WorldWideScience

Sample records for nordic countries related

  1. Participation in Job-Related Lifelong Learning among Well-Educated Employees in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, Tarja; Nissinen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore participation in job-related lifelong learning (LLL) among well-educated mature workers and compare it across four Nordic countries. Although this group generally is very active in LLL, the centrality of knowledge work in society, rapid pace of skills-renewal and rising learning demands for all…

  2. Work in Progress in the Nordic Countries Related to Fatigue of Welded Components and Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsson, Jack; Haagensen, Per; Agerskov, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Close international cooperation has been an important characteristic of the research on fatigue of welded structures in the Nordic countries. Cooperative projects were initiated already in the mid- 1980s and have continued for more than 20 years. Nordic delegates to IIW Commission XIII have surve...

  3. Transport in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, B.; Pettersson, S.; Vilkamo, S.

    1989-01-01

    Transport of radioactive material from different fields of operation is well advanced in the Nordic countries: waste from the medical sector, industry, research, and now in increasing amounts from reactor operation, including spent fuel. In the future, waste from decommissioning will also be transported. This report gives the amount of radioactive waste material to be transported in the Nordic countries. Transport routes, transport containers, and transport systems are described. Legislations and transport regulatins are discussed. (author)

  4. Risk of Air Pollution in Relation to Cancer in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Ketzel, Matthias; Becker, Thomas

    Seventeen pollutants (particles, heavy metals, inorganic gases and organic compounds) are for the first time analyzed in a screening of the carcinogenic risk at very high resolution and large scale in ambient air in the Nordic countries. Modelled 2010 annual mean air concentrations show...

  5. Changing health inequalities in the Nordic countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahelma, E; Lundberg, O; Manderbacka, K; Roos, E

    2001-01-01

    The Nordic countries, referring here to Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, have often been viewed as a group of countries with many features in common, such as geographical location, history, culture, religion, language, and economic and political structures. It has also been habitual to refer to a "Nordic model" of welfare states comprising a large public sector, active labour market policies, high costs for social welfare as well as high taxes, and a general commitment to social equality. Recent research suggests that much of this "Nordicness" appears to remain despite the fact that the Nordic countries have experienced quite different changes during the 1980s and 1990s. How this relates to changes in health inequalities is in the focus of this supplement.

  6. Relative deprivation in the Nordic countries-child mental health problems in relation to parental financial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdóttir, Hrafnhildur; Hensing, Gunnel; Povlsen, Lene; Petzold, Max

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic welfare system has been acknowledged as favourable for children, successfully contributing to low child mortality and poverty rates. Nevertheless, mental health problems among children and adolescents are common and the economic situation of the family has been highlighted as an important determinant. In spite of similar social, political and cultural structures, the Nordic countries differ; Iceland was most affected by the global financial crisis in 2008. The aim of this study was to examine potential differences in parental financial stress and the associations to child mental health between the Nordic countries as well as age and gender differences.  The study sample consisted of 6330 children aged 4-16 years old included in the 2011 version of the Nordic Study of Children's Health, Wellbeing and Quality of life. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was used to measure mental health problems.  In Iceland, 47.7% of the parents reported financial stress while ≤20% did so in the other countries except for Finland (33.5%). However, in case of parental financial stress the OR of mental health problems comparing children to parents with and without financial stress was significantly lower among the Icelandic children (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.15-2.24) than among the others: Denmark OR 3.07 (95% CI 2.15-4.39), Finland OR 2.28 (95% CI 1.60-3.25), Norway OR 2.77 (95% CI 1.86-4.12), Sweden OR 3.31(95% CI 2.26-4.86). No significant age or gender differences in the ORs were observed.  Besides socioeconomic situation, relative deprivation should be considered an important determinant of child mental health. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  7. Absenteeism in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke Nielsen, Ann-Kristina; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær; Jensen, Troels Wendelboe

    2007-01-01

    and Sweden. Employees working in the public sector, more specific the municipalities, have a higher level of absence compared to the private sector. According to the personal characteristics, women are more absent than men in all Nordic countries, but the effect of age differs according to the country...... in question. If the manager however is a woman and the employee likewise, then the level of absence is higher in Denmark, Norway and Finland compared to the other gender constellations. Originality/value - Because of the lack of international comparative studies of absenteeism in the Nordic countries...

  8. Radiation Protection Legislation in the Nordic Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Person, Lars.

    1990-01-01

    Recent alterations in the radiation protection laws of the Nordic countries are presented. The report amends the previous SS-report 87-37 with the title Radiation Protection and Atomic Energy Legislation in the Nordic Countries. (au)

  9. Hepatoblastoma in the nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, S; Schmidt, L S; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the aetiology of hepatoblastoma. Because of the young age at diagnosis, several studies have looked at various birth characteristics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of hepatoblastoma in the Nordic countries and the association between selected bir...

  10. Vocational education and training in the Nordic countries:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2018-01-01

    countries and the historical development of each of the four VET systems. This is followed by an examination of the role of VET in relation to the Nordic model of education and the Nordic labour market model. Finally, the position of VET in the Nordic transition systems is considered.......The chapter examines the systems of vocational education and training (VET) in four Nordic countries, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Denmark. First, it identifies the common political challenges for VET, which the following chapters of the book examine. Next, it outlines shared qualities of the Nordic...

  11. Freshwater exposure pathways in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1984-06-01

    The report relates to a subproject under a Nordic project called ''Large reactor accidents - consequences and mitigating actions''. The report summarizes information available, primarily in the Nordic countries, on freshwater exposure pathways. Experimental and theoretical data concerning the deposition and run-off of the nuclides *sp90*Sr and*Sp137*Cs is presented. Internal exposure via drinking water and freshwater fish is dealt with, as well as external exposure due to swimming, boating, contact with fishing utensils and use of beach areas. In addition is exposure via irrigated agricultural products considered. (RF)

  12. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. External environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, L; Andersen, A; Pukkala, E

    1997-01-01

    of the Nordic countries, corresponding to 7.3 million people, lives in urban areas. If there is an excess risk associated with air pollution, the annual number of lung cancer cases around the year 2000 in the Nordic countries would range from 0 (no excess risk) to 1,800 (relative risk, 1.5). As the existence...

  13. Relative deprivation in the Nordic countries-child mental health problems in relation to parental financial stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsdóttir, Hrafnhildur; Hensing, Gunnel; Povlsen, Lene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nordic welfare system has been acknowledged as favourable for children, successfully contributing to low child mortality and poverty rates. Nevertheless, mental health problems among children and adolescents are common and the economic situation of the family has been highlighted...... as an important determinant. In spite of similar social, political and cultural structures, the Nordic countries differ; Iceland was most affected by the global financial crisis in 2008. The aim of this study was to examine potential differences in parental financial stress and the associations to child mental...... to measure mental health problems.  RESULTS:  In Iceland, 47.7% of the parents reported financial stress while ≤20% did so in the other countries except for Finland (33.5%). However, in case of parental financial stress the OR of mental health problems comparing children to parents with and without financial...

  14. General practice in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Rose Olsen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: General practice systems in the Nordic countries share certain common features. The sector is based on the Nordic model of a tax-financed supply of services with a political objective of equal access for all. The countries also share the challenges of increased political expectations to deliver primary prevention and increased workload as patients from hospital care are discharged earlier. However, within this common framework, primary care is organized differently. This is particularly in relation to the private-public mix, remuneration systems and the use of financial and non-financial incentives. Objective: The objective of this paper is to compare the differences and similarities in primary care among the Nordic countries, to create a mapping of the future plans and reforms linked to remuneration and incentives schemes, and to discuss the pros and cons for these plans with reference to the literature. An additional objective is to identify gaps in the literature and future research opportunities. Results/Conclusions: Despite the many similarities within the Nordic health care systems, the primary care sectors function under highly different arrangements. Most important are the differences in the gate-keeping function, private versus salaried practices, possibilities for corporate ownership, skill-mix and the organisational structure. Current reforms and political agendas appear to focus on the side effects of the individual countries’ specific systems. For example, countries with salaried systems with geographical responsibility are introducing incentives for private practice and more choices for patients. Countries with systems largely based on private practice are introducing more monitoring and public regulation to control budgets. We also see that new governments tends to bring different views on the future organisation of primary care, which provide considerable political tension but few actual changes. Interestingly

  15. Occupation and leukemia in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Kautiainen, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar

    2012-01-01

    We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries.......We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries....

  16. Radiation protection legislation in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1992-01-01

    A close collaboration exists in the Nordic countries in the field of radiation protection. The radiation protection authorities attach major importance to a uniform interpretation of the international recommendations. The legal situation of the Nordic countries in the radiation protection field will be reviewed with the main emphasis on the new Swedish and Finnish laws. (author)

  17. Obesity Prevention in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmarr, Anders; Hejgaard, Tatjana; Matthiessen, Jeppe

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that mean BMI and prevalences of overweight/obesity and obesity have increased over the last decades in the Nordic countries, despite highly regulated societies with a focus on obesity prevention. We review recent overweight/obesity and obesity prevention initiatives within four of the five Nordic countries: Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland. Moreover, we analyze the current situation based on monitoring data on BMI collected in 2011 and 2014, and obtain overall estimates of overweight/obesity and obesity prevalences for the Nordic Region. Data analysis shows that obesity in adults has increased from 2011 to 2014, while no significant changes were found for children. No significant increases were found for mean BMI and overweight/obesity prevalence. Obesity prevention initiatives among the Nordic countries are highly similar although minor differences are present, which is rooted in transnational Nordic cooperation and comparable societal structures.

  18. The Wage Curve in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Strøjer; Albæk, K.; Asplund, R.

    regions in the long run. One explanation put forward for this slow speed of regional wage adjustment is the rather centralized bargaining system on the labour market in the Nordic countries. Wages are set according to the average unemployment rate for the economy as a whole, and differences in regional...... for researchers or civil servants with a deeper interest in labour market problems. The main result from this study is that the wage formation at the regional level is rather inflexible in the short run in all five Nordic countries, with no effect from changes in local unemployment on the local wage level......This report focusses on wage formation in the Nordic countries with a special attention to the effect from changes in local unemployment on the local wage level. The book gives a comprehensive and comparable study of this topic in the five Nordic countries which may be of great value...

  19. Eating out in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas Bøker; Kjærnes, U.; Holm, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    and restaurants is related to socio-demographic factors and factors relevant to the organization of daily life.We found that eating out is not a fundamental part of everyday eating. It is something which takes place occasionally. This may be taken to suggest that eating out in the Nordic countries is primarily...... lunches and dedicated public policies supporting the provisioning of lunches outside the home may have promoted eating out.Multivariate analysis revealed that eating out declines with age. An urbanization effect exists, as residence in a capital city increases the propensity to eat out. There were socio...

  20. Technology foresight in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eerola, A.; Jørgensen, Birte Holst

    2002-01-01

    and the society at large at the sametime. The report recommends: 1. The establishment of a Nordic forum for technology foresight practitioners and researchers. 2. The creation of a common follow-up system for relevant international technology foresight exercises. 3. The realisation oftechnology foresight......Technology foresight (TF) is increasingly used by governments, funding agencies, R&D institutions and private companies as a tool for strategy development, prioritisation of R&D funds, and learning. Although the Nordic Council of Ministers aims at"developing Nordic region in next 10 years...... and social differences among the Nordic countries. Nordic foresight cooperation may alsoremain as a distant academic exercise if proper links to political and economic decisions cannot be made and maintained. A technology foresight exercise might serve different institutions of the innovation system...

  1. Obesity Prevention in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockmarr, Anders; Hejgaard, Tatjana; Matthiessen, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mean BMI and prevalences of overweight/obesity and obesity have increased over the last decades in the Nordic countries, despite highly regulated societies with a focus on obesity prevention. We review recent overweight/obesity and obesity prevention initiatives...... that obesity in adults has increased from 2011 to 2014, while no significant changes were found for children. No significant increases were found for mean BMI and overweight/obesity prevalence. Obesity prevention initiatives among the Nordic countries are highly similar although minor differences are present...... within four of the five Nordic countries: Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland. Moreover, we analyze the current situation based on monitoring data on BMI collected in 2011 and 2014, and obtain overall estimates of overweight/obesity and obesity prevalences for the Nordic Region. Data analysis shows...

  2. Challenges for future family policies in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    responsibility of parents, but also a responsibility to be shared with society. Moreover, the Nordic welfare model goes hand-in-hand with the women’s movement by offering opportunities for women, as well as men, to also participate in education and employment. The question remains how more recent trends...... such as New Public Management principles and increased focus on children’s positions and rights affect family policies in the Nordic countries? The authors, who come from all five Nordic countries, discuss the following topics: issues related to family demographics, children’s position in society...

  3. Trading electricity outside the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The subject of transborder trade of electricity between the Nordic countries and other North-European countries is dealt with. A detailed comparison of generating capacity, generating costs as well as electricity prices, market structure and national and international regulations is given. This shows that generating costs in the Nordic countries in general are lower than those in other North-European countries. This indicates a potential for transborder trade. Norway has a potential for exporting power while Denmark and Sweden have a potential for energy exports due to current excess capacity. Transmission capacity from the Nordic countries to Germany is limited. As access to the German transmission network is restricted, conditions for trade depend on differences between marginal cost. After transmission cost, those differences do not finance larger investments in further capacity. A change in the market structure in Germany with third party access to the transmission network will allow major consumers to buy directly from producers in the Nordic countries. An opening up of the market should reduce the price load in Germany. This could cause price increases in the Nordic countries. (AB)

  4. Information Society Visions in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Kristensen, Thomas Myrup

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyses the information society visions put forward by the governments/administrations of the Nordic countries and compares them to the visions advanced at the EU-level. The paper suggests that the information society visions constitute a kind of common ideology for almost the whole...... political spectrum although it is characterised by a high degree of neo-liberal thinking. It is further argued that there is no distinctly Nordic model for an information society....

  5. Current research in transcultural psychiatry in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblad, Solvig; Kastrup, Marianne Carisius

    2013-12-01

    This article discusses major themes in recent transcultural psychiatric research in the Nordic countries from 2008 to 2011: (a) epidemiological studies of migration, (b) indigenous populations, and (c) quality of psychiatric care for migrants. Over the past several decades, the populations of the Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, which were relatively homogeneous, have become increasingly culturally diverse. Many migrants to Nordic countries have been exposed to extreme stress, such as threats of death and/or torture and other severe social adversities before, during, and after migration, with potential effects on their physical, mental, social, and spiritual health. Growing interest in transcultural issues is reflected in the level of scientific research and clinical activity in the field by Nordic physicians, psychologists, social scientists, demographers, medical anthropologists, as well as other clinicians and policy planners. Research includes work with migrants and indigenous minorities in the Nordic countries, as well as comparisons with mental health in postconflict countries. We conclude by suggesting future directions for transcultural psychiatry research and providing guidelines for the education and training of future clinicians in the Nordic countries.

  6. Dermatological moulage collections in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, A M.; Sinisalo, H.; Eilertsen, G.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The art of producing and acquiring dermatological wax models, moulages, flourished all over Europe in the beginning of the twentieth century, whereas very little is known about the existence of moulage collections in the Nordic countries. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to elucidate...... the presence, the origin, the production place, the use and the condition of dermatological moulage collections in the Nordic countries. METHODS: In each Nordic country, an extensive survey was undertaken during spring 2016. Dermatological departments, museums with medical collections, persons assumed to have...... specific information about wax moulages as well as secondary sources were contacted and interviewed. RESULTS: Several hitherto undescribed collections have survived in each country, most however damaged and in disrepair. One Danish and part of a Finnish collection have been restored. Only few moulages...

  7. Dermatological moulage collections in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, A-M; Sinisalo, H; Eilertsen, G; Åhrén, E; Meyer, I

    2018-04-01

    The art of producing and acquiring dermatological wax models, moulages, flourished all over Europe in the beginning of the twentieth century, whereas very little is known about the existence of moulage collections in the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to elucidate the presence, the origin, the production place, the use and the condition of dermatological moulage collections in the Nordic countries. In each Nordic country, an extensive survey was undertaken during spring 2016. Dermatological departments, museums with medical collections, persons assumed to have specific information about wax moulages as well as secondary sources were contacted and interviewed. Several hitherto undescribed collections have survived in each country, most, however, damaged and in disrepair. One Danish and part of a Finnish collection have been restored. Only few moulages are exhibited and some have been photographed and digitalized. Denmark and Sweden have had a local moulage production. Responses to the survey indicate that the result covers all collections of dermatological moulages in the Nordic countries, though some moulages may remain in private collections unknown to the authors, or uncatalogued in museums. Moulages are medical gems from bygone days before modern technology facilitated new means of communication. Restoration and appropriate storing should be considered for at least selected items from the Nordic collections. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  8. Cohort Fertility Patterns in the Nordic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Andersson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous analyses of period fertility suggest that the trends of the Nordic countries are sufficiently similar to speak of a common "Nordic fertility regime". We investigate whether this assumption can be corroborated by comparing cohort fertility patterns in the Nordic countries. We study cumulated and completed fertility of Nordic birth cohorts based on the childbearing histories of women born in 1935 and later derived from the population registers of Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. We further explore childbearing behaviour by women's educational attainment. The results show remarkable similarities in postponement and recuperation between the countries and very small differences in completed fertility across educational groups. Median childbearing age is about 2-3 years higher in the 1960-64 cohort than in the 1950-54 cohort, but the younger cohort recuperates the fertility level of the older cohort at ages 30 and above. A similar pattern of recuperation can be observed for highly educated women as compared to women with less education. An interesting finding is that of a positive relationship between educational level and the final number of children when women who become mothers at similar ages are compared. Country differences in fertility outcome are generally rather low. Childlessness is highest in Finland and lowest in Norway, and the educational differentials are largest in Norway. Despite such differences, the cohort analyses in many ways support the notion of a common Nordic fertility regime.

  9. Vocational education in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    a common heritage in education policy. This volume will help strengthen the knowledge base required for transnational policy learning, and for developing vocational education internationally for the future. As a result, the book will be of interest to researchers, academics and postgraduate students......Vocational Education in the Nordic Countries: Learning from Diversity is the second of two books that disseminates new and systematic knowledge on the strengths and weaknesses of the different models of vocational education and training (VET) in four Nordic countries. Vocational education in Europe...... involved in the study of vocational education, educational studies and educational policy, as well as policy makers....

  10. Household food waste in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerris, Mickey; Gaiani, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    such as climate change and unjust distribution of food resources, needs to be based on an appreciative and relational understanding of nature and food and not only on economic and moralizing arguments. This is done by drawing on an ecocentric perspective where food is seen as one of the areas where new narratives......This study focuses on food waste generated by households in four Nordic countries: Finland, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Based on existing literature we present (A) comparable data on amounts and monetary value of food waste; (B) explanations for food waste at household level; (C) a number...... of public and private initiatives at national levels aiming to reduce food waste; and (D) a discussion of ethical issues related to food waste with a focus on possible contributions from ecocentric ethics. We argue that reduction of food waste at household level, which has an impact on issues...

  11. Performance management in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Mads Bøge

    -specific perspective, I analyze variations and similarities among countries and agencies in their development of a performance measurement system and the incorporation and use of performance information. Empirically the study shows that some patterns can be discerned but they also seem to be rather complex. Starting......This paper reports a study of performance management in practice in three tasks (Food safety, Meteorology and Prisons) across the three Scandinavian countries Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The paper examines how the system of performance management in Denmark, Norway and Sweden (Management...... from this analysis I discuss, whether it is possible to identify a Nordic model of performance management? Whether we should distinguish between an East Nordic and a West Nordic model? Should we rather talk about a Danish model, a Swedish model and a Norwegian model, or are the differences within...

  12. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries.......To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries....

  13. On the Role of family Policy in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth B.

    obligations, for gender equality and most recently, a growing concern for securing time for both work and private life. These policy measures have aimed at improving living conditions for families with children and thus only indirectly at increasing the propensity to have children. The paper argues......Compared to other countries, e.g. in Southern Europe the fertility in the Nordic countries is relatively high. This paper discusses the role of Family Policy in the Nordic Countries in this respect. The Nordic countries experienced a decline in fertility in the first three decades of the 20th...... century where after the total fertility rates increased until the late 1960s where a new decline took off. Throughout the studied period, policy measures influencing living conditions for families have been influenced by concern for population development, for reconciliation between family and work...

  14. Telehealth ICT Infrastructures in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring; Hallenborg, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and recommendations of ICT infrastructures and reference architectures for telehealth in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden). This study shows that so far only Denmark has designed a complete reference architecture, and by the end...

  15. Assessing Children in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Hjörne, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Recent tendencies within assessment in comprehensive school in Nordic countries raise the question of the role of different practices of assessments, on how assessments are being used, for which purposes and the consequences of this. Assessments can be considered to be an integrated part of forma...

  16. Radiation protection laws in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Sweden has since 1988 a totally revised radiation protection law and Finland has recently enacted a new law. The legal situation of the Nordic countries in the radiation protection field is reviewed with the main emphasis on the Swedish law. (author)

  17. Access to Information in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Oluf

    Access to Information in the Nordic Countries explains and compares the legal rules determining public access to documents and data in Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Norway, and Iceland. In addition, international rules emanating from the United Nations, the Council of Europe and the European Union...

  18. Sound insulation requirements in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    All Nordic countries have sound insulation requirements for housing and sound classification schemes originating from a common INSTA‐proposal in the mid 90’s, but unfortunately being increasingly diversified since then. The present situation impedes development and create barriers for trade and e...

  19. Changes in colloid solution sales in Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsgaard, U E; Holtan, A; Perner, A

    2018-04-01

    Administration of resuscitation fluid is a common intervention in the treatment of critically ill patients, but the right choice of fluid is still a matter of debate. Changes in medical practice are based on new evidence and guidelines as well as traditions and personal preferences. Official warnings against the use of hydroxyl-ethyl-starch (HES) solutions have been issued. Nordic guidelines have issued several strong recommendations favouring crystalloids over colloids in all patient groups. Our objective was to describe the patterns of colloid use in Nordic countries from 2012 to 2016. The data were obtained from companies that provide pharmaceutical statistics in different countries. The data are sales figures from pharmaceutical companies to pharmacies and health institutions. We found a 56% reduction in the total sales of all colloids in Nordic countries over a 5-year period. These findings were mainly related to a 92% reduction in the sales of HES solutions. A reduction in sales of other synthetic colloids has also occurred. During the same period, we found a 46% increase in albumin sales, but these numbers varied between Nordic countries. The general reduction in colloid sales likely reflects the recommendation that colloids should be used only in special circumstances. The dramatic reduction in the sales of HES solutions was expected given evidence of harm and the official warnings. The steady increase in albumin sales and the notable differences between the five Nordic countries cannot be explained. © 2018 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, L; Winther, J F; Andersen, A

    1997-01-01

    Alcohol intake is causally associated with cancers of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus and liver. In all five Nordic countries, alcohol consumption increased substantially between 1965 (6.5 litres per adult per year) and 1975 (10 litres), but remained at about 10 litres between 1975...... and 1985. The daily consumption of men during the period was substantially higher than that of women, and that of both men and women was higher in Denmark than in the other Nordic countries. In about 2000, an annual total of almost 1,300 cancer cases (1,000 in men and 300 in women) would be avoided...... if alcohol drinking were eliminated. This corresponds to about 29% of all alcohol-related cancers, i.e. in the oesophagus (37%), oral cavity and pharynx (33%), larynx (29%) and liver (15%). About 2% of all cancers in men and 1% in women in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 will be caused...

  1. CISG Nordic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    CISG Nordic offers full text court decisions, papers, domestic laws, etc. collected in the Nordic countries. All material is related to the application of the CISG.......CISG Nordic offers full text court decisions, papers, domestic laws, etc. collected in the Nordic countries. All material is related to the application of the CISG....

  2. Emission Permits trade between the Nordic and Baltic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, Leif Kristian

    2000-05-01

    A bottom-up technology oriented model of the energy systems in the Nordic and Baltic countries have been constructed and used for analysing an optimal set of energy and emission trading within the region. The model used is MARKAL, which has been developed within the IEA-ETSAP. The analyses are based on national emission levels agreed on in the Kyoto protocol (and the following burden sharing negotiations within the European Union), and with an additional strengthening after 2010. Only energy related CO{sub 2} emissions are explicitly considered. Nuclear power in Sweden is assumed to be phased out. The results show that especially Norway and Sweden have large abatement costs when acting alone, whale the Baltic countries will probably not need to take domestic actions due to the Kyoto protocol if they act alone, as the restructuring of their economies in the beginning of the 1990ties cut emissions (and their economies) dramatically. It is shown that emission trading among the Nordic and Baltic countries can reduce abatement costs among the Nordic countries significantly, possibly down to a level equivalent to a world market (Annex I) permit price. Extending the Nordic common electricity market to Balticum will have minor influence on overall energy system costs. There is no pronounced direction for net electricity flow between the Nordic and Baltic countries. High marginal costs during peak hours in Balticum indicate that imports of Nordic hydro power during peak-hours could be a cost-effective option. This possibility could be implemented with a subsea AC/DC connection between Sweden and Latvia. It is politically viable to develop more hydropower in Norway, this country will be the major electricity exporter in the region, while Sweden will be the main importer. Changing scenario assumptions, i.e. no more Norwegian hydropower, but life extension of Swedish nuclear power, could change this picture. (author)

  3. Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povlsen, Lene; Regber, Susann; Fosse, Elisabeth; Karlsson, Leena Eklund; Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to identify applied definitions and measurements of economic poverty and to explore the proportions and characteristics of children and adolescents living in economic poverty in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden during the last decade and to compare various statistics between the Nordic countries. Official data from central national authorities on statistics, national reports and European Union Statistics of income and living conditions data were collected and analysed during 2015-2016. The proportion of Nordic children living in economic poverty in 2014 ranged from 9.4% in Norway to 18.5% in Sweden. Compared with the European Union average, from 2004 to 2014 Nordic families with dependent children experienced fewer difficulties in making their money last, even though Icelandic families reported considerable difficulties. The characteristics of children living in economic poverty proved to be similar in the five countries and were related to their parents' level of education and employment, single-parent households and - in Denmark, Norway and Sweden - to immigrant background. In Finland, poverty among children was linked in particular to low income in employed households. This study showed that economic poverty among Nordic families with dependent children has increased during the latest decade, but it also showed that poverty rates are not necessarily connected to families' ability to make their money last. Therefore additional studies are needed to explore existing policies and political commitments in the Nordic countries to compensate families with dependent children living in poverty.

  4. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Occupation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, L; Andersen, A; Pukkala, E

    1997-01-01

    million people (3.7 million men and 0.2 million women) in the Nordic countries were potentially exposed to above-average levels of one or more verified industrial carcinogens. It is expected that these exposures will result in a total of about 1,900 new cases of cancer every year in the Nordic countries...... around the year 2000, with 1,890 among men and fewer than 25 among women. The proportions that could be avoided if industrial carcinogens were eliminated would be 70% of mesotheliomas, 20% of cancers of the nasal cavity and sinuses, 12% of lung cancers, 5% of laryngeal cancers, 2% of urinary bladder...... cancers, 1% of the leukaemias, and 1% of renal cancers. Overall, it is estimated that verified industrial carcinogens will account for approximately 3% of all cancers in men and less than 0.1% of all cancers in women in the Nordic countries around the year 2000. No attempt was made to estimate...

  5. Trading electricity in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    An open market for electric power in the Nordic countries will require extensive common solutions of a range of economic, technical and political problems as a consequence of the natural monopoly of the transmission and distribution grid, and the need for supply reliability. The main objective is to establish and effective framework for competition in buying and selling electricity, both nationally and in a Nordic context, and to secure optimal resource allocation. The key participants are owners of the high-voltage grid and of the international grid connections. The objective should be to develop a 'point-tariff' system, a system for effective handling of bottlenecks, and an optimisation of further developments in the common high-voltage grid. Effective routines for measurement of the trade across the borders should be established. Institutions for power-trading should be developed, such as organised spot markets which should be established in Sweden and Finland. Transaction costs for trade between the spot markets in the different countries should be low. Until spot markets are established in Sweden and Finland, Statnett Marked should be made available for Sweden and Finish consumers and producers. Abuse of a domimant market position in a common market should be firmly discouraged. Different competition policies in the Nordic countries may give participants unequal possibilities to compete. (AB)

  6. Joint balance handling in the Nordic Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In September 2002 Nordel introduced new principles for disposing of regulation power for balancing production and consumption of electricity. The new principles imply that the regulation power in the joint Nordic power system is better utilized, and that the settlement of imbalances between the countries follows joint rules. The settlement of imbalances in the individual countries follows different principles but Nordel is looking into the possibilities of a harmonization. EU's most recent draft of a strategy report on development of the power market points among other things towards a joint regulation power market as a tool against misuse of market power. (BA)

  7. Contraceptive use in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindh, Ingela; Skjeldestad, Finn E; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to compare contraceptive use in the Nordic countries and to assess compliance with recommendations from the European Medicines Agency regarding the use of combined oral contraception containing low-dose estrogen and levonorgestrel, norethisterone or norgestimate. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: Data on hormonal contraceptive prescriptions and sales figures for copper intrauterine devices were obtained from national databases and manufacturers in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden in 2010-2013. RESULTS: Contraceptive use was highest in Denmark (42%) and Sweden (41%), followed...... by Finland (40%). Combined oral contraception was the most used method in all countries, with the highest use in Denmark (26%). The second most used method was the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, with the highest use in Finland (15%) and ≈10% in the other countries. Copper intrauterine devices...

  8. Nuclear power in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Of the Nordic countries-Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and Norway-the first two have chosen nuclear energy to supply a large portion of their electrical generation requirements. Finland has opted for two Western-style boiling water reactors and two modified Russian-designed pressurized water reactors. The country has led the nuclear nations of the world in the 1990s with its capacity factor. Domestic reports state that nuclear is the lowest-cost electrical generation source, and Finland will need additional capacity by 2000. The country's nuclear waste storage facilities are in operation, with more under construction. In this, the second part of a two-part feature (the first part viewed Sweden's nuclear program), the attention is focused on Finland: its government, where it has positioned itself in the world economy, and the internal conflicts of how, or if, to add the needed electrical capacity

  9. Who are private alcohol importers in the Nordic countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grittner Ulrike

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims - The high price of alcohol in the Nordic countries has been a long-standing policy to curb consumption, which has led consumers to importing alcohol from countries with lower prices. This paper seeks to develop a profile of alcohol importers in four Nordic countries. Methods - Cross-sectional data from general population surveys in Denmark (2003-2006, Norway (2004, Sweden (2003-2006 and Finland (2005-2006 were analysed by multiple logistic and linear regression. Independent variables included region, socio-demographics, drinking indicators and alcohol-related problems. Outcome variables were importer status and amount of imported alcohol. Results - People living in regions close to countries with lower alcohol prices were more often importers and imported higher amounts than people living in other regions. Higher educated persons were more likely to be importers, but the amounts imported were smaller than those by people with lower education. Persons with higher incomes were also more likely to be importers and they also imported larger amounts than people with lower incomes. In Sweden and Denmark regional differences of importer rates were more pronounced for persons of lower incomes. Age, risky single-occasion drinking, risky drinking and alcohol problems were positively related to the amounts of imported alcohol. Conclusions - Private importers in the Nordic countries are an integrated yet heavy drinking segment of society and do not appear to be located on the fringes of society

  10. Energy research projects in the Nordic countries - catalogue 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Nordic energy ministers at their meeting February 9, 1982 agreed upon a working plan for the Nordic energy cooperation. As part of this plan a contact group was established in order to maintain coordination and cooperation within the area of energy research and development. This group decided April 1982 to establish a catalogue of energy research projects in the Nordic countries. A pilot catalogue was published in June 1982. The 1983 catalogue gives an up-to-date survey of energy research and development projects in the Nordic countries. About 2125 projects are described, and information is given on investigator(s), performing organization, financing body, funds, and period. The catalogue is prepared by the Nordic energy libraries through their cooperation in Nordic Atomic Libraries Joint Secretariat. The information is also included in the data base Nordic Energy Index (NEI), which is online accessible at I/S Datacentralen, Copenhagen, via EURONET, SCANNET, TYMNET, AND TELENET. (BP)

  11. Power engineers of the Nordic and Baltic countries in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veski, Rein

    1999-01-01

    The Estonian delegation had been invited by Helsinki Energy to participate in the Nordic-Baltic District Heating Symposium. Distance heating enjoys a wide popularity in the Nordic countries. For heating purposes the use of biofuels, incl. peat, is highly recommended. Biofuels have found wide use in the Nordic countries, the share of peat being more considerable in Finland. The Estonians attended also the MODIS Workshop and made a visit to heat enterprises. (author)

  12. H{sub 2} R and D activities in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holst Joergensen, B.

    2003-10-01

    The report describes hydrogen related R and D activities in the five Nordic countries from 1998 and onwards. It is not a comprehensive account of all hydrogen related R and D as much relevant research is not described under the heading of hydrogen energy but integrated in other programmes or part of more generic basic research. Also much industry conducted H2 R and D activities are not published. It gives some background information on R and D in the five Nordic countries and gives account of the R and D efforts. At Nordic level through the Nordic Energy Research a number of R and D projects are also conducted and shortly described. At EU level, Nordic stakeholders are represented in a number of hydrogen and fuel cell R and D projects and short descriptions are provided. In the appendix, more detaield informaiton is given on the R and D projects at national, EU and Nordic levels. (au)

  13. Policy responses to hepatitis C in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Hetherington, Kristina L; Aleman, Soo

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden), the prevalence of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively low in the general population, but is much higher among people who inject drugs (PWID). We conducted an exploratory study...... within the same country. RESULTS: Stakeholders reported that three of the five study countries have national viral hepatitis strategies, while only Iceland has a national HCV elimination goal. The availability of harm reduction services varies, with opioid substitution therapy provided for the general...

  14. The Nordic Countries interests in principles for international greenhouse gas agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsnaes, K.; Meyer, H.; Stephensen, P.; Soerensen, L.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of this report is the interests of the Nordic countries in international agreements on greenhouse gases. The subject is approached mainly from an economic point of view. Introductory, the climate convention are described, with special attention to obligations to emission reductions. Important discussion points are timing of the reductions as well as the question of meeting the reductions by cooperation with other countries through joint-implementation projects. The different attitudes of the Nordic countries to these issues are discussed. In the following, the technical and economic possibilities for meeting the reduction objectives of each country are described. For this purpose, governmental plans and studies (on bottom-up as well as top-down studies) are brought into focus. A discussion of the differences and similarities of the methodology of the studies are carried out. Finally, the report focuses on costs of reducing emissions in the Nordic countries. A comparison between the different Nordic countries, as well as between the Nordic countries and the other OECD countries is done. The analysis points out, that the Nordic countries are characterized by relatively high costs in general. Another conclusion is, that the costs of reduction after the year 2000/2005 are much lower than costs of reductions in the short run. An exception to this is Denmark. This points out, that some Nordic countries prefer emission reductions through joint-implementation projects in other countries, rather than reductions through restrictive agreements in the sort run. (au) (29 tabs., 28 ills., 45 refs.)

  15. Nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eikelmann, I.M.H.; Moeller, B.

    1999-01-01

    This project is one of the new cross-disciplinary studies in the NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety) research program 1998-2001. The main task for the project is to aggregate knowledge of nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries, a 'base of knowledge', and make this available for the Nordic authorities as a supplement for the national emergency preparedness work. The project will focus on potential events in nuclear installations and the consequences for the Nordic countries especially on: vulnerable food chains; doses to man; environmental contamination; the emergency preparedness system. (au)

  16. Electricity tax in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Norwegian power taxation system is different from the taxation systems in the other Nordic countries in that there is a tax on the economic rent in the hydroelectric power generation. Because of this tax Norwegian hydropower producers are facing a higher average tax rate than other hydropower producers. This is important for the accumulation of capital by Norwegian power producers, which in turn affects the companies' ability to finance acquisitions and major investment projects. The tax on the economic rent also affects the need for risk management and the investment incentives for hydropower producers, but it is not possible, as a matter of principle, to prove that these effects have any essential socio-economic significance

  17. Reactor physics calculations in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeglund, R.

    1995-01-01

    The seventh biennial meeting on reactor physics calculations in the Nordic countries was arranged by VTT Energy on May 8-9, 1995. 26 papers on different subjects in the field of reactor physics were presented by 45 participants representing research establishments, technical universities, utilities, consultants and suppliers. Resent development and verification of the program systems of ABB Atom, Risoe, Scandpower, Studsvik and VTT Energy were the main topic of the meeting. Benchmarking of the two assembly codes CASMO-4 and HELIOS is proceeding. Cross section data calculated with CASMO-HEX have been validated for the Loviisa reactors. On core analysis ABB atom gives a description on its latest core simulator version POLCA7 with the calculation Core Master 2 and the BWR core supervision system Core Watch. Transient calculations with HEXTRAN, HEXTRAN- PLIM, TRAB, RAMONA, SIMULATE-3K and a code based on PRESTO II/POLCA7 were also presented

  18. Maternal deaths in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangen, Siri; Bødker, Birgit; Ellingsen, Liv

    2017-01-01

    reporting from hospitals. Each case was then assessed to determine the cause of death, and level of care provided. Potential improvements to care were evaluated. RESULTS: We registered 168 maternal deaths, 90 direct and 78 indirect cases. The maternal mortality ratio was 7.2/100 000 live births ranging from......INTRODUCTION: Despite the seriousness of the event, maternal deaths are substantially underreported. There is often a missed opportunity to learn from such tragedies. The aim of the study was to identify maternal deaths in the five Nordic countries, to classify causes of death based...... on internationally acknowledged criteria, and to identify areas that would benefit from further teaching, training or research to possibly reduce the number of maternal deaths. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We present data for the years 2005-2013. National audit groups collected data by linkage of registers and direct...

  19. Maternal and infant characteristics: differences and similarities between the Nordic countries and the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfling, Lukas; Bröms, Gabriella; Bahmanyar, Shahram; Kieler, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Data from the Nordic health care registers have been of great value in perinatal epidemiological research. It has been assumed that findings from the Nordic population (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) are applicable to other populations as well, including the population of the US. To describe and compare maternal and infant characteristics between the Nordic and the American populations as recorded in the official statistics. This population-based study included data on all females who gave birth and their infants in the Nordic countries and the US. The data were obtained from the US National Center for Health Statistics and the official statistics data for the Nordic countries. The data from all six countries included births from 2006 to 2010. The mean maternal age at delivery was lower in the US than in the Nordic countries (27.5 vs 30.3 years). Cesarean sections (32.2% vs 17.9%), low birth weight (8.2% vs 4.8%), and preterm birth (12.3% vs 5.9%) were more common in the US than in the Nordic countries. Smoking during early pregnancy was slightly less common in the US compared with Nordic countries (9.8% vs 11.2%). Restricting the data from the US to females with a university degree, characteristics such as age at delivery, birth weight, and preterm deliveries were more in alignment with the Nordic data. There are differences in some key maternal and neonatal characteristics between the Nordic countries and the US. However, some characteristics are related to socioeconomic status, suggesting that the Nordic data seem to be applicable to the part of the population in the US with a higher socioeconomic status.

  20. Introduction of human papillomavirus vaccination in Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Bente Braad; Rebolj, Matejka; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2012-02-14

    Cervical screening has helped decrease the incidence of cervical cancer, but the disease remains a burden for women. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is now a promising tool for control of cervical cancer. Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) are relatively wealthy with predominantly publicly paid health care systems. The aim of this paper was to provide an update of the current status of introduction of HPV vaccine into the childhood vaccination programs in this region. Data on cervical cancer, cervical screening programs, childhood immunization and HPV vaccination programs for Nordic countries were searched via PubMed and various organizations. We furthermore contacted selected experts for information. The incidence of cervical cancer is highest in Greenland (25 per 100,000, age standardized, World Standard Population, ASW) and lowest in Finland (4 per 100,000 ASW) and rates in the other Nordic countries vary between 7 and 11 per 100,000 ASW. Greenland and Denmark were first to introduce HPV vaccination, followed by Norway. Vaccination programs are underway in Sweden and Iceland, while Finland has just recently recommended introduction of vaccination. HPV vaccination has been intensively debated, in particular in Denmark and Norway. In Nordic countries with a moderate risk of cervical cancer and a publicly paid health care system, the introduction of HPV vaccination was a priority issue. Many players became active, from the general public to health professionals, special interest groups, and the vaccine manufacturers. These seemed to prioritize different health care needs and weighed differently the uncertainty about the long-term effects of the vaccine. HPV vaccination posed a pressure on public health authorities to consider the evidence for and against it, and on politicians to weigh the wish for cervical cancer protection against other pertinent health issues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Has streamflow changed in the Nordic countries?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisdal, Hege; Holmqvist, Erik; Jonsdottir, Jona Finndis; Jonsson, Pall; Kuusisto, Esko; Lindstroem, Goeran; Roald, Lars A.

    2010-01-15

    Climate change studies traditionally include elaboration of possible scenarios for the future and attempts to detect a climate change signal in historical data. This study focuses on the latter. A pan-Nordic dataset of more than 160 streamflow records was analysed to detect spatial and temporal changes in streamflow. The Mann-Kendall trend test was applied to study changes in annual and seasonal streamflow as well as floods and droughts for three periods: 1961-2000, 1941-2002 and 1920-2002. The period analysed and the selection of stations influenced the regional patterns found, but the overall picture was that trends towards increased streamflow were dominating for annual values and the winter and spring seasons. Trends in summer flow highly depended on the period analysed whereas no trend was found for the autumn season. A signal towards earlier snowmelt floods was clear and a tendency towards more severe summer droughts was found in southern Norway. A qualitative comparison of the findings to available streamflow scenarios for the region showed that the strongest trends found are coherent with changes expected in the scenario period, for example increased winter discharge and earlier snowmelt floods. However, there are also expected changes that are not reflected in the trends, such as the expected increase in autumn discharge in Norway. It can be concluded that the observed temperature increase has clearly affected the streamflow in the Nordic countries. These changes correspond well with the estimated consequences of a projected temperature increase. The effect of the observed and projected precipitation increase on streamflow is less clear.(Author)

  2. Social Policy and Economic Development in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kangas, Olli; Palme, Joakim

    between democratization and social policy, drawing attention to the role of the state and non-governmental organizations. Social Policy and Economic Development in Nordic Countries examines Nordic social policies on unemployment, social care, family, education and health care policies, and reviews future......This volume examines the relationship between Nordic social policy and economic development from a comparative perspective. It identifies the driving forces behind the development of the Nordic welfare model and the problems and dilemmas the model is facing at present. The book also traces the link...

  3. Welfare Reform in the Nordic Countries in the 1990s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Jon

    This article uses a new method for policy analysis, fuzzy-set theory, which is a framework that allows for a precise operationalization of theoretical concepts. fuzzy-set theory is used to asses the conformity of the Nordic countries to a pre-conceptualized ideal-typical nordic welfare model...

  4. Implementation of lung cancer CT screening in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Sørensen, Jens Benn; Saghir, Zaigham

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We review the current knowledge of CT screening for lung cancer and present an expert-based, joint protocol for the proper implementation of screening in the Nordic countries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experts representing all the Nordic countries performed literature review...... and concensus for a joint protocol for lung cancer screening. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Areas of concern and caution are presented and discussed. We suggest to perform CT screening pilot studies in the Nordic countries in order to gain experience and develop specific and safe protocols for the implementation...

  5. On wind power in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Lars J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the prospects for a large scale introduction of wind power in the Nordic countries especially with respect to the consequences for small independent power producers of the ongoing and planned deregulation of the electricity sector. The recoverable wind resources are great and integration costs are small due to the good load following capability of the existing Swedish and Norwegian hydroelectric capacity. The structure of the present electricity system and the current principles for electricity trade are reviewed. To what extent wind power will be the technology of choice for capacity replacement and expansion depends on how intermittent power will be valued on the future electricity market. In a deregulated market, wind power may be priced below its value unless appropriate pricing mechanisms are developed. Market reforms should therefore include consideration of the large contribution that wind energy must make in a future electricity system which, in addition to being economically efficient, is compatible with broader societal goals. 47 refs, 2 figs

  6. Roadmap for H{sub 2} in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannemand Andersen, P.; Greve, O.K.; Kruger Nielsen, S.

    2004-12-01

    This report reports on a roadmap workshop held in Roskilde in 2004 as part of the Nordic H{sub 2} Energy Foresight project. The workshop outlined a sequence of implementation and mutual interdependence of the hydrogen technology visions from today (2004) and until 2030. Furthermore, barriers, needs and drivers for realising the visions were discussed at the workshop in relation to science an education (needs for scientific research, needs for competences) and government (energy and industry policy, public R and D, early market stimulation, standardisation, safety). The roadmaps outlined key issues and challenges in hydrogen and fuel cell energy development and suggested paths that Nordic industry, energy companies, academia and governments may take to expand the use of hydrogen and fuel cell-based energy. Roadmap exercises offer a collective and consultative process, with the processes itself being equally important as the outcome. Hence, the aim is not to predict or suggest exact targets for hydrogen in the Nordic countries by 2030 nor putting up exact ways to achieve these targets. Bur by setting up ambitious and realistic targets and putting up roadmaps we can challenge our understanding of a future hydrogen society and be better able to suggest policies and decisions today. (au)

  7. Radiation protection and atomic energy legislation in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation protection and atomic energy laws of the Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden are presented in this report in their status of March 1, 1984. As a background to this legislation the Nordic co-operation is briefly reviewed and the common basis for the legal texts is given. Some historical remarks for the legislation of each country are included. (orig./HP)

  8. Iodine status in the Nordic countries - past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Helena Filipsson; Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Erlund, Iris; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg; Hulthén, Lena; Laurberg, Peter; Mattisson, Irene; Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Virtanen, Suvi; Meltzer, Helle Margrete

    2016-01-01

    Adequate iodine nutrition is dependent on ground water content, seafood, and, as many countries use iodized cow fodder, dairy products. In most countries, salt fortification programs are needed to assure adequate iodine intake. The objectives are threefold: 1) to describe the past and present iodine situation in the Nordic countries, 2) to identify important gaps of knowledge, and 3) to highlight differences among the Nordic countries' iodine biomonitoring and fortification policies. Historical data are compared with the current situation. The Nordic countries' strategies to achieve recommended intake and urine iodine levels and their respective success rates are evaluated. In the past, the iodine situation ranged from excellent in Iceland to widespread goiter and cretinism in large areas of Sweden. The situation was less severe in Norway and Finland. According to a 1960 World Health Organization (WHO) report, there were then no observations of iodine deficiency in Denmark. In Sweden and Finland, the fortification of table salt was introduced 50-75 years ago, and in Norway and Finland, the fortification of cow fodder starting in the 1950s helped improve the population's iodine status due to the high intake of milk. In Denmark, iodine has been added to household salt and salt in bread for the past 15 years. The Nordic countries differ with regard to regulations and degree of governmental involvement. There are indications that pregnant and lactating women, the two most vulnerable groups, are mildly deficient in iodine in several of the Nordic countries. The Nordic countries employ different strategies to attain adequate iodine nutrition. The situation is not optimal and is in need of re-evaluation. Iodine researchers, Nordic national food administrations, and Nordic governmental institutions would benefit from collaboration to attain a broader approach and guarantee good iodine health for all.

  9. Geriatric work-up in the Nordic countries. The Nordic approach to comprehensive geriatric assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sletvold, O; Tilvis, R; Jonsson, A

    1996-01-01

    A group established by the Nordic professors of geriatrics has developed a position document presenting a shared and updated review of geriatric work-up as a way of comprehensive geriatric assessment in the Nordic countries. The main intention is that the document will serve as support and help f...... languages, and the translated versions should ideally have been subjected to validity and reliability testing. However, so far no scale meets these demands regarding all the five Nordic languages.......A group established by the Nordic professors of geriatrics has developed a position document presenting a shared and updated review of geriatric work-up as a way of comprehensive geriatric assessment in the Nordic countries. The main intention is that the document will serve as support and help...... for the clinician concerned with hospital based geriatric medicine. It may also be useful for quality control and teaching. Not least, it may be useful for health professionals other than geriatricians. To some extent, the position of geriatric medicine in the Nordic countries varies between the countries. However...

  10. Survey of system responsibility in the Nordic countries. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-02-01

    In September 2004 the Nordic Council of Ministers asked Nordel to perform some tasks and present the results to the Council on 1 March 2005. One of the tasks is to survey how system responsibility is defined and executed in the different Nordic countries. According to the Nordic Council of Ministers, the survey shall illuminate similarities and differences between the countries and assess the reasons for the differences. Nordel is asked to present a joint view system responsibility in the Nordic countries. Among other things, the responsibility for the system operators and the participants in the market shall be defined. The definition shall also include the distribution of costs between costs for network business and costs for business in competition. This shall be done in a way that creates a common platform for the further harmonisation work and continuous positive development of the Nordic electricity market. It is also important to identify the need for changes in e.g. legislation and guidelines in the different countries as a consequence of an implementation of a common definition in the Nordic countries. Areas to be included in the task are among others, balance settlement, security of supply, congestion management and system services. (BA)

  11. Iodine status in the Nordic countries – past and present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Filipsson Nyström

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adequate iodine nutrition is dependent on ground water content, seafood, and, as many countries use iodized cow fodder, dairy products. In most countries, salt fortification programs are needed to assure adequate iodine intake. Objectives: The objectives are threefold: 1 to describe the past and present iodine situation in the Nordic countries, 2 to identify important gaps of knowledge, and 3 to highlight differences among the Nordic countries’ iodine biomonitoring and fortification policies. Design: Historical data are compared with the current situation. The Nordic countries’ strategies to achieve recommended intake and urine iodine levels and their respective success rates are evaluated. Results: In the past, the iodine situation ranged from excellent in Iceland to widespread goiter and cretinism in large areas of Sweden. The situation was less severe in Norway and Finland. According to a 1960 World Health Organization (WHO report, there were then no observations of iodine deficiency in Denmark. In Sweden and Finland, the fortification of table salt was introduced 50–75 years ago, and in Norway and Finland, the fortification of cow fodder starting in the 1950s helped improve the population's iodine status due to the high intake of milk. In Denmark, iodine has been added to household salt and salt in bread for the past 15 years. The Nordic countries differ with regard to regulations and degree of governmental involvement. There are indications that pregnant and lactating women, the two most vulnerable groups, are mildly deficient in iodine in several of the Nordic countries. Conclusion: The Nordic countries employ different strategies to attain adequate iodine nutrition. The situation is not optimal and is in need of re-evaluation. Iodine researchers, Nordic national food administrations, and Nordic governmental institutions would benefit from collaboration to attain a broader approach and guarantee good iodine health for all.

  12. Iodine status in the Nordic countries – past and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Helena Filipsson; Brantsæter, Anne Lise; Erlund, Iris; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg; Hulthén, Lena; Laurberg, Peter; Mattisson, Irene; Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Virtanen, Suvi; Meltzer, Helle Margrete

    2016-01-01

    Background Adequate iodine nutrition is dependent on ground water content, seafood, and, as many countries use iodized cow fodder, dairy products. In most countries, salt fortification programs are needed to assure adequate iodine intake. Objectives The objectives are threefold: 1) to describe the past and present iodine situation in the Nordic countries, 2) to identify important gaps of knowledge, and 3) to highlight differences among the Nordic countries’ iodine biomonitoring and fortification policies. Design Historical data are compared with the current situation. The Nordic countries’ strategies to achieve recommended intake and urine iodine levels and their respective success rates are evaluated. Results In the past, the iodine situation ranged from excellent in Iceland to widespread goiter and cretinism in large areas of Sweden. The situation was less severe in Norway and Finland. According to a 1960 World Health Organization (WHO) report, there were then no observations of iodine deficiency in Denmark. In Sweden and Finland, the fortification of table salt was introduced 50–75 years ago, and in Norway and Finland, the fortification of cow fodder starting in the 1950s helped improve the population's iodine status due to the high intake of milk. In Denmark, iodine has been added to household salt and salt in bread for the past 15 years. The Nordic countries differ with regard to regulations and degree of governmental involvement. There are indications that pregnant and lactating women, the two most vulnerable groups, are mildly deficient in iodine in several of the Nordic countries. Conclusion The Nordic countries employ different strategies to attain adequate iodine nutrition. The situation is not optimal and is in need of re-evaluation. Iodine researchers, Nordic national food administrations, and Nordic governmental institutions would benefit from collaboration to attain a broader approach and guarantee good iodine health for all. PMID:27283870

  13. Policy responses to hepatitis C in the Nordic countries: Gaps and discrepant reporting in the Hep-Nordic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Safreed-Harmon

    Full Text Available In the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, the prevalence of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is relatively low in the general population, but is much higher among people who inject drugs (PWID. We conducted an exploratory study to investigate the extent to which these countries have policies supporting key elements of the public health response that is necessary to achieve the global goal of eliminating HCV as a public health threat.Fourteen stakeholders representing government agencies, medical societies, and civil society organisations (CSOs in the Nordic countries completed a cross-sectional online survey that included 21 policy questions related to national coordination, prevention, testing, linkage to care, and treatment. We summarised the findings in a descriptive analysis, and noted discrepant responses from stakeholders within the same country.Stakeholders reported that three of the five study countries have national viral hepatitis strategies, while only Iceland has a national HCV elimination goal. The availability of harm reduction services varies, with opioid substitution therapy provided for the general population throughout all countries, but not needle and syringe programmes. No country has access to anonymous HCV testing in all parts of the country. National HCV treatment guidelines are available in all countries except Finland, and all countries provide publicly funded direct-acting antiviral treatment. Disagreement regarding policies was observed across countries, and CSOs were the stakeholder group that most frequently answered survey questions incorrectly.The Nordic region as a whole has not consistently expressed its commitment to tackling HCV, despite the existence of large HCV epidemics among PWID in these countries. Stakeholder alignment and an established elimination goal with an accompanying strategy and implementation plan should be recognised as the basis for coordinated national

  14. Policy responses to hepatitis C in the Nordic countries: Gaps and discrepant reporting in the Hep-Nordic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Hetherington, Kristina L; Aleman, Soo; Alho, Hannu; Dalgard, Olav; Frisch, Tove; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Weis, Nina; Lazarus, Jeffrey V

    2018-01-01

    In the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden), the prevalence of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively low in the general population, but is much higher among people who inject drugs (PWID). We conducted an exploratory study to investigate the extent to which these countries have policies supporting key elements of the public health response that is necessary to achieve the global goal of eliminating HCV as a public health threat. Fourteen stakeholders representing government agencies, medical societies, and civil society organisations (CSOs) in the Nordic countries completed a cross-sectional online survey that included 21 policy questions related to national coordination, prevention, testing, linkage to care, and treatment. We summarised the findings in a descriptive analysis, and noted discrepant responses from stakeholders within the same country. Stakeholders reported that three of the five study countries have national viral hepatitis strategies, while only Iceland has a national HCV elimination goal. The availability of harm reduction services varies, with opioid substitution therapy provided for the general population throughout all countries, but not needle and syringe programmes. No country has access to anonymous HCV testing in all parts of the country. National HCV treatment guidelines are available in all countries except Finland, and all countries provide publicly funded direct-acting antiviral treatment. Disagreement regarding policies was observed across countries, and CSOs were the stakeholder group that most frequently answered survey questions incorrectly. The Nordic region as a whole has not consistently expressed its commitment to tackling HCV, despite the existence of large HCV epidemics among PWID in these countries. Stakeholder alignment and an established elimination goal with an accompanying strategy and implementation plan should be recognised as the basis for coordinated national public health

  15. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Ulbak, Kaare; Dreyer, L

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our...... malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic...... and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180...

  16. Subspecialist training in surgical gynecological oncology in the nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B

    2011-01-01

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries we developed an online questionnaire in cooperation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian...... (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecological oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange...

  17. Monitoring and Benchmarking eHealth in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nøhr, Christian; Koch, Sabine; Vimarlund, Vivian; Gilstad, Heidi; Faxvaag, Arild; Hardardottir, Gudrun Audur; Andreassen, Hege K; Kangas, Maarit; Reponen, Jarmo; Bertelsen, Pernille; Villumsen, Sidsel; Hyppönen, Hannele

    2018-01-01

    The Nordic eHealth Research Network, a subgroup of the Nordic Council of Ministers eHealth group, is working on developing indicators to monitor progress in availability, use and outcome of eHealth applications in the Nordic countries. This paper reports on the consecutive analysis of National eHealth policies in the Nordic countries from 2012 to 2016. Furthermore, it discusses the consequences for the development of indicators that can measure changes in the eHealth environment arising from the policies. The main change in policies is reflected in a shift towards more stakeholder involvement and intensified focus on clinical infrastructure. This change suggests developing indicators that can monitor understandability and usability of eHealth systems, and the use and utility of shared information infrastructure from the perspective of the end-users - citizens/patients and clinicians in particular.

  18. Trends in parental leave in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eydal, Guðný; Gíslason, Ingólfur; Rostgaard, Tine

    2015-01-01

    are witnessing a paradigm shift in some of these countries, away from an emphasis on gender equality to a more traditional family approach, with the mother as the main parent, thinly guised as ‘free choice’ of individual families. Furthermore, the article asks why the changes in question have taken place......The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the development of parental leave in the Nordic countries in the last decade or so and explain the different roads taken by individual countries in this regard. Focusing on the recent development, mainly on father’s quota, we discuss whether we...... and examines the positions of different political parties towards the issue. The article shows that the Nordic countries are developing somewhat different policies and the gap between both policies and politics in the Nordic countries seems to be increasing rather than closing up....

  19. Current research in transcultural psychiatry in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekblad, Solvig; Kastrup, Marianne Carisius

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses major themes in recent transcultural psychiatric research in the Nordic countries from 2008 to 2011: (a) epidemiological studies of migration, (b) indigenous populations, and (c) quality of psychiatric care for migrants. Over the past several decades, the populations......, and after migration, with potential effects on their physical, mental, social, and spiritual health. Growing interest in transcultural issues is reflected in the level of scientific research and clinical activity in the field by Nordic physicians, psychologists, social scientists, demographers, medical...

  20. Facilities Management research in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2011-01-01

    to the establishment of the Centre for Facilities Management – Realdania Research (CFM), and updated information from keynote contributions to CFM’s Nordic FM Conference on 22-23 August 2011 by Suvi Nenonen (Finland), Jan Bröchner (Sweden), Geir K Hansen (Norway) and Per Anker Jensen (Denmark)....

  1. Historical Background of Inclusive Education Development in the Nordic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Andriichuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes and interprets the comprehensive presentation of the development of inclusive education in some Nordic countries, namely Sweden, Norway and Iceland. The article states that the special education is still an alternative form of education for children with special needs who cannot attend secondary schools in the majority of the countries. Thus, the relation between inclusive and special education allows the author to draw some parallels between these two types of study to trace the transition from one to another. The author concludes that the history of inclusive education formation in Sweden, Norway and Iceland has much in common, but the Icelandic education system has characteristics which distinguish it from the two others.

  2. Nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. A database, Nordic Nuclear Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margrethe, I.; Eikelmann, H.

    2003-01-01

    The acute phase of an accident and the possibility of high exposure of the populations are always the most important threats in the emergency preparedness work. Radioactive contamination from an accident can however also cause long time effects for land use and enhanced doses to special population groups and economic problems for agriculture, grazing animals, reindeer industry, hunting, freshwater fishing, tourism and recreation. For planning purposes it is always valuable to be aware of potential radiation hazard and other potential threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. Thus, mapping such threats in a Nordic context is an important factor in emergency preparedness in the Nordic countries. The project has dealt with threats from the north west of Russia and the Baltic states. The results from the different activities in the project is generated in a web based database called the 'the base of knowledge'. (orig.)

  3. Online development in the Nordic countries

    OpenAIRE

    Mickos, Elisabet (ed.); Lamvik, Aud (ed.); Retlev, Ulla (ed.); Wallin, Marie (ed.); Oker-Blom, Teodora (ed.)

    2007-01-01

    This is a collection of some of the articles that will form the e-book “Online development in the Nordic countries”. The e-book will contain the chapters: Introduction - Information policy - The infrastructure - Information systems and databases - Users - The online market in perspective. The final version of the e-book will include more articles, more pictures and information about the authors.

  4. Academisation of Nursing Education in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiho, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Nursing Science represents a new academic discipline in the Nordic Countries. The article focuses on the academisation of nursing education and the development of nursing to a specific discipline in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The education of nurses has developed within the national framework of each country, but not within a national…

  5. Anaesthesia nursing education in the Nordic countries: Literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yunsuk; Lahtinen, Pia; Meretoja, Riitta; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to analyse post-registration anaesthesia nursing education in the Nordic countries. The analysis was based on key determinants fundamental to analysing nursing education: 1) the sys]tem of anaesthesia nursing education, 2) entry requirements, 3) credits, the duration and the title or degree awarded, and 4) the amount of practical training. A scoping review was approached in a systematic manner. The literature was analysed using deductive content analysis. Data was gathered based on key determinants. The data were quantified into frequencies and percentages to compare the similarities and differences of anaesthesia nursing. The Nordic countries have different types of post-registration anaesthesia nursing education from non-degree supplementary programmes to Master's degree programmes. Even though the entry requirements correspond between countries, many more differences than similarities in anaesthesia nursing education were noted. A title granting the right to work as a nurse anaesthetist can be obtained through a variety of educational systems, credit requirements, the duration, and the amount of practical training in post-registration anaesthesia nursing programmes. This aim of the study was to analyse post-registration anaesthesia nursing education from the Nordic perspective. Harmonising the educational system and minimum education requirements in anaesthesia nursing education is recommended in order to facilitate free movement and assure the quality of care from the Nordic perspective. Since each Nordic country has its own native language, it was difficult to gather information from all the Nordic countries. Therefore, creating common educational database published in English can help to bench mark each country's educational system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nordic (cross-country) skiing injuries in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, E; Asquith, J

    1987-03-02

    A retrospective study of 88 nordic skiing injuries from the 1984 and 1985 skiing seasons in Australia is presented. To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date of such injuries. These injuries are compared with alpine skiing injuries from the same medical clinic for the 1985 skiing season. There was a much lower incidence of injury from nordic skiing; however, when injuries did occur, they tended to be more serious than those of alpine skiing and frequently required immediate evacuation to hospital for treatment. As the nordic skier is relatively isolated from medical services, these findings need to be considered in the future planning of rescue services for such skiers.

  7. An Overview of Aquaculture in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paisley, Larry; Ariel, Ellen; Lyngstad, T. M.

    2010-01-01

    in the Nordic countries has a long history; beginning in the 1850s when hatcheries for restocking of salmon and trout were established in Norway. Nowadays, Atlantic salmon is the dominant cultured species in Norway and the Faroe Islands, whereas rainbow trout dominate in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. Arctic......The goal of this review was to describe in some detail the Nordic aquaculture industries in order to illuminate the similarities and differences. Information that was gathered for each country includes aquaculture history, aquaculture acts and regulations, production and production systems...

  8. Pharmacy internship in the Nordic countries – Status and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stig Nørgaard, Lotte; Wallman, Andy; Bjornsdóttir, Ingunn

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacy internship in the Nordic countries – Status and future Conference Paper in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy 13(3):e14 · May 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2017.02.099 Conference: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy......Pharmacy internship in the Nordic countries – Status and future Conference Paper in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy 13(3):e14 · May 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2017.02.099 Conference: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy...

  9. Simulated recalls of fish products in five Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup, Maria; Storøy, J.; Lievonen, S.

    2008-01-01

    Simulated recalls of fish products sampled in retailer shops were conducted in five Nordic countries to indicate the effectiveness and accuracy of chain traceability systems. The results suggested poor traceability practices at the vessels/auctions and revealed that batch sizes at the last...... traceable step of the raw material vary considerably. However, the existing traceable information seemed to be easily accessible. Altogether, the fish industry in the Nordic countries seems not to be fully prepared for a recall.. Improved traceability awareness and practices in the whole chain can limit...

  10. [The manpower market for physicians in the Nordic countries 1980-2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, E; Taraldset, A

    2000-06-30

    The ratio between population and active physicians in the Nordic countries has improved from 488 inhabitants per physician in 1980 to 315 in 2000. There is a large mobility of physicians between the countries, contributing to levelling out swings in demand and supply of manpower. Language and culture being similar, physicians can easily adjust to working in a neighbouring country. Iceland is special in this respect, as a surplus of Icelandic physicians has always found work in the other Nordic countries. Of course, their numbers are small relative to the total number of active physicians in the Nordic countries, now approximately 76,000. The number of students admitted to Nordic medical faculties has changed in line with swings in estimated future demand for manpower. Today, numbers are increasing again; this year, approximately 2,900 students will be admitted. Norway stands apart from the other Nordic countries in terms of medical manpower needs. During the last 20 years there has been a continuous shortage of physicians while all the other countries have been through periods of surplus and unemployment among physicians. Manpower forecasts in the early 1980s underestimated the growth in the health care system and hence the demand for medical manpower.

  11. Wind and load variability in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holttinen, Hannele; Rissanen, Simo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    the three years analysed in this publication there were few storm incidents and they did not produce dramatic wind power ramps in the Nordic region. Wind and load variations are not correlated between the countries, which is beneficial from the viewpoint of wind integration. The smoothing effect is shown......This publication analysed the variability of wind production and load in Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and the Nordic region as a whole, based on real data measured from large-scale wind power during 2009–2011. The Nordic-wide wind power time series was scaled up such that Sweden had same amount...... of wind power production than Denmark, and Finland and Norway only 50% of the wind power production in Denmark. Wind power production in Denmark and Sweden is somewhat correlated (coefficient 0.7) but less correlation is found between the other countries. The variations from one hour to the next are only...

  12. The Nordic Countries interests in principles for international greenhouse gas agreements; Nordens interesser i principper for internationale drivhusgasaftaler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Meyer, H.; Stephensen, P.; Soerensen, L.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of this report is the interests of the Nordic countries in international agreements on greenhouse gases. The subject is approached mainly from an economic point of view. Introductory, the climate convention are described, with special attention to obligations to emission reductions. Important discussion points are timing of the reductions as well as the question of meeting the reductions by cooperation with other countries through joint-implementation projects. The different attitudes of the Nordic countries to these issues are discussed. In the following, the technical and economic possibilities for meeting the reduction objectives of each country are described. For this purpose, governmental plans and studies (on bottom-up as well as top-down studies) are brought into focus. A discussion of the differences and similarities of the methodology of the studies are carried out. Finally, the report focuses on costs of reducing emissions in the Nordic countries. A comparison between the different Nordic countries, as well as between the Nordic countries and the other OECD countries is done. The analysis points out, that the Nordic countries are characterized by relatively high costs in general. Another conclusion is, that the costs of reduction after the year 2000/2005 are much lower than costs of reductions in the short run. An exception to this is Denmark. This points out, that some Nordic countries prefer emission reductions through joint-implementation projects in other countries, rather than reductions through restrictive agreements in the sort run. (au) (29 tabs., 28 ills., 45 refs.)

  13. Naturally occurring radioactivity in the Nordic countries. Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In the publication 'Naturally Occurring Radiation in the Nordic Countries - Recommendations' published in 1986 the radiation protection authorities in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden gave radiation protection recommendations for natural radiation in the Nordic countries. The exposure of the populations in the Nordic countries to natural radiation sources is among the highest in the world and much effort has been devoted during the last 10 to 20 years to characterising, assessing and, where feasible, to reduce these exposures. The exposure of workers to natural radiation sources has also been an important area of work in the same period. During this period the international recommendations on radiation protection policy have been further developed with ICRP Publication 60: '1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection', and ICRP Publication 65: 'Protection Against Radon-222 at Home and at Work'. The European Basic Safety Standards Directive from 1996 (96/29/EURATOM), which is based on the ICRP recommendations, differs from the earlier versions in that special provisions have been laid down concerning exposure to natural radiation sources. As Denmark, Finland and Sweden are members of European Union and the EFTA-countries (Iceland and Norway) have close co-operation with the EU, the practical implementation of the EU-BSS will play an important role in all the Nordic countries. In November 1998, a new Drinking Water Directive, 98/83/EC, was adopted. The directive also includes radioactivity in drinking water, excluding potassium-40, radon, and radon decay products. Altogether this means that the Nordic recommendations from 1986 for natural radiation needed to be updated. The Nordic Radiation Protection Authorities therefore decided to set up a working group with the aim of revising the recommendations from 1986. The new revised recommendations will, as before, only deal with the components of the exposure to natural

  14. Economic regulation of electricity grids in Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, H.B.; EK, G. (Energy Markets Inspectorate, Eskilstuna (Sweden)); Ilonen, M.; Nurmi, S. (Energy Market Authority, Helsinki (Finland)); Moelgaard Jakobsen, N. (Danish Energy Regulatory Authority, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Syvertsen, S.C.; Steinnes, S.H. (Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate, Oslo (Norway))

    2011-12-15

    This report is about the design of economic regulation of electricity companies in the Nordic countries. The purpose is to inform the interested reader on how the regulation of tariffs is designed. The intention is to give a short overview on the current economic regulation with an ambition to focus on differences and similarities. A common feature of the electricity distribution sector is that the industry structure consists of many independent companies with great differences in size and density of customers. This is contrary to what is common in other countries. The regulatory task can be more challenging with many separate utilities to regulate, especially if the industry is very heterogenous. In the appendices, the economic regulation of each country is presented in more detail. In the main text the focus is on differences and similarities. When comparing the regulations one can make two observations. On a superior level there are great similarities. All Nordic countries regulate the network companies by setting revenue caps. The legislation, the goals given to the regulators and the regulators general interpretation of the rules are to a great extent the same. The primary purposes are to prevent the monopolist to overcharge customers and to create a rational network industry. The regulation shall stimulate an effective management resulting in productivity development and optimal quality of the services. The differences in the Nordic economic regulations are in the details - in the setup of the regulatory models and choice of parameters. For instance; the assessment of a reasonable rate-of-return is done in all the regulations. When deciding this rate-of-return some countries use the method of weighted cost of capital (WACC) and capital asset pricing model (CAPM), other do not. Even when using the same method, the inputs in the model are not the same. Common for the regulatory models are the division of costs related to capital costs and operating costs. The

  15. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Exogenous hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Dreyer, L; Tryggvadottir, L

    1997-01-01

    of the breast and uterine cervix) and beneficial effects (protection against cancers of the ovary and endometrium), indicate that 95 cases of breast cancer and 40 of cervical cancer will be caused by oral contraceptives annually around 2000 in the Nordic countries, which corresponds to 0.6% of all breast......The well-described influence of several aspects of reproductive life on the risk for cancer in the reproductive organs has raised concern regarding the safety of exogenous hormones, particularly since sex hormones have become one of the most widely used drugs among women in the western world...... aged 15-45 years in 1985 ranging between 6% (Norway) and 19% (Sweden) and proportions of current users in 1994 ranging between 20% (Norway) and 28% (Sweden). Such data on the current and long-term use of oral contraceptives by the female populations, linked with relative estimates of adverse (cancers...

  16. Occupational risk for oral cancer in nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarvainen, Laura; Suojanen, Juho; Kyyronen, Pentti

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate occupational risk for cancer of the tongue, oral cavity or pharynx after adjustment for alcohol and tobacco use. Materials and Methods: The data covered 14.9 million people and 28,623 cases of cancer of the tongue, oral cavity and pharynx in the Nordic countries 1961-2005. Alcohol...... consumption by occupation was estimated based on mortality from liver cirrhosis and incidence of liver cancer. Smoking by occupation was estimated based on the incidence of lung cancer. Results: Only few occupations had relative risks of over 1.5 for cancer of the tongue, oral cavity and pharynx...... chemical exposures, increased consumption of alcohol and tobacco products, or infection with human papilloma virus....

  17. Undergraduate Courses in Family Medicine in the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands and the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan-Helge

    1993-01-01

    Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries......Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries...

  18. Developments in strategic landscape monitoring for the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landscape plays an increasingly relevant and prominent role in the protection and mangement of the Earth's terrestrial environments and ecosystems, including the diverse forested, agricultural, wilderness and build-up landscapes within the Nordic countries. However to be meaningful in the Informa...

  19. Strategies for Internationalisation at Technical Universities in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Katrine Hahn; Karlsen, Jan Erik

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates strategies for internationalisation at technical universities in the Nordic countries. The study explores the institutional rationales for internationalisation, the stories told in the strategy documents, the importance of leaders, faculty, administration and students for implementation of the strategy, and barriers and…

  20. Multilingual Policies and Multilingual Education in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Mikaela; Björklund, Siv; Sjöholm, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    This article presents some aspects of multilingualism and multilingual education in the Nordic countries, drawing upon experiences from the project "Network for Researchers of Multilingualism and Multilingual Education, RoMME" (2011-2013), where Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are represented. The aim is to briefly present and…

  1. Advancing life cycle economics in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugbølle, Kim; Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2005-01-01

    Advancing construction and facilities management requires the ability to estimate and evaluate the economic consequences of decisions in a lifetime perspective. A survey of state-of-the-art on life cycle economics in the Nordic countries showed that, despite a number of similarities, no strong...... that the configuration of the roles as client, owner and user is indicative of a client's interest in life cycle economics. Second, a proposal for a common Nordic cost classification was put forward. Third, it was argued that there is a strong need to develop tools and methodologies to depict the cost/value ratio...

  2. Local Social Services in Nordic countries in Times of Disaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eydal, Guðný Björk; Ómarsdóttir, Ingibjörg Lilja; Dahlberg, Rasmus

    of such disasters is on the rise according to forecasts. In order to enhance resilience and preparedness of those most vulnerable in disasters, the involvement of local social services in the emergency management system is of vital importance. The literature shows how social services can enhance social and human......The project focused on the emergency management systems in the five Nordic countries. It investigated whether local social services have a formal role in the contingency planning of the systems. The project was part of The Nordic Welfare Watch research project during the Icelandic Presidency...... Program in the Nordic Council of Ministers 2014-2016. The council financed the project. The main findings show that Finland, Norway and Sweden specifically address the role of social services in times of disaster in their legal frameworks on emergency management. Finland and Norway also address the role...

  3. Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Regber, Susann; Fosse, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to identify applied definitions and measurements of economic poverty and to explore the proportions and characteristics of children and adolescents living in economic poverty in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden during the last decade and to compare various...... statistics between the Nordic countries. Methods: Official data from central national authorities on statistics, national reports and European Union Statistics of income and living conditions data were collected and analysed during 2015–2016. Results: The proportion of Nordic children living in economic...... poverty in 2014 ranged from 9.4% in Norway to 18.5% in Sweden. Compared with the European Union average, from 2004 to 2014 Nordic families with dependent children experienced fewer difficulties in making their money last, even though Icelandic families reported considerable difficulties...

  4. Higher education participation in the Nordic countries 1985-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Peter; Hedman, Juha; Helland, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    not seem to be a universal remedy for narrowing the social gap in HE participation in the Nordic countries. Examining upper tertiary education by field of study, we find great disparities in selectivity, but we also find that the vast majority of fields have moved towards more equalization. However...... having unique administrative data in all four countries. We ask (i) whether HE expansion in the Nordic countries has been followed by a similar closing of the social gap in HE participation, and (ii) whether privileged groups have been able to maintain their advantage in HE participation. The results did......, prestigious professional university programmes such as law and medicine continue to favour more socially privileged children, albeit the social gap is narrowed substantially in Finland and Norway. These two countries also display the most substantial decrease in overall HE inequality....

  5. The Nordic countries as a cohort for pharmacoepidemiological research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furu, Kari; Wettermark, Björn; Andersen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    issues. To perform cross-national pharmacoepidemiological studies, resources, networks and time are needed, as well as methods for pooling data. Interpretation of results needs to account for inter-country heterogeneity and the possibility of spurious relationships. The Nordic countries have a unique......The Nordic countries have a long tradition of registry-based epidemiological research. Many population-based health registries were established in the 1960s, with use of unique personal identifiers facilitating linkage between registries. In recent years, each country has established a national...... health registries. Comparisons are facilitated by many similarities among the databases, including data source, content, coverage and methods used for drug utilization studies and record linkage. There are, however, some differences in coding systems and validity, as well as in some access and technical...

  6. Employee Representation and Board Size in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steen; Rose, Caspar; Kronborg, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    Several European countries have mandatory employee representation on company boards, but the consequences for corporate governance are debated. We use employee representation rules in the otherwise quite similar Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) to elicit information...... on shareholder preferences for employee representation and board size. We find that shareholders tend to choose board structures that minimize the proportion of employee representatives. In Denmark and Norway employee representation depends on board size, and shareholders choose board sizes that minimize...

  7. The 1980s financial liberalization in the Nordic countries

    OpenAIRE

    Honkapohja, Seppo

    2012-01-01

    The financial liberalization in the four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) that took place mostly in the 1980s led to a major financial crisis in three of those countries. The crises in Finland, Norway, and Sweden are among the deepest financial crises in advanced market economies since World War II. Denmark experienced some banking problems but managed to avoid a systemic crisis. This paper reviews the process of liberalization and discusses the reasons why Finland, Nor...

  8. Wind and load variability in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, H.; Rissanen, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Larsen, X. [Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, Lyngby (Denmark); Loevholm, A. L. [Kjeller Vindteknikk (Norway)

    2013-04-15

    This publication analysed the variability of wind production and load in Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and the Nordic region as a whole, based on real data measured from large-scale wind power during 2009-2011. The Nordic-wide wind power time series was scaled up such that Sweden had same amount of wind power production than Denmark, and Finland and Norway only 50% of the wind power production in Denmark. Wind power production in Denmark and Sweden is somewhat correlated (coefficient 0.7) but less correlation is found between the other countries. The variations from one hour to the next are only weakly correlated between all countries, even between Denmark and Sweden. Largest variations occur when the production is approximately 30-70% of installed capacity and variability is low during periods of light winds. The variability in shorter time scales was less than the hourly variations. During the three years analysed in this publication there were few storm incidents and they did not produce dramatic wind power ramps in the Nordic region. Wind and load variations are not correlated between the countries, which is beneficial from the viewpoint of wind integration. The smoothing effect is shown as reduction of variability from a single country to Nordic-wide wind power. The impact of wind power on the variability that the system experiences is evaluated by analysing the variability of net load with different wind power penetration levels. The Nordic-wide wind power production increases the highest hourly ramps by 2.4% (up) and -3.6% (down) of installed wind power capacity when there is 20% wind power penetration and by 2.7% (up) and -4.7% (down) for 30% wind penetration. These results assess the impacts of variability only. The next step will be assessing the uncertainty from forecast errors. The timing of ramp events, and occurrence of high-wind and low-load are studied. With current wind penetration, low production levels (2-5% of installed wind power) can occur in a

  9. Child poverty in the Nordic countries: Definitions, measures and consequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Bodil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nordic countries are highly ranked in different statistical surveys on welfare and policy on a fairer distribution of income among different groups in the society. In social policy we talk about a Scandinavian model aiming to give the citizens basic economic and social security to reduce poverty. This model includes general and selective policies in areas as housing, income and social issues. The state is the main deliver of welfare services, even if private providers funded by the state are taking a bigger part of the delivery today. There are transfer payment to different groups, as families with children who get child allowances. The aim is to create good living conditions with equal opportunities to education and future life. During the last decade the welfare policy has been questioned and we have seen a development towards a more restricted welfare policy. Different statistics point at rising gaps of income between social groups in the Nordic societies. During an expert seminar on child poverty in the Nordic countries in the end of 2009, organized by the Swedish National Committee of the International Council of Social Welfare (ICSW, scholars and representatives from authorities and NGOs from the Nordic member organizations met in order to compare the situation in their respectively country. One topic of discussion was how to measure child poverty and what impact different measures have. In this article I will use this conference as a starting point when I discuss different definitions of child poverty and the prevalence of child poverty in the Nordic countries.

  10. Naturally occuring radiation in the Nordic countries - recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In the publication ''Report on the Applicability of International Radiation Protection Recommendations in the Nordic Countries'', published in 1976, the radiation protection authorities in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden expessed their agreement on the main principles of radiation protection. The general aspects of radiation protection were covered in the recommendations with the exception of exposure of the public from natural sources of radiation. In 1983 a working group published the report ''Naturally Occurring radiation in the Nordic Countries, - Levels'' in the Radiation Protection Information-Series from the Nordic countries. In that report the present knowledge of the population exposure from natural sources of external gamma-radiation and from radon and thoron daughters in air was reviewed as a basis for the development of the radiation protection recommendations for natural radiation. During preparation of these recommendations due account has also been taken of ICRP publication no. 39: ''Principles for Limiting Exposure of the Public to Natural Sources of Radiation'', which was published in 1984 and in which ICRP for the first time has issued more specific recommendations for natural sources. The recommendations may serve as a basis for more formal rules and regulations within each country, if this is seemed necessary. However, no attempt has been made to formulate identical rules for all the five countries since the exposure levels from natural sources, methods of application and the legal frameworks differ between the countries. (EG)

  11. Application in the Nordic Countries of international radioactive waste recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In the publication ''Report on the Applicability of International Radiation Protection Recommendations in the Nordic Countries'' published in 1976 the radiation protection authorities in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden expressed their agreement on the main principles of radiation protection. All aspects of radiation protection are covered in the recommendations. Since the recommendations were released new information on radioactive protection has been published e.g. by ICRP, IAEA and OECD/NEA and the radiation protection authorities have felt it necessary to make a revision of Chapter 21, Radioactive Waste, in the Recommendations of the Nordic Countries. Since 1982, a working group from the radiation protection authorities has been working on that revision. In this work the experience from national and international work has been incorporated. The new recommendations are divided into two main parts, one dealing with waste originating from the nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear waste) and one with waste from other sources (non-nuclear waste). These recommendations have been approved by the Nordic radiation protection authorities at a meeting in Finland, September 1985 and replace the corresponding recommendations in Chapter 21 in The 1976 Nordic Recommendations. (author)

  12. The Future of FM in the Nordic Countries and a Possible Common Research Agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Andersen, Per Dannemand; Rasmussen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify trends and challenges in relation to the FM profession in the Nordic countries and to identify inputs to a common Nordic research agenda. Theory: The study is based on theory from innovation systems and strategic foresight. Based on a literature review an innovation systems...... that the main issues vary considerably between the four countries, both with regards to megatrends in the strategic environments, the current trends and challenges and the future needs for new competences and knowledge. Despite the large national differences the study is able to identify joint interest across...

  13. Preparedness against power crises in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelsen, Atle

    2004-01-01

    In the so-called Akureyri declaration the Nordic energy ministers presented their requests and claims to the system operators about supply security and exchange capacity between the countries. Some special issues are grid strengthening, common principles for how to deal with export and import, and a common transmission system operator. The ministers want to make international lines a priority. A common, Nordic grid company is probably not of current interest. Of the transmission system operators, only Statnett (Norway) is ready to consider a supranational perspective. Although the Nordic energy market is the most well-functioning energy market in the world, the ministers are not entirely satisfied and want further improvement. The first step will be to work out organizational models for how the grid operation and system responsibility can be managed by the countries jointly and thus improve the preparedness. The major power customers fear that a power crisis in one country may cause a cascade outage to spread in the neighbouring countries without the authorities being prepared. Experts disagree about the likelihood of a power crisis the next years. However, consumption is increasing much faster than production. After the liberalization of the energy market in 1991, the investments in the physical power system have decreased dramatically

  14. Economic regulation of TSOs in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syvertsen, S. C.; Steinnes, S. H. [Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate, Oslo (Norway); Robles, H. B.; Ek, G. [Energy Markets Inspectorate, Eskilstuna (Sweden); Ilonen, M; Nurmi, S. [Energy Market Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Thomsen, H. [Sekretariatet for Energitilsynet, Valby (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    The main topic of this report is the economic regulation of the transmission system operators (To) in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). The purpose of this report is to give an overview of the design of the economic regulation and compare the main elements of the regulation between the countries. There is one To in each country. For all countries, the revenues of the Tos are regulated by yearly decisions. In Finland, Norway and Sweden the regulators set an annual revenue cap. In Denmark, the To sets the tariffs according to budget, while the regulator approves the annual report and thereby also approves the tariffs ex post. The economic regulation of TSOs includes both regulation of system operations and the regulation of network operations. Chapter 3 describes in brief the main responsibilities of the system operator in each country and how the costs related to these tasks are regulated. Norway regulates the system operation costs, where 60 percent of the costs are based on a cost-norm which is evaluated periodically. In Finland and Sweden these costs are considered as non-controllable and are passed through directly in the revenue cap. In Denmark only costs considered as necessary at efficient operation shall be included in the tariffs, and the regulators have the opportunity to exclude costs based on this. There are no benchmark or efficiency requirements in the Danish regulation. In chapter 4 the main elements of the economic regulation of network operations are described and compared in tables. All countries regulate the network operations of the TSO. In Denmark there are no explicit efficiency requirements, and the regulation is based on a non-profit principle. The TSO only gets a return based on a price adjustment on its capital base as of 2005. In Finland, Norway and Sweden the regulation include efficiency requirements or benchmarking of costs. In Norway this regards 60 percent of total costs related to the network operations

  15. Variations in pediatric asthma hospitalization rates and costs between and within Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocevar, Vasilisa Sazonov; Bisgaard, Hans; Jönsson, Linus

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed variations in hospitalization parameters and costs among asthmatic children in four Nordic countries by geographic location and age groups. METHODS: Cross-sectional, county-level aggregate data on asthma-related hospitalizations in 1999, obtained from public national...... not differ significantly from Sweden. CONCLUSIONS: Large variations in all parameters were observed between and within countries. Given the similarities among the four countries studied, these results may, among other reasons, indicate different efficiencies of the various asthma management plans between...

  16. Labor Market Institutions, Mobility, and Dualization in the Nordic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Svalund

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparing the Nordic countries, this article examines different combinations of permanent and temporary employment protection legislation, and whether such differences are reflected in patterns of labor market transitions. We find higher levels of transitions from unemployment to temporary contracts in Sweden and Finland, with lax regulation of temporary contracts and strict regulation of permanent contracts. Further, temporary employees are integrated into permanent contracts in countries with lax (Denmark or strict (Norway regulation of permanent contracts, while this is not the case in Finland and Sweden. For these countries, the study indicates a certain degree of labor market duality, with low mobility from temporary to permanent employment contracts.

  17. Fatal poisoning in drug addicts in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Anni; Teige, Brita; Ceder, Gunnel

    2001-01-01

    The study includes medicolegally examined fatal poisonings among drug addicts in 1997 in the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and the results are compared to a similar investigation from 1991. A common definition of ‘‘drug addict’’ was applied...... by the participating countries. The highest death rate by poisoning in drug addicts was observed in Denmark, where it was 6.54 per 105 inhabitants, followed by Norway with 6.35, Sweden with 2.21, Finland with 1.63 and Iceland with 1.20 per 105 inhabitants. All countries showed a higher death rate in 1997 than in 1991...

  18. New trajectories of unionization in the Nordic Ghent countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgedahl, Laust Kristian; Kongshøj, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    membership. These countries have witnessed different combinations of two types of reform, less attractive unemployment benefits plus new institutional alternatives to the traditional union-run funds, and this has led to different outcomes in each country. Benefit retrenchment and increased contributions led...... to institutional changes to unemployment insurance benefits and the institutional setup surrounding and regulating them. In this article, we investigate recent institutional changes in the three Nordic countries following the Ghent model, Finland, Sweden and Denmark, and analyse the consequences for union and fund...

  19. Functional level, physical activity and wellbeing in nursing home residents in three Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönstedt, Helena; Hellström, Karin; Bergland, Astrid

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to describe physical and cognitive function and wellbeing among nursing home residents in three Nordic countries. A second aim was to compare groups of differing ages, levels of dependency in daily life activities (ADL), degree of fall-related self-efficacy, wellbeing...

  20. Dimensions of the Wage-Unemployment Relationship in the Nordic Countries: Wage Flexibility without Wage Curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Madsen, Erik Strøjer; Asplund, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyses wage formation in the Nordic countries at the regional level by the use of micro-data. Our results deviate systematically from the main conclusions drawn by Blanchflower and Oswald (1994). We find no stable negative relation between wages and unemployment across regions in the...

  1. Endemic Hepatitis E in two Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norder, H.; Sundqvist, L.; Magnusson, L.

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies against hepatitis E virus (anti-HEV) were found in 248 Swedish and Danish patients between 1993 and 2007. Most patients were symptomatic and tested for anti-HEV due to travel abroad. Among patients with known country of infection, most were infected in Asia, mainly on the Indian...

  2. Occupational Risk for Oral Cancer in Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvainen, Laura; Suojanen, Juho; Kyyronen, Pentti; Lindqvist, Christian; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Lynge, Elsebeth; Sparen, Par; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Pukkala, Eero

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate occupational risk for cancer of the tongue, oral cavity or pharynx after adjustment for alcohol and tobacco use. The data covered 14.9 million people and 28,623 cases of cancer of the tongue, oral cavity and pharynx in the Nordic countries 1961-2005. Alcohol consumption by occupation was estimated based on mortality from liver cirrhosis and incidence of liver cancer. Smoking by occupation was estimated based on the incidence of lung cancer. Only few occupations had relative risks of over 1.5 for cancer of the tongue, oral cavity and pharynx. These occupations included dentists, artistic workers, hairdressers, journalists, cooks and stewards, seamen and waiters. Several occupational categories, including dentists, had an increased relative risk of tongue cancer. This new finding remains to be explained but could be related to occupational chemical exposures, increased consumption of alcohol and tobacco products, or infection with human papilloma virus. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Reactor accident calculation models in use in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1984-01-01

    The report relates to a subproject under a Nordic project called ''Large reactor accidents - consequences and mitigating actions''. In the first part of the report short descriptions of the various models are given. A systematic list by subject is then given. In the main body of the report chapter and subchapter headings are by subject. (Auth.)

  4. Household food waste in Nordic countries: Estimations and ethical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickey Gjerris

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on food waste generated by households in four Nordic countries: Finland, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Based on existing literature we present (A comparable data on amounts and monetary value of food waste; (B explanations for food waste at household level; (C a number of public and private initiatives at national levels aiming to reduce food waste; and (D a discussion of ethical issues related to food waste with a focus on possible contributions from ecocentric ethics. We argue that reduction of food waste at household level, which has an impact on issues such as climate change and unjust distribution of food resources, needs to be based on an appreciative and relational understanding of nature and food and not only on economic and moralizing arguments. This is done by drawing on an ecocentric perspective where food is seen as one of the areas where new narratives need to be developed to establish cultural habits replacing a focus on affluence and individual choice with a focus on participatory embeddedness in a more-than-human lifeworld.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v7i1.1786

  5. Dimensions of the Wage-Unemployment Relationship in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Asplund, Rita; Blomskog, Stig

    1999-01-01

    This paper analyses wage formation in the Nordic countries at the regional level by the use of micro-data. Our results deviate systematically from the main conclusions drawn by Blanchflower and Oswald (1994). We find no stable negative relation between wages and unemployment across regions...... in the Nordic labor markets once regional fixed effects are accounted for. Wage formation at the regional level is characterized by considerable persistence, but unemployment exerts no immediate influence on wages at the regional level. There is no evidence of a wage curve, nor of a Phillips curve...

  6. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Tobacco smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, L; Winther, J F; Pukkala, E

    1997-01-01

    Active smoking is causally associated with cancers of the lung, larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, pancreas, renal parenchyma, renal pelvis and urinary bladder, and passive smoking appears to be causally associated with cancer of the lung. Information on smoking habits for the years 1965......, 1975 and 1985 shows that more men than women in the Nordic countries were current smokers. The rates of women were stable over time and those of men were decreasing, approaching those of women. Lung cancer, in particular, is strongly associated with active smoking: by increasing the number...... of cigarettes smoked per day (lifelong) to 5, 10, 20 and 40 or more, the risk increases by five-, eight-, 16- and 30-fold, respectively, over that of people who have never smoked. Thus, with approximately 35% current smokers and 25% former smokers among Nordic men in 1985 and approximately 30% current smokers...

  7. Summary of avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J H; Andersen, A; Dreyer, L

    1997-01-01

    An overview is given of the most important known causes of cancer in the five Nordic countries and the resulting number of cancers that are potentially avoidable. The main causes include active and passive smoking, alcohol consumption, exposure to asbestos and other occupational carcinogens, solar...... and ionizing radiation, obesity, human papillomavirus infection in the female genital tract and infection with Helicobacter pylori. The organs most commonly affected are those of the respiratory system, the upper digestive tract and stomach, skin, the lower urinary tract and the uterine cervix. Annually, more...... than 18,000 cancers in men and 11,000 in women in the Nordic populations could be avoided by eliminating exposure to known carcinogens which is equivalent to 33% and 20% of all cancers arising in men and women, respectively, around the year 2000. Smoking habits account for a little more than half...

  8. Optimal utilization of electric power in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, G.; Gjelsvik, E.

    1992-01-01

    It is attempted to address the questions of which advantages the equilibrium solution would have for the energy market under free trade conditions, how Nordic electric power can be used optimally and what the trading pattern looks like, which kind of competition the transmission of electricity via cables to Iceland and other Nordic countries will meet in the United Kingdom (UK) and the Continent, how high the option values are of trading with electric power via cables from, for example, Iceland to the UK and how great the profit could be from a more effective use of electricity for aluminium production in Norway and Iceland. Data are given on consumer prices for 1990 in Scandinavia, Germany and the UK, and a few graphs and a map illustrate the text. (AB)

  9. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, J.; Engholm, G.; Ehrnrooth, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates four patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based oil cancer register data. differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries ill...... Europe. Variation ill the distribution of stage at diagnosis. initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum. diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were...

  10. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Joakim; Engholm, Gerda; Ehrnrooth, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates for patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based on cancer register data, differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries...... in Europe. Variation in the distribution of stage at diagnosis, initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum, diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were included...

  11. Transitions from vocational education to employment in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms; Tønder, Anna Hagen

    2018-01-01

    , market-based regulation and institutionalised negotiation. In addition, it compares the organisation of young peoples’ educational choice and the selection process in the students’ transitions to work and examines employment protection in the four countries. Finally, it compares attempts to revive......This chapter examines how the systems of initial vocational education and training (VET-systems) in four Nordic countries connect to the labour market, and how they support the students’ transition to employment. It employs a conceptual lens of three different coordination regimes: state planning...

  12. Features of information policy in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Strunin

    2014-06-01

    A result of research features implementation of information policy in the Nordic countries it is possible to identify common characteristics of all the countries: access to information; create a national information potential; use of information resources in the national interest; create a common health information; promote international cooperation in the field of communication and information; warranty information sovereignty of the state; development of information infrastructure; development of e­government; enhance information literacy; use of ICT in all spheres of society – the economy, education, medicine and so on.

  13. Application in the Nordic countries of ICRP publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The radiation protection institutes of the five Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, published in 1976 a joint report on the applicability of international radiation protection recommendations in the Nordic countries. The report was mainly based on the set of recommendations issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In the report it was stated that 'if the basic recommendations of ICRP are subsequently revised, it is the intention of the radiation protection institutes to consider equivalent changes in the recommended basis for regulatory texts and, if there is full agreement, jointly to announce changes which may be made in respect to the principles which have been recommended here'. In 1977 ICRP published its revised basic recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) which resulted from the examination of new information during the last decade and since the Commission's previous basic recommendations (ICRP Publication 9 adopted in 1965. In 1978 the representatives of the radiation protection institutes of the Nordic countries agreed at their meeting in Helsinki to prepare a joint policy document on the application of the revised ICRP recommendations in the Nordic countries. In common with the previous joint report of the Nordic radiation protection institutes of 1976 the present recommendations deal only with ionizing radiation. In the new recommendations ICRP has more clearly than in the previous recommendations systematized the basic principles in radiation protection by crystallizing its system of dose limitation in three main points: a) no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit; b) all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account; and C) the dose equivalent to individuals shall not exceed the limits recommended for the appropriate circumstances by the Commission. The levels for basic dose

  14. Health and inequalities in health in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Lauridsen, Jørgen Trankjær; Lyttkens, Carl Hampus

    2017-01-01

    programmes, although with somewhat different emphasis on the causes of ill-health, such as individual behaviour or social circumstances. Attitudes have changed over time, though. We compare these countries to the UK and Germany by using data from the European Social Survey 2002 and 2012 in addition to OECD......All five Nordic countries emphasise equal and easy access to healthcare. It is the purpose to explore to which extent the populations of these countries have reached good health and high degree of socio-economic equality of health. Each of the five countries has established extensive public health...... Statistics from the same years. Health is measured by self-assessed health in five categories, transformed to a cardinal scale using Swedish time trade-off weights. As socio-economic variable we use household income or length of education. Mean health, based on Swedish TTO weights applied to all countries...

  15. The Nordic countries and China - Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    Usually, Denmark is considered a ‘small state’ and China as one of world’s leading powers, however, Denmark and China have a ‘comprehensive strategic partnership’ signed by the two states in 2008. In this section we will account for this extraordinary relationship by briefly analysing the history...... of Danish-Chinese relations, the ups and downs during the Cold War and after the end of the Cold War, the development leading to the partnership agreement and the current situation....

  16. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries: demographics and disease status. The Nordic PAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T; Iversen, L; Lindqvist, U; Paimela, L; Ternowitz, T; Ståhle, M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries. Patients with putative PAM aged ≥ 18 years were recruited. Fifty-nine patients were included after clinical examination. The prevalence of PAM in the adult Nordic population was estimated to be 3.69 per million inhabitants [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.75-4.63]. The female to male ratio was close to 1:1. The mean age of skin disease onset was 25 years and the mean age of onset of joint disease was 30 years. The onset of skin disease was 2 years earlier among female patients. At inclusion, the mean duration of arthritis was 27 ± 11 years for male patients and 33 ± 11 years for female patients. PAM was most frequently seen in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of the toes, followed by the IP joint of the thumb and the DIP joint of the little finger on the left hand. Female and male patients had similar numbers of painful and swollen joints. Enthesitis was found in 19 patients (32%), while 38 patients (64%) had a history of dactylitis. Twenty-three of these 38 patients (61%) had a history of dactylitis in the same finger/toe as they had PAM. At the time of inclusion, 45% of the patients were found to have clear or almost clear skin. PAM in the Nordic countries has a low prevalence, with only three to five cases per million inhabitants. The majority of the patients present with mild skin disease.

  17. Energy research and development projects in the Nordic countries. Directory 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This is the fifth directory of research, development and demonstration projects in the Nordic countries within the field of energy. The directory includes projects running in 1987. 2378 projects are described, all of them financed through special public funds (i.e. external funding). The energy research organisation in each Nordic country is briefly reviewed in the appendixes, and a list of relevant newsletters are given. The directory is published at the request of the Nordic Council of Ministers and a special Energy Research Committee set up by the Nordic energy ministers in order to coordinate and promote Nordic information sharing in the energy field. (author)

  18. Energy research and development projects in the Nordic countries. Directory 1986. Energiforskningsprojekter i Norden. Katalog 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This is the fourth directory of research, development and demonstration projects in the Nordic countries within the field of energy. The 1986 directory includes projects running in 1986. 2172 projects are described and all of them are financed through special public funds (i.e. external funding). The energy research organisation in each Nordic country is briefly reviewed in the appendixes, and a list of relevant newsletters are given. The directory is published at the request if the Nordic Council of Ministers and a special Energy Reseach Committee set up by the Nordic energy ministers in order to coordinate and promote Nordic information sharing in the energy field. (author)

  19. Ecosystem Services and Forest Management in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filyushkina, Anna

    The main objective of this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the impacts of forest management on provision of non-market ecosystem services and identify trade-offs and synergies for forestry decision-making in the Nordic countries. First, existing scientific literature on assessments...... judgment method (the Delphi technique) was applied to preservation of biodiversity and habitat in the boreal zone. Results suggested that management intensity has a negative effect on the potential to preserve biodiversity and habitat. A wide range of estimates was provided by respondents for functional...

  20. Mortality by country of birth in the Nordic countries - a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkaniemi, Helena; Bacchus-Hertzman, Jennie; Fritzell, Johan; Rostila, Mikael

    2017-05-25

    Immigration to the Nordic countries has increased in the last decades and foreign-born inhabitants now constitute a considerable part of the region's population. Several studies suggest poorer self-reported health among foreign-born compared to natives, while results on mortality and life expectancy are inconclusive. To date, few studies have summarized knowledge on mortality differentials by country of birth. This article aims to systematically review previous results on all-cause and cause-specific mortality by country of birth in the Nordic countries. The methodology was conducted and documented systematically and transparently using a narrative approach. We identified 43 relevant studies out of 6059 potentially relevant studies in August 2016, 35 of which used Swedish data, 8 Danish and 1 Norwegian. Our findings from fully-adjusted models on Swedish data support claims of excess mortality risks in specific categories of foreign-born. Most notably, immigrants from other Nordic countries, especially Finland, experience increased risk of mortality from all causes, and specifically by suicide, breast and gynaecological cancers, and circulatory diseases. Increased risks in people from Central and Eastern Europe can also be found. On the contrary, decreased risks for people with Southern European and Middle Eastern origins are found for all-cause, suicide, and breast and gynaecological cancer mortality. The few Danish studies are more difficult to compare, with conflicting results arising in the analysis. Finally, results from the one Norwegian study suggest significantly decreased mortality risks among foreign-born, to be explored in further research. With new studies being published on mortality differentials between native and foreign-born populations in the Nordic countries, specific risk patterns have begun to arise. Regardless, data from most Nordic countries remains limited, as does the information on specific causes of death. The literature should be expanded

  1. Occupation and Risk of Bladder Cancer in Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of bladder cancer incidence according to occupational categories in the Nordic countries. METHODS: The study cohort comprised 15 million individuals older than 30 years who participated in one or more population censuses in 1960......% CI 1.33 to 1.53), hairdressers (1.28; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.40), seamen (1.22; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.30), printers (1.21; 95% CI 1.14 to 1.30), and plumbers (1.20; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.30). A significantly decreased risk of bladder cancer was observed among gardeners (0.78, 0.75 to 0.80), forestry workers (0.......74; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.78), and farmers (0.70; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: The SIR of bladder cancer was overall similar across the Nordic countries. The study suggests that occupation is evidently associated with bladder cancer risk....

  2. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obel, Carsten; Heiervang, Einar; Rodriguez, Alina; Heyerdahl, Sonja; Smedje, Hans; Sourander, André; Guethmundsson, Olafur O; Clench-Aas, Jocelyne; Christensen, Else; Heian, Frode; Mathiesen, Kristin S; Magnússon, Páll; Njarethvík, Urethur; Koskelainen, Merja; Rønning, John A; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Olsen, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) has been translated into the different Nordic languages between 1996 and 2003. During the past few years, SDQs have been completed for nearly 100,000 children and adolescents in population-based studies as well as in clinical samples. The largest studies have been performed in Norway and Denmark, and in these countries the diagnostic interview DAWBA has also been used in conjunction with the SDQ. In addition to a brief overview of past and ongoing SDQ work in Sweden, Finland, Norway, Denmark, and Iceland, we present scale means and standard deviations from selected community studies with comparable age groups, including parental reports for 7, 9 and 11 year-old children and self-reports of 13 and 15 year-olds. The descriptive statistics suggest that the distributions of SDQ scores are very similar across the Nordic countries. Further collaborative efforts in establishing norms and evaluating the validity of the SDQ as a screening instrument are encouraged.

  3. The New Normal: Scandals as a Standard Feature of Political Life in Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Allern, Sigurd; Pollack, Ester

    2018-01-01

    All political scandals trigger discussions of trust, but in a competitive, commercial media climate, both important and minor legal offences as well as moral transgressions are regularly treated as scandalous media events. Today, actors in social media and mainstream media organizations can colla...... corruption, and personal behavior scandals, such as accusations of sexual harassment, constitute the most prominent scandal types. However, regarding sexually-related behavior scandals, there are interesting differences between the Nordic countries....

  4. Survey of existing studies of smart grids and consumers - Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken; Borup, Mads

    2014-01-01

    is on household consumers; not on industrial companies or other private or public organisations. The present report focuses on studies in the Nordic region, i.e., studies in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Initially this report was part of a dual delivery, where 1) focused on the Nordic countries......The objective of this survey is to map smart grid studies that address private consumers. The survey shall identify what knowledge there exists about consumer and user behaviour in connection to smart grids and, moreover, how consumers and users are approached in the studies made. The focus......; and 2) focused on selected projects in other countries. This present report is the work completed in relation to the first part....

  5. The development of voluntary private health insurance in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Nina; Anell, Anders; Kaarboe, Odvar

    2016-01-01

    and capped. Nevertheless, the markets for voluntary private health insurance (VPHI) have been rapidly expanding. In this paper we describe the development of the market for VPHI in the Nordic countries. We outline similarities and differences and provide discussion of the rationale for the existence......The Nordic countries represent an institutional setting with tax-based health care financing and universal access to health care services. Very few health care services are excluded from what are offered within the publically financed health care system. User fees are often non-existing or low...... of different types of VPHI. Data is collected on the population covered by VPHI, type and scope of coverage, suppliers of VPHI and their relations with health providers. It seems that the main roles of VPHI are to cover out-of-pocket payments for services that are only partly financed by the public health care...

  6. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...

  7. A comparative study of gender pay gaps in nordic countries and eastern european countries

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Linling

    2007-01-01

    Under the compressed wage structure and generous family policies, Nordic countries have been regarded as leaders of gender equality in terms of low gender pay gaps and high rates of female labor force participation; after the fundamental restructuring of the economic system in Eastern European countries, women have experienced a remarkable change with respect to the labor market positions and economic status facing the increased wage inequality and significant declines in labor force particip...

  8. The Baltic Sea Diet Score: a tool for assessing healthy eating in Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, Noora; Kaartinen, Niina E; Schwab, Ursula; Lahti-Koski, Marjaana; Männistö, Satu

    2014-08-01

    The health-related effects of the Nordic diet remain mostly unidentified. We created a Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) for epidemiological research to indicate adherence to a healthy Nordic diet. We examined associations between the score and nutrient intakes that are considered important in promoting public health. We also examined the performance of the BSDS under two different cut-off strategies. The cross-sectional study included two phases of the National FINRISK 2007 Study. Diet was assessed using a validated FFQ. Food and nutrient intakes were calculated using in-house software. Nine components were selected for the score. Each component was scored according to both sex-specific consumption quartiles (BSDS-Q) and medians (BSDS-M), and summed to give the final score values. A large representative sample of the Finnish population. Men (n 2217) and women (n 2493) aged 25 to 74 years. In the age- and energy-adjusted model, adherence to the diet was associated with a higher intake of carbohydrates (E%), and lower intakes of SFA (E%) and alcohol (E%, where E% is percentage of total energy intake; P diet (P healthy Nordic diet to assess diet-health relationships in public health surveys in Nordic countries.

  9. Father's Rights to Paid Parental Leave in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Haas, L.

    2011-01-01

    to what extent government-provided, paid parental leave and quotas for fathers could bring about equality in the division of leave between men and women by focusing on the pioneers in the field, the Nordic countries – the first nations to offer fathers parental leave and introduce quotas. First, we......European Union policy encourages men and women to share parental leave to balance work and family life and promote gender equality in the labor market. A new directive extends parental leave to four months and introduces a quota, so one month is reserved for each parent. This article explores...... describe the extent to which parental leave policies have been established and implemented in a way that is likely to promote equal sharing of leave. Next, we evaluate the impact of particular configurations of gender equality incentives in present parental leave policies for the actual division of leave...

  10. Sound classification of dwellings in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Turunen-Rise, Iiris

    1997-01-01

    be met. The classification system is based on limit values for airborne sound insulation, impact sound pressure level, reverberation time and indoor and outdoor noise levels. The purpose of the standard is to offer a tool for specification of a standardised acoustic climate and to promote constructors......A draft standard INSTA 122:1997 on sound classification of dwellings is for voting as a common national standard in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Iceland) and in Estonia. The draft standard specifies a sound classification system with four classes A, B, C and D, where...... class C is proposed as the future minimum requirements for new dwellings. The classes B and A define criteria for dwellings with improved or very good acoustic conditions, whereas class D may be used for older, renovated dwellings in which the acoustic quality level of a new dwelling cannot reasonably...

  11. Young peoples’ access to working life in three Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2018-01-01

    While working life in the Nordic countries generally has a high quality, the question examined in this chapter is how accessible working life is for young people. The chapter examines how upper secondary vocational education (VET) is connected to working life and how it supports young peoples......’ transitions to the labour market in Norway, Denmark and Sweden. The examination includes a conceptual discussion of the links between education and working life in comparative research on VET and transition systems. It explores how the VET systems match the educational demand of young people with the skills...... requirements in working life. In addition, it examines young peoples’ transitions to working life in two selected industries, health care and construction. Also, three new, innovative institutions to mediate between VET and working life are investigat-ed....

  12. Radiocaesium in game animals in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Forest ecosystems in the Nordic countries have been shown to be very important for the overall transfer of Chernobyl radiocaesium to man. One of the major pathways of radiocaesium to man is through game animals, mainly moose and roe deer. As most of the game meat is consumed by the hunters - about 3000 000 in Sweden - and their families, these constitute the critical group. Aggregated transfer factors of between 0.01 and 0.03 m 2 kg -1 were found for moose and 0.03 to 0.14 for roe deer. The considerable variation for roe deer is a result of the large seasonal variation in 137 Cs activity concentrations in these animals with a peak value in August and September when the fruitbodies of fungi having high activity concentrations of 137 Cs, are abundant. In Sweden where annually between 100 000 and 135 000 moose are harvested the calculated annual transfer of 137 Cs by moose to man after the Chernobyl accident has been between 2.4 and 2.7 GBq, corresponding to an annual collective dose of 30 and 33 manSv. The corresponding transfer by roe deer lay been between 560 and 1 400 MBq, corresponding to an annual collective dose of 7 to 17 manSv. During the post-Chernobyl years there has been very little or no decrease in 137 Cs acitivity concentrations in moose and roe deer. The effective ecological half-life of radiocaesium in the forest ecosystem in the Nordic countries seems therefore to be very long and we suggest that the physical half-life is the best estimate. (orig.)

  13. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries-The impact of alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Engholm, Gerda; Pukkala, Eero; Stenbeck, Magnus; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Storm, Hans; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2018-05-05

    Alcohol consumption is an important and preventable cause of cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of the cancer burden in the Nordic countries linked to alcohol and estimate the potential for cancer prevention by changes in alcohol consumption. Using the Prevent macro-simulation model, the number of cancer cases in the Nordic countries over a 30-year period (2016-2045) was modelled for six sites, under different scenarios of changing alcohol consumption, and compared to the projected number of cases if constant alcohol consumption prevailed. The studied sites were colorectal, post-menopausal breast, oral cavity and pharynx, liver, larynx as well as oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The alcohol consumption was based on the categories of non-drinkers/occasional drinkers, light drinkers (12.5 and ≤ 50 g/day) and heavy drinkers (>50 g/day). About 83,000 cancer cases could be avoided in the Nordic countries in a 30-year period if alcohol consumption was entirely eliminated, which is 5.5% of the expected number of cases for the six alcohol-related cancer types. With a 50% reduction in the proportion with moderate alcohol consumption by year 2025, 21,500 cancer cases could be avoided. The number of avoidable cases was highest for post-menopausal breast and colorectal cancer, but the percentage was highest for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The results from this study can be used to understand the potential impact and significance of primary prevention programmes targeted towards reducing the alcohol consumption in the Nordic countries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Socioeconomic differences in emotional symptoms among adolescents in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Meilstrup, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    -aged Children (HBSC) international cross-sectional study from 2005/2006 provided data on 29,642 11-15-year-old adolescents from nationally random samples in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The outcome was daily emotional symptoms. Family Affluence Scale (FAS) was used as indicator of socioeconomic...... inequalities were found in Iceland and the smallest in Finland for girls and in Denmark for boys. Conclusions: Emotional symptoms were more common among Nordic adolescents from low affluence families. This association appeared in the study of both absolute and relative inequality. A comprehensive presentation......Aims: This comparative study examines absolute and relative socioeconomic differences in emotional symptoms among adolescents using standardised data from five Nordic countries and gives recommendations on how to present socioeconomic inequality. Methods: The Health Behaviour in School...

  15. Nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. Supplementary final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eikelmann, I.M.H.

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to continue the cross-disciplinary study SBA-1 'base of knowledge' in the NKS research program 1998-2001 regarding possible nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. The main task for the project was to expand and envelope this database. Finding information to be placed in the database and identifying and filling gaps in knowledge were prioritised. This is a continuous process which extends beyond the end of this project, in order to have an operating and updated database also in the years to come. In this project work has been done making information systems in Norway that can take care of the database in the future. The scope of the preceding project was to prepare a base of knowledge regarding possible nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. The database, including a literature database, is presented on the website 'Nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic Countries'. The utilisation of modern information technology gives the user of the database easy access to information on different types of nuclear installations and threats. The project focused on potential events at nuclear installations and the consequences for the Nordic countries, especially with regards to vulnerable food chains, doses to man, environmental contamination and emergency preparedness systems. The geographical area dealt with includes North-west Russia and the Baltic states and the nuclear installations investigated are nuclear power plants, ship reactors and storage and handling of used fuel and radioactive waste. (au)

  16. Energy research and development projects in the Nordic countries. Directory 1985. Energiforskningsprojekter i Norden. Katalog 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third directory of research, development and demonstration projects in the Nordic countries within the field of energy. The 1985 directory includes projects running in 1985. 1757 projects are described and all of them are financed through special public funds (i.e. external funding). The directory is published at the request of the Nordic Council of Ministers and a special Energy Research Committee set up by the Nordic energy ministers in order to coordinate and promote Nordic information sharing in the energy field. (author)

  17. Adaptation decision-making in the Nordic Countries: assessing the potential for joint action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhola, Sirkku; Goodsite, Michael Evan; Davis, Marion

    2014-01-01

    on the issue. This paper explores the potential for Nordic cooperation on adaptation; specifically, for the development of a regional adaptation strategy. In particular, it addresses two questions (1) What is the current state of adaptation in the Nordic countries? and (2) What are the potential benefits...

  18. A Cultural History of the Avant-Garde in the Nordic Countries 1900-1925

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The first publication to deal with the avant-garde in the Nordic countries at the start of the twentieth century. It is the first major historical work to consider the Nordic avant-garde in a transnational perspective which includes all the arts and to discuss the role of the avant-garde not only...

  19. Patenting activity in biotechnology and pharmaceuticals: a comparative analysis of the Nordic Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Sorisio

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study innovative activity, as measured by patent indicators, in pharmaceutical and biotechnological sectors in the Nordic Countries. The biotech sector in general and pharmaceutical in particular is one of the areas selected for strategic investments in every Nordic country. In terms of patents granted by country of inventors Denmark plays a leading role followed by Sweden, while patenting activity in Finland and Norway is lower. A concentration of patents tow...

  20. Cancer Risk in Relatives of Testicular Cancer Patients by Histology Type and Age at Diagnosis: A Joint Study from Five Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharazmi, Elham; Hemminki, Kari; Pukkala, Eero; Sundquist, Kristina; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tretli, Steinar; Olsen, Jörgen H; Fallah, Mahdi

    2015-08-01

    None of the population-based epidemiologic studies to date has had a large enough sample size to show the familial risk of testicular cancer (TC) by age at diagnosis for patients and their relatives or for rare histologic subtypes. To estimate absolute and relative risks of TC in relatives of TC patients by age at diagnosis in patients and their relatives and histological subtypes. In a joint population-based cohort study, 97 402 first-degree relatives of 21 254 TC patients who were diagnosed between 1955 and 2010 in five European countries were followed for cancer incidence. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated using histology-, age-, period-, and country-specific incidence rates as references. Lifetime cumulative risks were also calculated. The lifetime cumulative risk of TC in brothers of a patient with TC was 2.3%, which represents a fourfold increase in risk (SIR 4.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.6-4.6) compared to the general population. TC in a father increased the risk by up to twofold in his son (95% CI 1.7-2.4; lifetime risk 1.2%) and vice versa. When there were two or more TC patients diagnosed in a family, the lifetime TC risk for relatives was 10-11%. Depending on age at diagnosis, twins had a 9-74% lifetime risk of TC. Family history of most of the histologic subtypes of TC increased the risk of concordant and most discordant subtypes. There was a tendency toward concordant age at diagnosis of TC among relatives. This study provides clinically relevant age-specific cancer risk estimates for relatives of TC patients. Familial TC patients tended to develop TC at an age close to the age at diagnosis of TC among their relatives, which is a novel finding of this study. This joint European population study showed that sons and brothers of testicular cancer patients are at higher risk of developing this cancer at an age close to the age at diagnosis of their relatives. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Time trends and occupational variation in the incidence of testicular cancer in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylönen, Outi; Jyrkkiö, Sirkku; Pukkala, Eero; Syvänen, Kari; Boström, Peter J

    2018-02-20

    % CI 1.04-1.42). The only SIRs significantly testicular cancer between the Nordic countries. There is also some divergence in the incidences in different age groups and in the trends of the incidence. The effect of occupation-related factors on incidence of testicular cancer is only moderate. Our study describes the differences, but provides no explanation for this variation. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Electricity disclosure in the Nordic countries. Prestudy focussing on the customer perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gode, Jenny; Axelsson, Ulrik

    2007-04-01

    disclosure would follow this regionalisation, thereby suggesting a common Nordic system. However, customer related as well as political aspects could complicate such a system. We believe that the Nordic countries should co-operate to make possible a system for electricity disclosure (whether common or not) that minimises the multiple counting and maximises the reliability at Nordic level. A possible common system must be designed carefully and thoroughly, and therefore separate national systems are preferable in the short-term, still making efforts to maximise the overall reliability. It is of great importance that Swedish regulations are implemented as soon as possible and that the responsibility issues are solved. The Swedish system ought to be a certificate model, with a residual based on Swedish electricity mix corrected for redeemed attributes (preferably guarantees of origin) as well as import and export of electricity and attributes. To fulfil the EU directive on internal electricity markets, regulations are considered a prerequisite to assure reliability of the system at Swedish level. This would also increase the benefit for the customers. If such a system would be implemented in Sweden and Finland as well (requires conversion from existing statistical model in Finland), the reliability at Nordic level would increase substantially and the multiple counting would decrease

  3. The impact of Nordic countries' family friendly policies on employment, wages, and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Smith, Nina; Verner, Mette

    2008-01-01

    -friendly policies mainly directed towards giving mothers the right to be on long paid maternal leave have adverse effects on women's wages with consequences for gender equality. Indeed, extensive family-friendly schemes may even have created a `system-based glass ceiling' hindering women's career progression......The Nordic countries at the same time exhibit a remarkably high participation rate of mothers and a more moderate decline in fertility rates compared to other Western countries. This has been attributed to the fact that the welfare state model and, especially, the family friendly policies chosen...... in the Nordic countries are unique. In this paper we evaluate the impact of Nordic countries' family friendly policies on employment, wages and children's well-being. We demonstrate that, although the `Nordic model' has been successful in boosting female employment, it is a costly solution. Furthermore, family...

  4. Acoustic design of open-plan offices and comparison of requirements in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Claus Møller; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2018-01-01

    In the Nordic countries, most office buildings include open-plan offices. However, to optimize working conditions, such spaces require special acoustic design to obtain reasonable sound attenuation between groups and satisfactory speech intelligibility internally in groups, although optimal worki...

  5. An evaluation of the impact of green taxes in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. S.; Dengsøe, N.; Pedersen, A. B.

    The purpose of this report is to summarise the evaluations and studies of green taxes, that have been conducted in the Nordic countries and to discuss some of the methodological problems associated with these types of analyses...

  6. Trading with electric power in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    During recent years Nordic cooperation has contributed to a greater integration of the Nordic electric power markets. This has been based on trade on a short-term basis. As a part of increased integration in Europe and the demand for more effective administration of Nordic energy resources, trade with electric power has become more significant. At the same time environmental challenges have lead to an increase in Nordic and European cooperation, also within the energy sector. The aim of the seminar held in Hankoe, Norway, on June 9-11, 1992 was to discuss the problems within this field. Both theoretical and practical aspects were dealt with and developments in Europe and environmental issues were in focus. The lectures given at the seminar are included in this publication. (AB)

  7. Monitoring artificial radioactivity in the Nordic countries. BER-2 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennerstedt, T.; Rantanen, H.; Mortensen, B.N.

    1994-05-01

    This final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Project BER-2 gives detailed information on the monitoring of artificial radioactivity in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden). A comparison shows that for early warning the Nordic countries use a mix of stations measuring external gamma radiation and stations measuring airborne radioactivity. There is a trade-off between fast alarms and the sensitivity threshold. Total gamma measuring stations cannot detect increases smaller than the variations of normal background. Some stations, notably all Danish stations, are equipped with sodium iodide (NaI) type detectors, and operated in such a way that stray peaks due to an increase in the natural radon background can be subtracted. A Nordic Radiation Data Exchange System has been set up and tested on a trial basis. This system focuses on dose rate data from the automatic gamma monitoring stations. An important goal achieved in the project was to determine which data is essential, and to specify a common format for the data exchange. Various telecommunication methods have been tested, and the actual transfer of monitoring results between the Nordic countries was started. It is recommended as a future approach that every country appoint one organization with the responsibility of operating a national information data base, which can be commonly accessed from all the Nordic countries. A procedure for establishing a system of this type has been outlined

  8. Business models for full service energy renovation of single-family houses in Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatra, Krushna; Gustavsson, Leif; Haavik, Trond; Aabrekk, Synnøve; Svendsen, Svend; Vanhoutteghem, Lies; Paiho, Satu; Ala-Juusela, Mia

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► In the Nordic countries there is significant primary energy saving potential in single-family houses from 1970s. ► There are several behavioral, economical and market related hindrances to adoption of energy efficiency measures. ► One-stop-shop business models to offer full service energy renovation packages are slowly emerging. ► Marketing strategies and policy measures are required to promote full service energy renovation of single-family house. - Abstract: In Nordic countries significant primary energy saving potential exists in houses built before 1980. These old houses need to be renovated, which provides an opportunity for implementation of energy efficiency measures. However, there are several economic and market hindrances and the renovation markets are dominated by handicraft-based individual solutions. In this paper we have analyzed the opportunities for implementation of one-stop-shop business models where an overall contractor offers full-service renovation packages including consulting, independent energy audit, renovation work, follow-up (independent quality control and commissioning) and financing. A comparative assessment of emerging business models in the Nordic countries shows that different types of actors can provide such a service. Financing is included in some models. There are differences in how customers are contacted, while the similarities are on how the service is provided. Even though there is strong business potential for one-stop-shop energy renovation concept, still it has been somewhat difficult to start or run such a business. Various options to overcome the hindrances to promote energy efficient renovation of detached houses are discussed

  9. The Effect of Schooling on Basic Cognition in Selected Nordic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Jonsson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated schooling effects on cognition. Cognitive data were collected as part of a research project (ProMeal that investigated school meals and measured the intake of school lunch in relation to children’s health, cognitive function, and classroom learning in four Nordic countries, among children between 10–11 years of age. It was found that Finnish pupils attending 4th grade were not, on any measure, outperformed by Norwegian and Icelandic pupils attending 5th and Swedish pupils attending 4th grade on a task measuring working memory capacity, processing speed, inhibition, and in a subsample on response- and attention control. Moreover, boys were found to perform superior to girls on tasks measuring processing speed. However, girls were found to perform better on tasks related to attention and self-control. The results are discussed in relation to the reciprocal association between cognition and schooling and whether these results reflect quality differences between schools in the four Nordic countries; most notably in comparison to Finland.

  10. Liver transplantation in the Nordic countries - An intention to treat and post-transplant analysis from The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry 1982-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosby, Bjarte; Melum, Espen; Bjøro, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    AIM AND BACKGROUND: The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry (NLTR) accounts for all liver transplants performed in the Nordic countries since the start of the transplant program in 1982. Due to short waiting times, donor liver allocation has been made without considerations of the model of end-stage...

  11. An overview of current non-nuclear radioactive waste management in the Nordic countries and considerations on possible needs for enhanced inter-Nordic cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Brewitz, Erica; Magnússon, Sigurður M.

    -hanced Nordic cooperation within the area. The radiation safety authorities in the Nordic countries were all asked to produce a current status report including thoughts about possible needs for enhanced cooperation. The material was presented and discussed at a meeting in Copenhagen of rep-resentatives of NKS...

  12. Research on workplace health promotion in the Nordic countries: a literature review, 1986-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, Steffen; Eklund, Leena; Thorpenberg, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    Workplace health promotion may include approaches focusing on behavioral change among employees and approaches with a holistic system-oriented thinking aiming at changing the physical, social and organizational factors of a setting. This literature review aimed to identify studies on workplace health promotion in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden), to describe when, where and how the studies were performed and to further analyze the use of settings approaches and empowerment processes. Using scientific literature databases, we found 1809 hits when searching for Nordic studies published from 1986 to 2008 with the search term health promotion. Of these, 116 studies were related to workplace health promotion and 33 included interventions. We used content analysis to analyze the abstracts of all articles and the full articles of the intervention studies. Most studies were performed in Sweden and Finland. The focus was mainly on behavioral change rather than on holistic health promotion as defined by the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. This was especially obvious for the intervention studies. In addition to the intervention studies using non-settings approaches with top-down driven behavioral change, we identified studies with participatory settings approaches aimed at changing the setting. We categorized relatively few studies as having a non-participatory settings approach. The studies aiming specifically at improving employees' empowerment were evenly distributed between the categories market-oriented persuasion of empowerment, therapeutic empowerment and empowerment as a liberal management strategy. More studies on workplace health promotion using empowering and participatory settings approaches are needed in the Nordic countries, and a more theory-based approach towards this research field is needed.

  13. Resarch on the Future of FM in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Rasmussen, Birgitte; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    2012-01-01

    input to a common Nordic research agenda. The project was undertaken by Centre for Facilities Management – Realdania Research (CFM) at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). The project was designed by use of methods from the tradition of strategic foresight. This approach was chosen to ensure...... that the strategy reflects future needs and expectations among Nordic researchers and practitioners within the FM field. The foresight process included four elements: The first element was a preliminary survey of existing studies and foresight projects on the future for FM. In particular the survey included...

  14. Ecological and social dimensions of ecosystem restoration in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Dagmar; Svavarsdottir, Kristin; Nilsson, Christer

    2013-01-01

    An international overview of the extent and type of ecological restoration can offer new perspectives for understanding, planning, and implementation. The Nordic countries, with a great range of natural conditions but historically similar social and political structures, provide an opportunity...... and among countries, both in the Nordic countries and internationally. An obvious advantage of such cooperation is that a wider range of experiences from different habitats and different socio-economic conditions becomes available and thus provides a more solid basis for developing practical solutions...... to compare restoration approaches and efforts across borders. The aim of this study was to explore variation in ecological restoration using the Nordic countries as an example. We used recent national assessments and expert evaluations of ecological restoration. Restoration efforts differed among countries...

  15. Occupational Segregation by Sex in Nordic Countries: An Empirical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkas, Helina; Anker, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of data from 200 occupations 1970-90 shows that one-third of all workers in Finland, Norway, and Sweden would have to change occupations to eliminate gender segregation. Despite Nordic nations' commitment to equality, women often work in female-dominated or part-time occupations and typically earn less. (SK)

  16. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Carsten; Heiervang, Einar; Rodriguez, Alina

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) has been translated into the different Nordic languages between 1996 and 2003. During the past few years, SDQs have been completed for nearly 100,000 children and adolescents in population-based studies as well as in clinical samples...

  17. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Tobacco smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, L; Winther, J F; Pukkala, E

    1997-01-01

    of cigarettes smoked per day (lifelong) to 5, 10, 20 and 40 or more, the risk increases by five-, eight-, 16- and 30-fold, respectively, over that of people who have never smoked. Thus, with approximately 35% current smokers and 25% former smokers among Nordic men in 1985 and approximately 30% current smokers...

  18. Organisation of traumatic head injury management in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S; Sundstrøm, T; Ingebrigtsen, T

    2009-01-01

    ; 67% had specific protocols for the treatment of traumatic head injury. Computed tomography (CT) was available in 93% of the hospitals, and 59% of the hospitals could link CT scans to the regional neurosurgical department. CONCLUSIONS: Most Nordic hospitals are well prepared to manage patients...

  19. The development of voluntary private health insurance in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Alexandersen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Nordic countries represent an institutional setting with tax-based health care financing and universal access to health care services. Very few health care services are excluded from what are offered within the publically financed health care system. User fees are often non-existing or low and capped. Nevertheless, the markets for voluntary private health insurance (VPHI have been rapidly expanding. In this paper we describe the development of the market for VPHI in the Nordic countries. We outline similarities and differences and provide discussion of the rationale for the existence of different types of VPHI. Data is collected on the population covered by VPHI, type and scope of coverage, suppliers of VPHI and their relations with health providers. It seems that the main roles of VPHI are to cover out-of-pocket payments for services that are only partly financed by the public health care system (complementary, and to provide preferential access to treatments that are also available free of charge within the public health care system, but often with some waiting time (duplicate.

  20. Fatal poisoning in drug addicts in the Nordic countries in 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Edvardsen, Hilde Marie Erøy; Thelander, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    This report is a follow-up to a study on fatal poisoning in drug addicts conducted in 2012 by a Nordic working group. Here we analyse data from the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Data on sex, number of deaths, places of death, age, main intoxicants and other...... drugs detected in the blood were recorded. National data are presented and compared between the Nordic countries and with data from similar studies conducted in 1991, 1997, 2002 and 2007. The death rates (number of deaths per 100,000 inhabitants) increased in drug addicts in Finland, Iceland and Sweden...... in Finland (4.61) and Sweden (4.17) approaching the levels in the other countries. Women accounted for 15–27% of the fatal poisonings. The median age of the deceased drug addicts was still highest in Denmark, and deaths of addicts >45 years old increased in all countries. Opioids remained the main cause...

  1. Avoidable cancer cases in the Nordic countries - The impact of overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Engholm, Gerda; Lund, Anne-Sofie Q; Olafsdottir, Elinborg; Pukkala, Eero; Stenbeck, Magnus; Storm, Hans

    2017-07-01

    Several types of cancers are causally linked to overweight and obesity, which are increasing in the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of the cancer burden linked to overweight and obesity in the Nordic countries and estimate the potential for cancer prevention. Under different prevalence scenarios of overweight and obesity, the number of cancer cases in the Nordic countries in the next 30 years (i.e. 2016-2045) was estimated for 13 cancer sites and compared to the projected number of cancer cases if the prevalence stayed constant. The Prevent macro-simulation model was used. Over the period 2016-2045, 205,000 cancer cases out of the 2.1 million expected for the 13 cancer sites (9.5%) that have been studied, could be avoided in the Nordic countries by totally eliminating overweight and obesity in the target population. The largest proportional impact was found for oesophageal adenocarcinoma (24%), and the highest absolute impact was observed for colon (44638) and postmenopausal breast cancer (41135). Decreased prevalence of overweight and obesity would reduce the cancer burden in the Nordic countries. The results from this study form an important step to increase awareness and priorities in cancer control by controlling overweight and obesity in the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cervical cancer staging, pretreatment planning and surgical treatment in the Nordic countries - survey from the Surgical Subcommittee of the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Katrine; Haldorsen, Ingfrid S; Lundqvist, Elisabeth Avall

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cervical cancer patients in the Nordic countries are increasingly undergoing pretreatment imaging by ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), position emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT) or computed tomography, or sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure. The present ...

  3. Per and polyfluorinated substances in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posner, Stefan; Roos, Sandra; Brunn Poulsen, Pia

    This Tema Nord report presents a study based on open information and custom market research to review the most common perfluorinated substances (PFC) with less focus on PFOS and PFOA. The study includes three major parts: 1) Identification of relevant per-and polyfluorinated substances and their ......This Tema Nord report presents a study based on open information and custom market research to review the most common perfluorinated substances (PFC) with less focus on PFOS and PFOA. The study includes three major parts: 1) Identification of relevant per-and polyfluorinated substances...... and their use in various industrial sectors in the Nordic market by interviews with major players and database information 2) Emissions to and occurence in the Nordic environment of the substances described in 1) 3) A summary of knowledge of the toxic effects on humans and the environment of substances...

  4. EU Enlargement: Migration flows from Central and Eastern Europe into the Nordic countries - exploiting a natural experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.; Pytlikova, Mariola

    In this paper we look at migration flows from 10 Central and Eastern European Countries (CEEC) to 5 Nordic countries over the years 1985 - 2007. We exploit a natural experiment that arose from the fact that while Sweden opened its labour market from the day one of the 2004 EU enlargement......, and Finland and Iceland from year 2006, the other Nordic countries chose a transition period in relation to the "new" EU members. The results based on a differences-in-differences estimator show that the estimated effect of the opening of the Swedish, Finnish and Icelandic labour markets on migration from...... the CEECs that entered the EU in 2004 is not significantly different from zero. However, the effect of the opening of the Swedish and Finnish labour markets in 2007 on migration from the 2007 EU entrants, Bulgaria and Romania, is significantly positive. Further, we are interested in the overall effect...

  5. EU Enlargement: Migration flows from Central and Eastern Europe into the Nordic countries - exploiting a natural experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pytlikova, Mariola; Pedersen, Peder J.

    We look at migration flows from 8 Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs) to 5 Nordic countries over the years 1985 - 2005 and we can exploit a natural experiment that arose from the fact that while Sweden opened its labour market from the day one of the 2004 EU enlargement, the other Nordic...... countries chose a transition period in relation to the "new" EU members. We employ a differences-in-differences estimator in our analysis. The results show that the estimated effect of the opening of Swedish labour market in 2004 on migration is insignificantly different from zero. Further, we...... are interested in the overall effect of the "EU entry" on migration. Therefore we look at migration flows from CEECs during the first round EU enlargement towards CEECs in 2004 and compare them with migration flows from Bulgaria and Romania. We again used a DD estimator in our analysis. The estimated effect...

  6. Development of School Achievement in the Nordic Countries during Half a Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Jan-Eric; Blömeke, Sigrid

    2018-01-01

    The aim is to describe the development of achievement in compulsory school in the Nordic countries from the 1960s. The study relies on published results concerning literacy and numeracy from the international large-scale assessments between 1964 and 2012. Among others, the following conclusions are drawn: (1) for most countries, a small but…

  7. Normalization Fifty Years Beyond--Current Trends in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossebro, Jan; Bonfils, Inge S.; Teittinen, Antti; Tideman, Magnus; Traustadottir, Rannveig; Vesala, Hannu T.

    2012-01-01

    The authors discuss recent developments in services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the Nordic countries. They note that all of the countries saw important reforms during the 1990s, regarding both deinstitutionalization and decentralization. However, they posit that the litmus test of the reforms is not what happens during reform…

  8. Inner strength in relation to age, gender and culture among old people--a cross-sectional population study in two Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglund, Kerstin; Jonsén, Elisabeth; Lundman, Berit; Strandberg, Gunilla; Nygren, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical framework for the study was the Model of Inner Strength, and the Inner Strength Scale (ISS)developed based on the Model was used. The aim was to examine inner strength in relation to age, gender and culture among old people in Sweden and Finland. This study forms part of the GErontological Regional DAtabase (GERDA)-Botnia project that investigates healthy ageing with focus on the dignity, social participation and health of old people. The participants (N = 6119) were 65-, 70-, 75- and 80-year old and living in two counties in Sweden or Finland. The ISS consists of 20 items relating to four interrelated dimensions of inner strength, according to the Model of Inner Strength. The range of possible ISS scores is 20-120, a higher score denoting higher inner strength. The result showed that the 65-year-old participants had the highest mean ISS score, with a decrease in score for every subsequent age. The lowest score was achieved by the 80-year-old participants. Women had slightly but significantly higher mean ISS scores than men. Only small differences were found between the counties. The study population came from Sweden and Finland; still, despite the different backgrounds, patterns in the distribution of inner strength were largely similar. The present study provides basic and essential information about inner strength in a population of old people.

  9. The common objectives of the European Nordic countries and the role of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Christopher; Giannopapa, Christina; Vaudo, Ersilia

    2016-11-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has twenty two Member States with common goals of engaging in European space activities. However, the various Member States have a variety of governance structures, strategic priorities regarding space and other sectorial areas depending on their cultural and geopolitical aspirations. The Nordic countries, namely Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, have similarities which result often in common geopolitical and cultural aspects. These in turn shape their respective priorities and interests in setting up their policies in a number of sectorial areas like shipping and fisheries, energy, immigration, agriculture, security and defence, infrastructures, climate change and the Arctic. Space technology, navigation, earth observation, telecommunication and integrated applications can assist the Nordic countries in developing, implementing and monitoring policies of common interest. This paper provides an in-depth overview and a comprehensive assessment of these common interests in policy areas where space can provide support in their realisation. The first part provides a synthesis of the Nordic countries respective priorities through analysing their government programmes and plans. The priorities are classified according to the six areas of sustainability: energy, environment and climate change, transport, knowledge and innovation, natural resources (fisheries, agriculture, forestry, mining, etc), and security and external relations. Although the national strategies present different national perspectives, at the same time, there are a number of similarities when it comes to overall policy objectives in a number of areas such as the Arctic and climate change. In other words, even though the Arctic plays a different role in each country's national context and there are clear differences as regards geography, access to resources and security policies, the strategies display common general interest in sustainable development and management of

  10. Eating out in four Nordic countries: National patterns and social stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, T B; Kjærnes, U; Holm, L

    2017-12-01

    Using a survey conducted in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden) in 2012, we investigated whether eating out in cafés and restaurants in these countries is best characterized as a workday pattern activity or a leisure activity; and, whether frequent eating at cafés and restaurants is related to socio-demographic factors and factors relevant to the organization of daily life. We found that eating out is not a fundamental part of everyday eating. It is something which takes place occasionally. This may be taken to suggest that eating out in the Nordic countries is primarily a leisure activity. However, while this is an accurate portrayal of Denmark and Norway, eating out in Finland and Sweden is somewhat more common and linked to work-life. This difference probably reflects contrasting historical-institutional paths: in Finland and Sweden a food culture emphasizing cooked lunches and dedicated public policies supporting the provisioning of lunches outside the home may have promoted eating out. Multivariate analysis revealed that eating out declines with age. An urbanization effect exists, as residence in a capital city increases the propensity to eat out. There were socio-economic differences in all countries. We hypothesized that education and status would not significantly explain eating out activity after people's gastronomic interest had been controlled for. However, education was statistically significant in Sweden and Norway, and surprisingly status was negatively associated with eating out in Sweden. As expected, eating out was positively associated with income, and it was more frequent among the higher salariat and the self-employed (although not in Norway). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The relationship between sales of SSRI, TCA and suicide rates in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; De Leo, Diego; Ekeberg, Øivind; Hjelmeland, Heidi; Dieserud, Gudrun

    2010-08-06

    In the period 1990-2006, strong and almost equivalent increases in sales figures of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were observed in all Nordic countries. The sales figures of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) dropped in Norway and Sweden in the nineties. After 2000, sales figures of TCAs have been almost constant in all Nordic countries. The potentially toxic effect of TCAs in overdose was an important reason for replacing TCAs with SSRIs when treating depression. We studied whether the rapid increase in sales of SSRIs and the corresponding decline in TCAs in the period 1990-98 were associated with a decline in suicide rates. Aggregated suicide rates for the period 1975-2006 in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden) were obtained from the national causes-of-death registries. The sales figures of antidepressants were provided from the wholesale registers in each of the Nordic countries. Data were analysed using Fisher's exact test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was no statistical association (P = 1.0) between the increase of sales figures of SSRIs and the decline in suicide rates. There was no statistical association (P = 1.0) between the decrease in the sale figures of TCAs and change in suicide rates either. We found no evidence for the rapid increase in use of SSRIs and the corresponding decline in sales of TCAs being associated with a decline in the suicide rates in the Nordic countries in the period 1990-98. We did not find any inverse relationship between the increase in sales of SSRIs and declining suicide rates in four Nordic countries.

  12. The relationship between sales of SSRI, TCA and suicide rates in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahl Per-Henrik

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the period 1990-2006, strong and almost equivalent increases in sales figures of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs were observed in all Nordic countries. The sales figures of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs dropped in Norway and Sweden in the nineties. After 2000, sales figures of TCAs have been almost constant in all Nordic countries. The potentially toxic effect of TCAs in overdose was an important reason for replacing TCAs with SSRIs when treating depression. We studied whether the rapid increase in sales of SSRIs and the corresponding decline in TCAs in the period 1990-98 were associated with a decline in suicide rates. Methods Aggregated suicide rates for the period 1975-2006 in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden were obtained from the national causes-of-death registries. The sales figures of antidepressants were provided from the wholesale registers in each of the Nordic countries. Data were analysed using Fisher's exact test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results There was no statistical association (P = 1.0 between the increase of sales figures of SSRIs and the decline in suicide rates. There was no statistical association (P = 1.0 between the decrease in the sale figures of TCAs and change in suicide rates either. Conclusions We found no evidence for the rapid increase in use of SSRIs and the corresponding decline in sales of TCAs being associated with a decline in the suicide rates in the Nordic countries in the period 1990-98. We did not find any inverse relationship between the increase in sales of SSRIs and declining suicide rates in four Nordic countries.

  13. Nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project SBA-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eikelmann, I.M.H.

    2002-11-01

    The acute phase of a nuclear accident and the possibility of high exposure of the populations are always the most important threats in the emergency preparedness work. Radioactive contamination from an accident can however also cause long term effects for land use and enhanced doses to special population groups and economic problems for agriculture, reindeer industry, hunting, tourism and recreation. For planning purposes it is always valuable to be aware of surrounding radiation hazards and other potential threats. Thus, mapping such threats in a Nordic context is an important factor in emergency preparedness in the area. This report presents a cross-disciplinary study from the NKS research program 1998-2001.The scope of the project was to prepare a 'base of knowledge' regarding possible nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. This base of knowledge will, by modere information technology as different websites, be made available to authorities, media and the population. The users of the websites can easily get information on different types of nuclear installations and threats. The users can get an overview of the situation and, if they so wish, make their own judgements. The project dealt with a geographical area including North-west Russia and the Baltic states. The results from the different activities in the project were generated in a web based database called the 'the base of knowledge'. Key words Nuclear threats, Nordic countries, nuclear power plants, nuclear ship, nuclear waste, literature database, base of knowledge, webaccessed information, atmospheric transport, decommissioning of submarines, nuclear installations, waste management, radioactive contamination in marine environment, radioactive sources, criticality analysis. (au)

  14. Nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project SBA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikelmann, I.M.H. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2002-11-01

    The acute phase of a nuclear accident and the possibility of high exposure of the populations are always the most important threats in the emergency preparedness work. Radioactive contamination from an accident can however also cause long term effects for land use and enhanced doses to special population groups and economic problems for agriculture, reindeer industry, hunting, tourism and recreation. For planning purposes it is always valuable to be aware of surrounding radiation hazards and other potential threats. Thus, mapping such threats in a Nordic context is an important factor in emergency preparedness in the area. This report presents a cross-disciplinary study from the NKS research program 1998-2001.The scope of the project was to prepare a 'base of knowledge' regarding possible nuclear threats in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. This base of knowledge will, by modere information technology as different websites, be made available to authorities, media and the population. The users of the websites can easily get information on different types of nuclear installations and threats. The users can get an overview of the situation and, if they so wish, make their own judgements. The project dealt with a geographical area including North-west Russia and the Baltic states. The results from the different activities in the project were generated in a web based database called the 'the base of knowledge'. Key words Nuclear threats, Nordic countries, nuclear power plants, nuclear ship, nuclear waste, literature database, base of knowledge, webaccessed information, atmospheric transport, decommissioning of submarines, nuclear installations, waste management, radioactive contamination in marine environment, radioactive sources, criticality analysis. (au)

  15. Mania in the Nordic countries: patients and treatment in the acute phase of the EMBLEM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jens Knud; Porsdal, Vibeke; Aarre, Trond F

    2009-01-01

    countries with other European countries during the first 12 weeks of the EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) study. Adult patients with bipolar disorder were enrolled within standard course of care as in/outpatients if they initiated/changed oral medication...... status, functional status and pharmacological treatment. Psychiatric status at inclusion measured by the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder (CGI-BP) were similar in the Nordic and European patient groups, which is surprising as 73% of the Nordic patients...

  16. Sex differences in child and adolescent mortality in the Nordic countries, 1981--2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissler, Mika; Rahkonen, Ossi; Mortensen, Laust

    2009-01-01

    Unlike the situation for infant and adult mortality, there are only a few studies on child and adolescent mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in child and adolescent mortality by age and cohort in four Nordic countries over a 20-year period.......Unlike the situation for infant and adult mortality, there are only a few studies on child and adolescent mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in child and adolescent mortality by age and cohort in four Nordic countries over a 20-year period....

  17. Drug addict deaths in the Nordic countries: a study based on medicolegally examined cases in the five Nordic countries in 1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Anni; Teige, Brita; Holmgren, Per

    1996-01-01

    The study includes medicolegally examined deaths among drug addicts in 1991 in the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. A common definition of ‘drug addict’ was applied by the participating countries. The greatest number of drug addict deaths per 105 inhabitants...... was observed in Denmark followed, in descending order by Norway, Sweden, Finland and finally Iceland with only four deaths. The main difference between the countries was found in the number of fatal poisonings. The distribution according to geographical regions showed that about half of all drug addict deaths...

  18. Ethical aspects of registry-based research in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Håberg, Siri E; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Lafolie, Pierre; Zoega, Helga; Sarkkola, Catharina; von Kraemer, Stephanie; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Nørgaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    National health care registries in the Nordic countries share many attributes, but different legal and ethical frameworks represent a challenge to promoting effective joint research. Internationally, there is a lack of knowledge about how ethical matters are considered in Nordic registry-based research, and a lack of knowledge about how Nordic ethics committees operate and what is needed to obtain an approval. In this paper, we review ethical aspects of registry-based research, the legal framework, the role of ethics review boards in the Nordic countries, and the structure of the ethics application. We discuss the role of informed consent in registry-based research and how to safeguard the integrity of study participants, including vulnerable subjects and children. Our review also provides information on the different government agencies that contribute registry-based data, and a list of the major health registries in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Both ethical values and conditions for registry-based research are similar in the Nordic countries. While Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden have chosen different legal frameworks, these differences can be resolved through mutual recognition of ethical applications and by harmonizing the different systems, likely leading to increased collaboration and enlarged studies.

  19. Policies of access to healthcare services for accompanied asylum-seeking children in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Hinuga; Norredam, Marie; Hjern, Anders; Asher, Henry; Nielsen, Signe Smith

    2013-08-01

    Asylum-seeking children constitute a vulnerable group with high prevalence and risk for mental health problems. The aim of this study was to compare policies of access to healthcare services, including physical examination and screening for mental health problems on arrival, for accompanied asylum-seeking children in the Nordic countries. This study was based on the national reports "Reception of refugee children in the Nordic countries" written by independent national experts for the Nordic Network for Research on Refugee Children, supplemented by information from relevant authorities. In Sweden, Norway and Iceland, asylum-seeking children had access to healthcare services equal to children in the general population. On a policy level, Denmark imposed restrictions on non-acute hospitalisations and prolonged specialist treatments. Regarding health examinations, Sweden deviated from the Nordic pattern by not performing these systematically. In Denmark, Iceland, and some counties in Sweden, but not in Norway, screening for mental health problems was offered to asylum-seeking children. Access to healthcare services for asylum-seeking children differs in the Nordic countries; the consequences of these systematic differences for the individual asylum-seeking child are unknown. For asylum-seeking children, access to healthcare has to be considered in a wider context that includes the core conditions of being an asylum-seeker. A comparative study at policy level needs to be supplemented with empirical follow-up studies of the well-being of the study population to document potential consequences of policies in practice.

  20. Management of patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugaa, Kristina H; Bundgaard, Henning; Edvardsen, Thor; Eschen, Ole; Gilljam, Thomas; Hansen, Jim; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf; Platonov, Pyotr G; Svensson, Anneli; Svendsen, Jesper H

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostics of patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are complex, and based on the 2010 Task Force document including different diagnostic modalities. However, recommendations for clinical management and follow-up of patients with ARVC and their relatives are sparse. This paper aims to give a practical overview of management strategies, risk stratification, and selection of appropriate therapies for patients with ARVC and their family members. This paper summarizes follow-up and treatment strategies in ARVC patients in the Nordic countries. The author group represents cardiologists who are actively involved in the Nordic ARVC Registry which was established in 2009, and contains prospectively collected clinical data from more than 590 ARVC patients from Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Different approaches of management and follow-up are required in patients with definite ARVC and in genetic-mutation-positive family members. Furthermore, ARVC patients with and without implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) require different follow-up strategies. Careful follow-up is required in patients with ARVC diagnosis to evaluate the need of anti-arrhythmic therapy and ICD implantation. Mutation-positive family members should be followed regularly for detection of early disease and risk stratification of ventricular arrhythmias.

  1. Risk of early-onset prostate cancer associated with occupation in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes Barry, Kathryn; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Alavanja, Michael C. R.

    2017-01-01

    -49 and those aged 50 or older. We also conducted separate analyses by period of follow-up, 1961-1985 and 1986-2005, corresponding to pre- and post-prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening. RESULTS: For early-onset prostate cancer (n = 1521), we observed the highest SIRs for public safety workers (e......BACKGROUND: Early-onset prostate cancer is often more aggressive and may have a different aetiology than later-onset prostate cancer, but has been relatively little studied to date. We evaluated occupation in relation to early- and later-onset prostate cancer in a large pooled study. METHODS: We...... used occupational information from census data in five Nordic countries from 1960 to 1990. We identified prostate cancer cases diagnosed from 1961 to 2005 by linkage of census information to national cancer registries and calculated standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) separately for men aged 30...

  2. Survey shows large differences between the Nordic countries in the use of less invasive surfactant administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Baldvin; Andersson, Sture; Björklund, Lars J

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Less invasive surfactant administration (LISA), namely surfactant instillation through a thin catheter in the trachea during spontaneous breathing, is increasingly used for premature infants. We surveyed the use of this technique in the Nordic countries in autumn 2015. METHODS: A link to a web......-based survey of surfactant administration methods was emailed to the directors of all neonatal units in the Nordic Region, apart from Finland, where only the five university-based departments were invited. RESULTS: Of the 73 units (85%) who responded, 23 (32%) said that they used LISA. The country rates were......%. The main reasons for not using LISA were lack of familiarity with the technique (61%), no perceived benefit over other methods (22%) and concerns about patient discomfort (26%). CONCLUSION: Less invasive surfactant administration was used in 32% of Nordic neonatal units, most commonly in level three units...

  3. Natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, K.; Gutierrez Villanueva, J.-L.; Sundell-Bergman, S.

    2012-06-01

    The amount of natural radionuclides in the environment differs between the Nordic countries as shown by previous investigations and also by this study. Agricultural areas of high natural background are predominantly found in Sweden, Southern Finland and Norway while low background areas are typical for Iceland and Denmark. Thus, this study offers possibilities for studying behaviour of natural radionuclides under different conditions such as the influence of different soil types as well as the husbandry. Furthermore the areas also enable studying environmental behaviour of radium and other natural radionuclides under seemingly steady state conditions. However, migration and accumulation of natural radionuclides in cultivated soil is complex involving various processes. Thus, a long term goal of this study was to identify the implications of some of these processes by determining the soil to plant transfer for pasture land under the different conditions that prevail in the Nordic countries. The potential health hazards due to chronic ingestion of low concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides are fairly unknown but the results of this study may provide valuable background information for assessing these radiation risks. The aim of this project has been to gain knowledge on the status of natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land and in grassland plants in different Nordic countries and on the transfer of these radionuclides from soil/water to man via the milk/food chain (soil- meadow/pasture grass -cow-milk). Limited data are available on the mobility and the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in the ecosystems of the agricultural land. In addition, information concerning the concentrations in meat and dairy products is of interest for assessing exposures of humans to natural radionuclides. Soil characteristics are known to have significant impact on the mobility and uptake of natural radionuclides. Therefore, the uptake in relation to

  4. Natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, K.; Gutierrez Villanueva, J.-L.; Sundell-Bergman, S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) (Sweden)] [and others

    2012-06-15

    The amount of natural radionuclides in the environment differs between the Nordic countries as shown by previous investigations and also by this study. Agricultural areas of high natural background are predominantly found in Sweden, Southern Finland and Norway while low background areas are typical for Iceland and Denmark. Thus, this study offers possibilities for studying behaviour of natural radionuclides under different conditions such as the influence of different soil types as well as the husbandry. Furthermore the areas also enable studying environmental behaviour of radium and other natural radionuclides under seemingly steady state conditions. However, migration and accumulation of natural radionuclides in cultivated soil is complex involving various processes. Thus, a long term goal of this study was to identify the implications of some of these processes by determining the soil to plant transfer for pasture land under the different conditions that prevail in the Nordic countries. The potential health hazards due to chronic ingestion of low concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides are fairly unknown but the results of this study may provide valuable background information for assessing these radiation risks. The aim of this project has been to gain knowledge on the status of natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land and in grassland plants in different Nordic countries and on the transfer of these radionuclides from soil/water to man via the milk/food chain (soil- meadow/pasture grass -cow-milk). Limited data are available on the mobility and the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in the ecosystems of the agricultural land. In addition, information concerning the concentrations in meat and dairy products is of interest for assessing exposures of humans to natural radionuclides. Soil characteristics are known to have significant impact on the mobility and uptake of natural radionuclides. Therefore, the uptake in relation to

  5. Non-market forest ecosystem services and decision support in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filyushkina, Anna; Strange, Niels; Löf, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The need to integrate non-market ecosystem services into decision-making is widely acknowledged. Despite the exponentially growing body of literature, trade-offs between services are still poorly understood. We conducted a systematic review of published literature in the Nordic countries (Denmark......, Norway, Sweden and Finland) on the integration of non-market forest ecosystem services into decision-making. The aim of the review was two-fold: (1) to provide an overview of coverage of biophysical and socio-economic assessments of non-market ecosystem services in relation to forest management; (2......) to determine the extent of the integration of biophysical and socio-economic models of these services into decision support models. Our findings reveal the need for wider coverage of non-market ecosystem services and evidence-based modelling of how forest management regimes affect ecosystem services...

  6. Agricultural countermeasures in the Nordic countries after a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, M.; Lauritzen, B.

    2001-12-01

    This report by the NKSBOK-1.4 project group describes agricultural countermeasures after a nuclear accident, aiming at the reduction of radiation doses to man from the ingestion of foodstuffs. The intention has been to collect information based on common understanding that can be used as a Nordic handbook and in further developments of the national preparedness systems. The report covers two areas: the gathering and dissemination of information before and during a nuclear emergency, and the development of a countermeasures strategy. A number of factors are discussed, which will affect the choice of countermeasure(s), and as a case study, a technical cost-benefit assessment of a specific countermeasure is described. (au)

  7. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora infestans populations in the Nordic European countries reveals high genetic variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brurberg, May Bente; Elameen, Abdelhameed; Le, Ving Hong

    2011-01-01

    different fields using nine simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Forty-nine alleles were detected among the nine SSR loci and isolates from all four Nordic countries shared the most common alleles across the loci. In total 169 multilocus genotypes (based on seven loci) were identified among 191 isolates...

  8. Filter bed systems treating domestic wastewater in the Nordic countries - Performance and reuse of filter media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Petter D.; Krogstad, T.; Paruch, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Nine filter beds have been constructed in the Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Filter beds consist of a septic tank followed by an aerobic pre-treatment biofilter and a subsequent saturated flow grass-covered filter. Thus, filter beds are similar to subsurface flow construct...

  9. Present status and perspective of radiochemical analysis of radionuclides in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Olsson, Mattias; Togneri, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Radiochemical analysis plays a critical role in the determination of pure beta and alpha emitting radionuclides for environmental monitoring, radioecology, decommissioning, nuclear forensics and geological dating. A remarkable development on radiochemical analysis has been achieved in the past...... of radionuclides, especially in Nordic countries; some requirements from nuclear industries and research organizations, as well as perspectives on the development of radiochemical analysis are discussed....

  10. Troubling Gender Equality: Revisiting Gender Equality Work in the Famous Nordic Model Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Charlotta; Brunila, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    This article concerns gender equality work, that is, those educational and workplace activities that involve the promotion of gender equality. It is based on research conducted in Sweden and Finland, and focuses on the period during which the public sector has become more market-oriented and project-based all over the Nordic countries. The…

  11. Differences in outpatient antibiotic use between a Spanish region and a Nordic country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo-Fumanal, Sara; Rabanaque-Hernández, María José; Feja-Solana, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic use and misuse are linked to pathogen resistance and, as such, both constitute a public health issue with local, national, and global dimensions. Early studies have shown striking variations in the use of these drugs between Nordic and Mediterranean countries. The aim of the present st...

  12. Social inequality in fetal and perinatal mortality in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tina; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the epidemiological literature from the past 27 years on social inequality in fetal and perinatal mortality in the Nordic countries in order to examine whether social inequalities in fetal and perinatal mortality exist, and whether there are differences between...

  13. Cancer in persons working in dry cleaning in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Aage; Rylander, Lars

    2006-01-01

    -cleaning workers identified from the 1970 censuses in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Dry-cleaning work in the Nordic countries during the period when tetrachloroethylene was the dominant solvent was not associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer [rate ratio (RR) = 0.76; 95% confidence interval...... not found in women directly involved in dry cleaning. We found an excess risk of bladder cancer (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.93) not associated with length of employment. The finding of no excess risk of esophageal cancer in Nordic dry cleaners differs from U.S. findings. Chance, differences in level...

  14. The sampling and analysing methods of radionuclides used in the Nordic countries for environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taipale, Tarja K.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioecology Group under the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy has considered it to be of great importance to improve the comparability of environmental radioactivity measurements in the Nordic countries, a basic requirement for co-ordinated research programmes. In case of emergency, good comparability between the results obtained will be required for mutual assistance. Therefore several intercomparison exercises have been carried out between the laboratories measuring environmental radioactivity. The exercises have proved very useful and have led to a more comprehensive and systematic survey of the environmental measurement methodology used so far by the Nordic laboratories. Furthermore it is considered necessary to make some recommendations or even to reach an agreement on how to present the results in order to make the comparison of, at least, monitoring data easier. This report is based on the answers received from the participating laboratories to a questionnaire sent by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki

  15. The Nordic Countries Meeting on the Zebrafish as a Model for Development and Disease 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterberg, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The first Nordic Countries Meeting on the Zebrafish as a Model for Development and Disease took place at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, November 21–23, 2012. The meeting gathered 130 scientists, students, and company representatives from Iceland, Finland, Norway, Denmark, and Sweden, as well as invited guests and keynote speakers from England, Scotland, Germany, Poland, The Netherlands, Singapore, Japan, and the United States. Presentations covered a wide range of topics, including developmental biology, genetics, evolutionary biology, toxicology, behavioral studies, and disease mechanisms. The need for formal guidance and training in zebrafish housing, husbandry, and health monitoring was recognized, and the meeting expressed its support for the joint working group of the FELASA/COST action BM0804 EuFishBioMed. The decision was made to turn the Nordic meeting into an annual event and create a Nordic network of zebrafish researchers. PMID:23590403

  16. The sampling and analysing methods of radionuclides used in the Nordic countries for environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taipale, Tarja K [ed.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioecology Group under the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy has considered it to be of great importance to improve the comparability of environmental radioactivity measurements in the Nordic countries, a basic requirement for co-ordinated research programmes. In case of emergency, good comparability between the results obtained will be required for mutual assistance. Therefore several intercomparison exercises have been carried out between the laboratories measuring environmental radioactivity. The exercises have proved very useful and have led to a more comprehensive and systematic survey of the environmental measurement methodology used so far by the Nordic laboratories. Furthermore it is considered necessary to make some recommendations or even to reach an agreement on how to present the results in order to make the comparison of, at least, monitoring data easier. This report is based on the answers received from the participating laboratories to a questionnaire sent by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki.

  17. A Bottom-Up Strategy for Establishment of EER in Three Nordic Countries--The Role of Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette; Malmi, Lauri; Bernhard, Jonte; Andersson, Pernille

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the emergence of an engineering education research (EER) community in three Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland and Sweden. First, an overview of the current state of Nordic EER authorship is produced through statistics on international publication. Then, the history of EER and its precursor activities is described in three…

  18. Incentive pay and gender gaps in the Nordic countries

    OpenAIRE

    Westling, Tatu

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of incentive pay on gender pay gaps in Finland, Norway and Sweden among professionals and managers within MNCs. Mercer 2009 Total Remuneration Survey data is utilised. Uniform job ladder, occupation, industry and wage definitions enable consistent cross-country comparisons. In addition to the between-country variation, the within-country variation of gender gap with respect to incentive pay is analysed. The results indicate that gender pay gaps differ among the ...

  19. Age-period-cohort modelling of breast cancer incidence in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, K; Vaeth, M; Holst, H

    2001-01-01

    into account. Assuming the age dependency of the incidence pattern in old age to be common for the Nordic countries, an internal comparison could be made among the four countries of the cohort effects and the period effects. The study indicated that the period effects have been of importance for the increase...... in breast cancer incidence seen in the Nordic countries. The widespread practice of neglecting the period effects in age-period-cohort analysis of time trends in breast cancer incidence therefore probably needs reconsideration. A key finding was that Danish women born in the 20th century seem to have been...... exposed to an increasing load of cohort borne breast cancer risk factors not experienced to the same extent by Norwegian women, whereas they were seemingly subjected to the same period effects....

  20. Performance analysis for waste repositories in the nordic countries. Report for project AFA-1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, S. [VTT Energy (Finland); Broden, K. [Studsvik RadWaste AB (Sweden); Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K. [Forskningscenter Risoe (Denmark); Walderhaug, T. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute (Iceland); Helgason, J. [Ekra Geological Consulting (Iceland); Sneve, M.; Hornkjoel, S. [Norwegian Radiation Protection (Norway); Backe, S. [IFE (Norway)

    1997-02-01

    The Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) project (AFA-1) focused on safety in the final disposal of long-lived low and medium level radioactive waste and its sub project (AFA-1.2), where this report has been produced, is dealing with the performance analysis of the engineered barrier system (near-field) of the repositories for low-and medium level wastes. The topic intentionally excludes the discussion of the characteristics of the geological host medium. Therefore a more generic discussion of the features of performance analysis is possible independent of the fact that different host media are considered in the Nordic countries. The different waste management systems existing and planned in the Nordic countries are shortly described in the report. In the report main emphasis is paid on the general repositories. Some of the phenomena and interactions relevant for a generic type of repository are discussed as well. Among the different approaches for the development of scenarios for safety and performance analyses one particular method - the Rock Engineering System (RES) - was chosen to be demonstratively tested in a brainstorming session, where the possible interactions and their safety significance were discussed employing a simplified and generic Nordic repository system as the reference system. As an overall impression, the AFA-project group concludes that the use of the RES approach is very easy to learn even during a short discussion session. The use of different ways to indicate the safety significance of various interactions in a graphical user interface increases the clarity. Within the project a simple software application was developed employing a generally available spread sheet programme. The developed tool allows an easy opportunity to link the cell specific comments readily available for the `reader` of the obtained results. A short review of the performance analyses carried out in the Nordic countries for actual projects concerning repositories for

  1. Performance analysis for waste repositories in the nordic countries. Report for project AFA-1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.; Broden, K.; Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K.; Walderhaug, T.; Helgason, J.; Sneve, M.; Hornkjoel, S.; Backe, S.

    1997-02-01

    The Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) project (AFA-1) focused on safety in the final disposal of long-lived low and medium level radioactive waste and its sub project (AFA-1.2), where this report has been produced, is dealing with the performance analysis of the engineered barrier system (near-field) of the repositories for low-and medium level wastes. The topic intentionally excludes the discussion of the characteristics of the geological host medium. Therefore a more generic discussion of the features of performance analysis is possible independent of the fact that different host media are considered in the Nordic countries. The different waste management systems existing and planned in the Nordic countries are shortly described in the report. In the report main emphasis is paid on the general repositories. Some of the phenomena and interactions relevant for a generic type of repository are discussed as well. Among the different approaches for the development of scenarios for safety and performance analyses one particular method - the Rock Engineering System (RES) - was chosen to be demonstratively tested in a brainstorming session, where the possible interactions and their safety significance were discussed employing a simplified and generic Nordic repository system as the reference system. As an overall impression, the AFA-project group concludes that the use of the RES approach is very easy to learn even during a short discussion session. The use of different ways to indicate the safety significance of various interactions in a graphical user interface increases the clarity. Within the project a simple software application was developed employing a generally available spread sheet programme. The developed tool allows an easy opportunity to link the cell specific comments readily available for the 'reader' of the obtained results. A short review of the performance analyses carried out in the Nordic countries for actual projects concerning repositories for

  2. A ‘Balanced’ Life: Work-Life Balance and Sickness Absence in Four Nordic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Antai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little attention has been given to the relationship between work-life balance and sickness absence. Objective: To investigate the association between poor work-life balance and sickness absence in 4 Nordic welfare states. Methods: Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed on pooled cross-sectional data of workers aged 15–65 years from Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and Norway (n=4186 obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS. Poor work-life balance was defined based on the fit between working hours and family or social commitments outside work. Self-reported sickness absence was measured as absence for ≥7 days from work for health reasons. Results: Poor work-life balance was associated with elevated odds (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.80 of self-reported sickness absence and more health problems in the 4 Nordic countries, even after adjusting for several important confounding factors. Work-related characteristics, ie, no determination over schedule (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.53, and job insecurity (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.21 to 2.02 increased the likelihood of sickness absence, and household characteristics, ie, cohabitation status (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96 reduced this likelihood. The associations were non-significant when performed separately for women and men. Conclusion: Sickness absence is predicted by poor work-life balance. Findings suggest the need for implementation of measures that prevent employee difficulties in combining work and family life.

  3. A 'Balanced' Life: Work-Life Balance and Sickness Absence in Four Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antai, D; Oke, A; Braithwaite, P; Anthony, D S

    2015-10-01

    Little attention has been given to the relationship between work-life balance and sickness absence. To investigate the association between poor work-life balance and sickness absence in 4 Nordic welfare states. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed on pooled cross-sectional data of workers aged 15-65 years from Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and Norway (n=4186) obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS). Poor work-life balance was defined based on the fit between working hours and family or social commitments outside work. Self-reported sickness absence was measured as absence for ≥7 days from work for health reasons. Poor work-life balance was associated with elevated odds (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.80) of self-reported sickness absence and more health problems in the 4 Nordic countries, even after adjusting for several important confounding factors. Work-related characteristics, ie, no determination over schedule (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.53), and job insecurity (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.21 to 2.02) increased the likelihood of sickness absence, and household characteristics, ie, cohabitation status (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96) reduced this likelihood. The associations were non-significant when performed separately for women and men. Sickness absence is predicted by poor work-life balance. Findings suggest the need for implementation of measures that prevent employee difficulties in combining work and family life.

  4. Nuclear emergency preparedness in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworska, A. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    Radiation emergency preparedness systems must be able to deal with the threats posed to each country and the region as a whole. The threats from nuclear accidents differ in the various countries of the region. The most serious nuclear threats are those with cross-border implications and are generally assumed to be due to the presence of nuclear reactors of various kinds. Some countries in the region, Finland, Germany, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and Sweden, have nuclear power plants, and several countries in the region possess smaller research reactors. Other nuclear threats arise from nuclear powered naval vessels or submarines, and from nuclear powered satellites. Production, transportation, use, and disposal of radioactive materials constitute potential local nuclear hazards. Finally, terrorist use of radioactive material poses a nuclear threat to all countries. (au)

  5. Nuclear emergency preparedness in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation emergency preparedness systems must be able to deal with the threats posed to each country and the region as a whole. The threats from nuclear accidents differ in the various countries of the region. The most serious nuclear threats are those with cross-border implications and are generally assumed to be due to the presence of nuclear reactors of various kinds. Some countries in the region, Finland, Germany, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and Sweden, have nuclear power plants, and several countries in the region possess smaller research reactors. Other nuclear threats arise from nuclear powered naval vessels or submarines, and from nuclear powered satellites. Production, transportation, use, and disposal of radioactive materials constitute potential local nuclear hazards. Finally, terrorist use of radioactive material poses a nuclear threat to all countries. (au)

  6. Preparedness against power crises in the Nordic countries; Aapner for Norden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelsen, Atle

    2004-07-01

    In the so-called Akureyri declaration the Nordic energy ministers presented their requests and claims to the system operators about supply security and exchange capacity between the countries. Some special issues are grid strengthening, common principles for how to deal with export and import, and a common transmission system operator. The ministers want to make international lines a priority. A common, Nordic grid company is probably not of current interest. Of the transmission system operators, only Statnett (Norway) is ready to consider a supranational perspective. Although the Nordic energy market is the most well-functioning energy market in the world, the ministers are not entirely satisfied and want further improvement. The first step will be to work out organizational models for how the grid operation and system responsibility can be managed by the countries jointly and thus improve the preparedness. The major power customers fear that a power crisis in one country may cause a cascade outage to spread in the neighbouring countries without the authorities being prepared. Experts disagree about the likelihood of a power crisis the next years. However, consumption is increasing much faster than production. After the liberalization of the energy market in 1991, the investments in the physical power system have decreased dramatically.

  7. Familial melanoma by histology and age: joint data from five Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Mahdi; Pukkala, Eero; Sundquist, Kristina; Tretli, Steinar; Olsen, Jörgen H; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Hemminki, Kari

    2014-04-01

    We aimed to estimate lifetime cumulative risk of melanoma (CRM) in relatives of patients with melanoma by histology and age at diagnosis in patients and relatives. A population-based cohort of 238724 first-degree relatives of 46091 melanoma patients diagnosed in 1955-2010 in Nordic countries was followed for cancer incidence. The CRM (0-79 years) in first-degree relatives of a patient with superficial spreading (SSM), nodular (NM), or lentigo maligna melanoma was quite similar, ranging from 2.5% to about 3%, which represents about 2-fold increase over the general population risk. When one melanoma patient in the family was diagnosed before age 30, the CRM was about 3%. When there were > or =2 melanoma patients diagnosed before age 30 in a family, CRM for relatives was about 14%, 6% for diagnoses at age 30-59, and 5% for diagnoses at age 60 or older. Depending on age at diagnosis of same-sex twins (not known whether monozygotic/dizygotic), their CRM was about 7-21%. Although no familial case of concordant histological types of acral lentiginous/desmoplastic/compound nevus/spindle cell melanomas or malignant blue nevus was found, familial risks of discordant histological types of melanoma were interchangeably high for most of the types, e.g. higher risk of SSM when a first-degree relative had NM [standardized incidence ratios (SIR)=2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.1-3.3, n=72] or acral lentiginous (4.0, 95% CI=1.5-8.8, n=6) and vice versa. There was a tendency toward concordant age at diagnosis of melanoma among relatives of melanoma patients. Findings of this study may help clinicians to find subjects at high melanoma risk for the genetic counseling. The risk was highest when melanoma occurred in a same-sex twin, one first-degree relative diagnosed at young age ( or =2 first-degree relatives. Histological type of melanoma does not seem to play an important role in familial melanoma. This work was supported by the Nordic Cancer Union, Swedish Council for Working

  8. Praxis and guidelines for planned homebirths in the Nordic countries - an overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Olafsdottir, Olof Asta

    2014-01-01

    to a midwife attending the birth varies geographically. In the Stockholm County Council guidelines have been developed for publicly funding of planned home births; for the rest of Sweden no national guidelines have been formulated and the service is privately funded. KEY CONCLUSION: Inconsistencies in the home...... birth services of the Nordic countries imply different opportunities for midwifery care to women with regard to their preferred place of birth. Uniform sociodemography, health care systems and cultural context in the Nordic countries are factors in favour of further research to compare and aggregate...... woman has the right to be attended by a midwife during a homebirth and each county council must present a plan for the organization of birth services, including homebirth services. In Norway and Iceland the service is fully or partly funded by taxes and national guidelines are available but access...

  9. Nature interpretation for children and young people in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This TEMA-Nord report is a result of a one-year project with all of the Nordic countries participating. The primary goal of the project has been to collect, develop and mediate a series of good examples of how nature interpretation, aimed at children and young people, can encourage children's und...... of view are concerned especially with how nature interpreters can encourage children and young people to take ownership, to be involved with their body and mind, and to reflect and put the experience and the activities in nature into a wider context.......This TEMA-Nord report is a result of a one-year project with all of the Nordic countries participating. The primary goal of the project has been to collect, develop and mediate a series of good examples of how nature interpretation, aimed at children and young people, can encourage children...

  10. Natural Radionuclides in Meadow and Pasture land in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosén, Klas; Villanueva, José - Luis Gutiérrez; Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve

    transfer for pasture land under the different conditions that prevail in the Nordic countries. The potential health hazards due to chronic ingestion of low concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides are fairly unknown but the results of this study may provide valuable background information...... for assessing these radiation risks. The aim of this project has been to gain knowledge on the status of natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land and in grassland plants in different Nordic countries and on the transfer of these radionuclides from soil/water to man via the milk/food chain (soil- meadow/pasture...... grass –cow-milk). Limited data are available on the mobility and the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in the ecosystems of the agricultural land. In addition, information concerning the concentrations in meat and dairy products is of interest for assessing exposures of humans to natural...

  11. Approaches for integrated assessment of ecological and eutrophication status of surface waters in Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper H.; Aroviita, Jukka; Carstensen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    We review approaches and tools currently used in Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden) for integrated assessment of ‘ecological status’ sensu the EU Water Framework Directive as well as assessment of ‘eutrophication status’ in coastal and marine waters. Integration principles for...... principles applied within BQEs are critical and in need of harmonisation if we want a better understanding of potential transition in ecological status between surface water types, e.g. when riverine water enters a downstream lake or coastal water body.......We review approaches and tools currently used in Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden) for integrated assessment of ‘ecological status’ sensu the EU Water Framework Directive as well as assessment of ‘eutrophication status’ in coastal and marine waters. Integration principles...

  12. Financing of the National Churches in the Nordic Countries, England and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Sidsel; Bille, Trine

    This article analyses the financing of seven national churches in a large comparative study. The national churches in the Nordic countries and in England and Scotland are compared. They have many similarities in terms of history, intertwinement with the state, type and level of religiosity...... of the population, public role and public responsibilities, but the level of financing differs greatly. The purpose of the article is to discuss possible explanations for the differences in the level of financing. Adjusting for cost of public service tasks and for GDP leaves a large difference in financing among...... the seven national churches. We suggest that the source of finance is a determinant factor for the level of finance of national churches. Comparing the sources and level of financing of seven national churches in the Nordic countries, England and Scotland shows that financing by a taxation right yields...

  13. Alcohol-attributed disease burden in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agardh, Emilie E; Danielsson, Anna-Karin; Ramstedt, Mats

    2016-01-01

    , changes in consumption generally corresponded to changes in disease burden, but not to the same extent in Sweden and Norway. All countries had a similar disease pattern and the majority of DALYs were due to YLLs (62-76%), mainly from alcohol use disorder, cirrhosis, transport injuries, self-harm...... levels in general corresponded to changes in harm in Finland and Denmark, but not in Sweden and Norway for some years. All countries followed a similar pattern. The majority of disability-adjusted life years were due to premature mortality. Alcohol use disorder by non-fatal conditions accounted...

  14. Ethical aspects of registry-based research in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludvigsson JF

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Jonas F Ludvigsson,1,2 Siri E Håberg,3 Gun Peggy Knudsen,3 Pierre Lafolie,4,5 Helga Zoega,6 Catharina Sarkkola,7 Stephanie von Kraemer,7 Elisabete Weiderpass,1,7–10 Mette Nørgaard11 1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 2Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; 3Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; 4Department of Medicine, Clinical Pharmacology Unit, 5The Stockholm Regional Ethical Review Board, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; 7Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; 8Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 9The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 10Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; 11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Abstract: National health care registries in the Nordic countries share many attributes, but different legal and ethical frameworks represent a challenge to promoting effective joint research. Internationally, there is a lack of knowledge about how ethical matters are considered in Nordic registry-based research, and a lack of knowledge about how Nordic ethics committees operate and what is needed to obtain an approval. In this paper, we review ethical aspects of registry-based research, the legal framework, the role of ethics review boards in the Nordic countries, and the structure of the ethics application. We discuss the role of informed consent in registry-based research and how to safeguard the integrity of study participants, including vulnerable subjects and children. Our review also provides information on the different government agencies that contribute registry-based data, and a list of the major health registries in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and

  15. The housing boom and bust in the Nordic and Baltic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Hedvig; Haagerup, Christian Deichmann

    This article presents the findings of a comparative study of the housing markets in the Nordic and the Baltic countries and in the United Kingdom. The study was performed as part of the VISURF research network. Generally all the housing markets were affected by the global financial crisis......, but to a varying degree. The house prices fell in 2009 in most of the countries, yet Sweden and Norway only saw small decreases or negligible decreases in house prices following the crisis. However the construction of new housing fell in all of the countries in the study. The sudden change of the housing market...

  16. Farming different species in RAS in Nordic countries: Current status and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang; Lund, Ivar; Thorarinsdottir, Ragnheidur

    2013-01-01

    Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) have gained increasing interest in recent years as a means to intensify fish production while at the same time minimize the environmental impact. Considerable hands-on experience has accumulated within the Nordic countries over the last 20-30 years in desig...... such as aquaponic systems appear to be feasible primarily when culturing more exotic species targeted for selected customers...

  17. Characterisation of long-lived low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the Nordic Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.; Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K.; Carlsson, T.; Viitanen, P.; Walderhaug, T.; Sneve, M.; Hornkjoel, S.; Backe, S.

    1997-11-01

    The present report is final report from a study on characterisation of radioactive waters in the Nordic countries. The study has mainly been focused on long-lived low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Methods to measure or estimate the activity content and the general composition are discussed. Recommendations are given regarding characterisation of waste under treatment and characterisation of already produced waste packages. (au)

  18. Experiences of storage of radioactive waste packages in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.; Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K.; Ruokola, E.; Ramsoey, T.

    2001-04-01

    The present report includes results from a study on intermediate storage of radioactive waste packages in the Nordic countries. Principles for intermediate storage in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are presented. Recommendations are given regarding different intermediate storage options and also regarding control and supervision. The disposal of drums at Kjeller in Norway has also been included in the report. This is an example of an intended (and correctly licensed) disposal facility turned into what in practice has become a storage system. (au)

  19. Characterisation of long-lived low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broden, K. [Studsvik RadWaste AB, (El Salvador); Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K. [Forskningscenter Risoe, (Denmark); Carlsson, T.; Viitanen, P. [VVT, (Finland); Walderhaug, T. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute (Iceland); Sneve, M.; Hornkjoel, S. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Backe, S. [Institute for Energy Technology (Norway)

    1997-11-01

    The present report is final report from a study on characterisation of radioactive waters in the Nordic countries. The study has mainly been focused on long-lived low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Methods to measure or estimate the activity content and the general composition are discussed. Recommendations are given regarding characterisation of waste under treatment and characterisation of already produced waste packages. (au).

  20. Occupation and risk of primary fallopian tube carcinoma in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riska, A; Martinsen, J I; Kjaerheim, K

    2012-01-01

    .11-2.29, Obs = 32), nurses (1.49, 1.14-1.92, Obs = 60), shop workers (1.25, 1.07-1.46, Obs = 159) and clerical workers (1.20, 1.07-1.35, Obs = 271) and these sustained over times and different Nordic countries. There was a nonsignificant increased risk for PFTC among welders, printers, painters and chemical...

  1. Troubling gender equality: Revisiting gender equality work in the famous Nordic model countries

    OpenAIRE

    Edström, Charlotta; Brunila, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    This article concerns gender equality work, that is, those educational and workplace activities that involve the promotion of gender equality. It is based on research conducted in Sweden and Finland, and focuses on the period during which the public sector has become more market-oriented and project-based all over the Nordic countries. The consequences of this development on gender equality work have not yet been thoroughly analysed. Our joint empirical analysis is based on discourse-analytic...

  2. Management of early prostatic cancer in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, P M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Heggestad, T

    1995-01-01

    To explore the treatment of patients with early localized prostatic carcinoma, we surveyed the departments of urology and general surgery in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Clinical policies and physicians' attitudes toward the radical treatment options varied widely between the countries. ...

  3. Alcohol-attributed disease burden in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agardh, Emilie E; Danielsson, Anna-Karin; Ramstedt, Mats

    2016-01-01

    , changes in consumption generally corresponded to changes in disease burden, but not to the same extent in Sweden and Norway. All countries had a similar disease pattern and the majority of DALYs were due to YLLs (62-76%), mainly from alcohol use disorder, cirrhosis, transport injuries, self-harm...

  4. Socioeconomic differences in emotional symptoms among adolescents in the Nordic countries: recommendations on how to present inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Line; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Meilstrup, Charlotte; Due, Pernille; Madsen, Katrine Rich; Koushede, Vibeke; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2015-02-01

    This comparative study examines absolute and relative socioeconomic differences in emotional symptoms among adolescents using standardised data from five Nordic countries and gives recommendations on how to present socioeconomic inequality. The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) international cross-sectional study from 2005/2006 provided data on 29,642 11-15-year-old adolescents from nationally random samples in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The outcome was daily emotional symptoms. Family Affluence Scale (FAS) was used as indicator of socioeconomic position. We applied four summary measures of inequality: Prevalence Difference, Odds Ratio, Slope Index of Inequality and Relative Index of Inequality, and presented the socioeconomic inequality by a graphical illustration of the prevalence of emotional symptoms, the size of the FAS groups and the summary indices of inequality in each country. The prevalence of emotional symptoms ranged from 8.1% in Denmark to 13.2% in Iceland. There were large country variations in the size of the low FAS-group ranging from 2% in Iceland to 12% in Finland. The largest absolute and relative socioeconomic inequalities were found in Iceland and the smallest in Finland for girls and in Denmark for boys. Emotional symptoms were more common among nordic adolescents from low affluence families this association appeared in the study of both absolute and relative inequality. A comprehensive presentation of socioeconomic inequality should include the prevalence of the health outcome, the size of the socioeconomic groups, and the regression line representing the summary indices of inequality. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  5. Offshoring: Impacts on the Nordic welfare states and industrial relations - Survey based evidence from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refslund, Bjarke

    with much lower wages and other costs as well as less strict labour market regulation as well as other regulation e.g. environmental than found in the Nordic countries. The integration of e.g. the Chinese and Indian labour markets in the world economy, but more importantly for the Nordic economies...... (ICT) as well as transportation, this has made the process of relocation even more accessible. This adds yet another dimension to the impact internationalisation is having on national industrial relations as well as welfare state policies and general labour market regulation. Other central features...... of the more internationalised economy are increasing trade in intermediates, rising FDI and increasing competition. In this context where international relocation is increasingly accessible the phenomenon attracts much attention in both academic analysis, media reports as well as policy analysis. But our...

  6. Development of voluntary private health insurance in Nordic countries - An exploratory study on country-specific contextual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynkkynen, Liina-Kaisa; Alexandersen, Nina; Kaarbøe, Oddvar; Anell, Anders; Lehto, Juhani; Vrangbӕk, Karsten

    2018-03-16

    The Nordic countries are healthcare systems with tax-based financing and ambitions for universal access to comprehensive services. This implies that distribution of healthcare resources should be based on individual needs, not on the ability to pay. Despite this ideological orientation, significant expansion in voluntary private health insurance (VPHI) contracts has occurred in recent decades. The development and role of VPHIs are different across the Nordic countries. Complementary VPHI plays a significant role in Denmark and in Finland. Supplementary VPHI is prominent in Norway and Sweden. The aim of this paper is to explore drivers behind the developments of the VPHI markets in the Nordic countries. We analyze the developments in terms of the following aspects: the performance of the statutory system (real or perceived), lack of coverage in certain areas of healthcare, governmental interventions or inability to reform the system, policy trends and the general socio-cultural environment, and policy responses to voting behavior or lobbying by certain interest groups. It seems that the early developments in VPHI markets have been an answer to the gaps in the national health systems created by institutional contexts, political decisions, and cultural interpretations on the functioning of the system. However, once the market is created it introduces new dynamics that have less to do with gaps and inflexibilities and more with cultural factors. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Cost calculations at early stages of nuclear research facilities in the nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, Klaus; Salmenhaara, Seppo; Backe, Steinar; Cato, Anna; Lindskog, Staffan; Callander, Clas; Efraimsson, Henrik; Andersson, Inga; Sjoeblom, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    The Nordic countries Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and to some extent also Finland, had very large nuclear research and development programs for a few decades starting in the nineteen fifties. Today, only some of the facilities are in use. Some have been decommissioned and dismantled while others are at various stages of planning for shutdown. The perspective ranges from imminent to several decades. It eventually became realized that considerable planning for the future decommissioning is warranted and that an integral part of this planning is financial, including how financial funds should be acquired, used and allocated over time. This necessitates that accurate and reliable cost estimates be obtained at all stages. However, this is associated with fundamental difficulties and treacherous complexities, especially for the early ones. Eventually, Denmark and Norway decided not to build any nuclear power plants while Finland and Sweden did. This is reflected in the financing where the latter countries have established systems with special funds in which money is being collected now to cover the future costs for the decommissioning of the research facilities. Nonetheless, the needs for planning for the decommissioning of nuclear research facilities are very similar. However, they differ considerably from those of nuclear power reactors, especially with regard to cost calculations. It has become apparent in the course of work that summation types of cost estimation methodologies give rise to large systematic errors if applied at early stages, in which case comparison based assessments are less biased and may be more reliable. Therefore, in order to achieve the required quality of the cost calculations, it is necessary that data and experience from authentic cases be utilized in models for cost calculations. It also implies that this calculation process should include a well adopted learning process. Thus, a Nordic co-operation has been established for the exchange and

  8. Nordic working group for medical x-ray diagnostics: Diagnostic reference levels within xray diagnostics - experiences in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitz, W.; Groen, P.; Servomaa, A.; Einarsson, G.; Olerud, H.

    2003-01-01

    Medical x-ray diagnostics is one of the few applications of ionising radiation where people are irradiated on purpose. The strategy for radiation protection is also different compared to that in other areas that have the zero-alternative as its ultimate goal, meaning that no human beings at all are exposed in these practices. The focus in x-ray diagnostics concerning radiation protection is justification and optimisation. Optimisation implies that the examination is performed in such a way that the radiation dose is as small as possible without jeopardising the diagnostic security. X- ray diagnostics is a complex method where many technical parameters and methodology factors together are interacting in the determination of radiation dose and image quality. The optimisation process is not a simple and uncomplicated procedure, this difficulty is reflected in many international and national surveys showing a large spread of patient doses for one and the same type of examination. The concept diagnostic reference levels (DRL) has been introduced as a tool for reducing this wide distribution that is obviously indicating a lack of optimisation, and for cutting the highest radiation doses. In this presentation the concept for DRL and the experience gained in the Nordic countries with DRL are described. (orig.)

  9. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among People with Multiple Sclerosis in the Nordic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The aim of the study was to describe and compare (1 the types and prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments used among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS in the Nordic countries; (2 the types of conventional treatments besides disease-modifying medicine for MS that were used in combination with CAM treatments; (3 the types of symptoms/health issues addressed by use of CAM treatments. Methods. An internet-based questionnaire was used to collect data from 6455 members of the five Nordic MS societies. The response rates varied from 50.9% in Norway to 61.5% in Iceland. Results. A large range of CAM treatments were reported to be in use in all five Nordic countries. Supplements of vitamins and minerals, supplements of oils, special diet, acupuncture, and herbal medicine were among the CAM treatment modalities most commonly used. The prevalence of the overall use of CAM treatments within the last twelve months varied from 46.0% in Sweden to 58.9% in Iceland. CAM treatments were most often used in combination with conventional treatments. The conventional treatments that were most often combined with CAM treatment were prescription medication, physical therapy, and over-the-counter (OTC medications. The proportion of CAM users who reported exclusive use of CAM (defined as use of no conventional treatments besides disease-modifying medicine for MS varied from 9.5% in Finland to 18.4% in Norway. In all five Nordic countries, CAM treatments were most commonly used for nonspecific/preventative purposes such as strengthening the body in general, improving the body’s muscle strength, and improving well-being. CAM treatments were less often used for the purpose of improving specific symptoms such as body pain, problems with balance, and fatigue/lack of energy. Conclusions. A large range of CAM treatments were used by individuals with MS in all Nordic countries. The most commonly reported rationale for CAM treatment use

  10. Prisoners’ experiences of drug treatment and punishment in four Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giertsen Hedda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS - This article describes and analyses prisoners’ experiences of drug treatment in prison in four Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The article examines how prisoners experience drug treatment, control and sanctions as related to three main topics, namely motivation; the content of the measure and relations to staff; and control and sanctions. METHODS & DATA - The article is based on data from twelve prisons, three in each of the four countries; 91 interviews with prisoners; and around six months of observation. The two main kinds of drug treatment measures are drug treatment units and day programmes. RESULTS - Prisoners described several motives to participate in drug treatment measures: to leave drugs and crime; to renew relations with family and friends; to solve health problems; and to improve their prison conditions. Prisoners found that drug treatment measures offered possibilities to acquire new ways of being. Staff behaviour seemed to be more important to prisoners than the methods used, and some prisoners seemed more positive to staff involved with the drug treatment than to other staff. A surprising finding was the prisoners’ limited critique of controls and sanctions. We see this as embedded in the situation of being a prisoner, and also in relation to contexts outside prison. CONCLUSION - In discussing their experiences in the treatment units, prisoners are not so concerned about the rehabilitative features or the controls and sanctions. They evaluate their present situation in light of a future, which is their real concern. This is in line with a main task for staff, which is to prepare prisoners for release.

  11. Fatal poisoning in drug addicts in the Nordic countries in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, K Wiese; Edvardsen, H M E; Thelander, G; Ojanperä, I; Thordardottir, S; Andersen, L V; Kriikku, P; Vindenes, V; Christoffersen, D; Delaveris, G J M; Frost, J

    2015-03-01

    This report is a follow-up to a study on fatal poisoning in drug addicts conducted in 2012 by a Nordic working group. Here we analyse data from the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Data on sex, number of deaths, places of death, age, main intoxicants and other drugs detected in the blood were recorded. National data are presented and compared between the Nordic countries and with data from similar studies conducted in 1991, 1997, 2002 and 2007. The death rates (number of deaths per 100,000 inhabitants) increased in drug addicts in Finland, Iceland and Sweden but decreased in Norway compared to the rates in earlier studies. The death rate was stable in Denmark from 1991 to 2012. The death rate remained highest in Norway (5.79) followed by Denmark (5.19) and Iceland (5.16). The differences between the countries diminished compared to earlier studies, with death rates in Finland (4.61) and Sweden (4.17) approaching the levels in the other countries. Women accounted for 15-27% of the fatal poisonings. The median age of the deceased drug addicts was still highest in Denmark, and deaths of addicts >45 years old increased in all countries. Opioids remained the main cause of death, but medicinal opioids like methadone, buprenorphine, fentanyl and tramadol mainly replaced heroin. Methadone was the main intoxicant in Denmark and Sweden, whereas heroin/morphine caused the most deaths in Norway. Finland differed from the other Nordic countries in that buprenorphine was the main intoxicant with only a few heroin/morphine and methadone deaths. Deaths from methadone, buprenorphine and fentanyl increased immensely in Sweden compared to 2007. Poly-drug use was widespread in all countries. The median number of drugs per case varied from 4 to 5. Heroin/morphine, medicinal opioids, cocaine, amphetamines, benzodiazepines and alcohol were the main abused drugs. However, less widely used drugs, like gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), methylphenidate

  12. Ecological and Social Dimensions of Ecosystem Restoration in the Nordic Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Hagen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An international overview of the extent and type of ecological restoration can offer new perspectives for understanding, planning, and implementation. The Nordic countries, with a great range of natural conditions but historically similar social and political structures, provide an opportunity to compare restoration approaches and efforts across borders. The aim of this study was to explore variation in ecological restoration using the Nordic countries as an example. We used recent national assessments and expert evaluations of ecological restoration. Restoration efforts differed among countries: forest and peatland restoration was most common in Finland, freshwater restoration was most common in Sweden, restoration of natural heathlands and grasslands was most common in Iceland, restoration of natural and semi-cultural heathlands was most common in Norway, and restoration of cultural ecosystems, mainly abandoned agricultural land, was most common in Denmark. Ecological restoration currently does not occur on the Faroe Islands. Economic incentives influence ecological restoration and depend on laws and policies in each country. Our analyses suggest that habitat types determine the methods of ecological restoration, whereas socio-economic drivers are more important for the decisions concerning the timing and location of restoration. To improve the understanding, planning, and implementation of ecological restoration, we advocate increased cooperation and knowledge sharing across disciplines and among countries, both in the Nordic countries and internationally. An obvious advantage of such cooperation is that a wider range of experiences from different habitats and different socio-economic conditions becomes available and thus provides a more solid basis for developing practical solutions for restoration methods and policies.

  13. Cancer in persons working in dry cleaning in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Aage; Rylander, Lars; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Lindbohm, Marja-Liisa; Pukkala, Eero; Romundstad, Pål; Jensen, Per; Clausen, Lene Bjørk; Johansen, Kristina

    2006-02-01

    U.S. studies have reported an increased risk of esophageal and some other cancers in dry cleaners exposed to tetrachloroethylene. We investigated whether the U.S. findings could be reproduced in the Nordic countries using a series of case-control studies nested in cohorts of laundry and dry-cleaning workers identified from the 1970 censuses in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Dry-cleaning work in the Nordic countries during the period when tetrachloroethylene was the dominant solvent was not associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer [rate ratio (RR) = 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-1.69], but our study was hampered by some unclassifiable cases. The risks of cancer of the gastric cardia, liver, pancreas, and kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma were not significantly increased. Assistants in dry-cleaning shops had a borderline significant excess risk of cervical cancer not found in women directly involved in dry cleaning. We found an excess risk of bladder cancer (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.93) not associated with length of employment. The finding of no excess risk of esophageal cancer in Nordic dry cleaners differs from U.S. findings. Chance, differences in level of exposure to tetrachloroethylene, and confounding may explain the findings. The overall evidence on bladder cancer in dry cleaners is equivocal.

  14. Work in progress on fatigue of welded structures in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsson, Jack; Haagensen, Per; Agerskov, Henning

    2006-01-01

    Close international cooperation has been an important characteristic of the research on fatigue of welded structures in the Nordic countries. Cooperative projects were initiated already in the mid-1980's and have continued for nearly 20 years. This report is by no means exhaustive of all the work...... Welded Structures, which is partially funded by the Nordic Innovation Centre and numerous national funding agencies. The project has 10 industry companies, 5 universities and one research centre as partners....... on fatigue of welded structures progressing in this region, but it does provide a cross-section of those activities that has been brought to the attention of the national societies. Several of the issues reported here represent sub-tasks within the project Q-FAB: Quality and Cost of Fabricated Advanced......Close international cooperation has been an important characteristic of the research on fatigue of welded structures in the Nordic countries. Cooperative projects were initiated already in the mid-1980's and have continued for nearly 20 years. This report is by no means exhaustive of all the work...

  15. Following international trends while subject to past traditions: neuropsychological test use in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Jens; Løvstad, Marianne; Norup, Anne; Nybo, Taina; Persson, Bengt A; Rivera, Diego Fernando; Schanke, Anne-Kristine; Sigurdardottir, Solrun; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the neuropsychological test traditions of the four Nordic countries have spanned from the flexible and qualitative tradition of Luria-Christensen to the quantitative large battery approach of Halstead and Kløve-Matthews. This study reports current test use and discusses whether these traditions still influence attitudes toward test use and choice of tests. The study is based on survey data from 702 Nordic neuropsychologists. The average participant used 9 tests in a standard assessment, and 25 tests overall in their practice. Test use was moderated by nationality, competence level, practice profile, and by attitude toward test selection. Participants who chose their tests flexibly used fewer tests than those adhering to the flexible battery approach, but had fewer tests from which to choose. Testing patients with psychiatric disorders was associated with using more tests. IQ, memory, attention, and executive function were the domains with the largest utilization rate, while tests of motor, visual/spatial, and language were used by few. There is a lack of academic achievement tests. Screening tests played a minor role in specialized assessments, and symptom validity tests were seldom applied on a standard basis. Most tests were of Anglo-American origin. New test methods are implemented rapidly in the Nordic countries, but test selection is also characterized by the dominating position of established and much researched tests. The Halstead-Reitan and Luria traditions are currently weak, but national differences in size of test batteries seem to be influenced by these longstanding traditions.

  16. Tectonic vocabulary and materialization: Discourse on the future of tectonic architectural research in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Bundgaard, Charlotte; Hvejsel, Marie Frier

    2015-01-01

    By referring to the fundamental question of how we unite aesthetics and technology – tectonic theory is necessarily a focal point in the development of the architectural discipline. However, a critical reconsideration of the role of tectonic theory seems necessary when facing the present everyday....... On the occasion of the Second International Conference on Structures & Architecture held in July 2013 in Portugal the authors organized a special session entitled From open structures to the cladding of control bringing together researchers from the Nordic countries to discuss this issue. Likewise the initiative...... to establish a Nordic Network for Research and Teaching in Tectonics is currently forming. This paper seeks to jointly reflect upon these initiatives in order to bring them further, with the intention to clad a discourse on the future of tectonic architectural research that addresses the conditions of everyday...

  17. Mortality and morbidity of poisonings in the Nordic countries in 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrew, E.; Irestedt, B.; Hurri, T.

    2008-01-01

    Aim. To map and compare mortality and morbidity of poisonings in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden in 2002 and to establish a common understanding of methods and procedures among the National Poisons Information Centres (NPIC) in order to create a Nordic toxico-epidemiological platform....... Methods. Morbidity was for this study defined as acute poisonings treated in hospitals given the ICD-10 codes T36-T65 and F10-F19. The figures were extracted from the National Patient/Hospital Registers. Acute poisonings listed as main as well as side diagnoses were included. Deaths recorded as acute...... poisoning (using the same ICD-10 codes) were collected from the National Death Cause Registers. Results. Annual mortality of acute poisonings per 100,000 inhabitants (rate) was 16.6 in Finland and between 8.6 and 11.1 in the other Nordic countries. Morbidity rates varied between 150 and 255 per 100...

  18. Challenges for work-based learning in vocational education and training in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2015-01-01

    not to pursue an academic career. Countries with strong apprenticeship systems tend to have less youth unemployment and a smoother transition to the labour market than others. Furthermore, from a learning perspective, the outcomes of work-based training and informal learning are enhanced when they are combined...... with formal education in a dual system. In all the Nordic Countries full time work based apprenticeship has given way to more school-based forms of VET – though to very different extent: Sweden has integrated VET in a comprehensive Gymnasium while Denmark has maintained the apprenticeship model. The evolution...

  19. Evaluation of the effects of green taxes in the Nordic countries. Results and method question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skou Andersen, M.; Dengsoee, N.; Branth Pedersen, A.

    2000-01-01

    Green taxes have over the past 10 years become a significant part of environmental regulation in the Nordic countries. The present report is a literature study of the effects of green taxes with regard to CO 2 and pesticides. The authors have identified 68 studies of CO 2 -taxes and 20 studies of the pesticide taxes. The report presents a summary of the results from these studies and assesses the methodologies employed for examining the effects of the green taxes. The majority of the reviewed studies are ex-ante studies, which have been carried out in advance of the implementation of the taxes, and which are often based on simplified economic models. Ex-post studies, which are based on the actual historical data for the adjustment to the taxes, are relatively few. 20 ex-post studies of the CO 2 -taxes have been identified, while there are not any ex-post studies of the pesticide taxes. With regard to the environmental effects of green taxes, the ex-post studies can be relied on for the procurement of the most reliable data. The completed ex-post studies of the CO 2 -taxes do not present unambiguous results, because focus and methodology differ. Most studies are partial in their focus and relate to one or more sectors of the economy. Some studies have been carried out few tears after the introduction of the taxes, and do not present an updated assessment of the effects of the taxes. To the extent that it is possible to summarise the present knowledge about the effects of the CO 2 -taxes, there seems to be indications for relatively marked effects in Denmark as compared to the other Nordic countries, since Denmark is the only country whose taxed CO 2 -emissions have been reduced in absolute figures. With regard to Norway and Sweden, effects of the CO 2 -taxes can be identified in particular sectors in relation to business-as-usual scenarios. Finland's CO 2 -tax has not been comprehensively evaluated ex-post, but has reached a tax level which gives expectations of

  20. Learning from vocational education and training in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2018-01-01

    VET-systems of Norway and Finland demonstrate how strengths and weaknesses can be balanced in relation to common challenges. The chapter concludes that the policy architecture for VET comprises of a set of interrelated trade-offs that must be recognised to develop VET for the future. Lastly...

  1. Radiological emergency monitoring systems in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devell, L.; Lauritzen, B.

    2001-02-01

    This report describes the national systems for emergency monitoring of radioactivity in the five Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden as well as in the six Baltic Sea countries, Estonia, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and the Russian Federation. Similarities and differences regarding strategy and equipment are shown briefly. The main feature for early warning is the national network of automatic gamma monitoring stations. This network is supplemented by manual stations and/or survey teams, often measuring at predetermined locations. Air filter stations are used for nuclide analyses of particles and gases. Dose rate maps and fallout maps of ground deposited nuclides, e.g., cesium-137, are produced based on data from airborne measurements, monitoring stations, survey teams and environmental samples. Most countries describe programs for checking food contamination. Whole body counting and organ measurements are used to determine internal contamination. External contamination of people, vehicles, goods etc is checked with survey meters and other equipment at checkpoint or as needed. Field measurements of various kinds complete the national systems. Possible future development and planned improvement are discussed. This report is an extension and update of a previous NKS report covering the Nordic countries. (au)

  2. Status of small water supplies in the Nordic countries: Characteristics, water quality and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Maria J; Persson, Kenneth M; Andradottir, Hrund O; Gardarsson, Sigurdur M

    2017-11-01

    Access to safe water is essential for public health and is one of the most important prerequisites for good living and safe food production. Many studies have shown that non-compliance with drinking water quality standards in small water supply systems is much higher than in large systems. Nevertheless, people served by small water supply systems have the right to the same level of health protection. Actions are therefore needed to improve the situation. The objective of the present study was to carry out a baseline analysis of the situation in the Nordic region and provide recommendations for governmental policy and actions. Data were gathered on number of water supplies, population served, compliance with regulations and waterborne disease outbreaks from various sources in the Nordic countries. The collected data showed that there are about 12500 regulated water supplies, 9400 of which serve fewer than 500 persons. The number of unregulated and poorly regulated supplies is unknown, but it can be roughly estimated that these serve 10% of the Nordic population on a permanent basis or 2.6 million people. However, this does not tell the whole story as many of the very small water supplies serve transient populations, summerhouse dwellers and tourist sites, with many more users. Non-compliance regarding microbes is much higher in the small supplies. The population weighted average fecal contamination incidence rate in the Nordic region is eleven times higher in the smaller supplies than in the large ones, 0.76% and 0.07%, respectively. Registered waterborne disease outbreaks were also more frequent in the small supplies than in the large ones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Public health, healthcare, health and inequality in health in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Lauridsen, Jørgen Trankjær; Kifmann, Mathias

    2018-01-01

    -economic equality in health. Each of the five countries has established extensive public health programmes, although with somewhat different measures to increase health of the populations. We compare these countries to the UK and Germany by using data from the European Social Survey for 2002 and 2012 in addition......All five Nordic countries emphasize equal and easy access to healthcare, assuming that increased access to healthcare leads to increased health. It is the purpose of the present study to explore to which extent the populations of these countries have reached good health and a high degree of socio...... to OECD statistics for the same years. Health is measured by self-assessed health in five categories, which is transformed to a cardinal scale using Swedish time trade-off (TTO) weights. As socio-economic measures we use household income and length of education. Socio-economic inequality in health...

  4. Cesarean section trends in the Nordic Countries - a comparative analysis with the Robson classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykönen, Aura; Gissler, Mika; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Bergholt, Thomas; Rasmussen, Steen C; Smárason, Alexander; Bjarnadóttir, Ragnheiður I; Másdóttir, Birna B; Källén, Karin; Klungsoyr, Kari; Albrechtsen, Susanne; Skjeldestad, Finn E; Tapper, Anna-Maija

    2017-05-01

    The cesarean rates are low but increasing in most Nordic countries. Using the Robson classification, we analyzed which obstetric groups have contributed to the changes in the cesarean rates. Retrospective population-based registry study including all deliveries (3 398 586) between 2000 and 2011 in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The Robson group distribution, cesarean rate and contribution of each Robson group were analyzed nationally for four 3-year time periods. For each country, we analyzed which groups contributed to the change in the total cesarean rate. Between the first and the last time period studied, the total cesarean rates increased in Denmark (16.4 to 20.7%), Norway (14.4 to 16.5%) and Sweden (15.5 to 17.1%), but towards the end of our study, the cesarean rates stabilized or even decreased. The increase was explained mainly by increases in the absolute contribution from R5 (women with previous cesarean) and R2a (induced labor on nulliparous). In Finland, the cesarean rate decreased slightly (16.5 to 16.2%) mainly due to decrease among R5 and R6-R7 (breech presentation, nulliparous/multiparous). In Iceland, the cesarean rate decreased in all parturient groups (17.6 to 15.3%), most essentially among nulliparous women despite the increased induction rates. The increased total cesarean rates in the Nordic countries are explained by increased cesarean rates among nulliparous women, and by an increased percentage of women with previous cesarean. Meanwhile, induction rates on nulliparous increased significantly, but the impact on the total cesarean rate was unclear. The Robson classification facilitates benchmarking and targeting efforts for lowering the cesarean rates. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Associations between meal complexity and social context in four Nordic countries

    OpenAIRE

    Kahma, Nina; Mäkelä, Johanna; Niva, Mari; Lund, Thomas Bøker

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary eating is often portrayed by images of snacking, solitary grazing, disintegration of sociability, demise of family meals, and increasingly irregular eating patterns –what Claude Fischler has famously described as gastroanomy. Inspired by the concept of eating system, this article contributes to the discussion about the ongoing changes by examining the relation between meal complexity, sociability and the duration of meals in contemporary Nordic societies. We examine the differenc...

  6. Drug user organizations in the Nordic countries--local, national, and international dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Vibeke Asmussen; Anker, Jørgen; Tammi, Tuukka

    2012-04-01

    The article focuses on drug user organizations that represent and advocate for active "hard drug" users in the Nordic countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges that these organizations face in their search for legitimacy and political influence. The comparative perspective points at similarities and differences in national contexts that both support and challenges the existence of drug user organizations, including drug policy, social welfare policy, trends in drug use, and organizational conditions. The article also discusses the importance of international network and transnational organizations that support drug user organizations.

  7. Harmonization of antimicrobial susceptibility testing among veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the five Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hofshagen, Merete

    2003-01-01

    A total of 100 bacterial strains (25 Escherichia coli, 25 Salmonella enterica, 25 Staphylococcus aureus, and 25 Enterococcus strains) and four reference strains were tested for susceptibility toward 8-12 antimicrobial agents in 12 veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the five Nordic countries...... reported as vancomycin resistant. Ten laboratories identified the Enterococcus spp. to species level. All five Enterococcus faecium and 10 Enterococcus faecalis selected from the strain collection at the Danish Veterinary Institute were correctly identified by all laboratories, whereas some problems were...

  8. Connecting vocational education with work based learning in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms; Tønder, Anna Hagen

    This paper examines how the different systems of vocational education and training (VET-systems) in four Nordic countries connect to the labour market and how they provide access to employment and work-based learning for the students. The VET-system at upper secondary level includes youth as well...... they have developed. Next, the role of employment protection is examined and some recent initiatives to connect upper secondary VET closer to the labour market are presented. A special interest is taken in attempts to revive and strengthen apprenticeship programmes. The conclusion summarises the strengths...

  9. Urban form, transportation and greenhouse gas emissions- Experiences in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmaajaervi, I; Heinonen, S.; Lahti, P. [VTT, Building and Transport (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The main objective of the project was to identify instruments to develop urban form and transportation systems in a sustainable way to decrease greenhouse gas emissions in the Nordic countries. Instruments can be found on different levels: national, regional and local. The main sectors are land use and transportation planning, land use and transportation policies, tax policy, co-operation, information dissemination, interaction, monitoring and early warning systems. Instruments concern for example control of urban development, supporting residential activities in city centres, control of location of shopping malls, preventing long commuting trips, reduction of transportation need and car dependency, promotion of walking, cycling and public transport and eco-managed telework. (au)

  10. Unrecorded alcohol consumption: its economics and its effects on alcohol control in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, S; Osterberg, E

    2000-12-01

    The starting point of this paper is the fact that no country has complete records of alcohol consumption. In addition to being a matter or statistical accuracy, unrecorded alcohol also plays an important role in alcohol policy discussions. Furthermore, its quantity is bound to basic economic laws. These latter two aspects are the main interest in this paper, which discusses, first, what is really meant by unrecorded alcohol consumption and what kind of categories are included in it. The next task is to discuss the economics of different categories of unrecorded alcohol and the mechanisms which lead to increases or decreases in them. The examples in this part of the paper come from the Nordic countries. Arguments about increased smuggling and illegal distilling have always been used against alcohol policy restrictions in the Nordic countries. Recently the level of travellers' alcohol imports and border trade have also been used for the same purpose. In the European Union the task to harmonize alcohol excise taxes is partly given to increased travellers' duty-free allowances and market forces. This policy has already led to reductions in alcohol taxation both in Denmark and Sweden.

  11. Parents' labour market participation as a predictor of children's health and wellbeing: a comparative study in five Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt Pedersen, C; Madsen, Mette

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between parents' labour market participation and children's health and wellbeing. DESIGN: Parent reported data on health and wellbeing among their children from the survey Health and welfare among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries, 1996. A cross...... significant. Health outcomes and parents' labour market participation were associated in all five countries. CONCLUSIONS: Children in families with no parents employed in the past six months had higher prevalence of ill health and low wellbeing in the five Nordic countries despite differences in employment...... sectional study of random samples of children and their families in five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden). PARTICIPANTS: A total of 10 317 children aged 2-17 years. RESULTS: Children in families with no parents employed in the past six months had higher prevalence...

  12. Video mediated teaching of young students in peripheral regions of the Nordic countries - a discussion of problems and potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal

    Modern labour market is characterized by high educational demands. However, the opportunities for young people living in peripheral regions of countries of meeting such demands are reduced. Modern technology and improvements of video technology widened the possibilities of providing young people...... in these areas with education and has given rise to an increase in the interest of using video mediated teaching. Recent years several experiments have been implemented in Denmark and in the Nordic countries in general. In a Danish region a comprehensive innovation project including video mediated simultaneous...... teaching at two locations was implemented in years 2008 - 2010 (Andreasen, 2012). Drawing on theory of Etienne Wenger (2004) about learning and communities of practice this article discusses results from the dialogue research related to the project. The article will discuss problems and potentials...

  13. Epidemiology of stroke in the elderly in the Nordic countries. Incidence, survival, prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgeir Engstad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review what is known at present with respect to incidence, survival, risk factors and prevalence among the elderly stroke patients in the Nordic countries.Method: This article is based mainly on literature identified through search engines (Mc Master Plus, Cochrane Library, Medline and PubMed, restricted to first-ever stroke in Nordic population-based studies and having applied to the standard WHO definition, a prospective study design and no upper age limit.Results: Data from the Nordic countries show an incidence rate of 1250 to 1796/100 000 in the age group 75-84, and 1628 to 2234 in those above 85 years. The incidence rates are higher among men, but women are expected to contribute more to incident cases due to their higher life expectancy. If the age-specific incidence of stroke remains stable, the proportion of stroke patients aged 80 years and older may reach 50% in a few decades. The elderly stroke patients have a higher 30-days case fatality, and a higher risk of dependency. Better treatment of stroke patients has improved the survival over the last two decades. The prevalence is expected to increase due to the decrease in lethality, a slower fall in incidence and a higher proportion of elderly. Cardiovascular risk factors increase with age. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke mortality in the elderly. Cardioembolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation is the most common stroke subtype in the elderly. Lifestyle risk factors are less prevalent in the older stroke patients.Conclusion: The growing proportion of elderly stroke patients is a major challenge for future stroke care. The elderly stroke patients have a different risk factor profile compared to younger stroke patients. Treatment should focus on regaining independency. The age-specific epidemiology of stroke needs to be studied further in large studies in order to plan for future health care.

  14. Sound classification of dwellings in the Nordic countries – Differences and similarities between the five national schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    having several similarities. In 2012, status is that number and denotations of classes for dwellings are identical in the Nordic countries, but the structures of the standards and several details are quite different. Also the issues dealt with are different. Examples of differences are sound insulation...... for classification of such buildings. This paper presents and compares the main class criteria for sound insulation of dwellings and summarizes differences and similarities in criteria and in structures of standards. Classification schemes for dwellings also exist in several other countries in Europe......In all five Nordic countries, sound classification schemes for dwellings have been published in national standards being implemented and revised gradually since the late 1990s. The national classification criteria for dwellings originate from a common Nordic INSTA-B proposal from the 1990s, thus...

  15. Cesarean section trends in the Nordic Countries – a comparative analysis with the Robson classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pyykönen, Aura; Gissler, Mika; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    (3 398 586) between 2000 and 2011 in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The Robson group distribution, cesarean rate and contribution of each Robson group were analyzed nationally for four 3-year time periods. For each country, we analyzed which groups contributed to the change......Introduction: The cesarean rates are low but increasing in most Nordic countries. Using the Robson classification, we analyzed which obstetric groups have contributed to the changes in the cesarean rates. Material and methods: Retrospective population-based registry study including all deliveries...... in the total cesarean rate. Results: Between the first and the last time period studied, the total cesarean rates increased in Denmark (16.4 to 20.7%), Norway (14.4 to 16.5%) and Sweden (15.5 to 17.1%), but towards the end of our study, the cesarean rates stabilized or even decreased. The increase...

  16. ‘Moderate universalism’ in China and the Nordic countries: reviewing the major challenges in unemployment protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Kongshøj

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid welfare expansion is taking place in China across a range of policy fields. In the Nordic countries, intra-Nordic diversity and significant policy changes are not difficult to identify despite the notion of universal Nordic welfare regimes. This article will bridge these very different worlds of welfare in an effort to classify the Chinese unemployment-protection system with a comparative framework aimed at furthering the emerging Sino-Nordic research dialogue. This research dialogue has gained relevance in recent years with the new official Chinese goal of building a more universal welfare system. Welfare research that includes China from a comparative perspective is still extremely rare. Despite the lofty Chinese goals, many Chinese policy challenges still loom large. These are the rural-urban divide exacerbated by the Chinese household registration system, coverage of unemployment insurance and social assistance, inadequate and declining benefit levels, and, finally, funding issues. As this article will also substantiate, Denmark and Finland are something approaching best cases for illustrating intra-Nordic diversity. As regards the Chinese challenges, it is explained how they can to some extent be understood as the teething troubles of a developmental welfare state, since the Nordic counterparts have faced similar issues during their eras of welfare expansion.

  17. Social Inequalities in Obesity Persist in the Nordic Region Despite Its Relative Affluence and Equity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Maria; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Olafsdottir, Steingerdur

    2014-01-01

    Social inequalities in overweight and obesity (OWOB) have persisted in the affluent and reputedly egalitarian Nordic countries. In this review we examine associations between socioeconomic position (SEP) and OWOB, and secular trends in such associations. Determinants and possible causes of the re......Social inequalities in overweight and obesity (OWOB) have persisted in the affluent and reputedly egalitarian Nordic countries. In this review we examine associations between socioeconomic position (SEP) and OWOB, and secular trends in such associations. Determinants and possible causes...... of the relations are discussed together with opportunities to cope with OWOB as a public health problem. The findings show a persisting inverse social gradient. An interaction between SEP and gender is noted for adults in Denmark, Finland and Iceland and for children in Sweden. There are overall tendencies...... for increased inequality, however no consistent trend for an increased social gradient in OWOB. Reasons that increased inequality does not unequivocally mirror in a steepened social gradient in obesity may include methodological questions as well as societal efforts to counteract obesity. Multi-level efforts...

  18. Parents' labour market participation as a predictor of children's health and wellbeing: a comparative study in five Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt Pedersen, C; Madsen, M

    2002-11-01

    To study the association between parents' labour market participation and children's health and wellbeing. Parent reported data on health and wellbeing among their children from the survey Health and welfare among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries, 1996. A cross sectional study of random samples of children and their families in five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden). A total of 10 317 children aged 2-17 years. Children in families with no parents employed in the past six months had higher prevalence of recurrent psychosomatic symptoms (odds ratio 1.67, 95% confidence intervals 1.16 to 2.40), chronic illness (odds ratio 1.35, 95% confidence intervals 1.00 to 1.84), and low wellbeing (odds ratio 1.47, 95% confidence intervals 1.12 to 1.94). Social class, family type, parents' immigrant status, gender and age of the child, respondent, and country were included as confounders. When social class, family type and the parents' immigrant status (one or more born in the Nordic country versus both born elsewhere) were introduced into the model, the odds ratios were reduced but were still statistically significant. Health outcomes and parents' labour market participation were associated in all five countries. Children in families with no parents employed in the past six months had higher prevalence of ill health and low wellbeing in the five Nordic countries despite differences in employment rates and social benefits.

  19. Democracy, Caring and Competence: Values Perspectives in ECEC Curricula in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Johanna; Purola, Anna-Maija; Johansson, Eva Marianne; Broström, Stig; Emilson, Anette

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how Nordic Early Childhood Education and Care policies frame values education in preschools with a special focus on the values of democracy, caring and competence. The study is part of a larger Nordic project, "Values education in Nordic preschools: Basis of education for tomorrow," the aim of which is…

  20. A bottom-up strategy for establishment of EER in three Nordic countries – the role of networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette; Malmi, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the emergence of an engineering education research (EER) community in three Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland and Sweden. First, an overview of the current state of Nordic EER authorship is produced through statistics on international publication. Then, the history of EER...... and its precursor activities is described in three national narratives. These national storylines are tied together in a description of recent networking activities, aiming to strengthen the EER communities on the Nordic level. Taking these three perspectives together, and drawing on concepts from...... community of practice theory, network theory and learning network theory, we discuss factors behind the differences in the countries, and draw some conclusions about implications for networking activities in a heterogeneous community. Further, we discuss the role of networks for affording a joint identity....

  1. A bottom-up strategy for establishment of EER in three Nordic countries - the role of networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette; Malmi, Lauri; Bernhard, Jonte; Andersson, Pernille

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates the emergence of an engineering education research (EER) community in three Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland and Sweden. First, an overview of the current state of Nordic EER authorship is produced through statistics on international publication. Then, the history of EER and its precursor activities is described in three national narratives. These national storylines are tied together in a description of recent networking activities, aiming to strengthen the EER communities on the Nordic level. Taking these three perspectives together, and drawing on concepts from community of practice theory, network theory and learning network theory, we discuss factors behind the differences in the countries, and draw some conclusions about implications for networking activities in a heterogeneous community. Further, we discuss the role of networks for affording a joint identity.

  2. Sampling methods. A survey of methods in use in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, M.

    2000-10-01

    This report is a survey of sampling techniques currently in use for radioactivity measurements in the Nordic countries, but restricted to sampling techniques for pasture, soil and deposition in emergency situations. It is found that the participating laboratories apply similar sampling procedures for pasture, including cutting height and size of sampled areas. Soil samples are generally taken by some sort of corer of different diameter. The number of cores taken varies, different sampling patterns are used, and pooling of the samples is done by some of the laboratories. The analysis of pasture and of soil is made with Nal-detectors or by high-resolution gamma spectrometry on fresh or dried samples. Precipitation collectors of a range of sizes are used to determine the activity concentration in precipitation and of dry deposited radionuclides. The analysis is made with high-resolution gamma-spectrometry, either directly on a water sample or on ion exchange resins. (au)

  3. A new division of the Nordic countries into potential price regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the division of the Nordic countries into electric spot regions (potential price regions) should be changed. This implies, among other things, that Sweden is divided into three price regions. The price regions will be used for dealing with large bottlenecks, while small bottlenecks will be handled by means of countertrade. Will the change increase the risk of market power? Probably not. The present arrangement offers about equally good possibilities to exercise market power and causes price signals in general to become erroneous and that trade becomes limited. The absence of price limits in Sweden will probably not increase competition by much since the same producers are numerous on both sides of the limits. Price regions in Sweden may sharpen competition between producers in each region and producers in adjacent regions outside of Sweden

  4. Examination of lifestyle factors and diseases in teaching periodontology in dental education in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Christensen, Lisa Bøge

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lifestyle and general diseases are important for the development of periodontitis and other diseases in the oral cavity. Therefore, knowledge on lifestyle factors must be part of the dental curriculum. However, a search for information in the literature databases gave meagre results......, was sent to the chairs of the departments of periodontology in the Nordic countries. The questions concerned extent, curriculum structure, educational method, content, assessment and evaluation of the education. RESULTS: Education on lifestyle factors took place at all dental schools, but the extent......, content and placement in the curriculum varied. In some schools, more than 10 lessons were scheduled; two schools had only 3-5 lessons. The education of lifestyle factors was prioritised highest in the departments of periodontology followed by cariology and general health. Despite differences...

  5. Prevalence of Child Sexual Abuse in the Nordic Countries: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppen, Kathrine; Haugland, Siren; Svedin, Carl Göran; Mæhle, Magne; Breivik, Kyrre

    2016-01-01

    This review examined child sexual abuse in the Nordic countries focusing on prevalence rates and victims' age and relationship to the perpetrator. The results show a prevalence of child sexual abuse (broadly defined) between 3-23% for boys and 11-36% for girls. The prevalence rates for contact abuse were 1-12% for boys and 6-30% for girls, while 0.3-6.8% of the boys and 1.1-13.5% of the girls reported penetrating abuse. The findings suggest an increased risk of abuse from early adolescence. In adolescence, peers may constitute the largest group of perpetrators. The results highlight the need for preventive efforts also targeting peer abuse. Future research should include cross-national and repeated studies using comparable methodology.

  6. Interoperating AliEn and ARC for a Distributed Tier1 in the Nordic Countries

    CERN Document Server

    Gros, Philippe; Lindemann, Jonas; Saiz, Pablo; Zarochentsev, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    To reach its large computing needs, the ALICE experiment at CERN has developed its own middleware called AliEn, centralised and relying on pilot jobs. One of its strength is the automatic installation of the required packages. The Nordic countries have offered a distributed Tier-1 centre for the CERN experiments, where the job management should be done with the NorduGrid middleware ARC. We have developed an interoperation module to allow to unify several computing sites using ARC, and make them look like a single site from the point of view of AliEn. A prototype has been completed and tested out of production. This talk will present implementation details of the system and its performance in tests.

  7. Reverberation time in class rooms – Comparison of regulations and classification criteria in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Brunskog, Jonas; Hoffmeyer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory requirements or guidelines for classroom reverberation time exist in all five Nordic countries and in most of Europe – as well as other acoustic criteria for schools, e.g. concerning airborne and impact sound insulation, facade sound insulation and installation noise. There are several...... reasons for having such requirements: Improving learning efficiency for pupils and work conditions for teachers and reducing noise levels, thus increasing comfort for everyone. Instead of including acoustic regulatory requirements for schools directly in the building regulations, Iceland, Norway...... and Sweden have introduced acoustic quality classes A, B, C and D in national standards with class C referred to as regulatory requirements. These national classification standards are dealing with acoustic classes for several types of buildings. A classification scheme also exists in Finland...

  8. Sampling methods for pasture, soil and deposition for radioactivity emergency preparedness in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, M.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare sampling techniques for pasture, soil and deposition, planned for radioactivity surveillance in emergency situations in the Nordic countries. The basis of the survey was a questionnaire, sent to radiation protection authorities and laboratories. Sampling of pasture is performed with a cutting height between 1 and 5 cm above the ground from an area of about 1 m 2 . The sampling plots are usually randomly positioned. Soil samples, 3 to 20 cores in various patterns, are generally taken by a corer of varying diameter. For deposition sampling, precipitation collectors of different sizes are used. When comparing results, the differences between laboratories should be borne in mind so that proper corrections can be made. It is, however, important to consider that, especially in an emergency situation, the use of standardised methods may worsen the results if these methods are not part of the daily work. (orig.)

  9. Health Inequalities during the First 1000 days in EU and Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    -for-gestational age (LGA) newborns; furthermore, the prevalence of both breast-feeding rates and correct infant feeding practices is lower in mothers with low levels of education. Opportunities to reduce the social gradient in health inequalities in Nordic countries by intervening during the first 1000 days...... to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months. Moreover, it is key for parents to learn about “anticipatory feeding” methods and to know when, what and how much safe, nutritious foods to feed their infant. A more “joined up” health sector requires much better integration and communication between maternal and infant...... benefits. Central governments can initiate joined-up approaches through creating joint priorities and building social safety-nets for the most disadvantaged. This includes honouring pledges concerning the Convention of Rights of Child and other UN Resolutions, including the length of paid maternity leave...

  10. Laboratory study of subjective perceptions to low temperature heating systems with exhaust ventilation in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Quan; Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2017-01-01

    Given the global trends of rising energy demand and the increasing utilization of low-grade renewable energy, low-temperature heating systems can play key roles in improving building energy efficiency while providing a comfortable indoor environment. To meet the need to retrofit existing buildings...... in Nordic countries for greater energy efficiency, this study focused on human subjects’ thermal sensation, thermal comfort, thermal acceptability, draft acceptability, and perceived air quality when three low-temperature heating systems were used: conventional radiator, ventilation radiator, or floor...... heating with exhaust ventilation. Human subject tests were carried out in the climate chamber at the Technical University of Denmark. In total, 24 human subjects, 12 females and 12 males, participated in the tests during the winter season. The results show that no significant differences in thermal...

  11. Business models for full service energy renovation of single-family houses in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahapatra, Krushna; Gustavsson, Leif; Haavik, Trond

    2013-01-01

    the similarities are on how the service is provided. Even though there is strong business potential for one-stop-shop energy renovation concept, still it has been somewhat difficult to start or run such a business. Various options to overcome the hindrances to promote energy efficient renovation of detached houses...... markets are dominated by handicraft-based individual solutions. In this paper we have analyzed the opportunities for implementation of one-stop-shop business models where an overall contractor offers full-service renovation packages including consulting, independent energy audit, renovation work, follow......-up (independent quality control and commissioning) and financing. A comparative assessment of emerging business models in the Nordic countries shows that different types of actors can provide such a service. Financing is included in some models. There are differences in how customers are contacted, while...

  12. Joint analysis by the Nordic countries of a hepatitis Ao utbreak, October 2012 to June 2013: frozen strawberries suspected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethelberg, S.; Gillesberg Lassen, S.; Mølbak, K.

    2013-01-01

    The Nordic countries faced a food-borne outbreak of hepatitis A that started in October 2012 and was ongoing with 103 reported cases as of 27 June 2013. A case–control study in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, combined with trace-back investigations, has identified frozen strawberries...

  13. Drug costs and benefits of medical treatments in high-unmet need solid tumours in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osterlund, P; Sorbye, H; Pfeiffer, P.

    2016-01-01

    -unmet need solid tumour indications in Nordic countries (Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). Methods: For a selected number of cancer dugs, approved for metastatic cancer or non-curable treatment intention patients by the European Medicine Agency (EMA) after 2000, and indicated in high-unmet need...

  14. More for the money, but an impaired environment. The electricity sector in the Nordic countries from plan to realty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowitz, Einar; Rosnes, Orvika; Vennemo, Haakon

    2001-01-01

    Ten years after the reformation of the power market in the Nordic countries was begun, this article asks: What was the result of the reform? By means of a numerical equilibrium model the article discusses weather the power reform gives money back for the money invested by society in this sector. The answer is yes, but the environment is loosing

  15. Causality, selectivity or artefacts? Why socioeconomic inequalities in health are not smallest in the Nordic countries : Commentaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijts, T.; Eikemo, T.A

    2009-01-01

    Commentaries: The Nordic welfare states aim at providing equality of the highest standards for all their citizens. However, numerous studies have demonstrated that socioeconomic inequalities in morbidity and mortality are not among the smallest in these countries as compared with other European

  16. Travel-associated gonorrhoea in four Nordic countries, 2008 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauté, Julien; Cowan, Susan; Hiltunen-Back, Eija; Kløvstad, Hilde; Velicko, Inga; Spiteri, Gianfranco

    2017-05-18

    Travel may be associated with a higher risk of gonorrhoea and infection by antibiotic-resistant strains. The objective of this study was to estimate the risk for gonorrhoea among travellers from four Nordic European countries using surveillance data and to identify at-risk travellers to help target interventions. We retrieved gonorrhoea surveillance data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden and tourism denominator data from the Statistical Office of the European Union. A travel-associated case of gonorrhoea was defined as one for which the reported country of infection differed from the reporting country. During 2008-2013, the four countries reported 3,224 travel-associated gonorrhoea cases, of which 53% were among individuals below 35 years of age. The overall risk associated with travel abroad was 2.4 cases per million nights abroad. The highest risk was observed with travel to Asia (9.4). Cases more likely to be reported as travel-associated were: males, heterosexuals of both sexes, people older than 65 years, and foreign-born individuals. More effective interventions targeting young adults and other at-risk groups are needed. The use of travel-planning websites and social media should be explored further. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  17. Nordic cooperation within natural gas research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edna, O.-J.

    1993-01-01

    Nordic cooperation within natural gas research is discussed. A reorganization of this cooperation has recently taken place. It is explained that common Nordic resources are now to be concentrated within 7 areas, one of which is the area of energy/industrial policies, regional policies and agriculture and forestry, all under the common heading of ''Economy''. The plan of activities within this area includes international cooperation within the European Communities, the European Energy Charter, the International Energy Agency and will involve the energy policy situation in eastern Europe and the Baltic countries, the electric power and natural gas markets in the northern countries, energy related environmental questions and Nordic energy research cooperation. Nordic research activities constitute 2% of research resources within the OECD. The basis for Nordic research cooperation (for example a common cultural background) is described, and suggestions are made as to how it should be administrated. The Nordic energy research programme for 1991-1994 embodies bioenergy and the environment, fuel cells, energy and the society, solid fuels, district heating and petroleum technology. The status report for the nordic gas market, which represents the Nordic gas companies' evaluation of the Nordic gas market, is summarized, and Nordic research activities related to gas utilization are shortly commented upon. (AB)

  18. Estimation of CO{sub 2}-emissions from Fires in Dwellings, Schools and Cars in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, Per; Simonson McNamee, Margaret

    2009-07-01

    Updated estimates of emissions from fires in dwellings, schools, pre schools and cars are presented for the Nordic countries with the exception of Iceland. The updated emissions are calculated based on fire statistics from 2007 and are compared to results previously presented for 1994 in Sweden. To put the fire emissions data into perspective they are also compared to national estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions as reported by the Swedish EPA to the EU in their National Inventory Report for 2007. The statistical data on fires for Sweden for 2007 is more reliable compared with the data for 1994, which strengthens the updated emission estimate. The major uncertainty in the fire data used for the emission estimate is the interpretation of fire spread which is based on rather crude assumptions. In particular in the case of houses the fire spread area used for the estimate may be an exaggeration thereby giving a possible overestimation of the estimated emissions. Data indicates that the total emission of CO{sub 2} from fires in dwellings (including single family homes, semi-detached houses, summer houses and apartments) in Sweden 2007 is 15,5 kton. Similar values for Denmark (4,1 kton), Finland (6,9 kton) and Norway (6,4 kton). Similar data for school/preschool and car fires indicate that emissions in Sweden are higher than in the other Nordic countries for these categories as well although not by as great an amount. Finally, a comparison between emissions data from other sources of CO{sub 2} and those from fires indicate that emissions of CO{sub 2} from fires are minor compared to most other sources. The previous study based on statistics from 1994 also concluded that fires are a minor source of CO{sub 2} but a relatively significant source of, e.g., particulate matter, VOC, PAH and other large organic species

  19. A review of countries' pharmacist-patient communication legal requirements on prescription medications and alignment with practice: Comparison of Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensberg, Karin; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark; Björnsdottir, Ingunn

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacist-patient communication around prescription medications can optimize treatment outcomes. Society's expectations of pharmacist-patient communication around medications can be expressed in legislation, economic incentives, and authority control. In this study, the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden provide the legislative examples and can be used as a platform to discuss how society's expectations, professional visions, and practice are aligning. The overall aim of this study was to describe society's expectations of pharmacist-patient communication around medications as expressed by the state in Nordic legislation, economic incentives and authority control. Additionally, this study describes how the states govern Nordic pharmacists in different pharmacy systems. A legal review was performed using online legislative databases. Regulating authorities were contacted to gather supplementary information. Thereafter, a qualitative document analysis was conducted. The Nordic countries regulate staff-patient communication by using broad laws. The legislation's main focus during dispensing is information on the use of medications, but also generic substitution and pricing. Pharmacies should have internal routines for this in place. Pharmacists' obligation to keep a journal on advice given during dispensing is ambiguously regulated. The economic incentives for communication on prescription medication during dispensing are included in the general pharmacy mark-up. Today's authority control focuses on the pharmacy management and appears to primarily evaluate structure indicators of communication, for example, if there is a routine method of counseling available. Various countries throughout the world differ in their requirements for pharmacy staff to communicate on the use of medicines during dispensing. The Nordic countries all require such communication, which aligns with professional visions. Regardless of the pharmacy system, the

  20. Occupational variation in incidence of bladder cancer: a comparison of population-representative cohorts from Nordic countries and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; MacLeod, Jill; Demers, Paul A; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Lynge, Elsebeth; Sparen, Pär; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Anne Harris, M; Tjepkema, Michael; Peters, Paul A; Pukkala, Eero

    2017-08-04

    The objective of this study was to compare occupational variation of the risk of bladder cancer in the Nordic countries and Canada. In the Nordic Occupational Cancer study (NOCCA), 73 653 bladder cancer cases were observed during follow-up of 141.6 million person-years. In the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC), 8170 cases were observed during the follow-up of 36.7 million person-years. Standardised incidence ratios with 95% CI were estimated for 53 occupations in the NOCCA cohort and HR with 95% CIs were estimated for 42 occupations in the CanCHEC. Elevated risks of bladder cancer were observed among hairdressers, printers, sales workers, plumbers, painters, miners and laundry workers. Teachers and agricultural workers had reduced risk of bladder cancer in both cohorts. Chimney-sweeps, tobacco workers and waiters had about 1.5-fold risk in the Nordic countries; no risk estimates for these categories were given from the CanCHEC cohort. We observed different occupational patterns in risk of bladder cancer in Nordic countries and Canada. The only occupation with similarly increased risk was observed among sales workers. Differences in smoking across occupational groups may explain some, but not all, of this variation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Liver transplantation in the Nordic countries – An intention to treat and post-transplant analysis from The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry 1982–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosby, Bjarte; Melum, Espen; Bjøro, Kristian; Bennet, William; Rasmussen, Allan; Andersen, Ina Marie; Castedal, Maria; Olausson, Michael; Wibeck, Christina; Gotlieb, Mette; Gjertsen, Henrik; Toivonen, Leena; Foss, Stein; Makisalo, Heikki; Nordin, Arno; Sanengen, Truls; Bergquist, Annika; Larsson, Marie E.; Soderdahl, Gunnar; Nowak, Greg; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Isoniemi, Helena; Keiding, Susanne; Foss, Aksel; Line, Pål-Dag; Friman, Styrbjörn; Schrumpf, Erik; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Höckerstedt, Krister; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim and background. The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry (NLTR) accounts for all liver transplants performed in the Nordic countries since the start of the transplant program in 1982. Due to short waiting times, donor liver allocation has been made without considerations of the model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score. We aimed to summarize key outcome measures and developments for the activity up to December 2013. Materials and methods. The registry is integrated with the operational waiting-list and liver allocation system of Scandiatransplant (www.scandiatransplant.org) and accounted at the end of 2013 for 6019 patients out of whom 5198 were transplanted. Data for recipient and donor characteristics and relevant end-points retransplantation and death are manually curated on an annual basis to allow for statistical analysis and the annual report. Results. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, acute hepatic failure, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the five most frequent diagnoses (accounting for 15.3%, 10.8%, 10.6%, 9.3% and 9.0% of all transplants, respectively). Median waiting time for non-urgent liver transplantation during the last 10-year period was 39 days. Outcome has improved over time, and for patients transplanted during 2004–2013, overall one-, five- and 10-year survival rates were 91%, 80% and 71%, respectively. In an intention-to-treat analysis, corresponding numbers during the same time period were 87%, 75% and 66%, respectively. Conclusion. The liver transplant program in the Nordic countries provides comparable outcomes to programs with a MELD-based donor liver allocation system. Unique features comprise the diagnostic spectrum, waiting times and the availability of an integrated waiting list and transplant registry (NLTR). PMID:25959101

  2. CO{sub 2} mitigation costs and ancillary benefits in the Nordic countries, the UK and Ireland: A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kverndokk, Snorre; Rosendahl, Knut Einar

    2000-07-01

    This paper provides a survey of top-down modelling studies on mitigation costs and ancillary benefits in the Nordic countries, the UK and Ireland. Special emphasis is put on results concerning revenue recycling, double dividend, distributional effects and ancillary benefits. According to the papers surveyed, modest emissions restrictions as those given by the Kyoto Protocol, can be met without substantial costs for the countries studied. (Author)

  3. Transfer of 137Cs to cows' milk in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solheim Hansen, H.; Andersson, I.

    1994-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the transfer of Chernobyl derived 137 Cs cows' milk in the different Nordic countries. A compilation is given of data on 137 Cs levels in both dairy milk and milk from individual farms. In 1986 and 1987 the levels of 137 Cs were higest in Finland and Norway, intermediate in Sweden, the Faroe Islands and Iceland ( 137 Cs from global fallout only) and lowest in Denmark. The aggregated transfer coefficient (T a g) to cows' milk was 2-10 times higher in the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Norway compared to that in Denmark, Finland and Sweden for all years after 1986. The effective ecological half-life (T 1/2ecol ) for dairy cows' milk ranged from 1-2.3 y for all countries, except Iceland where the T 1/2ecol was 18.4 y (global fallout). It was therefore concluded that cows' milk production in the Faroe Islands and Norway was most sensitive to the Chernobyl 137 Cs fallout. Though milk production systems and management systems change over time and could alter the sensitivity to 137 Cs fallout, it is concluded that the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Norway would be most susceptible to future 137 Cs fallout. (orig.)

  4. Soil development in the Nordic countries - Identification and quantification of factors and processes, and prerequisites for biological primary production. Extended abstracts from a Nordic Workshop 6-9 September 1994, Asa, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Mats [ed.

    1996-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from research presentations during a Nordic workshop at Asa in Sweden, September 6-9th 1994. The main goal with the workshop was to give insight in ongoing pedological research in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Further aims were to form a basis for co-ordinated research that takes advantage of the amplitude in soils and climate, and scientific competence in the Nordic countries. The intention was also to initiate a Nordic soil data-bank to be used in research and teaching. Focus was placed on podzolised soils. Separate inputs have been made for all the 14 abstracts

  5. The Current State and Developments in Higher Education in Gerontology in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietanen, Heidi; Lyyra, Tiina-Mari; Parkatti, Terttu; Heikkinen, Eino

    2012-01-01

    The growing size of the older population challenges not only researchers but also higher education in gerontology. On the basis of an online survey the authors describe the situation of Nordic higher education in gerontology in 2008 and 2009 and also give some good examples of Nordic- and European-level collaboration. The survey results showed…

  6. The challenges of military medical education and training for physicians and nurses in the Nordic countries - an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonesson, Linda; Boffard, Kenneth; Lundberg, Lars; Rydmark, Martin; Karlgren, Klas

    2017-04-11

    Development and use of e-learning has not taken place to the same extent in military medicine in the Nordic countries. The aim was to explore the similarities and differences in education and training in military medicine for health professionals in the Nordic countries, and more specifically to identify the specific challenges regarding education and training of military medicine, and how e-learning is used at present and the opportunities for the future. Key educators within military medicine in the Nordic countries, as approved by the respective Surgeons General, were interviewed and the interviews were analyzed using content analysis. The data showed that all Nordic countries cooperate in the field of military medical training to some extent. The models of recruitment and employment of health professionals differed as well as the degree of political support. These differences affected the ability for health professionals to gain actual experience from the military environment. To improve the quality of medical education and training, attempts were made to recruit physicians. The recruitment of physicians was considered a challenge which had resulted in disruptions of courses, training programs and maintenance of accreditation. The Nordic countries were described as having commonalities in the military medical systems and common needs for international collaboration within training, but differing in the range of education and training. Gaps were identified in methods for transferring outcomes from education into practice, as well as regarding evaluation and feedback of outcomes to military medicine. The educational tradition was described as oriented towards practical skills training without requirements on pedagogical education of educators. The results confirmed previous studies showing that e-learning was underutilized. Contextual understanding and experience of healthcare were seen as crucial factors for successful e-learning development. Extended Nordic

  7. Assessing the link between health care utilisation in general practice and morbidity patterns in the elderly in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Anders; Kristensen, Troels; Ranstad, Karin

    important areas of healthcare utilisation in general practice in the Nordic countries. In the future, this demand for healthcare services among the elderly is expected to increase. For instance, it is likely that people live longer and advanced technologies continue to be developed, affecting demand...... and diabetes). Today we have limited information on the need for social services and health care services for the elderly in the Nordic countries. There is a need for improved understanding of variation in healthcare utilization and methods to measure the actual need for healthcare services among older......Objectives: The objective is to describe and analyze the prevalence of comorbidity and multimorbidity among older people with extensive and complex care needs. Next, the main objective is to present and discuss papers on the association between healthcare utilisation in general practice...

  8. Sound insulation and reverberation time for classrooms - Criteria in regulations and classification schemes in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic regulations or guidelines for schools exist in all five Nordic countries. The acoustic criteria depend on room uses and deal with airborne and impact sound insulation, reverberation time, sound absorption, traffic noise, service equipment noise and other acoustic performance...... have become more extensive and stricter during the last two decades. The paper focuses on comparison of sound insulation and reverberation time criteria for classrooms in regulations and classification schemes in the Nordic countries. Limit values and changes over time will be discussed as well as how...... not identical. The national criteria for quality level C correspond to the national regulations or recommendations for new-build. The quality levels A and B are intended to define better acoustic performance than C, and D lower performance. Typically, acoustic regulations and classification criteria for schools...

  9. Parents' labour market participation as predictor of children's well-being: changes from 1984 to 1996 in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Charlotte R; Holstein, Bjørn E; Köhler, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study analysed the influence of parents' labour market participation on their children's well-being in the five Nordic countries, and the changes from 1984 to 1996, during which unemployment rates generally rose in the Nordic countries. METHODS: Parent-reported questionnaire data...... from two cross-sectional studies, 12 years apart, with 15,354 (in 1984) and 15,255 (in 1996) randomly selected children aged 2-17 years. The response rates were 67.0% (n=10290) and 67.6% (n=10317), respectively. The parents' assessment of their children's well-being was measured by six items......, with three items focusing on psychological functioning and three items on social functioning. RESULTS: The association between parents' labour market participation and children's well-being changed from 1984 to 1996. In 1984, more children in families with paid work had low well-being than did children...

  10. Socio-economic inequality in preterm birth: a comparative study of the Nordic countries from 1981 to 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christina B; Mortensen, Laust H; Morgen, Camilla S

    2009-01-01

    During the 1980s and 1990s, there were large social and structural changes within the Nordic countries. Here we examine time changes in risks of preterm birth by maternal educational attainment in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Information on gestational age and maternal socio-economic posi......During the 1980s and 1990s, there were large social and structural changes within the Nordic countries. Here we examine time changes in risks of preterm birth by maternal educational attainment in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Information on gestational age and maternal socio......-economic position was obtained from the NorCHASE database, which includes comparable population-based register data of births from Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway from 1981 to 2000. The risks of very preterm birth (12 years of education, mothers with...

  11. TROUBLING GENDER EQUALITY: REVISITING GENDER EQUALITY WORK IN THE FAMOUS NORDIC MODEL COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotta Edström

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns gender equality work, that is, those educational and workplace activities that involve the promotion of gender equality. It is based on research conducted in Sweden and Finland, and focuses on the period during which the public sector has become more market-oriented and project-based all over the Nordic countries. The consequences of this development on gender equality work have not yet been thoroughly analysed. Our joint empirical analysis is based on discourse-analytic methodology and two previous empirical studies. By analysing interviews conducted with people involved in gender equality work, this article emphasises the effects of market-oriented and project-based gender equality work in education and working life in Sweden and in Finland. The findings highlight an alliance between projectisation and heteronormativity that acts to regulate how gender equality ought to be talked about in order for its issues to be heard. A persistently constructed ‘remedy’ to ‘the gender equality problem’ is that girls and women are positioned as ‘needing’ to change more than boys and men, by adopting more traditionally ‘masculine manners’ and choosing to work in more ‘masculine sectors’. The findings also show that the constitutive forces of these discourses provide little leeway for critical perspectives.

  12. Fatal poisonings in young drug addicts in the Nordic countries: a comparison between 1984–1985 and 1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Anni; Teige, Brita; Holmgren, Per

    1996-01-01

    Fatal poisonings among young drug addicts (15–34 years) in the five Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden in 1991 were investigated and compared to a similar investigation for 1984–1985 (Sweden for 1984 only). A common definition of ‘drug addict’ has been applied...... by the participating countries. In both investigations, the greatest number of drug addict deaths was seen in Denmark calculated per 105 inhabitants, followed in descending order by Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland. An increased number of deaths was observed from 1984–1985 to 1991 in all five countries...

  13. HIV-1 transmission between MSM and heterosexuals, and increasing proportions of circulating recombinant forms in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Mild, Mattias; Audelin, Anne; Fonager, Jannik; Skar, Helena; Bruun Jørgensen, Louise; Liitsola, Kirsi; Björkman, Per; Bratt, Göran; Gisslén, Magnus; Sönnerborg, Anders; Nielsen, Claus; Medstrand, Patrik; Albert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Increased knowledge about HIV-1 transmission dynamics in different transmission groups and geographical regions is fundamental for assessing and designing prevention efforts against HIV-1 spread. Since the first reported cases of HIV infection during the early 1980s, the HIV-1 epidemic in the Nordic countries has been dominated by HIV-1 subtype B and MSM transmission. HIV-1 pol sequences and clinical data of 51 per cent of all newly diagnosed HIV-1 infections in Sweden, Denmark, and Finland in the period 2000–2012 (N = 3,802) were analysed together with a large reference sequence dataset (N = 4,537) by trend analysis and phylogenetics. Analysis of the eight dominating subtypes and CRFs in the Nordic countries (A, B, C, D, G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, and CRF06_cpx) showed that the subtype B proportion decreased while the CRF proportion increased over the study period. A majority (57 per cent) of the Nordic sequences formed transmission clusters, with evidence of mixing both geographically and between transmission groups. Detailed analyses showed multiple occasions of transmissions from MSM to heterosexuals and that active transmission clusters more often involved single than multiple Nordic countries. The strongest geographical link was between Denmark and Sweden. Finally, Denmark had a larger proportion of heterosexual domestic spread of HIV-1 subtype B (75 per cent) compared with Sweden (49 per cent) and Finland (57 per cent). We describe different HIV-1 transmission patterns between countries and transmission groups in a large geographical region. Our results may have implications for public health interventions in targeting HIV-1 transmission networks and identifying where to introduce such interventions. PMID:27774303

  14. Long-term survival in patients hospitalized for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a prospective observational study in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudmundsson G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gunnar Gudmundsson,1,2 Charlotte Suppli Ulrik,3 Thorarinn Gislason,1,2 Eva Lindberg,4 Eva Brøndum,3 Per Bakke,5 Christer Janson31Department of Respiratory Medicine, Allergy and Sleep, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; 3Department of Respiratory Diseases, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; 5Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, NorwayBackground and aim: Mortality rate is high in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Our aim was to investigate long-term mortality and associated risk factors in COPD patients previously hospitalized for a COPD exacerbation.Methods: A total of 256 patients from the Nordic countries were followed for 8.7 ± 0.4 years after the index hospitalization in 2000–2001. Prior to discharge, the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire was administered and data on therapy and comorbidities were obtained. Information on long-term mortality was obtained from national registries in each of the Nordic countries.Results: In total, 202 patients (79% died during the follow up period, whereas 54 (21% were still alive. Primary cause of death was respiratory (n = 116, cardiovascular (n = 43, malignancy (n = 28, other (n = 10, or unknown (n = 5. Mortality was related to older age, with a hazard risk ratio (HRR of 1.75 per 10 years, lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 (HRR 0.80, body mass index (BMI <20 kg/m2 (HRR 3.21, and diabetes (HRR 3.02. Older age, lower BMI, and diabetes were related to both respiratory and cardiovascular mortality. An association was also found between lower FEV1 and respiratory mortality, whereas mortality was not significantly associated with therapy, anxiety, or depression.Conclusion: Almost four out of five patients died within 9 years following an admission

  15. The association of employment status and family status with health among women and men in four Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, E; Lahelma, E; Saastamoinen, P; Elstad, J-I

    2005-01-01

    The Nordic countries have relatively equal employment participation between men and women, but some differences between countries exist in labour market participation. The aim was to examine the association between employment status and health among women and men in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, and analyse whether this association is modified by marital status and parental status. The data come from nationally representative cross-sectional surveys carried out in Denmark (n = 2,209), Finland (n = 4,604), Norway (n = 1,844) and Sweden (n = 5,360) in 1994-95. Women and men aged 25-49 were included. Employment status was categorized into full-time employed, part-time employed, unemployed, and housewives among women and into employed and unemployed among men. Health was measured by perceived health and limiting longstanding illness. Logistic regression analysis was used, adjusting for age and education. Marital status and parental status were analysed as modifying factors. The non-employed were more likely to report perceived health as below good and limiting longstanding illness than the employed among both women and men. The association between employment status and perceived health remained unchanged when marital status and parental status were adjusted for among all men and Finnish women, but the association was slightly strengthened among Danish and Swedish women, with the housewives becoming more likely to report ill health than employed women. The association between employment status and limiting longstanding illness was slightly strengthened among women, and slightly weakened among Norwegian men when marital and parental status were adjusted for. Non-employment was associated with poorer health in all countries, although there are differences in the employment patterns between the countries. Among women marital status and parental status showed a modest or no influence on the association between employment status and health. Among men there was no

  16. Nordic Walking, a therapeutic modality against cancer related fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    González Castro, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Existe evidencia de que el ejercicio físico puede mejorar los síntomas de los pacientes y supervivientes de cáncer y en especial la fatiga relativa al cáncer (FRC). El Nordic Walking (NW) es una novedosa forma de ejercicio físico que presenta ventajas fisiológicas y psicológicas significativas respecto de la marcha normal. Este artículo propone el NW como tratamiento terapéutico alternativo contra la FRC. There is evidence that physical exercise can improve symptoms in cancer patients and ...

  17. Suggested best practice for geotechnical characterisation of permafrost in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Frederik Ancker; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    2012-01-01

    Even though permafrost is a specialty within Nordic geotechnical engineering, engineers and researcher will be faced with managing the consequences of projected climatic influences to construction design in permafrost areas. This requires the determination of the frozen soil engineering propertie...

  18. Exposure to tetrachloroethylene in dry cleaning shops in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Rylander, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene is the dominant solvent used in dry cleaning worldwide and many workers are potentially exposed. We report here on results of 1296 measurements of tetrachloroethylene undertaken in Nordic dry cleaning shops 1947-2001.......Tetrachloroethylene is the dominant solvent used in dry cleaning worldwide and many workers are potentially exposed. We report here on results of 1296 measurements of tetrachloroethylene undertaken in Nordic dry cleaning shops 1947-2001....

  19. A 12-Year Follow-up on the Long-Term Effectiveness of the Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in 4 Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Susanne K; Nygård, Mari; Dillner, Joakim

    2018-01-01

    Background: The long-term effectiveness of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine was assessed by monitoring the combined incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2, CIN3), adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), and cervical cancer related to HPV16 or HPV18. Methods: Women from...... Nordic countries of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden who received a 3-dose regimen of the qHPV vaccine in the beginning of FUTURE II (Females United to Unilaterally Reduce Endo/Ectocervical Disease; V501-015, base study NCT00092534) are followed through different national registries. Effectiveness...

  20. Associations between parents' subjective time pressure and mental health problems among children in the Nordic countries: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur; Bjereld, Ylva; Hensing, Gunnel; Petzold, Max; Povlsen, Lene

    2015-04-10

    The home, the family and the parents represent a context of everyday life that is important for child health and development, with parent-child relationships highlighted as crucial for children's mental health. Time pressure is an emerging feature of modern societies and previous studies indicates that parents with children living at home experience time pressure to a greater extent than people with no children living at home. Previous studies of children's mental health in relation to parents' time pressure are lacking. Hence, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between parents' subjective time pressure and mental health problems among children in the Nordic countries as well as potential disparities between boys and girls in different age groups. 4592 children, aged 4-16 from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, participating in the 2011 version of the NordChild study, were included. The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire was used to measure children's mental health and associations to parents' time pressure were assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Among children of parents experiencing time pressure, 18.6% had mental health problems compared to 10.1% among children of parents experiencing time pressure not or sometimes. The odds of mental health problems were higher among both boys (OR 1.80 95% CI 1.32-2.46) and girls (OR 1.95 95% CI 1.42-2.66) if their parents experienced time pressure when adjusted for financial stress. The highest prevalence of mental health problems in the case of parental time pressure was found among girls 13-16 years old (23.6%) and the lowest prevalence was found among boys 13-16 years old (10.7%). In this study an association between parents' subjective time pressure and increased mental health problems among children was found. Given that time pressure is a growing feature of modern societies, the results might contribute to an explanation as to mental health problems are common among children

  1. Control of high natural activity building materials and land areas in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjoenes, L.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced levels of natural radioactivity in the ground can cause problems with high concentrations of indoor 222 Rn, elevated levels of gamma radiation and natural radioactive elements in drinking water. Of the Nordic countries it is essentially Finland, Norway and Sweden that have problems with enhanced natural radioactivity in the ground and in building materials. Finland and Sweden have among the highest mean 222 Rn concentrations in dwellings in the world, 123 Bq m -3 and 108 Bq m -3 with a corresponding mean annual effective dose of about 2 mSv. In Sweden about 500,000 and in Finland and Norway about 200,000 persons get their drinking water from wells drilled in bedrock. The water from a large number of these wells contain elevated levels of naturally occurring radioactive elements, primarily 222 Rn. The action levels for 222 Rn in dwellings and above-ground workplaces are essentially the same in Finland, Norway and Sweden: 200 Bq m -3 for new buildings and 400 Bq m -3 for existing buildings. For mines and underground excavations, however, there are some differences. The treatment of gamma emitting natural radionuclides in building materials etc. is similar, although there are differences in the degree of control. The action levels for 222 Rn in drinking water differ from 100 Bq l -1 to 500 Bq l -1 . The action level in Finland has the form of an activity index that restricts also other radioactive nuclides. Denmark has not adopted a formal radon policy and has no recommended or legally binding action levels for 222 Rn or any other naturally occurring radionuclides. (author)

  2. Time pressure among parents in the Nordic countries: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur; Petzold, Max; Povlsen, Lene

    2014-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of time pressure experienced by parents in the Nordic countries and examine potential gender disparities as well as associations to parents' family and/or living conditions. 5949 parents of children aged 2-17 years from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, participating in the 2011 version of the NordChild study, reported their experience of time pressure when keeping up with duties of everyday life. A postal questionnaire addressed to the most active caretaker of the child, was used for data gathering and logistic regression analysis applied. The mother was regarded as the primary caregiver in 83.9% of the cases. Of the mothers, 14.2% reported that they experienced time pressure "most often", 54.7 % reported "sometimes" and 31.1 % reported they did "not" experience time pressure at all. Time pressure was experienced by 22.2 % of mothers in Sweden, 18.4% in Finland, 13.7% in Norway and 3.9% in Denmark, and could be associated to lack of support, high educational level, financial stress, young child age and working overtime. The mother is regarded as the child's primary caregiver among the vast majority of families in spite of living in societies with gender-equal family policies. The results indicate that time pressure is embedded in everyday life of mainly highly-educated mothers and those experiencing financial stress and/or lack of social support. No conclusion could be made about time pressure from the "normbreaking" fathers participating in the study, but associations were found to financial stress and lack of support.

  3. Nordic working group on x-ray diagnostics - Practical implementation of the directive on medical exposures in the Nordic EU countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltenburg, H.N.; Groen, P. [National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Herlev (Denmark); Leitz, W. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Servomaa, A. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Einarsson, G. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Reykjavik (Iceland); Olerud, H. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oslo (Norway)

    2003-06-01

    The EU directive on medical exposure, 97/43/EURATOM (referred to in the following as MED) imposes new requirements on hospital departments using ionising radiation for either diagnostics or treatment of illnesses. The directive was approved on 30 June 1997, and the member states were obliged to implement the requirements into national legislation before 13 May 2000. The implementation of a directive of this kind is a complicated process requiring time as well as other resources. The Nordic EU countries (Sweden, Finland and Denmark) must comply with the rules in MED, while this is not the case for Norway and Iceland as EFTA (European Free Trade Association) members, since the agreements between EFTA and EU does not cover the EURATOM treaty. The issues that have to be addressed in the national legislation are justification, optimisation, responsibilities, procedures, training, equipment, special protection during pregnancy and breast-feeding, and potential exposure. A central aspect in MED is the requirement for quality assurance programmes to be established in radiological departments (and in other departments employing ionising radiation). A change of this magnitude in legislation requires adjustments in the routines of the individual departments. The staff in each department needs to prepare and follow procedures and instructions for daily work and also participate in day-to-day quality assurance. A considerable burden has also been laid on the radiation protection authorities in the member states, first in the process of transposing MED into national law or regulations, and secondly in guiding the process of practical implementation. Here we will describe how the individual Nordic EU countries have chosen to implement MED in national legislation and how far the process of complying with the requirements has come so far. Although Norway and Iceland are not required to follow MED, it is still interesting for comparison to include the situation in these countries

  4. Nordic working group on x-ray diagnostics - Practical implementation of the directive on medical exposures in the Nordic EU countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltenburg, H.N.; Groen, P.; Leitz, W.; Servomaa, A.; Einarsson, G.; Olerud, H.

    2003-01-01

    The EU directive on medical exposure, 97/43/EURATOM (referred to in the following as MED) imposes new requirements on hospital departments using ionising radiation for either diagnostics or treatment of illnesses. The directive was approved on 30 June 1997, and the member states were obliged to implement the requirements into national legislation before 13 May 2000. The implementation of a directive of this kind is a complicated process requiring time as well as other resources. The Nordic EU countries (Sweden, Finland and Denmark) must comply with the rules in MED, while this is not the case for Norway and Iceland as EFTA (European Free Trade Association) members, since the agreements between EFTA and EU does not cover the EURATOM treaty. The issues that have to be addressed in the national legislation are justification, optimisation, responsibilities, procedures, training, equipment, special protection during pregnancy and breast-feeding, and potential exposure. A central aspect in MED is the requirement for quality assurance programmes to be established in radiological departments (and in other departments employing ionising radiation). A change of this magnitude in legislation requires adjustments in the routines of the individual departments. The staff in each department needs to prepare and follow procedures and instructions for daily work and also participate in day-to-day quality assurance. A considerable burden has also been laid on the radiation protection authorities in the member states, first in the process of transposing MED into national law or regulations, and secondly in guiding the process of practical implementation. Here we will describe how the individual Nordic EU countries have chosen to implement MED in national legislation and how far the process of complying with the requirements has come so far. Although Norway and Iceland are not required to follow MED, it is still interesting for comparison to include the situation in these countries

  5. Increasing incidence of thyroid cancer in the Nordic countries with main focus on Swedish data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Michael; Hedendahl, Lena; Ahonen, Mikko; Koppel, Tarmo; Hardell, Lennart

    2016-07-07

    Radiofrequency radiation in the frequency range 30 kHz-300 GHz was evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e. 'possibly' carcinogenic to humans, by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO in May 2011. Among the evaluated devices were mobile and cordless phones, since they emit radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). In addition to the brain, another organ, the thyroid gland, also receives high exposure. The incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing in many countries, especially the papillary type that is the most radiosensitive type. We used the Swedish Cancer Register to study the incidence of thyroid cancer during 1970-2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In women, the incidence increased statistically significantly during the whole study period; average annual percentage change (AAPC) +1.19 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) +0.56, +1.83 %). Two joinpoints were detected, 1979 and 2001, with a high increase of the incidence during the last period 2001-2013 with an annual percentage change (APC) of +5.34 % (95 % CI +3.93, +6.77 %). AAPC for all men during 1970-2013 was +0.77 % (95 % CI -0.03, +1.58 %). One joinpoint was detected in 2005 with a statistically significant increase in incidence during 2005-2013; APC +7.56 % (95 % CI +3.34, +11.96 %). Based on NORDCAN data, there was a statistically significant increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in the Nordic countries during the same time period. In both women and men a joinpoint was detected in 2006. The incidence increased during 2006-2013 in women; APC +6.16 % (95 % CI +3.94, +8.42 %) and in men; APC +6.84 % (95 % CI +3.69, +10.08 %), thus showing similar results as the Swedish Cancer Register. Analyses based on data from the Cancer Register showed that the increasing trend in Sweden was mainly caused by thyroid cancer of the papillary type. We postulate that the whole increase cannot be attributed to better diagnostic procedures. Increasing exposure to ionizing

  6. The association between nutritional conditions during World War II and childhood anthropometric variables in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell-Andersen, E; Tretli, S; Bjerknes, R; Forsén, T; Sørensen, T I A; Eriksson, J G; Räsänen, L; Grotmol, T

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the height and weight in Nordic children during the years around World War II (WWII), and compare them with the nutritional situation during the same period. Information on food consumption and energy intake were obtained from the literature. Anthropometric data were collected from the Nordic capitals and cover the period from 1930 to 1960 for ages 7-13 years. The greatest energy restriction took place in Norway (20%), followed by Finland (17%), while Sweden and Denmark had a restriction of 4-7% compared to pre-war levels. The most pronounced effect of WWII on height and weight is seen in Norwegian children, while some effect is observed for the youngest children in Finland. Little or no effect is seen in Sweden and Denmark. The Nordic children were affected by WWII in terms of a transient reduction in temporal trends in height and weight, and the magnitude of this decrease was associated with the severity of the energy restriction prevailing in the respective country during the war. These findings warrant further studies of the chronic diseases associated with height and weight for cohorts being in their growth periods during WWII. Copyright 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  7. Countermeasures to the Chernobyl accident in the Nordic countries: Public reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeberg, L; Rundmo, T; Eraenen, L; Ekstroem, H

    1998-01-01

    of the Chernobyl fall-out were so small that they would not be statistically confirmed. Public health effects were instead associated with stress and anxiety created by (unfounded, according to the experts) fear of radiation. One important difference between the countries is that Norway did not, and does not, have nuclear power while Sweden and Finland do. Compared to Continental Europe and the UK, the Nordic countries tend to be more ethnically homogenous (although this is rapidly changing in Sweden), and possibly less affected by social conflicts and suspected corruption in the political and economical spheres of society. Sweden has a history of non-corrupt and competent authorities, directed by persons appointed largely on the basis of substantial competence rather than political contacts. Although this state of affairs may have been changing during the last few decades, it is probably still true that people have trust in authorities. In contrast, they have little trust in politicians - although they like the democratic system. Possibly, people - at least in Sweden - would like to see more referenda and other types of direct democracy

  8. The effect of the medicine administration route on health-related quality of life: Results from a time trade-off survey in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in 2 Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Tine Rikke; Emborg, Charlotte; Dahlen, Karianne; Bøgelund, Mette; Carlborg, Andreas

    2016-07-16

    Agitation episodes are common among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Oral and intramuscular administration methods are commonly used in pharmacological treatment of acute agitation. Recently, an innovative inhalation product with loxapine(Adasuve®)has become available for treatment of acute agitation episodes associated with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The objective for the present study was to investigate the impact of the pharmacological treatment's administration methods on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in Denmark and Sweden using a time trade-off (TTO) approach. The TTO methodology was used to examine the HRQoL impact of administration method of pharmacological treatment of acute agitation. Data were collected via an internet-based survey, using an existing panel of respondents with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Respondents considered living with schizophrenia/ bipolar disorder, having one yearly agitation episode treated with inhaler better than living with the same conditions and receiving treatment with tablet or injection. The utility value was 0.762 for inhalable treatment, 0.707 for injection and 0.734 for tablet treatment. Patients' preference for treatment delivery options showed that inhalation was associated with a significant utility gain when compared to injection or tablets. Inhalable loxapine may be a new tool for control of agitation episodes for strengthening the patient provider alliance when taking patient's preference for delivery method into consideration.

  9. Nordic Energy basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koljonen, T.; Pursiheimo, E. [VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    2004-01-01

    This report gives numerical data of the existing energy systems in Denmark, Finland, Island, Norway and Sweden. The data includes: 1) Primary fossil fuel production and fuel reserves; 2) Energy production and consumption; 3) Hydrogen production in the Nordic countries; 4) Energy balances of the Nordic countries. The above data has been used as background information during the Nordic H{sub 2} Energy Foresight project. The data has been collected from public literature sources and also from project partners. (au)

  10. Transfer of patients from health care centres to special care services: analysis of travel distances in Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Jari; Kylänen, Marika; Tritter, Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    This paper highlights the importance of analysing patient transportation in Nordic circumpolar areas. The research questions we asked are as follows: How many Finnish patients have been transferred to special care intra-country and inter-country in 2009? Does it make any difference to health care policymakers if patients are transferred inter-country? We analysed the differences in distances from health care centres to special care services within Finland, Sweden and Norway and considered the health care policy implications. An analysis of the time required to drive between service providers using the "Google distance meter" (http://maps.google.com/); conducting interviews with key Finnish stakeholders; and undertaking a quantitative analyses of referral data from the Lapland Hospital District. Finnish patients are generally not transferred for health care services across national borders even if the distances are shorter. Finnish patients have limited access to health care services in circumpolar areas across the Nordic countries for 2 reasons. First, health professionals in Norway and Sweden do not speak Finnish, which presents a language problem. Second, the Social Insurance Institution of Finland does not cover the expenditures of travel or the costs of medicine. In addition, it seems that in circumpolar areas the density of Finnish service providers is greater than Swedish ones, causing many Swedish citizens to transfer to Finnish health care providers every year. However, future research is needed to determine the precise reasons for this.

  11. Fatal poisoning in drug addicts in the Nordic countries in 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Normann, P.T.; Ceder, G.

    2011-01-01

    to obtain national and comparable Nordic data, as well as data to compare with earlier studies in 2002, 1997, and 1991. Norway had the highest incidence of drug addict deaths by poisoning followed by Denmark, with 8.24 and 6.92 per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively. The death rates in Finland (4...

  12. Younger Children in ECEC: Focus on the National Steering Documents in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hännikäinen, Maritta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the national steering documents on early childhood education and care (ECEC) in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, with the focus on children up to the age of three, posing the question: What do these documents tell us about ECEC for younger children in the Nordic early childhood settings?…

  13. Why Aren't All Children in the Nordic Countries Bilingual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove

    1984-01-01

    Examines three Nordic bilingual programs: (1) immersion, where majority children with a high status mother tongue learn a second language; (2) submersion, where minority children with a low status mother tongue are forced to learn the majority language; and (3) language shelter, where minority children learn the majority language as a second…

  14. Trends in Food Habits and Their Relation to Socioeconomic Status among Nordic Adolescents 2001/2002 - 2009/2010

    OpenAIRE

    Fismen, Anne-Siri; Smith, Otto Robert Frans; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Rasmussen, Mette; Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Augustine, Lilly; Ojala, Kristiina; Samdal, Oddrun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have ...

  15. Clinical and genetic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome in the Nordic countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although previous studies have shown that DS-ALL differs clinically and genetically from non-DS-ALL, much remains to be elucidated as regards genetic and prognostic factors in DS-ALL. Methods To address clinical and genetic differences between DS-ALL and non-DS-ALL and to identify prognostic factors in DS-ALL, we ascertained and reviewed all 128 pediatric DS-ALL diagnosed in the Nordic countries between 1981 and 2010. Their clinical and genetic features were compared with those of the 4,647 B-cell precursor (BCP) ALL cases diagnosed during the same time period. Results All 128 DS-ALL were BCP ALL, comprising 2.7% of all such cases. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly (P = 0.026 and P = 0.003, respectively) worse for DS-ALL patients with white blood cell counts ≥50 × 109/l. The age distributions varied between the DS and non-DS cases, with age peaks at 2 and 3 years, respectively; none of the DS patients had infant ALL (P = 0.029). The platelet counts were lower in the DS-ALL group (P = 0.005). Abnormal karyotypes were more common in non-DS-ALL (P < 0.0001), and there was a significant difference in the modal number distribution, with only 2% high hyperdiploid DS-ALL cases (P < 0.0001). The 5-year EFS and 5-year OS were significantly worse for DS-ALL (0.574 and 0.691, respectively) compared with non-DS-ALL (0.783 and 0.894, respectively) in the NOPHO ALL-1992/2000 protocols (P < 0.001). Conclusions The present study adds further support for genetic and clinical differences between DS-ALL and non-DS-ALL. PMID:24726034

  16. Food waste quantification in primary production - The Nordic countries as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartikainen, Hanna; Mogensen, Lisbeth; Svanes, Erik; Franke, Ulrika

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of food waste in the food supply chain has increased, but very few studies have been published on food waste in primary production. The overall aims of this study were to quantify the total amount of food waste in primary production in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark, and to create a framework for how to define and quantify food waste in primary production. The quantification of food waste was based on case studies conducted in the present study and estimates published in scientific literature. The chosen scope of the study was to quantify the amount of edible food (excluding inedible parts like peels and bones) produced for human consumption that did not end up as food. As a result, the quantification was different from the existing guidelines. One of the main differences is that food that ends up as animal feed is included in the present study, whereas this is not the case for the recently launched food waste definition of the FUSIONS project. To distinguish the 'food waste' definition of the present study from the existing definitions and to avoid confusion with established usage of the term, a new term 'side flow' (SF) was introduced as a synonym for food waste in primary production. A rough estimate of the total amount of food waste in primary production in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark was made using SF and 'FUSIONS Food Waste' (FFW) definitions. The SFs in primary production in the four Nordic countries were an estimated 800,000 tonnes per year with an additional 100,000 tonnes per year from the rearing phase of animals. The 900,000 tonnes per year of SF corresponds to 3.7% of the total production of 24,000,000 tonnes per year of edible primary products. When using the FFW definition proposed by the FUSIONS project, the FFW amount was estimated at 330,000 tonnes per year, or 1% of the total production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Consumer perception of food products involving genetic modification: Results from a qualitative study in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2000-01-01

    1. The present study addresses consumer acceptance of food products involving the use of different applications of genetic modification in four Nordic countries. Three food products were used as examples: hard cheese, hard candy, and salmon. Three types of applications of genetic modification were...... in the final product has a clear impact on consumer acceptance. When the GM material is present and viable/able to function, acceptance is lowest. 5. The type of application of genetic modification has an impact on consumer acceptance as well, but it differs across products. Still, there is a clear tendency...

  18. Nordic Energy Technologies : Enabling a sustainable Nordic energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, Amund; Smith, Benjamin

    2009-10-15

    A high current Nordic competence in energy technology and an increased need for funding and international cooperation in the field are the main messages of the report. This report summarizes results from 7 different research projects relating to policies for energy technology, funded by Nordic Energy Research for the period 2007-2008, and provides an analysis of the Nordic innovation systems in the energy sector. The Nordic countries possess a high level of competence in the field of renewable energy technologies. Of the total installed capacity comprises a large share of renewable energy, and Nordic technology companies play an important role in the international market. Especially distinguished wind energy, both in view of the installed power and a global technology sales. Public funding for energy research has experienced a significant decline since the oil crisis of the 1970s, although the figures in recent years has increased a bit. According to the IEA, it will require a significant increase in funding to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit further climate change. The third point highlighted in the report is the importance of international cooperation in energy research. Nordic and international cooperation is necessary in order to reduce duplication and create the synergy needed if we are to achieve our ambitious policy objectives in the climate and energy issue. (AG)

  19. Sedation practice in Nordic and non-Nordic ICUs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Albarran, John W; Ring, Mette

    2013-01-01

    A trend towards lighter sedation has been evident in many intensive care units (ICUs). The aims of the survey were to describe sedation practice in European ICUs and to compare sedation practice in Nordic and non-Nordic countries....

  20. The expansion of English-medium instruction in the Nordic countries: Can top-down university language policies encourage bottom-up disciplinary literacy goals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Airey, John; Lauridsen, Karen M.; Räsänen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    towards English-medium instruction (EMI). In this paper, we discuss the introduction of EMI in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden). We present the educational setting and the EMI debate in each of these countries and summarize relevant research findings. We then make some tentative......Recently, in the wake of the Bologna Declaration and similar international initiatives, there has been a rapid increase in the number of university courses and programmes taught through the medium of English. Surveys have consistently shown the Nordic countries to be at the forefront of this trend...... the discussion of disciplinary literacy goals and require course syllabuses to detail disciplinaryspecific language-learning outcomes....

  1. Long-term Labour Shortage. The Economic Impact of Population Transition and Post-Industrialism on the OECD Countries: the Nordic Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perttu Salmenhaara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey of results about studies on ageing. The data is collected from population projections by the United Nations, OECD, the European Union and the Eurostat.The research question is how population ageing affects the percentage of the working age population in the OECD. Special focus countries are the Nordic countries. The method is to collect together comparable data from these previous studies. The results imply that from 2005 to 2050 the number of the elderly in relation to the working-age population is projected to increase radically. Most advanced national economies are likely to have problems in providing elderly care services and pensions. In addition, post-industrialisation and ethnic discrimination add to the problem by excluding a fair share of the working-age population from the labour market.

  2. A study of phage- and ribotype patterns of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Jensen, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the geographical distribution of phage and ribotypes of Staphylococcus aureus causing bovine mastitis in the 5 Nordic countries. A total of 403 isolates of S. aureus was isolated from 403 different dairy herds. One hundred five strains were isolated...... of the isolates of ribotype 1 belonged to phage type 29/52. This combined type accounted for 17% of all the 403 isolates. These findings show that a large number of different types of S. aureus can be isolated from cases of bovine mastitis. However, few types predominate within different countries....... These predominating types seem to be specific in each country, however, a single type was common for both Denmark, Sweden and Finland. This could suggest differences in the virulence or in modes of transmission of predominating and rare types of S. aureus associated with bovine mastitis....

  3. Emissions and air exposure of carcinogens and co-carcinogens in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Ketzel, Matthias

    This project (KoL 12-08) was performed for the Climate and Air Quality Group (KlimaogLuftgruppen, KoL), Nordic Council of Ministers by atmospheric emission, exposureand epidemiology experts from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Emission inventory methods and exposure models were presented...... to 2010 were compiled and discussed, and modelled andmeasured atmospheric concentrations for 2010 were compiled on regional, urbanand local scales. Nordic maps of emissions and air concentrations of PM2.5, PM10, NOx,NMVOC, benzene, BaP, dioxin, cadmium and nickel were compiled for allaggregated main...... sources, traffic and residential wood combustion. An overview of local studies on exposure for cities or communities with emphasis on wood combustion and traffic and a discussion of existing epidemiological studies on cancer and environment were given...

  4. Creating prospective value chains for renewable road transport energy sources up to 2050 in Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessberg, Nina; Leinonen, Anna; Tuominen, Anu

    2013-01-01

    If the Nordic energy and transport sectors are to meet the 2050 energy and climate policy targets, major systemic changes are necessary. Along with new technologies, changes are required also in other societal functions such as business models and consumer habits. The transition requires...... cooperation between public and private actors. This paper discusses the paradigm change towards 2050 Nordic road transport system based on renewable energy. More precisely, it proposes an approach for creation and analysis of prospective value networks up to the year 2050. The value networks arise from three...... application with a set of practical tools to support development of implementation strategies and policy programmes in the fields of energy and transport....

  5. A ‘Balanced’ Life: Work-Life Balance and Sickness Absence in Four Nordic Countries

    OpenAIRE

    D Antai; A Oke; P Braithwaite; DS Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little attention has been given to the relationship between work-life balance and sickness absence. Objective: To investigate the association between poor work-life balance and sickness absence in 4 Nordic welfare states. Methods: Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed on pooled cross-sectional data of workers aged 15–65 years from Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and Norway (n=4186) obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS). Poor work-lif...

  6. A Cultural History of the Avant-Garde in the Nordic Countries 1950-1975

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , radio, television and the performative arts. It is the first major historical work to consider the Nordic avant-garde in a transnational perspective that includes all the arts and to discuss the role of the avant-garde not only within the aesthetic field but in a broader cultural and political context......: The cultural politics, institutions and new cultural geographies after World War II, new technologies and media, performative strategies, interventions into everyday life and tensions between market and counterculture....

  7. Challenges to Nordic Police Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The paper will cover three main points: A short description of published police research in the Nordic countries; a somewhat longer discussion of the nature of, and challenges to, Nordic police research and, finally, a critique of the homeliness of research.......The paper will cover three main points: A short description of published police research in the Nordic countries; a somewhat longer discussion of the nature of, and challenges to, Nordic police research and, finally, a critique of the homeliness of research....

  8. Incidence of severe hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes in the Nordic countries in the period 2008-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Drivvoll, A K; Aakeson, K

    2017-01-01

    of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and treatment modalities on the frequency of SH; particularly, to explore if a HbA1c target ≤6.7% (50 mmol/mol) is feasible. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on children below 15 years with a diabetes duration more than 1 year, registered in the national childhood diabetes databases......OBJECTIVE: Treatment of type 1 diabetes has been intensified aiming at normalizing blood glucose, which may increase the risk of severe hypoglycemia (SH). We aimed to compare the incidence of SH events in the four Nordic countries Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and to assess the influence...... in the four Nordic countries from 2008 to 2012, were compiled. Data completeness was more than 95%. RESULTS: Totally 8806 (48% females) patients with 29 715 person years were included, mean age and diabetes duration were 11 years and 5.1 years, respectively. The overall rate of SH was 6.0 per 100 patient...

  9. Pros and cons of an expansion of the natural gas system in the Nordic Countries - sensitivity analysis of the scenario results from stage one of the Nordleden project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The report shows that the maximum economic profit from a transnordic gas grid amounts to 5-30 billion SEK (0.5-3 billion USD), depending on scenarios. This holds even under relatively strict CO 2 limitations. The profit is in the same range as the profits from emissions trading or from free trade in electricity in the Nordic market. In absolute numbers, the profit increases with increased energy demand. The natural gas supply could amount to about 300 TWh in year 2030, if the price at the border does not surpass 70 SEK/MWh (7 USD/MWh). The main expansion would be in central power and heat production. However, the report also shows that the transnordic gas grid could become a burden for the Nordic energy system, as the profit could be negative in the case where the investment is done according to the design case, but the gas price gets higher. The worst case could result in a loss of about 30 billion SEK. However, it is probably more realistic to assume that the market actors try to minimize their own risks through long term contracts with fixed prices and volumes, leading to a transfer of the risk to the society as a whole, being forced to renounce cheaper solutions for reaching the environmental goals in the case where natural gas becomes a more expensive fuel than supposed in the planning stage. The corresponding risk is much lower from a CO 2 point of view, i.e. if future CO 2 reduction limit become more strict than in the planning stage, the value of the gas grid is only marginally affected. Sensitivity analysis where the Nordic cooperation is widened to include trade in electricity (which already is a fact) and emission rights show that the optimum natural gas supply is affected, but to a small degree only. The net effect is a certain redistribution of the natural gas use between the countries

  10. Life expectancy and death by diseases of the circulatory system in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Hällgren, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Excess mortality from diseases and medical conditions (natural death) in persons with psychiatric disorders has been extensively reported. Even in the Nordic countries with well-developed welfare systems, register based studies find evidence of an excess mortality. In recent years, cardiac...... mortality and death by diseases of the circulatory system has seen a decline in all the Nordic countries, but a recent paper indicates that women and men in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, who had been hospitalised for a psychotic disorder, had a two to three-fold increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular...... disease. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality by diseases of the circulatory system among patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the three Nordic countries Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. Furthermore, the aim was to examine and compare life expectancy among these patients. Cause...

  11. Melancholy in Nordic Noir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waade, Anne Marit

    2017-01-01

    Nordic noir on screen is characterised by a certain melancholy displayed in the plot, the imagery and the characters. These elements also characterise Scandinavian crime fiction, for example, the troubled protagonists and the cold climate. Nordic noir has attracted considerable interest among...... audiences and academics. However, none of the academic contributions reflect the connection to the historical Nordic melancholy. In this article, I relate Nordic noir to Nordic melancholy in art, philosophy and culture in which melancholy as a romantic ideal was embedded in a particular landscape...

  12. Current use of ultrasound for central vascular access in children and infants in the Nordic countries--a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas C Risom; Rimstad, Ivan Jonassen; Tarpgaard, Mona

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: A cross-sectional survey using an online questionnaire was distributed to one anaesthesiologist at every hospital in the Nordic countries; a total of 177 anaesthesiologists were contacted from July till August 2012. RESULTS: The use of US for placing central venous catheters (CVCs) seems......PURPOSE: The use of ultrasound (US) guidance for central vascular access in children has been advocated as a safer approach compared to traditional landmark techniques. We therefore collected data on the current use of US for central vascular access in children and infants in the Nordic countries...

  13. EXAM-HRA. A comparison between HRA approaches in Nordic countries and in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.; Hussels, U.; Schubert, B.; Maennistoe, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    A joint project called ''EXAM-HRA'' is performed by German, Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants. The working group presently consists of: - Kent Bladh, RAB. - Anders Karlsson, FKA. - Guenter Becker and Marina Proske, RISA. - Ilkka Maennistoeand Jan-Erik Holmberg, VTT. - Lasse Tunturivuori, TVO. - Christian Bjursten Carlsson and Anders Olsson, Scandpower. - Gunnar Johanson and Lisa Fritzson, ES-konsult. The overall project objective is to provide guidance for a ''state of the art'' human reliability analysis (HRA) for purposes of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) to ensure that plant specific properties are properly taken into consideration in the analysis /1/. This will also provide means to improve plant features based on HRA and PSA results as well as providing means to improve Nordic and German HRA application for PSA purposes. In previous phase 1, a method of comparing existing HRA analysis has been developed and applied to tasks, which have been modelled for various German and Nordic PSA. In phase 2, three plant visits have been performed in Brunsbuettel (Germany), Forsmark (Sweden), and Olkiluoto (Finland) to compare actions in more detail, and to perform additional analysis using specific variants of HRA methods. Although both German and Nordic partners strongly rely on THERP method, the variants of this HRA method turned out to differ in some aspects. Swedish and Finnish analyses focus on the diagnosis part of the action. They are based on the time correlation of Swain /2/, but they make use of additional performance shaping factors normally not used in Germany. German analyses have a less complex model for diagnosis, but a more thorough investigation of the various action steps, especially considering various types of recovery. This will be demonstrated by an example, which will show the different analyses and their influence on results. (orig.)

  14. Birth characteristics and Wilms tumors in children in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Schmidt, Lisbeth Samsø; Kogner, Per

    2011-01-01

    during 1985-2006, individually matched to five controls drawn randomly from the Nordic childhood population. Information on birth characteristics was obtained from the population-based medical birth registries. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using conditional logistic......-based study, we confirmed earlier observations of an association between high birth weight and risk of Wilms tumor, but we found an effect only in girls. The higher risk of infants with low Apgar score might reflect hypoxia causing cell damage, adverse side effects of neonatal treatment or reverse causation...

  15. Future Research Agenda for FM in the Nordic Countries in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Andersen, Per Dannemand; Rasmussen, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    The study is based on theory from innovation systems and strategic foresight. First, a review of literature was carried out and an innovation systems model of the FM sector was developed. Secondly, four national workshops were held involving FM practitioners and researchers from Denmark, Norway......, Sweden and Finland. Third, the results of the workshops were presented and discussed at a Nordic FM conference in August 2011. Finally, an adapted Delphi survey was carried out as a final data collection and validation of the findings. This article has the main focus on the results of the Delphi survey....

  16. Fifteen years' experience of intestinal and multivisceral transplantation in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varkey, Jonas; Simrén, Magnus; Jalanko, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    was the most common complication and occurred in 79% of the patients followed by post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (21%) and graft-versus-host disease (18%). The 1- and 5-year survival was 79% and 65% respectively for the whole cohort and nutritional autonomy was achieved in 73% of the adults...... and 57% of the children at 1 year after transplantation. CONCLUSION: This collective Nordic experience confirms that intestinal transplantation is a complex procedure with many complications, yet with the possibility to provide long-term survival in selected conditions previously considered untreatable....

  17. Three Norwegian Varieties of a Nordic Model — A Historical Perspective on Working Life Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Heiret

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Through the use of a historical perspective, the aim of this article is to discuss and clarify the concurrent and conflicting interests and norms that have characterized the establishment and development of important institutions in Norwegian working life. The article concentrates on collective bargaining systems, the arrangements for codetermination, and the working environment regulations in both the public and private sector, which are regarded as the main institutions in the Norwegian and Nordic models of working life relations. The article is structured by an analytical distinction between three different historical periods that have constituted three distinct versions of the Norwegian model. By presenting a historical synthesis of Norwegian experiences, the article is a contribution to the ongoing debate on the varieties in the Nordic model, as to further comparisons and broader transnational studies.

  18. Can public policies sustain fertility in the Nordic countries?: Lessons from the past and questions for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Rønsen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The collective evidence of past research indicates that Nordic social welfare policies have had positive impacts on fertility. Yet, some patterns cause concern. One concern is that the good recuperation at cohort level partly is explained by relatively high fertility levels among women educated for female-dominated jobs with extensive part-time work. One may therefore question whether the present development is compatible with gender equality. Another concern is a more socially selective entry into fatherhood. Based on updated analyses of female as well as male fertility trends in Norway we address these issues, focussing especially on associations with educational level and field.

  19. Supporting same-sex mothers in the Nordic child health field: a systematic literature review and meta-synthesis of the most gender equal countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Michael B; Lang, Sarah N

    2016-12-01

    To explore the needs of and support given to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and inter-sex parents within the Nordic child health field. The number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and inter-sex parents is growing around the world. However, they face fear, discrimination and heteronormativity within the child health field. The Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland) rank as the most gender equal countries in the world; therefore, they may support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and inter-sex parents to a greater extent. Systematic literature review and meta-synthesis. A systematic search was conducted for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and inter-sex parents' experiences in the child health field, which consists of prenatal, labour and birth, postnatal and child health clinics, using PubMed, PsychInfo, Sociological Abstracts and CINAHL, as well as searching the grey literature, from 2000-2015. Ten articles were included. A quality assessment and a meta-synthesis of the articles were performed. Nearly all studies were qualitative, and most articles had at least one area of insufficient reporting. Only two countries, Sweden and Norway, had lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and inter-sex parents reporting on the child health field. However, gay, bisexual, transgender and inter-sex parents' perspectives were nonexistent in the literature; therefore, the results all relate to same-sex mothers. Five themes were found: Acceptance of Same-sex Mothers, Disclosing Sexual Orientation, Heteronormative Obstacles, Co-mothers are Not Fathers, and Being the Other Parent. Same-sex mothers are generally accepted within the Nordic child health field, but they still face overt and covert heteronormative obstacles, resulting in forms of discrimination and fear. Co-mothers feel invisible and secondary if they are not treated like an equal parent, but feel noticed and important when they are given equal support. Changes at the

  20. The FM Market in the Nordic Countries – Volume, Structure and Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to give an overview of the FM market in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland. A detailed study of the Danish FM market was done in 2008-9. This was followed up by a series of workshops facilitated by the author with groups of specialists in each of the countries...... in 2010 and 2011 to collect up-to-date information about all the 4 countries in relation to market volume, degree of outsourcing, structure and trends. The method for data collection was inspired by Delphi method. During the workshop the participants filled in a questionnaire with individual answers after...... about FM Market Data in Europe. In connection with the mentioned workshops another set of workshops were organized – except for Finland on the same day and with the same group of specialist – as part of a research project on FM Futures. The main purpose of this research is to provide input to a common...

  1. A new division of the Nordic countries into potential price regions; Ny inndeling av Norden i elspotomraader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    It has been proposed that the division of the Nordic countries into electric spot regions (potential price regions) should be changed. This implies, among other things, that Sweden is divided into three price regions. The price regions will be used for dealing with large bottlenecks, while small bottlenecks will be handled by means of countertrade. Will the change increase the risk of market power? Probably not. The present arrangement offers about equally good possibilities to exercise market power and causes price signals in general to become erroneous and that trade becomes limited. The absence of price limits in Sweden will probably not increase competition by much since the same producers are numerous on both sides of the limits. Price regions in Sweden may sharpen competition between producers in each region and producers in adjacent regions outside of Sweden.

  2. Establishment of Risk based microbiological criteria in the Nordic countries: A case study on Campylobacter in broiler meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauta, Maarten

    Microbiological criteria (MCs) offer a practical tool for food safety control and they are currently under discussion internationally. To meet the present scientific standards, there is an increasing demand for so- called “risk based” microbiological criteria that are based on risk assessment....... In this project we studied the potentials for setting risk based microbiological criteria on Campylobacter in chicken meat by studying the potential impact that specific microbiological criteria would have in different Nordic countries. This is done on the basis of different data sets that have been collected...... based microbiological criteria, the “case-by-case” risk assessment methodology is used (Christensen et al 2013) and its impact is analysed on the basis of the same data sets. In both approaches the same risk assessment model for Campylobacter in broiler meat is used. The difference between...

  3. Nordic Regional Report; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper elaborates findings and discussions of 2013 Cluster Consultation Nordic Regional report. The countries have close economic and financial ties and face some common challenges and shared risks, such as large banking sectors and high household debt. The economic performance of the four continental Nordic economies (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden—Nordic-4) ranks among the advanced economic development circle. It is analyzed that the large Nordic banking systems su...

  4. Conscious and subconscious attitudes towards English Imports in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Tore

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on how the present-day influence from English is perceived and assessed in seven Nordic communities. The focus is on comparison, between the seven communities, and between two data sets obtained under different conditions of consciousness. The comparisons show...... that the populations reproduce the “purism level” of their own community’s official language policy in their consciously offered responses to questions in a telephone survey, while the purism–laissez-faire ranking of the communities is turned upside down in a subconsciously offered data set obtained in a speaker...... evaluation experiment based on the matched-guise technique. In the same way, analyses of how the evaluative reactions correlate with social-group divisions show reproduction and non-reproduction of the stereotypically expected correlations, in the conscious and subconscious conditions respectively....

  5. Effects of occupation on risks of avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerheim, K; Martinsen, J I; Lynge, E

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of cancer risk according to occupational affiliation is an essential part of formatting preventive actions aimed at the adult population. Herein, data on 10 major cancer sites amenable by life style exposures from the Nordic Occupational Cancer Study (NOCCA) are presented. All subjects...... ratios (SIRs) were computed. Variation in risk across occupations was generally larger in men than in women. In men, the most consistent cluster with high risk of numerous cancer types included waiters, cooks and stewards, beverage workers, seamen, and chimney sweeps. Two clusters of occupations...... with generally low cancer risks were seen in both men and women. The first one comprised farmers, gardeners, and forestry workers, the second one included groups with high education, specifically those in health and pedagogical work. Although cancer risk varies by occupation, only a smaller part of the variation...

  6. Associations between meal complexity and social context in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahma, Nina; Mäkelä, Johanna; Niva, Mari

    2014-01-01

    main meals, lunch and dinner. The analysis builds on the concept of eating system, examining the effect sociability has on meal complexity. In the end we ask whether complexity can better be explained by social context, or if it, rather, results from social differentiation. The data (N=8248) are drawn......Contemporary eating is often portrayed by images of snacking, solitary grazing, disintegration of sociability, demise of family meals, and increasingly irregular eating patterns –what Claude Fischler has famously described as gastroanomy. Inspired by the concept of eating system, this article...... from the Food in Nordic Everyday Life survey conducted in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden in 2012. The Finns and Swedes typically had two hot meals a day, whereas the Danes and Norwegians only had one. Moreover, the differences in the complexity were the greatest in hot dinners, the Danes...

  7. Birth characteristics and Wilms tumors in children in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Schmidt, Lisbeth Samsø; Kogner, Per

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about causes of Wilms tumor. Because of the young age at diagnosis, several studies have looked at various birth characteristics. We conducted a registry-based case-control study involving 690 cases of Wilms tumor aged 0-14 years, occurring in Denmark, Finland, Norway or Sweden...... during 1985-2006, individually matched to five controls drawn randomly from the Nordic childhood population. Information on birth characteristics was obtained from the population-based medical birth registries. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using conditional logistic......-for-gestational age girls also had a higher risk (2.48, 1.51-4.05), whereas no effect was seen for boys (1.12, 0.60-2.07). An association was seen with Apgar score at 5 min birth order. In our large-scale, registry...

  8. The Expansion of English-Medium Instruction in the Nordic Countries: Can Top-Down University Language Policies Encourage Bottom-Up Disciplinary Literacy Goals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, John; Lauridsen, Karen M.; Räsänen, Anne; Salö, Linus; Schwach, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Recently, in the wake of the Bologna Declaration and similar international initiatives, there has been a rapid increase in the number of university courses and programmes taught through the medium of English. Surveys have consistently shown the Nordic countries to be at the forefront of this trend towards English-medium instruction (EMI). In this…

  9. Radiological imaging of the neck for initial decision-making in oral squamous cell carcinomas-A questionnaire survey in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norling, Rikke; Grau, Cai; Nielsen, Michael B

    2012-01-01

    by palpation and diagnostic imaging of the neck. We investigated the current practice of the initial radiological work-up of patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) in the Nordic countries. Methods. A questionnaire regarding the availability and use of guidelines and imaging modalities...

  10. Onset of mortality increase with age and age trajectories of mortality from all diseases in the four Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolejs J

    2017-01-01

    the model c/x. All-disease mortality represents an alternative tool to study the impact of age. All results are based on published data. Keywords: mortality, age, all diseases, external causes, Nordic countries

  11. The Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmorn, Lotte B.; Petersen, Kathrine B; Jakobsson, Maija

    2015-01-01

    by using International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision codes on diagnoses and the Nordic Medico-Statistical Committee Classification of Surgical Procedure codes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of the studied complications and possible risk factors among parturients in the Nordic countries. RESULTS......OBJECTIVE: To assess the rates and characteristics of women with complete uterine rupture, abnormally invasive placenta, peripartum hysterectomy, and severe blood loss at delivery in the Nordic countries. DESIGN: Prospective, Nordic collaboration. SETTING: The Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study...... (NOSS) collected cases of severe obstetric complications in the Nordic countries from April 2009 to August 2012. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Cases were reported by clinicians at the Nordic maternity units and retrieved from medical birth registers, hospital discharge registers, and transfusion databases...

  12. Sedation practice in Nordic and non-Nordic ICUs: a European survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Albarran, John W; Ring, Mette; Blackwood, Bronagh

    2013-07-01

    A trend towards lighter sedation has been evident in many intensive care units (ICUs). The aims of the survey were to describe sedation practice in European ICUs and to compare sedation practice in Nordic and non-Nordic countries. A cross-sectional survey of ICU nurses attending the fourth European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations (EfCCNa) in Denmark, 2011. Data included use of protocols; sedation, pain and delirium assessment tools; collaborative decision-making; sedation and analgesic medications; and educational preparation related to sedation. Response rate was 42% (n = 291) from 22 countries where 53% (n = 148) used sedation protocols. Nordic nurses reported greater use of sedation (91% versus 67%, p Nordic nurses. Decision-making on sedation was more inter-professionally collaborative in Nordic ICUs (83% versus 61%, p Nordic nurses reported greater consistency in maintaining circadian rhythm (66% versus 49%, p Nordic context might be more germane to the goal of lighter sedation and better pain management. Our study raises awareness of current sedation practice, paving the way towards optimized ICU sedation management. © 2013 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  13. In Search of Nordicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng; Strandgaard, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    This article looks at the branding of Copenhagen as a food destination through the advent of the New Nordic Cuisine movement and how this may change the way we think about destination branding. The destination management organization of Copenhagen opportunistically embraced the New Nordic Cuisine...... an inductive, in-depth, longitudinal study of the New Nordic Cuisine and its movement's development in relation to branding Copenhagen as a tourism destination....

  14. CONFERENCE: Nordic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Around 80 physicists from eleven countries fought heavy snowstorms and 20-below temperatures at the winter resort of Spåtind, Norway, for the 8th Nordic Meeting on Elementary Particle Physics in January. This biennial conference is a traditional meeting place for Nordic particle physicists, and especially for the young research students, but also draws participants from other countries. This year's meeting was organized by the Division of Particle Physics of the Swedish Physical Society

  15. Wine prices in the Nordic countries: Are they lower than in the region of origin?

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Bentzen; Valdemar Smith

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the retail prices on wine in different countries. In general, country-specific price differences on identical wines are expected to reflect differences in taxes, import prices, transportation and other costs. Also the competitive conditions on the retail markets in the relevant countries are important. Accordingly, lack of competition at the retail level, high import prices and high duties on wine all contribute to increase wine prices. Next, consumer price...

  16. Reactor safety; Description and evaluation of safety activities in Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.; Gunsell, L.

    1998-03-01

    The report gives a description of safety activities in the nuclear power industry. The study has been carried out as a part of the four year programme in Nordic Safety Research (NKS) which was completed in 1997. The objective of the NKS/RAK-1.1 project 'A survey and an evaluation of safety activities in nuclear power' was to make a broad description of various activities important for safety and to make an assessment of their efficiency. A special consideration was placed on a comparison of practices in Finland and Sweden, and between their nuclear utilities. The study has been divided into two parts, one theoretical part in which a model of the relationships between various activities important for safety has been constructed and one practical part where a total of 62 persons have been interviewed at the authorities, the nuclear utilities and one reactor vendor. To restrict the amount of work two activities, safety analysis and experience feedback, were selected. A few cases connected to incidents at nuclear power plants were discussed in more detail. The report has been structured around a simple model of nuclear safety consisting of the concepts of goals, means and outcomes. This model illustrates the importance of goal formulation, systematic planning and feedback of operational experience as major components in nuclear safety. In assessing organisation and management at authorities and the power utilities there is a clear trend of decentralisation and delegation of authority. The general impression from the study is that the safety activities in Finland and Sweden are efficient and well targeted. The experience from the methodology is favourable and the comparison of practices gives a good ground for a discussion of contents and targeting of safety activities. (EG) activities. (EG)

  17. Plants as De-Worming Agents of Livestock in the Nordic Countries: Historical Perspective, Popular Beliefs and Prospects for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingebrigtsen K

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Preparations derived from plants were the original therapeutic interventions used by man to control diseases (including parasites, both within humans and livestock. Development of herbal products depended upon local botanical flora with the result that different remedies tended to develop in different parts of the world. Nevertheless, in some instances, the same or related plants were used over wide geographic regions, which also was the result of communication and/or the importation of plant material of high repute. Thus, the Nordic countries have an ancient, rich and diverse history of plant derived anthelmintic medications for human and animal use. Although some of the more commonly used herbal de-wormers were derived from imported plants, or their products, many are from endemic plants or those that thrive in the Scandinavian environment. With the advent of the modern chemotherapeutic era, and the discovery, development and marketing of a seemingly unlimited variety of highly efficacious, safe synthetic chemicals with very wide spectra of activities, herbal remedies virtually disappeared from the consciousness – at least in the Western world. This attitude is now rapidly changing. There is a widespread resurgence in natural product medication, driven by major threats posed by multi-resistant pest, or disease, organisms and the diminishing public perceptions that synthetic chemicals are the panacea to health and disease control. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive account of the depth of historical Nordic information available on herbal de-wormers, with emphasis on livestock and to provide some insights on potentially rewarding areas of "re-discovery" and scientific evaluation in this field.

  18. Life Expectancy and Death by Diseases of the Circulatory System in Patients with Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Hällgren, Jonas; Westman, Jeanette; Ösby, Urban; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Gissler, Mika; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Objective Excess mortality from diseases and medical conditions (natural death) in persons with psychiatric disorders has been extensively reported. Even in the Nordic countries with well-developed welfare systems, register based studies find evidence of an excess mortality. In recent years, cardiac mortality and death by diseases of the circulatory system has seen a decline in all the Nordic countries, but a recent paper indicates that women and men in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, who had been hospitalised for a psychotic disorder, had a two to three-fold increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality by diseases of the circulatory system among patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the three Nordic countries Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. Furthermore, the aim was to examine and compare life expectancy among these patients. Cause specific Standardized Mortality Rates (SMRs) were calculated for each specific subgroup of mortality. Life expectancy was calculated using Wiesler’s method. Results The SMR for bipolar disorder for diseases of the circulatory system was approximately 2 in all countries and both sexes. SMR was slightly higher for people with schizophrenia for both genders and in all countries, except for men in Denmark. Overall life expectancy was much lower among persons with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, with life expectancy being from 11 to 20 years shorter. Conclusion Our data show that persons in the Nordic countries with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have a substantially reduced life expectancy. An evaluation of the reasons for these increased mortality rates should be prioritized when planning healthcare in the coming years. PMID:23826212

  19. Innovating and re-branding Nordic wellbeing tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalager, Anne-Mette; Konu, H.; Huijbens., E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Driving forces behind the successful development of coherent wellbeing tourism in the Nordic region. An innovation perspective on developing a particular Nordic content of wellbeing offered by tourism enterprises and destinations across the five Nordic countries...

  20. Aggressiveness of Phytophthora infestans on detached potato leaflets in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, A; Andersson, B; Le, V H

    2009-01-01

    differences between the test laboratories for infection efficiency, lesion growth rate and sporulation capacity on detached leaflets. When the laboratory effect was taken into account, the differences in aggressiveness between the countries were generally small or inconsistent between the test cultivars...... and epidemiologically insignificant. By contrast, variation among isolates within countries was substantial. The magnitude of the variation depended on country and cultivar. Maximal variation for the means of the isolates was between 89 and 185 h for latent period, between 100 and 1297 sporangia mm-2 for sporulation...

  1. Enablers and constrainers to participation: Has policy in Nordic countries reached its limit for raising participation in adult learning among certain groups? Paper presented (with R. Desjardins) at the II Nordic conference on Adult Learning, Linköping, Sweden, 17-19 April

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Desjardins, Richard

    barriers to participation, and ensure that disadvantaged groups have equal opportunity to take up adult learning. Together, observations indicate that policy matters in promoting adult learning, especially among adults that would otherwise not participate. At the same time the observations indicate......Despite comparatively high and equal participation in adult learning in Nordic countries, a distinct pattern of non-participation persists. Moreover, the pattern of adults who tend to participate comparatively less often is similar to the non-Nordic countries considered, although it is less...... accentuated. The Nordic countries have a long shared history of supporting and fostering a rich adult learning culture. Although various historical, social and cultural factors are behind this, Nordic countries also share a strong record of public policy that aims to: promote adult learning, target various...

  2. Non-communicable diseases and the social determinants of health in the Nordic countries: Findings from the European Social Survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaj, Mirza; Huijts, Tim; McNamara, Courtney L; Stornes, Per; Bambra, Clare; Eikemo, Terje A

    2017-03-01

    Comparative studies examining non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and determinants of health in the Nordic countries are scarce, outdated and focus only on a limited range of NCDs and health determinants. This study is the first to present a comprehensive overview of the distribution of social and behavioural determinants of health and of physical and mental NCDs in the Nordic population. We examined regional, country and gender differences for 17 health outcomes and 20 determinants of health. We use data from the 7th wave of the European Social Survey. All results were age-standardised by weighting up or down the unstandardized (crude) prevalence rates for five year age groups in each country to a common standard. We present pooled estimates for the combined regional samples as well as country-specific results for the Nordic region. Overall, the population of the Nordic region reported among the highest prevalence for one or both genders in 10 out of 17 health outcomes. Despite being the region with the highest prevalence for most health outcomes, overall self-rated health levels tend to be better in the Nordic region. Similarly, we found that the Nordic countries adhere to a healthier lifestyle and have better access to health care. Future studies should consider investigating further the association between health outcomes and determinants of health and how they are distributed in the Nordic societies.

  3. Nordic Branding Podcast 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    'Hygge' is a concept that has generated much interest as a way of conceptualising 'Nordic living', e.g. in books on hygge or scented candles. In this Nordic Branding reflections podcast we are having a 'hyggelig' session with ph.d. Jeppe Trolle Linnet, reflecting on this concept and related 'Nord......' values. We met at Meyers Deli and The Laundromat Cafe (Copenhagen)....

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Fløisand, Yngvar; Forestier, Erik; Gustafsson, Göran; Heldrup, Jesper; Hovi, Liisa; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jonsson, Olafur Gisli; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Holmberg, Erik; Juliusson, Gunnar; Stockelberg, Dick; Hasle, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. We investigated disease characteristics and outcome for de novo AML patients 10-30 years old treated in pediatric or adult departments. We included 166 patients 10-18 years of age with AML treated according to the pediatric NOPHO-protocols (1993-2009) compared with 253 patients aged 15-30 years treated in hematology departments (1996-2009) in the Nordic countries. The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients without APL. Overall survival at 5 years was 60% (52-68%) for pediatric patients compared to 65% (58-70%) for adult patients. Cytogenetics and presenting white blood cell count were the only independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Age was not an independent prognostic factor. No difference was found in outcome for AML patients age 10-30 years treated according to pediatric as compared to adult protocols. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Night-shift work and hematological cancers: a population based case-control study in three Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talibov, Madar; Pukkala, Eero; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Hansen, Johnni

    2018-05-01

    Objective The aim of this case-control study was to assess the effect of night-shift work on the risk of hematological cancers. Methods The study included 39 371 leukemia, 56 713 non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 9322 Hodgkin lymphoma, and 26 188 multiple myeloma cases diagnosed between 1961 and 2005 in Finland, Sweden, and Iceland. Five controls for each case were selected from the Nordic Occupational Cancer Study (NOCCA) cohort, matched by year of birth, sex and country. Night-shift exposure was assessed by using the NOCCA job-exposure matrix (JEM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from conditional logistic regression models. Results Overall, night work was not associated with a risk of hematological cancers. We observed a small but non-significantly increased risk for leukemia (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.99-1.16), especially for acute myeloid leukemia (OR 1.15, 95% CI 0.97-1.36) among workers exposed to a high level of cumulative night work exposure. Night work exposure was not associated with lymphatic cancers and multiple myeloma. Conclusion This study did not support associations between night-shift work and hematological cancers.

  6. Nordic Management and Sustainable Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preuss, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    of the Nordics and from that wants to answer if this management approach fosters a sustainable business culture. For defining the management and cultural approach applied in Nordic companies, the method of text mining in relation with machine learning will be used. Among European companies, the Nordic companies...

  7. Nordic Energy Policy Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Birte Holst

    2016-01-01

    Brundtland Commission Report, and climate change became a common concern. Energy technology cooperation was an integral part of Nordic energy policy cooperation from the very beginning. The Nordic Energy Research Programme was established with funding from each of the Nordic countries, and was earmarked...... by a committee of senior officials and a secretariat. This was characterised by an incremental development of the cooperation based on consensus, mutual understanding and trust facilitated through exchange of experiences, work groups, seminars, educational activities and mobility schemes for energy policy...

  8. THE PURSUIT OF A REMEDY FOR GENDER INEQUALITY IN WIDER EUROPE: COMPARISON OF POLICIES AND INDICES IN THE EU, NORDIC COUNTRIES, AND SOUTH EAST EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Jasna Kovačević; Dževad Šehić

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the differences between gender regimes in Europe, with an emphasis on EU policies, the Nordic women-friendly welfare states, and the former socialist policies of South Eastern European (SEE) countries. The main premise is that culture and differing institutionalization of gender equality contribute to different perceptions of women’s role in society and to a different perception of gender equality in general. The paper examines the theor...

  9. What Characterise the Nordic Welfare State Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bent

    2007-01-01

    The main distinctive characteristics of the Nordic welfare states are presented. These include full employment, high degree of equality, a high level of taxes and public sector spending. The Nordic countries are compared to other European countries. The conclusion being that the Nordic Model...... is here to stay, although a movement in a European direction is underway....

  10. Plan of Nordic research in nuclear safety 1994-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    A new four-year Nordic research programme in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection is to start in 1994 as a followup of several preceding Nordic programmes. It will include seven projects and a joint coordination function. The programme is intended to sustain a common understanding among safety authorities in the Nordic countries with respect to reactor safety and radiation protection. It mainly deals with questions that are actual within the Nordic region, but it may also include problems of concern to its eastern neighbours. Two of the projects deal with reactor safety, and one with radioactive waste. The other four projects are on environmental aspects: two of them deal with radioecology, and two with questions related to emergency preparedness. The programme is managed by the Nordic Committee for Safety Research, NKS, consisting of representatives from regulatory authorities, research bodies, and industry. Basic financing is provided by one consortium member from each of the five Nordic countries, whereby an annual budget of approximately 8 million Danish Kroner will be provided. Additional financing comes from sponsors interested in the programme as well as from those organizations taking part in the project work. Definite project plans are to be elaborated within the more general frames described in the present outline. The flexibility of the programme is enhanced by limiting the duration of individual activities to one or two years. This will make it possible to adjust the programme to actual needs in the Nordic countries. (au)

  11. Research on deployed Danish soldiers: why is knowledge derived from a small, Nordic country relevant for other countries?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Andersen, Soren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, the Danish military has deployed more than 40,000 soldiers to war zones, especially to the Balkans, Iraq, and Afghanistan. To the war in Afghanistan alone, the Danish Defense has to date deployed 9,918 unique soldiers with a total of 18,015 deployments. The total...... focusing on the development of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in this sample will be presented, and the relevance and generalizability of these findings to military populations from other countries will be discussed....

  12. Harmonization of electric power taxation in the Nordic countries - prospects and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel taxes are the most efficient measure to make electricity production more environmentally benign in a liberalised market. If air pollution is to be reduced in a cost-effective manner, the sources of pollution must be directly taxed. In a liberalised electricity market, this means that emissions of, for example, CO 2 will have to be taxed on the same terms in all countries that are part of this market. This will result in a cost-effective reduction of emissions. However, if these taxes are not harmonised on the international level, there is a risk of market distortion in favour of non-taxed electricity producers. (au)

  13. Evaluation of the feeding value of straw. A comparison of laboratory methods in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundstoel, F; Kossila, V; Theander, O; Thomsen, K V

    1978-01-01

    Straw from Scandinavian countries had in vivo (sheep) organic matter digestibilities of 42 to 68%. In vitro digestibilities were 59.0 to 70.4%, and increased with enzyme-soluble organic matter contents. Acid and neutral detergent fiber contents were not correlated strongly enough with alkali treated straw to be used for prediction of nutritional value. There was a correlation between N content and digestibility in NH/sub 3/-treated straw. As long as standard measuring techniques were used, determinations of dry matter, ash, acid and neutral detergent fiber, lignin, sugars, and cellulose were correlated well among different testing laboratories.

  14. International trends in health science librarianship: part 3--the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Lotta; Buset, Karen J; Kristiansen, Hanne M; Ovaska, Tuulevi; Murphy, Jeannette

    2012-09-01

    This is the third in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the first decade of the 21st century. The invited authors carried out a survey of librarians in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland to identify common developments in their countries. A focus on pedagogy was seen as the most important trend. Future issues will track trends in Southern Europe and Latin America. JM. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  15. Nordic Mediation - Comparing Denmark and Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappi-Seppälä, Tapio; Storgaard, Anette

    2015-01-01

    The Nordic Countries have a long common history in criminal policy but a closer look also indicates individual Development. the introduction of Victim Offender Mediation is one example of Nordic diversity in details.......The Nordic Countries have a long common history in criminal policy but a closer look also indicates individual Development. the introduction of Victim Offender Mediation is one example of Nordic diversity in details....

  16. The European internal market and Nordic energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohnheit, P.E.; Hoier Nielsen, H.; Soerensen, H.

    1992-01-01

    The aim was to attempt to clarify the immediate consequences, and potentials for energy policy, for the authorities and supply companies in the Nordic countries in relation to the establishment of the Single Market. Potentials for the development of coordinated electricity supply and natural gas markets, and for cooperative Nordic research and initiatives are examined. Descriptions of conditions in other lands are given. It is stated that decisions on investments must now be taken within an open capital market with other traditions. There is a need for faster technology transfer. It is concluded that it will be difficult to develope trade related to natural gas between all the Nordic countries, but it should increase (also with regard to electricity) between the Nordic countries and their neighbour countries. Regarding electricity supply, lifting of existing rights of monopoly will result in weaker connections between producer and consumer and supply reliability will decrease. Natural gas supply reliability will be strengthened but producers will shoulder more market risks. Fusions will increase but a greater variation of company types and organization forms will develope. Competition will be sharper and prices for electric power could rise. Nordic energy policy will have a more international character, especially with regard to environmental protection. Long-term investment will be encouraged. The Nordic Council of Ministers will need to concentrate on information dissemination related to energy system analyses as a basis for decision-making. Export of Scandinavian hydroelectric power will contribute to international goals for environmental protection. (AB) (45 refs.)

  17. Availability of Biomass for Energy Purposes in Nordic and Baltic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Lars; Andreassen, Kjell; Bergh, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    in a European perspective where 38 % of the land area is forest (EU-27). Although some forest areas are protected, 75–92 % of the area can still be used for wood production. Further, substantial agriculture land areas may also be available for production of biomass for energy. Coniferous species dominate......, leading to the conclusion that some of the difference may be used for energy purposes in the near future. The current potential for forest fuel resources was estimated to 230–410 TWh yr-1 (830–1,480 PJ yr-1) for the countries included and forest fuels will thus be of utmost importance for the future...... for specific regions. Wood is extensively used for energy purposes and the forests hold a large potential for increasing the production of renewable energy. The potential may be further increased in the future with increased fertilization, extended breeding for enhanced biomass production, larger cultivation...

  18. Sex differences in child and adolescent mortality by parental education in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissler, Mika; Rahkonen, Ossi; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2012-01-01

    ¿470). Data on the highest level of education in 2000 were obtained from national education registers, and data on mortality and causes of death were received from the national cause-of-death registers until the end of follow-up (20 years or 2003). Results Boys had a higher child and adolescent......Background Socioeconomic position inequalities in infant mortality are well known, but there is less information on how child mortality is socially patterned by sex and age. Objective To assess maternal and paternal socioeconomic inequalities in mortality by sex, whether these differences vary...... mortality than girls. The children of mothers and fathers who had had the shortest education time had the highest mortality for both sexes and for all ages and countries. The differences between the groups with longer than basic education were smaller, particularly among older children and girls...

  19. Sex differences in child and adolescent mortality by parental education in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissler, Mika; Rahkonen, Ossi; Mortensen, Laust; Arntzen, Annett; Cnattingius, Sven; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Hemminki, Elina

    2012-01-01

    Socioeconomic position inequalities in infant mortality are well known, but there is less information on how child mortality is socially patterned by sex and age. To assess maternal and paternal socioeconomic inequalities in mortality by sex, whether these differences vary by age and country, and how much of the sex differences can be explained by external causes of death. Data on all live-born children were received from national birth registries for 1981-2000 (Denmark: n=1,184,926; Norway: n=1,090,127; and Sweden n=1,961,911) and for 1987-2000 (Finland: n=841,470). Data on the highest level of education in 2000 were obtained from national education registers, and data on mortality and causes of death were received from the national cause-of-death registers until the end of follow-up (20 years or 2003). Boys had a higher child and adolescent mortality than girls. The children of mothers and fathers who had had the shortest education time had the highest mortality for both sexes and for all ages and countries. The differences between the groups with longer than basic education were smaller, particularly among older children and girls. The gradient in mortality was mostly similar for boys and girls. Among 1-19-year-olds, 32% of boys' deaths and 27% of girls' deaths were due to external causes. Boys' excess mortality was only partly explained by educational inequalities or by deaths from external causes. A more detailed analysis is needed to study whether the share of avoidable deaths is higher among children whose parents have had a shorter education time.

  20. Work ability of survivors of breast, prostate, and testicular cancer in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindbohm, M-L; Taskila, T; Kuosma, E

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can cause adverse effects on survivors' work ability. We compared the self-assessed work ability of breast, testicular, and prostate cancer survivors to that of people without cancer. We also investigated the association of disease-related and socio-demographic factors and job-related reso......-related resources (organizational climate, social support, and avoidance behavior) with work ability and looked at whether these associations were different for the survivors and reference subjects....

  1. Methods for mapping recreational and social values in urban green spaces in the nordic countries and their comparative merits for urban planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Hjorth Caspersen, Ole; Konijnendijk van den Bosch, Cecil C

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges faced by urban planning is to identify and evaluate recreational and social values of urban and peri-urban green spaces. Over the past 30 years a number of methods for mapping recreational and social values have been developed and implemented in the Nordic countries......, in dialogue between research and urban planning practice. This paper provides a framework for assessment of planning methods and an analysis of the comparative merits of seven Nordic mapping methods and how they address the challenges of identification and evaluation of recreational and social values....... The assessment shows that challenges are addressed in complementary ways and are tailored to different planning purposes. There is also scope for further improvements of the link between research and planning....

  2. Nordic Lighting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders V.

    2018-01-01

    The Danish designer Poul Henningsen wrote very elaborated theories of interior lighting from the mid-1920s on. He fought against the cold and reduced light quality of electric bulbs and tried to tame and cultivate this technology by design. He wanted a more rich light for domestic purpose...... worthwhile discussing than other design categories to interpret, whether experience of nature and climatic conditions play a role in Scandinavian Design, as repeatedly stated. This discussion contributes both to understanding of interior lighting and the historiographical critique of Scandinavian Design...... and shaped it through lamp design, colour reflections and differentiated use of several lamps in the room to make a more dim lighting, but with greater variation and softer contrasts. It was a ‘culture’ of lighting, he promoted, but he didn’t saw it as linked to the Nordic countries. His sensibility...

  3. Occupational exposure to asbestos and risk of cholangiocarcinoma: a population-based case–control study in four Nordic countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farioli, Andrea; Straif, Kurt; Brandi, Giovanni; Curti, Stefania; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Sparen, Pär; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Biasco, Guido; Violante, Francesco Saverio; Mattioli, Stefano; Pukkala, Eero

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between occupational exposure to asbestos and the risk of cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Methods We conducted a case–control study nested in the Nordic Occupational Cancer (NOCCA) cohort. We studied 1458 intrahepatic CC (ICC) and 3972 extrahepatic CC (ECC) cases occurring among subjects born in 1920 or later in Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Each case was individually matched by birth year, gender and country to five population controls. The cumulative exposure to asbestos (measured in fibres (f)/ml × years) was assessed by applying the NOCCA job-exposure matrix to data on occupations collected during national population censuses (conducted in 1960, 1970, 1980/81 and 1990). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI were estimated using conditional logistic regression models adjusted by printing industry work. Results We observed an increasing risk of ICC with cumulative exposure to asbestos: never exposed, OR 1.0 (reference category); 0.1–4.9 f/mL × years, OR 1.1 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.3); 5.0–9.9 f/mL × years, OR 1.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.1); 10.0–14.9 f/mL × years, OR 1.6 (95% CI 1.0 to 2.5); ≥15.0 f/mL × years, OR 1.7 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.6). We did not observe an association between cumulative asbestos exposure and ECC. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that exposure to asbestos might be a risk factor for ICC. Our findings also suggest that the association between ECC and asbestos is null or weaker than that observed for ICC. Further studies based on large industrial cohorts of asbestos workers and possibly accounting for personal characteristics and clinical history are needed. PMID:29133597

  4. Partial sick leave--review of its use, effects and feasibility in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausto, Johanna; Miranda, Helena; Martimo, Kari-Pekka; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2008-08-01

    Partial sick leave and partial sickness benefits are currently available in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland. The literature was reviewed to determine their use, describe their recipients, find evidence of their effects, and explore attitudes towards and experiences with their use. Eight databases were searched. National sickness absence statistics and other relevant sources were also reviewed. Of the sickness benefits, partial benefits accounted for approximately one-fifth in Norway, less than 10% in Denmark, and over a third in Sweden. In Finland, partial sick leave was seldom used during the first year (2007) of benefit availability. Few peer-reviewed studies on its effects were identified, and scientific evidence was scarce. Its acceptance was good in all four countries. Most of the recipients were women and over 45 years of age. Studies of its feasibility seem congruent in reporting hindrances due to inflexible work arrangements and poor collaboration between actors. More research and more rigorous study designs are needed to determine whether partial sick leave is feasible and beneficial in keeping those with reduced work ability in worklife.

  5. Severe accident research and management in Nordic Countries - A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    2002-01-01

    The report describes the status of severe accident research and accident management development in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The emphasis is on severe accident phenomena and issues of special importance for the severe accident management strategies implemented in Sweden and in Finland. The main objective of the research has been to verify the protection provided by the accident mitigation measures and to reduce the uncertainties in risk dominant accident phenomena. Another objective has been to support validation and improvements of accident management strategies and procedures as well as to contribute to the development of level 2 PSA, computerised operator aids for accident management and certain aspects of emergency preparedness. Severe accident research addresses both the in-vessel and the ex-vessel accident progression phenomena and issues. Even though there are differences between Sweden and Finland as to the scope and content of the research programs, the focus of the research in both countries is on in-vessel coolability, integrity of the reactor vessel lower head and core melt behaviour in the containment, in particular the issues of core debris coolability and steam explosions. Notwithstanding that our understanding of these issues has significantly improved, and that experimental data base has been largely expanded, there are still important uncertainties which motivate continued research. Other important areas are thermal-hydraulic phenomena during reflooding of an overheated partially degraded core, fission product chemistry, in particular formation of organic iodine, and hydrogen transport and combustion phenomena. The development of severe accident management has embraced, among other things, improvements of accident mitigating procedures and strategies, further work at IFE Halden on Computerised Accident Management Support (CAMS) system, as well as plant modifications, including new instrumentation. Recent efforts in Sweden in this area

  6. Particularities of the Nordic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Stoltz, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    The Nordic countries are in international rankings included as some of the most gender equal societies in the world (see e.g. the Global Gender Gap Index and the Gender Equality Index developed by the European Gender Equality Institute, EIGE), and scholars have demonstrated that the discourse...... and politics of women’s rights and gender equality has become an intrinsic part of the Nordic national identities and politics of belongings (Gullestad 2006). In spite of these achievements, Nordic scholars suggest that the increasing impact of globalization present major challenges for addressing multiple...... inequalities in power and resources (Melby et.al. 2008; Siim and Skjeie 2008). The chapter aims to analyse the challenge from globalization to the Nordic welfare and gender regimes and discuss the potentials and limits of this approach to equality from historical and comparative perspectives. The main research...

  7. Greening of Nordic electricity industry: policy convergence and diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, Atle; Gundersen, Mari Hegg; Koefoed, Anne Louise

    2004-01-01

    With a comparative focus on policy similarity and diversity, this article gives an overview of the main elements of electricity-related environmental policy in the Nordic countries, following the launching of a common electricity market in the 1990s. The article points out that the electricity related environmental policy positions of the Nordic countries showed a noticeable lack of coordination in the 1990s. Nordic divergence is observed both in terms of general policy orientations and at the instrument and incentive levels, in spite of the pioneering development of a common integrated electricity market and ambitious environmental policy goals. The article then highlights how the recent Swedish 'green' certificate market model has created a new momentum for market-based 'greening' with a potential for stronger convergence in Nordic renewable energy policy. In spite of signs of convergence, the article shows how the development of Nordic electricity-related environmental policy still contains considerable ambiguity: Unequal resource endowments, subject to simple resource-based interest formation, should indicate that there is little room for convergence in Nordic renewable energy policy. Shifting the environmental policy focus from existing technologies and resources to potential innovations, however provides a more open arena where the Nordic countries may see themselves served by the dynamic scope of a broader Nordic market based on a common policy approach, such as a green certificate market. In explaining why the Nordic arena may be an interesting locus for common renewable energy policy, the article points out that small countries may need an 'intermediary' arena to aggregate size and scope in order to generate a European momentum in regulatory competition with larger European states. Similarly, Nordic companies may consider the opportunity to gain first mover advantages by partnering with government as local experimentation may be seen as useful pilot

  8. Socioeconomic differences in children's use of physician services in the Nordic countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Halldorsson; A.E. Kunst (Anton); L. Köhler; J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between socioeconomic factors and the use of physician services among children and whether variations of the level of co-payment are correlated with different levels of inequalities in health services use. DESIGN: Description of the

  9. Socioeconomic differences in children's use of physician services in the Nordic countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halldórsson, M.; Kunst, A. E.; Köhler, L.; Mackenbach, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between socioeconomic factors and the use of physician services among children and whether variations of the level of co-payment are correlated with different levels of inequalities in health services use. DESIGN: Description of the socioeconomic differences in the

  10. Environmental Issues in the Media--Students' Perceptions in the Three Nordic-Baltic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinonen, Tuula; Yli-Panula, Eija; Svens, Maria; Vilkonis, Rytis; Persson, Christel; Palmberg, Irmeli

    2014-01-01

    The media, as a source of information, is supposed to have a significant role in effecting people's environmental knowledge and attitudes. The purpose of this study was to find students' perceptions of environmental issues as presented in the media and how students in Finland, Lithuania and Sweden used these media sources in the matters related to…

  11. The pursuit of a remedy for gender inequality in wider Europe: Comparison of policies and indices in the EU, Nordic countries, and south east Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Jasna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the differences between gender regimes in Europe, with an emphasis on EU policies, the Nordic women-friendly welfare states, and the former socialist policies of South Eastern European (SEE countries. The main premise is that culture and differing institutionalization of gender equality contribute to different perceptions of women’s role in society and to a different perception of gender equality in general. The paper examines the theoretical standpoints and historical background of different gender regimes in Europe. Gender equality indices are analyzed in order to investigate if any patterns exist among European countries with distinct cultural, political, and social backgrounds. Nordic countries are overachievers in gender equality in Europe, mainly due to the prevailing egalitarianism and institutionalization of women-friendly welfare policies, which can serve as a good benchmark for wider Europe, especially for countries from South East Europe. However, cultural differences exist between Scandinavian and other European countries, which cannot be considered homogeneous. The paper raises important issues of gender equality such as multiculturalism and immigration, questioning to what extent future EU enlargements will increase the risk of greater gender inequality in the EU.

  12. Occupation and cancer - follow-up of 15 million people in five Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pukkala, Eero; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2009-01-01

    most common cancer type in the present series, 373 361 cases) was larger, and there was a tendency of physically demanding occupations to show SIRs below unity. Women in occupations which require a high level of education have, on average, a higher age at first child-birth and elevated breast cancer...... workers producing beverage and tobacco, seamen and chimney sweeps. Among women, the SIRs varied from 0.58 (0.37-0.87) in seafarers to 1.27 (1.19-1.35) in tobacco workers. Low SIRs were found for farmers, gardeners and teachers. Our study was able to repeat most of the confirmed associations between...... with the lung cancer risk among farmers, gardeners and teachers. The occupational risk patterns were quite similar in all main histological subtypes of lung cancer. Bladder cancer is considered as one of the cancer types most likely to be related to occupational carcinogens. Waiters had the highest risk...

  13. In-vivo whole body measurement of internal radioactivity in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risco Norrlid, L. del (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (Sweden)); Halldorsson, O. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (Iceland)); Holm, S. (NM and PET at Copenhagen' s Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Huikari, J. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Isaksson, M. (Goeteborg Univ., Dept. Radiation Physics Sahlgren Academy (Sweden)); Lind, B. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Roed, H. (Danish State Institute for Radiation Protection (Denmark))

    2011-02-15

    The PIANOLIB activity aims to harmonize the calibrations of the measurement equipment in the region and to evaluate the quality status of this kind of measurement by means of a proficiency test exercise. In this report the first results of the PIANOLIB activity are presented, that is, a compilation of existent regional resources for in-vivo whole body measurement and the phantom library website. In 2010 the project PIANOLIB collected the relevant information about the regional facilities, distributed the exercise instructions and managed the circulation of the phantom IRINA among the participant laboratories. The inventory within the activity has showed that the regional whole body counting assets has relatively diminished compared to 2006, the last time an inventory of the kind was made. Both the field laboratories as the stationary ones are equipped with sophisticated whole-body counting systems with Ge-or NaI-detectors. The regional competence is good and still retains experienced staff, but it is clear that a new generation is coming that needs training and exchange of experiences. It is important to keep the practice of intercomparison and NKS continues to be the best framework for supporting this kind of activity. (Author)

  14. In-vivo whole body measurement of internal radioactivity in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risco Norrlid, L. del; Halldorsson, O.; Holm, S.; Huikari, J.; Isaksson, M.; Lind, B.; Roed, H.

    2011-02-01

    The PIANOLIB activity aims to harmonize the calibrations of the measurement equipment in the region and to evaluate the quality status of this kind of measurement by means of a proficiency test exercise. In this report the first results of the PIANOLIB activity are presented, that is, a compilation of existent regional resources for in-vivo whole body measurement and the phantom library website. In 2010 the project PIANOLIB collected the relevant information about the regional facilities, distributed the exercise instructions and managed the circulation of the phantom IRINA among the participant laboratories. The inventory within the activity has showed that the regional whole body counting assets has relatively diminished compared to 2006, the last time an inventory of the kind was made. Both the field laboratories as the stationary ones are equipped with sophisticated whole-body counting systems with Ge-or NaI-detectors. The regional competence is good and still retains experienced staff, but it is clear that a new generation is coming that needs training and exchange of experiences. It is important to keep the practice of intercomparison and NKS continues to be the best framework for supporting this kind of activity. (Author)

  15. Early Pliocene onset of modern Nordic Seas circulation related to ocean gateway changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schepper, Stijn; Schreck, Michael; Beck, Kristina Marie; Matthiessen, Jens; Fahl, Kirsten; Mangerud, Gunn

    2015-10-28

    The globally warm climate of the early Pliocene gradually cooled from 4 million years ago, synchronous with decreasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In contrast, palaeoceanographic records indicate that the Nordic Seas cooled during the earliest Pliocene, before global cooling. However, a lack of knowledge regarding the precise timing of Nordic Seas cooling has limited our understanding of the governing mechanisms. Here, using marine palynology, we show that cooling in the Nordic Seas was coincident with the first trans-Arctic migration of cool-water Pacific mollusks around 4.5 million years ago, and followed by the development of a modern-like Nordic Seas surface circulation. Nordic Seas cooling precedes global cooling by 500,000 years; as such, we propose that reconfiguration of the Bering Strait and Central American Seaway triggered the development of a modern circulation in the Nordic Seas, which is essential for North Atlantic Deep Water formation and a precursor for more widespread Greenland glaciation in the late Pliocene.

  16. Trends in Food Habits and Their Relation to Socioeconomic Status among Nordic Adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Siri Fismen

    Full Text Available In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries.The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS. Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data.Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002-2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002-2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006-2009/2010 for both sweet and soft drink consumption

  17. Trends in Food Habits and Their Relation to Socioeconomic Status among Nordic Adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fismen, Anne-Siri; Smith, Otto Robert Frans; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Rasmussen, Mette; Pedersen Pagh, Trine; Augustine, Lilly; Ojala, Kristiina; Samdal, Oddrun

    2016-01-01

    In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries. The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002-2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002-2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006-2009/2010 for both sweet and soft drink consumption. Socioeconomic

  18. Trends in Food Habits and Their Relation to Socioeconomic Status among Nordic Adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fismen, Anne-Siri; Smith, Otto Robert Frans; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Rasmussen, Mette; Pedersen Pagh, Trine; Augustine, Lilly; Ojala, Kristiina; Samdal, Oddrun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries. Methods The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Results Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002–2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002–2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006–2009/2010 for both sweet and soft

  19. Labour education the Nordic way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, John Steen

    2007-01-01

    With its more than 75 years of experience, the Nordic Folk High School in Geneva has a strong tradition of labour education. Every year, about 35 trade union members from the Nordic countries take part in a course run alongside the International Labour Conference in Geneva....

  20. Is Nordic Private Equity Different?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spliid, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Most research on private equity is based on American theory, tested on American empirical data. Nevertheless, the private equity concept has gained a solid foothold in the Nordic region, especially in Sweden. This article analyzes whether American-biased assumptions prevail in the Nordic countries...

  1. Parent Attitudes to Children's L1 Maintenance. A Cross-Sectional Study of Immigrant Groups in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmen, Anne; And Others

    This paper focuses on parents' attitudes about their children's maintenance of their native language (L1). It is part of an inter-nordic study of immigrant languages between generation one and generation two, that interviewed 276 parents of North American, Finnish, Turkish, and Vietnamese origin, residing in Denmark, Norway, Finland, and Sweden.…

  2. A Mixed Nordic Experience:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denm......Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland...

  3. Tackling the tobacco epidemic in the Nordic countries and lower cancer incidence by 1/5 in a 30-year period-The effect of envisaged scenarios changing smoking prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Engholm, Gerda; Brink, Anne-Line; Pukkala, Eero; Stenbeck, Magnus; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Storm, Hans

    2018-03-29

    Tobacco smoking is a leading cause of cancer and the most preventable cause of cancer worldwide. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of the cancer burden in the Nordic countries linked to tobacco smoking and estimate the potential for cancer prevention by changes in smoking prevalence. The Prevent macro-simulation model was used, estimating the future number of cancer cases in the Nordic countries over a 30-year period (2016-2045), for 13 cancer sites, under different scenarios of changing smoking prevalence, and compared to the projected number of cases if constant prevalence prevailed. A total of 430,000 cancer cases, of the 2.2 million expected for the 13 studied cancer sites, could be avoided in the Nordic countries over the 30-year period if smoking was eliminated from 2016 onwards. If prevalence of smoking is reduced to 5% by year 2030 and to 2% by 2040, 230,000 cancer cases could be avoided. The largest proportion of cancers can be avoided in Denmark, where smoking prevalence is the highest, and similar to the prevalence in many European countries. A large amount of cancers could be avoided in the Nordic countries if smoking prevalence was reduced. The results from this study can be used to understand the potential impact and significance of primary prevention programmes targeted towards reducing the prevalence of tobacco smoking in the Nordic countries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among motorcycle mechanics, Lahore (Pakistan: an application of standardized Nordic questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujtaba Baqar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study is a follow up to our previously published “letter to the editor”, whose purpose was to report the relationship of pain prevalence (work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and trouble prohibiting to normal work (work-related musculoskeletal disorders with descriptive variables among motorcycle mechanics using standardized Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMQ as a tool. Results demonstrates that the pain prevalence was significantly high in shoulders, neck, low-back, wrists, ankles and elbows compared to other body parts. Among variables “age of participants and working hours” were found to be directly associated whereby shoulder and neck pain had significant correlation with lower age groups and more working hours. Regarding trouble prohibited to normal work, a total of 121 (46% participants reported hindrance in normal work with serious complaints about shoulders for younger age group; wrists and hips for middle age group; and neck, lower back, knees, ankles for old age group. Finally, results of a frequencies and cross-tabulations indicated that prolong work hours were significantly associated with emergence of musculoskeletal symptoms. This high prevalence of WMSS leading to WMSD among the motorcycles mechanics reflects the ignorance of occupational duties. A possible recommendation of this research includes the development and implementation of health and safety guidelines for the mentioned industry.

  5. Occupational exposure to asbestos and risk of cholangiocarcinoma: a population-based case-control study in four Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farioli, Andrea; Straif, Kurt; Brandi, Giovanni; Curti, Stefania; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Sparen, Pär; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Biasco, Guido; Violante, Francesco Saverio; Mattioli, Stefano; Pukkala, Eero

    2018-03-01

    To assess the association between occupational exposure to asbestos and the risk of cholangiocarcinoma (CC). We conducted a case-control study nested in the Nordic Occupational Cancer (NOCCA) cohort. We studied 1458 intrahepatic CC (ICC) and 3972 extrahepatic CC (ECC) cases occurring among subjects born in 1920 or later in Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Each case was individually matched by birth year, gender and country to five population controls. The cumulative exposure to asbestos (measured in fibres (f)/ml × years) was assessed by applying the NOCCA job-exposure matrix to data on occupations collected during national population censuses (conducted in 1960, 1970, 1980/81 and 1990). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI were estimated using conditional logistic regression models adjusted by printing industry work. We observed an increasing risk of ICC with cumulative exposure to asbestos: never exposed, OR 1.0 (reference category); 0.1-4.9 f/mL × years, OR 1.1 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.3); 5.0-9.9 f/mL × years, OR 1.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.1); 10.0-14.9 f/mL × years, OR 1.6 (95% CI 1.0 to 2.5); ≥15.0 f/mL × years, OR 1.7 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.6). We did not observe an association between cumulative asbestos exposure and ECC. Our study provides evidence that exposure to asbestos might be a risk factor for ICC. Our findings also suggest that the association between ECC and asbestos is null or weaker than that observed for ICC. Further studies based on large industrial cohorts of asbestos workers and possibly accounting for personal characteristics and clinical history are needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Unintentional formation and emission of the persistent organic pollutants HCB and PCBs in the Nordic countries. Documentation of existing information regarding sources and emissions to air, water and soil, with focus on reporting obligations according to the Stockholm Convention, the UNECE POP protocol, and PRTR registers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    In recent years reporting requirements regarding emissions and releases of unintentionally formed persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been laid on parties to international agreements and members of the EU. Such obligations include those under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, the UNECE POP and PRTR protocols and the EU PRTR regulation. The aim of this project has been to assess, whether existing knowledge and data are adequate for the Nordic countries to be able to estimate the emissions eventually to be reported. The project reveals that there is a substantial lack of knowledge related to potential sources in the Nordic countries. It also suggests that even though many of the main potential sources are the same, the relative importance of them differs between countries. (au)

  7. Hospital volume and the risk of revision in Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in the Nordic countries -an observational study of 14,496 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badawy, Mona; Fenstad, Anne M.; Bartz-Johannessen, Christoffer A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: High procedure volume and dedication to unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has been suggested to improve revision rates. This study aimed to quantify the annual hospital volume effect on revision risk in Oxfordu? nicompartmental knee arthroplasty in the Nordic countries. Methods......). The outcome was revision risk after 2 and 10 years calculated using Kaplan Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to assess the Hazard Ratio (HR) of any revision due to specific reasons with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: The implant survival was 80% at 10 years in the volume...

  8. Protein intake from 0 to 18 years of age and its relation to health: a systematic literature review for the 5th Nordic Nutrition Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Hörnell

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present systematic literature review is a part of the 5th revision of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. The aim was to assess the health effects of different levels of protein intake in infancy and childhood in a Nordic setting. The initial literature search resulted in 435 abstracts, and 219 papers were identified as potentially relevant. Full paper selection resulted in 37 quality-assessed papers (4A, 30B, and 3C. A complementary search found four additional papers (all graded B. The evidence was classified as convincing, probable, limited-suggestive, and limited-inconclusive. Higher protein intake in infancy and early childhood is convincingly associated with increased growth and higher body mass index in childhood. The first 2 years of life is likely most sensitive to high protein intake. Protein intake between 15 E% and 20 E% in early childhood has been associated with an increased risk of being overweight later in life, but the exact level of protein intake above which there is an increased risk for being overweight later in life is yet to be established. Increased intake of animal protein in childhood is probably related to earlier puberty. There was limited-suggestive evidence that intake of animal protein, especially from dairy, has a stronger association with growth than vegetable protein. The evidence was limited-suggestive for a positive association between total protein intake and bone mineral content and/or other bone variables in childhood and adolescence. Regarding other outcomes, there were too few published studies to enable any conclusions. In conclusion, the intake of protein among children in the Nordic countries is high and may contribute to increased risk of later obesity. The upper level of a healthy intake is yet to be firmly established. In the meantime, we suggest a mean intake of 15 E% as an upper limit of recommended intake at 12 months, as a higher intake may contribute to increased risk for later obesity.

  9. Organization of nursing care in three Nordic countries: relationships between nurses' workload, level of involvement in direct patient care, job satisfaction, and intention to leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Rikard; Smeds Alenius, Lisa; Runesdotter, Sara; Ensio, Anneli; Jylhä, Virpi; Kinnunen, Juha; Strømseng Sjetne, Ingeborg; Tvedt, Christine; Wiberg Tjønnfjord, Maria; Tishelman, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Health care systems in Finland, Norway and Sweden share many similarities, e.g. full-coverage and tax-financed, with predominately public sector hospitals. Despite similarities, there are differences in the working situations for RNs within these Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to analyze associations between RNs' patient workload and level of involvement in direct patient care, their job satisfaction and intention to leave in these countries. A workforce survey was conducted through RN4CAST, an EU 7th framework project. The survey included 118 items derived from validated instruments or tested in prior research. Responses from 1133 RNs at 32 Finnish hospitals, 3752 RNs at 35 Norwegian hospitals, and 11 015 RNs at 71 Swedish hospitals comprise the database, which was analyzed using logistic and odds ratio regressions analyses. We found statistically significant differences in RNs' level of involvement in direct patient care (p direct patient care and intention to leave in Sweden, and more satisfaction among RNs in roles with more direct patient care (OR = 1.16, 1.02 ≤ CI95% ≤ 1.32). Nearly half the Finnish sample report intention to leave, with significantly lower levels in Norway and Sweden (p role of RNs in patient care might potentially diminish intention to leave and increase job satisfaction in these Nordic countries.

  10. Nordic Noir Production Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waade, Anne Marit; Jensen, Pia Majbritt

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors argue that Nordic noir constitutes a set of production values utilised and conceptualised to make Danish television series attractive in the international market. The idea of production values is embedded into a media industrial context where market principles of target...... by relating the specific Nordic noir production values present in the two series to changing conditions in Danish television drama production, in particular the internationalisation of DR’s Drama Division....

  11. The EEC's single market and the reconstruction of the Nordic electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, O.J.

    1992-01-01

    When the Single Market comes into operation, the author claims, vertically integrated, national and regional monopolies within the electric power sector will be abolished. The nature of the new organization of this sector is as yet unclear. The Nordic countries are beginning to prepare themselves for the new situation. The subject of the article is this prospective development and some of the problems that will arise for the Nordic countries in this respect. The various Nordic proposals and their background are described in addition to the present conditions within the Nordic electric power sector. The special problems which may arise in relation to the Nordic adaption to the Single Market, the forms of adaption that are already beginning (adaptions of regulations, legal aspects etc.) on the part of the authorities and the electric power companies' attitudes and adaptions to expected future conditions are elucidated. (AB)

  12. Makerspaces across Settings: Didactic Design for Programming in Formal and Informal Teacher Education in the Nordic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjällander, Susanne; Åkerfeldt, Anna; Mannila, Linda; Parnes, Peter

    2018-01-01

    For education to provide knowledge reflecting our current and future society, many countries are revising their curricula, including a vivid discussion on digital competence, programming and computational thinking. This article builds an understanding of the maker movement in relation to education in programming, by demonstrating challenges and…

  13. Deregulation, privatisation and marketisation of Nordic comprehensive education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovemark, Marianne; Kosunen, Sonja; Kauko, Jaakko

    2018-01-01

    economy. The aim of this article is to examine education in the five Nordic countries utilising three dimensions of political change: deregulation, marketisation and privatisation. We also analyse the parallel changes in relation to segregation and differentiation in education. The analysis shows...... that the themes related to deregulation seem to show fairly similar patterns and structures in all contexts. The emerging differences were discovered mainly in the themes of marketisation and privatisation. Institutional segregation emerges in all Nordic countries to different extents along the lines...

  14. Nordic Children's Conceptualizations of Healthy Eating in Relation to School Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Linda; Talvia, Sanna; Fossgard, Eldbjørg; Arnfjörð, Unnur Björk; Hörnell, Agneta; Ólafsdóttir, Anna Sigríður; Gunnarsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Wergedahl, Hege; Lagström, Hanna; Waling, Maria; Olsson, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Pupils' perspective should be better taken into account when developing nutrition education at school. The purpose of this paper is to explore Nordic children's perspectives on the healthiness of meals in the context of school lunches. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 78 focus group discussions were conducted with 10-11-year-old…

  15. Adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations in a Nordic population with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Svandis Erna; Brader, Lea; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg

    2013-01-01

    The Nordic countries collaborate in setting recommendations for intake of nutrients by publishing the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR). Studies exploring how well the Nordic population adheres to the NNR are limited and none are available for the metabolic syndrome (MetS) subgroup...

  16. Concerns and future challenges of health literacy in the Nordic countries - From the point of view of health promotion practitioners and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringsberg, K C; Olander, E; Tillgren, P; Thualagant, N; Trollvik, A

    2018-02-01

    Health literacy is an essential social determinant for promoting and maintaining the health of a population. From a health promotion perspective, explore health literacy issues, concerns and future challenges among Nordic practitioners and researchers. Data were collected in a workshop at the 8 th Nordic Health Promotion Conference, and in a literature review, with articles from five databases. The search included title and abstract with the search terms health literacy* and health literacy as a MeSH term and all the Nordic countries. Qualitative and quantitative analysis were used. Twenty-five persons participated in the workshop. The discussions were summarized in six themes: concept of health literacy in national language; risk of victim blaming; measuring health literacy; content in school curricula on health literacy; new technologies for information and communication; communication and collaboration between different actors in support of health. Forty-three articles on health literacy were identified, mainly conducted within three fields: development, test and adaptation of instruments for measuring health literacy; measurement of health literacy among patients, or other defined target groups and on populations; and developing and evaluating methods/tools for the training of personnel groups or different target groups. There is a need for further studies providing a more in-depth understanding of the health literacy concept, knowledge on how to measure health literacy, ethical aspects, application in intersectoral collaboration as well as the adaptation to new technologies for information and communication in education supporting health literacy. As health literacy is an essential social health determinant, a concern and a future challenge must be, to make the health literacy concept familiar and visible in health promotion policies, research and practice such as health education.

  17. Competitive policies in the Nordic energy research and innovation area - eNERGIA : Part 1: Country reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klitkou, Antje; Pedersen, Trond Einar; Scordato, Lisa; Mariussen, Aage

    2008-07-01

    This (Part 1: Country reports) is the first report about the results from the eNERGIA project. The second report mainly deals with selected renewable energy technologies from different perspectives, while the third report sums up the SWOT-analysis, the eNERGIA workshops and the case studies of good practice. A short synthesis report summarises the entire project. This first report is the presentation of the countries studied in the project - Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. The policy system and the political framework conditions that underpin energy related industrial activity are reviewed for each country. This includes energy strategies, laws and regulations, R&D and innovation policies and instruments, and international collaboration. Key actors and institutions in the public domain, research and education, and non-governmental organisations are mapped. Finally, the descriptions of the countries include also technology specific overviews of R&D-intensive firms in the energy sector. The report comprises three parts: Part 1: Country reports Part 2: Technology reports Part 3: Special reports The results are summarised in the Synthesis report. (Author). refs., 24 figs., 49 tabs

  18. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Slaug, Bjørn; Brandt, Åse

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients and their home environments. The instrument was translated...... from the original Swedish version of the Housing Enabler, and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers and professional translators......, resulting in the Nordic Housing Enabler. For reliability testing, the sampling strategy and data collection procedures used were the same in all countries. Twenty voluntary occupational therapists, pair-wise but independently from each other, collected data from 106 cases by means of the Nordic Housing...

  19. Nordic Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This Box Set NORDIC LANDSCAPE presents Nordic Territories, a project by Rasmus Hjortshøj, exploring the man-made landscapes of the coastal territories and the entanglement of society and nature in times where it is no longer merely mankind subjected to nature, but where nature is equally being...... territories is not only their transient nature, but also the warm currents of the Gulf Stream making these northern shorelines habitable for human settlements....

  20. The Nordic Research programme on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    Only two of the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden) - Sweden and Finland - operate nuclear power plants, but there are a number of nuclear installations close to their borders. Regular 4-year programmes were initiated in 1977, designated NKS-programmes. (NKS: Nordisk KerneSikkerhedsforskning - Nordic nuclear-safety research). The current fourth NKS-programme is, influenced by the Chernobyl accident, dominated by the necessity for acquiring knowledge on unexpected events and release of radioactive material from nuclear installations. The present programme is divided into the areas of emergency preparedness, waste and decommissioning, radioecology and reactor safety. It comprises a total of 18 projects, the results of which will later be published in the form of handbooks for use in cases of emergency etc. The future of joint Nordic project work in the nuclear safety field must be seen in the light of changing conditions in and around the Nordic countries, such as the opening of relations to neighbours in the east, the move towards the European Communities and the need for training a new generation of specialists in the nuclear field etc. Each project is described in considerable detail and a list of reports resulting from the third NKS-programme 1985-1989 is given. (AB)

  1. A Nordic perspective on career competences and guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie

    This concept note reflects an initiative within the Nordic ELPGN group, in partnership with the Nordic network for adult learning (NVL), to investigate the possibilities for collaboration between the Nordic countries in developing a number of joint documents on career competences and....../or a competence framework for career learning in the Nordic countries. The objective for this concept note is to contribute to a shared Nordic frame of understanding for career competences which can be used in the ongoing development of guidance in the Nordic countries. The intended audience is guidance...... professionals, teachers, researchers, managers, policy makers and clients....

  2. eHealth provides a novel opportunity to exploit the advantages of the Nordic countries in psychiatric genetic research, building on the public health care system, biobanks, and registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-07-07

    Nordic countries have played an important role in the recent progress in psychiatric genetics, both with large well-characterized samples and expertise. The Nordic countries have research advantages due to the organization of their societies, including system of personal identifiers, national health registries with information about diseases, treatment and prescriptions, and a public health system with geographical catchment areas. For psychiatric genetic research, the large biobanks and population surveys are a unique added value. Further, the population is motivated to participate in research, and there is a trust in the institutions of the society. These factors have been important for Nordic contributions to biomedical research, and particularly psychiatric genetics. In the era of eHealth, the situation seems even more advantageous for Nordic countries. The system with public health care makes it easy to implement national measures, and most of the Nordic health care sector is already based on electronic information. The potential advantages regarding informed consent, large scale recruitment and follow-up, and longitudinal cohort studies are tremendous. New precision medicine approaches can be tested within the health care system, with an integrated approach, using large hospitals or regions of the country as a test beds. However, data protection and legal framework have to be clarified. In order to succeed, it is important to keep the people's trust, and maintain the high ethical standards and systems for secure data management. Then the full potential of the Nordic countries can be leveraged in the new era of precision medicine including psychiatric genetics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Beyond 3G Research: Can the nordic and baltic countries (re)emerge among the world leaders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Ramjee; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2007-01-01

    The development of Beyond 3G systems requires a multidisciplinary and user-driven approach. On the basis of its established research traditions and institutions, the Nordic and Baltic area could be a driver in advanced mobile and wireless systems. This role is likely to be very different from...... the one played by the region in the first generation and 2G systems based on the standardised technology systems. In the Beyond 3G setting we will see solutions based less on specific technologies and more on interoperability and new business models....

  4. Market design : Common Nordic end-user market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    No later than 2015, suppliers in the Nordic countries should be able to offer electricity to consumers in any Nordic country on equal terms. In this report NordREG has analyzed the present situation in the Nordic countries and identified the issues that should be harmonised in order to establish a common Nordic end-user market. In this report NordREG also suggests an indicative road map for the implementation process. (Author)

  5. Lutheranism and the Nordic States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Mette

    2017-01-01

    The Reformation in the Nordic region – today consisting of Island, Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland – was Lutheran and state driven. This chapter addresses the question of Nordic forms of Lutheranism as well as the question of the impact of Lutheranism in the North by focusing on the relation...

  6. Mercury in Nordic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munthe, John; Waengberg, Ingvar (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Stockholm (SE)); Rognerud, Sigurd; Fjeld, Eirik (Norwegian Inst. for Water Research (NIVA), Oslo (Norway)); Verta, Matti; Porvari, Petri (Finnish Environment Inst. (SYKE), Helsinki (Finland)); Meili, Markus (Inst. of Applied Environmental Research (ITM), Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    This report provides a first comprehensive compilation and assessment of available data on mercury in air, precipitation, sediments and fish in the Nordic countries. The main conclusion is that mercury levels in Nordic ecosystems continue to be affected by long-range atmospheric transport. The geographical patterns of mercury concentrations in both sediments and fish are also strongly affected by ecosystem characteristics and in some regions possibly by historical pollution. An evaluation of geographical variations in mercury concentrations in precipitation indicates that the influence from anthropogenic sources from Central European areas is still significant. The annual variability of deposition is large and dependant of precipitation amounts. An evaluation of data from stations around the North Sea has indicated a significant decrease in mercury concentrations in precipitation indicating a continuous decrease of emissions in Europe (Waengberg et al., 2007). For mercury in air (TGM), the geographical pattern is less pronounced indicating the influence of mercury emissions and distribution over a larger geographical area (i.e. hemispherical transport). Comparison of recent (surficial) and historical lake sediments show significantly elevated concentrations of mercury most likely caused by anthropogenic atmospheric deposition over the past century. The highest pollution impact was observed in the coastal areas of southern Norway, in south western Finland and in Sweden from the coastal areas in the southwest across the central parts to the north-east. The general increase in recent versus old sediments was 2-5 fold. Data on mercury in Nordic freshwater fish was assembled and evaluated with respect to geographical variations. The fish data were further compared with temporal and spatial trends in mercury deposition and mercury contamination of lake sediments in order to investigate the coupling between atmospheric transport and deposition of mercury and local mercury

  7. Partnerships in Nordic Building Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The project had two main objectives. The first was to establish a Nordic network of people and organisations interested in partnerships and partnering in the building industry in order to facilitate the exchange of experiences and new ideas. This objective was met through a series of workshops......, the functioning of specific partnering tools, knowledge management, training etc. Whereas the growth of partnering in all of the Nordic construction industries has developed from inspiration from the UK, and from other Nordic countries, it is the overall impression that partnering is interpreted, implemented...

  8. Nordic Luther Research in Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bo Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Luther research in the Nordic countries is characterised by both continuation and discussion of its own legacy. Finnish Luther studies have a prominent position here, but are by no means the only actors in Nordic Luther research. Giving an overview of Nordic Luther research in the last decade......, the article selects four main topics that have been the focus of special attention: politics and ethics, Communicatio idiomatum  and Luther's view on language, Luther as preacher, and Luther and the gift. The article concludes with some comments on the continuing role of creation theology, so strongly...

  9. Market potential and business opportunities for mayor renovation of non-residential buildings with the use of the Belok Total Concept method in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlstrøm, Åsa; Maripuu, Mari-Liis; Afshari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    for the method to be used on a larger scale, there must be commercial interest from the different companies to provide services with the method. The target groups are among others Engineering companies with energy consultants, design engineers and architects, Contractors and technology providers, energy...... controllers and ESCO companies. The article provides a market analysis of possibilities and barriers for energy renovations that have been carried out in Finland, Denmark and Sweden together with experiences from pilot buildings where the Total Concept method has been applied. The estimated annual market...... volume of renovation in the three Nordic countries is estimated to be about 4 million m2 and the total investment volume up to 280 MEUR per year. For the key actors involved in the Total Concept method the annual market volume is estimated to be about 70 MEUR. Furthermore, a new relevant key function...

  10. Experiences from Nordic research collaboration in linguistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helge Sandøy

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The project “Modern loanwords in the languages of the Nordic countries (MIN – Moderne importord i språka i Norden” was the first large-scale collaborative project between linguists in the Nordic countries. This article presents both the aim of the project and some experiences from the work with respect to project design, financing and networking.

  11. Changes in the social context and conduct of eating in four Nordic countries between 1997 and 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lotte; Lauridsen, Drude Skov; Lund, Thomas Bøker

    2016-01-01

    of conduct. We based the analysis on data from two surveys conducted in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden in 1997 and 2012. The surveys reported in detail one day of eating in representative samples of adult populations in the four countries (N = 4823 and N = 8242). We compared data regarding where...... of using tablets, computers, and smartphones while eating was strongly associated with young age. Further, each of the practices appeared to be related to different types of meal. We conclude that while the changes in the social organization of eating were not dramatic, signs of individualization...

  12. On Russian/Nordic Investment Competition in the Baltic States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olenchenko Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The researchers often overlook the relationships between Russian and Nordic investment capital; and even less attention is paid to studying the competition between the two. Yet this subject can be of particular relevance to the areas that are geographically, historically and culturally close to both Russia and the Nordic countries. Thus, the aim of this article is to understand how the competition between Russian and Nordic capital investment is played out in the Baltic States. The study discusses the principles of Russian and Nordic investment in the Baltic, and suggests ways to regulate these relations. To this end, we compare the investment conditions created in the Baltic States for both Russian and Nordic investors. The analysis shows that most of the Baltic market is controlled by the Nordic capital, which blocks the arrival of Russian investment to the Baltic States. With a nod to a number of previous studies, the authors of this article suggest some adjustments to the theory of foreign direct investment. The study will be also of practical interest to those Russian investors who are seeking entry points to the Baltic markets.

  13. The Nordic Gender Equality Model

    OpenAIRE

    Teigen, Mari; Skjeie, Hege

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we investigate the descriptive premises involved in portrayals of a Nordic model of gender equality. Mainly, we focus on the equality dimensions that form the baseline in comparative welfare state research and research on political participation. We outline these dimensions as norms for economic equity and democratic parity. First, we examine whether and how descriptive statistics that assess these two dimensions currently rank Nordic countries compared with other European co...

  14. CISG Nordic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    CISG Nordic er en forskningsdatabase hvor den seneste information om den internationale købelovs anvendelse i de Nordiske lande offentliggøres. På hjemmesiden indgår retsafgørelser, bibliografiske noter, FN dokumenter m.m.......CISG Nordic er en forskningsdatabase hvor den seneste information om den internationale købelovs anvendelse i de Nordiske lande offentliggøres. På hjemmesiden indgår retsafgørelser, bibliografiske noter, FN dokumenter m.m....

  15. CISG Nordic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    CISG Nordic er en forskningsdatabase hvor den seneste information om den internationale købelovs anvendelse i de Nordiske lande offentliggøres. På hjemmesiden indgår retsafgørelser, bibliografiske noter, FN dokumenter m.m.......CISG Nordic er en forskningsdatabase hvor den seneste information om den internationale købelovs anvendelse i de Nordiske lande offentliggøres. På hjemmesiden indgår retsafgørelser, bibliografiske noter, FN dokumenter m.m....

  16. Body mass index standard deviation score and obesity in children with type 1 diabetes in the Nordic countries. HbA1c and other predictors of increasing BMISDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkebaek, N H; Kahlert, J; Bjarnason, R; Drivvoll, A K; Johansen, A; Konradsdottir, E; Pundziute-Lyckå, A; Samuelsson, U; Skrivarhaug, T; Svensson, J

    2018-05-21

    Intensified insulin therapy may increase body weight and cause obesity. This study compared body mass index standard deviation score (BMISDS) and obesity rate in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and uncovered predictors for increasing BMISDS. Data registered in the Nordic national childhood diabetes databases during the period 2008-2012 on children below 15 years with T1D for more than 3 months were compiled, including information on gender, age, diabetes duration, hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ), insulin dose, severe hypoglycemia (SH), treatment modality, height and weight. The Swedish reference chart for BMI was used for calculating BMISDS. Totally, 11 025 children (48% females) (30 994 registrations) were included. Medians by the last recorded examination were: age, 13.5 years; diabetes duration, 4.3 years; HbA 1c , 7.9% (63 mmol/mol); insulin dose, 0.8 IU/kg/d and BMISDS, 0.70. Obesity rate was 18.5%. Adjusted mean BMISDS (BMISDS adj) was inversely related to HbA 1c and directly to diabetes duration. Higher BMISDS adj was found in those with an insulin dose above 0.6 IU/kg/d, and in girls above 10 years. Pump users had higher BMISDS adj than pen users, and patients with registered SH had higher BMISDS adj than patients without SH (both P < .001). Obesity rate in children with T1D in the Nordic countries is high, however, with country differences. Low HbA 1c , long diabetes duration, higher insulin dose, pump treatment and experiencing a SH predicted higher BMISDS. Diabetes caregivers should balance the risk of obesity and the benefit of a very low HbA 1c. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Nordic Noir on Television: The Killing I-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Gunhild

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic Noir has been applied by many countries as a slightly distorting mirror of tendencies in their own societies. On the background of its international appeal, the article analyses the prevalent genre of The Killing – the thriller – and relates it to the genres of crime fiction, political...

  18. The Nordic Housing Enabler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, T.; Nygren, C.; Slaug, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses development of a content-valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients, and their home environments. The instrument was transla......This study addresses development of a content-valid cross-Nordic version of the Housing Enabler and investigation of its inter-rater reliability when used in occupational therapy rating situations, involving occupational therapists, clients, and their home environments. The instrument...... was translated from the original Swedish version of the Housing Enabler, and adapted according to accessibility norms and guidelines for housing design in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland. This iterative process involved occupational therapists, architects, building engineers, and professional translators......, resulting in the Nordic Housing Enabler. For reliability testing, the sampling strategy and data collection procedures used were the same in all countries. Twenty voluntary occupational therapists, pair-wise but independently of each other, collected data from 106 cases by means of the Nordic Housing...

  19. Perspectives on Nordic Working Life Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ch. Karlsson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to this Thematic Issue on Perspectives on Nordic Working Life Research! It is perhaps not that surprising that a journal called Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies contains many discussions about “Nordic Models”: What is the Nordic Welfare State Model? What has happened to it lately? Is there still one? Has there ever been one? What about the Nordic Industrial Relations Model—is it on its way to be abandoned? And the Nordic Labor Market Model? Or the Nordic Work Environment Model? In contrast, in the Thematic Issue part of this issue of NJWLS Nordic working life research itself is discussed. Editing the issue has led me to some (selfcritical reflections on Nordic working life research—or perhaps rather reflections on the self-image of Nordic working life researchers. We often say that two of the cornerstones of Nordic working life research are the assumption that there is a positive correlation between employee autonomy at work and higher productivity, and that our research tradition is different from those found in other geographical areas (and, implicitly, probably better. Being part of the Nordic tradition, I too have claimed both, but I now think both needs to be qualified and critically discussed. Or rather, the first needs to be qualified and the consequences of the other critically evaluated (...

  20. A revision of the history of the Colletotrichum acutatum species complex in the Nordic countries based on herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundelin, Thomas; Strømeng, Gunn Mari; Gjærum, Halvor B; Amby, Daniel Buchvaldt; Ørstad, Kari; Jensen, Birgit; Lund, Ole Søgaard; Stensvand, Arne

    2015-08-01

    Herbaria collections containing plants with disease symptoms are highly valuable, and they are often the only way to investigate outbreaks and epidemics from the past as the number of viable isolates in culture collections is often limited. Species belonging to the Colletotrichum acutatum complex infect a range of important crops. As members of the C. acutatum complex are easily confused with other Colletotrichum species, molecular methods are central for the correct identification. We performed molecular analyses on 21 herbaria specimens, displaying anthracnose symptoms, collected in Norway and Denmark before the first confirmed findings of C. acutatum complex members in this region. Sequencing parts of the fungal ITS regions showed that members of the species complex were present in 13 of the 21 specimens collected in different parts of Norway and Denmark between 1948 and 1991, representing seven plant hosts (three cherry species, apple, raspberry and rhododendron). This is the first time herbarium specimens have been used to study these pathogens under Nordic conditions. Differences in the ITS sequences suggest the presence of different genotypes within the complex, indicating a well-established population. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Changes in the thermal growing season in Nordic countries during the past century and prospects for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Carter

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The start, end, duration and intensity of the thermal growing season (the period with mean daily temperatures exceeding 5°C during the past century (1890-1995 was analysed at nine sites in the Nordic region. Statistical comparisons were made between three adjacent 35-year periods. The results indicate that the growing season lengthened considerably at all sites between 1891-1925 and 1926-1960. Lengthening has continued at a slower rate up to the present at the eight Fennoscandian sites but not at the Icelandic site. In contrast, the intensity of the growing season, expressed by effective temperature sum above 5°C, which increased at all sites between the first two periods, has decreased slightly at all locations except Turku in recent decades. Under three scenarios, representing the range of estimated greenhouse gas-induced warming by the 2050s, the growing season is expected to lengthen at all sites. For a “Central” scenario, the greatest lengthening is computed for southern and western Scandinavia (7-8 weeks with smaller changes in Finland (4 weeks and Iceland (3 weeks. With a lengthening growing season during the past century in Fennoscandia, there are likely to have been impacts on natural and managed ecosystems. Some evidence of recent biotic and abiotic effects already exists, but other indicators of long-term change remain to be analysed.

  2. Changes in the thermal growing season in Nordic countries during the past century and prospects for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. CARTER

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The start, end, duration and intensity of the thermal growing season (the period with mean daily temperatures exceeding 5°C during the past century (1890-1995 was analysed at nine sites in the Nordic region. Statistical comparisons were made between three adjacent 35-year periods. The results indicate that the growing season lengthened considerably at all sites between 1891-1925 and 1926-1960. Lengthening has continued at a slower rate up to the present at the eight Fennoscandian sites but not at the Icelandic site. In contrast, the intensity of the growing season, expressed by effective temperature sum above 5°C, which increased at all sites between the first two periods, has decreased slightly at all locations except Turku in recent decades. Under three scenarios, representing the range of estimated greenhouse gas-induced warming by the 2050s, the growing season is expected to lengthen at all sites. For a "Central" scenario, the greatest lengthening is computed for southern and western Scandinavia (7-8 weeks with smaller changes in Finland (4 weeks and Iceland (3 weeks. With a lengthening growing season during the past century in Fennoscandia, there are likely to have been impacts on natural and managed ecosystems. Some evidence of recent biotic and abiotic effects already exists, but other indicators of long-term change remain to be analysed. ;

  3. Nordic Working Life Research - Continuity and Renewal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Helge Søndergaard; Bergholm, Tapio; Gonäs, Lena

    2011-01-01

    Working life research does not have clear boundaries; however its focus is quite clear: Changes in working life and how these changes affect qualifications, health, occupations, innovation, the economy, identity, social orientation and culture. The density of working life research is quite high...... in the Nordic countries, and this research has always been involved in the development of the Nordic welfare societies in which the development of work has been one important factor. In this article working life research is presented in its historical contexts, emphasizing the welfare challenges to which...... the research has been related. The challenges and tensions related to the research are not presented as being simply internal to the research work, they also reflect challenges and tensions in working life and institutions that are supposed to support working life. Current controversies in working life...

  4. Grid investments in a Nordic perspective. Report to EMG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-05-15

    In a letter of 20 November 2008, the Electricity Market Group (EMG) under the Nordic Council of Ministers requested NordREG to carry out an assignment related to transmission network investments in the Nordic countries. The assignment to NordREG was divided into two tasks; to map the differences in the legislation and licensing processes in the Nordic countries and to analyse these differences and possible ways of financing common network investment projects. In the second half of 2009 the consultant Econ Poeyry was engaged to support in the finalisation of this project, mainly concerning possibilities for Nordic financing. The final text is however the sole responsibility of the task force. A draft version of the final report was delivered to EMG in December 2009. At the same time the report was sent to the Nordic TSOs together with an invitation to a workshop at Gardermoen on 26 January 2010. The comments from the TSOs are included in appendix 2 of the report

  5. Energy economy in Nordic industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, P H; Finnedal, B H

    1980-01-01

    The employment, economic and energetic situation in various industrial branches and their importance for industry as a whole is mapped for Nordic countries. Future Nordic energy projects can base their attempts to decrease energy costs per unit on this report. In food and stimulants industry, chemical, glass and ceramic industry over 90% energy is used for processing while in steel- and metal-industry the processing consumes only about 25%. Rentability of new investments in energy saving should be considered in these branches against investments in automation, new equipment etc. Common Nordic energy-saving projects can provide much better energy economy. For instance 4% of USA energy which had formerly been used in drying processes is drastically decreased and if the USA result can be transferred to Nordic conditions DKr 160 million can be save. Prospective common projects are process-types like drying, spray-drying, heat treatments of mineral proproducts, and evaporation.

  6. Birth characteristics and Wilms tumors in children in the Nordic countries: a register-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüz, Joachim; Schmidt, Lisbeth Samsø; Kogner, Per; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Pal, Niklas; Stokland, Tore; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-05-01

    Little is known about causes of Wilms tumor. Because of the young age at diagnosis, several studies have looked at various birth characteristics. We conducted a registry-based case-control study involving 690 cases of Wilms tumor aged 0-14 years, occurring in Denmark, Finland, Norway or Sweden during 1985-2006, individually matched to five controls drawn randomly from the Nordic childhood population. Information on birth characteristics was obtained from the population-based medical birth registries. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using conditional logistic regression analysis. We observed a distinct association between Wilms tumor and high birth weight (≥4 kg) for girls (OR 1.97, CI 1.50-2.59) but not for boys (1.04, 0.78-1.38); overall, the OR was 1.43 (1.17-1.74). Among girls, risk increased by 28% (15-42%) per 500 g increase in birth weight. Large-for-gestational age girls also had a higher risk (2.48, 1.51-4.05), whereas no effect was seen for boys (1.12, 0.60-2.07). An association was seen with Apgar score at 5 min birth order. In our large-scale, registry-based study, we confirmed earlier observations of an association between high birth weight and risk of Wilms tumor, but we found an effect only in girls. The higher risk of infants with low Apgar score might reflect hypoxia causing cell damage, adverse side effects of neonatal treatment or reverse causation as low Apgar score might indicate the presence of a tumor. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  7. Democracy and care: Values education in Nordic preschool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Henrik; Skriver Jensen, Anders; Broström, Stig

    2018-01-01

    This chapter deals with caring and democratic values expressed in interaction between educators and children (between one to five years) in Nordic preschool settings. Data consist of video sequences based in several preschools from each Nordic countries. The theoretical position is based...... on Tomasello and Klafki . Democratic values are with reference to Klafki related to influence, rights, freedom, co-determination solidarity and emphatic life style. Care is expressed when the educator shows a specific emotional attitude, openness and sensitivity and strives to understand the child...... is needed in order to create an intentional and goal-oriented values education....

  8. Vector-borne parasitic infections in dogs in the Baltic and Nordic countries: A questionnaire study to veterinarians on canine babesiosis and infections with Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiškina, Valentina; Jokelainen, Pikka

    2017-09-15

    Canine vector-borne diseases have been spreading northwards in Europe, and canine babesiosis and infections with Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) and Dirofilaria repens have been diagnosed also in the Baltic and the Nordic countries. We used an online questionnaire to survey how large a proportion of veterinarians in the Baltic (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) and the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) saw canine babesiosis cases and dogs infected with D. immitis and D. repens in 2016. In addition, questions regarding transmission, zoonotic potential, clinical signs, and treatment of the infections were asked. The questionnaire was completed by 122 veterinarians. In 2016, 23% of them had seen at least one case of canine babesiosis, 15% at least one dog with D. immitis infection, and 9% at least one dog with D. repens infection. A veterinarian working in the Baltic countries had 12.2 times higher odds to have seen a canine babesiosis case and 9.3 times higher odds to have seen a dog with D. repens infection than a veterinarian working in the Nordic countries did. While 48% of the veterinarians knew that canine babesiosis is not considered a zoonosis, 26% knew that D. immitis is zoonotic and 34% knew that D. repens is zoonotic. The results suggested that autochthonous cases of the three vector-borne parasitic infections were seen by veterinarians in the Baltic countries, whereas most cases seen by veterinarians in the Nordic countries appeared to be imported. A substantial proportion of the veterinarians did not know whether the parasites are zoonotic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nordic Analysis of Climate Friendly Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Inger; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wahlstrøm, Åsa

    This report summarizes the findings of the work conducted within the project “Nordic Analysis of Climate Friendly Buildings”, financed by the Nordic Council of Ministers. The main goal of the project was to establish a knowledge and decision base for a Nordic innovation program that will promote...... the development and demonstration of low energy and climate friendly buildings. The innovation program should support a development that brings the Nordic countries to an international forefront with respect to business strongholds and market penetration of low energy and climate friendly buildings....

  10. Nordic Corporate Governance and Industrial Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steen

    to the international audience. This paper therefore reviews the Nordic corporate governance model with special emphasis on a unique ownership structure, industrial foundations (foundations that own business companies). Rather than a meticulous description of details it emphasizes the Nordic model as a mode......The Nordic countries have attracted considerable attention in recent years as a benchmark for good governance. However, while the political governance characteristics of the Nordic model – particularly the welfare state - are well understood, its corporate governance characteristics remain elusive...

  11. Analysing changes of health inequalities in the Nordic welfare states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahelma, Eero; Kivelä, Katariina; Roos, Eva

    2002-01-01

    -standing illness and perceived health were analysed by age, gender, employment status and educational attainment. First, age-adjusted overall prevalence percentages were calculated. Second, changes in the magnitude of relative health inequalities were studied using logistic regression analysis. Within each country......This study examined changes over time in relative health inequalities among men and women in four Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. A serious economic recession burst out in the early 1990s particularly in Finland and Sweden. We ask whether this adverse social structural......'development influenced health inequalities by employment status and educational attainment, i.e. whether the trends in health inequalities were similar or dissimilar between the Nordic countries. The data derived from comparable interview surveys carried out in 1986/87 and 1994/95 in the four countries. Limiting long...

  12. The Nordic Health Promotion Research Network (NHPRN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringsberg, Karin C

    2015-08-01

    The Nordic Health Promotion Research Network (NHPRN) was established in 2007 at the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV). This article aims to describe the foundation of the NHPRN, the development and the present status of the work of NHPRN. The NHPRN consists of about 50 senior and junior researchers from all Nordic countries. It is a working network that aims to develop the theoretical understanding of health promotion, to create research cooperation in health promotion from a Nordic perspective and to extend the scope of health promotion through education. Network members meet biannually to discuss and further develop research within the field and are also responsible for the Nordic conference on Health Promotion, organized every 3 years. The NHV hosted the network between 2007 and 2014; and the World Health Organisation (WHO) will assume this role in 2015. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  13. The Impact of Political Relations Between Countries on Economic Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Askari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we assess the implications of changes in bilateral diplomatic relations with the United States for economic relations. We identify countries whose relations with the US changed during two historic and significant milestones in the past three decades, and a third group of countries after their leftist governments failed/collapsed in early 1990s. Using the Mann-Whitney U-test, we measure the significance of changes in economic relations. We chose the following set of economic indices to reflect economic relations: imports and exports to and from the US, capital outflows from the US to the country, economic and military assistance provided by the US, flow of students to the US, US arms export to the country, the country’s military expenditures, and believing in the importance of remittances and FDI and portfolio investment we use total figures as we did not have bilateral figures. Our results, though mixed, offer some interesting insights.

  14. Breast cancer incidence and mortality in the Nordic capitals, 1970-1998. Trends related to mammography screening programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törnberg, Sven; Kemetli, Levent; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to relate the time trends in breast cancer incidence and mortality to the introduction of mammography screening in the Nordic capitals. Helsinki offered screening to women aged 50-59 starting in 1986. The other three capitals offered screening to women aged 50......-69 starting in 1989 in Stockholm, 1991 in Copenhagen, and 1996 in Oslo. Prevalence peaks in breast cancer incidence depended on the age groups covered by the screening, the length of the implementation of screening, and the extent of background opportunistic screening. No mortality reduction following...... the introduction of screening was visible after seven to 12 years of screening in any of the three capitals where significant effects of the screening on the breast cancer mortality had already been demonstrated by using other analytical methods for the evaluation. No visible effect on mortality reduction...

  15. Nordic noir and lifted localities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    What I do here is to draw attention to a particular visual quality of recent Nordic noir and to relate the visuality of TV-drama to what I – with a term borrowed from Roland Robertson – dub lifted localites.......What I do here is to draw attention to a particular visual quality of recent Nordic noir and to relate the visuality of TV-drama to what I – with a term borrowed from Roland Robertson – dub lifted localites....

  16. Nordic Narratives of the Second World War : National Historiographies Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    How have the dramatic events of the Second World War been viewed in the Nordic countries? In Nordic Narratives of the Second World War, leading Nordic historians analyse post-war memory and historiography. They explore the relationship between scholarly and public understandings of the war. How have national interpretations been shaped by official security-policy doctrines? And in what way has the end of the Cold War affected the Nordic narratives? The authors not only present the ...

  17. Nordic market report 2009 : Development in the Nordic electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    The Nordic region is characterized by a unique mix of generation sources where the high share of hydropower, representing virtually all of the Norwegian and nearly half of the Swedish generation capacity, has a great influence on the market. The level of precipitation is thus vital when calculating and analysing potential generation levels. In addition, the Nordic region has significantly colder winters than any other European country, influencing the consumption as many households are electrically heated. In 2008 the overall electricity consumption in the Nordic region was slightly higher - 1.6 per cent - than in 2007. During periods of peak consumption the Nordic power system proved sufficient to ensure security of supply without restrictions on consumption. The Nordic region operates almost entirely as one synchronous power system through transmission grid. The continuous reinforcement of the Nordic transmission grid has enabled an increased security of supply as well as a more efficient use of the generation capacity. Increasing cross border power flows strain the transmission lines and increases the demand for transmission capacity. Possible congestions occurring between the Nord Pool bidding areas are handled through market splitting, while internal congestions in general are handled through counter trade or by reducing interconnector capacity at the bidding area borders. The Nordic wholesale power market is a well functioning electricity market. Trade at Nord Pool has increased steadily since it was established in 1993. Although trading at Nord Pool Spot is voluntary, significantly more physical power is now traded on the power exchange than bilaterally - from 42 per cent of total Nordic consumption in 2004 to 76 per cent in 2008. During 2008 average spot prices at Nord Pool were considerably higher (approximately 60 per cent) than prices in 2007. The Nordic retail markets are essentially four separate markets, influenced by national differences, but work on

  18. Nordic market report 2009. Development in the Nordic electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-15

    The Nordic region is characterized by a unique mix of generation sources where the high share of hydropower, representing virtually all of the Norwegian and nearly half of the Swedish generation capacity, has a great influence on the market. The level of precipitation is thus vital when calculating and analysing potential generation levels. In addition, the Nordic region has significantly colder winters than any other European country, influencing the consumption as many households are electrically heated. In 2008 the overall electricity consumption in the Nordic region was slightly higher - 1.6 per cent - than in 2007. During periods of peak consumption the Nordic power system proved sufficient to ensure security of supply without restrictions on consumption. The Nordic region operates almost entirely as one synchronous power system through transmission grid. The continuous reinforcement of the Nordic transmission grid has enabled an increased security of supply as well as a more efficient use of the generation capacity. Increasing cross border power flows strain the transmission lines and increases the demand for transmission capacity. Possible congestions occurring between the Nord Pool bidding areas are handled through market splitting, while internal congestions in general are handled through counter trade or by reducing interconnector capacity at the bidding area borders. The Nordic wholesale power market is a well functioning electricity market. Trade at Nord Pool has increased steadily since it was established in 1993. Although trading at Nord Pool Spot is voluntary, significantly more physical power is now traded on the power exchange than bilaterally - from 42 per cent of total Nordic consumption in 2004 to 76 per cent in 2008. During 2008 average spot prices at Nord Pool were considerably higher (approximately 60 per cent) than prices in 2007. The Nordic retail markets are essentially four separate markets, influenced by national differences, but work on

  19. How Do World-Class Nordic Combined Athletes Differ From Specialized Cross-Country Skiers and Ski Jumpers in Sport-Specific Capacity and Training Characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Rasdal, Vegard; Bråten, Steinar; Moen, Frode; Ettema, Gertjan

    2016-10-01

    To compare sport-specific laboratory capacities and the annual training of world-class Nordic combined (NC) athletes with specialized ski jumpers (SJ) and cross-country (XC) skiers. Five world-class athletes from each sports discipline were compared. Ski jump imitations were performed on a 3-dimensional force plate in NC athletes and SJ, whereas XC skiing characteristics were obtained from submaximal and maximal roller ski skating on a treadmill in NC athletes and XC skiers. In addition, anthropometrics and annual training characteristics were determined. NC athletes demonstrated 9% higher body mass and showed 17% lower vertical speed in the ski jump imitation than SJ (all P ski-jumping-specific sessions and outdoor ski jumps compared with SJ. NC athletes performed 31% less endurance training, mainly caused by lower amounts of low- and moderate-intensity training in the classical technique, whereas high-intensity strength and speed training and endurance training in the skating technique did not differ substantially from XC skiers. To simultaneously optimize endurance, explosive, and technical capacities in 2 different disciplines, world-class NC athletes train approximately two-thirds of the XC skier's endurance training volume and perform one-half of the ski-jump-specific training compared with SJ. Still, the various laboratory capacities differed only 10-17% compared with SJ and XC skiers.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of fumonisins by the Nordic countries and occurrence of fumonisins (FB1 and FB2) in corn-based foods on the Danish market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette; Thorup, Inger

    2001-01-01

    Experts from the Nordic countries (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland) have carried out an evaluation of fumonisins. The working group members concluded that, at that time point, it was not possible to carry out a complete risk assessment. However, it was recommended that the human daily...... intake of fumonisins should be less than 1 mug/kg bw/day. Subsequently, the presence of the Fusarium mycotoxins fumonisin B-1 and B-2 (FB1 and FB2) in corn-based food on the Danish retail market has been determined. A total of 70 samples were analysed and 37% contained FB1 and 21% contained FB2....... No fumonisins were found in sweet corn (canned or frozen), corn-on-the-cob, corn starch or gruel powder for babies. FB1 was found in about half of the corn flakes, corn snack and popcorn (not popped) samples, whereas FB2 was seen to a lesser extent. Both FB1 and FB2 were found in 75% or more of the corn flour...

  1. Trends in testicular cancer incidence in the Nordic countries with a special focus on the recent decrease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rune; Møller, Henrik; Pukkala, Eero

    to increases with each consecutive birth cohort in each country. In Denmark, a decline in incidence was observed during the past 5 years, and men born around 1943 and around 1968 showed lower incidences than men born just before or just after these dates. These birth-cohort effects were seen both for seminoma...

  2. The formation of parliamentarism in the Nordic countries from the Napoleonic Wars to the First World War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Uffe; Kurunmäki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter analyses the conceptual clusters that have been formed in the debates over parliamentary government in Denmark, Finland and Sweden. The aim is to bring forth a transnational view by paying attention to the ways in which the parliamentary life of other countries was referred to and co...

  3. Nordic Cancer Registries - an overview of their procedures and data comparability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkala, Eero; Engholm, Gerda; Højsgaard Schmidt, Lise Kristine; Storm, Hans; Khan, Staffan; Lambe, Mats; Pettersson, David; Ólafsdóttir, Elínborg; Tryggvadóttir, Laufey; Hakanen, Tiina; Malila, Nea; Virtanen, Anni; Johannesen, Tom Børge; Larønningen, Siri; Ursin, Giske

    2018-04-01

    The Nordic Cancer Registries are among the oldest population-based registries in the world, with more than 60 years of complete coverage of what is now a combined population of 26 million. However, despite being the source of a substantial number of studies, there is no published paper comparing the different registries. Therefore, we did a systematic review to identify similarities and dissimilarities of the Nordic Cancer Registries, which could possibly explain some of the differences in cancer incidence rates across these countries. We describe and compare here the core characteristics of each of the Nordic Cancer Registries: (i) data sources; (ii) registered disease entities and deviations from IARC multiple cancer coding rules; (iii) variables and related coding systems. Major changes over time are described and discussed. All Nordic Cancer Registries represent a high quality standard in terms of completeness and accuracy of the registered data. Even though the information in the Nordic Cancer Registries in general can be considered more similar than any other collection of data from five different countries, there are numerous differences in registration routines, classification systems and inclusion of some tumors. These differences are important to be aware of when comparing time trends in the Nordic countries.

  4. The Nordic difference: Job quality in Europe 1995–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Oinas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous empirical research has pointed out that Nordic countries are distinguished from the rest of Europe in terms of job quality. On the other hand, it has been debated whether, in the longer run, the Nordic welfare state is able to insulate workers from globalization effects. This article investigates whether Nordic countries have retained their advantageous position concerning job quality compared with other EU countries. Empirical analyses are based on the European Working Conditions Survey collected in 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010. We use data on employees in the 15 member states of the EU prior to enlargement in 2004 (n = 61,457. The results partly confirm previous findings of high job quality in the Nordic countries. However, there are clear differences between Nordic countries. To be precise, Denmark stands out from the rest of Europe and other Nordic countries with its higher level of job quality.

  5. Effects of an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet on ambulatory blood pressure in metabolic syndrome: a randomized SYSDIET sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brader, L; Uusitupa, M; Dragsted, L O; Hermansen, K

    2014-01-01

    Dietary pattern is central in the prevention of hypertension and blood pressure (BP)-related diseases. A diet based on healthy Nordic foods may have a favourable impact on BP. The objective was to clarify whether a Nordic alternative for a healthy food pattern would have beneficial effects on ambulatory BP in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS). In total, 37 subjects were randomized to either a healthy Nordic diet or a control diet. A healthy Nordic diet embraced whole grains, rapeseed oil, berries, fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts and low-fat dairy products of Nordic origin. The mean nutrient intake in the Nordic countries formed the control diet, embracing wheat products, dairy fat-based spread and a lower intake of fruits, vegetables and fish. Diets were isoenergetic. Ambulatory BP was monitored and 24-h urine was collected before and after 12 weeks of intervention. After 12 weeks, ambulatory diastolic BP (-4.4 mm Hg; P=0.001) and mean arterial pressure (-4.2 mm Hg; P=0.006) were lowered by the healthy Nordic diet compared with the control diet, whereas changes in ambulatory systolic BP did not differ significantly between diets (-3.5 mm Hg; P=0.122). Heart rate tended to be lower in those on the healthy Nordic diet (P=0.057). Urinary sodium and potassium excretions were unaffected by diets and consequently not associated with the healthy Nordic diet-induced lowering of BP. Consumption of Nordic varieties of health-enhancing foods for 12 weeks decreased diastolic ambulatory BP and mean arterial pressure in subjects with features of MetS during weight-stable condition, suggesting beneficial effects of a healthy Nordic dietary pattern on ambulatory BP.

  6. Nordic Branding Podcast 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Reflections on Nordic branding with professor Dannie Kjeldgaard. Why Nordic regionality and why now? What is the dynamics of local/global/glocal/regional?......Reflections on Nordic branding with professor Dannie Kjeldgaard. Why Nordic regionality and why now? What is the dynamics of local/global/glocal/regional?...

  7. Energy integration experiences at the Europe, at the Nordic countries and at the Central America: considerations relevant to the South America integration process; Experiencias de integracao energetica na Europa, nos paises nordicos e na America Central: consideracoes relevantes ao processo de integracao Sul-Americana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Adriana Fiorotti; Andreza, Fernanda Marques Pereira; Soares, Jeferson Borghetti; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Bacile; Oliveira, Ricardo Gorini de [Empresa de Pesquisa Energetica (EPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], Emails: adriana.campos@epe.gov.br, fernanda.andreza@epe.gov.br; jeferson.soares@epe.gov.br, maria.pinheiro, ricardo.gorini@epe.gov.br

    2010-07-01

    In view of institutional/contractual regulatory problems at the South America, some experiences of energy integration at the electrical sectors and natural gas (Nordic countries. European Union and Central America), identifying related vantages and advantageous. Besides, there is an attempt of characterization of the process step of energy integration, and the fitting of regions in these steps, observing that the process of energy integration in the South America it is found in a initial step yet if it is considered the used methodology by the Colombian enterprise Interconexion Electrica S.A.E.S.P. - ISA (2007)

  8. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. PROCEDURE: We investigated disease characteristics and outcome...... countries. RESULTS: The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients...

  9. New Nordic comics—a question of promotion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Platz Cortsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Throughout history, the cultures of the Nordic countries have at certain points been seen through a lense that stresses regional commonality, most recently with terms like “New Nordic Cooking” or “Nordic Noir.” In this article, we examine the possibility of a common concept of “New Nordic Comics” by analyzing a number of Nordic comics anthologies. We discuss in what way Nordic comics might be said to be new and how they can be considered to be Nordic. We state that the comics in the collections are not identifiable as particularly Nordic based on their themes or the stylistic or visual repertoires. In these respects, Nordic comics are part of a broader transnational comics culture. The comics, however, occasionally bear witness to a Nordic background or heritage, for instance, in the form of words in Finnish or the Scandinavian languages, names of characters or the milieux in the comics. On the whole, Nordicness in comics is variable and diverse, and rather than a phenomenon based on inherent quality or aesthetic commonality, new Nordic comics are a result of promotional strategies, cultural policies, and transnational connections between Nordic actors in the comics field.

  10. Nordic Market report 2010. Development in the Nordic Electricity Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-15

    The Nordic region is characterized by a unique mix of generation sources, with a very high share of hydropower. Hydropower accounts for virtually all of the Norwegian and nearly half of the Swedish generation capacity, making the level of precipitation vital when calculating and analysing potential generation levels. Climatic conditions such as, significantly colder winters than any other European country also influence consumption in the Nordic region, as many households are electrically heated. Overall electricity consumption in the Nordic region in 2009 was marked by decreasing consumption in every market - from a decrease of 1,5% in Denmark to a decrease of 5,5% in Finland. The Nordic transmission grid connects almost the entire region into one synchronous power system enabling increased security of supply as well as a more efficient use of the generation capacity, but congestion occurs. Congestions between the Nord Pool bidding areas are handled through market splitting, while internal congestions in general are handled through counter trade or by reducing interconnector capacity at the bidding area borders. The key future challenge for transmission network operations both in the Nordic area, and as well on the European level will be to facilitate the functioning of the pan-European wholesale electricity markets. The Nordic wholesale power market is well functioning. The volume traded at Nord Pool in 2009 was about the same share of total consumption as that of 2008. Although trading at Nord Pool is voluntary, significantly more power is traded on the power exchange than bilaterally. During 2009 average spot prices at Nord Pool were lower than prices in 2008 due to both lower demand and generation costs for thermal power plants for most of 2009. The Nordic retail markets are essentially four separate markets, influenced by national differences, but work on integration has started. Throughout 2009 retail prices in the Nordic region were lower than in 2008

  11. Pharmacoepidemiology at Nordic School of Public Health NHV: Examples from 1999 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Gyllensten, Hanna; Hedna, Khedidja; Hakkarainen, Katja M; Lesén, Eva; Andersson Sundell, Karolina; Gyllensten, H; Hedna, K; Hakkarainen, K M; Lesén, E; Sundell, K Andersson

    2015-08-01

    Pharmacoepidemiology is a branch of public health and had a place at the Nordic School of Public Health. Courses, Master's theses and Doctorates of Public Health (DrPH) in Pharmacoepidemiology were a relatively minor, but still important part of the school's activities. This paper gives a short background, followed by some snapshots of the activities at NHV, and then some illustrative case-studies. These case-studies list their own responsible co-authors and have separate reference lists. In the Nordic context, NHV was a unique provider of training and research in pharmacoepidemiology, with single courses to complete DrPH training, as well as implementation of externally-funded research projects. With the closure of NHV at the end of 2014, it is unclear if such a comprehensive approach towards pharmacoepidemiology will be found elsewhere in the Nordic countries. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  12. Action plan for Nordic energy co-operation 2006-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Action Plan for Nordic Energy Co-operation 2006-2009 is targeted at creating a visible and sustainable contribution to solving the most important and politically most relevant energy policy challenges faced by the Nordic region. The plan concentrates on three main areas: Energy markets; Sustainable energy system; and Nordic impact on the international agenda. The Action Plan is the energy sector's contribution to the implementation of the Nordic strategy 'Sustainable Development - New Bearing for the Nordic Countries' and to a number of the Nordic Council's recommendations for the development of the Nordic energy sector. An important element of the implementation of the action plan is on-going contact and information sharing between the Nordic Energy Policy co-operation and the Nordic Energy Research. The continues dialogue between the Nordic Council of Energy Ministers and The Nordic Council on future energy policy challenges will likewise be an important part of the political process. (BA)

  13. NKS - The Nordic region's cooperative network for addressing challenges in nuclear safety and emergency preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K.G. [NKS/Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Andgren, K. [NKS/Vattenfall R and D (Sweden); Leino, K. [NKS/Fortum Power and Heat Oy (Finland); Magnusson, S. [NKS/Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (Iceland); Physant, F. [NKS/FRIT, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2014-07-01

    Based on the foundation of a common cultural and historical heritage and a long tradition of collaboration, NKS aims to facilitate a common Nordic view on nuclear and radiation safety. A common understanding of rules, practice and measures, and national differences in this context, is here an essential requirement. Problems can generally be tackled quicker, more efficiently, more consistently and at a lower cost through collaboration, bearing in mind that key competencies are not equally distributed in the different Nordic countries. For instance common Nordic challenges emerge in relation to nuclear installations, where nuclear power plants are in operation in Finland and Sweden, and research reactors have been operated in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. There is an obvious benefit in exchanging ideas and technologies in relation to plant operation, and since a number of reactors in different Nordic countries are under decommissioning, a collaborative benefit can also be realised in that context. Sweden also has a nuclear fuel production plant, and its collaboration with other Nordic nuclear installations can also be beneficial. Further, a number of large radiological installations are projected in Nordic areas (e.g., the MAX-LAB/MAX IV synchrotron radiation source and the European spallation source ESS), where Nordic organisations are collaborating in addressing, e.g., potential environmental implications. On the emergency preparedness side, the Fukushima accident in March 2011 was a reminder that large accidents at nuclear installations can lead to widespread radioactive contamination in the environment. In order to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies, should they affect Nordic populations, it is necessary to maintain an operational emergency preparedness. By continuously improving detection, response and decision aiding tools while maintaining an informal collaborative network between relevant stakeholders in the Nordic countries (including

  14. EDITORIAL The 23rd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting The 23rd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsson, Sveinn; Sveinbjörnsson, Einar

    2010-12-01

    A Nordic Semiconductor Meeting is held every other year with the venue rotating amongst the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The focus of these meetings remains 'original research and science being carried out on semiconductor materials, devices and systems'. Reports on industrial activity have usually featured. The topics have ranged from fundamental research on point defects in a semiconductor to system architecture of semiconductor electronic devices. Proceedings from these events are regularly published as a topical issue of Physica Scripta. All of the papers in this topical issue have undergone critical peer review and we wish to thank the reviewers and the authors for their cooperation, which has been instrumental in meeting the high scientific standards and quality of the series. This meeting of the 23rd Nordic Semiconductor community, NSM 2009, was held at Háskólatorg at the campus of the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland, 14-17 June 2009. Support was provided by the University of Iceland. Almost 50 participants presented a broad range of topics covering semiconductor materials and devices as well as related material science interests. The conference provided a forum for Nordic and international scientists to present and discuss new results and ideas concerning the fundamentals and applications of semiconductor materials. The meeting aim was to advance the progress of Nordic science and thus aid in future worldwide technological advances concerning technology, education, energy and the environment. Topics Theory and fundamental physics of semiconductors Emerging semiconductor technologies (for example III-V integration on Si, novel Si devices, graphene) Energy and semiconductors Optical phenomena and optical devices MEMS and sensors Program 14 June Registration 13:00-17:00 15 June Meeting program 09:30-17:00 and Poster Session I 16 June Meeting program 09:30-17:00 and Poster Session II 17 June Excursion and dinner

  15. Proceedings of the 1st Nordic Optimization Symposium - 10th Nordic MPS meeting, Copenhagen 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens; Jørgensen, Rene Munk; Kohl, Niklas

    2006-01-01

    , Operations Research and Mathematical Programming. Finally we would like to thank our sponsors and supporter for their contributions. It has among other things made it possible to give free registration to a number of researchers from the Baltic countries and Ph.D. students in general. We wish you all......On behalf of the Technical University of Denmark, the Danish Operations Research Society and the Nordic Section of the Mathematical Programming Society we welcome you to Copenhagen and the 1st Nordic Optimization Symposium - the 10th meeting of the Nordic MPS. The meetings of the Nordic MPS have...... to add a new title, that reflects the much broader field that is our playground at these meetings. Still the odd trustworthy title “Meeting of the Nordic MPS” has been maintained to demonstrate the origin of the symposium. It is our hope that future Nordic MPS meetings will carry on using this “double...

  16. Nordic eHealth Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyppönen, Hannele; Faxvaag, Arild; Gilstad, Heidi

    This report describes first results of the Network: eHealth policy analysis and first common Nordic eHealth indicators. The results show similarities and also some differences in the eHealth policies, priorities and implementation. Interesting similarities and differences in availability and use...... of eHealth services in the Nordic countries were found with the first comparable eHealth indicators. The results create a basis for Evidence-based policy making as well as benchmarking and learning best practices from each other....

  17. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis

    2006-01-01

    activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism....... Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients...... when compared to unsupervised Nordic Walking and advice to stay active. In addition we investigate whether there is an increase in the cardiovascular metabolism in persons performing supervised Nordic Walking compared to persons who are advised to stay active. Finally, we investigate whether...

  18. Development of a Common Nordic Balance Settlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    NordREG finds it essential for the customers that a common integrated end-user electricity market is developed and that all end-users are able to take part in the Nordic market. A common Nordic balance settlement is one important part of such a change. However, attention has to be paid to the comments that a badly designed common system is worse than well-designed national systems. It is thus important that the change to a common balance settlement is so thoroughly investigated that the common system gives a basis for a well-functioning market. An important basis for such a change is an agreed vision for the process: The present different systems for balance settlement shall by the year 2010 be replaced by a common Nordic balance settlement. This means that: It will be possible for a supplier to sell to the whole Nordic market from one legal entity and using only one system for customer management and reporting. The common Nordic balance settlement will be designed in such a way that it contributes to a well functioning market. This means for example that it will be attractive even for small suppliers and some end-users to be balance responsible parties. It is feasible that the first phase is focused on those present differences that are most decisive for fulfilment of the vision. NordREG recommends that the following issues shall be discussed and agreed in co-operation between NordREG, Nordel and relevant stakeholders in the first phase: The definition shall include how the common Nordic balance settlement shall interact with the balance control and the balance regulation of the interconnected power system and the balance settlement between countries performed by the TSOs. The definition should include the cost-base for common Nordic balance settlement in relation to other system responsibility costs. The core activities of system responsibility have also been analyzed by NordREG. It is important to find a balance between inter alia the need for simplicity and the

  19. Development of a Common Nordic Balance Settlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    NordREG finds it essential for the customers that a common integrated end-user electricity market is developed and that all end-users are able to take part in the Nordic market. A common Nordic balance settlement is one important part of such a change. However, attention has to be paid to the comments that a badly designed common system is worse than well-designed national systems. It is thus important that the change to a common balance settlement is so thoroughly investigated that the common system gives a basis for a well-functioning market. An important basis for such a change is an agreed vision for the process: The present different systems for balance settlement shall by the year 2010 be replaced by a common Nordic balance settlement. This means that: It will be possible for a supplier to sell to the whole Nordic market from one legal entity and using only one system for customer management and reporting. The common Nordic balance settlement will be designed in such a way that it contributes to a well functioning market. This means for example that it will be attractive even for small suppliers and some end-users to be balance responsible parties. It is feasible that the first phase is focused on those present differences that are most decisive for fulfilment of the vision. NordREG recommends that the following issues shall be discussed and agreed in co-operation between NordREG, Nordel and relevant stakeholders in the first phase: The definition shall include how the common Nordic balance settlement shall interact with the balance control and the balance regulation of the interconnected power system and the balance settlement between countries performed by the TSOs. The definition should include the cost-base for common Nordic balance settlement in relation to other system responsibility costs. The core activities of system responsibility have also been analyzed by NordREG. It is important to find a balance between inter alia the need for simplicity and the

  20. The Nordic model”: historical origins and its significance for the work place dialogue towards increased organizational sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiller, B.; Winkel, Jørgen; Edwards, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    of the labour market and a principle of no-state intervention in industrial conflicts. Thus, the industrial relations in the Nordic countries still seem to be exceptional. Key research issues are now to further investigate the Nordic Model in terms of: - critical prerequisites for a positive environment...... for dialogues based on workplace agreements - how such insights can be measured and further developed - how they can be made available to a wider audience in an applicable way...