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Sample records for normal bedside ultrasound

  1. Performance of Bedside Lung Ultrasound by a Pediatric Resident

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    Zhan, Chen; Grundtvig, Natalia; Klug, Bent Helmuth

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that lung ultrasound is a good, radiation-free alternative to chest radiography in children with pneumonia. We investigated how bedside lung ultrasound performed by a pediatric resident compared with chest radiography in children with suspected pneumonia. METHODS......: This was a prospective study comparing bedside lung ultrasound to chest radiography as the reference standard. Children aged 0 to 15 years with suspected pneumonia at a pediatric emergency department were included and underwent chest radiography and lung ultrasound. A pediatric resident with minimal practical ultrasound...

  2. Bedside ultrasound education in Canadian medical schools: A national survey

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    Peter Steinmetz

    2016-04-01

    Results:  Approximately half of the 13 responding medical schools had integrated bedside ultrasound teaching into their undergraduate curriculum. The most common trends in undergraduate ultrasound teaching related to duration (1-5 hours/year in 50% of schools, format (practical and theoretical in 67% of schools, and logistics (1:4 instructor to student ratio in 67% of schools. The majority of responding vice-deans indicated that bedside ultrasound education should be integrated into the medical school curriculum (77%, and cited a lack of ultrasound machines and infrastructure as barriers to integration. Conclusions: This study documents the current characteristics of undergraduate ultrasound education in Canada.

  3. Frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets (B-lines) using a regionally based lung ultrasound examination named vet BLUE (veterinary bedside lung ultrasound exam) in dogs with radiographically normal lung findings.

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    Lisciandro, Gregory R; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fulton, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Lung ultrasound is superior to lung auscultation and supine chest radiography for many respiratory conditions in human patients. Ultrasound diagnoses are based on easily learned patterns of sonographic findings and artifacts in standardized images. By applying the wet lung (ultrasound lung rockets or B-lines, representing interstitial edema) versus dry lung (A-lines with a glide sign) concept many respiratory conditions can be diagnosed or excluded. The ultrasound probe can be used as a visual stethoscope for the evaluation of human lungs because dry artifacts (A-lines with a glide sign) predominate over wet artifacts (ultrasound lung rockets or B-lines). However, the frequency and number of wet lung ultrasound artifacts in dogs with radiographically normal lungs is unknown. Thus, the primary objective was to determine the baseline frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets in dogs without clinical signs of respiratory disease and with radiographically normal lung findings using an 8-view novel regionally based lung ultrasound examination called Vet BLUE. Frequency of ultrasound lung rockets were statistically compared based on signalment, body condition score, investigator, and reasons for radiography. Ten left-sided heart failure dogs were similarly enrolled. Overall frequency of ultrasound lung rockets was 11% (95% confidence interval, 6-19%) in dogs without respiratory disease versus 100% (95% confidence interval, 74-100%) in those with left-sided heart failure. The low frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets observed in dogs without respiratory disease and with radiographically normal lungs suggests that Vet BLUE will be clinically useful for the identification of canine respiratory conditions. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  4. Elderly Woman with Abdominal Pain: Bedside Ultrasound Diagnosis of Diverticulitis

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    Jason D. Heiner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old otherwise healthy female presented to the emergency department with two weeks of worsening abdominal pain. She was afebrile with normal vital signs. Her physical examination was notable for moderate abdominal tenderness without rebound to the left and suprapubic regions of the abdomen. Laboratory studies were remarkable for a white blood cell count of 13,000/mm3. A focused bedside ultrasound over the patient’s region of maximal discomfort revealed a thickened bowel wall and several small contiguous hypoechoic projections surrounding a hyperechoic center, suggestive of diverticulitis (Figure. She was given metronidazole and ciprofloxacin and her diagnosis of uncomplicated colonic diverticulitis was confirmed by computed tomography (CT.

  5. Bedside lung ultrasound: a case of neurogenic pulmonary edema.

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    Merenkov, Vladimir V; Kovalev, Alexey N; Gorbunov, Vyacheslav V

    2013-06-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is an acute life-threatening complication associated with many forms of central nervous system injury. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after injury and has a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated appropriately. Lung ultrasound quickly provides at the bedside relevant information on the state of aeration and ventilation of the lung. We describe a case report of acute respiratory insufficiency after posterior cranial fossa surgery. The patient underwent a subtotal meningiomectomy. Postoperative course was complicated by respiratory failure with unstable hemodynamic parameters. The pulmonary edema was suspected, and sonography examination was performed. Lung ultrasound showed typical signs for non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Transthoracic echocardiography showed preserved left ventricle systolic function, but signs of the severe hypovolemia were found. We corrected for the preload and ventilator support settings. Within 24 h, her respiratory status improved with a resolution of the pulmonary edema. Lung ultrasound at the bedside can provide accurate information on lung status in neurocritically ill patients with acute respiratory failure. The addition of transthoracic echocardiography to lung sonography provides an additive insight on the eventual pulmonary involvement. Lung ultrasound has the potential to become a reference tool for bedside dynamic respiratory monitoring in the Neuro ICU.

  6. Bedside ultrasound reliability in locating catheter and detecting complications

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    Payman Moharamzadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central venous catheterization is one of the most common medical procedures and is associated with such complications as misplacement and pneumothorax. Chest X-ray is among good ways for evaluation of these complications. However, due to patient’s excessive exposure to radiation, time consumption and low diagnostic value in detecting pneumothorax in the supine patient, the present study intends to examine bedside ultrasound diagnostic value in locating tip of the catheter and pneumothorax. Materials and methods: In the present cross-sectional study, all referred patients requiring central venous catheterization were examined. Central venous catheterization was performed by a trained emergency medicine specialist, and the location of catheter and the presence of pneumothorax were examined and compared using two modalities of ultrasound and x-ray (as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicting values were reported. Results: A total of 200 non-trauma patients were included in the study (58% men. Cohen’s Kappa consistency coefficients for catheterization and diagnosis of pneumothorax were found as 0.49 (95% CI: 0.43-0.55, 0.89 (P<0.001, (95% CI: 97.8-100, respectively. Also, ultrasound sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing pneumothorax were 75% (95% CI: 35.6-95.5, and 100% (95% CI: 97.6-100, respectively. Conclusion: The present study results showed low diagnostic value of ultrasound in determining catheter location and in detecting pneumothorax. With knowledge of previous studies, the search still on this field.   Keywords: Central venous catheterization; complications; bedside ultrasound; radiography;

  7. Bedside Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Small Bowel Obstruction

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    Alexander Anshus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An elderly female with no history of prior abdominal surgeries presented to the emergency department (ED with acute onset of abdominal pain and distention. Upon arrival, she began having large volume bilious emesis. While waiting for a computed tomography (CT scan of her abdomen and pelvis, a point of care ultrasound (POCUS was performed which showed evidence of a small bowel obstruction (SBO. The patient had a nasogastric tube placed that put out over two liters of bilious contents. A subsequent CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of SBO from a left inguinal hernia and the patient was admitted to the surgical service. Significant findings: The POCUS utilizing the low frequency curvilinear probe demonstrates fluid-filled, dilated bowel loops greater than 2.5cm with to-and-fro peristalsis, and thickened bowel walls greater than 3mm, concerning for SBO. Discussion: Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common diagnosis in the ED, accounting for approximately 15% of all ED visits for acute abdominal pain.1 SBO accounts for approximately 80% of all obstructions.2 In the diagnosis of SBO, studies show that abdominal x-rays have a sensitivity of 66-77% and specificity of 50-57%,3 CT scans have a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%,4 and ultrasound has a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 96%.5 While CT scan remains a widely accepted modality for diagnosing SBO, ultrasound is more cost effective, well tolerated, does not involve ionizing radiation, and can be done in a timely manner at the patient’s bedside. Ultrasound can also identify transition points as well as distinguish between functional and mechanical obstruction.6 In addition to SBO, ultrasound can be used to diagnose external hernias, intussusception, tumors, superior mesenteric artery (SMA syndrome, foreign bodies, bezoars, and ascariasis.7

  8. From the Heart: Interatrial Septal Aneurysm Identified on Bedside Ultrasound

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    Michael Butterfield

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 61 year-old man presented to the Emergency Department for one day of nonspecific chest pain. Bedside echocardiogram performed by the emergency physician revealed normal systolic cardiac function but also showed a large ( > 10mm bicornuate interatrial septal aneurysm (IASA projecting into the right atrium (Figure 1, Video 1. There was no evidence of intraatrial thrombus. A formal echocardiogram performed later that day confirmed the diagnosis and also detected a patent foramen ovale (PFO with a left-to-right shunt that reversed with Valsalva maneuver. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:719–720

  9. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum on Bedside Ultrasound: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Zachariah, Sybil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is a rare disease process with no clear etiology, although it is thought to be related to changes in intrathoracic pressure causing chest pain and dyspnea. We present a case of a 17-year-old male with acute chest pain evaluated initially by bedside ultrasound, which showed normal lung sliding but poor visualization of the parasternal and apical cardiac views due to significant air artifact, representing air in the thoracic cavity. The diagnosis was later verified by chest radiograph. We present a case report on ultrasound-diagnosed pneumomediastinum, and we review the diagnostic modalities to date. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:321–324.

  10. [Ultrasound at the bedside: does a portable ultrasound device save time?].

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    Fischer, T; Filimonow, S; Petersein, J; Beyersdorff, D; Mühler, M; Bollow, M; Badakhshi, H R; Hamm, B

    2002-10-01

    To prospectively determine whether the use of a portable ultrasound device results in a detectable reduction of the time required for acute ultrasound (US) assessment at the bedside. A total of 125 patients underwent US at the bedside, among them 68 for abdominal assessment, 12 patients for chest or soft-tissue evaluation, and 45 patients with vascular disease. Five different US systems equipped with 3.5 MHz and 7.5 MHz wide-band transducers were compared in terms of overall examination time including transport, setting up and disassembling, switching on and off as well as initializing the device (but without writing of the report). The following ultrasound systems were used: the portable SonoSite 180 (SonoSite, Germany) as well as the mobile units Masters/Gateway 2000 (Diasonics, USA), Tosbee (Toshiba, Japan), PowerVision 7000 (Toshiba, Japan), and SONOLINE Elegra (Siemens AG, Germany). The portable ultrasound device significantly reduced the examination time per patient to a mean 16 +/- 4 min from 26 +/- 5 min for the mobile units (p mobile system.

  11. Role of Bedside Ultrasound in CMV Retinitis: A Case Report

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    Lauren Westafer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of retinal detachment diagnosed by emergency department bedside ultrasonography in a patient with CMV retinitis. The indications and findings of ocular ultrasonography are discussed.

  12. Does the use of bedside pelvic ultrasound decrease length of stay in the emergency department?

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    Thamburaj, Ravi; Sivitz, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasounds by emergency medicine (EM) and pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians have increased because of ultrasonography training during residency and fellowship. The availability of ultrasound in radiology departments is limited or difficult to obtain especially during nighttime hours. Studies have shown that EM physicians can accurately perform goal-directed ultrasound after appropriate training. The goal of this study was to compare the length of stay for patients receiving an ultrasound to confirm intrauterine pregnancies. The hypothesis of this study is that a bedside ultrasound by a trained EM/PEM physician can reduce length of stay in the emergency department (ED) by 1 hour. This was a case cohort retrospective review for patients aged 13 to 21 years who received pelvic ultrasounds in the ED during 2007. Each patient was placed into 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received bedside ultrasounds done by institutionally credentialed EM/PEM attending physicians. Group 2 received radiology department ultrasound only. Each group had subanalysis done including chief complaint, time of presentation, time to completion of ultrasound, length of stay, diagnosis, and disposition. Daytime was defined as presentation between 7 AM and 9 PM when radiology ultrasound technologists were routinely available. We studied 330 patients, with 244 patients (74%) in the bedside ultrasound group. The demographics of both groups showed no difference in age, presenting complaints, discharge diagnoses, and ultimate disposition. Group 1 had a significant reduction (P ultrasound compared with group 2 (mean, 82 minutes [range, 1-901 minutes] vs 149 minutes [range, 7-506 minutes]) and length of stay (142 [16-2268] vs. 230 [16-844]). Of those presenting during the day (66%), group 1 showed a significant reduction in length of stay (P ultrasound by trained EM/PEM physicians produced a significant reduction in length of stay in the ED, regardless of radiology ultrasound technologist

  13. Bedside Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Peritonsillar Abscess

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    Harshal Bhakta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 34-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department with fever, sore throat, and difficulty swallowing. On exam, the patient had trismus, a deviated uvula, and swelling of his left peritonsillar space. An intraoral point of care ultrasound (POCUS was performed, which revealed a fluid collection in the patient’s left peritonsillar space. The patient was diagnosed with a peritonsillar abscess (PTA and needle aspiration was performed under direct ultrasound guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was sent home with a course of antibiotics. Significant findings: The first video is an intraoral ultrasound using the high frequency endocavitary probe demonstrating an anechoic fluid collection adjacent to the patient’s enlarged left tonsil. The second video shows real-time ultrasound-guided successful drainage of the PTA. Discussion: Peritonsillar abscesses are the most common deep space infection of the head and neck1, most commonly affecting children and young adults.2 The ability of physicians to accurately differentiate PTA from peritonsillar cellulitis (PTC by physical exam alone is limited. Traditionally, PTA has been treated using landmark-based needle aspiration.3 If unsuccessful, computed tomography (CT imaging and otolaryngology (ENT consultation is usually required.3 Although diagnosis of PTA using intraoral ultrasound has a sensitivity and specificity of between 89%-95% and 79%-100% respectively, it is still underutilized in comparison to these traditional methods.4 Studies have shown the use of ultrasound for diagnosis and treatment of PTA leads to significantly better outcomes and higher success rates of drainage (when compared to landmark-based needle aspiration, less need for CT imaging, and less need for ENT consultation.3 Utilizing intraoral point-of-care ultrasound is an efficient, safe, and cost-effective way of diagnosing and treating PTA.

  14. [Usefulness of bedside ultrasound compared to capnography and X-ray for tracheal intubation].

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    Alonso Quintela, P; Oulego Erroz, I; Mora Matilla, M; Rodríguez Blanco, S; Mata Zubillaga, D; Regueras Santos, L

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of bedside ultrasound compared to capnography and X-ray for endotracheal intubation in children and newborns. Hemodynamically stable children intubated in pedriatric and neonatal intensive care unit were included. Endotracheal tube insertion was checked after every intubation attempt by tracheal ultrasound and capnography simultaneously. The endotracheal tube insertion depth was then checked by assesment of lung sliding by thoracic ultrasound. Thereafter, Chest X-ray was performed and interpreted as usual. Time to perform each technique was recorded. The study included 31 intubations in 26 patients (15 in PICU and 16 in NICU). There were no statistically significant differences between tracheal ultrasound and capnography or between thoracic ultrasound and x-ray in identifying the correct endotracheal intubation and assessment of endotracheal tube insertion depth, respectively. Sensibility and specificity of ultrasound compared to capnography was 92% and 100%, and 100% and 75% compared to X-ray. Ultrasound was significantly slower compared to capnography [12 (4-16) vs 6 (3-12) seconds; P<.001] and significantly quicker compared to X-ray [0.22 (0.17-0.40) vs. 20 (17-25) minutes, P<.001]. Ultrasound appears to be as effective as capnography, although slower, for identifying endotracheal intubation. Ultrasound may be useful in clinical situations, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation where capnography is less reliable. Ultrasound is as effective and quicker than X-ray for assessment of endotracheal tube insertion depth, and it may contribute to decrease the routine use of X-ray after tracheal intubation. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Occult Iliac Deep Vein Thrombosis in Second Trimester Pregnancy: Clues on Bedside Ultrasound

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    Roopa Avula

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Isolated pelvic deep vein thromboses (DVT are rare and difficult to diagnose, but they are more common in pregnant women and carry an increased risk of embolization. Pulmonary embolism is the most common non-obstetric cause of death in pregnancy. Compression ultrasound is the first-line imaging test for suspected lower extremity DVT, but it cannot usually aid in directly visualizing or easily diagnosing isolated pelvic DVT. Nonetheless, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS may provide valuable clues to help rule in pelvic DVT and expedite initiation of anticoagulant therapy. Such findings include increased venous diameter, increased resistance to compression, visible venous reflux, and blunted phasicity. This case presents an example of how these findings on POCUS led the emergency physician to make the difficult diagnosis of pelvic DVT at the bedside within seconds.

  16. Ultrasound, normal placenta - Braxton Hicks (image)

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    ... performed at 17 weeks gestation. It shows the placenta during a normal (Braxton Hicks) contraction. Throughout the ... contracts to facilitate better blood flow through the placenta and the fetus. In this ultrasound, the placenta ...

  17. Ultrasound, color - normal umbilical cord (image)

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    ... is a normal color Doppler ultrasound of the umbilical cord performed at 30 weeks gestation. The cord is ... the cord, two arteries and one vein. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta, located in the ...

  18. Development of a bedside viable ultrasound protocol to quantify appendicular lean tissue mass.

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    Paris, Michael T; Lafleur, Benoit; Dubin, Joel A; Mourtzakis, Marina

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound is a non-invasive and readily available tool that can be prospectively applied at the bedside to assess muscle mass in clinical settings. The four-site protocol, which images two anatomical sites on each quadriceps, may be a viable bedside method, but its ability to predict musculature has not been compared against whole-body reference methods. Our primary objectives were to (i) compare the four-site protocol's ability to predict appendicular lean tissue mass from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; (ii) optimize the predictability of the four-site protocol with additional anatomical muscle thicknesses and easily obtained covariates; and (iii) assess the ability of the optimized protocol to identify individuals with low lean tissue mass. This observational cross-sectional study recruited 96 university and community dwelling adults. Participants underwent ultrasound scans for assessment of muscle thickness and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans for assessment of appendicular lean tissue. Ultrasound protocols included (i) the nine-site protocol, which images nine anterior and posterior muscle groups in supine and prone positions, and (ii) the four-site protocol, which images two anterior sites on each quadriceps muscle group in a supine position. The four-site protocol was strongly associated (R 2  = 0.72) with appendicular lean tissue mass, but Bland-Altman analysis displayed wide limits of agreement (-5.67, 5.67 kg). Incorporating the anterior upper arm muscle thickness, and covariates age and sex, alongside the four-site protocol, improved the association (R 2  = 0.91) with appendicular lean tissue and displayed narrower limits of agreement (-3.18, 3.18 kg). The optimized protocol demonstrated a strong ability to identify low lean tissue mass (area under the curve = 0.89). The four-site protocol can be improved with the addition of the anterior upper arm muscle thickness, sex, and age when predicting appendicular lean tissue mass

  19. Detection of Acute Pulmonary Embolism by Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient Presenting in PEA Arrest: A Case Report

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    Hangyul Chung-Esaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal management of the critically ill patient in shock requires rapid identification of its etiology. We describe a successful application of an emergency physician performed bedside ultrasound in a patient presenting with shock and subsequent cardiac arrest. Pulmonary embolus was diagnosed using bedside echocardiogram and confirmed with CTA of the thorax. Further validation and real-time implementation of this low-cost modality could facilitate the decision to implement thrombolytics for unstable patients with massive pulmonary embolism who cannot undergo formal radiographic evaluation.

  20. Bedside Ultrasound of Quadriceps to Predict Rehospitalization and Functional Decline in Hospitalized Elders

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    Ana Clara Guerreiro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the capacity of total anterior thigh thickness, quadriceps muscle thickness, and quadriceps contractile index, all measured by bedside ultrasound, to predict rehospitalization, functional decline, and death in elderly patients 3 months after hospital discharge. To evaluate intra and interobserver reproducibility of the dominant thigh evaluation method by point of care ultrasound.MethodsCohort study of patients aged 65 years or more admitted to a medium complexity unit in a teaching hospital in southern Brazil. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and ultrasound evaluation of the dominant thigh of each participant were performed. After 3 months of hospital discharge, telephone contact was made to evaluate the outcomes of rehospitalization or death and functional decline—assessed by the 100 points Barthel scale and defined as a decrease of five or more points.Results100 participants were included. There was no statistically significant difference between intraobserver measurements in the GEE method analysis (p > 0.05, and the mean bias obtained in Bland–Altman plots was close to zero in all four analyses performed, suggesting good intra and interobserver agreement. There was a significant correlation between the echographic measurements (quadriceps thickness and contractile index and gait speed, timed up and go, and handgrip tests. There was a significant association between contractile index (quadriceps thickness over total anterior thigh thickness multiplied by 100 lower than 60% and functional decline (relative risk 1.35; CI 95% 1.10–1.65; p = 0.003 as well as between the thickness of the quadriceps and rehospitalization or death, in both individuals with preserved walking capacity and in bedridden elders (relative risk 1.34; CI 95% 1.02–1.75; p = 0.04.ConclusionThe ultrasonographic method to evaluate thigh thickness was easily applicable and reproducible. The thickness of the quadriceps could

  1. Outcomes From Polyhydramnios With Normal Ultrasound.

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    Yefet, Enav; Daniel-Spiegel, Etty

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the short- and long-term outcomes of children from pregnancies complicated with polyhydramnios, defined as amniotic fluid index (AFI) >24 cm, and with a normal detailed ultrasound examination. This retrospective cohort study examined 134 children aged 4 to 9 years with polyhydramnios and normal detailed ultrasound examination during pregnancy compared with 268 controls with normal AFI and normal detailed ultrasound examination matched for maternal age, year of delivery, gestational week at delivery, and presence or absence of diabetes. The primary outcome was the rate of malformations diagnosed postnatally. Additional outcomes were obstetrics outcomes, genetic syndromes, and neurodevelopment. Polyhydramnios was associated with increased risk for cesarean delivery (CD) and birth weight >90th percentile. This elevation in CD was attributed to increased rate of elective CD due to suspected macrosomia. Polyhydramnios was associated with increased risk for congenital malformations (n = 25 [19%] compared with 27 [10%], respectively; P = .016) without a statistically significant increase in the rate of major malformations (11 [8%] vs. 10 [4%]; P = .057). Genetic syndromes were more prevalent in the polyhydramnios group (5 [3.7%] vs. 2 [0.75%]; P = .043), as were neurologic disorders and developmental delay (9.7% vs. 3%; P = .004). Despite a normal detailed ultrasound examination, polyhydramnios is associated with increased rate of fetal malformations, genetic syndromes, neurologic disorders, and developmental delay, which may be diagnosed only after birth. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Comparing diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound and radiography for bone fracture screening in multiple trauma patients at the ED.

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    Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Moharamzadeh, Payman; Jamali, Kazem; Pouraghaei, Mahboob; Fadaie, Maryam; Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Shahsavari, Kavous

    2013-11-01

    Long bone fractures are currently diagnosed using radiography, but radiography has some disadvantages (radiation and being time consuming). The present study compared the diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound and radiography in multiple trauma patients at the emergency department (ED). The study assessed 80 injured patients with multiple trauma from February 2011 to July 2012. The patients were older than 18 years and triaged to the cardiopulmonary resuscitation ward of the ED. Bedside ultrasound and radiography were conducted for them. The findings were separately and blindly assessed by 2 radiologists. Sensitivity, specificity, the positive and negative predictive value, and κ coefficient were measured to assess the accuracy and validity of ultrasound as compared with radiography. The sensitivity of ultrasound for diagnosis of limb bone fractures was not high enough and ranged between 55% and 75% depending on the fracture site. The specificity of this diagnostic method had an acceptable range of 62% to 84%. Ultrasound negative prediction value was higher than other indices under study and ranged between 73% and 83%, but its positive prediction value varied between 33.3% and 71%. The κ coefficient for diagnosis of long bone fractures of upper limb (κ = 0.58) and upper limb joints (κ = 0.47) and long bones of lower limb (κ = 0.52) was within the medium range. However, the value for diagnosing fractures of lower limb joints (κ = 0.47) was relatively low. Bedside ultrasound is not a reliable method for diagnosing fractures of upper and lower limb bones compared with radiography. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Central Venous Catheter Confirmation by Bedside Ultrasound Versus Chest Radiography in Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

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    Ablordeppey, Enyo A; Drewry, Anne M; Beyer, Alexander B; Theodoro, Daniel L; Fowler, Susan A; Fuller, Brian M; Carpenter, Christopher R

    2017-04-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the accuracy of bedside ultrasound for confirmation of central venous catheter position and exclusion of pneumothorax compared with chest radiography. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists, conference proceedings and ClinicalTrials.gov. Articles and abstracts describing the diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound compared with chest radiography for confirmation of central venous catheters in sufficient detail to reconstruct 2 × 2 contingency tables were reviewed. Primary outcomes included the accuracy of confirming catheter positioning and detecting a pneumothorax. Secondary outcomes included feasibility, interrater reliability, and efficiency to complete bedside ultrasound confirmation of central venous catheter position. Investigators abstracted study details including research design and sonographic imaging technique to detect catheter malposition and procedure-related pneumothorax. Diagnostic accuracy measures included pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio. Fifteen studies with 1,553 central venous catheter placements were identified with a pooled sensitivity and specificity of catheter malposition by ultrasound of 0.82 (0.77-0.86) and 0.98 (0.97-0.99), respectively. The pooled positive and negative likelihood ratios of catheter malposition by ultrasound were 31.12 (14.72-65.78) and 0.25 (0.13-0.47). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for pneumothorax detection was nearly 100% in the participating studies. Bedside ultrasound reduced mean central venous catheter confirmation time by 58.3 minutes. Risk of bias and clinical heterogeneity in the studies were high. Bedside ultrasound is faster than radiography at identifying pneumothorax after central venous catheter insertion. When a central venous catheter malposition exists, bedside ultrasound will identify four out of every five earlier than

  4. A prospective comparison of supine chest radiography and bedside ultrasound for the diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax.

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    Blaivas, Michael; Lyon, Matthew; Duggal, Sandeep

    2005-09-01

    Supine anteroposterior (AP) chest radiography may not detect the presence of a small or medium pneumothorax (PTX) in trauma patients. To compare the sensitivity and specificity of bedside ultrasound (US) in the emergency department (ED) with supine portable AP chest radiography for the detection of PTX in trauma patients, and to determine whether US can grade the size of the PTX. This was a prospective, single-blinded study with convenience sampling, based on researcher availability, of blunt trauma patients at a Level 1 trauma center with an annual census of 75,000 patients. Enrollment criteria were adult trauma patients receiving computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis (which includes lung windows at the authors' institution). Patients in whom the examination could not be completed were excluded. During the initial evaluation, attending emergency physicians performed bedside trauma US examinations to determine the presence of a sliding lung sign to rule out PTX. Portable, supine AP chest radiographs were evaluated by an attending trauma physician, blinded to the results of the thoracic US. The CT results (used as the criterion standard), or air release on chest tube placement, were compared with US and chest radiograph findings. Sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for US and AP chest radiography for the detection of PTX, and Spearman's rank correlation was used to evaluate for the ability of US to predict the size of the PTX on CT. A total of 176 patients were enrolled in the study over an eight-month period. Twelve patients had a chest tube placed prior to CT. Pneumothorax was detected in 53 (30%) patients by US, and 40 (23%) by chest radiography. There were 53 (30%) true positives by CT or on chest tube placement. The sensitivity for chest radiography was 75.5% (95% CI = 61.7% to 86.2%) and the specificity was 100% (95% CI = 97.1% to 100%). The sensitivity for US was 98.1% (95% CI = 89.9% to 99

  5. [The clinical value of bedside lung ultrasound in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiac pulmonary edema].

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    Zhou, Shusheng; Zha, Yu; Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Junfan; Liu, Weiyong; Liu, Bao

    2014-08-01

    To study the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound examination in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiac pulmonary edema. A prospective pilot and single-blind trial was conducted. A total of 89 patients with respiratory failure admitted to the Department of Critical Care Medicine of Anhui Provincial Hospital from September 2012 to September 2013 were enrolled. There were 32 patients with COPD, 31 patients with cardiac pulmonary edema, 8 patients with interstitial lung disease, 12 with lung infection, and 6 patients with other diseases. Another group of 30 patients without respiratory disease were enrolled as the control group. Bedside lung ultrasound examinations were performed in all patients within 24 hours, and chest radiograph was performed at the same time. The signs to be revealed were the "A" lines or horizontal lines arising from the pleural line, and the comet-tail artifact ("B" lines) arising from the lung wall interface. Of 89 patients, 33 patients were shown a mean of 2.94 ± 1.87 "A" lines per case with the bedside lung ultrasound, and 38 patients with a mean of 3.27 ± 1.72 "B" lines per patient. 1.94 ± 0.96 "A" lines a case and 1.74 ± 0.82 "B" lines a case in control group. There were significant difference between the test group and control group ("A"line: t=3.835, P=0.000; "B" line: t=6.540, P=0.000). Among 32 cases with COPD, 28 patients had a positive result of "A" line with a coincidence rate of 81.2%. In the 31 patients with cardiac pulmonary edema, 25 patients presented "B" line, with a coincidence rate of 80.6%. The "A" lines or horizontal lines arising from the pleural line showed a sensitivity of 81.30% and a specificity of 87.70% with a positive predictive value (PPV) 78.80% and a negative predictive value (NPV) 89.30% of in the diagnosis of COPD, and the "B" lines showed a sensitivity of 80.60% and a specificity of 77.60% with a PPV of 65.80% and a NPV of 88.20% in the diagnosis of cardiac pulmonary edema

  6. Hand-carried ultrasound performed at bedside in cardiology inpatient setting – a comparative study with comprehensive echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramires Jose F

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hand-carried ultrasound (HCU devices have been demonstrated to improve the diagnosis of cardiac diseases over physical examination, and have the potential to broaden the versatility in ultrasound application. The role of these devices in the assessment of hospitalized patients is not completely established. In this study we sought to perform a direct comparison between bedside evaluation using HCU and comprehensive echocardiography (CE, in cardiology inpatient setting. Methods We studied 44 consecutive patients (mean age 54 ± 18 years, 25 men who underwent bedside echocardiography using HCU and CE. HCU was performed by a cardiologist with level-2 training in the performance and interpretation of echocardiography, using two-dimensional imaging, color Doppler, and simple calliper measurements. CE was performed by an experienced echocardiographer (level-3 training and considered as the gold standard. Results There were no significant differences in cardiac chamber dimensions and left ventricular ejection fraction determined by the two techniques. The agreement between HCU and CE for the detection of segmental wall motion abnormalities was 83% (Kappa = 0.58. There was good agreement for detecting significant mitral valve regurgitation (Kappa = 0.85, aortic regurgitation (kappa = 0.89, and tricuspid regurgitation (Kappa = 0.74. A complete evaluation of patients with stenotic and prosthetic dysfunctional valves, as well as pulmonary hypertension, was not possible using HCU due to its technical limitations in determining hemodynamic parameters. Conclusion Bedside evaluation using HCU is helpful for assessing cardiac chamber dimensions, left ventricular global and segmental function, and significant valvular regurgitation. However, it has limitations regarding hemodynamic assessment, an important issue in the cardiology inpatient setting.

  7. An Experiential Learning Model Facilitates Learning of Bedside Ultrasound by Preclinical Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokoohi, Hamid; Boniface, Keith; Kaviany, Parisa; Armstrong, Paige; Calabrese, Kathleen; Pourmand, Ali

    2016-01-01

    .2% for the 10-19, 20-29, and >30 groups, respectively, of which none were statistically significant. However, the improvements in the left upper quadrant view was 12.7%, 11.6%, 15.7% for the 10-19, 20-29, and >30 groups, respectively. In all views, performing >30 examinations more than doubled the odds of successfully completing the examination. An experiential learning model of ultrasound training consisting of brief didactic presentation, practice FAST examinations on normal models, and proctored examinations on patients is an effective way to teach preclinical medical students basic ultrasound skills. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Basic lung ultrasound. Part 1. Normal lung ultrasound and diseases of the chest wall and the pleura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Quintana Gordon, F B; Nacarino Alcorta, B

    2015-01-01

    Lung ultrasound has become part of the diagnostic armamentarium in Resuscitation and Recovery Units with an enormous potential due to its many advantages: capacity to diagnose more precisely than conventional radiology, earlier diagnosis, convenience due to being able to performed at the bedside, possibility of being performed by one person, absence of ionising radiation, and, due to its dynamic character, is capable of transforming into physiological processes that were once static images. However, lung ultrasound also has its limitations and has a learning curve. The aim of this review is to provide sufficient information that may help the specialist starting in this field to approach the technique with good possibilities of success. To do this, the review is structured into two parts. In the first, the normal ultrasound of the chest wall is presented, as well as the pleura, diaphragm, and lung parenchyma, and the most important pathologies of the chest wall (rib fractures and hematomas), the pleura (pleural effusion and its different types, and pneumothorax), and the diaphragm (hypokinesia and paralysis). In the second part, parenchymal diseases will be approached and will include, atelectasis, pneumonia and abscess, lung oedema, respiratory distress, and pulmonary thromboembolism. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Original Research Body Mass Index is a Poor Predictor of Bedside Appendix Ultrasound Success or Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel H.F. Lam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between body mass index (BMI and success or accuracy rate of beside ultrasound (BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the emergency department with suspected appendicitis were eligible. Enrollment was by convenience sampling. After informed consent, BUS was performed by trained emergency physicians who had undergone a minimum of one-hour didactic training on the use of BUS to diagnose appendicitis. We ascertained subject outcomes by a combination of medical record review and telephone follow up. Calculated BMI for adults and children were divided into four categories (underweight, normal, overweight, obese according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classifications. Results: A total of 125 subjects consented for the study, and 116 of them had adequate image data for final analysis. Seventy (60% of the subjects were children. Prevalence of appendicitis was 39%. Fifty-two (45% of the BUS studies were diagnostic (successful. Overall accuracy rate was 75%. Analysis by chi-square test or Mann-Whitney U test did not find any significant correlation between BMI category and BUS success. Similarly, there was no significant correlation between BMI category and BUS accuracy. The same conclusion was reached when children and adults were analyzed separately, or when subjects were dichotomized into underweight/ normal and overweight/ obese categories. Conclusion: BMI category alone is a poor predictor of appendix BUS success or accuracy. [West J Emerg Med. 2016;17(4454-459.

  10. Radiographer-acquired and radiologist-reviewed ultrasound examination--agreement with radiologist's bedside evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenman, Carina; Thorelius, Lars; Knutsson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Growing demand for ultrasound examinations and higher quality requirements motivate searching for routines combining the diagnostic accuracy of radiologist-performed examinations with the economical advantages of sonographer-performed examinations. One possible approach is to use strictly...

  11. The use of bedside ultrasound and community-based paracentesis in a palliative care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landers A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is little information, particularly in New Zealand, on the use of ultrasound to enhance clinical decision-making in a specialist palliative care service. Technological advances have resulted in increasingly portable, user-friendly ultrasound machines that can be used in the home setting to offer convenient access to this treatment option. AIM: To evaluate the clinical use of portable ultrasonography in the management of abdominal ascites in a community palliative care service. METHODS: Patients referred to the Nurse Maude Hospice and Palliative Care Service requiring assessment for abdominal ascites over 12 months were scanned using a newly purchased handheld ultrasound machine. The patients had a variety of diagnoses; the most common diagnosis was ovarian cancer. RESULTS: Forty-one ultrasound scans performed for 32 patients to assess for ascites drainage were recorded. Fluid was identified in 19 assessments and drainage undertaken in 17. Over half the scans were completed at home, allowing nine procedures to be performed safely and conveniently, which reduced time spent at the local hospital. There were no major complications. DISCUSSION: Ultrasonography is a tool that has not previously been utilised in palliative care locally, but has significant potential patient benefits. This novel use of technology also highlighted potential cost savings to the patient and health system, which may be beneficial to other palliative care services in New Zealand.

  12. Normal ovarian cycle in endo vaginal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, F.; Dualde, D.; Labrador, T.; Morales, F.J.; Vidal, P.; Gordo, G.

    1995-01-01

    The changing morphology of the endometrium and ovaries during the menstrual cycle can be viewed with great richness of image using high frequency (5-6-7.5 Mhz) probes in endo vaginal ultrasound. The radiological findings associated with the menstrual cycle are reviewed in terms of four phases (follicular, preovulatory, ovulatory and luteal) and a study is made of the changes that can lead to different morphologies, some of which, especially those of the corpus luteus, are peculiar. The need to be familiar with these changes in order to avoid confusing them with pathological signs is pointed out. (Author)

  13. Sensitivity of bedside ultrasound and supine anteroposterior chest radiographs for the identification of pneumothorax after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, R Gentry; Stone, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Supine anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs in patients with blunt trauma have poor sensitivity for the identification of pneumothorax. Ultrasound (US) has been proposed as an alternative screening test for pneumothorax in this population. The authors conducted an evidence-based review of the medical literature to compare sensitivity of bedside US and AP chest radiographs in identifying pneumothorax after blunt trauma. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for trials from 1965 through June 2009 using a search strategy derived from the following PICO formulation of our clinical question: patients included adult (18 + years) emergency department (ED) patients in whom pneumothorax was suspected after blunt trauma. The intervention was thoracic ultrasonography for the detection of pneumothorax. The comparator was the supine AP chest radiograph during the initial evaluation of the patient. The outcome was the diagnostic performance of US in identifying the presence of pneumothorax in the study population. The criterion standard for the presence or absence of pneumothorax was computed tomography (CT) of the chest or a rush of air during thoracostomy tube placement (in unstable patients). Prospective, observational trials of emergency physician (EP)-performed thoracic US were included. Trials in which the exams were performed by radiologists or surgeons, or trials that investigated patients suffering penetrating trauma or with spontaneous or iatrogenic pneumothoraces, were excluded. The methodologic quality of the studies was assessed. Qualitative methods were used to summarize the study results. Data analysis consisted of test performance (sensitivity and specificity, with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of thoracic US and supine AP chest radiography. Four prospective observational studies were identified, with a total of 606 subjects who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of US for the detection of pneumothorax ranged from

  14. Comparative ultrasound measurement of normal thyroid gland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-31

    Aug 31, 2011 ... the normal thyroid gland has a homogenous increased medium level echo texture. The childhood thyroid gland dimension correlates linearly with age and body surface unlike adults. [14] Iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) are thyroid hormones which function to control the basal metabolic rate (BMR).

  15. Doppler ultrasound scan during normal gestation: umbilical circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, T.; Sabate, J.; Martinez-Benavides, M. M.; Sanchez-Ramos, J.

    2002-01-01

    To determine normal umbilical circulation patterns by means of Doppler ultrasound scan in a healthy gestating population without risk factors and with normal perinatal results, and to evaluate any occurring modifications relative to gestational age by obtaining records kept during pregnancy. One hundred and sixteen pregnant women carrying a single fetus have been studied. These women had no risk factors, with both clinical and analytical controls, as well as ultrasound scans, all being normal. There were performed a total of 193 Doppler ultrasound scans between weeks 15 and 41 of gestation, with blood-flow analysis in the arteries and vein of the umbilical cord. The obtained information was correlated with parameters that evaluate fetal well-being (fetal monitoring and/or oxytocin test) and perinatal result (delivery type, birth weight, Apgar score). Statistical analysis was performed with the programs SPSS 6.0.1 for Windows and EPIINFO 6.0.4. With pulsed Doppler, the umbilical artery in all cases demonstrated a biphasic morphology with systolic and diastolic components and without retrograde blood flow. As the gestation period increased, there was observed a progressive decrease in resistance along with an increase in blood-flow velocity during the diastolic phase. The Doppler ultrasound scan is a non-invasive method that permits the hemodynamic study of umbilical blood circulation. A knowledge of normal blood-flow signal morphology, as well as of the normal values for Doppler indices in relation to gestational age would permit us to utilize this method in high-risk pregnancies. (Author) 30 refs

  16. VEGF pathway targeting agents, vessel normalization and tumor drug uptake : from bench to bedside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arjaans, Marlous; Schroder, Carolien P.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Dafni, Urania; Kleibeuker, Josee E.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway targeting agents have been combined with other anticancer drugs, leading to improved efficacy in carcinoma of the cervix, stomach, lung, colon and rectum, ovary, and breast. Vessel normalization induced by VEGF pathway targeting agents influences

  17. Bedside intravascular ultrasound-guided inferior vena cava filter placement in medical-surgical intensive care critically-ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Abusedera

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Bedside IVUS-guided filter placement in medical-surgical critically ill patient in intensive care unit is a feasible, safe and reliable technique for IVC interruption. IVUS may be the most appropriate tool to guide filter insertion in obese patient.

  18. Doppler ultrasound scan during normal gestation: umbilical circulation; Ecografia Doppler en la gestacion normal: circulacion umbilical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, T.; Sabate, J.; Martinez-Benavides, M. M.; Sanchez-Ramos, J. [Hospital Virgen Macarena. Sevilla (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    To determine normal umbilical circulation patterns by means of Doppler ultrasound scan in a healthy gestating population without risk factors and with normal perinatal results, and to evaluate any occurring modifications relative to gestational age by obtaining records kept during pregnancy. One hundred and sixteen pregnant women carrying a single fetus have been studied. These women had no risk factors, with both clinical and analytical controls, as well as ultrasound scans, all being normal. There were performed a total of 193 Doppler ultrasound scans between weeks 15 and 41 of gestation, with blood-flow analysis in the arteries and vein of the umbilical cord. The obtained information was correlated with parameters that evaluate fetal well-being (fetal monitoring and/or oxytocin test) and perinatal result (delivery type, birth weight, Apgar score). Statistical analysis was performed with the programs SPSS 6.0.1 for Windows and EPIINFO 6.0.4. With pulsed Doppler, the umbilical artery in all cases demonstrated a biphasic morphology with systolic and diastolic components and without retrograde blood flow. As the gestation period increased, there was observed a progressive decrease in resistance along with an increase in blood-flow velocity during the diastolic phase. The Doppler ultrasound scan is a non-invasive method that permits the hemodynamic study of umbilical blood circulation. A knowledge of normal blood-flow signal morphology, as well as of the normal values for Doppler indices in relation to gestational age would permit us to utilize this method in high-risk pregnancies. (Author) 30 refs.

  19. Prediction of endometriosis by transvaginal ultrasound in reproductive-age women with normal ovarian size

    OpenAIRE

    Tamer H. Said; Amal Z. Azzam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To predict endometriosis by transvaginal ultrasound (TVS) in reproductive-age women with normal ovarian size. Design: Prospective study. Setting: El-Shatby Maternity Hospital, Alexandria University. Patients: 125 Women with symptoms suggestive of endometriosis and with normal ovarian size during TVS. Interventions: Patients were subjected to high frequency ultrasound and evaluated for the presence of ultrasound signs of endometriosis (TVS-based soft markers). All patien...

  20. Maxillary length in 11- to 26-week-old normal fetuses studied by 3D ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N V; Darvann, T A; Sundberg, K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this article is to investigate normal prenatal maxillary length using 3D ultrasound and to correlate this with previously reported results for the mandible and the biparietal diameter (BPD). METHODS: Seventy-two 3D ultrasound volumes from normal pregnancies in 52 volu...

  1. Does it require to exclude cardiobiliary reflex in every acute coronary syndrome follow up patient with bedside ultrasound on emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bolatkale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In emergency department, physicians can diagnose pulseless electrical activity, asystole, pericardial effusions, ischemic heart disease, wall motion abnormalities, valvular cardiac disease volume status or global cardiac function evaluating with electrocardiographic findings or using bedside cardiac ultrasonography. But these two methods are not always sufficient to explain the underlying another pathologies such as pancreatitis and acute cholecystitis which can mimick acute cardiac events. Patients who are followed up with a preliminary diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in the emergency department, might have underlying biliary or pancreatic pathologies, or even more, these might be the sole reason of the clinical picture. So bedside abdomen ultrasonography and liver enzymes may be requested in all patients with suspected cardiac pathology with a normal cardiac ultrasonography when a patient presented with acute chest or abdominal pain. Physicians must be aware for coexisting pathophysiologies and take into account the differential diagnosis of all life-threatening causes such as cardiac ischemia or acute abdominal situations. So the diagnostic tests for gallbladder pathology could be added to cardiac ultrasonography

  2. Bedside examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, D

    2016-01-01

    In most dizzy patients a limited selection of bedside tests, together with the history, is adequate to establish a differential diagnosis and select the next diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A set of basic bedside tests that should be applied in every patient with vertigo or imbalance allows identifying: (1) patients who need immediate referral for further assessment and treatment; (2) patients with nonthreatening disorders for which treatment can be started without more detailed testing; (3) patients with benign paroxysmal vertigo, in whom a detailed work-up is not required and who can immediately be treated with an appropriate particle-repositioning maneuver; and (4) patients who need a comprehensive neuro-otologic and neurologic work-up. Additional neuro-otologic bedside tests help to further refine the differential diagnosis. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective imaging modalities after first pyelonephritis failed to identify significant urological anomalies, despite normal antenatal ultrasounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mola, Gylli; Wenger, Therese Ramstad; Salomonsson, Petra

    2017-01-01

    scintigraphies. Using the European Association of Paediatric Urology guidance would have missed three urological patients, one with initial surgery, and avoided 46 scintigraphies. Investigating patients under two years with ultrasound and scintigraphy, and just ultrasound in children over two years, would have...... identified all patients initially treated with surgery and avoided 65 scintigraphies. CONCLUSION: Dilated VUR was the dominant anomaly in a cohort with first time pyelonephritis and normal antenatal ultrasound. The optimal imaging strategy after pyelonephritis must be identified....

  4. Bedside ultrasound to detect central venous catheter misplacement and associated iatrogenic complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jasper M; Raadsen, Reinder; Blans, Michiel J; Petjak, Manfred; Van de Ven, Peter M; Tuinman, Pieter R

    2018-03-13

    Insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC) is common practice in critical care medicine. Complications arising from CVC placement are mostly due to a pneumothorax or malposition. Correct position is currently confirmed by chest x-ray, while ultrasonography might be a more suitable option. We performed a meta-analysis of the available studies with the primary aim of synthesizing information regarding detection of CVC-related complications and misplacement using ultrasound (US). This is a systematic review and meta-analysis registered at PROSPERO (CRD42016050698). PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched. Articles which reported the diagnostic accuracy of US in detecting the position of CVCs and the mechanical complications associated with insertion were included. Primary outcomes were specificity and sensitivity of US. Secondary outcomes included prevalence of malposition and pneumothorax, feasibility of US examination, and time to perform and interpret both US and chest x-ray. A qualitative assessment was performed using the QUADAS-2 tool. We included 25 studies with a total of 2548 patients and 2602 CVC placements. Analysis yielded a pooled specificity of 98.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 97.8-99.5) and sensitivity of 68.2 (95% CI: 54.4-79.4). US examination was feasible in 96.8% of the cases. The prevalence of CVC malposition and pneumothorax was 6.8% and 1.1%, respectively. The mean time for US performance was 2.83 min (95% CI: 2.77-2.89 min) min, while chest x-ray performance took 34.7 min (95% CI: 32.6-36.7 min). US was feasible in 97%. Further analyses were performed by defining subgroups based on the different utilized US protocols and on intra-atrial and extra-atrial misplacement. Vascular US combined with transthoracic echocardiography was most accurate. US is an accurate and feasible diagnostic modality to detect CVC malposition and iatrogenic pneumothorax

  5. Antenatal hydronephrosis: Negative predictive value of normal postnatal ultrasound - a 5-year study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorthy, I.; Joshi, N.; Cook, J.V. E-mail: jcook@epsom-sthelier.nhs.uk; Warren, M

    2003-12-01

    AIM: To determine whether normal postnatal ultrasound, as part of a strict screening protocol for the detection and follow-up of antenatal hydronephrosis, effectively excludes the majority of babies with congenital urinary tract abnormalities that would otherwise present with a urinary tract infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all babies who had postnatal follow-up of antenatally detected hydronephrosis over a 5-year period at our institution, a district general Trust with a specialist paediatric unit. We then studied all babies presenting with urinary tract infection before their first birthday to our institution over the same period. By cross-referencing these two study groups we were able to determine which babies developed a urinary tract infection having been previously discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound. RESULTS: Four hundred and twenty-five babies had postnatal follow-up of antenatal hydronephrosis. Of these, 284 were investigated with ultrasound alone. In the same 5-year period, 230 babies presented with urinary tract infection before their first birthday. Only three of these babies had been previously discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound. The negative predictive value of a normal postnatal ultrasound was therefore 98.9% (281/284) for babies who subsequently presented with a urinary tract infection before their first birthday. CONCLUSION: Careful antenatal and postnatal ultrasound with strict protocols is effective in detecting congenital renal tract abnormalities. Infants discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound are highly unlikely to still have an undetected urinary tract abnormality. We suggest that all babies with antenatal hydronephrosis are started on prophylactic antibiotics at birth, pending further investigation. All babies without features of severe obstruction antenatally should have their postnatal ultrasound delayed for a month. We recommend selective use of micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG

  6. Antenatal hydronephrosis: Negative predictive value of normal postnatal ultrasound - a 5-year study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorthy, I.; Joshi, N.; Cook, J.V.; Warren, M.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether normal postnatal ultrasound, as part of a strict screening protocol for the detection and follow-up of antenatal hydronephrosis, effectively excludes the majority of babies with congenital urinary tract abnormalities that would otherwise present with a urinary tract infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all babies who had postnatal follow-up of antenatally detected hydronephrosis over a 5-year period at our institution, a district general Trust with a specialist paediatric unit. We then studied all babies presenting with urinary tract infection before their first birthday to our institution over the same period. By cross-referencing these two study groups we were able to determine which babies developed a urinary tract infection having been previously discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound. RESULTS: Four hundred and twenty-five babies had postnatal follow-up of antenatal hydronephrosis. Of these, 284 were investigated with ultrasound alone. In the same 5-year period, 230 babies presented with urinary tract infection before their first birthday. Only three of these babies had been previously discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound. The negative predictive value of a normal postnatal ultrasound was therefore 98.9% (281/284) for babies who subsequently presented with a urinary tract infection before their first birthday. CONCLUSION: Careful antenatal and postnatal ultrasound with strict protocols is effective in detecting congenital renal tract abnormalities. Infants discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound are highly unlikely to still have an undetected urinary tract abnormality. We suggest that all babies with antenatal hydronephrosis are started on prophylactic antibiotics at birth, pending further investigation. All babies without features of severe obstruction antenatally should have their postnatal ultrasound delayed for a month. We recommend selective use of micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG

  7. Paediatric renal length measurements from ultrasound and DMSA scans: does clinical practice reflect theoretical normal values?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Que, L.; Rutland, M.D.; Hassan, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Renal length measurement is a routine part of ultrasound examination in children and those results are plotted on a normogram style graph, so that each child's results are compared to a normal range (mean ± 2 S.D.). Renal length measurements from the posterior oblique views of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scans in our department have not always correlated well with the ultrasound measurements on the same patients. Renal lengths from the DMSA scans of 120 patients with apparently normal kidneys were recorded and used to generate a normogram of renal length at different ages (0.5-7 years). This DMSA normogram was compared to the ultrasound (US) normogram used in the Paediatric Radiology Department, and it showed slight differences in renal lengths (3-8 mm), but that the US normogram had smaller coefficients of variation (US = 6.6%, NM 8.3%), implying a 'tighter' normal range. 39 of these patients had DMSA and ultrasound measurements of renal length within 3 months, and these were studied first by calculating the mean and CV values for different age groups, and then by plotting individual renal lengths on the appropriate normograms. The measured data produced much greater variability in the ultrasound measurements than the DTPA measurements, and the individual points produced 4/78 (5.1%) abnormal results for DMSA, but 21/78 (26.9%) abnormal results for ultrasound. Thus, in routine clinical use, using patients with apparently normal kidneys, ultrasound was unable to match the 'normal range' set by their current normogram, but the nuclear medicine showed 5.1% of values outside the normal (DMSA) range, which was completely appropriate for a range of ± 2 standard deviations

  8. Predicting Fluid Responsiveness Using Bedside Ultrasound Measurements of the Inferior Vena Cava and Physician Gestalt in the Emergency Department of an Urban Public Hospital in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawe, Hendry Robert; Haeffele, Cathryn; Mfinanga, Juma A; Mwafongo, Victor G; Reynolds, Teri A

    Bedside inferior vena cava (IVC) ultrasound has been proposed as a non-invasive measure of volume status. We compared ultrasound measurements of the caval index (CI) and physician gestalt to predict blood pressure response in patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation. This was a prospective study of adult emergency department patients requiring fluid resuscitation. A structured data sheet was used to record serial vital signs and the treating clinician's impression of patient volume status and cause of hypotension. Bedside ultrasound CI measurements were performed at baseline and after each 500mL of fluid. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to characterize the relationship between CI and Physician gestalt, and the change in mean arterial pressure (MAP). We enrolled 364 patients, 52% male, mean age 36 years. Indications for fluid resuscitation were haemorrhage (54%), dehydration (30%), and sepsis (17%). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis found optimal CI cut-off values of 45%, 52% and 53% to predict a MAP rise of 5, 8 and 10 mmHg per litre of fluid, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of CI of 50% for predicting a 10mmHg increase in MAP per litre were 88% (95%CI 81-93%) and 73% (95%CI 67-79%), respectively, area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85 (0.81-0.89). The sensitivity and specificity of physician gestalt estimate of volume depletion severity were 68% (95%CI 60-75%) and 86% (95%CI 80-90%), respectively, AUC = 0.83 (95% CI: 0.79-0.87). Those with a baseline CI ≥ 50% (51% of patients) had a 2.8-fold greater fluid responsiveness than those with a baseline CI<50% (p<0.0001). Ultrasound measurement of the CI can predict blood pressure response among patients requiring intravenous fluid resuscitation and may be useful in early identification of patients who will benefit most from volume resuscitation, and those who will likely require other interventions.

  9. Bedside Ultrasonography: AUseful Tool for Traumatic Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Uzma; Zahur, Zainab; Chaudhry, Muhammad Amjad; Warraich, Riaz Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound and supine chest radiography for the diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax. Analytical study. PIMS and PAEC General Hospital, Islamabad, from November 2014 to August 2015. Patients coming to emergency departments of the study centres, who had sustained chest injuries, were inducted. Their portable bedside ultrasound and supine chest radiographs were taken for assessing pneumothorax and subsequently CTchest was done for confirmation as gold standard. Based on CTfindings, sensitivity for ultrasonography and chest radiography was found to be 83.33% and 54.76%, respectively and specificity of 100% for both modalities. Ultrasound can be used as a useful and suitable adjunct to CTin trauma patients as it is easily available, non-invasive, bedside, easily examined with no radiation risk.

  10. Ultrasound Assessment of Normal Portal Vein Diameter in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even if the additional use of color and spectral Doppler improves the assessment of patients suspected of having portal hypertension, gray scale assessment of portal vein diameter is corner stone in the initial evaluation. Knowing the normal portal venous dimension in a specified population is so crucial. Methods: This is a ...

  11. Determination of normal dimension of the spleen by ultrasound in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: A prospective study of normal spleen ultrasound-based measurements in 200 Nigerian adults at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital Benin, Nigeria. Results: There were 91 males and 109 females; their age ranged between 20 and 60 years. For the males the mean age was 32.4 years (± 9.2 ...

  12. Colour doppler ultrasound assessment of the normal neonatal hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Neira, C.L.; Laffan, E.; Daneman, A.; Fong, K.; Roposch, A.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the morphology and hemodynamic characteristics of the arterial vessels of the proximal femur according to specific anatomic regions in asymptomatic neonates in 2 pediatric-based health care institutions. Forty-three neonates (29 female, 14 male; age range, 2 d-3 mo; median age, 3 d) were enrolled in the study. Thirty-two (37%) of 86 hips were classified as Graf type IIA joints (mean alpha angle, 56.0 o ± 2.7 o ), and 54 (63%) were classified as type I joints (mean alpha angle, 65.0 o ± 4.6 o ). Colour and spectral Doppler imaging identified vessels running along the acetabular labrum, epiphyseal vessels, and femoral neck. We showed 4 different patterns of vascularity of the hips: radial, parallel, mixed radial-parallel, and indeterminate, however, they were not related to the hip maturity (P = .3, coronal plane; P = .62, transverse plane) or to the amount of colour pixels identified in each region (P = .35). The mean number of pixels in the ligamentum teres region was significantly higher than that in other regions of interest (P =.03). Except for the acetabular labrum arteries, Doppler spectrum waveforms of proximal femur arteries presented with low resistivity. There was a tendency towards females' acetabular arteries presenting with lower peak systolic velocities than males' acetabular arteries (P =.06). Colour Doppler spectrum waveforms and intensity of vascularity in normal neonatal hips differ according to the anatomic region under evaluation. This observation deserves further investigation on its role on the physiopathogenesis of neonatal hip disorders. (author)

  13. Ultrasound of the sural nerve: Normal anatomy on cadaveric dissection and case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belsack, Dries, E-mail: dries.belsack@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Jette, Brussels (Belgium); Jager, Tjeerd, E-mail: tjeerd.jager@asz.be [Department of Radiology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Merestraat 80, 9300 Aalst (Belgium); Scafoglieri, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.scafoglieri@vub.ac.be [Department of Experimental Anatomy, Free University Brussels, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Jette (Belgium); Vanderdood, Kurt, E-mail: kvanderd@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Maaslandziekenhuis, Dr H van der Hoffplein 1, 6162 Sittard-Geleen, Sittard (Netherlands); Van Hedent, Eddy, E-mail: eddy.vanhedent@asz.be [Department of Radiology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Merestraat 80, 9300 Aalst (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip, E-mail: filip.vanhoenacker@telenet.be [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Maarten, Duffel-Mechelen, Rooienberg 25, 2570 Duffel (Belgium); Marcelis, Stefaan, E-mail: stefaan.marcelis@sintandriesstielt.be [Department of Radiology, Sint Andriesziekenhuis, Krommewalstraat 11, 8700 Tielt (Belgium); De Maeseneer, Michel, E-mail: michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Jette, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-11-01

    The sural nerve is a small sensory nerve innervating the lateral aspect of the ankle and foot. Clinical symptoms of pathology may present as atypical sensory changes in this region. We present the normal anatomy and ultrasound technique for examination of the sural nerve based on an anatomical dissection, as well as imaging in a normal volunteer. We also present a case series (n = 10) of different conditions of the sural nerve that we encountered based on a review of interesting cases from 4 institutions. The pathological conditions included neuropathy related to stripping or venous laser surgery, compression by abscess, Lyme disease, nerve tumors, traumatic transsection, and encasement by fibrous plaque and edema. Ultrasound with its exquisite resolution is the preferred imaging method for examining the sural nerve in patients with unexplained sensory changes at the lateral aspect of the ankle and foot.

  14. Measurements of heel pad thickness in normal Koreans by ultrasound and conventional X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Bong Lin; Kim, Yang Su; Kim, Kun Sang

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of heel pad thickness (HPT) has never been done by ultrasound in healthy Korean. To establish normal standard value of HPT in Koreans, 87 healthy volunteers were examined using 10MHZ high resolution ultrasound. As a control, measurement of HPT were done in 46 healthy volunteers on conventional X-ray. The results are as follows; 1. In ultrasonic measurement cases, the mean value of right HPT is 15.8 ± 1.9 mm and the mean value of left HPT is 15.4 ± 2.0mm. In X-ray measurement cases, the mean value of right HPT is 19.9 ± 2.17mm and the mean value of left HPT is 19.8 ± 2.28mm. 2. Maximum value of HPT is 20.8mm in ultrasonic measurement cases, 23mm in X-ray measurement cases. 3. The value of HPT is well correlated with weight, height both in ultrasound and in X-ray measurement (ρ < 0.05). Correlation between the value of HPT and age is not evident (correlation coefficients = -0.18, -0.15). There is no significant difference between left and right foot (ρ < 0.05), and male and female (ρ < 0.05). 4. The results can be considered that there is no significant difference in normal standard value of HPT between Koreans and white, and that upper limit of normal in Koreans is 23mm by conventional X-ray

  15. Can ultrasound of plantar plate have normal appearance with a positive drawer test?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Eloy de Avila [Affiliated Professor, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (EPM-Unifesp), São Paulo (Brazil); Mann, Tania Szejnfeld [Medical Assistant of Medicine and Surgery of the Foot and Ankle Group, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Puchnick, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.ddi@epm.br [Professor and Coordinator of Educational and Research Support, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Tertulino, Franklin de Freitas [Postgraduate Physician, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Cannato, Camila Testoni [Resident Physician, Department of Surgery, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Nery, Caio [Associate Professor, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Corrêa [Associate Professor, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •We evaluate the accuracy of ultrasound to identify and measure the plantar plate. •We correlate ultrasound findings with those of physical examination and MRI. •Ultrasound and MRI measures of plantar plate were positively correlated. •Ultrasound is efficient in identifying and measuring plantar plate. •Ultrasound may complement physical examination. •Young asymptomatic subjects can present a grade I positive drawer test. -- Abstract: Objectives: The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the reliability of ultrasound (US) examination in the identification and measurement of the metatarsophalangeal plantar plate (MTP-PP) in asymptomatic subjects and (2) to establish the correlation of US findings with those of physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), once it is an important tool in the evaluation of the instability syndrome of the second and third rays. Materials and Methods: US examinations of the second and third MTP-PPs were performed in eight asymptomatic volunteers, totaling 32 MTP joints, by three examiners with different levels of experience in musculoskeletal US. Plantar plate dimensions, integrity and echogenicity, the presence of ruptures, and confidence level in terms of structure identification were determined using conventional US. Vascular flow was assessed using power Doppler. US data were correlated with data from physical examination and MRI. Results: MTP-PPs were ultrasonographically identified in 100% of cases, always showing homogeneous hyperechoic features and no detectable vascular flow on power Doppler, with 100% certainty in identification for all examiners. There was excellent US inter-observer agreement for longitudinal measures of second and third toe MTP-PPs and for transverse measures of the second toe MTP-PP. The MTP drawer test was positive for grade 1 MTP instability in 34.4% of joints with normal US results. Transverse MTP-PP measures were significantly higher in individuals with positive

  16. Variability in diaphragm motion during normal breathing, assessed with B-mode ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Caitlin J; Shahgholi, Leili; Cieslak, Kathryn; Hellyer, Nathan J; Strommen, Jeffrey A; Boon, Andrea J

    2013-12-01

    Clinical measurement, cross-sectional. To establish a set of normal values for diaphragm thickening with tidal breathing in healthy subjects. Normal values for diaphragm contractility, as imaged sonographically, have not been described, despite the known role of the diaphragm in contributing to spinal stability. If the normal range of diaphragm contractility can be defined in a reliable manner, ultrasound has the potential to be used clinically and in research as a biofeedback tool to enhance diaphragm activation/contractility. B-mode ultrasound was performed on 150 healthy subjects to visualize and measure hemi-diaphragm thickness on each side at resting inspiration and expiration. Primary outcome measures were hemi-diaphragm thickness and thickening ratio, stratified for age, gender, and body mass index. Interrater and intrarater reliability were also measured. Normal thickness of the diaphragm at rest ranged from 0.12 to 1.18 cm, with slightly greater thickness in men but no effect of age. Average ± SD change in thickness from resting expiration to resting inspiration was 20.0% ± 15.5% on the right and 23.5% ± 24.4% on the left; however, almost one third of healthy subjects had no to minimal diaphragm thickening with tidal breathing. There is wide variability in the degree of diaphragm contractility during quiet breathing. B-mode ultrasound appears to be a reliable means of determining the contractility of the diaphragm, an important muscle in spinal stability. Further studies are needed to validate this imaging modality as a clinical tool in the neuromuscular re-education of the diaphragm to improve spinal stability in both healthy subjects and in patients with low back pain.

  17. Perineal Ultrasound Findings of Stress Urinary Incontinence : Differentiation from Normal Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Yon; Chung, Eun Chul; Rhee, Chung Sik; Suh, Jeong Soo

    1995-01-01

    Perineal ultrasonography is a noninvasive method that is easier than chain cystoure-thrography in the diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence(SUI). We report the findings of stress urinary incontinence at peritoneal ultrasound and its differential points form normal control. Twenty-two patients with SUI and l6 normal controls were included in our study. Aloka SSD 650 with 3.5MHz convex transducer was used, and sagittal image through the bladder, bladder base, urethrovesical junction and pubis was obtained from the vulva area, We measured thepdsterior urethrovesical angle(PUVA) at rest and stress, and calculated the difference between the two angles. We also measured the distance of bladder neck descent during stress and the diameter of proximal urethra at rest. The data were analyzed with student t-test. At rest, PUVA was 135.3 .deg. in patients with SUI group and 134.5 .deg. in normal control group(P=0.8376). During streets, PUVA was 149.5 .deg. in SUI group and 142.1 .deg. in normal group(P=0.0135). The difference PUVAs at rest and during stress was 14.2 .deg. in SUI group and 7.6 .deg. in normal group(P=0.0173). The distance of bladder neck descent during stress was 14.5mm in SUI group and 9.8mm in normal group(P=0.0029). The diameter of proxiaml urethra at rest was 4.4mm in SUI group and 3.6mm in normal group(P=0.0385). In conclusion, ultrasound parameters that include the PUVA during stress, the difference between PUVAs at rest and during stress, the distance of bladder neck descent during stress and the diameter of proximal ureyhra at rest are useful in diagnosis of the stress urinary incontinence

  18. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  19. Breast metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma mimicking normal breast parenchyma on ultrasound: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jin Hwa; Park, Min Kyung; Kim, Dae Cheol; Lee, Mi Ri; Cho, Se Heon [Dong A University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Breast metastases from extramammary malignancies are uncommon. Although metastatic lesions show variable radiologic features, there have been few reports of metastatic breast cancer with negative sonographic findings. Furthermore, the results of several studies have indicated a high negative predictive value when ultrasonographic and mammographic findings were normal in the setting of a palpable lump, and follow-up is recommended when the physical examination is not highly suspicious. Herein, we report a case of a 26-year-old woman with breast metastasis from a known gastric adenocarcinoma, which had negative findings without any evidence of suspicious features for malignancy on the initial mammogram and ultrasound.

  20. Quantitative volumetric imaging of normal, neoplastic and hyperplastic mouse prostate using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shalini; Pan, Chunliu; Wood, Ronald; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Yeh, Shuyuan; Sha, Kai; Krolewski, John J; Nastiuk, Kent L

    2015-09-21

    Genetically engineered mouse models are essential to the investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying human prostate pathology and the effects of therapy on the diseased prostate. Serial in vivo volumetric imaging expands the scope and accuracy of experimental investigations of models of normal prostate physiology, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer, which are otherwise limited by the anatomy of the mouse prostate. Moreover, accurate imaging of hyperplastic and tumorigenic prostates is now recognized as essential to rigorous pre-clinical trials of new therapies. Bioluminescent imaging has been widely used to determine prostate tumor size, but is semi-quantitative at best. Magnetic resonance imaging can determine prostate volume very accurately, but is expensive and has low throughput. We therefore sought to develop and implement a high throughput, low cost, and accurate serial imaging protocol for the mouse prostate. We developed a high frequency ultrasound imaging technique employing 3D reconstruction that allows rapid and precise assessment of mouse prostate volume. Wild-type mouse prostates were examined (n = 4) for reproducible baseline imaging, and treatment effects on volume were compared, and blinded data analyzed for intra- and inter-operator assessments of reproducibility by correlation and for Bland-Altman analysis. Examples of benign prostatic hyperplasia mouse model prostate (n = 2) and mouse prostate implantation of orthotopic human prostate cancer tumor and its growth (n =  ) are also demonstrated. Serial measurement volume of the mouse prostate revealed that high frequency ultrasound was very precise. Following endocrine manipulation, regression and regrowth of the prostate could be monitored with very low intra- and interobserver variability. This technique was also valuable to monitor the development of prostate growth in a model of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we demonstrate accurate ultrasound image

  1. Ultrasound Imaging of Testes and Epididymides of Normal and Infertile Breeding Bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Mahmood Ali, Nazir Ahmad*, Nafees Akhtar, Shujait Ali, Maqbool Ahmad and Muhammad Younis1

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Echotexture of testes and epididymides from 10 slaughtered male buffaloes was studied. Diameter of testis and mediastinum testis was measured by ultrasound and compared with respective values taken by calipers. Testes and epididymides of another 10 fertile and 10 infertile breeding bulls were examined in vivo through manual palpation and ultrasound imaging. Semen quality of these bulls was also monitored. There were significant (P<0.01 positive correlations between ultrasound and calipers values of all parameters. The testicular parenchyma of fertile bulls was uniformly homogeneous and moderately echogenic. Epididymal tail was more heterogeneous and less echogenic, while epididymal head was homogeneous and less echogenic, than the testicular parenchyma. The epididymal body appeared as hypoechoic structure with echogenic margin. Among 10 infertile bulls, nine had poor semen quality, while one bull failed to give any ejaculate. On ultrasonography, six bulls showed abnormalities in their scrotal echotexture. Among these, one had an abundance of hyperechoic areas scattered in the testicular parenchyma, some of these showed acoustic shadowing, showing testicular degenerations with mineralization. The second bull showed many anechoic areas in the testes and epididymal head, demarcated from the rest of the organ by well defined margins. In the third bull, three-fourth of the right testis showed hyperechoic areas, suspected of testicular degeneration with mineralization. The fourth bull had two anechoic areas in one testis assumed to represent dilated blood vessel. The fifth bull showed small hyperechoic areas within the testicular parenchyma. The sixth bull showed an anechoic area with distinct hyperechogenic margin below the testicular tunics. The remaining four bulls had normal echogenicity of testes and epididymides in spite of poor semen quality. In conclusion, diagnostic ultrasound may be included in breeding soundness examination of breeding

  2. The effects of simultaneous application of ultrasound and ionizing radiation on cultured mammalian cells and normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Shozo

    1976-01-01

    The influence of therapeutic ultrasound on ionizing radiation effects was studied. Cultured mammalian cells, FM3A, and normal tissues, auricle and kidney of rabbits, were irradiated with ionizing radiation alone, ultrasound alone and both simultaneously. The biological experiments were conducted on the basis of the investigations about the physical and the chemical aspects of ultrasound. The results obtained from such a systematic study were as follows. It was considered that so called ''cavitation'' with bubble formation played an important role on the chemical effects of ultrasound. The chemical effect showed an intensity threshold in the range from 0.5 to 1 W/cm 2 . In the biological studies of ultrasound, the following must be considered; (1) the inhomogeneity of ultrasound intensity on the same plane (2) the distance between ultrasound transducer and sample. At a distance of 3 cm, the radiosensitizing effect due to simultaneous irradiation of x-rays and ultrasound on cells in suspension was detected at intensities above 2 W/cm 2 . The KI starch system in solution also showed a similar tendency. The irreversible tissue destruction was observed in the auricle irradiated with 690 R of 60 Co gamma-rays with simultaneous ultrasound at an intensity of 3 W/cm 2 for 15 minutes. However, no irreversible damage was recognized in the separate treatments with a dose four times of the combined irradiation. The interstitial nephritis was found in the kidney irradiated with 200 R of gamma-rays with simultaneous ultrasound for 5 minutes. No histological change was detectable in the separate treatments with a dose three times of the combined irradiation. The results seem to indicate that the ionizing radiation effects are enhanced by therapeutic ultrasound. (auth.)

  3. Comparative ultrasound measurement of normal thyroid gland dimensions in school aged children in our local environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchie, T T; Oyobere, O; Eze, K C

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the measurement of normal range of ultrasound (US) thyroid gland dimensions in school-aged children (6-16 years) in our environment and compared with what is obtained elsewhere. A prospective ultrasound measurement study done in University of Benin Teaching Hospital Benin, Nigeria. A prospective ultrasound (US) study of thyroid dimensions of 500 school-aged children in our environment consisting of 227 boys and 273 girls was done from 1 December 2006 to July 2007. The subjects were examined by the authors and subjects with palpable abnormal thyroid gland were excluded from the study. The thyroid dimensions (length, height, and diameter) were taken for each lobe by means of ultrasound (US). In addition volume of each thyroid lobe was calculated and the summation of volume of the lobes was taken as thyroid gland volume of each subject. Also height and weight of patients were documented from which the subject's body surface was calculated. Incidental thyroid gland lesion in US was excluded from the study. Using the Statistical program of social science (SPSS) and INSTAT (Graph Pad Inc. USA) the data were analyzed. Informed consent was obtained from all the subjects and the study was done in line with the ethical guidelines of the centers. The US thyroid gland volume in school-aged children in Benin City from this study ranges between 1.17 cm 3 and 7.19 cm 3 , mean volume range of 1.76-4.95 cm 3 , median volume range of 1.73-4.73 cm 3 , and range of standard deviation from 0.39 cm 3 to 1.49 cm 3 . The average mean thyroid volume is 2.32 cm 3 with the following average dimensions; anteroposterior right lobe =1.06 cm, mediolateral right lobe = 1.01 cm and craniocaudal right lobe = 2.34 cm, and anteroposterior left lobe = 1.01 cm, mediolateral left lobe = 1.04 cm and craniocaudal left lobe = 2.41 cm for both boys and girls respectively. These data are significantly lower than data obtained by European based World Health

  4. Shear-wave ultrasound elastography of the liver in normal-weight and obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Smita Sane; Youssfi, Mostafa; Patel, Mittun; Hu, Houchun H; Shaibi, Gabriel Q; Towbin, Richard B

    2017-12-01

    Background The identification and subsequent management of liver diseases in children is challenging due to the lack of non-invasive imaging biomarkers. Ultrasound shear-wave elastography (US-SWE) is an emerging imaging technique which can quantitatively assess liver stiffness and may be useful as a tool in the management of liver disease in overweight and obese children. Purpose To evaluate US-SWE velocities of the liver in normal-weight and obese children, to correlate US-SWE findings with age and body-mass-index (BMI), and to compare US-SWE values with qualitative assessment (i.e. normal versus abnormal echogenicity) of the liver by conventional US. Material and Methods A cohort of 300 children (mean age, 9.9 ± 5.3 years; age range, 0.06-18.9 years) were studied, comprising 176 normal-weight and 124 obese participants. In each patient, both US-SWE and conventional US of the liver were obtained. Three pediatric radiologists individually and in consensus determined whether liver parenchyma was of normal or abnormal echogenicity. Results US-SWE velocities differed between normal-weight and obese children (1.08 ± 0.14 versus 1.44 ± 0.39 m/s; P normal-weight children ( P normal-appearing livers (1.53 ± 0.38 vs. 1.17 ± 0.27). The difference was not significant in the normal-weight group. Conclusion US-SWE provides a useful quantitative imaging biomarker for evaluating liver stiffness in children.

  5. Ultrasound demonstration of distal biceps tendon bifurcation: normal and abnormal findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Capaccio, Enrico; Derchi, Lorenzo E.; Martinoli, Carlo; Michaud, Johan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the US appearance of the distal biceps tendon bifurcation in normal cadavers and volunteers and in those affected by various disease processes. Three cadaveric specimens, 30 normal volunteers, and 75 patients were evaluated by means of US. Correlative MR imaging was obtained in normal volunteers and patients. In all cases US demonstrated the distal biceps tendon shaped by two separate tendons belonging to the short and long head of the biceps brachii muscle. Four patients had a complete rupture of the distal insertion of the biceps with retraction of the muscle belly. Four patients had partial tear of the distal biceps tendon with different US appearance. In two patients the partial tear involved the short head of the biceps brachii tendon, while in the other two patients, the long head was involved. Correlative MR imaging is also presented both in normal volunteers and patients. US changed the therapeutic management in the patients with partial tears involving the LH of the biceps. This is the first report in which ultrasound considers the distal biceps tendon bifurcation in detail. Isolated tears of one of these components can be identified by US. Knowledge of the distal biceps tendon bifurcation ultrasonographic anatomy and pathology has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications. (orig.)

  6. Ultrasound demonstration of distal biceps tendon bifurcation: normal and abnormal findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Michaud, Johan; Capaccio, Enrico; Derchi, Lorenzo E; Martinoli, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the US appearance of the distal biceps tendon bifurcation in normal cadavers and volunteers and in those affected by various disease processes. Three cadaveric specimens, 30 normal volunteers, and 75 patients were evaluated by means of US. Correlative MR imaging was obtained in normal volunteers and patients. In all cases US demonstrated the distal biceps tendon shaped by two separate tendons belonging to the short and long head of the biceps brachii muscle. Four patients had a complete rupture of the distal insertion of the biceps with retraction of the muscle belly. Four patients had partial tear of the distal biceps tendon with different US appearance. In two patients the partial tear involved the short head of the biceps brachii tendon, while in the other two patients, the long head was involved. Correlative MR imaging is also presented both in normal volunteers and patients. US changed the therapeutic management in the patients with partial tears involving the LH of the biceps. This is the first report in which ultrasound considers the distal biceps tendon bifurcation in detail. Isolated tears of one of these components can be identified by US. Knowledge of the distal biceps tendon bifurcation ultrasonographic anatomy and pathology has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  7. Measurement precision and normal range of endometrial thickness in a postmenopausal population by transvaginal ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, L; Ravn, Pernille; Skouby, Sven O.

    2002-01-01

    of the ET. Measurements were performed by transvaginal ultrasound. A subset of the women (n = 178) was examined twice 3 months to 2 years apart to assess the long-term variability. RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, ET varied with length of menopause. During the first 5 years after menopause (YSM) the mean ET...... was 2.3 mm but it decreased by 0.03 mm/year (P changes (P = 0.13). Thereafter there was a minimal increase of 0.01 mm/year (P changes on ET, only women who had...... reached the menopause more than 5 years earlier were entered into the subsequent long-term study. The mean ET was 2.0 mm +/- 1.0 mm with no significant differences within or between the observers' measurements. The precision errors were less than 1 mm. CONCLUSIONS: The normal range of the thickness...

  8. Point of Care Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Goudie, Adrian; Chiorean, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the use of portable ultrasound scanners has enhanced the concept of point of care ultrasound (PoC-US), namely, "ultrasound performed at the bedside and interpreted directly by the treating clinician." PoC-US is not a replacement for comprehensive ultrasound, but rather allow...... and critical care medicine, cardiology, anesthesiology, rheumatology, obstetrics, neonatology, gynecology, gastroenterology and many other applications. In the future, PoC-US will be more diverse than ever and be included in medical student training.......Over the last decade, the use of portable ultrasound scanners has enhanced the concept of point of care ultrasound (PoC-US), namely, "ultrasound performed at the bedside and interpreted directly by the treating clinician." PoC-US is not a replacement for comprehensive ultrasound, but rather allows...

  9. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 66. Cosgrove DO, Eckersley RJ, Harvey CJ, Lim A. Ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. ... by: Jason Levy, MD, Northside Radiology Associates, Atlanta, GA. Also ...

  10. Ultrasound measurements of umbilical cord transverse area in normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrygal, Marek; Brazert, Jacek; Wender-Ozegowskal, Ewa; Zawiejska, Agnieszka; Brazert, Maciej; Dubiel, Mariusz; Gudmundsson, Saemundur

    2014-11-01

    A voluminous umbilical cord has been described in diabetic pregnancies. The aim of this studywas to see if measurements of cord diameters might be of value in the evaluation of diabetic pregnancies and especially those suspected of a large for gestational age (LGA) fetus. In an observational, prospective study umbilical cord areas and vessel diameters were measured between gestational age of 22 and 40 weeks in transverse ultrasound images of the central part of the cord in 141 normal and 135 diabetic pregnancies of which 30 were suspected of being LGA. Wharton's jelly area was calculated by subtracting the vessel area from the total transverse cord area. Normal reference curves were constructed for gestational age. Umbilical cord and Wharton's jelly areas increased with gestation. The vessel area leveled out at 32-33 weeks of gestation and the umbilical vein area decreased after 36 weeks of gestation. The umbilical cord parameters in diabetic pregnancies did not differ from controls. Cord areas were enlarged in 1/3 of the LGA fetuses. Umbilical cord area measurements are of limited value for the evaluation of diabetic pregnancies suspected having a LGA-fetus.

  11. Developing an emergency ultrasound app

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kim Thestrup; Subhi, Yousif; Aagaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Focused emergency ultrasound is rapidly evolving as a clinical skill for bedside examination by physicians at all levels of education. Ultrasound is highly operator-dependent and relevant training is essential to ensure appropriate use. When supplementing hands-on focused ultrasound courses, e...

  12. Bedside Interprofessional Rounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailee Burdick DNP, RN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bedside interprofessional rounding is gaining ground as a means to improve collaboration and patient outcomes, yet little is known regarding patients’ perceptions of the practice. Methods: This descriptive study used individual patient interviews to elicit views on interprofessional rounding from 35 patients at a large, urban hospital. Results: The findings identified three major categories: 1 about the rounding process; 2 clinical information; and 3 the impact/value of bedside inter-professional rounding. Discussion: Intentionally eliciting and responding to our patients’ views of interprofessional rounding may help us design methods that are patient centered and effective.

  13. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  14. Local Reference Ranges of Thyroid Volume in Sudanese Normal Subjects Using Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Yousef

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish a local reference of thyroid volume in Sudanese normal subjects using ultrasound. A total of 103 healthy subjects were studied, 28 (27.18% females and 75 (72.82% males. Thyroid volume was estimated using ellipsoid formula. The mean age and range of the subjects was 21.8 (19–29 years; the mean body mass index (BMI was 22.3 (16.46–26.07 kg/m2. The overall mean volume ± SD volume of the thyroid gland for both lobes in all the patients studied was 6.44 ± 2.44 mL. The mean volume for both lobes in females and males were 5.78 ± 1.96 mL and 6.69 ± 2.56 mL, respectively. The males' thyroid volume was greater than the females'. The mean volume of the right and left lobes of the thyroid gland in males and females were 3.38 ± 1.37 mL and 3.09 ± 1.24 mL, respectively. The right thyroid lobe volume was greater than the left. The values obtained in this study were lower than those reported from previous studies.

  15. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    , as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training...

  16. Between Bedside and Budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.T. Blank; E. Eggink

    1998-01-01

    Original title: Tussen bed en budget. The report Between bedside and budget (Tussen bed en budget) describes an extensive empirical study of the efficiency of general and university hospitals in the Netherlands. A policy summary recaps the main findings of the study. Those findings

  17. Doppler ultrasound velocities and resistive indexes immediately after pediatric liver transplantation: normal ranges and predictors of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Lucy H; Arys, Bo; Low, Gavin; Bhargava, Ravi; Kumbla, Surekha; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2014-07-01

    We sought to determine the ranges of Doppler ultrasound findings immediately after pediatric liver transplantation that are associated with successful outcomes or postoperative complications. This study included consecutive children who underwent Doppler ultrasound less than 48 hours after liver transplantation from 2001 to 2011. Operative reports and clinical outcome data were recorded. We had 110 patients (54% girls) with mean age at transplantation of 2.9 years (median, 1.3 years; range, 0-14 years) and a median follow-up interval of 3.5 years. Two pediatric radiologists reviewed ultrasound images in consensus. We computed descriptive statistics, interindex correlations, and analysis of variance. Twenty-four of 110 patients had a vascular complication, most commonly hepatic arterial thrombosis (seven patients). Compared with published adult normal values, normal pediatric Doppler parameters at postoperative day 1 trended toward higher normal velocities and resistive indexes (up to 0.95). Absent or low-velocity common hepatic artery flow less than 50 cm/s or a common hepatic artery resistive index less than 0.50 were significantly associated with hepatic artery thrombosis, whereas absent or low-velocity portal venous flow less than 30 cm/s or low-velocity hepatic venous flow less than 25 cm/s were significantly associated with vascular complications and a monotonic hepatic venous waveform was significantly associated with venous complications. Flow in a pediatric liver on the first day after transplantation is normally hyperdynamic, especially in the youngest transplant recipients, and, as a result, low velocities or resistive indexes are particularly concerning for complications. The pediatric-specific ranges of expected posttransplantation Doppler ultrasound findings presented in this article should assist in identifying normal variation and potentially life-threatening complications.

  18. How reassuring is a normal breast ultrasound in assessment of a screen-detected mammographic abnormality? A review of interval cancers after assessment that included ultrasound evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, M.L.; Welman, C.J.; Celliers, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To review factors resulting in a false-negative outcome or delayed cancer diagnosis in women recalled for further evaluation, including ultrasound, after an abnormal screening mammogram. Materials and methods: Of 646,692 screening mammograms performed between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2004, 34,533 women were recalled for further assessment. Nine hundred and sixty-four interval cancers were reported in this period. Forty-six of these women had been recalled for further assessment, which specifically included ultrasound evaluation in the preceding 24 months, and therefore, met the inclusion criteria for this study. Screening mammograms, further mammographic views, ultrasound scans, clinical findings, and histopathology results were retrospectively reviewed by two consultant breast radiologists. Results: The interval cancer developed in the contralateral breast (n = 9), ipsilateral breast, but different site (n = 6), and ipsilateral breast at the same site (n = 31) as the abnormality for which they had recently been recalled. In the latter group, 10 were retrospectively classified as a false-negative outcome, nine had a delay in obtaining a biopsy, and 12 had a delay due to a non-diagnostic initial biopsy. Various factors relating to these outcomes are discussed. Conclusion: Out of 34,533 women who attended for an assessment visit and the 46 women who subsequently developed an interval breast cancer, 15 were true interval cancers, 10 had a false-negative assessment outcome, and 21 had a delay to cancer diagnosis on the basis of a number of factors. When there is discrepancy between the imaging and histopathology results, a repeat biopsy rather than early follow-up would have avoided a delay in some cases. A normal ultrasound examination should not deter the radiologist from proceeding to stereotactic biopsy, if the index mammographic lesion is suspicious of malignancy.

  19. Differentiation between chronic hepatitis and normal liver of grayscale ultrasound tissue quantification using adobe photoshop(5.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Cheol; Oh, Jong Young; Lim, Jong Uk; Nam, Kyung Jin

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate whether was any difference in the brightness of echogenicity on gray scale ultrasound imaging between the liver with chronic hepatitis and the normal liver using Adobe photoshop 5.0 Seventy-five patients with pathologically proven chronic hepatitis and twenty normal volunteers were included in this study. Adobe photoshop 5.0 histogram was used to measure the brightness of image. The measured brightness of the liver was divided by the brightness of the kidney, and the radio was calculated and compared between patients with chronic hepatitis and the normal control groups. In addition, the degree of fibrosis was also evaluated. The difference in brightness between the normal liver and live with chronic hepatitis was statistically significant, but no statistically significant difference was observed between the brightness of the liver and the degree of fibrosis in the liver. Tissue echo quantification using Adobe Photoshop 5.0 may be a helpful diagnostic methods for the patients with chronic hepatitis.

  20. Comparative analysis of contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma with controlled velocity of ultrasound in normal and fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Byung Jin; Han, Joon Koo; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Dong Hyuk

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma with controlled velocities of ultrasound in normal and fatty liver. 31 patient with normal liver and 39 patients with moderate degree of fatty liver were studies with sonography with controlled velocities of ultrasound (1,580 m/sec, 1,540 m/sec, 1,500 m/sec, 1,460 m/sec). Sonographic images were captured with picture grabbing (Sono-PACS) and were recalled with visual C++(Microsoft Redmond. WA, USA). The contrast between hepatic vein and parenchyma was measured and analyzed on each sonographic image. The number of patients with the highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma among the 31 patients with normal liver were 5 (16.1%) with 1,580 m/sec, 12 (38.8%) with 1,540 m/sec, 9 (29.0%) with 1,500 m/sec, and 5 (16.1%) with 1,460 m/sec. The number of patients with highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma among the 39 patients with fatty liver were 3 (7.7%) with 1,580 m/sec, 7 (17.9%) with 1,540 m/sec, 12 (30.8%) with 1,500 m/sec and 17 (43.6%) with 1,460 m/sec. The velocity of ultrasound for the highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma in normal liver was 1,540 m/sec, and 1,460 m/sec in fatty liver.

  1. An analysis of MRI and ultrasound imaging in patients with gout who have normal plain radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John D; Kedar, Rajendra P; Anderson, Scott R; Osorio, Angie H; Albritton, Nancy L; Gnanashanmugam, Shanmugapriya; Valeriano, Joanne; Vasey, Frank B; Ricca, Louis R

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of occult destructive arthropathy in subjects with gout and normal plain radiographs by utilizing MRI and ultrasound (US). The study consisted of two visits. At Visit 1, a plain radiograph of the 'index joint' was obtained. The 'index joint' was defined as a joint that has had the most acute attacks of gout historically. The index joint plain radiograph had to be free of erosive damage in order for the subject to qualify for Visit 2. At Visit 2, the subject had an MRI with contrast and an US of the index joint. Each subject also had an MRI and US of an 'asymptomatic joint'. The 'asymptomatic joint' was defined as a joint that had never experienced an acute attack of gout (determined by standard protocol). The primary endpoint was erosive changes on the MRI and/or US of the index joint. Secondary endpoints included erosive changes on the asymptomatic joint as well as bone marrow oedema (BME) (on MRI), synovial pannus (SP), soft tissue tophi (STT) or oedema (STE) on either the index or asymptomatic joint. Twenty-seven subjects (26 males; 1 female) completed both visits. Their average age and disease duration were 55.1 years (range 21-75 years) and 6.8 years (range 0.25-25 years), respectively. The subjects' average serum uric acid level over the past 5 years was 8.09 mg/dl (range 4.1-12.8 mg/dl); their average on the day of Visit 1 was 7.96 mg/dl (range 4.6-13.9 mg/dl). The first MTP was the most common index joint (17) followed by the ankle (5), mid-tarsal (2), knee (2) and wrist (1). The knee was the most common asymptomatic joint (21) followed by the wrist (3), MTP (2) and ankle (1). All subjects had both MRIs; one subject refused the US. Out of 27 subjects, 15 (56%) had erosions on MRI of their index joint (P < 0.0001); only 1 subject (4%) had erosions identified in the index joint by US (P = NS). Regarding the secondary endpoints on the index joint, the MRI detected SP (13), BME (4), STE (3) and STT (0); the US

  2. Doppler ultrasound of the placenta and maternal and fetal vessels during normal gestation in captive agoutis (Dasyprocta prymnolopha, Wagler, 1831).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Francisco C A; Pessoa, Gerson T; Moura, Laecio S; Rodrigues, Renan P S; Diniz, Anaemilia N; Souza, André B; Silva, Elzivânia G; Sanches, Marina P; Silva-Filho, Osmar F; Guerra, Porfirio C; Sousa, João M; Neves, Willams C; Alves, Flávio R

    2016-11-01

    The use of ultrasound for pregnancy monitoring is critical for the evaluation of hemodynamic parameters essential to fetal viability. In the present study, using B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, we characterized the placenta, subplacenta, maternal, and fetal vessels during normal gestation of healthy agoutis raised in captivity. In total, 30 agoutis were obtained from the Center for the Study and Preservation of Wild Animals, Center of Agricultural Sciences, Federal University of Piauí (Núcleo de Estudos e Preservação de Animais Silvestres-NEPAS, Centro de Ciências Agrárias-CCA, Universidade Federal do Piauí-UFPI). These animals were subjected to B-mode and Doppler ultrasound examinations to evaluate their maternal and fetal hemodynamic profiles. The placenta was located in the mesometrial region and had a discoid, ellipsoid, or globular aspect. With spectral Doppler, characteristic systolic and diastolic flow was observed in the umbilical artery. This flow increased during pregnancy. A cross-sectional view revealed a goblet-shaped placenta. The uteroplacental blood flow was characterized by a marked increase in systolic peak velocity during pregnancy, the presence of a rapid deceleration ramp, and a relatively high diastolic speed. The fetal aortic vascular flow was predominantly systolic and diastolic. The caudal vena cava blood flow was characterized by a systolic peak followed by a decreased diastolic wave throughout pregnancy. In the present study, we characterized the morphologic and hemodynamic interactions of the placenta/subplacenta with maternal and fetal vessels in agoutis at 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 days gestation using B-mode and Doppler ultrasound. We determined the approximation and separation of the blood flow values of the umbilical artery, subplacental flow, uteroplacental artery, fetal aorta, and fetal vena cava. We believe these values may contribute to an understanding of the gestational biology and aid delivery prediction in this species

  3. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Zamysłowska-Szmytke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG oculomotor tests (central group and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Material and Methods: Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT, Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA and gaze nystagmus assessment. Results: Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73% had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. Conclusions: The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes.

  5. Diuretic Agent and Normal Saline Infusion Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomies in Nondilated Pelvicaliceal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagci, Cemil, E-mail: cemil.yagci@medicine.ankara.edu.tr; Ustuner, Evren, E-mail: evrenustuner@hotmail.com; Atman, Ebru Dusunceli, E-mail: ebrumd2001@yahoo.com [Ankara University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Baltaci, Sumer, E-mail: sbaltaci@hotmail.com [Ankara University, Department of Urology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Uzun, Caglar, E-mail: cuzun77@yahoo.com; Akyar, Serdar, E-mail: yusuf.s.akyar@medicine.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey)

    2013-04-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in a nondilated pelvicaliceal system is technically challenging. We describe an effective method to achieve transient dilatation of the pelvicaliceal system via induction of diuresis using infusion of a diuretic agent in normal saline, therefore allowing easier access to the pelvicaliceal system. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, the technique had been tested in 22 nephrostomies with nondilated system (a total of 20 patients with 2 patients having bilateral nephrostomies) during a 5-year period. Patients were given 40 mg of furosemide in 250 ml of normal saline solution intravenously by rapid infusion. As soon as maximum calyceal dilatation of more than 5 mm was observed, which is usually 15 min later after the end of rapid infusion, patients were positioned obliquely, and PCN procedure under ultrasound guidance was performed. The procedure was successful in 19 of the nephrostomies in 17 patients with a success rate of 86.36 % per procedure and 85 % per patient in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems. No major nephrostomy-, drug-, or technique-related complications were encountered. The technique failed to work in three patients due to the presence of double J catheters and preexisting calyceal perforation which avoided transient dilation of the pelvicaliceal system with diuresis. Diuretic infusion in saline is a feasible and effective method for PCN in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems.

  6. Automatic segmentation method of pelvic floor levator hiatus in ultrasound using a self-normalizing neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati, Ester; Hu, Yipeng; Sindhwani, Nikhil; Dietz, Hans Peter; D'hooge, Jan; Barratt, Dean; Deprest, Jan; Vercauteren, Tom

    2018-04-01

    Segmentation of the levator hiatus in ultrasound allows the extraction of biometrics, which are of importance for pelvic floor disorder assessment. We present a fully automatic method using a convolutional neural network (CNN) to outline the levator hiatus in a two-dimensional image extracted from a three-dimensional ultrasound volume. In particular, our method uses a recently developed scaled exponential linear unit (SELU) as a nonlinear self-normalizing activation function, which for the first time has been applied in medical imaging with CNN. SELU has important advantages such as being parameter-free and mini-batch independent, which may help to overcome memory constraints during training. A dataset with 91 images from 35 patients during Valsalva, contraction, and rest, all labeled by three operators, is used for training and evaluation in a leave-one-patient-out cross validation. Results show a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.90 with an interquartile range of 0.08, with equivalent performance to the three operators (with a Williams' index of 1.03), and outperforming a U-Net architecture without the need for batch normalization. We conclude that the proposed fully automatic method achieved equivalent accuracy in segmenting the pelvic floor levator hiatus compared to a previous semiautomatic approach.

  7. Effects of Hot Packs on Small-Intestinal Motility Measured by Doppler Ultrasound and Subjective Feelings in Normal Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Yusuke; Choe, Myoung-Ae

    Constipation is a common problem in patients and the general population. Hot packs can relieve constipation, but the effect on small-intestinal motility remains unknown. We aimed to determine the effect of hot packs on small-intestinal motility and subjective feelings associated with bowel activity after removing the hot packs. Thirty-four normal adults were assigned to either an experimental group (n = 18) or a control group (n = 16). Hot and normal packs were applied for 10 minutes to the lumbar regions of the experimental and control groups, respectively. Small-intestinal motility was measured by Doppler ultrasound before, during, and after pack application. Subjective feelings were also evaluated after removing the packs. The number of small-intestinal peristalses and subjective feelings of 20 participants showing anechoic areas in the small-intestinal lumen were analyzed.

  8. Fast Doppler as a novel bedside measure of cerebral perfusion in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Eric S; Mehic, Edin; Mourad, Pierre D; Juul, Sandra E

    2016-02-01

    Altered cerebral perfusion from impaired autoregulation may contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. We hypothesized that fast Doppler imaging could provide a reproducible bedside estimation of cerebral perfusion and autoregulation in preterm infants. This is a prospective pilot study using fast Doppler ultrasound to assess blood flow velocity in the basal ganglia of 19 subjects born at 26-32 wk gestation. Intraclass correlation provided a measure of test-retest reliability, and linear regression of cerebral blood flow velocity and heart rate or blood pressure allowed for estimations of autoregulatory ability. The intraclass correlation when imaging in the first 48 h of life was 0.634. We found significant and independent correlations between the systolic blood flow velocity and both systolic blood pressure and heart rate (P = 0.015 and 0.012 respectively) only in the 26-28 wk gestational age infants in the first 48 h of life. Our results suggest that fast Doppler provides reliable bedside measurements of cerebral blood flow velocity at the tissue level in premature infants, acting as a proxy for cerebral tissue perfusion. Additionally, autoregulation appears to be impaired in the extremely preterm infants, even within a normal range of blood pressures.

  9. Ultrasound-mediated delivery and distribution of polymeric nanoparticles in the normal brain parenchyma of a metastatic brain tumour model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Baghirov

    Full Text Available The treatment of brain diseases is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB preventing most drugs from entering the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS with microbubbles can open the BBB safely and reversibly. Systemic drug injection might induce toxicity, but encapsulation into nanoparticles reduces accumulation in normal tissue. Here we used a novel platform based on poly(2-ethyl-butyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles to permeabilize the BBB in a melanoma brain metastasis model. With a dual-frequency ultrasound transducer generating FUS at 1.1 MHz and 7.8 MHz, we opened the BBB using nanoparticle-microbubbles and low-frequency FUS, and applied high-frequency FUS to generate acoustic radiation force and push nanoparticles through the extracellular matrix. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we quantified nanoparticle extravasation and distribution in the brain parenchyma. We also evaluated haemorrhage, as well as the expression of P-glycoprotein, a key BBB component. FUS and microbubbles distributed nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma, and the distribution depended on the extent of BBB opening. The results from acoustic radiation force were not conclusive, but in a few animals some effect could be detected. P-glycoprotein was not significantly altered immediately after sonication. In summary, FUS with our nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles can achieve accumulation and displacement of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma.

  10. Ultrasound-mediated delivery and distribution of polymeric nanoparticles in the normal brain parenchyma of a metastatic brain tumour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghirov, Habib; Snipstad, Sofie; Sulheim, Einar; Berg, Sigrid; Hansen, Rune; Thorsen, Frits; Mørch, Yrr; Åslund, Andreas K. O.

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of brain diseases is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) preventing most drugs from entering the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can open the BBB safely and reversibly. Systemic drug injection might induce toxicity, but encapsulation into nanoparticles reduces accumulation in normal tissue. Here we used a novel platform based on poly(2-ethyl-butyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles to permeabilize the BBB in a melanoma brain metastasis model. With a dual-frequency ultrasound transducer generating FUS at 1.1 MHz and 7.8 MHz, we opened the BBB using nanoparticle-microbubbles and low-frequency FUS, and applied high-frequency FUS to generate acoustic radiation force and push nanoparticles through the extracellular matrix. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we quantified nanoparticle extravasation and distribution in the brain parenchyma. We also evaluated haemorrhage, as well as the expression of P-glycoprotein, a key BBB component. FUS and microbubbles distributed nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma, and the distribution depended on the extent of BBB opening. The results from acoustic radiation force were not conclusive, but in a few animals some effect could be detected. P-glycoprotein was not significantly altered immediately after sonication. In summary, FUS with our nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles can achieve accumulation and displacement of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma. PMID:29338016

  11. Radiographic Follow-up of DDH in Infants: Are X-rays Necessary After a Normalized Ultrasound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkissian, Eric J; Sankar, Wudbhav N; Zhu, Xiaowei; Wu, Chia H; Flynn, John M

    2015-09-01

    Concerns about radiation exposure have created a controversy over long-term radiographic follow-up of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in infants who achieve normal clinical and ultrasonographic examinations. The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of continued radiographic monitoring by contrasting the incidence of residual radiographic dysplasia to the risks of radiation exposure. We reviewed a consecutive series of infants with idiopathic DDH presenting to our institution over 4 years. Infants with "normalized DDH" had achieved a stable clinical examination with an ultrasound revealing no signs of either hip instability or acetabular dysplasia. We excluded infants with persistently abnormal ultrasonographic indices, clinical examinations, or both by 6 months of age, including those requiring surgical reduction. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs at approximately 6 and 12 months of age were then evaluated for evidence of residual radiographic acetabular dysplasia. Radiation effective dose was calculated using PCXMC software. We identified 115 infants with DDH who had achieved both normal ultrasonographic and clinical examinations at 3.1±1.1 months of age. At the age of 6.6±0.8 months, 17% of all infants demonstrated radiographic signs of acetabular dysplasia. Of infants left untreated (n=106), 33% had dysplasia on subsequent radiographs at 12.5±1.2 months of age. No significant differences were evident in either the 6- or 12-month rates of dysplasia between infants successfully treated with a Pavlik harness and infants normalizing without treatment but with a history of risk factors (P>0.05). The radiation effective dose was DDH normalization in our study cohort appear to outweigh the risks of radiation exposure. Our findings may warrant radiographic follow-up in this population of infants through at least walking age to allow timely diagnosis and early intervention of residual acetabular dysplasia. Level IV-retrospective case series.

  12. Do we need to follow up an early normal ultrasound with a later plain radiograph in children with a family history of developmental dysplasia of the hip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazal, Suhayl; Flowers, Mark J

    2015-10-01

    We routinely perform a pelvic radiograph between 6 and 12 months of age for children with a family history of developmental dysplasia of hip (DDH). We conducted this study to determine whether children with a family history of DDH and a normal hip ultrasound after birth require any further radiological follow-up. We identified all children referred to our hip-screening clinic in a 3-year period between August 2008 and August 2011 with a family history of DDH and a normal hip ultrasound after birth. A total of 119 patients with a normal hip ultrasound after birth had a pelvic radiograph at a median age of 6.6 months. Six patients had residual dysplasia (acetabular index >30°) on the initial radiograph; five of these had resolved spontaneously by age 12 months, and the remaining patient had a normal radiograph at 21 months of age and was discharged. We have found no cases of residual hip dysplasia requiring treatment in children with a family history of DDH and a normal hip ultrasound after birth. We have therefore changed our practice accordingly and no longer routinely followed up such cases. Diagnostic study, Level II.

  13. Normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  14. Time to Add a Fifth Pillar to Bedside Physical Examination: Inspection, Palpation, Percussion, Auscultation, and Insonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Jagat; Chandrashekhar, Y; Braunwald, Eugene

    2018-02-28

    Inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation have been the 4 pillars of clinical bedside medicine. Although these basic methods of physical examination have served us well, traditional bedside examination, for a number of reasons including diminishing interest and expertise, performs well less than what is required of a modern diagnostic strategy. Improving the performance of physical examination is vital given that it is crucial to guide diagnostic possibilities and further testing. Current efforts at improving physical examination skills during medical training have not been very successful, and incorporating appropriate technology at the bedside might improve its performance. Selective use of bedside ultrasound (or insonation) can be one such strategy that could be incorporated as the fifth component of the physical examination. Seeing pathology through imaging might improve interest in physical examination among trainees, and permit appropriate downstream testing and possibly superior decision making. Current ultrasound technology makes this feasible, and further miniaturization of ultrasound devices and reduced cost will allow for routine use at the bedside. It is time to have a wider debate and a possible consensus about updates required to enhance current paradigms of physical examination.

  15. Transthoracic lung ultrasound in normal dogs and dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Nathalie; Pariaut, Romain; Pate, Julie; Saelinger, Carley; Kearney, Michael T; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is the most common complication of left-sided heart failure in dogs and early detection is important for effective clinical management. In people, pulmonary edema is commonly diagnosed based on transthoracic ultrasonography and detection of B line artifacts (vertical, narrow-based, well-defined hyperechoic rays arising from the pleural surface). The purpose of this study was to determine whether B line artifacts could also be useful diagnostic predictors for cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs. Thirty-one normal dogs and nine dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema were prospectively recruited. For each dog, presence or absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema was based on physical examination, heartworm testing, thoracic radiographs, and echocardiography. A single observer performed transthoracic ultrasonography in all dogs and recorded video clips and still images for each of four quadrants in each hemithorax. Distribution, sonographic characteristics, and number of B lines per thoracic quadrant were determined and compared between groups. B lines were detected in 31% of normal dogs (mean 0.9 ± 0.3 SD per dog) and 100% of dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema (mean 6.2 ± 3.8 SD per dog). Artifacts were more numerous and widely distributed in dogs with congestive heart failure (P edema on radiographs. Findings from the current study supported the use of thoracic ultrasonography and detection of B lines as techniques for diagnosing cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. Accuracy of Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System (BedsidePEWS) in a Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, Orsola; Ciofi Degli Atti, Marta L; Di Ciommo, Vincenzo; Cecchetti, Corrado; Bertaina, Alice; Tiozzo, Emanuela; Raponi, Massimiliano

    2016-07-01

    Hospital mortality in children who undergo stem cell transplant (SCT) is high. Early warning scores aim at identifying deteriorating patients and at preventing adverse outcomes. The bedside pediatric early warning system (BedsidePEWS) is a pediatric early warning score based on 7 clinical indicators, ranging from 0 (all indicators within normal ranges for age) to 26. The aim of this case-control study was to assess the performance of BedsidePEWS in identifying clinical deterioration events among children admitted to an SCT unit. Cases were defined as clinical deterioration events; controls were all the other patients hospitalized on the same ward at the time of case occurrence. BedsidePEWS was retrospectively measured at 4-hour intervals in cases and controls 24 hours before an event (T4-T24). We studied 19 cases and 80 controls. The score significantly increased in cases from a median of 4 at T24 to a median of 14 at T4. The proportion of correctly classified cases and controls was >90% since T8. The area under the curve receiver operating characteristic was 0.9. BedsidePEWS is an accurate screening tool to predict clinical deterioration in SCT patients. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  17. A STUDY ON ROLE OF DOPPLER ULTRASOUND IN NORMAL AND HIGH-RISK PREGNANCIES WITH PERINATAL OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozibur Rahman Laskar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To evaluate the diagnostic value of various waveform of Doppler ultrasound of three vessels (uterine artery, middle cerebral artery and umbilical artery in high-risk pregnancies in compare to normal pregnancy related to perinatal outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS 200 singleton pregnancies beyond 28 weeks of gestation were studied out of which 100 were normal and 100 were high-risk pregnancies with PIH and clinical suspicion of IUGR. Doppler examination was done after recording history, clinical ex and USG. RESULTS The PI, RI and S/D of Umbilical artery and Uterine artery were significantly higher in study group as compared to control group and the PI, RI and S/D of middle cerebral artery were significantly lower in study group as compared to control group. 70% of foetuses in study group had at least one adverse outcome in study group in contrast to only 10% of control group had adverse outcome. Doppler study of UA and UmbA together had a better sensitivity than individual vessel. The MCA/UmbA PI ratio of study group showed more foetuses to redistribute their cardiac output than the abnormal MCA PI or UmbA PI. The cerebroumbilical ratio provided a better predictor of high-risk pregnancies and adverse perinatal outcome than either MCA or UmbA. CONCLUSION Hence, we conclude that Doppler studies of multiple vessels in the foetoplacental circulation can help in the monitoring of compromised foetus and can help in predicting neonatal morbidity. This may be helpful in determining the optimal time of delivery in complicated pregnancies. ABBREVIATIONS UA-Uterine artery, UmbA-Umbilical artery, MCA-Middle cerebral artery, RI-Resistive index, PI-Pulsatility index, S/DSystolic/Diastolic ratio, IUGR-Intrauterine growth restriction, IUFD-Intrauterine fetal demise, LSCS-Lower segment caesarean section, SVD-Spontaneous vaginal delivery, PIH- Pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  18. Instrumentation for bedside analysis of swallowing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Catiuscia S S; Nunes, Luiz G Q; Melo, Pedro L

    2010-01-01

    Disordered swallowing, or dysphagia, is a common problem seen in patients undergoing treatment for cancer, stroke and neurodegenerative illnesses. This disease is associated with aspiration-induced chest infections. The methods currently used for diagnosis, however, are qualitative or based on expensive equipment. Swallowing accelerometry is a promising low-cost, quantitative and noninvasive tool for the evaluation of swallowing. This work describes the design and application of a bedside instrument able to evaluate swallowing mechanisms and to identify patients at risk of aspiration. Three-axis swallowing accelerometry was used to measure the neck vibrations associated with deglutition, providing analog signals to a virtual instrument developed in LabVIEW environment. In vivo tests in normal subjects as well as tests with disphagic patients showed that the system was able to easily and non-invasively detect changes in the swallowing acceleration pattern associated with increasing values of water volume (p disphagia. We concluded that the developed system could be a useful tool for the objective bedside evaluation of patients at risk of aspiration.

  19. Length and volume of morphologically normal kidneys in Korean Children: Ultrasound measurement and estimation using body size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Hwee; Kim, Myung Joon; Lim, Sok Hwan; Lee, Mi Jung; Kim, Ji Eun

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between anthropometric measurements and renal length and volume measured with ultrasound in Korean children who have morphologically normal kidneys, and to create simple equations to estimate the renal sizes using the anthropometric measurements. We examined 794 Korean children under 18 years of age including a total of 394 boys and 400 girls without renal problems. The maximum renal length (L) (cm), orthogonal anterior-posterior diameter (D) (cm) and width (W) (cm) of each kidney were measured on ultrasound. Kidney volume was calculated as 0.523 x L x D x W (cm 3 ). Anthropometric indices including height (cm), weight (kg) and body mass index (m 2 /kg) were collected through a medical record review. We used linear regression analysis to create simple equations to estimate the renal length and the volume with those anthropometric indices that were mostly correlated with the US-measured renal sizes. Renal length showed the strongest significant correlation with patient height (R2, 0.874 and 0.875 for the right and left kidneys, respectively, p < 0.001). Renal volume showed the strongest significant correlation with patient weight (R2, 0.842 and 0.854 for the right and left kidneys, respectively, p < 0.001). The following equations were developed to describe these relationships with an estimated 95% range of renal length and volume (R2, 0.826-0.884, p < 0.001): renal length = 2.383 + 0.045 x Height (± 1.135) and = 2.374 + 0.047 x Height (± 1.173) for the right and left kidneys, respectively; and renal volume 7.941 + 1.246 x Weight (± 15.920) and = 7.303 + 1.532 x Weight (± 18.704) for the right and left kidneys, respectively. Scatter plots between height and renal length and between weight and renal volume have been established from Korean children and simple equations between them have been developed for use in clinical practice.

  20. Bedside risk estimation of morbidly adherent placenta using simple calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maymon, R; Melcer, Y; Pekar-Zlotin, M; Shaked, O; Cuckle, H; Tovbin, J

    2018-03-01

    To construct a calculator for 'bedside' estimation of morbidly adherent placenta (MAP) risk based on ultrasound (US) findings. This retrospective study included all pregnant women with at least one previous cesarean delivery attending in our US unit between December 2013 and January 2017. The examination was based on a scoring system which determines the probability for MAP. The study population included 471 pregnant women, and 41 of whom (8.7%) were diagnosed with MAP. Based on ROC curve, the most effective US criteria for detection of MAP were the presence of the placental lacunae, obliteration of the utero-placental demarcation, and placenta previa. On the multivariate logistic regression analysis, US findings of placental lacunae (OR = 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2-9.5; P = 0.01), obliteration of the utero-placental demarcation (OR = 12.4; 95% CI, 3.7-41.6; P calculated, yielding an area under the curve of 0.93 (95% CI, 0.87-0.97). Accordingly, we have constructed a simple calculator for 'bedside' estimation of MAP risk. The calculator is mounted on the hospital's internet website ( http://www.assafh.org/Pages/PPCalc/index.html ). The risk estimation of MAP varies between 1.5 and 87%. The present calculator enables a simple 'bedside' MAP estimation, facilitating accurate and adequate antenatal risk assessment.

  1. Transabdominal ultrasound for standardized measurement of bowel wall thickness in normal children and those with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, XinWu; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2014-12-01

    The intestinal wall can be visualized using high resolution transabdominal ultrasound (TUS). TTUS measurement of the bowel wall thickness has been described in adults but data are lacking in children. The purpose of this prospective study was to sonographically investigate bowel wall thickness in healthy children and children with Crohn's disease. TUS (5-15 MHz) of the intestine was performed in 58 healthy children (age range 3 to 16 years) and in 30 children with Crohn's disease (age range 8 to 17 years). The following regions were assessed and bowel wall thickness measured: terminal ileum, cecum, right flexure, and sigmoid colon. In patients with Crohn's disease, the involved region was additionally assessed regarding length of involved segment and sonographic signs of transmural inflammation and fistula. TUS allowed adequate measurement of bowel wall thickness in all 58 healthy children (100%) and in all 30 Crohn's disease patients (100%). The bowel wall thickness significantly differed between groups. Bowel wall thickness (mean +/- SD) in all segments was less then 2 mm in all healthy children (1.0+/-0.1 mm terminal ileum, 1.1+/-0.1 mm cecum, 1.1+/-0.1 mm right flexure, and 1.3+/-0.1 mm sigmoid colon). In Crohn's disease patients, bowel wall thickness was ≥ 3 mm in the ileocecal region and was significantly increased (5.1+/-1.9 mm) compared to the healthy children. The mean length of involved segment was 15+/-6.5 cm [5 - 30 cm]. Additional findings in Crohn's disease patients were: transmural inflamation (3/30), interenteric fistula (3/30), gastrocolic fistula (1/30) and vesicoenteric fistula (1/30). Similar to adults, normal bowel wall thickness in children is always less than 2 mm. In all patients with Crohn's disease, increased bowel wall thickness could be detected. TUS is a helpful tool in the diagnosis and assessment of activity and complications in Crohn's disease.

  2. Emergency department diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon calcification and shoulder impingement syndrome using bedside ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-day history of severe left shoulder pain made worse with movement. Emergency department (ED) bedside point-of-care static and dynamic ultrasound examination of the supraspinatus tendon revealed supraspinatus tendon calcification with impingement syndrome, and the patient was urgently referred to orthopedics after ED pain control was achieved. Bedside shoulder and supraspinatus tendon evaluation with static and dynamic ultrasonography can assist in the rapid diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon calcification and supraspinatus tendon impingement syndrome in the emergency department. PMID:23398632

  3. Bedside Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Using Portable X-Ray in Acute Severe Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushikesh Shah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute cholangitis require emergent biliary decompression. Those who are hemodynamically unstable on vasopressor support and mechanical ventilation are too critically ill to move outside of the intensive care unit. This prohibits performing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP in the endoscopy unit. Fluoroscopic guidance is required to confirm deep biliary cannulation during ERCP. There are a few reported cases of bedside ERCP using portable C-arm fluoroscopy unit or ultrasound guided cannulation. We present a unique case of life-saving emergent bedside ERCP in a severely ill patient with cholangitis and septic shock, using simple portable X-ray to confirm biliary cannulation.

  4. Subluxation of the peroneus long tendon in the cuboid tunnel: is it normal or pathologic? An ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, Taylor J.; Rosenberg, Zehava S.; Ciavarra, Gina; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Velez, Zoraida Restrepo; Prost, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the position of the peroneus longus (PL) tendon relative to the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel during ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion using ultrasound and MRI. The study population included two groups: 20 feet of 10 asymptomatic volunteers who underwent prospective dynamic ultrasound and 55 ankles found through retrospective review of routine ankle MRI examinations. The location of the PL tendon at the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel was designated as completely within the tunnel, indeterminate, or subluxed with respect to ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. On dynamic ultrasound, the PL tendon was perched plantar to the cuboid tuberosity in dorsiflexion, and glided to enter the cuboid tunnel distal to the tuberosity in plantarflexion in all 20 feet. On the MRI evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0006) in the location of the PL tendon between the ankles scanned in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Based on our findings on ultrasound and MRI, the PL tendon can glide in and out of the cuboid tunnel along the cuboid tuberosity depending on ankle position. Thus, ''subluxation'' of the tendon as it curves to enter the cuboid tunnel, which to the best of our knowledge has not yet been described, should be recognized as a normal, position-dependent phenomenon and not be reported as pathology. (orig.)

  5. Subluxation of the peroneus long tendon in the cuboid tunnel: is it normal or pathologic? An ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Taylor J. [Charlotte Radiology, Charlotte, NC (United States); Rosenberg, Zehava S.; Ciavarra, Gina; Bencardino, Jenny T. [New York Langone Medical Center / Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States); Velez, Zoraida Restrepo [Cedimed-Dinamica, Medellin (Colombia); Prost, Roberto [Marino Hospital ASL Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the position of the peroneus longus (PL) tendon relative to the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel during ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion using ultrasound and MRI. The study population included two groups: 20 feet of 10 asymptomatic volunteers who underwent prospective dynamic ultrasound and 55 ankles found through retrospective review of routine ankle MRI examinations. The location of the PL tendon at the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel was designated as completely within the tunnel, indeterminate, or subluxed with respect to ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. On dynamic ultrasound, the PL tendon was perched plantar to the cuboid tuberosity in dorsiflexion, and glided to enter the cuboid tunnel distal to the tuberosity in plantarflexion in all 20 feet. On the MRI evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0006) in the location of the PL tendon between the ankles scanned in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Based on our findings on ultrasound and MRI, the PL tendon can glide in and out of the cuboid tunnel along the cuboid tuberosity depending on ankle position. Thus, ''subluxation'' of the tendon as it curves to enter the cuboid tunnel, which to the best of our knowledge has not yet been described, should be recognized as a normal, position-dependent phenomenon and not be reported as pathology. (orig.)

  6. Subluxation of the peroneus long tendon in the cuboid tunnel: is it normal or pathologic? An ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Taylor J; Rosenberg, Zehava S; Velez, Zoraida Restrepo; Ciavarra, Gina; Prost, Roberto; Bencardino, Jenny T

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the position of the peroneus longus (PL) tendon relative to the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel during ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion using ultrasound and MRI. The study population included two groups: 20 feet of 10 asymptomatic volunteers who underwent prospective dynamic ultrasound and 55 ankles found through retrospective review of routine ankle MRI examinations. The location of the PL tendon at the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel was designated as completely within the tunnel, indeterminate, or subluxed with respect to ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. On dynamic ultrasound, the PL tendon was perched plantar to the cuboid tuberosity in dorsiflexion, and glided to enter the cuboid tunnel distal to the tuberosity in plantarflexion in all 20 feet. On the MRI evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0006) in the location of the PL tendon between the ankles scanned in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Based on our findings on ultrasound and MRI, the PL tendon can glide in and out of the cuboid tunnel along the cuboid tuberosity depending on ankle position. Thus, "subluxation" of the tendon as it curves to enter the cuboid tunnel, which to the best of our knowledge has not yet been described, should be recognized as a normal, position-dependent phenomenon and not be reported as pathology.

  7. Intra-operative Vector Flow Imaging Using Ultrasound of the Ascending Aorta among 40 Patients with Normal, Stenotic and Replaced Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve gives rise to more complex blood flows with increased velocities. The angleindependent vector flow ultrasound technique transverse oscillation was employed intra-operatively on the ascending aorta of (I) 20 patients with a healthy aortic valve and 20 patients with aor...... replacement corrects some of these changes. Transverse oscillation may be useful for assessment of aortic stenosis and optimization of valve surgery. (E-mail: lindskov@gmail.com) 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology...... with aortic stenosis before (IIa) and after (IIb) valve replacement. The results indicate that aortic stenosis increased flow complexity (p , 0.0001), induced systolic backflow (p , 0.003) and reduced systolic jet width (p , 0.0001). After valve replacement, the systolic backflow and jet width were normalized...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  10. Comparing portable computers with bedside computers when administering medications using bedside medication verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Beymer, Patti; Williams, Phillip; Stimac, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This research examined bedside medication verification administration in 2 adult critical care units, using portable computers and permanent bedside computers. There were no differences in the number of near-miss errors, the time to administer the medications, or nurse perception of ease of medication administration, care of patients, or reliability of technology. The percentage of medications scanned was significantly higher with the use of permanent bedside computers, and nurses using permanent bedside computers were more likely to agree that the computer was always available.

  11. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of normal kidney in a rabbit model: correlation with CT and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Kin, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Hun [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and safety of using a cooled-tip electrode to perform percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of kidney tissue in rabbits, and to evaluate the ability of CT to reveal the appearance and extent of tissue necrosis during follow-up after ablation. Using ultrasound guidance, a 17-G cooled-tip electrode was inserted into the right lower portion of the kidney in 26 New Zealand White rabbits. Radiofrequency was applied for 2 mins, and biphasic helical CT scanning was used to assess tissue destruction and the presence or absence of complications immediately after the procedure and at 24 hrs, 2 and 3 days, and 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 weeks. The study had three phases: acute (immediately killed : N=10); subacute (killed at 24 hrs (n=3), 2 days (n=3), 3 days (n=1) : N=7); chronic (killed at 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=2), 4 weeks (n=1), 7 weeks (n=1): N=8). After the animals were killed, their kidneys were histopathologically examined and the radiologic and pathologic findings of lesion size and configuration were correlated. In each instance, ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablations of the lower pole of the kidney were technically successful. Contrast-enhanced biphasic helical CT revealed regions of hypoattenuation devoid of parenchymal enhancement, and these correlated closely with true pathologic lesion size (r=0.884; p>0.05). In subacute and chronic models, CT scanning revealed gradual spontaneous resorption of the ablated lesion and the presence of perilesional calcification. Histopathologically, in the acute phase the ablated lesion showed coagulative necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells, and in the chronic phase there was clear cut necrosis of glomeruli, tubules and renal interstitium, with diminishing inflammatory response and peripheral fibrotic tissue formation. Ultrasound-guided renal radiofrequency ablation is technically feasible and safe. In addition, the avascular lesion measured at contrast-enhanced helical CT closely correlated with

  12. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of normal kidney in a rabbit model: correlation with CT and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Kin, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2002-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and safety of using a cooled-tip electrode to perform percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of kidney tissue in rabbits, and to evaluate the ability of CT to reveal the appearance and extent of tissue necrosis during follow-up after ablation. Using ultrasound guidance, a 17-G cooled-tip electrode was inserted into the right lower portion of the kidney in 26 New Zealand White rabbits. Radiofrequency was applied for 2 mins, and biphasic helical CT scanning was used to assess tissue destruction and the presence or absence of complications immediately after the procedure and at 24 hrs, 2 and 3 days, and 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 weeks. The study had three phases: acute (immediately killed : N=10); subacute (killed at 24 hrs (n=3), 2 days (n=3), 3 days (n=1) : N=7); chronic (killed at 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=2), 4 weeks (n=1), 7 weeks (n=1): N=8). After the animals were killed, their kidneys were histopathologically examined and the radiologic and pathologic findings of lesion size and configuration were correlated. In each instance, ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablations of the lower pole of the kidney were technically successful. Contrast-enhanced biphasic helical CT revealed regions of hypoattenuation devoid of parenchymal enhancement, and these correlated closely with true pathologic lesion size (r=0.884; p>0.05). In subacute and chronic models, CT scanning revealed gradual spontaneous resorption of the ablated lesion and the presence of perilesional calcification. Histopathologically, in the acute phase the ablated lesion showed coagulative necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells, and in the chronic phase there was clear cut necrosis of glomeruli, tubules and renal interstitium, with diminishing inflammatory response and peripheral fibrotic tissue formation. Ultrasound-guided renal radiofrequency ablation is technically feasible and safe. In addition, the avascular lesion measured at contrast-enhanced helical CT closely correlated with

  13. Medical students' perceptions of bedside teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David; Cozar, Octavian; Lefroy, Janet

    2017-06-01

    Bedside teaching is recognised as a valuable tool in medical education by both students and faculty members. Bedside teaching is frequently delivered by consultants; however, junior doctors are increasingly engaging in this form of clinical teaching, and their value in this respect is becoming more widely recognised. The aim of this study was to supplement work completed by previous authors who have begun to explore students' satisfaction with bedside teaching, and their perceptions of the relationship with the clinical teachers. Specifically, we aimed to identify how students perceive bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants. We aimed to identify how students perceived bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all third-year medical students at Keele University via e-mail. Responses were submitted anonymously. Forty-six students responded (37.4%), 73.3 per cent of whom said that they felt more comfortable having bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors than by consultants. Consultants were perceived as more challenging by 60 per cent of respondents. Students appeared to value feedback on their performance, trust the validity of taught information, and to value the overall educational experience equally, regardless of the clinical grade of the teacher. Student preference does not equate to the value that they place on their bedside teaching. Junior doctors are perceived as being more in touch with students and the curriculum, whereas consultants are perceived as having higher expectations and as being both stricter and more knowledgeable. The clinical teacher's approachable manner and enthusiasm for teaching are more important than clinical grade, as is the ability to deliver well-structured constructive feedback. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: hypotension after a MVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. A 25 year old woman was a restrained driver in a rollover motor vehicle accident (MVA and suffered a C5-C6 fracture-dislocation with spinal cord injury. She was lucid and able to follow commands and could move her upper extremities but not her lower extremities. She was given approximately 6 liters of fluid but required vasopressors to maintain her blood pressure. Initial ECG revealed a normal sinus rhythm without significant ST changes (Figure 1. Upon initial evaluation her blood pressure was low. Bedside ultrasound of the left anterior second intercostal space revealed a sliding lung sign and a 4 chamber view of her heart was performed (Figure 2. Which of the following is the most likely cause of her hypotension? 1. Blunt cardiac injury; 2. Intravascular volume depletion; 3. Neurogenic stunned myocardium; 4. Pericardial tamponade; 5. Pneumothorax ...

  15. Bedside ultrasonography (US), Echoscopy and US point of care as a new kind of stethoscope for Internal Medicine Departments: the training program of the Italian Internal Medicine Society (SIMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arienti, Vincenzo; Di Giulio, Rosella; Cogliati, Chiara; Accogli, Esterita; Aluigi, Leonardo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, thanks to the development of miniaturized ultrasound devices, comparable to personal computers, tablets and even to smart phones, we have seen an increasing use of bedside ultrasound in internal medicine departments as a novel kind of ultrasound stethoscope. The clinical ultrasound-assisted approach has proved to be particularly useful in assessing patients with nodules of the neck, dyspnoea, abdominal pain, and with limb edema. In several cases, it has allowed a simple, rapid and precise diagnosis. Since 2005, the Italian Society of Internal Medicine and its Ultrasound Study Group has been holding a Summer School and training courses in ultrasound for residents in internal medicine. A national network of schools in bedside ultrasound was then organized for internal medicine specialists who want to learn this technique. Because bedside ultrasound is a user-dependent diagnostic method, it is important to define the limits and advantages of different new ultrasound devices, to classify them (i.e. Echoscopy and Point of Care Ultrasound), to establish appropriate different levels of competence and to ensure their specific training. In this review, we describe the point of view of the Italian Internal Medicine Society on these topics.

  16. Bedside upper gastrointestinal series in critically ill low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Gopi K; Levin, Terry L; Kurian, Jessica; Kohli, Anirudh; Borenstein, Steven H; Goldman, Harold S

    2014-10-01

    The upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series is the preferred method for the diagnosis of malrotation. A bedside UGI technique was developed at our institution for use in low birth weight, critically ill neonates to minimize the risks of transportation from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) such as hypothermia and dislodgement of support lines and tubes. To determine the ability of a bedside UGI technique to identify the position of the duodenojejunal junction (DJJ) in low birth weight, critically ill infants in the NICU. We retrospectively reviewed bedside UGI examinations performed in premature infants weighing less than 1,500 g from 2008 to 2013 and correlated the findings with clinical data, imaging studies and surgical findings. Of 27 patients identified (weight range: 633-1,495 g), 21 (78%) bedside UGI series were diagnostic. Twenty of 27 cases (74%) demonstrated normal intestinal rotation. One case demonstrated malrotation with midgut volvulus, which was confirmed at surgery. In six cases (22%), the position of the DJJ could not be accurately determined. No cases of malrotation with midgut volvulus were missed. None of the patients with normal bedside UGI studies was found to have malrotation based on clinical follow-up (mean: 20 months), surgical findings or further imaging. The bedside UGI is a useful technique to exclude malrotation in critically ill neonates and minimizes potential risks of transportation to the radiology suite. Pitfalls that may preclude a diagnostic examination include incorrect timing of radiographs, patient rotation, suboptimal enteric tube position and bowel distention. In cases of diagnostic uncertainty, a follow-up study should be performed.

  17. Observing bedside rounds for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookherjee, Somnath; Cabrera, Daniel; McKinney, Christy M; Kaplan, Elizabeth; Robins, Lynne

    2017-12-01

    Bedside rounds are an ideal opportunity for clinical teaching. We previously offered faculty development on balancing learner autonomy, patient care and teaching. We noticed that participants often asked whether attending physicians and learners shared the same perceptions of the key elements (patient-centredness, efficiency and educational value) of bedside rounds. Understanding these perceptions and identifying areas of discordance would inform faculty development for optimal bedside rounds. At a university hospital we observed 16 attending physicians and 47 learners over 112 patient encounters. We noted the length of rounds and the number of interruptions. Participants were surveyed on their perception of the attending physicians' efficacy in preparing the team for rounds, and the efficiency and educational value of the rounds. Bedside rounds are an ideal opportunity for clinical teaching FINDINGS: After the same rounds, compared with the attending physicians, learners perceived the patient-centredness, efficiency and educational value of the rounds to be significantly higher. Learners rated attending physicians higher than attending physicians did themselves on learner autonomy, appropriate supervision, conferring responsibility for the care plan to learners and not interrupting. There was no correlation between interruptions and length of the rounds, or learner or attending physician perception of key elements of the rounds. Learners tended to attribute greater efficacy to attending physicians for team preparation than attending physicians did themselves. We identified salient beliefs and practices on bedside teaching. Our findings suggest that identifying shared goals and expectations, and creating metrics to define successful rounds, may help attending physicians to better synergize with learners. Interruptions need not be eschewed completely for the purpose of achieving efficient rounds. Integrating these measures into faculty development may bolster the

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  19. Avoidance of voiding cystourethrography in infants younger than 3 months with Escherichia coli urinary tract infection and normal renal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, Jean-Yves; Chehade, Hassib; Kies, Chafika Zohra; Girardin, Eric; Cachat, Francois; Gehri, Mario

    2017-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) represents the most common bacterial infection in infants, and its prevalence increases with the presence of high-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). However, voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) is invasive, and its indication in infants urinary E. coli infection. Adding a normal renal US finding decreased this probability to 1%. However, in the presence of non- E. coli bacteria, the probability of high-grade VUR was 26%, and adding an abnormal US finding increased further this probability to 55%. In infants aged 0-3 months with a first febrile UTI, the presence of E. coli and normal renal US findings allow to safely avoid VCUG. Performing VCUG only in infants with UTI secondary to non- E. coli bacteria and/or abnormal US would save many unnecessary invasive procedures, limit radiation exposure, with a very low risk (<1%) of missing a high-grade VUR. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. USEFUL: Ultrasound Exam for Underlying Lesions Incorporated into Physical Exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Steller

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Ultrasound Screening Exam for Underlying Lesions (USEFUL was developed in an attempt to establish a role for bedside ultrasound in the primary and preventive care setting. It is the purpose of our pilot study to determine if students were first capable of performing all of the various scans required of our USEFUL while defining such an ultrasound-assisted physical exam that would supplement the standard hands-on physical exam in the same head-to-toe structure. We also aimed to assess the time needed for an adequate exam and analyze if times improved with repetition and previous ultrasound training. Methods: Medical students with ranging levels of ultrasound training received a 25-minute presentation on our USEFUL followed by a 30-minute hands-on session. Following the hands-on session, the students were asked to perform a timed USEFUL on 2-3 standardized subjects. All images were documented as normal or abnormal with the understanding that an official detailed exam would be performed if an abnormality were to be found. All images were read and deemed adequate by board eligible emergency medicine ultrasound fellows. Results: Twenty-six exams were performed by 9 students. The average time spent by all students per USEFUL was 11 minutes and 19 seconds. Students who had received the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine’s integrated ultrasound curriculum performed the USEFUL significantly faster (p< 0.0025. The time it took to complete the USEFUL ranged from 6 minutes and 32 seconds to 17 minutes, and improvement was seen with each USEFUL performed. The average time to complete the USEFUL on the first standardized patient was 13 minutes and 20 seconds, while 11 minutes and 2 seconds, and 9 minutes and 20 seconds were spent performing the exam on the second and third patient, respectively. Conclusion: Students were able to effectively complete all scans required by the USEFUL in a timely manner. Students who have

  1. 77 FR 73345 - Safety Standard for Bedside Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ...-- Reclined Cradles to assess and market various design elements and structures in bedside sleeper products.... Fatalities All four reported fatalities involved the same brand of recalled bedside sleeper/bassinet. In all... components of a particular brand of bedside sleeper. In two of these three fatalities involving a 4-month-old...

  2. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of ... What are the limitations of Obstetrical Ultrasound Imaging? Obstetric ultrasound cannot identify all fetal abnormalities. Consequently, when ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland ...

  7. Evaluation of Snake Bites with Bedside Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef E Jolissaint

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: While watering his lawn, a 36-year-old man felt two sharp bites to his bilateral ankles. He reports that he then saw a light brown, 2-foot snake slither away from him. He came to the emergency department because of pain and swelling in his ankles and inability to bear weight. Physical examination revealed bilateral ankle swelling and puncture marks on his left lateral heel and medial right ankle. Palpation, passive flexion and extension elicited severe pain bilaterally. Blood work including prothrombin time (PT, partial thromboplastin time (PTT, international normalized ratio (INR, and fibrinogen were within normal limits. Consultation with Poison Control indicated the snake was likely a copperhead, which is a venomous snake whose bites rarely require antivenin. Significant findings: In this case, ultrasonography of the lateral surface of the left foot revealed soft tissue edema (red arrow and fluid collection (white asterisk adjacent to the extensor tendon (white arrow. The edematous area resembles cobblestones, with hypoechoic areas of fluid spanning relatively hyperechoic fat lobules. The tendon is surrounded by anechoic fluid, expanding the potential space in the sheath. No hyperechoic foreign objects were noted. Discussion: The patient was diagnosed with soft tissue injury and extensor tenosynovitis after a snake envenomation. Snake venom contains metalloproteinases and other enzymatic proteins that cause local tissue edema and necrosis.1 After a snake bite, ultrasound can be used to assess for retained fangs, soft tissue edema, tendon sheath fluid, muscle fasciculation, and injury to deeper musculature that may not be readily apparent on physical exam.2,3 Most patients with tenosynovitis will recover with immobilization of the joint and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications.4 Rarely, the tendon may become infected requiring antibiotics and surgical intervention.4 Topics: Ultrasound, snake envenomation

  8. Has Bedside Teaching Had Its Day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Zeshan; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Though a diverse array of teaching methods is now available, bedside teaching is arguably the most favoured. Students like it because it is patient-centred, and it includes a high proportion of relevant skills. It is on the decline, coinciding with declining clinical skills of junior doctors. Several factors might account for this: busier…

  9. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Principles of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an autologous Stem Cell Transplant · Slide 8 · Conditioning · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Stem Cell Transplantation · Slide 13.

  10. Bedside pleural procedures by pulmonologists and non-pulmonologists: a 3-year safety audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Kay Choong; Ong, Venetia; Teoh, Chia Meng; Ooi, Oon Cheong; Widjaja, Louis Sutrisno; Mujumdar, Sandhya; Phua, Jason; Khoo, Kay Leong; Lee, Pyng; Lim, Tow Keang

    2014-04-01

    Pleural procedures such as tube thoracostomy and chest aspirations are commonly performed and carry potential risks of visceral organ injury, pneumothorax and bleeding. In this context limited information exists on the complication rates when non-pulmonologists perform ultrasound-guided bedside pleural procedures. Bedside pleural procedures in our university hospital were audited to compare complication rates between pulmonologists and non-pulmonologists. A combined safety approach using standardized training, pleural safety checklists and ultrasound-guidance was initially implemented in a ∼1000-bed academic medical centre. A prospective audit, over approximately 3.5 years, of all bedside pleural procedures excluding procedures done in operating theatres and radiological suites was then performed. Overall, 529 procedures (295 by pulmonologists; 234 by non-pulmonologists) for 443 patients were assessed. There were 16 (3.0%) procedure-related complications, all in separate patients. These included five iatrogenic pneumothoraces, four dry taps, four malpositioned chest tubes, two significant chest wall bleeds and one iatrogenic hemothorax. There were no differences in complication rates between pulmonologists and non-pulmonologists. Presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) independently increased the risk of complications by nearly sevenfold. Results from this study support pleural procedural practice by both pulmonologists and non-pulmonologists in an academic medical centre setting. This is possible with a standard training program, pleural safety checklists and relatively high utilization rates of ultrasound guidance for pleural effusions. Nonetheless, additional vigilance is needed when patients with COPD undergo pleural procedures. © 2014 The Authors. Respirology © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Ultrasound for the diagnosis of infectious diseases: Approach to the patient at point of care and at secondary level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar; Garcia-Casasola, Gonzalo; Guillén-Astete, Carlos; Losa, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Bedside ultrasound evaluation for infection can be performed promptly at the bedside, using simple equipment and without irradiation. Visualization of the foci often enables prompt antimicrobial therapy and even early ultrasound-guided procedure, facilitating earlier confirmation. These procedures are made safer using the real-time visual control that ultrasound provides. Future challenges for an infectious diseases specialist include gaining experience about the appropriate use of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS). Ultrasonography training is required to ensure competent use of this technology. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prehospital Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries fallopian tubes bladder Pelvic ultrasound exams ... to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins ... development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is ... in front of the rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ... pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  3. Bedside Echocardiography for Rapid Diagnosis of Malignant Cardiac Tamponade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaina Brinley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 47-year-old female with metastatic breast cancer presented to the Emergency Department with chest pain and shortness of breath. She was hypotensive and her EKG showed sinus tachycardia with low voltage. A bedside ultrasound was performed that detected a pericardial effusion and evidence of cardiac tamponade. The patient’s vitals improved with a fluid bolus and she went emergently to the cardiac catheterization lab for fluoroscopy and echocardiography guided pericardiocentesis. A total of 770 mL of fluid was removed from her pericardial space. Significant findings: The video shows a subxiphoid view of the heart with evidence of a large pericardial effusion with tamponade – note the anechoic stripe in the pericardial sac (see red arrow. This video demonstrates paradoxical right ventricular collapse during diastole and right atrial collapse during systole which is indicative of tamponade.1,2 Figure 1 is from the same patient and shows sonographic pulsus paradoxus. This is an apical 4 chamber view of the heart with the sampling gate of the pulsed wave doppler placed over the mitral valve. The Vpeak max and Vpeak min are indicated. If there is more than a 25% difference with inspiration between these 2 values, this is highly suggestive of tamponade.1 In this case, there is a 32.4% difference between the Vpeak max 69.55 cm/s and Vpeak min 46.99 cm/s. Discussion: Cardiac tamponade is distinguished from pericardial effusion by right ventricular compression/collapse and hemodynamic instability. Findings can include hypotension, tachycardia, distant heart sounds, and jugular venous distension.3,4 One might also see a plethoric IVC without respiratory variation indicative of elevated right atrial pressures.1 Detection of right ventricular collapse for cardiac tamponade has sensitivities ranging from 48%-100% and specificities ranging from 33%-100%.5 A larger effusion is more likely to lead to cardiac tamponade. However

  4. Ultrasound-guided pleural access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaee, Samira; Argento, A Christine

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasonography of the thorax has become a more recognized tool in pulmonary medicine, thanks to continuing clinical research that has proven its many valuable roles in the day-to-day management of pulmonary and pleural diseases. Ultrasound examination is a cost-effective imaging modality that permits the pulmonologist to obtain information about the pathologies in the thorax without the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation, providing the examiner with real-time and immediate results. Its ease of use and training along with its portability to the patient's bedside and accurate examination of the pleural space has allowed for safer pleural procedures such as thoracentesis, chest tube placement, tunneled pleural catheter placement, and medical thoracoscopy. In this review, we summarize the technique of chest ultrasonography, compare ultrasound to other frequently used thoracic imaging modalities, and focus on its use in obtaining pleural access while performing invasive pleural procedures. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women, a pelvic ultrasound exam can help identify: kidney stones bladder tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  8. Health technology assessment and screening in The Netherlands: case studies of mammography in breast cancer, PSA screening in prostate cancer, and ultrasound in normal pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banta, H.D.; Oortwijn, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the assessment and implementation of three screening methods: mammography for breast cancer, screening for prostate cancer, and routine use of ultrasound in pregnancy. METHODS: To review policy documents and published papers dealing with prevention and screening in the

  9. Comparison of bedside inoculation of culture media with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The yield of bacterial cultures from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) is very low. Bedside inoculation of culture media with CSF may improve yields. Objective: To compare the culture yield of CSF inoculated onto culture medium at the bedside to that of CSF inoculated onto culture ...

  10. Bedside teaching in medical education: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Ten Cate, Olle

    2014-04-01

    Bedside teaching is seen as one of the most important modalities in teaching a variety of skills important for the medical profession, but its use is declining. A literature review was conducted to reveal its strengths, the causes of its decline and future perspectives, the evidence with regard to learning clinical skills and patient/student/teacher satisfaction. PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library were systematically searched with regard to terms related to bedside teaching. Articles regarding the above-mentioned subjects were included. Bedside teaching has shown to improve certain clinical diagnostic skills in medical students and residents. Patients, students/residents and teachers all seem to favour bedside teaching, for varying reasons. Despite this, the practice of bedside teaching is declining. Reasons to explain this decline include the increased patient turnover in hospitals, the assumed violation of patients' privacy and an increased reliance on technology in the diagnostic process. Solutions vary from increasingly using residents and interns as bedside teachers to actively educating staff members regarding the importance of bedside teaching and providing them with practical essentials. Impediments to bedside teaching need to be overcome if this teaching modality is to remain a valuable educational method for durable clinical skills.

  11. Bedside prediction of right subclavian venous catheter insertion length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Ji Choi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The present study aimed to evaluate whether right subclavian vein (SCV catheter insertion depth can be predicted reliably by the distances from the SCV insertion site to the ipsilateral clavicular notch directly (denoted as I-IC, via the top of the SCV arch, or via the clavicle (denoted as I-T-IC and I-C-IC, respectively. Method: In total, 70 SCV catheterizations were studied. The I-IC, I-T-IC, and I-C-IC distances in each case were measured after ultrasound-guided SCV catheter insertion. The actual length of the catheter between the insertion site and the ipsilateral clavicular notch, denoted as L, was calculated by using chest X-ray. Results: L differed from the I-T-IC, I-C-IC, and I-IC distances by 0.14±0.53, 2.19±1.17, and -0.45 ±0.68 cm, respectively. The mean I-T-IC distance was the most similar to the mean L (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.89. The mean I-IC was significantly shorter than L, while the mean I-C-IC was significantly longer. Linear regression analysis provided the following formula: Predicted SCV catheter insertion length (cm = -0.037 + 0.036 × Height (cm + 0.903 × I-T-IC (cm (adjusted r2 =0.64. Conclusion: The I-T-IC distance may be a reliable bedside predictor of the optimal insertion length for a right SCV cannulation.

  12. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Orebaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "brachial plexus", "median nerve", "ulnar nerve", "radial nerve", "axillary nerve", and "musculocutanous nerve". Each of these was then paired with the MESH terms "anatomy", "nerve block", "anomaly", "variation", and "ultrasound". Resulting articles were hand searched for additional relevant literature. A total of 68 searches were conducted, with a total of 377 possible articles for inclusion. Of these, 57 were found to provide substantive information for this review. The normal anatomy of the brachial plexus is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on those features revealed by use of imaging technologies. Anomalies of the anatomy that might affect the conduct of the various brachial plexus blocks are noted. Brachial plexus blockade has been effectively utilized as a component of anesthesia for upper extremity surgery for a century. Over that period, our understanding of anatomy and its variations has improved significantly. The ability to explore anatomy at the bedside, with real-time ultrasonography, has improved our appreciation of brachial plexus anatomy as well.

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries fallopian tubes bladder Pelvic ultrasound exams are also used to ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the ... vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as detailed as with the transrectal probe. An MRI of the pelvis may be obtained as an ... Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your knees toward your chest. To obtain high-quality images, an ultrasound transducer – a plastic cylinder about ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries ... page How is the procedure performed? Transabdominal: For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... right in front of the rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ... ultrasound to clean out the bowel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries ... with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with infertility. In ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound ... patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer ... in the sperm or urine following the procedure. After an ultrasound examination, you should be able to ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... obtain high-quality images, an ultrasound transducer – a plastic cylinder about the size of a finger – is ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed ... ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: ... fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ... pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormal growth within the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of ... show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... help to distract the child and make the time pass quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most ... child's favorite channel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Transvaginal ultrasound is performed very much like a gynecologic exam and involves the insertion of the transducer ... with your feet in stirrups similar to a gynecologic exam. Transrectal: For a transrectal ultrasound, a protective ...

  6. Emergency Physician Performed Ultrasound for DVT Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Christian Fox

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis is a common condition that is often difficult to diagnose and may be lethal when allowed to progress. However, early implementation of treatment substantially improves the disease prognosis. Therefore, care must be taken to both acquire an accurate differential diagnosis for patients with symptoms as well as to screen at-risk asymptomatic individuals. Many diagnostic tools exist to evaluate deep vein thrombosis. Compression ultrasonography is currently the most effective diagnostic tool in the emergency department, shown to be highly accurate at minimal expense. However, limited availability of ultrasound technicians may result in delayed imaging or in a decision not to image low-risk cases. Many studies support emergency physiciansas capable of accurately diagnosing deep vein thrombosis using bedside ultrasound. Further integration of ultrasound into the training of emergency physicians for use in evaluating deep vein thrombosis will improve patient care and cost-effective treatment.

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning may be able to give a ...

  10. Recognizing Bedside Events Using Thermal and Ultrasonic Readings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielsen Asbjørn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Falls in homes of the elderly, in residential care facilities and in hospitals commonly occur in close proximity to the bed. Most approaches for recognizing falls use cameras, which challenge privacy, or sensor devices attached to the bed or the body to recognize bedside events and bedside falls. We use data collected from a ceiling mounted 80 × 60 thermal array combined with an ultrasonic sensor device. This approach makes it possible to monitor activity while preserving privacy in a non-intrusive manner. We evaluate three different approaches towards recognizing location and posture of an individual. Bedside events are recognized using a 10-second floating image rule/filter-based approach, recognizing bedside falls with 98.62% accuracy. Bed-entry and exit events are recognized with 98.66% and 96.73% accuracy, respectively.

  11. Improving nurse–physician teamwork through interprofessional bedside rounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Stanislav; Chon, Tony Y; Christopherson, Marie L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Worden, Lindsey M; Ratelle, John T

    2016-01-01

    Background Teamwork between physicians and nurses has a positive association with patient satisfaction and outcomes, but perceptions of physician–nurse teamwork are often suboptimal. Objective To improve nurse–physician teamwork in a general medicine inpatient teaching unit by increasing face-to-face communication through interprofessional bedside rounds. Intervention From July 2013 through October 2013, physicians (attendings and residents) and nurses from four general medicine teams in a single nursing unit participated in bedside rounding, which involved the inclusion of nurses in morning rounds with the medicine teams at the patients’ bedside. Based on stakeholder analysis and feedback, a checklist for key patient care issues was created and utilized during bedside rounds. Assessment To assess the effect of bedside rounding on nurse–physician teamwork, a survey of selected items from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to participants before and after the implementation of bedside rounds. The number of pages to the general medicine teams was also measured as a marker of physician–nurse communication. Results Participation rate in bedside rounds across the four medicine teams was 58%. SAQ response rates for attendings, residents, and nurses were 36/36 (100%), 73/73 (100%), and 32/73 (44%) prior to implementation of bedside rounding and 36 attendings (100%), 72 residents (100%), and 14 (19%) nurses after the implementation of bedside rounding, respectively. Prior to bedside rounding, nurses provided lower teamwork ratings (percent agree) than residents and attendings on all SAQ items; but after the intervention, the difference remained significant only on SAQ item 2 (“In this clinical area, it is not difficult to speak up if I perceive a problem with patient care”, 64% for nurses vs 79% for residents vs 94% for attendings, P=0.02). Also, resident responses improved on SAQ item 1 (“Nurse input is well received in this area

  12. Improving nurse-physician teamwork through interprofessional bedside rounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Stanislav; Chon, Tony Y; Christopherson, Marie L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Worden, Lindsey M; Ratelle, John T

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork between physicians and nurses has a positive association with patient satisfaction and outcomes, but perceptions of physician-nurse teamwork are often suboptimal. To improve nurse-physician teamwork in a general medicine inpatient teaching unit by increasing face-to-face communication through interprofessional bedside rounds. From July 2013 through October 2013, physicians (attendings and residents) and nurses from four general medicine teams in a single nursing unit participated in bedside rounding, which involved the inclusion of nurses in morning rounds with the medicine teams at the patients' bedside. Based on stakeholder analysis and feedback, a checklist for key patient care issues was created and utilized during bedside rounds. To assess the effect of bedside rounding on nurse-physician teamwork, a survey of selected items from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to participants before and after the implementation of bedside rounds. The number of pages to the general medicine teams was also measured as a marker of physician-nurse communication. Participation rate in bedside rounds across the four medicine teams was 58%. SAQ response rates for attendings, residents, and nurses were 36/36 (100%), 73/73 (100%), and 32/73 (44%) prior to implementation of bedside rounding and 36 attendings (100%), 72 residents (100%), and 14 (19%) nurses after the implementation of bedside rounding, respectively. Prior to bedside rounding, nurses provided lower teamwork ratings (percent agree) than residents and attendings on all SAQ items; but after the intervention, the difference remained significant only on SAQ item 2 ("In this clinical area, it is not difficult to speak up if I perceive a problem with patient care", 64% for nurses vs 79% for residents vs 94% for attendings, P=0.02). Also, resident responses improved on SAQ item 1 ("Nurse input is well received in this area", 62% vs 82%, P=0.01). Increasing face-to-face communication through

  13. Improving nurse-physician teamwork through interprofessional bedside rounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henkin S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stanislav Henkin,1 Tony Y Chon,2 Marie L Christopherson,3 Andrew J Halvorsen,1,4 Lindsey M Worden,3 John T Ratelle51Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 2Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 3Department of Nursing, Mayo Clinic, 4Department of Medicine, Internal Medicine Residency Office of Educational Innovations, Mayo Clinic, 5Division of Hospital Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Background: Teamwork between physicians and nurses has a positive association with patient satisfaction and outcomes, but perceptions of physician–nurse teamwork are often suboptimal.Objective: To improve nurse–physician teamwork in a general medicine inpatient teaching unit by increasing face-to-face communication through interprofessional bedside rounds.Intervention: From July 2013 through October 2013, physicians (attendings and residents and nurses from four general medicine teams in a single nursing unit participated in bedside rounding, which involved the inclusion of nurses in morning rounds with the medicine teams at the patients’ bedside. Based on stakeholder analysis and feedback, a checklist for key patient care issues was created and utilized during bedside rounds.Assessment: To assess the effect of bedside rounding on nurse–physician teamwork, a survey of selected items from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ was administered to participants before and after the implementation of bedside rounds. The number of pages to the general medicine teams was also measured as a marker of physician–nurse communication.Results: Participation rate in bedside rounds across the four medicine teams was 58%. SAQ response rates for attendings, residents, and nurses were 36/36 (100%, 73/73 (100%, and 32/73 (44% prior to implementation of bedside rounding and 36 attendings (100%, 72 residents (100%, and 14 (19% nurses after the implementation of bedside rounding, respectively. Prior to bedside rounding, nurses provided lower

  14. Blind bedside insertion of small bowel feeding tubes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2009-12-01

    The use of Naso-Jejunal (NJ) feeding is limited by difficulty in feeding tube placement. Patients have traditionally required transfer to Endoscopy or Radiology for insertion of small bowel feeding tubes, with clear resource implications. We hypothesised that the adoption of a simple bedside procedure would be effective and reduce cost. Clinical nutrition and nurse specialist personnel were trained in the 10\\/10\\/10 method of blind bedside NJ insertion.

  15. Use of Bedside Compression Ultrasonography for Diagnosis of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Moussa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 70-year-old female with a history of breast cancer and smoking for 50 years presented to the emergency department with left-lower extremity pain and swelling for two days. The patient denied recent long-distance travel, history of hypercoagulable disorder, or recent surgery. Physical examination revealed a warm, erythematous, 3+ edematous left-lower extremity with mild tenderness extending into the proximal thigh. Her D-dimer level was 2307ng/mL and vital signs were significant for a heart rate of 110bpm, oxygen saturation of 90% on 2 liters of oxygen, and blood pressure of 153/102. Significant findings: As shown in the still image of the performed ultrasound, a transverse view of the proximal-thigh revealed a visible thrombus (green shading occluding the lumen of the left common femoral vein (blue ring, which was non-compressible when direct pressure was applied to the probe. Also visible is a patent and compressible branch of the common femoral vein (purple ring and the femoral artery (red ring, highlighted by its thick vessel wall and pulsatile motion. Discussion: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT affects 1 per 1,000 individuals each year and may lead to complications such as recurrent DVT, pulmonary embolism, and death.1 The utilization of bedside compression ultrasonography allows for rapid diagnosis of DVT and has virtually replaced other diagnostic methods due to its non-invasive and inexpensive nature. When performing compression ultrasonography, the patient should be positioned to maximize distention of the leg veins. The extremity in question should be flexed at the knee and externally rotated at the hip (this fully exposes of the common, superficial, and deep femoral veins as well as the popliteal fossa and the head of the bed elevated at a 30-45 degree angle.2 In patients with an elevated D-dimer and low-to-moderate clinical probability, negative compression imaging of a single proximal location of the femoral

  16. Patients' attitude towards bedside teaching in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Arwa; El Mhamdi, Sana; Bouanene, Ines; Sriha, Asma; Soltani, Mohamed

    2015-12-25

    To assess patient' reaction towards bedside teaching at the University Hospital of Monastir (Tunisia) and to identify the factors that may influence it. A cross-sectional study was conducted during December 2012 at the University Hospital of Monastir. Each department, except the psychiatric department and the intensive care units, was visited in one day. All inpatients present on the day of the study were interviewed by four trained female nurses using a structured questionnaire. Of the 401 patients approached, 356 (88.8%) agreed to participate. In general, the results demonstrate that patients were positive toward medical students' participation. The highest acceptance rates were found in situations where there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g. when reading their medical file, attending ward rounds and observing doctor examining them). As the degree of students' involvement increased, the refusal rate increased. Gender, age, educational level, marital status and the extent of students' involvement in patient's care were identified as the main factors affecting patients' attitude. Taking advantage of this attitude, valorizing patient role as educator and using further learning methods in situations where patient's consent for student involvement was not obtained should be considered to guarantee optimal care and safety to patients and good medical education to future physicians.

  17. Patients’ attitude towards bedside teaching in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mhamdi, Sana; Bouanene, Ines; Sriha, Asma; Soltani, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess patient' reaction towards bedside teaching at the University Hospital of Monastir (Tunisia) and to identify the factors that may influence it. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted during December 2012 at the University Hospital of Monastir. Each department, except the psychiatric department and the intensive care units, was visited in one day. All inpatients present on the day of the study were interviewed by four trained female nurses using a structured questionnaire. Results Of the 401 patients approached, 356 (88.8%) agreed to participate. In general, the results demonstrate that patients were positive toward medical students’ participation. The highest acceptance rates were found in situations where there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g. when reading their medical file, attending ward rounds and observing doctor examining them). As the degree of students’ involvement increased, the refusal rate increased. Gender, age, educational level, marital status and the extent of students’ involvement in patient’s care were identified as the main factors affecting patients’ attitude. Conclusion: Taking advantage of this attitude, valorizing patient role as educator and using further learning methods in situations where patient’s consent for student involvement was not obtained should be considered to guarantee optimal care and safety to patients and good medical education to future physicians. PMID:26706313

  18. Body Composition Tools for Assessment of Adult Malnutrition at the Bedside: A Tutorial on Research Considerations and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earthman, Carrie P

    2015-09-01

    Because of the key role played by the body's lean tissue reserves (of which skeletal muscle is a major component) in the response to injury and illness, its maintenance is of central importance to nutrition status. With the recent development of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition diagnostic framework for malnutrition, the loss of muscle mass has been recognized as one of the defining criteria. Objective methods to evaluate muscle loss in individuals with acute and chronic illness are needed. Bioimpedance and ultrasound techniques are currently the best options for the clinical setting; however, additional research is needed to investigate how best to optimize measurements and minimize error and to establish if these techniques (and which specific approaches) can uniquely contribute to the assessment of malnutrition, beyond more subjective evaluation methods. In this tutorial, key concepts and statistical methods used in the validation of bedside methods to assess lean tissue compartments are discussed. Body composition assessment methods that are most widely available for practice and research in the clinical setting are presented, and clinical cases are used to illustrate how the clinician might use bioimpedance and/or ultrasound as a tool to assess nutrition status at the bedside. Future research needs regarding malnutrition assessment are identified. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  19. Comprehensive ultrasound assessment of complications post-liver transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, J

    2010-04-01

    Human liver transplantation for end-stage liver disease was first performed in 1963. Refinements in surgical technique and new immunosuppressive regimens have improved outcomes. Today, transplant patients have a 5-year survival rate of approximately 75%. Nevertheless, significant complications still occur. Ultrasonography (US), is the initial imaging modality of choice allowing bedside assessment for detection and follow-up of early and delayed graft complications, and facilitating interventional procedures. This review outlines the role of ultrasound in post-transplantation assessment.

  20. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture After Statin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesselroade, Ryan D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury. We report the case of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture sustained with minimal force while refereeing a football game. The injury was suspected to be associated with statin use as the patient had no other identifiable risk factors.The diagnosis was confirmed using bedside ultrasound. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(4:306-309.

  1. Bedside teaching-making it an effective instructional tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ishtiaq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Bedside teaching is defined as any teaching in the presence of patient and is the core teaching strategy during the clinical years of a medical student. Although it is considered the most effective method to teach clinical and communication skills but its quality is deteriorating with the passage of time. The objective of this study is to explore faculty's perceptions about bedside teaching. This study was conducted in clinical disciplines of Ayub Medical College and hospital Abbottabad, Pakistan from January 2012 to July 2012. Pragmatic paradigm was selected to gather both quantitative and qualitative information. Data was collected sequentially to validate findings. Perceptions of all professors of clinical subjects about bed side teaching were recorded on a close-ended structured questionnaire. Then in-depth interviews were taken from 5 professors using an open ended questionnaire. Quantitative data was analysed using, SPSS-16. Qualitative research data was analysed through content analysis. Out of 20 professors of clinical departments 18 agreed to respond to the questionnaire assessing their perceptions about bed side teaching. Non-existence of bedside teaching curriculum, lack of discipline in students and faculty, lack of accountability, poor job satisfaction and low salary were identified as major factors responsible for decline in quality of bedside teaching. Most of them advocated that curriculum development, planning bedside teaching, implementation of discipline and accountability, improved job satisfaction and performance based promotions will improve quality of clinical teaching. Curriculum development for bedside teaching, institutional discipline, application of best planning strategies, performance based appraisal of faculty and good job satisfaction can make bedside teaching an effective instructional tool.

  2. Percutaneous drainage with ultrasound guidance in the intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Doo Kyung; Won, Je Hwan; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Kim, Ji Hyung

    2004-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of bedside percutaneous drainage procedures with ultrasound guidance in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Sixty five percutaneous drainage procedures performed at the bedside, in 39 ICU patients, were evaluated. All of the procedures were performed with ultrasound guidance alone. The procedures consisted of percutaneous drainage of abdominal (n=35) and pleural (n=27) fluids, percutaneous cholecystostomy (n=2) and percutaneous nephrostomy (n=1). The clinical responses were classified as 'complete response', 'partial response', 'failure' or 'undetermined'. The medical records were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the clinical response. Technical success was achieved in 64 of the 65 procedures (98.5%). The complication rate was 13.8% (9 cases). There was no immediate procedure-related death or worsening of the clinical condition of the patients. The clinical responses after drainage were 'complete response' in 39 cases (60.9%). 'partial response' in 14 (21.9%), 'failure' in 3 (4.7%), and 'undetermined' in 8 (12.5%). Bedside drainage procedures with ultrasound guidance are effective and safe to perform when patients are too critically ill to be moved from the ICU to the angiography room

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  4. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (psports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  5. Teaching at the Bedside. Maximal Impact in Minimal Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, William G; Kritek, Patricia A; Clay, Alison S; Luks, Andrew M; Thomson, Carey C

    2016-04-01

    Academic physicians encounter many demands on their time including patient care, quality and performance requirements, research, and education. In an era when patient volume is prioritized and competition for research funding is intense, there is a risk that medical education will become marginalized. Bedside teaching, a responsibility of academic physicians regardless of professional track, is challenged in particular out of concern that it generates inefficiency, and distractions from direct patient care, and can distort physician-patient relationships. At the same time, the bedside is a powerful location for teaching as learners more easily engage with educational content when they can directly see its practical relevance for patient care. Also, bedside teaching enables patients and family members to engage directly in the educational process. Successful bedside teaching can be aided by consideration of four factors: climate, attention, reasoning, and evaluation. Creating a safe environment for learning and patient care is essential. We recommend that educators set expectations about use of medical jargon and engagement of the patient and family before they enter the patient room with trainees. Keep learners focused by asking relevant questions of all members of the team and by maintaining a collective leadership style. Assess and model clinical reasoning through a hypothesis-driven approach that explores the rationale for clinical decisions. Focused, specific, real-time feedback is essential for the learner to modify behaviors for future patient encounters. Together, these strategies may alleviate challenges associated with bedside teaching and ensure it remains a part of physician practice in academic medicine.

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and ...

  8. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P. [Russian Radiology Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kotlyarov, Peter M. [Russian Center of Roentgenradiology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V. [Yaroslavl Railway Clinic (Russian Federation); Alexandrov, Yury K. [State Medical Academy, Yaroslavl (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  9. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P.; Kotlyarov, Peter M.; Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V.; Alexandrov, Yury K.

    2010-01-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  10. Prenatal examination of the area and morphology of the atrioventricular valves using four-dimensional ultrasound in normal and abnormal hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, B.M.E.; Uittenbogaard, L.B.; Tromp, C.H.N.; Schaefer, S.S.; Heymans, M.W.; van Vugt, J.M.G.; Haak, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our aim is to evaluate the feasibility to examine the morphology and area of the atrioventricular (AV) valves in normal fetuses and fetuses with cardiac defects using spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC). Methods: Atrioventricular valves were analyzed longitudinally in STIC volumes of

  11. Prenatal examination of the area and morphology of the atrioventricular valves using four-dimensional ultrasound in normal and abnormal hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, B.M.; Uittenbogaard, L.B.; Tromp, C.H.; Schaefer, S.S.; Heymans, M.W.; Vugt, J.M.G. van; Haak, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim is to evaluate the feasibility to examine the morphology and area of the atrioventricular (AV) valves in normal fetuses and fetuses with cardiac defects using spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC). METHODS: Atrioventricular valves were analyzed longitudinally in STIC volumes of

  12. Diagnostic use of lung ultrasound compared to chest radiograph for suspected pneumonia in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatya, Yogendra; Rupp, Jordan; Russell, Frances M; Saunders, Jason; Bales, Brian; House, Darlene R

    2018-03-12

    Lung ultrasound is an effective tool for diagnosing pneumonia in developed countries. Diagnostic accuracy in resource-limited countries where pneumonia is the leading cause of death is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of bedside lung ultrasound compared to chest X-ray for pneumonia in adults presenting for emergency care in a low-income country. Patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected pneumonia were evaluated with bedside lung ultrasound, single posterioranterior chest radiograph, and computed tomography (CT). Using CT as the gold standard, the sensitivity of lung ultrasound was compared to chest X-ray for the diagnosis of pneumonia using McNemar's test for paired samples. Diagnostic characteristics for each test were calculated. Of 62 patients included in the study, 44 (71%) were diagnosed with pneumonia by CT. Lung ultrasound demonstrated a sensitivity of 91% compared to chest X-ray which had a sensitivity of 73% (p = 0.01). Specificity of lung ultrasound and chest X-ray were 61 and 50% respectively. Bedside lung ultrasound demonstrated better sensitivity than chest X-ray for the diagnosis of pneumonia in Nepal. ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number NCT02949141 . Registered 31 October 2016.

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? Men who have ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the ... is specialized and is best performed by a technologist and physician with experience in vascular ultrasound imaging. top of page Additional Information and Resources ...

  19. Acute complications associated with bedside placement of feeding tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, William N

    2006-02-01

    Several types of feeding tubes can be placed at a patient's bedside; examples include nasogastric, nasointestinal, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes. Nasoenteral tubes can be placed blindly at bedside or with the assistance of placement devices. Nasoenteric tubes can also be placed via fluoroscopy and endoscopy. Gastrostomy and jejunostomy tubes can be placed using endoscopic techniques. This paper will describe the indications and contraindications for different types of tubes that can be placed at the bedside and complications associated with tube placement. Complications associated with nasoenteral tubes include inadvertent malpositioning of the tube, epistaxis, sinusitis, inadvertent tube removal, tube clogging, tube-feeding-associated diarrhea, and aspiration pneumonia. Complications from percutaneous gastrostomy and jejunostomy tube placements include procedure-related mishaps, site infection, leakage, buried bumper syndrome, tube malfunction, and inadvertent removal. These complications will be reviewed, along with a discussion of incidence, cause, treatment, and prevention approaches.

  20. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, E.G.; Doherty, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound was used as early as 1950 in attempts to detect malignant tumors within the human breast and brain. In the years following, however, little attention was paid to this method of imaging by the radiologic community. Extensive work with this technique was not begun until the 1960s, when bistable ultrasound enabled sonographers to display organ outlines for the first time. Prior to the development of bistable ultrasound, sonographic images were limited to A-mode displays, which were merely a series of amplitude spikes on a graph. Over the past 20 or so years, major advances in ultrasound technology have gradually taken us from the simple graphic A-mode display, through bistable organ outlines, to gray-scale images with excellent parenchymal detail, and finally to real-time ultrasound

  1. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into the body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then gently presses the transducer against ... performed on an infant, a nurse or radiologic technologist may assist with keeping the ... procedure? Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most ...

  2. Trauma Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A 3-Dimensional Printed Ultrasound Probe Visuospatial Trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Ryan T; Dove, Jesse C; Ratzlaff, Robert A; Diaz-Gomez, Jose L; Cox, Daniel J; Simon, Leslie V

    2017-09-04

    Training adult learners to use ultrasound in clinical practice relies on the ability of the learner to apply visuospatial concepts to the anatomy of the human body. We describe a visuospatial trainer that replicates the housing of an ultrasound transducer, through which a linear laser projects light in the same plane and orientation as the ultrasonic sound waves. We use this trainer in combination with a porcine heart dissection laboratory to teach bedside cardiac ultrasound and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Off-the-shelf components, including an on/off switch, a laser, and 2 ampere batteries are connected in series and placed inside the 3-dimensional (3D)-printed housing. The trainer's laser emission projects a red line that visually represents the ultrasound's field. Learners project the laser against a porcine or human heart in the orientation of the TTE window they wish to obtain and then dissect the heart in that plane, allowing for visualization of how grayscale images are obtained from 3D structures. Previous research has demonstrated that visuospatial aptitude is correlated with ultrasound procedural performance. We present this trainer and educational method as a specific training intervention that could enhance the visuospatial ability of the ultrasound learner. This visuospatial trainer and educational method present a novel process for enhancing learner understanding of 2-dimensional ultrasound images as they relate to 3D structures. Having a clear understanding of how images are generated in cross section may translate into more proficient adaptation of cardiac ultrasound and TTE.

  4. Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharthkumar Bhikhabhai Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice. Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway. Settings and Design: A prospective, clinical study. Materials and Methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography. Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea. Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

  5. Comparative study of bedside and laboratory measurements of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzischek, D A; Tanseco, F V

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of variations in technique on measurements of hemoglobin level done at the bedside and to compare these results with laboratory measurements of hemoglobin. In accordance with hospital policy, procedure, and protocol, various techniques were used to obtain samples of capillary and venous blood and of blood from arterial and central venous catheters. Levels of hemoglobin were measured at the bedside and in the laboratory, and the results were compared. The Johns Hopkins Hospital adult postanesthesia care unit. A total of 187 blood samples were obtained from 62 adults who had undergone general surgery. Group I comprised 20 subjects with capillary and venous blood samples. Group II comprised 21 subjects with arterial blood samples. Group III comprised 21 subjects with central venous blood samples. The results showed that the amount of blood to be discarded before obtaining samples of arterial and central venous blood need not be any larger than double the dead space of the catheter, and that shaking the blood sample for 10 seconds was sufficient to mix the sample before measurement of hemoglobin levels. Results of bedside and laboratory measurements of hemoglobin level were comparable. Bedside measurement of hemoglobin increases efficiency in patient care, decreases risk of blood-transmitted infection for staff, and decreases cost to the patient. However, the persons who perform the assay must be responsible in adhering to the standard of practice to minimize errors in the measurements.

  6. The evaluation of bedside teaching – an instrument for staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The benefits of teaching at the patient's bedside have been well documented and described. Ramani et al.1 identify these as being the demonstration of communication skills, the findings of the physical examination, the teaching of humanistic aspects of clinical medicine, and the opportunity to role-model professional ...

  7. Comparative Study of Predeposit and Bedside Leucodepletion Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A; Khetarpal Sm, A; Jetley, S

    2010-04-01

    Removal of leucocytes from cellular blood components is associated with reduction of several transfusion associated adverse reactions. A total of 400 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) were subjected to leucodepletion at room temperature and 4°C using different commercially available prestorage and bedside filters (Terumo Penpol Immugard III and Pall Medical BPF-4). Pre-filtration and post-filtration parameters were compared to assess the efficacy of prestorage leucodepletion vis-à-vis bedside leucodepletion and the requirement of universal leucodepletion. Mean post-filtration red cell recovery ranged from 88.49-93.49% with all bags showing more than 85% red cell recovery. Mean post-filtration residual leucocyte count ranged from 0.205 × 10(6)-0.338 × 10(6)/bag with all bags showing more than log 3 leucoreduction. Prestorage leucoreduction achieved by the polyurethane filter was better than that achieved by the polyester filter. Red cell recovery with the bedside filters at room temperature was significantly less than that with prestorage filters at either temperature. This study suggests that prestorage leucoreduction is preferable over bedside leucoreduction and that polyurethane filters are better than polyester filters since leucodepletion achieved with the former is higher. We recommend selective log 3 leucodepletion using polyurethane prestorage filters for patients with specific indications.

  8. An unanticipated diagnosis with bedside ultrasonography in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although abdominal pain is a common presentation in emergency departments, rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is among the rarest diagnosis. Here we present 2 cases of RSH likely caused by coughing due to upper respiratory tract infection. The two described cases were diagnosed by bedside ultrasonography and ...

  9. Effect of bedside teaching activities on patients' experiences at an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items where respondents scored less than the median of 67 (interquartile range 21) were categorised as displaying a negative attitude. Results. Patients (60%) did not favour the bedside teaching activities. No significant association was found with age, sex, occupation, literacy level, duration of hospital stay, and ward.

  10. Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering: Preclinical Validation to Bedside Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Pepper, Victoria; Sams, Malik; Breuer, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in biomaterial science and available cell sources have spurred the translation of tissue-engineering technology to the bedside, addressing the pressing clinical demands for replacement cardiovascular tissues. Here, the in vivo status of tissue-engineered blood vessels, heart valves, and myocardium is briefly reviewed, illustrating progress toward a tissue-engineered heart for clinical use. PMID:26661524

  11. Reliability of bedside blood glucose estimating methods in detecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypoglycaemia occurs in many disease states common in the tropics. Facilities and skilled manpower required for laboratory blood glucose measurement are not always available in health facilities in developing countries. Objective: The study was carried out to determine the validity of bedside methods of ...

  12. Bedside paediatric HIV testing in Malawi: Impact on testing rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Provider initiated testing and counselling (PITC) is recommended for all inpatients in Malawi if they have not been tested in the previous 3 months. However testing rates remain low among children. We audited the effect of implementing a bedside diagnostic HIV testing service to determine if it would improve ...

  13. Executive cognitive impairment detected by simple bedside testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims. Cognitive impairment in people with type 2 diabetes is a barrier to successful disease management. We sought to determine whether impaired executive function as detected by a battery of simple bedside cognitive tests of executive function was associated with inadequate glycaemic control. Methods. People with ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  16. Transvaginal ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding and menstrual problems Certain types of infertility Ectopic pregnancy Pelvic pain Transvaginal ultrasound is also used during ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... patient consultation. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's ( ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... a nodule found during a rectal exam, detect abnormalities, and determine whether the gland is enlarged. Ultrasound ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test ... that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more ...

  5. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.N.T.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasound is a form of energy which consists of mechanical vibrations the frequencies of which are so high that they are above the range of human hearing. The lower frequency limit of the ultrasonic spectrum may generally be taken to be about 20 kHz. Most biomedical applications of ultrasound employ frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz. At these frequencies, the wavelength is in the range 1.5 - 0.1 mm in soft tissues, and narrow beams of ultrasound can be generated which propagate through such tissues without excessive attenuation. This chapter begins with brief reviews of the physics of diagnostic ultrasound pulse-echo imaging methods and Doppler imaging methods. The remainder of the chapter is a resume of the applications of ultrasonic imaging to physiological measurement

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... tip of the transducer is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A ... both sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... performed to detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is inserted into an opening of the body may produce minimal discomfort. If no biopsy is ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a more in-depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In ... ask for your child's favorite channel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite channel. top ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown ... I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable ... biopsy is planned. An enema may be taken two to four hours before the ultrasound to clean ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound Imaging? Men who have had the tail end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery ... or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Please ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... These exams are frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and ... identify and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries in planes that ... a special study usually done to provide detailed evaluation of the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be tilted ... you at the conclusion of your examination. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

  16. Thyroid ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid physiology and diagnostic evaluation of patients with thyroid disorders. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. ... Thyroid Tests Read more Ultrasound ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... to investigate a nodule found during a rectal exam, detect abnormalities, and determine whether the gland is ... a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically requires insertion of an ultrasound probe into ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, ... the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, ... the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... is sometimes seen in infections top of page How should I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose- ... sheath and lubricated before insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gland for later laboratory testing. top of page How should I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose- ... and lubricated with a gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ... detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... to the child prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to ... the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. You may be asked to drink water prior to the examination to fill your bladder. ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the prostate is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any ... size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  3. Breast ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as: Cysts, which are, fluid-filled sacs Fibroadenomas , which are, noncancerous solid growths Lipomas, which are, noncancerous fatty lumps that can occur anywhere in the body, including the breasts Breast cancers can also be seen with ultrasound. ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... abnormal area in the prostate gland for later laboratory testing. top of page How should I prepare? ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... be heard with every heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart ... Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview ...

  14. Back to the Bedside: Developing a Bedside Aid for Concussion and Brain Injury Decisions in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Edward R; Lopez, Kevin; Hess, Erik P; Abujarad, Fuad; Brandt, Cynthia A; Shiffman, Richard N; Post, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Current information-rich electronic health record (EHR) interfaces require large, high-resolution screens running on desktop computers. This interface compromises the provider's already limited time at the bedside by physically separating the patient from the doctor. The case study presented here describes a patient-centered clinical decision support (CDS) design process that aims to bring the physician back to the bedside by integrating a patient decision aid with CDS for shared use by the patient and provider on a touchscreen tablet computer for deciding whether or not to obtain a CT scan for minor head injury in the emergency department, a clinical scenario that could benefit from CDS but has failed previous implementation attempts. This case study follows the user-centered design (UCD) approach to build a bedside aid that is useful and usable, and that promotes shared decision-making between patients and their providers using a tablet computer at the bedside. The patient-centered decision support design process focuses on the prototype build using agile software development, but also describes the following: (1) the requirement gathering phase including triangulated qualitative research (focus groups and cognitive task analysis) to understand current challenges, (2) features for patient education, the physician, and shared decision-making, (3) system architecture and technical requirements, and (4) future plans for formative usability testing and field testing. We share specific lessons learned and general recommendations from critical insights gained in the patient-centered decision support design process about early stakeholder engagement, EHR integration, external expert feedback, challenges to two users on a single device, project management, and accessibility. Successful implementation of this tool will require seamless integration into the provider's workflow. This protocol can create an effective interface for shared decision-making and safe resource

  15. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  16. The Role of Airway and Endobronchial Ultrasound in Perioperative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Votruba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed an increased use of ultrasound in evaluation of the airway and the lower parts of the respiratory system. Ultrasound examination is fast and reliable and can be performed at the bedside and does not carry the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Apart from use in diagnostics it may also provide safe guidance for invasive and semi-invasive procedures. Ultrasound examination of the oral cavity structures, epiglottis, vocal cords, and subglottic space may help in the prediction of difficult intubation. Preoperative ultrasound may diagnose vocal cord palsy or deviation or stenosis of the trachea. Ultrasonography can also be used for confirmation of endotracheal tube, double-lumen tube, or laryngeal mask placement. This can be achieved by direct examination of the tube inside the trachea or by indirect methods evaluating lung movements. Postoperative airway ultrasound may reveal laryngeal pathology or subglottic oedema. Conventional ultrasound is a reliable real-time navigational tool for emergency cricothyrotomy or percutaneous dilational tracheostomy. Endobronchial ultrasound is a combination of bronchoscopy and ultrasonography and is used for preoperative examination of lung cancer and solitary pulmonary nodules. The method is also useful for real-time navigated biopsies of such pathological structures.

  17. Use of ocular ultrasound for the evaluation of retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinar, Zachary; Chan, Linda; Orlinsky, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Retinal detachment is an ocular emergency posing diagnostic difficulty for the emergency practitioner. Direct fundoscopy and visual field testing are difficult to perform and do not completely rule out retinal detachment. Ophthalmologists use ocular ultrasound to enhance their clinical acumen in detecting retinal detachments (RD), and bedside ultrasound capability is readily available to many emergency practitioners (EP). Our study sought to assess whether ocular ultrasound would be a helpful adjunct for the diagnosis of RD for the practicing EP. This was a prospective observational study with a convenience sample of patients. As part of a general course on emergency ultrasonography, practitioners received a 30-min training session on ocular ultrasound before beginning the study. Trained practitioners submitted ultrasound scans with interpretation on patients with signs and symptoms consistent with retinal detachment. Thirty-one of the 72 practitioners trained submitted ocular ultrasound reports on patients presenting to the Emergency Department with concerns for retinal detachments. EPs achieved a 97% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] 82-100%) and 92% specificity (95% CI 82-97%) on 92 examinations (29 retinal detachments). Disc edema and vitreous hemorrhage accounted for false positives, and a subacute retinal detachment accounted for the only false negative. These data show that trained emergency practitioners can use ocular ultrasound as an adjunct to their clinical assessment for retinal detachment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aortic Dissection and Thrombosis Diagnosed by Emergency Ultrasound in a Patient with Leg Pain and Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann H. Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case of aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysm thrombosis in a 78-year-old male who presented to the emergency department (ED complaining of lower extremity and paralysis for the past 1.5 hours. The initial vital signs in the ED were as follows: blood pressure (BP 132/88 mmHg, heart rate (HR 96, respiratory rate (RR 14, and an oxygen saturation of 94% at room air. Physical exam was notable for pale and cold left leg. The ED physician was unable to palpate or detect a Doppler signal in the left femoral artery. Bedside ultrasound was performed which showed non-pulsatile left femoral artery and limited flow on color Doppler. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening ultrasound was performed showing a 4.99 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and an intra-aortic thrombus with an intimal flap. Vascular surgery was promptly contacted and the patient underwent emergent aorto-bi-femoral bypass, bilateral four compartment fasciotomy, right common femoral artery endarterectomy with profundoplasty, and subsequent left leg amputation. Emergency physicians should utilize bedside ultrasound in patients who present with risk factors or threatening signs and symptoms that may suggest aortic dissection or aneurysm. Bedside ultrasound decreases time to definitive treatment and the mortality of the patients.

  19. Just-in-time cost-effective off-the-shelf remote telementoring of paramedical personnel in bedside lung sonography-a technical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegler, Nancy; McBeth, Paul B; Tevez-Molina, Martha C; McMillan, Janelle; Crawford, Innes; Hamilton, Douglas R; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2012-12-01

    Remote telementored ultrasound (RTMUS) is a new discipline that allows a remote expert to guide variably experienced clinical responders through focused ultrasound examinations. We used the examination of the pleural spaces after tube thoracostomy (TT) removal by a nurse with no prior ultrasound experience as an illustrative but highly accurate example of the technique using a simple cost-effective system. The image outputs of a handheld ultrasound machine and a head-mounted Web camera were input into a customized graphical user interface and streamed over a freely available voice over Internet protocol system that allowed two-way audio and visual communication between the novice examiner and the remote expert. The bedside nurse was then guided to examine the anterior chest of a patient who had recently had bilateral TTs removed. The team sought to determine the presence or absence of any recurrent pneumothoraces using the standard criteria for the ultrasound diagnosis of post-removal pneumothorax (PTXs). An upright chest radiograph (CXR) was obtained immediately after the RTMUS examination. The RTMUS system enabled the novice user to learn how to hold the ultrasound probe, where to place it on the chest, and thereafter to diagnose a subtle unilateral PTX characterized as "tiny" on the subsequent formal CXR report. As ultrasound has almost limitless clinical utility, using simple but advanced informatics and communication technologies has potential to improve worldwide healthcare delivery. RTMUS could be used both to enhance the information content as well as to digitally document important physiologic findings in any clinical encounter wherever a portable ultrasound and Internet connectivity are available.

  20. Human dimensions in bedside teaching: focus group discussions of teachers and learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Subha; Orlander, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this shift. Yet, essential clinical skills, professionalism, and humanistic patient interactions are best taught at the bedside. Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this decline. This study explored perceptions of teachers and learners on the value of bedside teaching and the humanistic dimensions of bedside interactions that make it imperative to shift clinical teaching back to the bedside. Focus group methodology was used to explore teacher and learner opinions. Four teacher groups consisted of (a) Chief Residents, (b) Residency Program Directors, (c) skilled bedside teachers, and (d) a convenience group of other Department of Medicine faculty at Boston University School of Medicine. Six learner groups consisted 2 each of 3rd-year students, PGY1 medicine residents, and PGY2 medicine residents. Each discussion lasted 60 to 90 minutes. Sessions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. Teachers and learners shared several opinions on bedside teaching, particularly around humanistic aspects of bedside interactions. The key themes that emerged included (a) patient involvement in discussions, (b) teachers as role models of humanism, (c) preserving learner autonomy, (d) direct observation and feedback of learners at the bedside, (e) interactions with challenging patients, and (e) admitting limitations. Within these themes, participants noted some behaviors best avoided at the bedside. Teachers and learners regard the bedside as a valuable venue in which to learn core values of medicine. They proposed many strategies to preserve these humanistic values and improve bedside teaching. These strategies are essential for true patient-centered care.

  1. Bench-to-bedside review: An approach to hemodynamic monitoring--Guyton at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magder, Sheldon

    2012-10-29

    Hemodynamic monitoring is used to identify deviations from hemodynamic goals and to assess responses to therapy. To accomplish these goals one must understand how the circulation is regulated. In this review I begin with an historical review of the work of Arthur Guyton and his conceptual understanding of the circulation and then present an approach by which Guyton's concepts can be applied at the bedside. Guyton argued that cardiac output and central venous pressure are determined by the interaction of two functions: cardiac function, which is determined by cardiac performance; and a return function, which is determined by the return of blood to the heart. This means that changes in cardiac output are dependent upon changes of one of these two functions or of both. I start with an approach based on the approximation that blood pressure is determined by the product of cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance and that cardiac output is determined by cardiac function and venous return. A fall in blood pressure with no change in or a rise in cardiac output indicates that a decrease in vascular resistance is the dominant factor. If the fall in blood pressure is due to a fall in cardiac output then the role of a change in the return function and cardiac function can be separated by the patterns of changes in central venous pressure and cardiac output. Measurement of cardiac output is a central component to this approach but until recently it was not easy to obtain and was estimated from surrogates. However, there are now a number of non-invasive devices that can give measures of cardiac output and permit the use of physiological principles to more rapidly appreciate the primary pathophysiology behind hemodynamic abnormalities and to provide directed therapy.

  2. The study on quality control of bedside CR examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xufeng; Luo Xiaomei; Xu Qiaolan; Wu Tengfang; Wen Xingwei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the quality controll of bedside CR examination and improves the imaging quality. Methods: X-ray examination with CR system were performed on 3,300 patients. All CR cassettes were encoded. The imaging plate and cassettes were cleaned regularly. Results: With and without quality control, the percentage of first-rate film was 58.2% and 51%, the second-rate film was 40% and 45.5%, the third-rate film was 1.3% and 2%, respectively. Corxespondingly, the ratio of re-examination decreased from 1.5% to 0.5% after quality control, and imaging quality was stable. Conclusion: The quality control of bedside CR examination can improve the image quality as well as lighten the labor of radiographers. (authors)

  3. The predictive diagnostic value of serial daily bedside ultrasonography for severe dengue in Indonesian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meta Michels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of dengue patients at risk for progressing to severe disease is difficult. Significant plasma leakage is a hallmark of severe dengue infection which can suddenly lead to hypovolemic shock around the time of defervescence. We hypothesized that the detection of subclinical plasma leakage may identify those at risk for severe dengue. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive diagnostic value of serial ultrasonography for severe dengue. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Daily bedside ultrasounds were performed with a handheld ultrasound device in a prospective cohort of adult Indonesians with dengue. Timing, localization and relation to dengue severity of the ultrasonography findings were determined, as well as the relation with serial hematocrit and albumin values. The severity of dengue was retrospectively determined by WHO 2009 criteria. A total of 66 patients with proven dengue infection were included in the study of whom 11 developed severe dengue. Presence of subclinical plasma leakage at enrollment had a positive predictive value of 35% and a negative predictive value of 90% for severe dengue. At enrollment, 55% of severe dengue cases already had subclinical plasma leakage, which increased to 91% during the subsequent days. Gallbladder wall edema was more pronounced in severe than in non-severe dengue patients and often preceded ascites/pleural effusion. Serial hematocrit and albumin measurements failed to identify plasma leakage and patients at risk for severe dengue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Serial ultrasonography, in contrast to existing markers such as hematocrit, may better identify patients at risk for development of severe dengue. Patients with evidence of subclinical plasma leakage and/or an edematous gallbladder wall by ultrasonography merit intensive monitoring for development of complications.

  4. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

    OpenAIRE

    Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormal...

  5. Perceptions of Teamwork in the Interprofessional Bedside Rounding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaird, Genevieve; Dent, John M; Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Muller, Abigail Guo Jian; Nelson, Nicole; Brashers, Valentina

    Patient perceptions of teamwork have been a relatively undiscovered domain. Our study investigated the use of the Patients' Insights and Views of Teamwork (PIVOT) survey on an acute cardiology unit in an academic teaching hospital with patients receiving Rounding with Heart, an interprofessional bedside rounding initiative, and others receiving traditional rounding processes. Sixty-three subjects were surveyed during their hospital stay. We found a significant difference (p = .006) in PIVOT scores between those receiving interprofessional rounding and those not receiving this rounding structure. In an item-by-item analysis, four specific items were found to be significant which were supported by analysis of qualitative data. Observations of the structured interprofessional rounding process by our research team reveal themes that emerged from observations: (1) openness/inclusivity, (2) patient-centeredness, (3) attending role/shared leadership, (4) nonconfrontational learning, (5) efficacy, and (6) team at bedside. Our results indicate that patients may be able to recognize the teamwork in the structured bedside rounding process and that interfacing with the team may be an important component to patients. We conclude that patient perceptions of teamwork are a valuable informant to modeling collaborative practices, and there are key observable components to the structured rounding model that may foster collaboration among different disciplines.

  6. Do lean practices lead to more time at the bedside?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Tiffany; Comer, Linda; Whichello, Ramona

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the application of value-added processes in healthcare, with an emphasis on their effects on bedside nursing. Literature relevant to Lean methodology and inpatient care was reviewed, excluding all research related to other service lines (i.e., surgical services, emergency services, laboratory, radiology, etc.). Increased value is also an important tenet of transforming care at the bedside (TCAB), an initiative launched by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Therefore, articles concerning TCAB were also included in this review. A systematic study of the literature revealed varied applications of Lean principles in practice, ranging from the implementation of a single tool, to full organizational restructuring. All articles reviewed reported positive results, although the majority lacked strong supporting evidence for claims of improvement. Even though there is some indication that the application of Lean principles to nursing processes is successful in improving specific outcomes, the authors cannot conclude that the implementation of Lean methodology or TCAB greatly influences direct patient care, or increases time spent at the bedside. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... special preparation. You may be asked to drink water prior to the examination to fill your bladder. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. What is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... ultrasound exams are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), as well as the type of body ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), as well as the type of body ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and organs in the lower abdomen and pelvis. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then listens for the returning echoes from ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top ... waves as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer ...

  20. Hip Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child and make the time ... back or side. Almost all of the ultrasound studies of infants and ... studied. The gel will help the transducer make secure contact with the body ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... No Please type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Please help us improve RadiologyInfo.org by taking our brief survey: Survey Do ... Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... in which needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies , in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. ... not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  7. Can anatomists teach living anatomy using ultrasound as a teaching tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurjus, Rosalyn A; Dimorier, Kathryn; Brown, Kirsten; Slaby, Frank; Shokoohi, Hamid; Boniface, Keith; Liu, Yiju Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of bedside ultrasound by an increasing number of medical specialties has created the need for more ultrasound exposure and teaching in medical school. Although there is a widespread support for more vertical integration of ultrasound teaching throughout the undergraduate curriculum, little is known about whether the quality of ultrasound teaching differs if performed by anatomists or clinicians. The purpose of this study is to compare medical students' evaluation of ultrasound anatomy teaching by clinicians and anatomists. Hands-on interactive ultrasound sessions were scheduled as part of the gross anatomy course following principles of adult learning and instructional design. Seven teachers (three anatomists and four clinicians) taught in each session. Before each session, anatomists were trained in ultrasound by clinicians. Students were divided into groups, rotated teachers between sessions, and completed evaluations. Results indicated students perceived the two groups as comparable for all factors except for knowledge organization and the helpfulness of ultrasound for understanding anatomy (P teach living anatomy using ultrasound with minimal training as well as clinicians, and encourage the teaching of living anatomy by anatomists in human anatomy courses using ultrasound. Repeating this study at a multicenter level is currently being considered to further validate our conclusion. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. Bedside Teaching: Is it Effective Methods in Clinical Nursing Students Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatikhu Yatuni Asmara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical learning is the centre of medical students education. Students not only learn about practical skills but also communication with patient and other health care givers which both competencies are useful for students when they come into working world (Spencer, 2003. There are variations of methods applied in clinical learning process; one of them is bedside teaching. The aim of this study was to observe the bedside teaching process which is held in group of students, teacher, and patient. Another aim was to know responses of students, teacher, and patients to the bedside teaching process. Method: The method which was applied in this study is observation in which bedside teaching process was observed related to the roles and function of each component of bedside teaching: students, teacher, and patient in each phase: preparation, process, and evaluation. Then it was continued by interview to know the responses of students, teacher, and patient related to bedside teaching process. Result: The result showed that both students and teacher felt that bedside teaching is an effective method since it helped students to achieve their competences in clinical setting and develop their communication skill. Furthermore teacher stated that bedside teaching facilitated her to be a good role model for students. As well as students and teacher, patient got advantage from the bedside teaching process that she got information related to her case; however the time to discuss was limited. During the observation, each component of bedside teaching did their roles and function, such as: during the preparation teacher asked inform consent from patient, and patient gave inform consent as well while students prepared the material. Discussions: Suggestion for next research is conducting a deeper study about perception of students, teacher, and patient about bedside teaching process and the strategies to develop it to be better method. Keywords: bedside

  9. [The influence of ultrasound therapy on patient's blood pressure subjected to activity ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciejka, Elzbieta; Wiechna, Katarzyna

    2009-07-01

    The ultrasound therapy is a one of physical methods to treat disorders of movement organ. The ultrasound wave, while passing through layers of tissues gives away acoustic energy. Each tissue of the body has got different structure and different ability to absorb the ultrasound energy. A biological influence of ultrasounds on the body depends on an amount of energy absorbed by the tissues. The influence is resultant of thermal and non-thermal effects of ultrasounds, which includes cavitation and acoustic streaming. Beside local reaction of tissues treated with ultrasound, there is also a general reaction of a whole body. Depends on parameters of ultrasound wave may have an influence on cardiovascular system, especially blood pressure, both on people with normal blood pressure and hypertension. Evaluation of change in blood pressure due to ultrasound therapy. Evaluation of change in blood pressure after ultrasound therapy among people with normal blood pressure and with hypertension. Research on influence of applied dose of ultrasounds and time of application on change in blood pressure. The research was done among 29 patients (aged form 30 to 83) qualified to ultrasound therapy by a physician. Each patient was treated with a one series of 10 ultrasound sessions. The ultrasound device used at that time was US 10 with applicator of 5 cm2 surface and 1 MHz frequency. The dose was 0.05-1.5 W/cm2 of continuous ultrasound wave applied dynamically. Time of each session was 3-9 minutes. Blood pressure was measured using Korotkow's method before and after first (measurement I, II), after fifth (III), and after tenth (IV) therapeutic session. The control group were 10 patients without ultrasound influence. We observed statistically decreased patient's blood pressure after the ultrasound treatment. Blood pressure of patients with hypertension statistically decreased after ultrasound therapy too. Decrease of systolic blood pressure was observed after an application of medium

  10. Ultrasound-guided central venous cannulation in bariatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusasco, Claudia; Corradi, Francesco; Zattoni, Pier Luigi; Launo, Claudio; Leykin, Yigal; Palermo, Salvatore

    2009-10-01

    Central venous catheterization may be difficult in morbidly obese patients because anatomic landmarks are often obscured. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided central venous cannulation in 55 patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The usefulness of ultrasonic examination combined with intraatrial electrocardiogram as a diagnostic tool for catheter misplacement was studied. Preliminary ultrasound examination of the neck vessels demonstrated anatomical variations in the position of internal jugular vein in 19 cases and four unrecognized asymptomatic thromboses of the right internal jugular vein. Central venous catheterization was successful in all 55 patients, in 51 with single skin puncture, and in 42 with single vein puncture. In three cases in whom the catheter was misplaced, this was detected by bedside ultrasonic examination during the procedure and immediately corrected by real-time echographic visualization. No arterial puncture, no hematoma, and no pneumothorax occurred in any patient. Successful catheter placement was also confirmed in all patients by post-operative chest X-ray. No evidence of infection or thrombosis subsequently was noted. The use of ultrasound guidance may increase the success rate and decrease the incidence of complications associated with central venous cannulation. The advantages of this approach is visualization of the anatomical structures at puncture site prior to skin puncture and the ability to track needle and guide-wire placement during the procedure. With its high accuracy in detecting catheter misplacement, bedside ultrasonic examination combined with intraatrial electrocardiogram may further decrease morbidity associated with misplaced central venous catheters.

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos related to General Ultrasound Sponsored by ...

  12. Intercostal Artery Laceration: Rare Complication of Thoracentesis and Role of Ultrasound in Early Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam Mansour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemothorax is a rare but potentially fatal postthoracentesis complication. Early clinical signs may be nonspecific resulting in diagnostic delay. A high index of suspicion is vital for early diagnosis and intervention to avoid further bleeding. Following procedure, early bedside ultrasound findings can be vital for early detection. We report a case of massive hemothorax in a 63-year-old male following therapeutic thoracentesis. Diagnosis was made following highly suggestive sonographic findings prompting thoracotomy and lacerated intercostal artery cauterization.

  13. Transthoracic ultrasound in the assessment of pleural and pulmonary diseases: use and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandeo, Marco; Rotondo, Antonio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Catalano, Daniela; Feragalli, Beatrice; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-10-01

    Interest in transthoracic ultrasound (US) procedures increased after the availability of portable US equipment suitable for use at the patient's bedside. It is possible to detect space-occupying lesions of the pleura, pleural effusion, focal or diffuse pleural thickening and subpleural lesions of the lung, even in emergency settings. Transthoracic US is useful as a guidance system for thoracentesis and peripheral lesion biopsy, where it minimises the occurrence of pneumothorax and haemorrhage. Transthoracic US imaging is strongly influenced by physical interaction of the ultrasonic beam at the tissue/air interface, which gives rise to reverberations classified as simple (A-line), "comet tail" and "ring down"(B-line) artifacts. Although these artifacts can be suggestive of a disease condition, they are essentially imaging errors present even in normal subjects and in empty-pleura post-pneumonectomy patients. In order to clarify some confusion and to report on the state of the art, we present a review of the literature on transthoracic US in diseases of the pleura and peripheral lung regions and our own clinical experience over 3 decades. The review focuses on quality assurance procedures and their value in diagnostic imaging and patient monitoring and warns against possible inappropriate indications and misleading information. Thoracic US is much more than "fishing for the moon in the well".

  14. Impact of point-of-care ultrasound on quality of care in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhikari S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Srikar Adhikari,1 Richard Amini,1 Lori A Stolz,1 Michael Blaivas2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA Abstract: The use of point-of-care (POC ultrasonography has rapidly expanded in recent years, in both academic and community settings. It is one of the few diagnostic modalities that can be performed rapidly at the bedside by a physician and has significant impact on patient outcomes. It is portable, readily accessible, and cost-effective, and has no risk of ionizing radiation. There is an abundance of evidence that supports the use of POC ultrasound by physicians in different subspecialties. Multiple studies have documented the diagnostic accuracy of POC ultrasound and its ability to decrease the time to definitive treatment. As ultrasound technology has advanced, POC ultrasound applications have also evolved from being used solely in patients with blunt abdominal trauma to applications for nearly every clinical scenario imaginable. From performing procedures more safely to diagnosing pathology more quickly, POC ultrasound is radically changing clinical practice, patient outcomes, and the overall quality of patient care a clinician can provide. Recently, there has been a paradigm shift involving a symptom-based approach to POC ultrasound. This unique symptom-based ultrasound approach has led to improved quality of care in a variety of clinical settings. Keywords: point-of-care ultrasound, ultrasonography, bedside ultrasound, emergency physician, emergency department, quality, symptom-based

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ... Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most patients. Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. What is ... into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , ...

  1. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. This ultrasound examination is usually ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see ...

  3. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Hip Arthrocentesis in a Child with Hip Pain and Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Moak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Children presenting to the emergency department with hip pain and fever are at risk for significant morbidity due to septic arthritis. Distinguishing between septic arthritis and other causes of hip pain may be challenging. Sonographic visualization of the hip with real-time ultrasound-guided arthrocentesis may allow faster differentiation between etiologies, hastening definitive therapy and improving analgesia. This report describes the use of hip sonography in a case of Lyme arthritis. The authors review the medical literature in support of bedside hip sonography and discuss how to perform ultrasound-guided hip arthrocentesis. Clinical findings in septic and Lyme arthritis are also described.

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... absent blood flow to various organs greater than normal blood flow to different areas, which is sometimes ... examination, you should be able to resume your normal activities immediately. top of page Who interprets the ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3- ...

  8. Applicability of the Schwartz Equation and the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Bedside Equation for Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Overweight Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Teresa V; Harrison, Donald L; Gildon, Brooke L; Carter, Sandra M; Turman, Martin A

    2016-06-01

    To determine if significant correlations exist between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equation values, derived by using the original Schwartz equation and the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) bedside equation with a 24-hour urine creatinine clearance (Clcr ) value normalized to a body surface area of 1.73 m(2) in overweight and obese children. Prospective analysis (20 patients) and retrospective analysis (43 patients). Pediatric inpatient ward and pediatric nephrology clinic at a comprehensive academic medical center. Sixty-three pediatric patients (aged 5-17 years), of whom 27 were overweight (body mass index [BMI] at the 85th percentile or higher) and 36 were not overweight (BMI lower than the 85th percentile [controls]) between 2007 and 2012. Data from the overweight patients were compared with nonoverweight controls. GFR values were calculated by using the original Schwartz equation and the CKiD bedside equation. Each patient's 24-hour urine Clcr value normalized to a body surface area of 1.73 m(2) served as the index value. A Pearson correlation coefficient model was used to determine association between the 24-hour urine Clcr value (index value) with the Schwartz and CKiD GFR estimations. Significant correlation was found to exist between the Schwartz and CKiD bedside GFR estimations relative to the 24-hour urine Clcr in the control subjects (r = 0.85, poverweight subjects (r = 0.86, poverweight children with a kidney disorder. The CKiD bedside GFR estimations were not significantly different compared with 24-hour urine Clcr values for the overweight group with kidney disorder (p=0.85). The Schwartz and CKiD bedside estimations of GFR correlated with 24-hour urine Clcr values in both overweight and nonoverweight children. Compared with the Schwartz equation, which tended to overestimate renal function, the CKiD bedside equation appeared to approximate 24-hour urine Clcr more closely in overweight children with kidney disorder. © 2016

  9. Incremental value of thoracic ultrasound in intensive care units: Indications, uses, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardo, Biagio; Martone, Francesca; Trambaiolo, Paolo; Severino, Sergio; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; D'Andrea, Antonello

    2016-05-28

    Emergency physicians are required to care for unstable patients with life-threatening conditions, and thus must make decisions that are both quick and precise about unclear clinical situations. There is increasing consensus in favor of using ultrasound as a real-time bedside clinical tool for clinicians in emergency settings alongside the irreplaceable use of historical and physical examinations. B-mode sonography is an old technology that was first proposed for medical applications more than 50 years ago. Its application in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases has always been considered limited, due to the presence of air in the lung and the presence of the bones of the thoracic cage, which prevent the progression of the ultrasound beam. However, the close relationship between air and water in the lungs causes a variety of artifacts on ultrasounds. At the bedside, thoracic ultrasound is based primarily on the analysis of these artifacts, with the aim of improving accuracy and safety in the diagnosis and therapy of the various varieties of pulmonary pathologic diseases which are predominantly "water-rich" or "air-rich". The indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages, and techniques of thoracic ultrasound and its related procedures are analyzed in the present review.

  10. Vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, D B; Ricci, M A

    1998-04-01

    Surgeon-interpreted diagnostic ultrasound has become the preferred screening test and often the definitive test for the diagnosis of arterial stenosis, aneurysm, and venous thrombosis. As a modality for surveillance, its noninvasive quality makes it particularly appealing as the test of choice to screen patients for abdominal aortic aneurysms or to perform follow-up examinations on those patients with a carotid endartectomy or in situ bypass grafts. The increasing reliance on intraoperative duplex imaging of vascular procedures demands that the surgeon learn the skills to perform the studies without a technologist or radiologist to interpret the examination.

  11. Elective open bedside tracheostomy in the neurosurgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Maharjan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available JCMSBackground and Objectives: Tracheostomy is electively performed in critically ill patients requiring prolonged respiratory support. The risk of transporting, the increasing associated cost and operative room schedule are some of the obstacles for wider acceptance of this procedure. The use of rigid selection criteria exclude many patients who would benefit of this approach. The present study was designed to determine the safety of open bedside tracheostomy (OBT as a routine intensive care units (ICU procedure without any selection criteria, considering its peri and postoperative complications.Materials & Methods: Retrospective medical chart review of all patients that underwent elective tracheostomy between June 2014 and January 2015.Results: The study group comprised 52 patients with a mean age of 40.4±15.1 years. The incidence of intra-procedure complications was 5.7% and post-procedure complications was 3.8%.Conclusions: Open bedside tracheostomy seems to be a safe and simple procedure, even when performed by a trained resident under controlled circumstances, and should be considered as an option for ICU patients.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1: 9-11

  12. Improving patient satisfaction with nursing communication using bedside shift report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if standardizing shift report improves patient satisfaction with nursing communication. Patient surveys taken after discharge from the hospital show that patients perceive nursing communication during their stay could be improved. Standardizing bedside reporting is one step toward improving communication between nurses, patients, and their families. A pilot bedside shift report process was developed on a medical/surgical intermediate care unit to improve patient satisfaction scores in the area of "nurse communicated well," with the goal of reaching 90% satisfaction rates, which increased from 76% and 78%. Peplau's interpersonal relations theory was used in the adoption of this practice. This theory is based on the idea that the nurse-patient relationship is therapeutic and that it is crucial for nurses to assess, plan, and put context behind the care delivered to their patients. Lewin's Change Theory and the tenets of unfreezing, moving, and refreezing were crucial to the implementation of this practice change. Monitoring of patient satisfaction was continued for 3 months. There was a rise in patient satisfaction in nursing communication to 87.6%, an increase from 75% in the previous 6 months. This score did not meet the goal of 90%, but did show that this practice change did impact this particular area of patient satisfaction. This process was instituted organization-wide. Reaching the goal of 90% satisfaction in the area of patient perceptions of nursing communication is the overall goal of this program.

  13. The role of ultrasound technology in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Tyler; Gorsky, Kevin; Viezel-Mathieu, Alex; Kanevsky, Jonathan; Gilardino, Mirko S

    2018-03-01

    The modern medical era is in part characterized by the increased availability of portable imaging devices. Ultrasound devices are used for either high-resolution non-invasive imaging or as a focused acoustic energy source capable of sculpting and shaping tissue. Given the broad scope of the field, plastic and reconstructive surgeons have the unique ability to implement and tailor the use of ultrasound in a variety of clinical situations. This article will review novel uses for ultrasound in the field of plastic surgery. A systematic electronic search was performed using the PubMed database. Search terms used were "ultrasonography" or "ultrasound" and "plastic surgery". Two independent reviewers subsequently reviewed the resultant articles based on strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Selected manuscripts were analyzed and grouped by procedure categories. 303 articles were included in the study, spanning six procedure categories. The categories included breast, head and neck, microsurgery and reconstruction, skin, aesthetic, and other innovative applications. Ultrasound imaging was shown useful in vascular mapping, dermal and adipose volumetric evaluation, and postoperative flap monitoring. As an energy source, ultrasound has been described for skin tightening, adipose tissue removal, facial rejuvenation, increased neocollagenesis, and bone healing. Reported benefits of incorporating ultrasound into routine clinical practice included promising procedural outcomes, minimal complications, comprehensive patient follow-up and quantitative anatomic evaluation of results. Ultrasound offers a portable and non-invasive bedside means to obtain real-time visualization of patients' anatomy, while also providing an effective, focused and safe energy source for procedures. This review highlights novel applications of ultrasonography in the hands of a modern plastic surgeon, across the entire breadth of the specialty. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic

  14. A Waveform Archiving System for the GE Solar 8000i Bedside Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Andrea; Jaishankar, Rohan; Filippidis, Aristotelis; Holsapple, James; Heldt, Thomas

    2018-01-01

     Our objective was to develop, deploy, and test a data-acquisition system for the reliable and robust archiving of high-resolution physiological waveform data from a variety of bedside monitoring devices, including the GE Solar 8000i patient monitor, and for the logging of ancillary clinical and demographic information.  The data-acquisition system consists of a computer-based archiving unit and a GE Tram Rac 4A that connects to the GE Solar 8000i monitor. Standard physiological front-end sensors connect directly to the Tram Rac, which serves as a port replicator for the GE monitor and provides access to these waveform signals through an analog data interface. Together with the GE monitoring data streams, we simultaneously collect the cerebral blood flow velocity envelope from a transcranial Doppler ultrasound system and a non-invasive arterial blood pressure waveform along a common time axis. All waveform signals are digitized and archived through a LabView-controlled interface that also allows for the logging of relevant meta-data such as clinical and patient demographic information.  The acquisition system was certified for hospital use by the clinical engineering team at Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. Over a 12-month period, we collected 57 datasets from 11 neuro-ICU patients. The system provided reliable and failure-free waveform archiving. We measured an average temporal drift between waveforms from different monitoring devices of 1 ms every 66 min of recorded data.  The waveform acquisition system allows for robust real-time data acquisition, processing, and archiving of waveforms. The temporal drift between waveforms archived from different devices is entirely negligible, even for long-term recording.

  15. Point of Care Neonatal Ultrasound - Head, Lung, Gut and Line Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Chandra; Suryawanshi, Pradeep

    2016-10-08

    Knowledge and skills of heart, head, lung, gut and basic abdominal ultrasound is of immense utility to clinicians in their day-to-day patient management, and in acute events, in the absence of specialist service back-up. This review examines the potential role of clinician-performed ultrasound in the neonatal intensive care unit. The bibliographic search of English-language literature was performed electronically using PubMed and EMBASE databases for the different topics we have covered under this review. Bedside head ultrasound can be used to identify and screen for intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia and post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilatation. It is also a useful adjuvant tool in the evaluation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The relatively new lung ultrasound technique is useful in identifying transient tachypnea, pneumonia, pneumothorax, fluid overload and pleural effusion. Gut ultrasound is useful in identifying necrotizing enterocolitis and probably is better than X-ray in prognostication. Ultrasound is also useful in identifying vascular line positions without radiation exposure. Ultrasound performed by the clinician has an extensive role in the neonatal intensive care unit. Basic ultrasound knowledge of head, lung and gut is a useful supplement to clinical decision-making.

  16. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  17. Laparoscopy and ultrasound examination in women with acute pelvic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, A L; Felding, C

    1990-01-01

    The results of preoperative pelvic examination and eventual ultrasound examination were correlated with the laparoscopic findings in 316 women with acute pelvic pain. The predictive values of normal and abnormal findings at pelvic examination were 46.9 and 82.1%, respectively. 42.1% of the women...... had ultrasound examination performed. This investigation showed to be helpful especially in patients with normal findings at pelvic examination. If ultrasonic findings were abnormal the results at laparoscopy were also abnormal in 90%. On the contrary, normal findings at ultrasound examination did...... not exclude abnormal pelvic findings. The predictive value of normal results at ultrasound examination was 50.0%. This discrepancy between ultrasonic and pelvic findings can be explained by the size of the pelvic masses. Ultrasound examination is a valuable tool in the evaluation of patients with acute pelvic...

  18. Development and User Research of a Smart Bedside Station System toward Patient-Centered Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Baek, Hyunyoung; Ryu, Borim; Chung, Eunja; Kim, Kidong; Yi, Jay Chaeyong; Park, Soo Beom; Hwang, Hee

    2015-09-01

    User experience design that reflects real-world application and aims to support suitable service solutions has arisen as one of the current issues in the medical informatics research domain. The Smart Bedside Station (SBS) is a screen that is installed on the bedside for the personal use and provides a variety of convenient services for the patients. Recently, bedside terminal systems have been increasingly adopted in hospitals due to the rapid growth of advanced technology in healthcare at the point of care. We designed user experience (UX) research to derive users' unmet needs and major functions that are frequently used in the field. To develop the SBS service, a service design methodology, the Double Diamond Design Process Model, was undertaken. The problems or directions of the complex clinical workflow of the hospital, the requirements of stakeholders, and environmental factors were identified through the study. The SBS system services provided to patients were linked to the hospital's main services or to related electronic medical record (EMR) data. Seven key services were derived from the results of the study. The primary services were as follows: Bedside Check In and Out, Bedside Room Service, Bedside Scheduler, Ready for Rounds, My Medical Chart, Featured Healthcare Content, and Bedside Community. This research developed a patient-centered SBS system with improved UX using service design methodology applied to complex and technical medical services, providing insights to improve the current healthcare system.

  19. A Formalized Three-Year Emergency Medicine Residency Ultrasound Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience and type of curriculum: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Residency Program Ultrasound Education Curriculum is a three-year curriculum for PGY-1 to PGY-3 learners. Introduction/Background: Each year of the three-year The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Ultrasound Curriculum focuses on different aspects of emergency ultrasonography, thereby promoting progressive understanding and utilization of point-of-care ultrasound in medical decision-making during residency training. Ultrasound is an invaluable bedside tool for emergency physicians; this skill must be mastered by resident learners during residency training, and ultrasound competency is a required ACGME milestone.1 The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP currently recommends that 11 applications of emergency ultrasound be part of the core skills of an emergency physician.2 This curriculum acknowledges the standards developed by ACEP and the ACGME. Objectives: Learners will 1 know the indications for each the 11 ACEP point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS applications; 2 perform each of the 11 ACEP POCUS applications; 3 integrate POCUS into medical decision-making. Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include: independent, self-directed learning (textbook and literature reading, brief didactic sessions describing indications and technique for each examination, hands-on ultrasound scanning under the direct supervision of ultrasound faculty with real-time feedback, and quality assurance review of ultrasound images. Residents are expected to perform a minimum of 150 ultrasound examinations with associated quality assurance during the course of their residency training. The time requirements, reading material, and ultrasound techniques taught vary depending on the year of training. Length of curriculum: The entirety of the curriculum is three years; however, each year of residency training has

  20. Implementing interprofessional bedside rounding at the prequalification stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuite DR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel R Tuite,1 David Healy,1 Thomas S MacKinnon2 1Faculty of Medicine, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, 2School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the paper by Henkin et al,1 demonstrating that the use of interprofessional bedside rounding (IBR significantly improved nurse–physician teamwork, particularly from the nurses’ point of view. This finding is relevant when one takes into account the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork; a review conducted by Epstein concluded that effective interprofessional teamwork both maximizes patient safety and increases job satisfaction and efficiency.2 We, as medical students, believe that inadequate emphasis is placed on interprofessional collaboration at the prequalification phase, and therefore, we suggest that implementing IBR at the university level could represent a method to improve teamwork between the nurses and doctors of the future.  View the original paper by Henkin et al.  

  1. Prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy measured by simple bedside tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, Torben Bech; Benn, Jette; Christiansen, J S

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, five simple bedside tests, beat-to-beat variation during quiet respiration, beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration, heart rate and blood pressure response to standing, heart rate response to exercise, and heart rate response....... The prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy in the whole diabetic population indicated by abnormal response in beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration was 27%. Diabetic autonimic neuropathy increased in frequency with duration of disease. Patients with nephropathy or proliferative retinopathy had...... a significantly higher prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy as indicated by abnormal beat-to-beat variation during forced respirations (p less than 0.01) than patients without these complications....

  2. Ultrasound images transmitted via FaceTime are non-inferior to images on the ultrasound machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Andrea R; Buchner, Jessica A; Verceles, Avelino C; Zubrow, Marc T; Mallemat, Haney A; Papali, Alfred; McCurdy, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Remote telementored ultrasound (RTMUS) systems can deliver ultrasound (US) expertise to regions lacking highly trained bedside ultrasonographers and US interpreters. To date, no studies have evaluated the quality and clinical utility of US images transmitted using commercially available RTMUS systems. This prospective pilot evaluated the quality of US images (right internal jugular vein, lung apices and bases, cardiac subxiphoid view, bladder) obtained using a commercially available iPad operating FaceTime software. A bedside non-physician obtained images and a tele-intensivist interpreted them. All US screen images were simultaneously saved on the US machine and captured via a FaceTime screen shot. The tele-intensivist and an independent US expert rated image quality and utility in guiding clinical decisions. The tele-intensivist rated FaceTime images as high quality (90% [69/77]) and could comfortably make clinical decisions using these images (96% [74/77]). Image quality did not differ between FaceTime and US images (97% (75/77). Strong inter-rater reliability existed between tele-intensivist and US expert evaluations (Spearman's rho 0.43; PFaceTime are not inferior to those obtained directly with the US machine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bedside immunochromatographic test for enterovirus 71 infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan-Ying Arthur; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Chen, Chih-Jung; Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Hsieh, Juo-Yu; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2013-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes frequent outbreaks worldwide, particularly in the Asia-Pacific area. Its quick spread is a critical challenge for public health and timely preventive measures and clinical management therefore rely on early detection. There is a need for a rapid, easy-to-use, and reliable method for detecting EV71 infections. The study aimed to evaluate a bedside immunochromatography (ICT) kit for diagnosing acute EV71 infection in children. Pediatric patients with herpangina or hand-foot-mouth disease were randomly and prospectively enrolled from hospitals across Taiwan. Throat or rectal swabs were collected for viral culture and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR). For the ICT kit, whole blood was obtained by ear piercing, finger-sticking, or venipuncture. The results of ICT, virus isolation and RTPCR in clinical samples were compared. Of the 156 patients enrolled, 91 (58%), 64 (41%) and 72 (46%) had positive results of the ICT kit, viral culture and RTPCR, respectively. Laboratory-confirmed infection with either positive EV71 culture or RTPCR was used as the diagnostic standard. The sensitivity and specificity of the ICT kit was 84% and 77%, respectively. The viral culture and RTPCR had relatively lower sensitivity but higher specificity. The patient's age did not affect the performance of the ICT, viral culture and RTPCR. However, a low sensitivity of ICT kit was noted before the second day of disease onset. The ICT kit may serve as a simple, quick and reliable method for the bedside diagnosis of acute EV71 infection in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Arrhythmias and Cardiac Bedside Monitoring in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Sherri L

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac physiology is unique in neonates and infants; there are several physiologic changes that occur in the first weeks of life. Important changes can be captured on the bedside monitor and provide vital data in a noninvasive way to providers. The importance of diligent observation cannot be overstated. Bedside monitoring has improved in the last decade, which has enhanced the ability to detect changes in heart rates and rhythms. The purpose here is to review cardiac physiology, describe those arrhythmias able to be observed on bedside monitors, and highlight heart rate changes that can be early signs of sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... various organs greater than normal blood flow to different areas, which is sometimes seen in infections top ... scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resume your normal activities immediately. top of page Who interprets the results and how do I get ... or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or ...

  7. Lung ultrasound findings in meconium aspiration syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piastra, Marco; Yousef, Nadya; Brat, Roselyne; Manzoni, Paolo; Mokhtari, Mostafa; De Luca, Daniele

    2014-09-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a rare and life-threatening neonatal lung injury induced by meconium in the lung and airways. Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a quick, easy and cheap imaging technique that is increasingly being used in critical care settings, also for newborns. In this paper we describe ultrasound findings in MAS. Six patients with MAS of variable severity were examined by LUS during the first hours of life. Chest X-rays were used as reference. The following dynamic LUS signs were seen in all patients: (1) B-pattern (interstitial) coalescent or sparse; (2) consolidations; (3) atelectasis; (4) bronchograms. No pattern was observed for the distribution of signs in lung areas, although the signs varied with time, probably due to the changing localisation of meconium in the lungs. LUS images corresponded well with X-ray findings. In conclusion, we provide the first formal description of LUS findings in neonates with MAS. LUS is a useful and promising tool in the diagnosis and management of MAS, providing real-time bedside imaging, with the additional potential benefit of limiting radiation exposure in sick neonates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Role of Lung Ultrasound in Diagnosis of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Cao, Hai Ying; Wang, Hua-Wei; Kong, Xiang Yong

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is one of the most common causes of neonatal respiratory failure and mortality. The risk of developing RDS decreases with both increasing gestational age and birth weight. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of lung ultrasound in the diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in newborn infants. From March 2012 to May 2013, 100 newborn infants were divided into two groups: RDS group (50 cases) and control group (50 cases). According to the findings of chest x-ray, there were 10 cases of grade II RDS, 15 grade III cases, and 25 grade IV cases in RDS group. Lung ultrasound was performed at bedside by a single expert. The ultrasound indexes observed in this study included pleural line, A-line, B-line, lung consolidation, air bronchograms, bilateral white lung, interstitial syndrome, lung sliding, lung pulse etc. In all of the infants with RDS, lung ultrasound consistently showed generalized consolidation with air bronchograms, bilateral white lung or alveolar-interstitial syndrome, pleural line abnormalities, A-line disappearance, pleural effusion, lung pulse, etc. The simultaneous demonstration of lung consolidation, pleural line abnormalities and bilateral white lung, or lung consolidation, pleural line abnormalities and A-line disappearance co-exists with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Besides, the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 100% of lung pulse for the diagnosis of neonatal RDS. This study indicates that using an ultrasound to diagnose neonatal RDS is accurate and reliable too. A lung ultrasound has many advantages over other techniques. Ultrasound is non-ionizing, low-cost, easy to operate, and can be performed at bedside, making this technique ideal for use in NICU.

  9. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures ... the Thyroid? What is an Ultrasound of the Thyroid? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy uses ... of Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy? What is Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate ... for ultrasound examinations. top of page What does the ultrasound equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of ...

  13. Standardized cine-loop documentation in abdominal ultrasound facilitates offline image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormagen, Johann Baptist; Gaarder, Mario; Drolsum, Anders

    2015-01-01

    One of the main disadvantages of conventional ultrasound is its operator dependency, which might impede the reproducibility of the sonographic findings. A new approach with cine-loops and standardized scan protocols can overcome this drawback. To compare abdominal ultrasound findings of immediate bedside reading by performing radiologist with offline reading by a non-performing radiologist, using standardized cine-loop sequences. Over a 6-month period, three radiologists performed 140 dynamic ultrasound organ-based examinations in 43 consecutive outpatients. Examination protocols were standardized and included predefined probe position and sequences of short cine-loops of the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, kidneys, and urine bladder, covering the organs completely in two planes. After bedside examinations, the studies were reviewed and read out immediately by the performing radiologist. Image quality was registered from 1 (no diagnostic value) to 5 (excellent cine-loop quality). Offline reading was performed blinded by a radiologist who had not performed the examination. Bedside and offline reading were compared with each other and with consensus results. In 140 examinations, consensus reading revealed 21 cases with renal disorders, 17 cases with liver and bile pathology, and four cases with bladder pathology. Overall inter-observer agreement was 0.73 (95% CI 0.61-0.91), with lowest agreement for findings of the urine bladder (0.36) and highest agreement in liver examinations (0.90). Disagreements between the two readings were seen in nine kidneys, three bladder examinations, one pancreas and bile system examinations each, and in one liver, giving a total number of mismatches of 11%. Nearly all cases of mismatch were of minor clinical significance. The median image quality was 3 (range, 2-5) with most examinations deemed a quality of 3. Compared to consensus reading, overall accuracy was 96% for bedside reading and 94% for offline reading. Standardized cine

  14. Accuracy of the bedside head impulse test in detecting vestibular hypofunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns‐Häderli, M; Straumann, D; Palla, A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the accuracy of the bedside head impulse test (bHIT) by direct comparison with results from the quantitative head impulse test (qHIT) in the same subjects, and to investigate whether bHIT sensitivity and specificity changes with neuro‐otological training. Methods Video clips of horizontal bHIT to both sides were produced in patients with unilateral and bilateral peripheral vestibular deficits (n = 15) and in healthy subjects (n = 9). For qHIT, eye and head movements were recorded with scleral search coils on the right eye and the forehead. Clinicians (neurologists or otolaryngologists) with at least 6 months of neuro‐otological training (“experts”: n = 12) or without this training (“non‐experts”: n = 45) assessed video clips for ocular motor signs of vestibular deficits on either side or of normal vestibular function. Results On average, bHIT sensitivity was significantly (t test: p<0.05) lower for experts than for non‐experts (63% vs 72%), while bHIT specificity was significantly higher for experts than non‐experts (78% vs 64%). This outcome was a consequence of the experts' tendency to accept bHIT with corresponding borderline qHIT values as still being normal. Fitted curves revealed that at the lower normal limit of qHIT, 20% of bHIT were rated as deficient by the experts and 37% by the non‐experts. Conclusions When qHIT is used as a reference, bHIT sensitivity is adequate and therefore clinically useful in the hands of both neuro‐otological experts and non‐experts. We advise performing quantitative head impulse testing with search coils or high speed video methods when bHIT is not conclusive. PMID:17220287

  15. Advances in lung ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco Neto, Miguel Jose; Rahal Junior, Antonio; Vieira, Fabio Augusto Cardillo; Silva, Paulo Savoia Dias da; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound examination of the chest has advanced in recent decades. This imaging modality is currently used to diagnose several pathological conditions and provides qualitative and quantitative information. Acoustic barriers represented by the aerated lungs and the bony framework of the chest generate well-described sonographic artifacts that can be used as diagnostic aids. The normal pleural line and A, B, C, E and Z lines (also known as false B lines) are artifacts with specific characteristics. Lung consolidation and pneumothorax sonographic patterns are also well established. Some scanning protocols have been used in patient management. The Blue, FALLS and C.A.U.S.E. protocols are examples of algorithms using artifact combinations to achieve accurate diagnoses. Combined chest ultrasonography and radiography are often sufficient to diagnose and manage lung and chest wall conditions. Chest ultrasonography is a highly valuable diagnostic tool for radiologists, emergency and intensive care physicians. (author)

  16. Early bedside detection of ischemia and rejection in liver transplants by microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håugaa, Håkon; Thorgersen, Ebbe B; Pharo, Anne; Boberg, Kirsten M; Foss, Aksel; Line, Pål Dag; Sanengen, Truls; Almaas, Runar; Grindheim, Guro; Pischke, Soeren Erik; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Tønnessen, Tor Inge

    2012-07-01

    This study was performed to explore whether lactate, pyruvate, glucose, and glycerol levels sampled via microdialysis catheters in the transplanted liver could be used to detect ischemia and/or rejection. The metabolites were measured at the bedside every 1 to 2 hours after the operation for a median of 10 days. Twelve grafts with biopsy-proven rejection and 9 grafts with ischemia were compared to a reference group of 39 grafts with uneventful courses. The median lactate level was significantly higher in both the ischemia group [5.8 mM (interquartile range = 4.0-11.1 mM)] and the rejection group [2.1 mM (interquartile range = 1.9-2.4 mM)] versus the reference group [1.5 mM (interquartile range = 1.1-1.9 mM), P interquartile range = 155-206 μM)] versus the reference group [124 μM (interquartile range = 102-150 μM), P interquartile range = 23.9-156.7) and 138 μM (interquartile range = 26-260 μM)] versus the reference group [11.8 (interquartile range = 10.6-13.6), P interquartile range = 9-24 μM), P = 0.002]. Ischemia was detected with 100% sensitivity and greater than 90% specificity when a positive test was repeated after 1 hour. In 3 cases of hepatic artery thrombosis, ischemia was detected despite normal blood lactate levels. Consecutive pathological measurements for 6 hours were used to diagnose rejection with greater than 80% sensitivity and specificity at a median of 4 days before the activity of alanine aminotransferase, the concentration of bilirubin in serum, or both increased. In conclusion, bedside measurements of intrahepatic lactate and pyruvate levels were used to detect ischemia and rejection earlier than current standard methods could. Discrimination from an uneventful patient course was achieved. Consequently, intrahepatic graft monitoring with microdialysis may lead to the earlier initiation of graft-saving treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  17. Improving Patient Safety and Satisfaction 
With Standardized Bedside Handoff and Walking Rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Julia S

    2015-08-01

    In 2009, the Joint Commission identified a standardized approach to handoff communication as a patient safety goal to reduce communication errors. Evidence suggests that a structured handoff report, combined with active patient participation, reduces communication errors and promotes patient safety. Research shows that bedside handoff increases nurses' accountability by visualizing the patient and exchanging information at the point of care. Based on recommendations from the Joint Commission, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and broader research literature, a standardized approach to bedside handoff and walking rounds was implemented on an inpatient surgical oncology unit. At a Glance • A standardized handoff communication tool is recognized as a Joint Commission patient safety goal to reduce communication errors and improve patient safety. • The benefits of patient safety and satisfaction outweigh the barriers to implementing a bedside handoff report. • A standardized, nurse-driven, electronic report should guide transfer of information during bedside handoff.

  18. How to achieve ultrasound-guided femoral venous access: the new standard of care in the electrophysiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Benedict M; Child, Nicholas; Roberts, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Bedside vascular ultrasound machines are increasingly available. They are used to facilitate safer vascular access across a number of different specialties. In the electrophysiology laboratory however, where patients are frequently anticoagulated and require the insertion of multiple venous sheaths, anatomical landmark techniques predominate. Despite the high number of vascular complications associated with electrophysiological procedures and the increasing evidence to support its use in electrophysiology, ultrasound remains underutilised. A new standard of care is required. A comprehensive technical report, providing a detailed explanation of this important technique, will provide other electrophysiology centres with the knowledge and justification for adopting ultrasound guidance as their standard practice. We review the increasing body of evidence which demonstrates that routine ultrasound usage can substantially improve the safety of femoral venous access in the electrophysiology laboratory. We offer a comprehensive technical report to guide operators through the process of ultrasound-guided venous access, with a specific focus on the electrophysiology laboratory. Additionally, we detail a novel technique which utilises real-time colour Doppler ultrasound to accurately identify needle tip location during venous puncture. The use of vascular ultrasound to guide femoral venous cannulation is rapid, inexpensive and easily learnt. Ultrasound is readily available and offers the potential to significantly reduce vascular complications in the unique setting of the electrophysiology laboratory. Ultrasound guidance to achieve femoral venous access should be the new standard of care in electrophysiology.

  19. Advantages and pitfalls of pocket ultrasound vs daily chest radiography in the coronary care unit: A single-user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Colin T; Manning, Warren J

    2017-05-01

    Pocket ultrasonography may enhance patient diagnosis and care. We sought to assess pocket ultrasound in detecting common conditions in the coronary care unit (CCU) compared to portable daily chest radiography (CXR) and conventional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). An experienced pocket ultrasound user performed a pocket ultrasound examination for interstitial edema, pneumonia, central line seen in the right ventricle, pleural and pericardial effusions, left atrial enlargement, and cardiomegaly. Data were blindly compared to the radiologist CXR interpretation and cardiologist TTE interpretation. A total of 102 CXR and pocket ultrasound examinations were performed in 66 patients. The most common CXR indication was "interval change" (37%) and finding central line (65%). Pocket ultrasound demonstrated overall good concordance with CXR ranging from 77% for pleural effusion to 92% for pneumonia. Additionally, the pocket ultrasound examination appeared to anticipate resolution of pulmonary edema prior to the CXR. Compared to TTE, pocket ultrasound had excellent sensitivity for cardiac findings with values ranging from 85% for left atrial enlargement to 100% for cardiomegaly, but limited specificity of cardiomegaly at just 51%. In the CCU, bedside pocket ultrasound reliably diagnoses common conditions identified by CXR with the advantage of lack of ionizing radiation and the suggestion of detecting the resolution of pulmonary edema prior to CXR. Pitfalls include only modest concordance for pleural effusions and limited specificity for cardiomegaly. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to determine whether pocket ultrasound can reduce routine daily CXR in the CCU and other intensive care settings. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The role of routine post-natal abdominal ultrasound for newborns in a resource-poor setting: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omokhodion Samuel I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Neonatal abdominal ultrasound is usually performed in Nigeria to investigate neonatal symptoms rather than as a follow up to evaluate fetal abnormalities which were detected on prenatal ultrasound. The role of routine obstetric ultrasonography in the monitoring of pregnancy and identification of fetal malformations has partly contributed to lowering of fetal mortality rates. In Nigeria which has a high maternal and fetal mortality rate, many pregnant women do not have ante-natal care and not infrequently, women also deliver their babies at home and only bring the newborns to the clinics for immunization. Even when performed, most routine obstetric scans are not targeted towards the detection of fetal abnormalities. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the benefit of routinely performing abdominal scans on newborns with a view to detecting possible abnormalities which may have been missed ante-natally. Methods- This was a longitudinal study of 202 consecutive, apparently normal newborns. Routine clinical examination and abdominal ultrasound scans were performed on the babies by their mother's bedside, before discharge. Neonates with abnormal initial scans had follow-up scans. Results- There were 108 males and 94 females. There were 12 (5.9% abnormal scans seen in five male and seven female neonates. Eleven of the twelve abnormalities were in the kidneys, six on the left and five on the right. Three of the four major renal anomalies- absent kidney, ectopic/pelvic kidney and two cases of severe hydronephrosis were however on the left side. There was one suprarenal abnormality on the right suspected to be a possible infected adrenal haemorrage. Nine of the abnormal cases reported for follow- up and of these, two cases had persistent severe abnormalities. Conclusions- This study demonstrated a 5.9% incidence of genito urinary anomalies on routine neonatal abdominal ultrasound in this small population. Routine obstetric USS

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  2. Prenatal ultrasound - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100197.htm Prenatal ultrasound - series—Procedure, part 1 To use the ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prenatal Testing Ultrasound A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... color picture. It can also convert blood flow information into a distinctive sound that can be heard ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose heart conditions, and assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ... heart failure, and to assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound of the heart is commonly called an “ ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... illness. Ultrasound is used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... can be heard with every heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound ... is full when the scan begins. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins ... the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a variety of conditions and to assess organ damage following ... the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart conditions, including valve problems and congestive ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... can only see the outer surface of bony structures and not what lies within (except in infants ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... for a procedure like angioplasty . top of page How should I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose- ... are poorly suited for ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  20. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a ... the scan begins. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  4. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%). Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (Pbarrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the hospital wards as a supportive environment for student learning.

  5. Monitoring Apnea of Prematurity: Validity of Nursing Documentation and Bedside Cardiorespiratory Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sanjiv B.; Burnell, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare apnea events recorded by bedside cardiorespiratory monitor and nursing documentation with those detected by visual inspection of continuous electronic cardiorespiratory waveform. Methods In a prospective observational study, 20 nonventilated infants of 28 to 33 weeks’ gestational age were monitored for apnea during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Apnea was defined as a respiratory pause > 20 seconds or > 15 seconds if associated with a heart rate apnea was defined as one for which visual inspection of continuous electronic cardiorespiratory waveform on the central monitor verified apnea. Results The number of apnea episodes recorded by nursing documentation and bedside monitors were 207 and 418, respectively. Only 7.7% of apnea events recorded by nursing documentation were confirmed as true apnea compared with 50.4% of apnea recorded by bedside monitors and the difference was statistically significant. Of true apnea (n = 211) episodes recorded on central monitors, 99% were recorded by bedside monitors but only 7.6% of apnea occurrences were recorded by nursing personnel. Conclusions Nursing documentation does not provide accurate monitoring of apnea. Although bedside monitors have better sensitivity and specificity than nursing documentation, future research should be directed to improve the specificity of bedside monitoring. PMID:23254381

  6. Monitoring apnea of prematurity: validity of nursing documentation and bedside cardiorespiratory monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sanjiv B; Burnell, Erica

    2013-09-01

    To compare apnea events recorded by bedside cardiorespiratory monitor and nursing documentation with those detected by visual inspection of continuous electronic cardiorespiratory waveform. In a prospective observational study, 20 nonventilated infants of 28 to 33 weeks' gestational age were monitored for apnea during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Apnea was defined as a respiratory pause > 20 seconds or > 15 seconds if associated with a heart rate apnea was defined as one for which visual inspection of continuous electronic cardiorespiratory waveform on the central monitor verified apnea. The number of apnea episodes recorded by nursing documentation and bedside monitors were 207 and 418, respectively. Only 7.7% of apnea events recorded by nursing documentation were confirmed as true apnea compared with 50.4% of apnea recorded by bedside monitors and the difference was statistically significant. Of true apnea (n = 211) episodes recorded on central monitors, 99% were recorded by bedside monitors but only 7.6% of apnea occurrences were recorded by nursing personnel. Nursing documentation does not provide accurate monitoring of apnea. Although bedside monitors have better sensitivity and specificity than nursing documentation, future research should be directed to improve the specificity of bedside monitoring. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Teachers as learners: the effect of bedside teaching on the clinical skills of clinician-teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, Marjorie D; Jackson, Molly B; Ajam, Kamal S; Wolfhagen, Ineke H; Ramsey, Paul G; Scherpbier, Albert J

    2011-07-01

    To assess the impact on full-time faculty's own clinical skills and practices of sustained clinical skills bedside teaching with preclerkship students. This was a longitudinal, qualitative study of faculty who provide dedicated ongoing bedside clinical skills teaching for preclerkship medical students. Interviews were conducted during 2003 to 2007 with 31 faculty of the Colleges program at University of Washington School of Medicine. Content analyses of interview transcripts were performed. Teachers perceived a strong positive impact of teaching on their own clinical skills. Six themes were associated with the influence of bedside teaching on teachers' skills and practices. One related to deterrents to change (e.g., reliance on tests/specialists) that narrowed teachers' practice skills prior to starting bedside teaching. Three related to expansion of the process of clinical care resulting from bedside teaching: expanded knowledge and skills, deconstructing the clinical experience (e.g., deepening, broadening, slowing one's practice), and greater self-reflection (e.g., awareness of being a role model). Two were perceived outcomes: improved clinical skills (e.g., physical examination) and more mindful practices (e.g., self-confidence, patient-centered). Teachers perceived profound positive impact on their clinical skills from teaching preclerkship students at the bedside. Further studies are needed, including comparing teaching preclerkship students with teaching advanced students and residents, to assess whether teaching at other levels has this effect.

  8. [How should anesthesiologists perform ultrasound examinations? Diagnostic use of ultrasound in emergency and intensive care and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maecken, T; Zinke, H; Zenz, M; Grau, T

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging has attained great significance as a tool for diagnostics in emergency and intensive care medicine. The major advantages of this technique are its instantaneous bedside availability and the possibility to perform repeatable examinations. These advantages are based on recent developments, such as portable ultrasound devices offering excellent imaging quality as well as a quick-start-function. Ultrasound imaging in critically ill patients is frequently performed under pressure of time depending on the current acute physical state. All standard examinations in echocardiography, vascular, abdominal and thoracic ultrasound scanning can be applied in these patients. Based on the clinical scenario the duration of examinations may vary from seconds during cardiopulmonary resuscitations to time-consuming repeated scanning. The transition from basic to subject-specific detailed examinations is flowing and has to be adjusted to local conditions. In the field of emergency and intensive care medicine the technique used is whole-body sonography. The goal is to classify the patient's present physical state and to define a targeted therapeutic approach. The characteristics of whole-body sonography are similar to the field of anesthesiology which is an interdisciplinary one. Currently, these characteristics deserve more attention in training in sonography.

  9. Supporting clinical practice at the bedside using wireless technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Michael J; Meurer, David P; Colman, Ian; Holroyd, Brian R; Rowe, Brian H

    2004-11-01

    Despite studies that show improvements in both standards of care and outcomes with the judicious application of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), their clinical utilization remains low. This randomized controlled trial examined the use of a wirelessly networked mobile computer (MC) by physicians at the bedside with access to an emergency department information system, decision support tools (DSTs), and other software options. Each of ten volunteer emergency physicians was randomized using a matched-pair design to work five shifts in standard fashion (desktop computer [DC] access) and five shifts with a wirelessly networked MC. Work pattern issues and electronic CPG/DST use were compared using end-of-shift satisfaction questionnaires and review of a CPG/DST database. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine between-shift differences. A total of 100 eight-hour shifts were evaluated; 99% compliance with postshift questionnaires was achieved. Using a seven-point Likert scale (MC values first), MCs were rated as being as fast (5.04 vs. 4.54; p=0.13) and convenient (5.08 vs. 4.14; p=0.07) as DCs. Overall, physicians rated MCs to be less efficient (3.18 vs. 4.30; p=0.02) but encouraged more frequent use of DSTs (4.10 vs. 3.47; p=0.03) without impacting doctor-patient communication (2.78 vs. 2.96; p=0.51). During the study period, physician use of an intranet Web application (eCPG) was more frequent during shifts assigned to the MC when compared with the DC (eCPG uses/shift, 3.6 vs. 2.0; p=0.033). The MC technology permitted physicians to access information at the bedside and increased the use of CPG/DST tools. According to physicians, patients appeared to accept their use of information technology to assist in decision making. Development of improved computer technology may address the major limitation of MC portability.

  10. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Ultrasound and traditional diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beluffi, G.; Fiori, P.; D'Allocchio, T.; Chiara, A.; Rondini, G.; Bragheri, G.

    1986-01-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) is the most fraquent cause of abdominal surgery during the first month of life. A new diagnostic approach to this type of pathology is given by ultrasound examination which offers the opportunity to perform a precise study of pyloric muscle thickness, pyloric diameter width and pyloric muscle lenght. Ultrasound provides a quick diagnostic tool sparing radiation exposure to the patient. X-ray study is only to be reserved to the few cases in which clinical and ultrasound data are doubtful and, in all instances, to rule-out other possible causes of gastric outlet obstruction. We report 20 infants (14 males and 6 females) referred by ultrasound in 12 cases, suspected in 1 and excluded in 7 cases. Upper gastrointestinal tract series confirmed the presence of HPS in 13 cases; discovered a huge gastroesophageal reflux in one and showed normal findings in 6 cases

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uterus and ovaries. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most patients. Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is inserted into an opening of the body may produce minimal discomfort. If a Doppler ultrasound ...

  13. Harmonic Intravascular Ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Frijlink (Martijn)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractMedical ultrasound is a popular imaging modality in cardiology. Harmonic Imaging is a technique that has been shown to increase the image quality of diagnostic ultrasound at frequencies below 10 MHz. However, Intravascular Ultrasound, which is a technique to acoustically investigate

  14. [Lung ultrasound in acute and critical care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, P M; Seibel, A; Aichinger, G; Steigerwald, M; Dorr, K; Scheiermann, P; Schellhaas, S; Cuca, C; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-07-01

    The development of modern critical care lung ultrasound is based on the classical representation of anatomical structures and the need for the assessment of specific sonography artefacts and phenomena. The air and fluid content of the lungs is interpreted using few typical artefacts and phenomena, with which the most important differential diagnoses can be made. According to a recent international consensus conference these include lung sliding, lung pulse, B-lines, lung point, reverberation artefacts, subpleural consolidations and intrapleural fluid collections. An increased number of B-lines is an unspecific sign for an increased quantity of fluid in the lungs resembling interstitial syndromes, for example in the case of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or lung contusion. In the diagnosis of interstitial syndromes lung ultrasound provides higher diagnostic accuracy (95%) than auscultation (55%) and chest radiography (72%). Diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary embolism can be achieved at the bedside by evaluating subpleural lung consolidations. Detection of lung sliding can help to detect asymmetrical ventilation and allows the exclusion of a pneumothorax. Ultrasound-based diagnosis of pneumothorax is superior to supine anterior chest radiography: for ultrasound the sensitivity is 92-100% and the specificity 91-100%. For the diagnosis of pneumothorax a simple algorithm was therefore designed: in the presence of lung sliding, lung pulse or B-lines, pneumothorax can be ruled out, in contrast a positive lung point is a highly specific sign of the presence of pneumothorax. Furthermore, lung ultrasound allows not only diagnosis of pleural effusion with significantly higher sensitivity than chest x-ray but also visual control in ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis.

  15. Ultrasound-guided central venous access using Google Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teresa S; Dameff, Christian J; Tully, Jeffrey L

    2014-12-01

    The use of ultrasound during invasive bedside procedures is quickly becoming the standard of care. Ultrasound machine placement during procedures often requires the practitioner to turn their head during the procedure to view the screen. Such turning has been implicated in unintentional hand movements in novices. Google Glass is a head-mounted computer with a specialized screen capable of projecting images and video into the view of the wearer. Such technology may help decrease unintentional hand movements. Our aim was to evaluate whether or not medical practitioners at various levels of training could use Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided procedure, and to explore potential advantages of this technology. Forty participants of varying training levels were randomized into two groups. One group used Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided central line. The other group used traditional ultrasound during the procedure. Video recordings of eye and hand movements were analyzed. All participants from both groups were able to complete the procedure without difficulty. Google Glass wearers took longer to perform the procedure at all training levels (medical student year 1 [MS1]: 193 s vs. 77 s, p > 0.5; MS4: 197s vs. 91s, p ≤ 0.05; postgraduate year 1 [PGY1]: 288s vs. 125 s, p > 0.5; PGY3: 151 s vs. 52 s, p ≤ 0.05), and required more needle redirections (MS1: 4.4 vs. 2.0, p > 0.5; MS4: 4.8 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY1: 4.4 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY3: 2.0 vs. 1.0, p > 0.5). In this study, it was possible to perform ultrasound-guided procedures with Google Glass. Google Glass wearers, on average, took longer to gain access, and had more needle redirections, but less head movements were noted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathophysiology of septic shock: From bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of sepsis and its resultant outcomes remains a paradox. On the one hand, we know more about the pathophysiology of sepsis than ever before. However, this knowledge has not been successfully translated to the bedside, as the vast majority of clinical trials for sepsis have been negative. Yet even in the general absence of positive clinical trials, mortality from sepsis has fallen to its lowest point in history, in large part due to educational campaigns that stress timely antibiotics and hemodynamic support. While additional improvements in outcome will assuredly result from further compliance with evidence based practices, a deeper understanding of the science that underlies the host response in sepsis is critical to the development of novel therapeutics. In this review, we outline immunopathologic abnormalities in sepsis, and then look at potential approaches to therapeutically modulate them. Ultimately, an understanding of the science underlying sepsis should allow the critical care community to utilize precision medicine to combat this devastating disease on an individual basis leading to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Bedside Tested Ocular Motor Disorders in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Servillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Ocular motor disorders (OMDs are a common feature of multiple sclerosis (MS. In clinical practice, if not reported by patients, OMDs are often underdiagnosed and their prevalence is underestimated. Methods. We studied 163 patients (125 women, 76.7%, 38 men, 23.3%; median age 45.0 years; median disease duration 10 years; median EDSS 3.5 with definite MS (n=150, 92% or clinically isolated syndrome (n=13, 8% who underwent a thorough clinical examination of eye movements. Data on localization of previous relapses, MS subtype, and MRI findings were collected and analyzed. Results. Overall, 111/163 (68.1% patients showed at least one abnormality of eye movement. Most frequent OMDs were impaired smooth pursuit (42.3%, saccadic dysmetria (41.7%, unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (14.7%, slowing of saccades (14.7%, skew deviation (13.5%, and gaze evoked nystagmus (13.5%. Patients with OMDs had more severe disability (P=0.0005 and showed more frequently infratentorial MRI lesions (P=0.004. Localization of previous relapses was not associated with presence of OMDs. Conclusion. OMDs are frequent in patients with stable (no relapses MS. A precise bedside examination of eye motility can disclose abnormalities that imply the presence of subclinical MS lesions and may have a substantial impact on definition of the diagnosis and on management of MS patients.

  18. Monitoring of patient-ventilator interaction at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of patient-ventilator interactions at the bedside involves evaluation of patient breathing pattern on ventilator settings. One goal of mechanical ventilation is to have ventilator-assisted breathing coincide with patient breathing. The objectives of this goal are to have patient breath initiation result in ventilator triggering without undue patient effort, to match assisted-breath delivery with patient inspiratory effort, and to have assisted breathing cease when the patient terminates inspiration, thus avoiding ventilator-assisted inspiration during patient exhalation. Asynchrony can occur throughout the respiratory cycle, and this paper describes common asynchronies. The types of asynchronies discussed are trigger asynchrony (ie, breath initiation that may manifest as ineffective triggering, double-triggering, or auto-triggering); flow asynchrony (ie, breath-delivery asynchrony, which may manifest as assisted-breath delivery being faster or slower than what patient desires); and cycling asynchronies (ie, termination of assisted inspiration does not coincide with patient breath termination, which may manifest as delayed cycling or premature cycling). Various waveforms are displayed and graphically demonstrate asynchronies; basic principles of waveform interpretation are discussed.

  19. Surfactant from neonatal to pediatric ICU: bench and bedside evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boet, A; Brat, R; Aguilera, S S; Tissieres, P; De Luca, D

    2014-12-01

    Surfactant is a cornerstone of neonatal critical care for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome of preterm babies. However, other indications have been studied for various clinical conditions both in term neonates and in children beyond neonatal age. A high degree of evidence is not yet available in some cases and this is due to the complex and not yet totally understood physiopathology of the different types of pediatric and neonatal lung injury. We here summarise the state of the art of the bench and bedside knowledge about surfactant use for the respiratory conditions usually cared for in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units. Future research direction will also be presented. On the whole, surfactant is able to improve oxygenation in infection related respiratory failure, pulmonary hemorrhage and meconium aspiration syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage with surfactant solution is currently the only means to reduce mortality or need for extracorporeal life support in neonates with meconium aspiration. While surfactant bolus or lavage only improves the oxygenation and ventilatory requirements in other types of postneonatal acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there seems to be a reduction in the mortality of small infants with RSV-related ARDS.

  20. Interrater reliability of the bedside shivering assessment scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Grissom, Jana L; Williamson, Rachel A; Bennett, Stacey N; Bellows, Steven T; James, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Since its early development, the Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale (BSAS) has had only initial psychometric testing. Before this instrument is incorporated into routine practice, its interrater reliability should be explored in a diverse group of practitioners. This prospective nonrandomized study used a panel of 5 observers who completed 100 paired assessments. Observers independently scored patients for shivering by using the BSAS. Kappa statistics were determined by using SAS version 9.4 with BSAS scores treated as ordinal data. A weighted kappa value of 0.48 from 100 paired observations of 22 patients indicates moderate agreement of the BSAS scores. Most of the BSAS scores were 0 or 1; dichotomizing shivering as little or no shivering versus significant shivering resulted in a kappa of 0.66 (substantial agreement). No relationship was found between timing of assessment or the role of the practitioner and the likelihood of both observers assigning the same BSAS score. The BSAS has adequate interrater reliability to be considered for use among a diverse group of practitioners.

  1. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel H.F. Lam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED. Increasingly emergency physicians (EP are using bedside ultrasound (BUS as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspected appendicitis were eligible for enrollment. After informed consent was obtained, BUS was performed on the subjects by trained EPs who had undergone a minimum of one-hour didactic training on the use of BUS to diagnose appendicitis.They then recorded elements of clinical history, physical examination, white blood cell count (WBC with polymophonuclear percentage (PMN, and BUS findings on a data form. We ascertained subject outcomes by a combination of medical record review and telephone follow-up. Results: A total of 125 subjects consented for the study, and 116 had adequate image data for final analysis. Prevalence of appendicitis was 40%. Mean age of the subjects was 20.2 years, and 51% were male. BUS was 100% sensitive (95% CI 87-100% and 32% specific (95% CI 14-57% for detection of appendicitis, with a positive predictive value of 72% (95% CI 56-84%, and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI 52-100%. Assuming all non-diagnostic studies were negative would yield a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 81%. Subjects with appendicitis had a significantly higher occurrence of anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and a higher WBC and PMN count when compared to those without appendicitis. Their BUS studies were significantly more likely to result in visualization of the appendix, appendix diameter >6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid, visualization of the appendix tip, and sonographic Mcburney’s sign (p6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid were

  2. Ultrasound techniques in the evaluation of the mediastinum, part I: endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and transcutaneous mediastinal ultrasound (TMUS), introduction into ultrasound techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, Christoph Frank; Annema, Jouke Tabe; Clementsen, Paul; Cui, Xin Wu; Borst, Mathias Maximilian; Jenssen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has gained importance in pulmonary medicine over the last decades including conventional transcutaneous ultrasound (TUS), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). Mediastinal lymph node staging affects the management of patients with both operable and

  3. Repeated bedside echocardiography in children with respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehlicka Petr

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to verify the benefits and limitations of repeated bedside echocardiographic examinations in children during mechanical ventilation. For the purposes of this study, we selected the data of over a time period from 2006 to 2010. Methods A total of 235 children, average age 3.21 (SD 1.32 years were included into the study and divided into etiopathogenic groups. High-risk groups comprised: Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS, return of spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ROSC, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, cardiomyopathy (CMP and cardiopulmonary disease (CPD. Transthoracic echocardiography was carried out during mechanical ventilation. The following data were collated for statistical evaluation: right and left ventricle myocardial performance indices (RV MPI; LV MPI, left ventricle shortening fraction (SF, cardiac output (CO, and the mitral valve ratio of peak velocity of early wave (E to the peak velocity of active wave (A as E/A ratio. The data was processed after a period of recovery, i.e. one hour after the introduction of invasive lines (time-1 and after 72 hours of comprehensive treatment (time-2. The overall development of parameters over time was compared within groups and between groups using the distribution-free Wilcoxons and two-way ANOVA tests. Results A total of 870 echocardiographic examinations were performed. At time-1 higher average values of RV MPI (0.34, SD 0.01 vs. 0.21, SD 0.01; p Conclusion Echocardiography complements standard monitoring of valuable information regarding cardiac load in real time. Chest excursion during mechanical ventilation does not reduce the quality of the acquired data.

  4. Repeated bedside echocardiography in children with respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobr, Jiri; Fremuth, Jiri; Pizingerova, Katerina; Sasek, Lumir; Jehlicka, Petr; Fikrlova, Sarka; Slavik, Zdenek

    2011-04-26

    The aim of this study was to verify the benefits and limitations of repeated bedside echocardiographic examinations in children during mechanical ventilation. For the purposes of this study, we selected the data of over a time period from 2006 to 2010. A total of 235 children, average age 3.21 (SD 1.32) years were included into the study and divided into etiopathogenic groups. High-risk groups comprised: Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), return of spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ROSC), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), cardiomyopathy (CMP) and cardiopulmonary disease (CPD). Transthoracic echocardiography was carried out during mechanical ventilation. The following data were collated for statistical evaluation: right and left ventricle myocardial performance indices (RV MPI; LV MPI), left ventricle shortening fraction (SF), cardiac output (CO), and the mitral valve ratio of peak velocity of early wave (E) to the peak velocity of active wave (A) as E/A ratio. The data was processed after a period of recovery, i.e. one hour after the introduction of invasive lines (time-1) and after 72 hours of comprehensive treatment (time-2). The overall development of parameters over time was compared within groups and between groups using the distribution-free Wilcoxons and two-way ANOVA tests. A total of 870 echocardiographic examinations were performed. At time-1 higher average values of RV MPI (0.34, SD 0.01 vs. 0.21, SD 0.01; p mechanical ventilation does not reduce the quality of the acquired data.

  5. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  6. Eating disorders: from bench to bedside and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Provensi, Gustavo; Ricca, Valdo; Lutz, Thomas; Passani, Maria Beatrice

    2016-12-01

    The central nervous system and viscera constitute a functional ensemble, the gut-brain axis, that allows bidirectional information flow that contributes to the control of feeding behavior based not only on the homeostatic, but also on the hedonic aspects of food intake. The prevalence of eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, binge eating and obesity, poses an enormous clinical burden, and involves an ever-growing percentage of the population worldwide. Clinical and preclinical research is constantly adding new information to the field and orienting further studies with the aim of providing a foundation for developing more specific and effective treatment approaches to pathological conditions. A recent symposium at the XVI Congress of the Societá Italiana di Neuroscienze (SINS, 2015) 'Eating disorders: from bench to bedside and back' brought together basic scientists and clinicians with the objective of presenting novel perspectives in the neurobiology of eating disorders. Clinical studies presented by V. Ricca illustrated some genetic aspects of the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa. Preclinical studies addressed different issues ranging from the description of animal models that mimic human pathologies such as anorexia nervosa, diet-induced obesity, and binge eating disorders (T. Lutz), to novel interactions between peripheral signals and central circuits that govern food intake, mood and stress (A. Romano and G. Provensi). The gut-brain axis has received increasing attention in the recent years as preclinical studies are demonstrating that the brain and visceral organs such as the liver and guts, but also the microbiota are constantly engaged in processes of reciprocal communication, with unexpected physiological and pathological implications. Eating is controlled by a plethora of factors; genetic predisposition, early life adverse conditions, peripheral gastrointestinal hormones that act directly or indirectly on the central nervous system, all are

  7. A bedside measure of body composition in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah A; Davidson, Zoe E; Davies, Peter S W; Truby, Helen

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, monitoring body composition is a critical component of nutritional assessment and weight management in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a simple bedside measurement tool for body composition, namely bioelectrical impedance analysis, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Measures of fat-free mass were determined using a bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and compared against estimations obtained from a reference body composition model. Additionally, the use of raw impedance values was analyzed using three existing predictive equations for the estimation of fat-free mass. Accuracy of bioelectrical impedance analysis was assessed by comparison against the reference model by calculation of biases and limits of agreement. Body composition was measured in 10 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, mean age 9.01 ± 2.34 years. The bioelectrical impedance analysis machine values of fat-free mass were on average 2.3 ± 14.1 kg higher than reference values. Limits of agreement (based on 95% confidence interval of the mean) were -7.4 to 2.9 kg. There was a significant correlation between the mean fat-free mass and difference in fat-free mass between the bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and the reference model (r = -0.86; P = 0.02) suggesting that the bias was not consistent across the range of measurements. The most accurate predictive equation for the estimation of fat-free mass using raw impedance values was the equation by Pietrobelli et al. (mean difference, -0.7 kg; 95% limits of agreement, -3.5 to 2.0 kg). In a clinical setting, where a rapid assessment of body composition is advantageous, the use of raw impedance values, combined with the equation by Pietrobelli et al., is recommended for the accurate estimation of fat-free mass, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  9. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Chae

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing has been embraced by early adopters to produce medical imaging-guided 3D printed biomodels that facilitate various aspects of clinical practice. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. With increasing accessibility, investigators are now able to convert standard imaging data into Computer Aided Design (CAD files using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography (SLA, multijet modeling (MJM, selective laser sintering (SLS, binder jet technique (BJT, and fused deposition modeling (FDM. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without out-sourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. In this review the existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice, spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative aesthetics, are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, patient and surgical trainee education, and the development of intraoperative guidance tools and patient-specific prosthetics in everyday surgical practice.

  10. Thoracic ultrasound: Potential new tool for physiotherapists in respiratory management. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Neindre, Aymeric; Mongodi, Silvia; Philippart, François; Bouhemad, Bélaïd

    2016-02-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasound by physiotherapists is not a new concept; it is frequently performed in musculoskeletal physiotherapy. Physiotherapists currently lack accurate, reliable, sensitive, and valid measurements for the assessment of the indications and effectiveness of chest physiotherapy. Thoracic ultrasound may be a promising tool for the physiotherapist and could be routinely performed at patients' bedsides to provide real-time and accurate information on the status of pleura, lungs, and diaphragm; this would allow for assessment of lung aeration from interstitial syndrome to lung consolidation with much better accuracy than chest x-rays or auscultation. Diaphragm excursion and contractility may also be assessed by ultrasound. This narrative review refers to lung and diaphragm ultrasound semiology and describes how physiotherapists could use this tool in their clinical decision-making processes in various cases of respiratory disorders. The use of thoracic ultrasound semiology alongside typical examinations may allow for the guiding, monitoring, and evaluating of chest physiotherapy treatments. Thoracic ultrasound is a potential new tool for physiotherapists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. EEG in children, in the laboratory or at the patient's bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, A; Cheliout-Heraut, F; Eisermann, M; Touzery de Villepin, A; Lamblin, M D

    2015-03-01

    In pediatrics, EEG recordings are performed on patients from the neonatal period up to young adults. This means adapting techniques to many different conditions, concerning not only the patient's age, the need for asepsis and the patient's behavior, but also the environment (e.g. in the laboratory, at the patient's bedside, or in the neonatal intensive care unit [NICU]). Technical requirements depend on age, indication and the type of examination; in infancy, there should be a minimum of 12 EEG electrodes, ECG and respiration recording. In epileptology, surface EMG is also necessary to characterize the type of seizures and refine the diagnosis of epilepsy syndrome, on which physicians will base their treatment choice. The role of the EEG technician is essential because the quality of the recording, its analysis and conclusion will depend on the quality of the technical set-up and the interaction with the child. Sleep is a systematic part of the study up to the age of 5 years for several reasons: sleep EEG yields information on brain maturation; the EEG tracing during wakefulness can contain too many artefacts; and some grapho-elements, key to the diagnosis, only appear during sleep. The time of the examination must be chosen according to the child's usual nap times, possibly after sleep deprivation. Grapho-elements and spatio-temporal organization of the EEG vary with age, and normal variants and unusual aspects are quite wide for any given age; this is why a physician experienced in pediatric EEG should perform the interpretation. This chapter concerns EEG performed in infants, children and adolescents, its technical aspects according to age and indications (general pediatrics, emergency, epilepsy). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The clinical application of computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Sen; Guo Tianchang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn, especially in chest radiography. Methods: Bedside CR images were selected in 100 cases randomly. The exposure parameters were optimized using the large latitude of CR. The details of images were post-processed and adjusted using spatial tuning technique. Then CR photography was compared with conventional X-ray photography. Results: The images acquired with CR had good contrast, high definition, and little distortion, in which the condemned image rate was 1%. While in conventional X-ray photography, the unsuccessful imaging rate is 9%. Conclusion: Bedside computed radiography of new-born, especially the chest imaging, is very helpful to improve image quality and positive rate of the diagnosis. (authors)

  13. Reduction of bioactive substances in stored donor blood: prestorage versus bedside leucofiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J H; Mynster, T; Reimert, C M

    1999-01-01

    Leucocyte filtration has been suggested to improve transfusion products. We studied the effect of prestorage versus bedside leucofiltration on reduction of bioactive substances and leucocyte content in donor blood. Forty-five units of whole blood from healthy blood donors were studied...... leucofiltration, and analysed by ELISA and RIA methods for extracellular content of myeloperoxidase (MPO), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), histamine (HIS) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Leucocyte content was counted in all samples. In non-filtered blood extracellular MPO, ECP, HIS and PAI-1...... period of time. Prestorage and bedside leucofiltration on day 7 reduced the leucocyte content to less than 0.5x10(6)/L, whereas the median content in blood stored for 21 or 35 d was only reduced to 32.0 and 52.2x10(6)/L, respectively. Prestorage leucofiltration may thus be advantageous to bedside...

  14. [Rationalization and rationing at the bedside. A normative and empirical status quo analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strech, D

    2014-02-01

    The topic of bedside rationing is increasingly discussed in Germany. Further need for clarification exists for the question how bedside rationing (e.g., in the area of overcare) can be justified despite coexistent inefficiencies. This paper outlines and analyses the relationship of waste avoidance and rationing from an ethical perspective. Empirical findings regarding the status quo of bedside rationing and rationalization are presented. These normative and empirical explorations will then be further specified regarding opportunities for future physician-driven activities to tackle overuse. The self-government partners in Germany should communicate more explicitly within their communities and to the public how and with which benchmarks they aim to reduce inefficient health care (overuse) in an appropriate manner. Physician-driven activities such as the "Choosing Wisely®" initiative in the USA could provide a first step to raise the awareness for overuse among physicians as well as in the public.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ... is rarely needed for ultrasound examinations. top of page What does the ultrasound equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. An ultrasound examination is usually ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... proper blood flow into it. top of page How should we prepare for an abdominal ultrasound exam? ... are poorly suited for ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  2. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman RH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald H Silverman1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Medical Center, 2F.L. Lizzi Center for Biomedical Engineering, Riverside Research, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via cilio-destruction, tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. Keywords: ophthalmic ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, ultrafast imaging, Doppler imaging 

  3. Automatic Ultrasound Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin

    on the scanners, and to improve the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in ultrasound by introducing new quantitative measures. Thus, four major issues concerning automation of the medical ultrasound are addressed in this PhD project. They touch upon gain adjustments in ultrasound, automatic synthetic aperture image...... on the user adjustments on the scanner interface to optimize the scan settings. This explains the huge interest in the subject of this PhD project entitled “AUTOMATIC ULTRASOUND SCANNING”. The key goals of the project have been to develop automated techniques to minimize the unnecessary settings...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  5. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Jones, Bhavan Prasad Rai Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, UK Purpose: Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. Materials and methods: An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Results: Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%. Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (P<0.01. Seventy-eight percent of the study group agreed that clinical simulation is a good learning tool for clinical examination. Seventy percent of students felt junior doctors were as able as senior doctors to teach. Lack of confidence was identified as the commonest barrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. Conclusion: This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the

  6. Patient-centered interprofessional collaborative care: factors associated with bedside interprofessional rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Wolpaw, Daniel R; Lehman, Erik; Chuang, Cynthia H

    2014-07-01

    Medical care delivered in hospital-based medicine units requires interprofessional collaborative care (IPCC) to improve quality. However, models such as bedside interprofessional rounds, or encounters that include the team of physician and nurse providers discussing medical care at the patient's bedside, are not well studied. To examine the incidence of and time spent in bedside interprofessional rounds on internal medicine teaching services in one academic medical center. Observational descriptive study of internal medicine faculty serving as inpatient medicine attending physicians. Participants completed a daily electronic survey following team rounding sessions to assess rounding characteristics (November 2012-June 2013); variables such as resident level-of-training, attending physician years' of experience, house staff call day and clinic schedule were obtained from administrative data. Descriptive, Kruskal-Wallis, and multivariable logistic regression statistics were used to evaluate the study objectives. Primary outcomes were: (1) incidence of bedside interprofessional rounds, (2) time spent with patients during bedside interprofessional rounding encounters, and, (3) factors associated with increased occurrence of and time spent with patients during bedside interprofessional rounds. Covariates included resident level-of-training, attending physician years' of experience, census size, and call day. Of 549 rounding sessions, 412 surveys were collected (75 % response) from 25 attending physicians. Bedside interprofessional rounds occurred with 64 % of patients (median 8.0 min/encounter), differing by unit (intermediate care 81 %, general medicine 63 %, non-medicine 57 %, p interprofessional rounds were senior resident (OR 2.67, CI 1.75-4.06, PGY-3/PGY-4 vs. PGY-2), weekdays (OR 1.74, CI 1.13-2.69), team census size ≤ 11 (OR 2.36, CI 1.37-4.06), and attending physicians with ≤ 4 years' experience (OR 2.15, CI 1.31-3.55). Factors independently associated with

  7. Factors influencing when intensive care unit nurses go to the bedside to investigate patient related alarms: A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despins, Laurel A

    2017-12-01

    This study examines what prompts the intensive care unit (ICU) nurse to go to the patient's bedside to investigate an alarm and the influences on the nurse's determination regarding how quickly this needs to occur. A qualitative descriptive design guided data collection and analysis. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis guided by the Patient Risk Detection Theoretical Framework was applied to the data. Four specialty intensive care units in an academic medical center. ICU nurses go the patient's bedside in response to an alarm to catch patient deterioration and avert harm. Their determination of the immediacy of patient risk and their desire to prioritize their bedside investigations to true alarms influences how quickly they proceed to the bedside. Ready visual access to physiological data and waveform configurations, experience, teamwork, and false alarms are important determinants in the timing of ICU nurses' bedside alarm investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  9. Point-of-care Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Ectopic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farhat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 31-year-old female presented to the Emergency Department by ambulance with severe abdominal pain and presyncope. On exam, the patient was hypotensive with suprapubic tenderness. Though the patient denied being pregnant, her labs showed a beta human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG of 38,000 mIU/ml. A bedside transabdominal pelvic ultrasound revealed an ectopic pregnancy and the patient was taken to the operating room for an emergent right salpingectomy. Significant findings: The transabdominal pelvic ultrasound shows an empty uterus (annotated with free fluid and a right sided extrauterine gestational sac representing an ectopic pregnancy (red arrow. Discussion: Ectopic pregnancy is the leading cause of mortality in the first trimester of pregnancy making prompt diagnosis critical.1 Risk factors including history of previous ectopic pregnancy,2 pelvic inflammatory disease,2 increased age,3 and smoking4 can raise suspicion of an ectopic pregnancy. However, the absence of risk factors does not exclude ectopic pregnancy from the differential. Any sexually active female with abdominal pain following a period of amenorrhea should be suspected of an ectopic until proven otherwise. One third of all pregnant women experience abdominal pain and/or vaginal bleeding and 9% of women with an ectopic are asymptomatic. Thus, history alone is insufficient to make the diagnosis.5 In early pregnancy, ectopic pregnancies share the same symptoms as normal pregnancies, including a missed menstrual period, fatigue, and nausea. The first classical signs of an ectopic pregnancy are vaginal bleeding, dizziness, and lower abdominal and/or pelvic pain usually 6 to 8 weeks after a missed menstrual period.5 A meta-analysis of studies on pelvic ultrasonography demonstrated a sensitivity of 99.3% and a negative predictive value of 99.6% for diagnosing ectopic pregnancy and therefore should be utilized as a first-line diagnostic tool for emergency

  10. Point-of-care ultrasound education for non-physician clinicians in a resource-limited emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Lori A; Muruganandan, Krithika M; Bisanzo, Mark C; Sebikali, Mugisha J; Dreifuss, Bradley A; Hammerstedt, Heather S; Nelson, Sara W; Nayabale, Irene; Adhikari, Srikar; Shah, Sachita P

    2015-08-01

    To describe the outcomes and curriculum components of an educational programme to train non-physician clinicians working in a rural, Ugandan emergency department in the use of POC ultrasound. The use of point-of-care ultrasound was taught to emergency care providers through lectures, bedsides teaching and hands-on practical sessions. Lectures were tailored to care providers' knowledge base and available therapeutic means. Every ultrasound examination performed by these providers was recorded over 4.5 years. Findings of these examinations were categorised as positive, negative, indeterminate or procedural. Other radiologic studies ordered over this same time period were also recorded. A total of 22,639 patients were evaluated in the emergency department by emergency care providers, and 2185 point-of-care ultrasound examinations were performed on 1886 patients. Most commonly used were the focused assessment with sonography in trauma examination (53.3%) and echocardiography (16.4%). Point-of-care ultrasound studies were performed more frequently than radiology department-performed studies. Positive findings were documented in 46% of all examinations. We describe a novel curriculum for point-of-care ultrasound education of non-physician emergency practitioners in a resource-limited setting. These non-physician clinicians integrated ultrasound into clinical practice and utilised this imaging modality more frequently than traditional radiology department imaging with a large proportion of positive findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Portable Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso

    This PhD project investigates hardware strategies and imaging methods for hand-held ultrasound systems. The overall idea is to use a wireless ultrasound probe linked to general-purpose mobile devices for the processing and visualization. The approach has the potential to reduce the upfront costs ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging ...

  13. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  14. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If You Have Questions Print en español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that ... Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) Urinary ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  15. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... while the ultrasound images are reviewed. The branches of the carotid ...

  16. uper-resolution Axial Localization of Ultrasound Scatter Using Multi-focal Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Greenaway, Alan H.; Anderson, Tom

    2017-01-01

    to noise ratio in each image. Conclusion: Super-resolution axial imaging from optical microscopy has been successfully translated into ultrasound imaging by using raw ultrasound data and standard beamforming. Significance: The normalized sharpness method has the potential to be used in scatterer...... localization applications and contribute in current super-resolution ultrasound imaging techniques.......This paper aims to develop a method for achieving micrometre axial scatterer localization for medical ultrasound, surpassing the inherent, pulse length dependence limiting ultrasound imaging. Methods: The method, directly translated from cellular microscopy, is based on multi-focal imaging...

  17. Gray scale ultrasound and isotope scanning: complementary techniques for imaging the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.J.; Sullivan, D.; Rosenfield, A.T.; Gottschalk, A.

    1977-01-01

    Technical advances in gray scale ultrasound have led to better signal-to-noise ratios and improved resolution. A display of the texture of the liver is now possible, making ultrasound an important complementary technique to radisotope scanning. In the positive radioisotope scan, ultrasound permits differentiation of isotopically cold areas into neoplasms, benign cysts, and abscesses. In addition, when the radioisotope scan is equivocal, ultrasound is invaluable in differentiating normal variants from disease states. Dilated intrahepatic ducts can also be identified. Examples of the use of ultrasound in defining radioisotope abnormalities are presented

  18. Real-time ultrasound-guided placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheter without fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamuta, Soshi; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Matsuhashi, Shiori; Shimizu, Arata; Uraoka, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masato

    2018-03-01

    Malposition of peripherally inserted central catheters placed at the bedside is a well-recognized phenomenon. We report the success rate of the placement of peripherally inserted central catheters with ultrasound guidance for tip positioning and describe the knacks and pitfalls. We retrospectively reviewed the medical case charts of 954 patients who received peripherally inserted central catheter procedure. Patient clinical data included success rate of puncture, detection rate of tip malposition with ultrasonography, adjustment rate after X-ray, and success rate of peripherally inserted central catheter placement. The success rate of puncture was 100% (954/954). Detection rate of tip malposition with ultrasonography was 82.1% (78/95). The success rate of ultrasound-guided tip navigation was 98.2% (937/954). The success rate of ultrasound-guided tip location was 98.0% (935/954). Adjustment rate after X-ray was 1.79% (17/952). The final success rate of peripherally inserted central catheter placement was 99.8% (952/954). Ultrasound guidance for puncturing and tip positioning is a promising option for the placement of peripherally inserted central catheters. Ultrasound guidance could dispense with radiation exposure and the transfer of patients to the X-ray department.

  19. Point-of-care ultrasound in aerospace medicine: known and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Michael S; Garcia, Kathleen; Martin, David S

    2014-07-01

    Since its initial introduction into the bedside assessment of the trauma patient via the Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) exam, the use of point-of-care ultrasound has expanded rapidly. A growing body of literature demonstrates ultrasound can be used by nonradiologists as an extension of the physical exam to accurately diagnose or exclude a variety of conditions. These conditions include, but are not limited to, hemoperitoneum, pneumothorax, pulmonary edema, long-bone fracture, deep vein thrombosis, and elevated intracranial pressure. As ultrasound machines have become more compact and portable, their use has extended outside of hospitals to places where the physical exam and diagnostic capabilities may be limited, including the aviation environment. A number of studies using focused sonography have been performed to meet the diagnostic challenges of space medicine. The following article reviews the available literature on portable ultrasound use in aerospace medicine and highlights both known and potential applications of point-of-care ultrasound for the aeromedical clinician.

  20. Ultrasound imaging in medical student education: Impact on learning anatomy and physical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Sokpoleak; Patel, Rita M; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound use has expanded dramatically among the medical specialties for diagnostic and interventional purposes, due to its affordability, portability, and practicality. This imaging modality, which permits real-time visualization of anatomic structures and relationships in vivo, holds potential for pre-clinical instruction of students in anatomy and physical diagnosis, as well as providing a bridge to the eventual use of bedside ultrasound by clinicians to assess patients and guide invasive procedures. In many studies, but not all, improved understanding of anatomy has been demonstrated, and in others, improved accuracy in selected aspects of physical diagnosis is evident. Most students have expressed a highly favorable impression of this technology for anatomy education when surveyed. Logistic issues or obstacles to the integration of ultrasound imaging into anatomy teaching appear to be readily overcome. The enthusiasm of students and anatomists for teaching with ultrasound has led to widespread implementation of ultrasound-based teaching initiatives in medical schools the world over, including some with integration throughout the entire curriculum; a trend that likely will continue to grow. Anat Sci Educ 10: 176-189. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  1. Systematic review on bedside electromagnetic-guided, endoscopic, and fluoroscopic placement of nasoenteral feeding tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Arja; Van Der Poel, Marcel J.; De Rooij, Thijs; Molenaar, IQ; Bergman, Jacques J.; Busch, Olivier R.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M.; Besselink, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasoenteral tube feeding is frequently required in hospitalized patients to either prevent or treat malnutrition, but data on the optimal strategy of tube placement are lacking. Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of bedside electromagnetic (EM)-guided, endoscopic, and

  2. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF LEUKOCYTE REMOVAL FILTERS DURING BEDSIDE LEUKOCYTE FILTRATION OF RED-CELL CONCENTRATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GU, YJ; OBSTER, R; DEHAAN, J; HUET, RCGG; VANOEVEREN, W

    1992-01-01

    The biocompatibility of leukocyte removal filters was evaluated in four different types of leukocyte filters made from different materials during bedside leukocyte filtration of red cell concentrates (RCC). Two units of banked RCC were filtrated through each leukocyte filter inserted into the

  3. SCI with Brain Injury: Bedside-to-Bench Modeling for Developing Treatment and Rehabilitation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    used for pain management), baclofen (used for spasticity control), and topiramate (used for controlling seizures), all identified as common treatment ...Modeling for Developing Treatment and Rehabilitation Strategies PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael S. Beattie, Ph.D...September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SCI with Brain Injury: Bedside To Bench Modeling For Developing Treatment And Rehabilitation Strategies 5a

  4. Bedside diagnosis of imported malaria using the Binax Now malaria antigen detection test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Bruun, Brita; Baek, Leif

    2006-01-01

    Malaria may be misdiagnosed in non-endemic countries when the necessary experience for rapid expert microscopy is lacking. Rapid diagnostic tests may improve the diagnosis and may play a role as a bedside diagnostic tool. In a multicentre study we recruited patients suspected of malaria over a pe...

  5. Monitoring the microcirculation at the bedside using hand-held imaging microscopes: Automatic tracking of erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorelli, M.; Bocchi, L.; Ince, C.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the development of portable microscopy devices that enable the noninvasive bedside evaluation of the mucosal microcirculation in critically ill patients has expanded the research on this level of the cardiovascular system. Several semi-quantitative scores have been defined to assess

  6. Transillumination test: A bedside aid for differentiating meningocele from myelomeningocele: Point of care testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakash Pandita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transillumination test is a bedside and simple technique to illuminate the body cavity by transmission of light through the cavity. Transillumination test is used in a variety of conditions like hydrocele, Hydrocephalus, pneumoperitonium and pneumothorax in neonatology. We describe use of transillumination for differentiating meningocele and myelomeningocele.

  7. Metabolic impact of shivering during therapeutic temperature modulation: the Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjatia, Neeraj; Strongilis, Evangelia; Gordon, Errol; Prescutti, Mary; Fernandez, Luis; Fernandez, Andres; Buitrago, Manuel; Schmidt, J Michael; Ostapkovich, Noeleen D; Mayer, Stephan A

    2008-12-01

    Therapeutic temperature modulation is widely used in neurocritical care but commonly causes shivering, which can hamper the cooling process and result in increases in systemic metabolism. We sought to validate a grading scale to assist in the monitoring and control of shivering. A simple 4-point Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale was validated against continuous assessments of resting energy expenditure, oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide production as measured by indirect calorimetry. Therapeutic temperature modulation for fever control or the induction of hypothermia was achieved with the use of a surface or endovascular device. Expected energy expenditure was calculated using the Harris-Benedict equation. A hypermetabolic index was calculated from the ratio of resting of energy expenditure to energy expenditure. Fifty consecutive cerebrovascular patients underwent indirect calorimetry between January 2006 and June 2007. Fifty-six percent were women, and mean age 63+/-16 years. The majority underwent fever control (n=40 [80%]) with a surface cooling device (n=44 [87%]) and had signs of shivering (Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale >0, 64% [n=34 of 50]). Low serum magnesium was independently associated with the presence of shivering (Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale >0; OR, 6.8; 95% CI, 1.7 to 28.0; P=0.01). The Bedside Shivering Assessment Scale was independently associated with the hypermetabolic index (W=16.3, PShivering Assessment Scale is a simple and reliable tool for evaluating the metabolic stress of shivering.

  8. OW FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND APPLICATION IN KNEE ARTHROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Pedder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: in vitro study of ultrasound dissection devices' impact on meniscus and knee cartilage as well as comparison of outcomes with familiar arthroscopic techniques.Materials and methods. Meniscus and joint cartilage specimen obtained during total knee replacement were placed in a normal saline. All experiments were conducted no later than in 2 hours after obtaining and followed by histology of biopsy specimens. In the first series of experiment the authors performed meniscus dissection with ultrasound instrument «Scalpel», cold plasm ablator and surgical scalpel.Results. The first series of experiments demonstrated disruption of fibers orientation on meniscus rim after dissection with scalpel; necrosis depth after coblation is 0,7-0,8 mm. Ultrasound dissection devices leave necrosis depth of 0,1-0,2 mm and smooth cartilage surface. The second series of experiments proved that after shaver application cartilage surface was coarse; certain necrosis sections of 16-90 nm were observed on relatively smooth cartilage surface after coblation. Application of ultrasound «Miller» device leaves smooth cartilage surface with no fibers, no signs of cartilage thinning and necrosis not exceeding 15 nm.Conclusion. The results of experiments confirm that use of low frequency ultrasound dissection devices is advantageous as compared to mechanical and ablation cutting techniques while ensuring histologically proven atraumatic handling of biopsy specimens of meniscus and hyaline cartilage.

  9. Cardiac Point-of-Care Ultrasound: State of the Art in Medical School Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johri, Amer M; Durbin, Joshua; Newbigging, Joseph; Tanzola, Robert; Chow, Ryan; De, Sabe; Tam, James

    2018-03-14

    The development of small, user friendly, handheld ultrasound devices has stimulated the growth of cardiac point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) for the purpose of rapid, bedside cardiac assessment. Medical schools have begun integrating cardiac POCUS into their curricula. In this review the authors summarize the variable approaches taken by several medical training programs with respect to duration of POCUS training, prerequisite knowledge, and methods of delivering these skills (including e-learning, hands-on training, and simulation). The authors also address issues related to the need for competency evaluation and the limitations of the technology itself. The studies reviewed suggest that undergraduate education is a viable point at which to introduce basic POCUS concepts. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel bedside cardiopulmonary physical diagnosis curriculum for internal medicine postgraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibaldi, Brian Thomas; Niessen, Timothy; Gelber, Allan Charles; Clark, Bennett; Lee, Yizhen; Madrazo, Jose Alejandro; Manesh, Reza Sedighi; Apfel, Ariella; Lau, Brandyn D; Liu, Gigi; Canzoniero, Jenna VanLiere; Sperati, C John; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Brotman, Daniel J; Traill, Thomas A; Cayea, Danelle; Durso, Samuel C; Stewart, Rosalyn W; Corretti, Mary C; Kasper, Edward K; Desai, Sanjay V

    2017-10-06

    Physicians spend less time at the bedside in the modern hospital setting which has contributed to a decline in physical diagnosis, and in particular, cardiopulmonary examination skills. This trend may be a source of diagnostic error and threatens to erode the patient-physician relationship. We created a new bedside cardiopulmonary physical diagnosis curriculum and assessed its effects on post-graduate year-1 (PGY-1; interns) attitudes, confidence and skill. One hundred five internal medicine interns in a large U.S. internal medicine residency program participated in the Advancing Bedside Cardiopulmonary Examination Skills (ACE) curriculum while rotating on a general medicine inpatient service between 2015 and 2017. Teaching sessions included exam demonstrations using healthy volunteers and real patients, imaging didactics, computer learning/high-fidelity simulation, and bedside teaching with experienced clinicians. Primary outcomes were attitudes, confidence and skill in the cardiopulmonary physical exam as determined by a self-assessment survey, and a validated online cardiovascular examination (CE). Interns who participated in ACE (ACE interns) by mid-year more strongly agreed they had received adequate training in the cardiopulmonary exam compared with non-ACE interns. ACE interns were more confident than non-ACE interns in performing a cardiac exam, assessing the jugular venous pressure, distinguishing 'a' from 'v' waves, and classifying systolic murmurs as crescendo-decrescendo or holosystolic. Only ACE interns had a significant improvement in score on the mid-year CE. A comprehensive bedside cardiopulmonary physical diagnosis curriculum improved trainee attitudes, confidence and skill in the cardiopulmonary examination. These results provide an opportunity to re-examine the way physical examination is taught and assessed in residency training programs.

  11. The construction of power in family medicine bedside teaching: a video observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte E; Ajjawi, Rola; Monrouxe, Lynn V

    2013-02-01

    Bedside teaching is essential for helping students develop skills, reasoning and professionalism, and involves the learning triad of student, patient and clinical teacher. Although current rhetoric espouses the sharing of power, the medical workplace is imbued with power asymmetries. Power is context-specific and although previous research has explored some elements of the enactment and resistance of power within bedside teaching, this exploration has been conducted within hospital rather than general practice settings. Furthermore, previous research has employed audio-recorded rather than video-recorded observation and has therefore focused on language and para-language at the expense of non-verbal communication and human-material interaction. A qualitative design was adopted employing video- and audio-recorded observations of seven bedside teaching encounters (BTEs), followed by short individual interviews with students, patients and clinical teachers. Thematic and discourse analyses of BTEs were conducted. Power is constructed by students, patients and clinical teachers throughout different BTE activities through the use of linguistic, para-linguistic and non-verbal communication. In terms of language, participants construct power through the use of questions, orders, advice, pronouns and medical/health belief talk. With reference to para-language, participants construct power through the use of interruption and laughter. In terms of non-verbal communication, participants construct power through physical positioning and the possession or control of medical materials such as the stethoscope. Using this paper as a trigger for discussion, we encourage students and clinical teachers to reflect critically on how their verbal and non-verbal communication constructs power in bedside teaching. Students and clinical teachers need to develop their awareness of what power is, how it can be constructed and shared, and what it means for the student

  12. Ultrasound biomicroscopy of the anterior segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, J M; Ritch, R

    1996-08-01

    New imaging technologies are revolutionizing the understanding and treatment of a wide variety of ocular disorders. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, ultrasound biomicroscopy, confocal scanning laser polarimetry, color doppler imaging of blood flow, and optical coherence tomography are providing important information regarding disease pathophysiology, diagnosis, progression, and treatment. High frequency (50 MHz), high resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy of the anterior segment was obtained in a wide variety of disorders of the anterior segment. Tissue resolution is approximately 50 microns and the penetration depth is 5 mm. Ultrasound biomicroscopy is capable of imaging the comea, iris, anterior chamber, anterior chamber angle, posterior chamber, and ciliary body with great detail. The structures surrounding the posterior chamber, previously hidden from clinical observation, can be imaged and their normal anatomic relationships assessed. The various forms of angle closure glaucoma, such as pupillary block and plateau iris configuration, can be differentiated. The concave iris found in pigment dispersion and its response to treatment can be assessed. Visualization of anterior segment anatomy in eyes with opaque media is possible. Ultrasound biomicroscopy assists in the management of eyes with disorders of the anterior segment. Future applications of this technology will yield important information regarding accommodation, normal ocular physiology and disease pathophysiology.

  13. Surgical repair of bilateral levator ani muscles with ultrasound guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; Shobeiri, S Abbas; Quiroz, Lieschen H

    2013-07-01

    Separation of the levator ani muscles from pubic bone is a common major levator trauma that may occur in vaginal delivery and is associated with pelvic floor dysfunctions. We describe a novel ultrasound-guided technique to repair these muscles. A 33-year-old woman presented with a history of difficult vaginal delivery and complaint of numbness and weakness of the vagina. In evaluation, bilateral levator defects were diagnosed by physical examination, three-dimensional endovaginal ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. With ultrasound guidance the detached ends of muscles were tagged and sutured to their insertion points at the pubic bone. The patient's normal anatomy was restored with the return to normal pelvic floor tone. A follow-up ultrasound showed restored levator anatomy at 3 months.

  14. Bedside teaching in undergraduate medical education: issues, strategies, and new models for better preparation of new generation doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus; Siraj, Harlina Halizah; Mohamad, Nabishah; Das, Srijit; Rabeya, Yousuf

    2011-03-01

    Bedside teaching is a vital component of medical education. It is applicable to any situation where teaching is imparted in the presence of patients. In teaching in the patients' presence, learners have the opportunities to use all of their senses and learn the humanistic aspect of medicine such as role modeling, which is vital but difficult to communicate in words. Unfortunately, bedside teaching has been on the decline. To investigate the reasons for the decline in bedside teaching, its importance and its revival, a review of literature was carried out using PubMed and other data bases. The review revealed that the major concerns of bedside teaching were time constraint, false preceptors' concern about patients' comfort, short stay of patients in hospitals, learner distraction by technology, lack of experience and unrealistic faculty expectation. Whatsoever the reasons, bedside teaching cannot be replaced with anything else. There are newer approaches of effective bedside teaching, and the core focus of all such approaches is educational process. A bedside teacher must learn how to involve patients and learners in the educational processes. Moreover, bedside teaching is the process through which learners acquire the skills of communication by asking patients' permission, establishing ground rules, setting time limit, introducing the team, diagnosing learner, diagnosing patient, conducting focused teaching, using simple language, asking patient if there is any question, closing with encouraging thanks, and giving feedback privately. It is most important to ensure a comfortable environment for all participants, the learner, the patient and the bedside teacher. Ongoing faculty development programs on educational processes and realistic faculty expectations may overcome the problems.

  15. US-guided placement of temporary internal jugular vein catheters: immediate technical success and complications in normal and high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Kara, Gulcan; Torun, Dilek; Kizilkilic, Osman; Yildirim, Tulin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: : To evaluate the technical success and immediate complication rates of temporary internal jugular vein (IJV) haemodialysis catheter placement in normal and high-risk patients. Methods and materials: Two-hundred and twenty temporary internal jugular vein catheters inserted under ultrasound guidance in 172 patients were prospectively analyzed. Of 172 patients, 93 (54%) were males and 79 (46%) were females (age range, 18-83; mean, 56.0 years). Of 220 catheters, 171 (78%) were placed in patients who had a risk factor for catheter placement like patients with disorder of haemostasis, poor compliance, and previous multiple catheter insertion in the same IJV. Forty-seven (21.3%) procedures were performed on bed-side. A catheter was inserted in the right IJV in 178 procedures (80.9%) and left IJV in 42 procedures. Of 172 patients, 112 (65%) had only one catheter placement and the rest had had more than one catheter placement (range, 1-5). Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients (100%). Average number of puncture was 1.24 (range, 1-3). One hundred and eighty-three insertions (83.1%) were single-wall punctures, whereas 37 punctures were double wall punctures. Nine (4%) minor complications were encountered. Inadvertent carotid artery puncture without a sequel in four procedures (1.8%), oozing of blood around the catheter in three procedures (1.4%), a small hematoma in one procedure (0.4%), and puncture through the pleura in one procedure (0.4%) without development of pneumothorax. Oozing of blood was seen only in patients with disorder of haemostasis. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided placement of internal jugular vein catheters is very safe with very high success rate and few complications. It can safely be performed in high-risk patients, like patients with disorders of haemostasis and patients with previous multiple catheter insertion in the same vein

  16. The influence of ultrasound on ionizing radiation effects, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Takeo; Fujita, Katsuzo; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1976-01-01

    The effects of simultaneous administration of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co gamma-rays) and ultrasound (1 MHz, 3 W/cm 2 ) on normal tissues of the auricules and kidneys, of rabbits were examined. Irreversible damages of the auricules were obtained with simultaneous irradiation of 690 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and exposure to ultrasound for 15 minutes, but with only irradiation of 2760 R of 60 Co gamma-rays or only administration of ultrasound for 60 minutes, damages were reversible. In 5 of 6 kidneys, interstitial nephritis was demonstrated histopathologically after simultaneous administration of 200 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and ultrasound for 5 minutes. However, with each alone (600 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and ultrasound for 60 minutes) no detectable changes were found. The results obtained from these experiments suggest that the effect of simultaneous irradiation with 60 Co gamma-rays and exposure to ultrasound on normal tissues may be synergistic and that ultrasound may potentiate the effects of 60 Co gamma-rays. (Evans, J.)

  17. Bedside lung ultrasound, mobile radiography and physical examination: a comparative analysis of diagnostic tools in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Andrew J; Nalos, Marek; Sue, Kwan-Hing; Hruby, Jan; Campbell, Daniel M; Braham, Rachel M; Orde, Sam R

    2016-06-01

    To compare lung ultrasonography (LUS), chest xray (CXR) and physical examination (Ex) for the detection of pathological abnormalities in the lungs of critically ill patients. A prospective cohort study of 145 patients in the intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital who were undergoing echocardiography for a clinical indication. Each patient was independently assessed by Ex, CXR and LUS on the same day. Examiners were asked to comment on the presence or absence and severity of pleural effusion, lung consolidation and alveolar interstitial syndrome (AIS). Independent expert examiners performed the LUS and an independent radiologist reported on the CXR. Ex, CXR and LUS were in fair agreement with each other in detecting a pulmonary abnormality (CXR v LUS, κ = 0.31; CXR v Ex, κ = 0.29; LUS v Ex, κ = 0.22). LUS detected more abnormalities than did CXR (16.2%; χ(2) = 64.1; P < 0.001) or Ex (23.5%; χ(2) = 121.9; P < 0.001). CXR detected more pleural effusions than LUS (9.3%; χ(2) = 7.6; κ = 0.39), but LUS detected more pleural effusions than Ex (22.8%; χ(2) = 36.4; κ = 0.18). There was no significant difference in the performance of LUS and CXR in quantifying the size of a pleural effusion (Z = -1.2; P = 0.23). Ex underestimated size compared with CXR or LUS. LUS detected more consolidation than CXR (17%; χ(2) = 115.9; P < 0.001) and Ex (16.2%; χ(2) = 90.3; P < 0.001). We saw no difference in performance between CXR and Ex in detecting lung consolidation (0.9%; χ(2) = 0.51; P < 0.48). LUS detected more cases of AIS than CXR (5.5%; χ(2) = 7.9; P = 0.005) and Ex (13%; χ(2) = 25.8; P < 0.001). There was only fair-to-moderate agreement between LUS, CXR and Ex in detecting pulmonary abnormalities, including pleural effusion, lung consolidation and AIS. The higher rate of detection from LUS, combined with its ease of use and increasing accessibility, makes for a powerful diagnostic tool in the ICU.

  18. Basic ultrasound training can replace chest radiography for safe tube thoracostomy removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavingia, Kedar S; Soult, Michael C; Collins, Jay N; Novosel, Timothy J; Weireter, Leonard J; Britt, L D

    2014-08-01

    An ultrasound (US) examination can be easily and rapidly performed at the bedside to aide in clinical decisions. Previously we demonstrated that US was safe and as effective as a chest x-ray (CXR) for removal of tube thoracostomy (TT) when performed by experienced sonographers. This study sought to examine if US was as safe and accurate for the evaluation of pneumothorax (PTX) associated with TT removal after basic US training. Patients included had TT managed by the surgical team between October 2012 and May 2013. Bedside US was performed by a variety of members of the trauma team before and after removal. All residents received, at minimum, a 1-hour formal training class in the use of ultrasound. Data were collected from the electronic medical records. We evaluated 61 TTs in 61 patients during the study period. Exclusion of 12 tubes occurred secondary to having incomplete imaging, charting, or death before having TT removed. Of the 49 remaining TT, all were managed with US imaging. Average age of the patients was 40 years and 30 (61%) were male. TT was placed for PTX in 37 (76%), hemothorax in seven (14%), hemopneumothorax in four (8%), or a pleural effusion in one (2%). Two post pull PTXs were correctly identified by residents using US. This was confirmed on CXR with appropriate changes made. US was able to successfully predict the safe TT removal and patient discharge at all residency levels after receiving a basic US training program.

  19. Cardiac tamponade secondary to purulent pericarditis diagnosed with the aid of emergency department ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Mackenzie

    2017-08-01

    Purulent pericarditis is a rare but devastating disease process and even when treated, carries a poor prognosis. Cardiac tamponade is the most severe complication of purulent pericarditis and without acute surgical intervention, is often fatal. Diagnosis requires pericardiocentesis; however, early consideration of the disease and its complications in the emergency department (ED) can be life-saving. Here, we present a case of an intravenous drug user who presented with altered mental status and a rectal temperature of 105.4°. While in the ED, the patient acutely decompensated. The ED physician performed bedside cardiac ultrasound that a showed pericardial effusion and right ventricle diastolic collapse concerning for cardiac tamponade. The patient underwent urgent pericardiocentesis which revealed 300 ml of purulent fluid. Both blood and pericardial cultures grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Despite a complicated hospital course, with appropriate antibiotic coverage and surgical intervention, the patient was discharged in good neurologic condition. This rare case of purulent pericarditis underscores the utility of bedside ultrasound in the ED and the complicated nature of altered mental status in intravenous drug users. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...