in spiral technique (neck, thorax, abdomen, thorax and abdomen). We found the mAs product to be reduced typically by 10-60% depending on patient geometry and anatomical regions. The mean reduction was 22.3% (neck 20%, thorax 23%, abdomen 23%, thorax and abdomen 22%). In general, no deterioration of image quality was observed. There was no correlation between the age and the mean mAs reduction in the different anatomical regions. By classifying the children respectively to their weight, there is a positive trend between increasing weight and mAs reduction. We conclude that mAs in spiral CT examinations of children can be reduced substantially by attenuation-based on-line modulation of the tube current without deterioration of image quality. Attenuation-based on-line modulation of tube current is efficient and practical for reducing dose exposure to children. (orig.)

  4. Incidence and Imaging Findings of Costal Cartilage Fractures in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma: A Retrospective Review of 1461 Consecutive Whole-Body CT Examinations for Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummela, Mari T; Bensch, Frank V; Pyhältö, Tuomo T; Koskinen, Seppo K

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To assess the incidence of costal cartilage (CC) fractures in whole-body computed tomographic (CT) examinations for blunt trauma and to evaluate distribution of CC fractures, concomitant injuries, mechanism of injury, accuracy of reporting, and the effect on 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. All whole-body CT examinations for blunt trauma over 36 months were reviewed retrospectively and chest trauma CT studies were evaluated by a second reader. Of 1461 patients who underwent a whole-body CT examination, 39% (574 of 1461) had signs of thoracic injuries (men, 74.0% [425 of 574]; mean age, 46.6 years; women, 26.0% [149 of 574]; mean age, 48.9 years). χ 2 and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Interobserver agreement was calculated by using Cohen kappa values. Results A total of 114 patients (men, 86.8% [99 of 114]; mean age, 48.6 years; women, 13.2% [15 of 114]; mean age, 45.1 years) had 221 CC fractures. The incidence was 7.8% (114 of 1461) in all whole-body CT examinations and 19.9% (114 of 574) in patients with thoracic trauma. Cartilage of rib 7 (21.3%, 47 of 221) was most commonly injured. Bilateral multiple consecutive rib fractures occurred in 36% (41 of 114) versus 14% (64 of 460) in other patients with chest trauma (OR, 3.48; 95% CI: 2.18, 5.53; P chest trauma with CC fractures (13%, 15 of 114) versus patients with chest trauma without CC fractures (4%, 18 of 460) (OR, 3.72; 95% CI: 1.81, 7.64; P = .0001), as well as aortic injuries (n = 4 vs n = 0; P = .0015; OR, unavailable). Kappa value for interobserver agreement in detecting CC fractures was 0.65 (substantial agreement). CC fractures were documented in 39.5% (45 of 114) of primary reports. The 30-day mortality of patients with CC fractures was 7.02% (eight of 114) versus 4.78% (22 of 460) of other patients with chest trauma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI: 0.65, 3.47; P = .3371). Conclusion

  5. Effects of blood glucose level on 18F-FDG uptake for PET/CT in normal organs: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Sprinz

    Full Text Available To perform a systematic review of the effect of blood glucose levels on 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG uptake in normal organs.We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases through 22 April 2017 to identify all relevant studies using the keywords "PET/CT" (positron emission tomography/computed tomography, "standardized uptake value" (SUV, "glycemia," and "normal." Analysis followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses recommendations. Maximum and mean SUVs and glycemia were the main parameters analyzed. To objectively measure the magnitude of the association between glycemia and 18F-FDG uptake in different organs, we calculated the effect size (ES and the coefficient of determination (R2 whenever possible.The literature search yielded 225 results, and 14 articles met the inclusion criteria; studies included a total of 2714 (range, 51-557 participants. The brain SUV was related significantly and inversely to glycemia (ES = 1.26; R2 0.16-0.58. Although the liver and mediastinal blood pool were significantly affected by glycemia, the magnitudes of these associations were small (ES = 0.24-0.59, R2 = 0.01-0.08 and negligible (R2 = 0.02, respectively. Lung, bone marrow, tumor, spleen, fat, bowel, and stomach 18F-FDG uptakes were not influenced by glycemia. Individual factors other than glycemia can also affect 18F-FDG uptake in different organs, and body mass index appears to be the most important of these factors.The impact of glycemia on SUVs in most organs is either negligible or too small to be clinically significant. The brain SUV was the only value largely affected by glycemia.

  6. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  7. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated