WorldWideScience

Sample records for noradrenergic neurotransmitter systems

  1. The central noradrenergic system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-07-27

    Jul 27, 2006 ... recognition of a direct influence of the central noradrenergic system on peripheral ... influences on cerebral function and behavior it is impossible to imagine ... stimuli and to speed-up information processing.4. The influence of ...

  2. Focus On: Neurotransmitter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Puglia, Michael P.; Zucca, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Neurotransmitter systems have been long recognized as important targets of the developmental actions of alcohol (i.e., ethanol). Short- and long-term effects of ethanol on amino acid (e.g., γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate) and biogenic amine (e.g., serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmitters have been demonstrated in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Researchers have detected ethanol effects after exposure during developmental periods equivalent to the first, second, and third trimesters of human pregnancy. Results support the recommendation that pregnant women should abstain from drinking—even small quantities—as effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter systems have been detected at low levels of exposure. Recent studies have elucidated new mechanisms and/or consequences of the actions of ethanol on amino acid and biogenic amine neurotransmitter systems. Alterations in these neurotransmitter systems could, in part, be responsible for many of the conditions associated with FASD, including (1) learning, memory, and attention deficits; (2) motor coordination impairments; (3) abnormal responsiveness to stress; and (4) increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as substance abuse and depression, and also neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and sudden infant death syndrome. However, future research is needed to conclusively establish a causal relationship between these conditions and developmental dysfunctions in neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23580048

  3. The central noradrenergic system: an overview | Viljoen | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The central noradrenergic system belongs to a group of brainstem neuromodulatory systems previously referred to as the ascending reticular activating system. In this article a heuristic model is presented of the central noradrenergic system depicting the major projections to other cerebral areas, its interactions with other ...

  4. Noradrenergic dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary eGannon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The brain noradrenergic system supplies the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the brain via widespread efferent projections, and plays a pivotal role in modulating cognitive activities in the cortex. Profound noradrenergic degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients has been observed for decades, with recent research suggesting that the locus coeruleus (where noradrenergic neurons are mainly located is a predominant site where AD-related pathology begins. Mounting evidence indicate that the loss of noradrenergic innervation greatly exacerbates AD pathogenesis and progression, although the precise roles of noradrenergic components in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize current findings on noradrenergic dysfunction in AD, as well as to point out deficiencies in our knowledge where more research is needed.

  5. Functional neuroanatomy of the central noradrenergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabadi, Elemer

    2013-08-01

    The central noradrenergic neurone, like the peripheral sympathetic neurone, is characterized by a diffusely arborizing terminal axonal network. The central neurones aggregate in distinct brainstem nuclei, of which the locus coeruleus (LC) is the most prominent. LC neurones project widely to most areas of the neuraxis, where they mediate dual effects: neuronal excitation by α₁-adrenoceptors and inhibition by α₂-adrenoceptors. The LC plays an important role in physiological regulatory networks. In the sleep/arousal network the LC promotes wakefulness, via excitatory projections to the cerebral cortex and other wakefulness-promoting nuclei, and inhibitory projections to sleep-promoting nuclei. The LC, together with other pontine noradrenergic nuclei, modulates autonomic functions by excitatory projections to preganglionic sympathetic, and inhibitory projections to preganglionic parasympathetic neurones. The LC also modulates the acute effects of light on physiological functions ('photomodulation'): stimulation of arousal and sympathetic activity by light via the LC opposes the inhibitory effects of light mediated by the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus on arousal and by the paraventricular nucleus on sympathetic activity. Photostimulation of arousal by light via the LC may enable diurnal animals to function during daytime. LC neurones degenerate early and progressively in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, leading to cognitive impairment, depression and sleep disturbance.

  6. Dynamic regulation of neurotransmitter specification: Relevance to nervous system homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinsky, Laura N.; Belgacem, Yesser Hadj; Swapna, Immani; Sequerra, Eduardo Bouth

    2013-01-01

    During nervous system development the neurotransmitter identity changes and coexpression of several neurotransmitters is a rather generalized feature of developing neurons. In the mature nervous system, different physiological and pathological circumstances recreate this phenomenon. The rules of neurotransmitter respecification are multiple. Among them, the goal of assuring balanced excitability appears as an important driving force for the modifications in neurotransmitter phenotype expression. The functional consequences of these dynamic revisions in neurotransmitter identity span a varied range, from fine-tuning the developing neural circuit to modifications in addictive and locomotor behaviors. Current challenges include determining the mechanisms underlying neurotransmitter phenotype respecification and how they intersect with genetic programs of neuronal specialization. PMID:23270605

  7. Noradrenergic and GABAergic systems in the medial hypothalamus are activated during hypoglycemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beverly, JL; De Vries, MG; Bouman, SD; Arseneau, LM

    Noradrenergic and GABAergic systems in the medial hypothalamus influence plasma glucose and may be activated during glucoprivation. Microdialysis probes were placed into the ventromedial nucleus (VMH), lateral hypothalamus (LHA), and paraventricular nucleus (PVH) of male Sprague-Dawley rats to

  8. Evidence for a role of corticopetal, noradrenergic systems in the development of executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, David J; Miller, Christine E; McGaughy, Jill A

    2017-09-01

    Adolescence is a period during which many aspects of executive function are maturing. Much of the literature has focused on discrepancies between sub-cortical and cortical development that is hypothesized to lead to over-processing of reinforcement related stimuli unchecked by fully matured response inhibition. Specifically, maturation of sub-cortical dopaminergic systems that terminate in the nucleus accumbens has been suggested to occur prior to the full maturation of corticopetal dopaminergic systems. However, converging evidence supports the hypothesis that many aspects of cognitive control are critically linked to cortical noradrenergic systems, that the effectiveness of drugs used to treat disorders of executive function, e.g. ADHD, may result primarily from increases in cortical norepinephrine (NE) and that cortical noradrenergic systems mature across adolescence. However, little attention has been given to the development of this system during adolescence or to its influence in executive function. In the present paper, we discuss the developmental trajectory of the noradrenergic system of the forebrain, highlight the interactions between noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems, and highlight the contribution of the immature corticopetal noradrenergic systems in the ontogeny of several aspects of executive function. Finally we compare data from adolescent rats to those gathered after selective depletion of NE in sub-regions of the prefrontal cortex with an emphasis on the similarities in performance of NE lesioned rats and adolescents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuropeptide S interacts with the basolateral amygdala noradrenergic system in facilitating object recognition memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ren-Wen; Xu, Hong-Jiao; Zhang, Rui-San; Wang, Pei; Chang, Min; Peng, Ya-Li; Deng, Ke-Yu; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The noradrenergic activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) was reported to be involved in the regulation of object recognition memory. As the BLA expresses high density of receptors for Neuropeptide S (NPS), we investigated whether the BLA is involved in mediating NPS's effects on object recognition memory consolidation and whether such effects require noradrenergic activity. Intracerebroventricular infusion of NPS (1nmol) post training facilitated 24-h memory in a mouse novel object recognition task. The memory-enhancing effect of NPS could be blocked by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol. Furthermore, post-training intra-BLA infusions of NPS (0.5nmol/side) improved 24-h memory for objects, which was impaired by co-administration of propranolol (0.5μg/side). Taken together, these results indicate that NPS interacts with the BLA noradrenergic system in improving object recognition memory during consolidation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Stimulation of the noradrenergic system during memory formation impairs extinction learning but not the disruption of reconsolidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeter, M.; Kindt, M.

    2012-01-01

    The noradrenergic system plays a critical role in the ‘consolidation’ of emotional memory. If we are to target ‘reconsolidation’ in patients with anxiety disorders, the noradrenergic strengthening of fear memory should not impair the disruption of reconsolidation. In Experiment I, we addressed this

  11. Zebrafish neurotransmitter systems as potential pharmacological and toxicological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, E P; Rosemberg, D B; Seibt, K J; Capiotti, K M; Da Silva, R S; Bonan, C D

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in neurobiology have emphasized the study of brain structure and function and its association with numerous pathological and toxicological events. Neurotransmitters are substances that relay, amplify, and modulate electrical signals between neurons and other cells. Neurotransmitter signaling mediates rapid intercellular communication by interacting with cell surface receptors, activating second messenger systems and regulating the activity of ion channels. Changes in the functional balance of neurotransmitters have been implicated in the failure of central nervous system function. In addition, abnormalities in neurotransmitter production or functioning can be induced by several toxicological compounds, many of which are found in the environment. The zebrafish has been increasingly used as an animal model for biomedical research, primarily due to its genetic tractability and ease of maintenance. These features make this species a versatile tool for pre-clinical drug discovery and toxicological investigations. Here, we present a review regarding the role of different excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems in zebrafish, such as dopaminergic, serotoninergic, cholinergic, purinergic, histaminergic, nitrergic, glutamatergic, glycinergic, and GABAergic systems, and emphasizing their features as pharmacological and toxicological targets. The increase in the global knowledge of neurotransmitter systems in zebrafish and the elucidation of their pharmacological and toxicological aspects may lead to new strategies and appropriate research priorities to offer insights for biomedical and environmental research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cochlear Damage Affects Neurotransmitter Chemistry in the Central Auditory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Albert Godfrey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the perception of a monotonous sound not actually present in the environment, affects nearly 20% of the population of the United States. Although there has been great progress in tinnitus research over the past 25 years, the neurochemical basis of tinnitus is still poorly understood. We review current research about the effects of various types of cochlear damage on the neurotransmitter chemistry in the central auditory system and document evidence that different changes in this chemistry can underlie similar behaviorally measured tinnitus symptoms. Most available data have been obtained from rodents following cochlear damage produced by cochlear ablation, loud sound, or ototoxic drugs. Effects on neurotransmitter systems have been measured as changes in neurotransmitter level, synthesis, release, uptake, and receptors. In this review, magnitudes of changes are presented for neurotransmitter-related amino acids, acetylcholine, and serotonin. A variety of effects have been found in these studies that may be related to animal model, survival time, type of cochlear damage, or methodology. The overall impression from the evidence presented is that any imbalance of neurotransmitter-related chemistry could disrupt auditory processing in such a way as to produce tinnitus.

  13. Seasonal and hormonal modulation of neurotransmitter systems in the song control circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Gregory F; Balthazart, Jacques

    2010-03-01

    In the years following the discovery of the song system, it was realized that this specialized circuit controlling learned vocalizations in songbirds (a) constitutes a specific target for sex steroid hormone action and expresses androgen and (for some nuclei) estrogen receptors, (b) exhibits a chemical neuroanatomical pattern consisting in a differential expression of various neuropeptides and neurotransmitters receptors as compared to surrounding structures and (c) shows pronounced seasonal variations in volume and physiology based, at least in the case of HVC, on a seasonal change in neuron recruitment and survival. During the past 30 years numerous studies have investigated how seasonal changes, transduced largely but not exclusively through changes in sex steroid concentrations, affect singing frequency and quality by modulating the structure and activity of the song control circuit. These studies showed that testosterone or its metabolite estradiol, control seasonal variation in singing quality by a direct action on song control nuclei. These studies also gave rise to the hypothesis that the probability of song production in response to a given stimulus (i.e. its motivation) is controlled through effects on the medial preoptic area and on catecholaminergic cell groups that project to song control nuclei. Selective pharmacological manipulations confirmed that the noradrenergic system indeed plays a role in the control of singing behavior. More experimental work is, however, needed to identify specific genes related to neurotransmission that are regulated by steroids in functionally defined brain areas to enhance different aspects of song behavior. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Selectivity of phenothiazine cholinesterase inhibitors for neurotransmitter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvesh, Sultan; Macdonald, Ian R; Martin, Earl

    2013-07-01

    Synthetic derivatives of phenothiazine have been used for over a century as well-tolerated drugs against a variety of human ailments from psychosis to cancer. This implies a considerable diversity in the mechanisms of action produced by structural changes to the phenothiazine scaffold. For example, chlorpromazine treatment of psychosis is related to its interaction with dopaminergic receptors. On the other hand, antagonistic action of such drugs on cholinergic receptor systems would be counter-productive for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. In a search for phenothiazines that are inhibitors of cholinesterases, especially butyrylcholinesterase, with potential to treat Alzheimer's disease, we wished to ascertain that such molecules could be devoid of neurotransmitter receptor interactions. To that end, a number of our synthetic N-10-carbonyl phenothiazine derivatives, with cholinesterase inhibitory activity, were tested for interaction with a variety of neurotransmitter receptor systems. We demonstrate that phenothiazines can be prepared without significant neurotransmitter receptor interactions while retaining high potency as cholinesterase ligands for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Does Growth Impairment Underlie the Adverse Effects of Dexamethasone on Development of Noradrenergic Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Ko, Ashley; Seidler, Frederic J

    2018-06-20

    Glucocorticoids are given in preterm labor to prevent respiratory distress but these agents evoke neurobehavioral deficits in association with reduced brain region volumes. To determine whether the neurodevelopmental effects are distinct from growth impairment, we gave developing rats dexamethasone at doses below or within the therapeutic range (0.05, 0.2 or 0.8 mg/kg) at different stages: gestational days (GD) 17-19, postnatal days (PN) 1-3 or PN7-9. In adolescence and adulthood, we assessed the impact on noradrenergic systems in multiple brain regions, comparing the effects to those on somatic growth or on brain region growth. Somatic growth was reduced with exposure in all three stages, with greater sensitivity for the postnatal regimens; brain region growth was impaired to a lesser extent. Norepinephrine content and concentration were reduced depending on the treatment regimen, with a rank order of deficits of PN7-9 > PN1-3 > GD17-19. However, brain growth impairment did not parallel reduced norepinephrine content in magnitude, dose threshold, sex or regional selectivity, or temporal pattern, and even when corrected for reduced brain region weights (norepinephrine per g tissue), the dexamethasone-exposed animals showed subnormal values. Regression analysis showed that somatic growth impairment accounted for an insubstantial amount of the reduction in norepinephrine content, and brain growth impairment accounted for only 12%, whereas specific effects on norepinephrine accounted for most of the effect. The adverse effects of dexamethasone on noradrenergic system development are not simply related to impaired somatic or brain region growth, but rather include specific targeting of neurodifferentiation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Functional imaging of neurotransmitter systems in movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgin, N.

    1998-01-01

    PET and SPECT enable the direct measurement of components of the dopaminergic and other systems in the living human brain and offer unique opportunity for the in vivo quantification on the dopaminergic function in PD and other movement disorders. The need to establish the early and differential diagnosis of PD is increasingly important given the recent evidence that early pharmacologic intervention may slow progression of this progressive degenerative disease. Accordingly, imaging with PET and SPECT using specific neuro markers has been increasingly important to biochemically identify the loss of specific neurotransmitters, their synthesizing enzymes and their receptors in movement disorders. Through the parallel development of new radiotracers, kinetic models and better instruments, PET and SPECT technology is enabling investigation of increasingly more complex aspects of the human brain neurotransmitter systems. This paper summarizes the results of different PET-SPECT studies used to evaluate the various elements of the dopamine system in the human brain with PET and intends to introduce the newly emerging specific tracers and their applications to clinical research in movement disorders

  17. Functional imaging of neurotransmitter systems in movement disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgin, N. [Ankara, Gazi Univ. Medical School (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-09-01

    PET and SPECT enable the direct measurement of components of the dopaminergic and other systems in the living human brain and offer unique opportunity for the in vivo quantification on the dopaminergic function in PD and other movement disorders. The need to establish the early and differential diagnosis of PD is increasingly important given the recent evidence that early pharmacologic intervention may slow progression of this progressive degenerative disease. Accordingly, imaging with PET and SPECT using specific neuro markers has been increasingly important to biochemically identify the loss of specific neurotransmitters, their synthesizing enzymes and their receptors in movement disorders. Through the parallel development of new radiotracers, kinetic models and better instruments, PET and SPECT technology is enabling investigation of increasingly more complex aspects of the human brain neurotransmitter systems. This paper summarizes the results of different PET-SPECT studies used to evaluate the various elements of the dopamine system in the human brain with PET and intends to introduce the newly emerging specific tracers and their applications to clinical research in movement disorders.

  18. Noradrenergic System in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease A Target for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Cristy; Fahimi, Atoossa; Das, Devsmita; Mojabi, Fatemeh S; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Salehi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Locus coeruleus (LC) neurons in the brainstem send extensive noradrenergic (NE)-ergic terminals to the majority of brain regions, particularly those involved in cognitive function. Both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS) are characterized by similar pathology including significant LC degeneration and dysfunction of the NE-ergic system. Extensive loss of NE-ergic terminals has been linked to alterations in brain regions vital for cognition, mood, and executive function. While the mechanisms by which NE-ergic abnormalities contribute to cognitive dysfunction are not fully understood, emergent evidence suggests that rescue of NE-ergic system can attenuate neuropathology and cognitive decline in both AD and DS. Therapeutic strategies to enhance NE neurotransmission have undergone limited testing. Among those deployed to date are NE reuptake inhibitors, presynaptic α-adrenergic receptor antagonists, NE prodrugs, and β-adrenergic agonists. Here we examine alterations in the NE-ergic system in AD and DS and suggest that NE-ergic system rescue is a plausible treatment strategy for targeting cognitive decline in both disorders.

  19. Central serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors in functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S O'Mahony; TG Dinan; PW Keeling; ASB Chua

    2006-01-01

    Functional dyspepsia is a symptom complex characterised by upper abdominal discomfort or pain, early satiety,motor abnormalities, abdominal bloating and nausea in the absence of organic disease. The central nervous system plays an important role in the conducting and processing of visceral signals. Alterations in brain processing of pain, perception and affective responses may be key factors in the pathogenesis of functional dyspepsia. Central serotonergic and noradrenergic receptor systems are involved in the processing of motor,sensory and secretory activities of the gastrointestinal tract. Visceral hypersensitivity is currently regarded as the mechanism responsible for both motor alterations and abdominal pain in functional dyspepsia. Some studies suggest that there are alterations in central serotonergic and noradrenergic systems which may partially explain some of the symptoms of functional dyspepsia. Alterations in the autonomic nervous system may be implicated in the motor abnormalities and increases in visceral sensitivity in these patients.Noradrenaline is the main neurotransmitter in the sympathetic nervous system and again alterations in the functioning of this system may lead to changes in motor function. Functional dyspepsia causes considerable burden on the patient and society. The pathophysiology of functional dyspepsia is not fully understood but alterations in central processing by the serotonergic and noradrenergic systems may provide plausible explanations for at least some of the symptoms and offer possible treatment targets for the future.

  20. Critical role of somatostatin receptor 2 in the vulnerability of the central noradrenergic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ádori, Csaba; Glück, Laura; Barde, Swapnali

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites. This is n......Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites...... morphometry and mRNA profiling in a cohort of Alzheimer’s and age-matched control brains in combination with genetic models of somatostatin receptor deficiency to establish causality between defunct somatostatin signalling and noradrenergic neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer’s disease, we found significantly....../IV and onwards, i.e., a process preceding advanced Alzheimer’s pathology. The loss of SSTR2 transcripts in the LC neurons appeared selective, since tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine β-hydroxylase, galanin or galanin receptor 3 mRNAs remained unchanged. We modeled these pathogenic changes in Sstr2 −/− mice and...

  1. RESTRAIN OF FEAR: PARTICIPATION OF GABA NEUROTRANSMITTER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina I. Shulgina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In experiences on rats in the conditions of free behavior at development of a conditioned of passive avoidanсe reflex (the first series and a defensive reflex and a conditional inhibition (the second series it is revealed, and elaboration of internal inhibition and Phenibut – a nonspecific agonist of GAMKA and GAMKB receptors cause in experimental animals weakening of freezing arising in a dangerous situation, and a disinhibition of research behavior. Results of experiences in the accounting of data of the literature allow to assume that both factors, and elaboration of internal inhibition, and Phenibut weaken freezing – the phenomenon used in experiments as a biological analog of fear, owing to increase of level of activity of the GABA neurotransmitter system of a brain.

  2. Modulation of limbic noradrenergic circuits by cannabinoids

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Ana Raquel Franky Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento Medicina The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the regulation of several physiological functions. The widespread distribution of the endocannabinoid system in the central nervous system (CNS) accounts for many effects attributed to cannabinoids. Importantly, cannabinoids have been shown to modulate mood, cognition and memory. There is growing evidence suggesting that cannabinoids can interact with the noradrenergic system. Noradrenergic trans...

  3. Modulation of multiple memory systems: from neurotransmitters to metabolic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Paul E; Newman, Lori A; Scavuzzo, Claire J; Korol, Donna L

    2013-11-01

    This article reviews evidence showing that neurochemical modulators can regulate the relative participation of the hippocampus and striatum in learning and memory tasks. For example, relative release of acetylcholine increases in the hippocampus and striatum reflects the relative engagement of these brain systems during learning of place and response tasks. Acetylcholine release is regulated in part by available brain glucose levels, which themselves are dynamically modified during learning. Recent findings suggest that glucose acts through astrocytes to deliver lactate to neurons. Brain glycogen is contained in astrocytes and provides a capacity to deliver energy substrates to neurons when needed, a need that can be generated by training on tasks that target hippocampal and striatal processing mechanisms. These results integrate an increase in blood glucose after epinephrine release from the adrenal medulla with provision of brain energy substrates, including lactate released from astrocytes. Together, the availability of peripheral and central energy substrates regulate the processing of learning and memory within and across multiple neural systems. Dysfunctions of the physiological steps that modulate memory--from hormones to neurotransmitters to metabolic substrates--may contribute importantly to some of the cognitive impairments seen during normal aging and during neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. What is the role of neurotransmitter systems in cortical seizures?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, Suppl.3 (2008), S111-S120 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neurotransmitters * cerebral cortex * seizures Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  5. Co-expression of Cholinergic and Noradrenergic Phenotypes in Human and Non-Human Autonomic Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Weihe, Eberhard; Schütz, Burkhard; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Anlauf, Martin; Schäfer, Martin K.; Eiden, Lee E.

    2005-01-01

    It has long been known that the sympathetic innervation of the sweat glands is cholinergic in most mammalian species, and that during development, rodent sympathetic cholinergic sweat gland innervation transiently expresses noradrenergic traits. We show here that some noradrenergic traits persist in cholinergic sympathetic innervation of the sweat glands in rodents, but that lack of expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter renders these cells functionally non-noradrenergic. Adult hum...

  6. Mapping neurotransmitter networks with PET: an example on serotonin and opioid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Lauri; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Raitakari, Olli; Hietala, Jarmo

    2014-05-01

    All functions of the human brain are consequences of altered activity of specific neural pathways and neurotransmitter systems. Although the knowledge of "system level" connectivity in the brain is increasing rapidly, we lack "molecular level" information on brain networks and connectivity patterns. We introduce novel voxel-based positron emission tomography (PET) methods for studying internal neurotransmitter network structure and intercorrelations of different neurotransmitter systems in the human brain. We chose serotonin transporter and μ-opioid receptor for this analysis because of their functional interaction at the cellular level and similar regional distribution in the brain. Twenty-one healthy subjects underwent two consecutive PET scans using [(11)C]MADAM, a serotonin transporter tracer, and [(11)C]carfentanil, a μ-opioid receptor tracer. First, voxel-by-voxel "intracorrelations" (hub and seed analyses) were used to study the internal structure of opioid and serotonin systems. Second, voxel-level opioid-serotonin intercorrelations (between neurotransmitters) were computed. Regional μ-opioid receptor binding potentials were uniformly correlated throughout the brain. However, our analyses revealed nonuniformity in the serotonin transporter intracorrelations and identified a highly connected local network (midbrain-striatum-thalamus-amygdala). Regionally specific intercorrelations between the opioid and serotonin tracers were found in anteromedial thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left parietal cortex, i.e., in areas relevant for several neuropsychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders. This methodology enables in vivo mapping of connectivity patterns within and between neurotransmitter systems. Quantification of functional neurotransmitter balances may be a useful approach in etiological studies of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in drug development as a biomarker-based rationale for targeted

  7. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in generalized epilepsy in a multi-neurotransmitter system: How to improve the antiepileptic effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Here, we describe in generalized epilepsies the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides acting at specific subreceptors. In order to consider a network context rather than one based on focal substrates and in order to make the interaction between neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and their specific subreceptors comprehensible, neural networks in the hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex are described. In this disease, a neurotransmitter imbalance between dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons and between presynaptic GABAergic neurons (hypoactivity) and glutaminergic neurons (hyperactivity) occurs. Consequently, combined GABA A agonists and NMDA antagonists could furthermore stabilize the neural networks in a multimodal pharmacotherapy. The antiepileptic effect and the mechanisms of action of conventional and recently developed antiepileptic drugs are reviewed. The GASH:Sal animal model can contribute to examine the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs. The issues of whether the interaction of classical neurotransmitters with other subreceptors (5-HT 7 , metabotropic 5 glutaminergic, A 2A adenosine, and alpha nicotinic 7 cholinergic receptors) or whether the administration of agonists/antagonists of neuropeptides might improve the therapeutic effect of antiepileptic drugs should be addressed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Genetic and Reflex Epilepsies, Audiogenic Seizures and Strains: From Experimental Models to the Clinic". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters multiple neurotransmitter systems in the neonatal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P; Turner, Karly M; Alexander, Suzanne; Eyles, Darryl W; McGrath, John J; Burne, Thomas H J

    2017-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency is a risk factor for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. DVD deficiency in rats is associated with altered brain structure and adult behaviours indicating alterations in dopamine and glutamate signalling. Developmental alterations in dopamine neurotransmission have also been observed in DVD-deficient rats but a comprehensive assessment of brain neurochemistry has not been undertaken. Thus, the current study determined the regional concentrations of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, glutamine, glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and associated metabolites, in DVD-deficient neonates. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a vitamin D deficient diet or control diet six weeks prior to mating until birth and housed under UVB-free lighting conditions. Neurotransmitter concentration was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography on post-mortem neonatal brain tissue. Ubiquitous reductions in the levels of glutamine (12-24%) were observed in DVD-deficient neonates compared with control neonates. Similarly, in multiple brain regions DVD-deficient neonates had increased levels of noradrenaline and serine compared with control neonates. In contrast, increased levels of dopamine and decreased levels of serotonin in DVD-deficient neonates were limited to striatal subregions compared with controls. Our results confirm that DVD deficiency leads to changes in multiple neurotransmitter systems in the neonate brain. Importantly, this regionally-based assessment in DVD-deficient neonates identified both widespread neurotransmitter changes (glutamine/noradrenaline) and regionally selective neurotransmitter changes (dopamine/serotonin). Thus, vitamin D may have both general and local actions depending on the neurotransmitter system being investigated. Taken together, these data suggest that DVD deficiency alters neurotransmitter systems relevant to schizophrenia in the developing rat

  9. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensing System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Christopher J; Johnson, David M; Winter, Bruce A; Whitlock, Sidney V; Kressin, Kenneth R; Horne, April E; Robinson, Justin C; Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Tye, Susannah J; Chang, Su-Youne; Agnesi, Filippo; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Covey, Daniel; Shon, Young-Min; Bennet, Kevin E; Garris, Paul A; Lee, Kendall H

    2009-01-01

    The Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensing System (WINCS) measures extracellular neurotransmitter concentration in vivo and displays the data graphically in nearly real time. WINCS implements two electroanalytical methods, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and fixed-potential amperometry (FPA), to measure neurotransmitter concentrations at an electrochemical sensor, typically a carbon-fiber microelectrode. WINCS comprises a battery-powered patient module and a custom software application (WINCSware) running on a nearby personal computer. The patient module impresses upon the electrochemical sensor either a constant potential (for FPA) or a time-varying waveform (for FSCV). A transimpedance amplifier converts the resulting current to a signal that is digitized and transmitted to the base station via a Bluetooth radio link. WINCSware controls the operational parameters for FPA or FSCV, and records the transmitted data stream. Filtered data is displayed in various formats, including a background-subtracted plot of sequential FSCV scans - a representation that enables users to distinguish the signatures of various analytes with considerable specificity. Dopamine, glutamate, adenosine and serotonin were selected as analytes for test trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow-injection measurements and in vivo measurements in rat and pig. Further testing demonstrated basic functionality in a 3-Tesla MRI unit. WINCS was designed in compliance with consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, and it is anticipated that its capability for real-time intraoperative monitoring of neurotransmitter release at an implanted sensor will prove useful for advancing functional neurosurgery.

  10. Regulation of Neurotransmitter Responses in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP J’-aminobutyric acid; yclic AM’P; neuromodulation ; brain 1ABTAT(Continue on reverse if necessary and...crucial enzyme for regulating neuromodulation in brain. Given the ultimate goal of developing novel pharmacological agents for N! manipulating...central nervous system function, the discovery of a biochemical response to a neuromodulator can be considered a major step in that direction. Thus, up to

  11. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in major depression in a multi-neurotransmitter system: a focus on antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, R

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and the corresponding subreceptors involved in major depression. Neuronal circuits in the brainstem, hippocampus and hypothalamus are developed, since they can be used to derive a multimodal pharmacotherapy. In this sense, serotonin hypoactivity could occur through a strong presynaptic inhibition of glutaminergic neurons via the subtype 5 of metabotropic glutaminergic receptors, and noradrenaline hypoactivity could be due to an enhanced presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic neurons via GABAB receptors. In the hippocampus, dopamine hypoactivity leads to a decreased positive effect. In clinical trials, the antidepressant effect of drugs interfering with the mentioned subreceptors, for example the triple reuptake inhibitor amitifadine, is being investigated. Moreover, the alterations of neuropeptides, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone, neuropeptide Y and galanin are pointed out. The additional antidepressant effect of analogs, agonists and antagonists of the mentioned neuropeptides should be examined.

  12. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  13. Polymorphisms of genes in neurotransmitter systems were associated with alcohol use disorders in a Tibetan population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    Full Text Available Studies of linkage and association in various ethnic populations have revealed many predisposing genes of multiple neurotransmitter systems for alcohol use disorders (AUD. However, evidence often is contradictory regarding the contribution of most candidate genes to the susceptibility of AUD. We, therefore, performed a case-control study to investigate the possible associations of genes selected from multiple neurotransmitter systems with AUD in a homogeneous Tibetan community population in China. AUD cases (N = 281 with an alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT score ≥10, as well as healthy controls (N = 277 with an AUDIT score ≤5, were recruited. All participants were genotyped for 366 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of 34 genes selected from those involved in neurotransmitter systems. Association analyses were performed using PLINK version 1.07 software. Allelic analyses before adjustment for multiple tests showed that 15 polymorphisms within seven genes were associated with AUD (p<0.05. After adjustment for the number of SNPs genotyped within each gene, only the association of a single marker (rs10044881 in HTR4 remained statistically significant. Haplotype analysis for two SNPs in HTR4 (rs17777298 and rs10044881 showed that the haplotype AG was significantly associated with the protective effect for AUD. In conclusion, the present study discovered that the HTR4 gene may play a marked role in the pathogenesis of AUD. In addition, this Tibetan population sample marginally replicated previous evidence regarding the associations of six genes in AUD.

  14. Turning off neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Solomon H

    2006-04-07

    The historic discovery that the catecholamine neurotransmitters of the sympathetic nervous system, norepinephrine and epinephrine, are inactivated through their reuptake by presynaptic nerve terminals provided new insights into neurotransmitter action and paved the way for the development of modern antidepressant drugs.

  15. Regulation of aortic extracellular matrix synthesis via noradrenergic system and angiotensin II in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dab, Houcine; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nedra; Sakly, Mohsen; Hodroj, Wassim; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero; Kacem, Kamel

    2012-10-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis regulation by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) or angiotensin II (ANG II) was widely reported, but interaction between the two systems on ECM synthesis needs further investigation. We tested implication of SNS and ANG II on ECM synthesis in juvenile rat aorta. Sympathectomy with guanethidine (50 mg/kg, subcutaneous) and blockade of the ANG II AT1 receptors (AT1R) blocker with losartan (20 mg/kg/day in drinking water) were performed alone or in combination in rats. mRNA and protein synthesis of collagen and elastin were examined by Q-RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Collagen type I and III mRNA were increased respectively by 62 and 43% after sympathectomy and decreased respectively by 31 and 60% after AT1R blockade. Combined treatment increased collagen type III by 36% but not collagen type I. The same tendency of collagen expression was observed at mRNA and protein levels after the three treatments. mRNA and protein level of elastin was decreased respectively by 63 and 39% and increased by 158 and 15% after losartan treatment. Combined treatment abrogates changes induced by single treatments. The two systems act as antagonists on ECM expression in the aorta and combined inhibition of the two systems prevents imbalance of mRNA and protein level of collagen I and elastin induced by single treatment. Combined inhibition of the two systems prevents deposit or excessive reduction of ECM and can more prevent cardiovascular disorders.

  16. Interacting noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems shift human brain activation patterns during encoding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stegeren, Anda H.; Roozendaal, Benno; Kindt, Merel; Wolf, Oliver T.; Joëls, Marian

    Emotionally arousing experiences are usually well retained, an effect that depends on the release of adrenal stress hormones. Animal studies have shown that corticosterone and noradrenaline - representing the two main stress hormone systems - act in concert to enhance memory formation by actions

  17. Interacting noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems shift human brain activation patterns during encoding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stegeren, A.H.; Roozendaal, B.; Kindt, M.; Wolf, O.T.; Joëls, M.

    2010-01-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are usually well retained, an effect that depends on the release of adrenal stress hormones. Animal studies have shown that corticosterone and noradrenaline - representing the two main stress hormone systems - act in concert to enhance memory formation by actions

  18. Noradrenergic enhancement of amygdala responses to fear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onur, Oezguer A; Walter, Henrik; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Rehme, Anne K; Schmidt, Christoph; Keysers, Christian; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and the noradrenergic (norepinephrine, NE) system in responding to stressful stimuli such as fear signals, suggesting hyperfunction of both in the development of stress-related pathologies including anxiety disorders. However, no

  19. The effects of ecstasy on neurotransmitter systems: a review on the findings of molecular imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegting, Yosta; Reneman, Liesbeth; Booij, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Ecstasy is a commonly used psychoactive drug with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as the main content. Importantly, it has been suggested that use of MDMA may be neurotoxic particularly for serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) neurons. In the past decades, several molecular imaging studies examined directly in vivo the effects of ecstasy/MDMA on neurotransmitter systems. The objective of the present study is to review the effects of ecstasy/MDMA on neurotransmitter systems as assessed by molecular imaging studies in small animals, non-human primates and humans. A search in PubMed was performed. Eighty-eight articles were found on which inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. Thirty-three studies met the inclusion criteria; all were focused on the 5-HT or dopamine (DA) system. Importantly, 9 out of 11 of the animal studies that examined the effects of MDMA on 5-HT transporter (SERT) availability showed a significant loss of binding potential. In human studies, this was the case for 14 out of 16 studies, particularly in heavy users. In abstinent users, significant recovery of SERT binding was found over time. Most imaging studies in humans that focused on the DA system did not find any significant effect of ecstasy/MDMA use. Preclinical and clinical molecular imaging studies on the effects of ecstasy/MDMA use/administration on neurotransmitter systems show quite consistent alterations of the 5-HT system. Particularly, in human studies, loss of SERT binding was observed in heavy ecstasy users, which might reflect 5-HT neurotoxicity, although alternative explanations (e.g. down-regulation of the SERT) cannot be excluded.

  20. Nicotine stimulates pancreatic cancer xenografts by systemic increase in stress neurotransmitters and suppression of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Plummer, Howard K; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2009-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality in Western countries. We have shown previously that four representative human PDAC cell lines were regulated by beta-adrenoreceptors via cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling. In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that nicotine stimulates the growth of PDAC xenografts in nude mice by increasing the systemic levels of the stress neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline, which are the physiological agonists for beta-adrenoreceptors and that inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) of the adenylyl cyclase-dependent pathway downstream of adrenoreceptors blocks this effect. The size of xenografts from PDAC cell line Panc-1 was determined 30 days after inoculation of the cancer cells. Stress neurotransmitters in serum as well as cAMP in the cellular fraction of blood and in tumor tissue were assessed by immunoassays. Levels of GABA, its synthesizing enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 and beta-adrenergic signaling proteins in the tumor tissue were determined by western blotting. Nicotine significantly increased the systemic levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cAMP while increasing xenograft size and protein levels of cAMP, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the tumor tissue. Nicotine additionally reduced the protein levels of both GAD isozymes and GABA in tumor tissue. Treatment with GABA abolished these responses to nicotine and blocked the development of xenografts in mice not exposed to nicotine. These findings suggest that the development and progression of PDAC is subject to significant modulation by stimulatory stress neurotransmitters and inhibitory GABA and that treatment with GABA may be useful for marker-guided cancer intervention of PDAC.

  1. The antidepressant-like effect of ethynyl estradiol is mediated by both serotonergic and noradrenergic systems in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Rivera, N M; López-Rubalcava, C; Estrada-Camarena, E

    2013-10-10

    17α-Ethynyl-estradiol (EE2, a synthetic steroidal estrogen) induces antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test (FST) similar to those induced by 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (dual antidepressants). However, the precise mechanism of action of EE2 has not been studied. In the present study, the participation of estrogen receptors (ERs) and the serotonergic and the noradrenergic presynaptic sites in the antidepressant-like action of EE2 was evaluated in the FST. The effects of the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (10 μg/rat; i.c.v.), the serotonergic and noradrenergic terminal destruction with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT; 200 μg/rat, i.c.v.), and N-(2-chloro-ethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4; 10mg/kg, i.p.) were studied in ovariectomized rats treated with EE2 and subjected to the FST. In addition, the participation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the antidepressant-like action of EE2 was explored using the selective α2-receptor antagonist idazoxan (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0mg/kg, i.p.). EE2 induced an antidepressant-like action characterized by a decrease in immobility behavior with a concomitant increase in swimming and climbing behaviors. The ER antagonist, 5,7-DHT, DSP4, and idazoxan blocked the effects of EE2 on the immobility behavior, whereas ICI 182,780 and 5,7-DHT affected swimming behavior. The noradrenergic compound DSP4 altered climbing behavior, while Idazoxan inhibited the increase of swimming and climbing behaviors induced by EE2. Our results suggest that the antidepressant-like action of EE2 implies a complex mechanism of action on monoaminergic systems and estrogen receptors. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Perivascular neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Simona D; Haanes, Kristian A; Warfvinge, Karin

    2018-01-01

    In order to understand the nature of the relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and primary headaches, we have conducted a literature review with particular emphasis on the role of perivascular neurotransmitters. Primary headaches are in general considered complex polygenic disorders...... (located outside the blood-brain barrier) are variably activated and sensitized which gives rise to vasoactive neurotransmitter release. Sympathetic, parasympathetic and sensory nerves to the cerebral vasculature are activated. During migraine attacks, altered CBF has been observed in brain regions...... such as the somatosensory cortex, brainstem and thalamus. In regulation of CBF, the individual roles of neurotransmitters are partly known, but much needs to be unraveled with respect to headache disorders....

  3. Sleep and Sedative States Induced by Targeting the Histamine and Noradrenergic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedatives target just a handful of receptors and ion channels. But we have no satisfying explanation for how activating these receptors produces sedation. In particular, do sedatives act at restricted brain locations and circuitries or more widely? Two prominent sedative drugs in clinical use are zolpidem, a GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulator, and dexmedetomidine (DEX, a selective α2 adrenergic receptor agonist. By targeting hypothalamic neuromodulatory systems both drugs induce a sleep-like state, but in different ways: zolpidem primarily reduces the latency to NREM sleep, and is a controlled substance taken by many people to help them sleep; DEX produces prominent slow wave activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG resembling stage 2 NREM sleep, but with complications of hypothermia and lowered blood pressure—it is used for long term sedation in hospital intensive care units—under DEX-induced sedation patients are arousable and responsive, and this drug reduces the risk of delirium. DEX, and another α2 adrenergic agonist xylazine, are also widely used in veterinary clinics to sedate animals. Here we review how these two different classes of sedatives, zolpidem and dexmedetomideine, can selectively interact with some nodal points of the circuitry that promote wakefulness allowing the transition to NREM sleep. Zolpidem enhances GABAergic transmission onto histamine neurons in the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN to hasten the transition to NREM sleep, and DEX interacts with neurons in the preoptic hypothalamic area that induce sleep and body cooling. This knowledge may aid the design of more precise acting sedatives, and at the same time, reveal more about the natural sleep-wake circuitry.

  4. Noradrenergic System and Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Zenger, Manuel

    2017-07-22

    There is ample evidence indicating that noradrenaline plays an important role in memory mechanisms. Noradrenaline is thought to modulate these procsses through activation of adrenergic receptors in neurons. Astrocytes that form essential partners for synaptic function, also express alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors. In astrocytes, noradrenaline triggers metabolic actions such as the glycogenolysis leading to an increase in l-lactate formation and release. l-Lactate can be used by neurons as a sourc of energy during memory tasks and can also induc transcription of plasticity genes in neurons. Activation of β-adrenergic receptors can also trigger gliotransmitter release resulting of intracllular calcium waves. These gliotransmitters modulate the synaptic activity and thereby can modulate long-term potentiation mechanisms. In summary, recnt evidencs indicate that noradrenaline exerts its memory-promoting effects through different modes of action both on neurons and astrocytes.

  5. Noradrenergic System and Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Zenger, Manuel; Burlet-Godinot, Sophie; Petit, Jean-Marie; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence indicating that noradrenaline plays an important role in memory mechanisms. Noradrenaline is thought to modulate these procsses through activation of adrenergic receptors in neurons. Astrocytes that form essential partners for synaptic function, also express alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors. In astrocytes, noradrenaline triggers metabolic actions such as the glycogenolysis leading to an increase in l-lactate formation and release. l-Lactate can be used by neurons as a sourc of energy during memory tasks and can also induc transcription of plasticity genes in neurons. Activation of β-adrenergic receptors can also trigger gliotransmitter release resulting of intracllular calcium waves. These gliotransmitters modulate the synaptic activity and thereby can modulate long-term potentiation mechanisms. In summary, recnt evidencs indicate that noradrenaline exerts its memory-promoting effects through different modes of action both on neurons and astrocytes.

  6. Glucocorticoids interact with the noradrenergic arousal system in the nucleus accumbens shell to enhance memory consolidation of both appetitive and aversive taste learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Romy; Fornari, Raquel V; Roozendaal, Benno

    2012-09-01

    It is well established that glucocorticoid hormones strengthen the consolidation of long-term memory of emotionally arousing experiences but have little effect on memory of low-arousing experiences. Although both positive and negative emotionally arousing events tend to be well remembered, studies investigating the neural mechanism underlying glucocorticoid-induced memory enhancement focused primarily on negatively motivated training experiences. In the present study we show an involvement of glucocorticoids within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in enhancing memory consolidation of both an appetitive and aversive form of taste learning. The specific glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist RU 28362 (1 or 3ng) administered bilaterally into the NAc shell, but not core, of male Sprague-Dawley rats immediately after an appetitive saccharin drinking experience dose-dependently enhanced 24-h retention of the safe taste, resulting in a facilitated attenuation of neophobia. Similarly, GR agonist infusions given into the NAc shell immediately after pairing of the saccharin taste with a malaise-inducing agent enhanced memory of this negative experience, resulting in an intensified conditioned aversion. Importantly, a suppression of noradrenergic activity within the NAc shell with the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol blocked the facilitating effect of a concurrently administered GR agonist on memory consolidation in both the appetitive and aversive learning task. Thus, these findings indicate that GR activation interacts with the noradrenergic arousal system within the NAc to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing training experiences regardless of valence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Localization of endogenous amyloid-β to the coeruleo-cortical pathway: consequences of noradrenergic depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer A; Reyes, Beverly A S; Thomas, Steven A; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2018-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system is an understudied circuit in the context of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is thought to play an important role in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases involving catecholamine neurotransmitters. Understanding the expression and distribution of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, a primary component of AD, under basal conditions and under conditions of NE perturbation within the coeruleo-cortical pathway may be important for understanding its putative role in pathological states. Thus, the goal of this study is to define expression levels and the subcellular distribution of endogenous Aβ with respect to noradrenergic profiles in the rodent LC and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and, further, to determine the functional relevance of NE in modulating endogenous Aβ 42 levels. We report that endogenous Aβ 42 is localized to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive somatodendritic profiles of the LC and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH) immunoreactive axon terminals of the infralimbic mPFC (ILmPFC). Male and female naïve rats have similar levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage products demonstrated by western blot, as well as similar levels of endogenous Aβ 42 as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two models of NE depletion, DSP-4 lesion and DβH knockout (KO) mice, were used to assess the functional relevance of NE on endogenous Aβ 42 levels. DSP-4 lesioned rats and DβH-KO mice show significantly lower levels of endogenous Aβ 42 . Noradrenergic depletion did not change APP-cleavage products resulting from β-secretase processing. Thus, resultant decreases in endogenous Aβ 42 may be due to decreased neuronal activity of noradrenergic neurons, or, by decreased stimulation of adrenergic receptors which are known to contribute to Aβ 42 production by enhancing γ-secretase processing under normal physiological conditions.

  8. CXCL12 chemokine and GABA neurotransmitter systems crosstalk and their putative roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyon eAlice

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Since CXCL12 and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, have been found in the brain, the role of this chemokine has been expanded from chemoattractant in the immune system to neuromodulatory in the brain. Several pieces of evidence suggest that this chemokine system could crosstalk with the GABAergic system, known to be the main inhibitory neurotransmitter system in the brain. Indeed, GABA and CXCL12 as well as their receptors are colocalized in many cell types including neurons and there are several examples in which these two systems interact. Several mechanisms can be proposed to explain how these systems interact, including receptor-receptor interactions, crosstalk at the level of second messenger cascades, or direct pharmacological interactions, as GABA and GABAB receptor agonists/antagonists have been shown to be allosteric modulators of CXCR4.The interplay between CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 and GABA/GABAA-GABAB receptors systems could have many physiological implications in neurotransmission, cancer and inflammation. In addition, the GABAB agonist baclofen is currently used in medicine to treat spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and other disorders. More recently it has also been used in the treatment of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. The allosteric effects of this agent on CXCR4 could contribute to these beneficial effects or at the opposite, to its side effects.

  9. Functional relevance of neurotransmitter receptor heteromers in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Sergi; Ciruela, Francisco; Woods, Amina S; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2007-09-01

    The existence of neurotransmitter receptor heteromers is becoming broadly accepted and their functional significance is being revealed. Heteromerization of neurotransmitter receptors produces functional entities that possess different biochemical characteristics with respect to the individual components of the heteromer. Neurotransmitter receptor heteromers can function as processors of computations that modulate cell signaling. Thus, the quantitative or qualitative aspects of the signaling generated by stimulation of any of the individual receptor units in the heteromer are different from those obtained during coactivation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrate that some neurotransmitter receptor heteromers can exert an effect as processors of computations that directly modulate both pre- and postsynaptic neurotransmission. This is illustrated by the analysis of striatal receptor heteromers that control striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  10. Neurotransmitter systems and neurotrophic factors in autism: association study of 37 genes suggests involvement of DDC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Claudio; Hervás, Amaia; Balmaña, Noemí; Salgado, Marta; Maristany, Marta; Vilella, Elisabet; Aguilera, Francisco; Orejuela, Carmen; Cuscó, Ivon; Gallastegui, Fátima; Pérez-Jurado, Luis Alberto; Caballero-Andaluz, Rafaela; Diego-Otero, Yolanda de; Guzmán-Alvarez, Guadalupe; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Ribasés, Marta; Bayés, Mònica; Cormand, Bru

    2013-09-01

    Neurotransmitter systems and neurotrophic factors can be considered strong candidates for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in neurotransmission, brain maturation and cortical organization, while neurotrophic factors (NTFs) participate in neurodevelopment, neuronal survival and synapses formation. We aimed to test the contribution of these candidate pathways to autism through a case-control association study of genes selected both for their role in central nervous system functions and for pathophysiological evidences. The study sample consisted of 326 unrelated autistic patients and 350 gender-matched controls from Spain. We genotyped 369 tagSNPs to perform a case-control association study of 37 candidate genes. A significant association was obtained between the DDC gene and autism in the single-marker analysis (rs6592961, P = 0.00047). Haplotype-based analysis pinpointed a four-marker combination in this gene associated with the disorder (rs2329340C-rs2044859T-rs6592961A-rs11761683T, P = 4.988e-05). No significant results were obtained for the remaining genes after applying multiple testing corrections. However, the rs167771 marker in DRD3, associated with ASD in a previous study, displayed a nominal association in our analysis (P = 0.023). Our data suggest that common allelic variants in the DDC gene may be involved in autism susceptibility.

  11. Noradrenergic deficits in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nahimi, A.; Sommerauer, M.; Ostergaard, K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: In vitro studies suggest that noradrenergic projections from locus coeruleus to subcortical and cortical brain structures, e.g., thalamus, undergo severe neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Loss of noradrenergic projections may alter oscillatory activity that in turn may...... be associated with cognitive decline. To test this hypothesis of the origin of cognitive decline in this disease, we used positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify the density of noradrenergic projections in groups of PD patients and healthy controls (HC), in combination with neuropsychological assessment...... with cognitive performance, independent of premorbid cognitive function or disease. PD patients had significant slowing of qEEG, e.g., the background alpha rhythm, but only EEG reactivity upon eye opening correlated with thalamic 11C-MeNER BPND in PD patients. Conclusion: This is the first direct quantification...

  12. Short- and long-term memory: differential involvement of neurotransmitter systems and signal transduction cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÔNICA R.M. VIANNA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Since William James (1890 first distinguished primary from secondary memory, equivalent to short- and long-term memory, respectively, it has been assumed that short-term memory processes are in charge of cognition while long-term memory is being consolidated. From those days a major question has been whether short-term memory is merely a initial phase of long-term memory, or a separate phenomena. Recent experiments have shown that many treatments with specific molecular actions given into the hippocampus and related brain areas after one-trial avoidance learning can effectively cancel short-term memory without affecting long-term memory formation. This shows that short-term memory and long-term memory involve separate mechanisms and are independently processed. Other treatments, however, influence both memory types similarly, suggesting links between both at the receptor and at the post-receptor level, which should not be surprising as they both deal with nearly the same sensorimotor representations. This review examines recent advances in short- and long-term memory mechanisms based on the effect of intra-hippocampal infusion of drugs acting upon neurotransmitter and signal transduction systems on both memory types.

  13. Unconventional neurotransmitters, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Leonelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitters are also involved in functions other than conventional signal transfer between nerve cells, such as development, plasticity, neurodegeneration, and neuroprotection. For example, there is a considerable amount of data indicating developmental roles for the glutamatergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABA-ergic, and ATP/adenosine systems. In this review, we discuss the existing literature on these "new" functions of neurotransmitters in relation to some unconventional neurotransmitters, such as the endocannabinoids and nitric oxide. Data indicating both transcriptional and post-transcriptional modulation of endocannabinoid and nitrinergic systems after neural lesions are discussed in relation to the non-conventional roles of these neurotransmitters. Knowledge of the roles of neurotransmitters in brain functions other than information transfer is critical for a more complete understanding of the functional organization of the brain and to provide more opportunities for the development of therapeutical tools aimed at minimizing neuronal death.

  14. The role of central noradrenergic dysregulation in anxiety disorders: evidence from clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalk, N J; Nutt, D J; Lingford-Hughes, A R

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the noradrenergic dysregulation in clinical anxiety disorders remains unclear. In panic disorder, the predominant view has been that central noradrenergic neuronal networks and/or the sympathetic nervous system was normal in patients at rest, but hyper-reactive to specific stimuli, for example carbon dioxide. These ideas have been extended to other anxiety disorders, which share with panic disorder characteristic subjective anxiety and physiological symptoms of excess sympathetic activity. For example, Generalized Anxiety Disorder is characterized by chronic free-floating anxiety, muscle tension, palpitation and insomnia. It has been proposed that there is chronic central hypersecretion of noradrenaline in Generalized Anxiety Disorder, with consequent hyporesponsiveness of central post-synaptic receptors. With regards to other disorders, it has been suggested that there is noradrenergic involvement or derangement, but a more specific hypothesis has not been enunciated. This paper reviews the evidence for noradrenergic dysfunction in anxiety disorders, derived from indirect measures of noradrenergic function in clinical populations.

  15. The role of the noradrenergic system in the exploration-exploitation trade-off: a pharmacological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Jepma

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal research and computational modeling have indicated an important role for the neuromodulatory locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE system in the control of behavior. According to the adaptive gain theory, the LC-NE system is critical for optimizing behavioral performance by regulating the balance between exploitative and exploratory control states. However, crucial direct empirical tests of this theory in human subjects have been lacking. We used a pharmacological manipulation of the LC-NE system to test predictions of this theory in humans. In a double-blind parallel-groups design (N = 52, participants received 4 mg reboxetine (a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, 30 mg citalopram (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or placebo. The adaptive gain theory predicted that the increased tonic NE levels induced by reboxetine would promote task disengagement and exploratory behavior. We assessed the effects of reboxetine on performance in two cognitive tasks designed to examine task (disengagement and exploitative versus exploratory behavior: a diminishing-utility task and a gambling task with a non-stationary pay-off structure. In contrast to predictions of the adaptive gain theory, we did not find differences in task (disengagement or exploratory behavior between the three experimental groups, despite demonstrable effects of the two drugs on non-specific central and autonomic nervous system parameters. Our findings suggest that the LC-NE system may not be involved in the regulation of the exploration-exploitation trade-off in humans, at least not within the context of a single task. It remains to be examined whether the LC-NE system is involved in random exploration exceeding the current task context.

  16. Motor system dysfunction in the schizophrenia diathesis: Neural systems to neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, R; Noronha, C; Diwadkar, V A

    2017-07-01

    Motor control is a ubiquitous aspect of human function, and from its earliest origins, abnormal motor control has been proposed as being central to schizophrenia. The neurobiological architecture of the motor system is well understood in primates and involves cortical and sub-cortical components including the primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the prefrontal cortex, the basal ganglia, and cerebellum. Notably all of these regions are associated in some manner to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. At the molecular scale, both dopamine and γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) abnormalities have been associated with working memory dysfunction, but particularly relating to the basal ganglia and the prefrontal cortex respectively. As evidence from multiple scales (behavioral, regional and molecular) converges, here we provide a synthesis of the bio-behavioral relevance of motor dysfunction in schizophrenia, and its consistency across scales. We believe that the selective compendium we provide can supplement calls arguing for renewed interest in studying the motor system in schizophrenia. We believe that in addition to being a highly relevant target for the study of schizophrenia related pathways in the brain, such focus provides tractable behavioral probes for in vivo imaging studies in the illness. Our assessment is that the motor system is a highly valuable research domain for the study of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Kimble, Christopher J; Covey, Daniel P; Blaha, Charles D; Agnesi, Filippo; Mohseni, Pedram; Whitlock, Sidney; Johnson, David M; Horne, April; Bennet, Kevin E; Lee, Kendall H; Garris, Paul A

    2009-10-01

    Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that modulation of specific central neuronal systems contributes to the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of targeted regions may therefore advance functional neurosurgery by, among other goals, providing a strategy for investigation of mechanisms, identification of new candidate neurotransmitters, and chemically guided placement of the stimulating electrode. The authors report the development of a device called the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring during functional neurosurgery. This device supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially and chemically resolved neurotransmitter measurements in the brain. The FSCV study consisted of a triangle wave scanned between -0.4 and 1 V at a rate of 300 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages were compared with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single carbon fiber (r = 2.5 mum) into a glass capillary and pulling the capillary to a microscopic tip by using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (that is, the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by approximately 100 microm. The neurotransmitter dopamine was selected as the analyte for most trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow injection and noise analysis, and in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring dopamine release in the striatum following high-frequency electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. Direct comparisons were made to a conventional hardwired system. The WINCS, designed in compliance with FDA-recognized consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, consisted of 4 modules: 1) front-end analog circuit for FSCV (that is, current-to-voltage transducer); 2

  18. Effects of age on spatial information processing: relationship to senescent changes in brain noradrenergic and opioid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    A major focus in current research on aging is the identification of senescent changes in cognitive function in laboratory animals. This literature indicates that the processing of spatial information may be particularly impaired during senescence. The degree to which nonspecific factors (eg. sensory of motor deficits) contribute to behavioral impairments in aging, however, remains largely uninvestigated. In addition, few studies have attempted to identify senescent changes in brain structure and function which might underlie the behavioral manifestations of aging. In the behavioral experiments reported here, the authors tested young, middle-age, and senescent rates in several versions of a spatial memory task, the Morris water maze. The results of these investigations demonstrate that aged rats are significantly impaired in the Morris task compared to young or middle-age animals. In addition, these studies indicate that age-related deficits in the water maze reflect a specific dysfunction in the ability of older animals to effectively process spatial information rather than a senescent decline in sensory or motor functions. Using the subjects from the behavioral studies, additional investigations assessed whether age-dependent changes in neurochemical and neuroanatomical systems which are known to mediate spatial learning in young animals were related to the behavioral deficits exhibited by aged rats. The results of these studies demonstrate that a portion of senescent animals exhibit significant increases in lateral septal 3 H-desmethylimipramine binding and decrease in 3 H-naloxone binding in this same region as assessed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

  19. Interactions Between Epinephrine, Ascending Vagal Fibers and Central Noradrenergic Systems in Modulating Memory for Emotionally Arousing Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric L. Williams

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that exposure to emotionally laden events initiates secretion of the arousal related hormone epinephrine in the periphery. These neuroendocrine changes and the subsequent increase in peripheral physiological output play an integral role in modulating brain systems involved in memory formation. The impermeability of the blood brain barrier to epinephrine represents an important obstacle in understanding how peripheral hormones initiate neurochemical changes in the brain that lead to effective memory formation. This obstacle necessitated the identity of a putative pathway capable of conveying physiological changes produced by epinephrine to limbic structures that incorporate arousal and affect related information into memory. A major theme of the proposed studies is that ascending fibers of the vagus nerve may represent such a mechanism. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating the contribution of ascending vagal fibers in modulating memory for responses learned under behavioral conditions that produce emotional arousal by manipulating appetitive stimuli. A combination of electrophysiological recording of vagal afferent fibers and in vivo microdialysis was employed in a second study to simultaneously assess how elevations in peripheral levels of epinephrine affect vagal nerve discharge and the subsequent potentiation of norepinephrine release in the basolateral amygdala. The final study used double immunohistochemistry labeling of c-fos and dopamine beta hydroxylase, the enzyme for norepinephrine synthesis to determine if epinephrine administration alone or stimulation of the vagus nerve at an intensity identical to that which improved memory in Experiment 1 produces similar patterns of neuronal activity in brain areas involved in processing memory for emotional events. Findings emerging from this collection of studies establish the importance of ascending fibers of the vagus nerve as an essential pathway for conveying the

  20. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System-based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J; Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Kimble, Christopher J; Sieck, Gary C; Bennet, Kevin E; Garris, Paul A; Blaha, Charles D; Lee, Kendall H

    2009-10-01

    In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal model, the pig. The

  1. Modulation of the storage of social recognition memory by neurotransmitter systems in the insular cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Lorena E S; Zinn, Carolina G; Schmidt, Scheila D; Saenger, Bruna F; Ferreira, Flávia F; Furini, Cristiane R G; Myskiw, Jociane C; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2017-09-15

    The insular cortex (IC) receives projections from prefrontal, entorhinal and cingulate cortex, olfactory bulb and basal nuclei and has reciprocal connections with the amygdala and entorhinal cortex. These connections suggest a possible involvement in memory processes; this has been borne out by data on several behaviors. Social recognition memory (SRM) is essential to form social groups and to establish hierarchies and social and affective ties. Despite its importance, knowledge about the brain structures and the neurotransmitter mechanisms involved in its processing is still scarce. Here we study the participation of NMDA-glutamatergic, D1/D5-dopaminergic, H2-histaminergic, β-adrenergic and 5-HT 1A -serotoninergic receptors of the IC in the consolidation of SRM. Male Wistar rats received intra-IC infusions of substances acting on these receptors immediately after the sample phase of a social discrimination task and 24h later were exposed to a 5-min retention test. The intra-IC infusion of antagonists of D1/D5, β-adrenergic or 5-HT 1A receptors immediately after the sample phase impaired the consolidation of SRM. These effects were blocked by the concomitant intra-IC infusion of agonists of these receptors. Antagonists and agonists of NMDA and H2 receptors had no effect on SRM. The results suggest that the dopaminergic D1/D5, β-adrenergic and serotonergic 5-HT 1A receptors in the IC, but not glutamatergic NMDA and the histaminergic H2 receptors, participate in the consolidation of SRM in the IC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Selective deficiencies in descending inhibitory modulation in neuropathic rats: implications for enhancing noradrenergic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ryan; Qu, Chaoling; Xie, Jennifer Y; Porreca, Frank; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2018-05-31

    Pontine noradrenergic neurones form part of a descending inhibitory system that influences spinal nociceptive processing. Weak or absent descending inhibition is a common feature of chronic pain patients. We examined the extent to which the descending noradrenergic system is tonically active, how control of spinal neuronal excitability is integrated into thalamic relays within sensory-discriminative projection pathways, and how this inhibitory control is altered after nerve injury. In vivo electrophysiology was performed in anaesthetised spinal nerve ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats to record from wide dynamic range neurones in the ventral posterolateral thalamus (VPL). In sham rats, spinal block of α2-adrenoceptors with atipamezole resulted in enhanced stimulus-evoked and spontaneous firing in the VPL, and produced conditioned place avoidance. However, in SNL rats these conditioned avoidance behaviours were absent. Furthermore, inhibitory control of evoked neuronal responses was lost but spinal atipamezole markedly increased spontaneous firing. Augmenting spinal noradrenergic tone in neuropathic rats with reboxetine, a selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor, modestly reinstated inhibitory control of evoked responses in the VPL but had no effect on spontaneous firing. In contrast, clonidine, an α2 agonist, inhibited both evoked and spontaneous firing, and exhibited increased potency in SNL rats compared to sham controls. These data suggest descending noradrenergic inhibitory pathways are tonically active in sham rats. Moreover, in neuropathic states descending inhibitory control is diminished, but not completely absent, and distinguishes between spontaneous and evoked neuronal activity. These observations may have implications for how analgesics targeting the noradrenergic system provide relief.

  3. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Fortuna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation.

  4. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurotransmitters activate T-cells and elicit crucial functions via neurotransmitter receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia

    2008-08-01

    Neurotransmitters are traditionally viewed as nerve-secreted molecules that trigger or inhibit neuronal functions. Yet, neurotransmitters bind also their neurotransmitter receptors in T-cells and directly activate or suppress T-cell functions. This review focuses only on the activating effects of neurotransmitters on T-cells, primarily naïve/resting cells, and covers dopamine, glutamate, serotonin, and few neuropeptides: GnRH-I, GnRH-II, substance P, somatostatin, CGRP, and neuropeptide Y. T-cells express many neurotransmitter receptors. These are regulated by TCR-activation, cytokines, or the neurotransmitters themselves, and are upregulated/downregulated in some human diseases. The context - whether the T-cells are naïve/resting or antigen/mitogen/cytokine-activated, the T-cell subset (CD4/CD8/Th1/Th2/Teff/Treg), neurotransmitter dose (low/optimal or high/excess), exact neurotransmitter receptors expressed, and the cytokine milieu - is crucial, and can determine either activation or suppression of T-cells by the same neurotransmitter. T-cells also produce many neurotransmitters. In summary, neurotransmitters activate vital T-cell functions in a direct, potent and specific manner, and may serve for communicating between the brain and the immune system to elicit an effective and orchestrated immune function, and for new therapeutic avenues, to improve T-cell eradication of cancer and infectious organisms.

  6. Noradrenergic Modulation of Cognition in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Borodovitsyna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine released by the locus coeruleus modulates cellular processes and synaptic transmission in the central nervous system through its actions at a number of pre- and postsynaptic receptors. This transmitter system facilitates sensory signal detection and promotes waking and arousal, processes which are necessary for navigating a complex and dynamic sensory environment. In addition to its effects on sensory processing and waking behavior, norepinephrine is now recognized as a contributor to various aspects of cognition, including attention, behavioral flexibility, working memory, and long-term mnemonic processes. Two areas of dense noradrenergic innervation, the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, are particularly important with regard to these functions. Due to its role in mediating normal cognitive function, it is reasonable to expect that noradrenergic transmission becomes dysfunctional in a number of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases characterized by cognitive deficits. In this review, we summarize the unique role that norepinephrine plays in prefrontal cortical and hippocampal function and how its interaction with its various receptors contributes to cognitive behaviors. We further assess the changes that occur in the noradrenergic system in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia and how these changes contribute to cognitive decline in these pathologies.

  7. Noradrenergic Dysfunction in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases—An Overview of Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Peterson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic dysfunction contributes to cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's Disease (AD and Parkinson's Disease (PD. Conventional therapeutic strategies seek to enhance cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in AD and PD, respectively, and few studies have examined noradrenergic dysfunction as a target for medication development. We review the literature of noradrenergic dysfunction in AD and PD with a focus on human imaging studies that implicate the locus coeruleus (LC circuit. The LC sends noradrenergic projections diffusely throughout the cerebral cortex and plays a critical role in attention, learning, working memory, and cognitive control. The LC undergoes considerable degeneration in both AD and PD. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging have facilitated greater understanding of how structural and functional alteration of the LC may contribute to cognitive decline in AD and PD. We discuss the potential roles of the noradrenergic system in the pathogenesis of AD and PD with an emphasis on postmortem anatomical studies, structural MRI studies, and functional MRI studies, where we highlight changes in LC connectivity with the default mode network (DMN. LC degeneration may accompany deficient capacity in suppressing DMN activity and increasing saliency and task control network activities to meet behavioral challenges. We finish by proposing potential and new directions of research to address noradrenergic dysfunction in AD and PD.

  8. Behavioral correlates of cerebrospinal fluid amino acid and biogenic amine neurotransmitter alterations in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Van Hemelrijck, An; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2013-09-01

    Behavioral and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are a heterogeneous group of behavioral and psychiatric disturbances occurring in dementia patients of any etiology. Research suggests that altered activities of dopaminergic, serotonergic, (nor)adrenergic, as well as amino acid neurotransmitter systems play a role in the etiopathogenesis of BPSD. In this study we attempted to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurochemical correlates of BPSD to provide further insight into its underlying neurochemical pathophysiological mechanisms. Patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 202), probable AD with cerebrovascular disease (n = 37), probable frontotemporal dementia (FTD; n = 32), and probable dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB; n = 26) underwent behavioral assessment and lumbar puncture. CSF levels of six amino acids and several biogenic amines and metabolites were analyzed using ultraperformance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. In the AD patients, CSF homovanillic acid/5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (HVA/5HIAA) ratios correlated positively with anxieties/phobias, whereas CSF levels of taurine correlated negatively with depression and behavioral disturbances in general. In FTD patients, CSF levels of glutamate correlated negatively with verbally agitated behavior. In DLB patients, CSF levels of HVA correlated negatively with hallucinations. Several neurotransmitter systems can be linked to one specific behavioral syndrome depending on the dementia subtype. In addition to biogenic amines and metabolites, amino acids seem to play a major role in the neurochemical etiology of BPSD as well. Copyright © 2013 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Positive effects of β-amyrin on pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice via GABAergic neurotransmitter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Se Jin; Park, Ho Jae; Gao, Qingtao; Lee, Hyung Eun; Park, Se Jin; Hong, Eunyoung; Jang, Dae Sik; Shin, Chan Young; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-09-15

    Sleep loss, insomnia, is considered a sign of imbalance of physiological rhythm, which can be used as pre-clinic diagnosis of various neuropsychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study is to understand the pharmacological actions of α- or β-amyrin, natural triterpene compound, on the sleep in mice. To analyze the sleeping behavior, we used the well-known pentobarbital-induced sleeping model after single administration of either α- or β-amyrin. The sleeping onset time was remarkably decreased and duration was prolonged by β-amyrin (1, 3, or 10mg/kg) but not by α-amyrin (1, 3, or 10mg/kg). These effects were significantly blocked by GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Moreover, β-amyrin increased brain GABA level compared to the vehicle administration. Overall, the present study suggests that β-amyrin would enhance the total sleeping behavior in pentobarbital-induced sleeping model via the activation of GABAergic neurotransmitter system through GABA content in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The emergence of neurotransmitters as immune modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Lluis, Carmen; Ahern, Gerard P; O'Connell, Peta J

    2007-09-01

    Initially, the idea that neurotransmitters could serve as immunomodulators emerged with the discovery that their release and diffusion from nervous tissue could lead to signaling through lymphocyte cell-surface receptors and the modulation of immune function. It is now evident that neurotransmitters can also be released from leukocytes and act as autocrine or paracrine modulators. Here, we review the data indicating that leukocytes synthesize and release 'neurotransmitters' and we also discuss the diverse effects that these compounds exert in a variety of immune cells. The role of neurotransmitters in immune-related diseases is also reviewed succinctly. Current and future developments in understanding the cross-talk between the immune and nervous systems will probably identify new avenues for treating immune-mediated diseases using agonists or antagonists of neurotransmitter receptors.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na+/Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporters in a membrane-aqueous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Marie; Tagmose, L.; Jørgensen, A.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a homology model of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in a membrane environment and in complex with either the natural substrate S-HT or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitaloprom. We have also included a transporter homologue......, the Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter (LeuT), in our study to evaluate the applicability of a simple and computationally attractive membrane system. Fluctuations in LeuT extracted from simulations are in good agreement with crystal logrophic B factors. Furthermore, key interactions identified in the X....... Specific interactions responsible for ligand recognition, are identified in the hSERT-5HT and hSERT-escitaloprom complexes. Our finding5 are in good agreement with predictions from mutagenesis studies....

  12. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  13. Drugs of abuse specifically sensitize noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons via a non-dopaminergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanteri, Christophe; Salomon, Lucas; Torrens, Yvette; Glowinski, Jacques; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2008-06-01

    A challenge in drug dependence is to delineate long-term neurochemical modifications induced by drugs of abuse. Repeated d-amphetamine was recently shown to disrupt a mutual regulatory link between noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons, thus inducing long-term increased responses to d-amphetamine and para-chloroamphetamine, respectively. We show here that such a sensitization of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons also occurs following repeated treatment with cocaine, morphine, or alcohol, three compounds belonging to main groups of addictive substances. In all cases, this sensitization is prevented by alpha 1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors blockade, indicating the critical role of these receptors on long-term effects of drugs of abuse. However, repeated treatments with two non-addictive antidepressants, venlafaxine, and clorimipramine, which nevertheless inhibit noradrenergic and serotonergic reuptake, do not induce noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons sensitization. Similarly, this sensitization does not occur following repeated treatments with a specific inhibitor of dopamine (DA) reuptake, GBR12783. Moreover, we show that the effects of SCH23390, a D1 receptor antagonist known to inhibit development of d-amphetamine behavioral sensitization, are due to its 5-HT2C receptor agonist property. SCH23390 blocks amphetamine-induced release of norepinephrine and RS102221, a 5-HT2C antagonist, can reverse this inhibition as well as inhibition of noradrenergic sensitization and development of behavioral sensitization induced by repeated d-amphetamine. We propose that noradrenergic/serotonergic uncoupling is a common neurochemical consequence of repeated consumption of drugs of abuse, unrelated with DA release. Our data also suggest that compounds able to restore the link between noradrenergic and serotonergic modulatory systems could represent important therapeutic targets for investigation.

  14. Neurotransmitter receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, M.; Hierholzer, J.; Nikolai-Beyer, K.

    1993-01-01

    The importance of neuroreceptor imaging in vivo using single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) has increased enormously. The principal neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, GABA/benzodiazepine, acetylcholine, and serotonin, are presented with reference to anatomical, biochemical, and physiological features. The main radioligands for SPECT and PET are introduced, and methodological characteristics of both PET and SPECT presented. Finally, the results of neurotransmitter receptor imaging obtained so far will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. A pilot integrative genomics study of GABA and glutamate neurotransmitter systems in suicide, suicidal behavior, and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Honglei; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Galfalvy, Hanga; Huang, Yung-Yu; Rosoklija, Gorazd B; Dwork, Andrew J; Burke, Ainsley; Arango, Victoria; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, John J

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) and glutamate are the major inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system, respectively, and have been associated with suicidal behavior and major depressive disorder (MDD). We examined the relationship between genotype, brain transcriptome, and MDD/suicide for 24 genes involved in GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. In part 1 of the study, 119 candidate SNPs in 24 genes (4 transporters, 4 enzymes, and 16 receptors) were tested for associations with MDD and suicidal behavior in 276 live participants (86 nonfatal suicide attempters with MDD and 190 non-attempters of whom 70% had MDD) and 209 postmortem cases (121 suicide deaths of whom 62% had MDD and 88 sudden death from other causes of whom 11% had MDD) using logistic regression adjusting for sex and age. In part 2, RNA-seq was used to assay isoform-level expression in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of 59 postmortem samples (21 with MDD and suicide, 9 MDD without suicide, and 29 sudden death non-suicides and no psychiatric illness) using robust regression adjusting for sex, age, and RIN score. In part 3, SNPs with subthreshold (uncorrected) significance levels below 0.05 for an association with suicidal behavior and/or MDD in part 1 were tested for eQTL effects in prefrontal cortex using the Brain eQTL Almanac (www.braineac.org). No SNPs or transcripts were significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. However, a protein coding transcript (ENST00000414552) of the GABA A receptor, gamma 2 (GABRG2) had lower brain expression postmortem in suicide (P = 0.01) and evidence for association with suicide death (P = 0.03) in a SNP that may be an eQTL in prefrontal cortex (rs424740, P = 0.02). These preliminary results implicate GABRG2 in suicide and warrant further investigation and replication in larger samples. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Harmane: an atypical neurotransmitter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Ghazaleh, Haya; Lalies, Maggie D; Nutt, David J; Hudson, Alan L

    2015-03-17

    Harmane is an active component of clonidine displacing substance and a candidate endogenous ligand for imidazoline binding sites. The neurochemistry of tritiated harmane was investigated in the present study examining its uptake and release properties in the rat brain central nervous system (CNS) in vitro. At physiological temperature, [(3)H]harmane was shown to be taken up in rat brain cortex. Further investigations demonstrated that treatment with monoamine uptake blockers (citalopram, nomifensine and nisoxetine) did not alter [(3)H]harmane uptake implicating that the route of [(3)H]harmane transport was distinct from the monoamine uptake systems. Furthermore, imidazoline ligands (rilmenidine, efaroxan, 2-BFI and idazoxan) showed no prominent effect on [(3)H]harmane uptake suggesting the lack of involvement of imidazoline binding sites. Subsequent analyses showed that disruption of the Na(+) gradient using ouabain or choline chloride did not block [(3)H]harmane uptake suggesting a Na(+)-independent transport mechanism. Moreover, higher temperatures (50°C) failed to impede [(3)H]harmane uptake implying a non-physiological transporter. The failure of potassium to evoke the release of preloaded [(3)H]harmane from rat brain cortex indicates that the properties of this putative endogenous ligand for imidazoline binding sites do not resemble that of a conventional neurotransmitter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. NORADRENERGIC AND ADRENERGIC FUNCTIONING IN AUTISM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MINDERAA, RB; ANDERSON, GM; VOLKMAR, FR; AKKERHUIS, GW; COHEN, DJ

    1994-01-01

    A neurochemical assessment of noradrenergic and adrenergic functioning was carried out with autistic patients and normal control individuals. Norepinephrine and related compounds were measured in autistic (n = 17 unmedicated, 23 medicated; age range 9-29 years old) and normal controls (n = 27; age

  18. Nanosensors for neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Elena; Kruss, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Neurotransmitters are an important class of messenger molecules. They govern chemical communication between cells for example in the brain. The spatiotemporal propagation of these chemical signals is a crucial part of communication between cells. Thus, the spatial aspect of neurotransmitter release is equally important as the mere time-resolved measurement of these substances. In conclusion, without tools that provide the necessary spatiotemporal resolution, chemical signaling via neurotransmitters cannot be studied in greater detail. In this review article we provide a critical overview about sensors/probes that are able to monitor neurotransmitters. Our focus are sensing concepts that provide or could in the future provide the spatiotemporal resolution that is necessary to 'image' dynamic changes of neurotransmitter concentrations around cells. These requirements set the bar for the type of sensors we discuss. The sensor must be small enough (if possible on the nanoscale) to provide the envisioned spatial resolution and it should allow parallel (spatial) detection. In this article we discuss both optical and electrochemical concepts that meet these criteria. We cover techniques that are based on fluorescent building blocks such as nanomaterials, proteins and organic dyes. Additionally, we review electrochemical array techniques and assess limitations and possible future directions.

  19. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  20. Fast methods for analysis of neurotransmitters from single cell and monitoring their releases in central nervous system by capillary electrophoresis, fluorescence microscopy and luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ziqiang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-12-10

    Fast methods for separation and detection of important neurotransmitters and the releases in central nervous system (CNS) were developed. Enzyme based immunoassay combined with capillary electrophoresis was used to analyze the contents of amino acid neurotransmitters from single neuron cells. The release of amino acid neurotransmitters from neuron cultures was monitored by laser induced fluorescence imaging method. The release and signal transduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in CNS was studied with sensitive luminescence imaging method. A new dual-enzyme on-column reaction method combined with capillary electrophoresis has been developed for determining the glutamate content in single cells. Detection was based on monitoring the laser-induced fluorescence of the reaction product NADH, and the measured fluorescence intensity was related to the concentration of glutamate in each cell. The detection limit of glutamate is down to 10-8 M level, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than the previously reported detection limit based on similar detection methods. The mass detection limit of a few attomoles is far superior to that of any other reports. Selectivity for glutamate is excellent over most of amino acids. The glutamate content in single human erythrocyte and baby rat brain neurons were determined with this method and results agreed well with literature values.

  1. Porters and neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N; Lill, H

    1994-11-01

    Uptake of neurotransmitters involves multiple transporters acting in different brain locations under different physiological conditions. The vesicular transporters are driven by a proton-motive force generated by a V-ATPase and their substrates are taken up via proton/substrate exchange. The plasma membrane transporters are driven by an electrochemical gradient of sodium generated by a Na+/K(+)-ATPase. Two distinct families of transporters were identified in this group. One cotransports sodium with glutamate and other amino acids and requires additionally an outwardly directed potassium gradient. The second cotransports sodium, chloride and a variety of neurotransmitters, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine and monoamines. Genes and cDNA encoding several members of the latter family have been cloned and studied in detail. The structure and function as well as the evolutionary relationships among these neurotransmitter transporters are discussed.

  2. Predator Exposure/Psychosocial Stress Animal Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Modulates Neurotransmitters in the Rat Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. Brad; Ebenezer, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Leslie D.; Francis, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can develop in response to a traumatic event involving a threat to life. To date, no diagnostic biomarkers have been identified for PTSD. Recent research points toward physiological abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, sympathoadrenal medullary and immune system that may be implicated in the disorder. The modulation of neurotransmitters is another possible mechanism, but their role in the progression of PTSD is poorly understood. Low serotonin (5-HT) may be a factor, but it may not be the only neurotransmitter affected as modulation affects levels of other neurotransmitters. In this study, we hypothesized the predator exposure/psychosocial stress rodent model of PTSD may alter levels of 5-HT and other neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experiment. We induced PTSD via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress model, whereby rats were placed in a cage with a cat for 1 hour on days 1 and 11 of the 31-day experiment. Rats also received psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. On day 32, the rats were sacrificed and the brains dissected to remove the hippocampus and PFC. Norepinephrine (NE), 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanillic acid (HVA), dopamine (DA), and 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 5-HT levels in the hippocampus and PFC were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the hippocampus, 5-HT and HVA were lower, while NE and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. In the PFC, only 5-HT was lower, while NE, DA, and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. The rate limiting enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase were also examined and confirmed our findings. These results demonstrate that the predator exposure/psychosocial stress model of PTSD produces neurotransmitter changes similar to those seen in human patients and may cause a

  3. Predator exposure/psychosocial stress animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder modulates neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Brad Wilson

    Full Text Available Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD can develop in response to a traumatic event involving a threat to life. To date, no diagnostic biomarkers have been identified for PTSD. Recent research points toward physiological abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, sympathoadrenal medullary and immune system that may be implicated in the disorder. The modulation of neurotransmitters is another possible mechanism, but their role in the progression of PTSD is poorly understood. Low serotonin (5-HT may be a factor, but it may not be the only neurotransmitter affected as modulation affects levels of other neurotransmitters. In this study, we hypothesized the predator exposure/psychosocial stress rodent model of PTSD may alter levels of 5-HT and other neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experiment. We induced PTSD via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress model, whereby rats were placed in a cage with a cat for 1 hour on days 1 and 11 of the 31-day experiment. Rats also received psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. On day 32, the rats were sacrificed and the brains dissected to remove the hippocampus and PFC. Norepinephrine (NE, 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, homovanillic acid (HVA, dopamine (DA, and 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, and 5-HT levels in the hippocampus and PFC were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In the hippocampus, 5-HT and HVA were lower, while NE and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. In the PFC, only 5-HT was lower, while NE, DA, and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. The rate limiting enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase were also examined and confirmed our findings. These results demonstrate that the predator exposure/psychosocial stress model of PTSD produces neurotransmitter changes similar to those seen in human patients and may

  4. Porters and neurotransmitter transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, Nathan; Lill, H

    1994-01-01

    Uptake of neurotransmitters involves multiple transporters acting in different brain locations under different physiological conditions. The vesicular transporters are driven by a proton-motive force generated by a V-ATPase and their substrates are taken up via proton/substrate exchange. The plasma

  5. Noradrenergic Action in Prefrontal Cortex in the Late Stage of Memory Consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronel, Sophie; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; Sara, Susan J.

    2004-01-01

    These experiments investigated the role of the noradrenergic system in the late stage of memory consolidation and in particular its action at beta receptors in the prelimbic region (PL) of the prefrontal cortex in the hours after training. Rats were trained in a rapidly acquired, appetitively motivated foraging task based on olfactory…

  6. Noradrenergic action in prefrontal cortex in the late stage of memory consolidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tronel, Sophie; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; Sara, Susan J.

    2004-01-01

    These experiments investigated the role of the noradrenergic system in the late stage of memory consolidation and in particular its action at beta receptors in the prelimbic region (PL) of the prefrontal cortex in the hours after training. Rats were trained in a rapidly acquired, appetitively

  7. Noradrenergic Control of Odor Recognition in a Nonassociative Olfactory Learning Task in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrac, Alexandra; Nguyen, Veronique; Marien, Marc; Didier, Anne; Jourdan, Francois

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of pharmacological modulations of the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system on odor recognition in the mouse. Mice exposed to a nonrewarded olfactory stimulation (training) were able to memorize this odor and to discriminate it from a new odor in a recall test performed 15 min later. At longer delays (30 or…

  8. Enhanced noradrenergic activity in the amygdala contributes to hyperarousal in an animal model of PTSD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronzoni, G.; Arco, A. Del; Mora, F.; Segovia, G.

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of the noradrenergic system in the amygdala has been suggested to contribute to the hyperarousal symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, only two studies have examined the content of noradrenaline or its metabolites in the amygdala of rats

  9. Dysfunctional Neurotransmitter Systems in Fibromyalgia, Their Role in Central Stress Circuitry and Pharmacological Actions on These Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Becker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is considered a stress-related disorder, and hypo- as well as hyperactive stress systems (sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis have been found. Some observations raise doubts on the view that alterations in these stress systems are solely responsible for fibromyalgia symptoms. Cumulative evidence points at dysfunctional transmitter systems that may underlie the major symptoms of the condition. In addition, all transmitter systems found to be altered in fibromyalgia influence the body's stress systems. Since both transmitter and stress systems change during chronic stress, it is conceivable that both systems change in parallel, interact, and contribute to the phenotype of fibromyalgia. As we outline in this paper, subgroups of patients might exhibit varying degrees and types of transmitter dysfunction, explaining differences in symptomatoloy and contributing to the heterogeneity of fibromyalgia. The finding that not all fibromyalgia patients respond to the same medications, targeting dysfunctional transmitter systems, further supports this hypothesis.

  10. Noradrenergic modulation of neural erotic stimulus perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Heiko; Wiegers, Maike; Metzger, Coraline Danielle; Walter, Martin; Grön, Georg; Abler, Birgit

    2017-09-01

    We recently investigated neuromodulatory effects of the noradrenergic agent reboxetine and the dopamine receptor affine amisulpride in healthy subjects on dynamic erotic stimulus processing. Whereas amisulpride left sexual functions and neural activations unimpaired, we observed detrimental activations under reboxetine within the caudate nucleus corresponding to motivational components of sexual behavior. However, broadly impaired subjective sexual functioning under reboxetine suggested effects on further neural components. We now investigated the same sample under these two agents with static erotic picture stimulation as alternative stimulus presentation mode to potentially observe further neural treatment effects of reboxetine. 19 healthy males were investigated under reboxetine, amisulpride and placebo for 7 days each within a double-blind cross-over design. During fMRI static erotic picture were presented with preceding anticipation periods. Subjective sexual functions were assessed by a self-reported questionnaire. Neural activations were attenuated within the caudate nucleus, putamen, ventral striatum, the pregenual and anterior midcingulate cortex and in the orbitofrontal cortex under reboxetine. Subjective diminished sexual arousal under reboxetine was correlated with attenuated neural reactivity within the posterior insula. Again, amisulpride left neural activations along with subjective sexual functioning unimpaired. Neither reboxetine nor amisulpride altered differential neural activations during anticipation of erotic stimuli. Our results verified detrimental effects of noradrenergic agents on neural motivational but also emotional and autonomic components of sexual behavior. Considering the overlap of neural network alterations with those evoked by serotonergic agents, our results suggest similar neuromodulatory effects of serotonergic and noradrenergic agents on common neural pathways relevant for sexual behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and

  11. Involvement of the Cerebral Monoamine Neurotransmitters System in Antidepressant-Like Effects of a Chinese Herbal Decoction, Baihe Dihuang Tang, in Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Li Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Baihe Dihuang Tang (BDT is a renowned Chinese herbal formula which is commonly used for treating patients with mental instability, absentmindedness, insomnia, deficient dysphoria, and other psychological diseases. These major symptoms closely associated with the depressive disorders. BDT was widely popular use for treating emotion-thought disorders for many years in China. In the present study, the antidepressant-like effect of BDT in mice was investigated by using the forced swim test (FST and the tail suspension test (TST. The underlying mechanism was explored by determining the effect of BDT on the level of cerebral monoamine neurotransmitters. BDT (9 and 18 g/kg, p.o. for 14 days administration significantly reduced the immobility time in both the FST and the TST without changing locomotion in the open field-test (OFT. Moreover, BDT treatment at the dose of 18 g/kg inhibited reserpine-induced ptosis. Meanwhile, BDT enhanced 5-HT and NA levels in mouse cerebrum as well as decreased the ratio of 5-HT compared to its metabolite, 5-HIAA, (turnover, 5-HIAA/5-HT after TST. The results demonstrated that the antidepressant-like effect of BDT is mediated, at least partially, via the central monoaminergic neurotransmitter system.

  12. A Life of Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Solomon H

    2017-01-06

    Development of scientific creativity is often tied closely to mentorship. In my case, two years with Julius Axelrod, the sum total of my research training, was transformative. My mentoring generations of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows has been as nurturing for me as it has been for them. Work in our lab over fifty years has covered the breadth of neurotransmitters and related substances, focusing on the discovery and characterization of novel messenger molecules. I can't conceptualize a more rewarding professional life.

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals for neurotransmitter imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Neurotransmitter imaging with radiopharmaceuticals plays major role for understanding of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and depression. Radiopharmaceuticals for neurotransmitter imaging can be divided to dopamine transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals and serotonin transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals. Many kinds of new dopamine transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals has a tropane ring and they showed different biological properties according to the substituted functional group on tropane ring. After the first clinical trials with [{sup 123}I] {beta} -CIT, alkyl chain substituent introduced to tropane ring amine to decrease time for imaging acquisition and to increase selectivity. From these results, [{sup 123}I]PE2I, [18F]FE-CNT, [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and [{sup 18}F]FP-CIT were developed and they showed high uptake on the dopamine transporter rich regions and fast peak uptake equilibrium time within 4 hours after injection. [{sup 11}C]McN 5652 was developed for serotonin transporter imaging but this compound showed slow kinetics and high background radioactivity. To overcome these problems, new diarylsulfide backbone derivatives such as ADAM, ODAM, AFM, and DASB were developed. In these candidates, [{sup 11}C]AFM and [{sup 11}C]DASB showed high binding affinity to serotonin transporter and fast in vivo kinetics. This paper gives an overview of current status on dopamine and serotonin transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals and the development of new lead compounds as potential radiopharmaceuticals by medicinal chemistry.

  14. Noradrenergic Stimulation Impairs Memory Generalization in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluen, Lisa Marieke; Agorastos, Agorastos; Wiedemann, Klaus; Schwabe, Lars

    2017-07-01

    Memory generalization is essential for adaptive decision-making and action. Our ability to generalize across past experiences relies on medial-temporal lobe structures, known to be highly sensitive to stress. Recent evidence suggests that stressful events may indeed interfere with memory generalization. Yet, the mechanisms involved in this generalization impairment are unknown. We tested here whether a pharmacological elevation of major stress mediators-noradrenaline and glucocorticoids-is sufficient to disrupt memory generalization. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, healthy men and women received orally a placebo, hydrocortisone, the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine that leads to increased noradrenergic stimulation, or both drugs, before they completed an associative learning task probing memory generalization. Drugs left learning performance intact. Yohimbine, however, led to a striking generalization impairment in women, but not in men. Hydrocortisone, in turn, had no effect on memory generalization, neither in men nor in women. The present findings indicate that increased noradrenergic activity, but not cortisol, is sufficient to disrupt memory generalization in a sex-specific manner, with relevant implications for stress-related mental disorders characterized by generalization deficits.

  15. Neurotransmitters, more than meets the eye--neurotransmitters and their perspectives in cancer development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi Jie; Cho, Chi Hin

    2011-09-30

    The neurotransmitter/receptor system has been shown to modulate various aspects of tumor development including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, migration and metastasis. It has been found that tumor tissues can not only synthesize and release a wide range of neurotransmitters but also produce different biological effects via respective receptors. These tissues are also innervated by nerve fibers but the biological significance is unknown. Nevertheless neurotransmitters can produce either stimulatory or inhibitory effect in normal and tumor tissues. These effects are dependent on the types of tissues and the kinds of neurotransmitter as well as the subtypes of corresponding receptors being involved. These findings clearly extend the conventional role of neurotransmitters in nervous system to the actions in oncogenesis. In this regard, intervention or stimulation of these neuronal pathways in different cancer diseases would have significant clinical implications in cancer treatments. Here, we summarize the influences of various well-characterized neurotransmitters and their receptors on tumor growth and further discuss the respective possible strategies and perspectives for cancer therapy in the future. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for 3 H-glycine, 3 H-dopamine, and 3 H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these 3 H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of 3 H-glutamate and 3 H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally

  17. The role of identified neurotransmitter systems in the response of insular cortex to unfamiliar taste: activation of ERK1-2 and formation of a memory trace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, D E; Hazvi, S; Neduva, V; Dudai, Y

    2000-09-15

    In the behaving rat, the consumption of an unfamiliar taste activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1-2 (ERK1-2) in the insular cortex, which contains the taste cortex. In contrast, consumption of a familiar taste has no effect. Furthermore, activation of ERK1-2, culminating in modulation of gene expression, is obligatory for the encoding of long-term, but not short-term, memory of the new taste (Berman et al., 1998). Which neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory systems are involved in the activation of ERK1-2 by the unfamiliar taste and in the long-term encoding of the new taste information? Here we show, by the use of local microinjections of pharmacological agents to the insular cortex in the behaving rat, that multiple neurotransmitters and neuromodulators are required for encoding of taste memory in cortex. However, these systems vary in the specificity of their role in memory acquisition and in their contribution to the activation of ERK1-2. NMDA receptors, metabotropic glutamate receptors, muscarinic, and beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic receptors, all contribute to the acquisition of the new taste memory but not to its retrieval. Among these, only NMDA and muscarinic receptors specifically mediate taste-dependent activation of ERK1-2, whereas the beta-adrenergic function is independent of ERK1-2, and dopaminergic receptors regulate also the basal level of ERK1-2 activation. The data are discussed in the context of postulated novelty detection circuits in the central taste system.

  18. Neurotransmitter system of immune regulation as a marker of immunological disorders in pupils in the conditions of increased entry of strontium with drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.V. Dolgikh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of immunological markers in schoolchildren exposed to strontium is performed. It is shown that under the conditions of increased administration of strontium with drinking water the indication of spontaneous and induced levels of neurotransmitters in vitro allows to detect early functional disorders of the immune system. It was found that the following markers of specific hypersensitivity and mediators of intercellular immune regulation (IgG specific to strontium, cytokines IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, α-TNF, GM-CSF, spontaneous and specifically stimulated, RANKL, OPG( may be proposed for the identification of health risk as early markers of immune disorders in school children living in areas of strontium geochemical provinces.

  19. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  20. The putative Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter/osmolyte transporter inebriated in the Drosophila hindgut is essential for the maintenance of systemic water homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Zhuo; Quigley, Caitlin; Li, Hong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms are able to maintain systemic water homeostasis over a wide range of external or dietary osmolarities. The excretory system, composed of the kidneys in mammals and the Malpighian tubules and hindgut in insects, can increase water conservation and absorption to maintain systemic water homeostasis, which enables organisms to tolerate external hypertonicity or desiccation. However, the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of systemic water homeostasis by the excretory system have not been fully characterized. In the present study, we found that the putative Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter/osmolyte transporter inebriated (ine) is expressed in the basolateral membrane of anterior hindgut epithelial cells. This was confirmed by comparison with a known basolateral localized protein, the α subunit of Na+-K+ ATPase (ATPα). Under external hypertonicity, loss of ine in the hindgut epithelium results in severe dehydration without damage to the hindgut epithelial cells, implicating a physiological failure of water conservation/absorption. We also found that hindgut expression of ine is required for water conservation under desiccating conditions. Importantly, specific expression of ine in the hindgut epithelium can completely restore disrupted systemic water homeostasis in ine mutants under both conditions. Therefore, ine in the Drosophila hindgut is essential for the maintenance of systemic water homeostasis. PMID:25613130

  1. Interaction between morphine and noradrenergic system of basolateral amygdala on anxiety and memory in the elevated plus-maze test based on a test-retest paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadegan, Farhad; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2013-05-01

    The amygdala is the key brain structure for anxiety and emotional memory storage. We examined the involvement of β-adrenoreceptors in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and their interaction with morphine in modulating these behaviors. The elevated plus-maze has been employed for investigating anxiety and memory. Male Wistar rats were used for this test. We injected morphine (4, 5, and 6 mg/kg) intraperitoneally, while salbutamol (albuterol) (1, 2, and 4 μg/rat) and propranolol (1, 2, and 4 μg/rat) were injected into the BLA. Open- arms time percentage (%OAT), open- arms entry percentage (%OAE), and locomotor activity were determined by this behavioral test. Retention was tested 24 hours later. Intraperitoneal injection of morphine (6 mg/kg) had an anxiolytic-like effect and improvement of memory. The highest dose of salbutamol decreased the anxiety parameters in test session and improved the memory in retest session. Coadministration of salbutamol and ineffective dose of morphine presenting anxiolytic response. In this case, the memory was improved. Intra-BLA administration of propranolol (4 μg/rat) decreased %OAT in the test session, while had no effect on memory formation. Coadministration of propranolol and morphine (6 mg/kg) showed an increase in %OAT. There was not any significant change in the above- mentioned parameter in the retest session. Coadministration of morphine and propranolol with the effective dose of salbutamol showed that propranolol could reverse anxiolytic-like effect. We found that opioidergic and β-adrenergic systems have the same effects on anxiety and memory in the BLA; but these effects are independent of each other.

  2. Genetic susceptibility and neurotransmitters in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschou, Peristera; Fernandez, Thomas V; Sharp, Frank; Heiman, Gary A; Hoekstra, Pieter J

    2013-01-01

    Family studies have consistently shown that Tourette syndrome (TS) is a familial disorder and twin studies have clearly indicated a genetic contribution in the etiology of TS. Whereas early segregation studies of TS suggested a single-gene autosomal dominant disorder, later studies have pointed to more complex models including additive and multifactorial inheritance and likely interaction with genetic factors. While the exact cellular and molecular base of TS is as yet elusive, neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies have pointed to the involvement of cortico-striato-thalamocortical circuits and abnormalities in dopamine, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and serotonin neurotransmitter systems, with the most consistent evidence being available for involvement of dopamine-related abnormalities, that is, a reduction in tonic extracellular dopamine levels along with hyperresponsive spike-dependent dopamine release, following stimulation. Genetic and gene expression findings are very much supportive of involvement of these neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, intriguingly, genetic work on a two-generation pedigree has opened new research pointing to a role for histamine, a so far rather neglected neurotransmitter, with the potential of the development of new treatment options. Future studies should be aimed at directly linking neurotransmitter-related genetic and gene expression findings to imaging studies (imaging genetics), which enables a better understanding of the pathways and mechanisms through which the dynamic interplay of genes, brain, and environment shapes the TS phenotype. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. One-single physical exercise session after object recognition learning promotes memory persistence through hippocampal noradrenergic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva de Vargas, Liane; Neves, Ben-Hur Souto das; Roehrs, Rafael; Izquierdo, Iván; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela

    2017-06-30

    Previously we showed the involvement of the hippocampal noradrenergic system in the consolidation and persistence of object recognition (OR) memory. Here we show that one-single physical exercise session performed immediately after learning promotes OR memory persistence and increases norepinephrine levels in the hippocampus. Additionally, effects of exercise on memory are avoided by an intra-hippocampal beta-adrenergic antagonist infusion. Taken together, these results suggest that exercise effects on memory can be related to noradrenergic mechanisms and acute physical exercise can be a non-pharmacological intervention to assist memory consolidation and persistence, with few or no side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Atypical Neurotransmitters and the Neurobiology of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joca, Samia Regiane; Moreira, Fabricio Araujo; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report that the mechanism of action of antidepressants involves the facilitation of monoaminergic neurotransmission in the brain in the 1960s, the leading hypothesis about the neurobiology of depression has been the so called "monoaminergic hypothesis". However, a growing body of evidence from the last two decades also supports important involvement of non-monoaminergic mechanisms in the neurobiology of depression and antidepressant action. The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) and endocannabinoid signaling in the brain during the 1990s challenged the wellestablished criteria of classical neurotransmission. These transmitters are synthesized and released on demand by the postsynaptic neurons, and may act as a retrograde messenger on the presynaptic terminal, modulating neurotransmitter release. These unconventional signaling mechanisms and the important role as neural messengers have classified NO and endocannabinoids as atypical neurotransmitters. They are able to modulate neural signaling mediated by the main conventional neurotransmitters systems in the brain, including the monoaminergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling systems. This review aims at discussing the fundamental aspects of NO- and endocannabinoid-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to the neurobiology of depression. Both preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of these atypical neurotransmitters in the neurobiology of depression, and in the antidepressant effects are presented here. The evidence is discussed on basis of their ability to modulate different neurotransmitter systems in the brain, including monoaminergic and glutamatergic ones. A better comprehension of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms in the neurobiology depression could provide new avenues for the development of novel non-monoamine based antidepressants.

  5. Evaluation of the noradrenergic pathway and alpha-2 and beta-receptors in the modulation of the analgesia induced by transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation of high and low frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Vasconcellos, Thiago Henrique Ferreira; Pantaleão, Patricia de Fátima; Teixeira, Dulcinéa Gonçalves; Santos, Ana Paula; Ferreira, Célio Marcos dos Reis

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation is a noninvasive method used in clinical Physiotherapy to control acute or chronic pain. Different theories have been proposed to explain the mechanism of the analgesic action of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, as the participation of central and peripheral neurotransmitters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the involvement of noradrenergic pathway and of the receptors alfa-2 and beta in the modulation of analgesia produced by transcut...

  6. Chlorotoxin-mediated disinhibition of noradrenergic locus coeruleus neurons using a conditional transgenic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbaum, J Michael; Cirelli, Chiara; Walcott, Elisabeth; Krushel, Les A; Edelman, Gerald M; Tononi, Giulio

    2004-07-30

    The noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) has been implicated in the promotion of arousal, in focused attention and learning, and in the regulation of the sleep/waking cycle. The complex biological functions of the central noradrenergic system have been investigated largely through electrophysiological recordings and neurotoxic lesions of LC neurons. Activation of LC neurons through electrical or chemical stimulation has also led to important insights, although these techniques have limited cellular specificity and short-term effects. Here, we describe a novel method aimed at stimulating the central noradrenergic system in a highly selective manner for prolonged periods of time. This was achieved through the conditional expression of a transgene for chlorotoxin (Cltx) in the LC of adult mice. Chlorotoxin is a component of scorpion venom that partially blocks small conductance chloride channels. In this manner, the influence of GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory inputs on LC cells is greatly reduced, while their ability to respond to excitatory inputs is unaffected. We demonstrate that the unilateral induction of Cltx expression in the LC is associated with a concomitant ipsilateral increase in the expression of markers of noradrenergic activity in LC neurons. Moreover, LC disinhibition is associated with the ipsilateral induction of the immediate early gene NGFI-A in cortical and subcortical target areas. Unlike previous gain of function approaches, transgenic disinhibition of LC cells is highly selective and persists for at least several weeks. This method represents a powerful new tool to assess the long-term effects of LC activation and is potentially applicable to other neuronal systems.

  7. Noradrenergic lesioning with an anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picklo, M. J.; Wiley, R. G.; Lappi, D. A.; Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Sympathectomy has been achieved by a variety of methods but each has its limitations. These include lack of tissue specificity, incomplete lesioning, and the age range of susceptibility to the lesioning. To circumvent these drawbacks, an immunotoxin was constructed using a monoclonal antibody against the noradrenergic specific enzyme dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) coupled via a disulfide bond to saporin, a ribosomal inactivating protein. Three days after intravenous injection of the anti-D beta H immunotoxin (50 micrograms) into adult Sprague-Dawley rats, 66% of neurons in the superior cervical ganglia were chromatolytic. Superior cervical ganglia neurons were poisoned in 1 day old and 1 week old (86% of neurons) neonatal rats following subcutaneous injection of 3.75 and 15 micrograms, respectively. The anti-D beta H immunotoxin will be a useful tool in the study of the peripheral noradrenergic system in adult and neonatal animals.

  8. Neurotransmitter signaling in white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Arthur M; Fern, Robert F; Matute, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    White matter (WM) tracts are bundles of myelinated axons that provide for rapid communication throughout the CNS and integration in grey matter (GM). The main cells in myelinated tracts are oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, with small populations of microglia and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. The prominence of neurotransmitter signaling in WM, which largely exclude neuronal cell bodies, indicates it must have physiological functions other than neuron-to-neuron communication. A surprising aspect is the diversity of neurotransmitter signaling in WM, with evidence for glutamatergic, purinergic (ATP and adenosine), GABAergic, glycinergic, adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic signaling, acting via a wide range of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Both axons and glia are potential sources of neurotransmitters and may express the respective receptors. The physiological functions of neurotransmitter signaling in WM are subject to debate, but glutamate and ATP-mediated signaling have been shown to evoke Ca(2+) signals in glia and modulate axonal conduction. Experimental findings support a model of neurotransmitters being released from axons during action potential propagation acting on glial receptors to regulate the homeostatic functions of astrocytes and myelination by oligodendrocytes. Astrocytes also release neurotransmitters, which act on axonal receptors to strengthen action potential propagation, maintaining signaling along potentially long axon tracts. The co-existence of multiple neurotransmitters in WM tracts suggests they may have diverse functions that are important for information processing. Furthermore, the neurotransmitter signaling phenomena described in WM most likely apply to myelinated axons of the cerebral cortex and GM areas, where they are doubtless important for higher cognitive function. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Both a Nicotinic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) and a Noradrenergic SNP Modulate Working Memory Performance when Attention Is Manipulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Pamela M.; Sundararajan, Ramya; Lin, Ming-Kuan; Kumar, Reshma; Fryxell, Karl J.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relation between the two systems of visuospatial attention and working memory by examining the effect of normal variation in cholinergic and noradrenergic genes on working memory performance under attentional manipulation. We previously reported that working memory for location was impaired following large location precues,…

  10. Compact microelectrode array system: tool for in situ monitoring of drug effects on neurotransmitter release from neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Guo, Chunxian; Lim, Layhar; Cheong, Serchoong; Zhang, Qingxin; Tang, Kumcheong; Reboud, Julien

    2008-02-15

    This paper presents a compact microelectrode array (MEA) system, to study potassium ion-induced dopamine release from PC12 neural cells, without relying on a micromanipulator and a microscope. The MEA chip was integrated with a custom-made "test jig", which provides a robust electrical interfacing tool between the microchip and the macroenvironment, together with a potentiostat and a microfluidic syringe pump. This integrated system significantly simplifies the operation procedures, enhances sensing performance, and reduces fabrication costs. The achieved detection limit for dopamine is 3.8 x 10-2 muM (signal/noise, S/N = 3) and the dopamine linear calibration range is up to 7.39 +/- 0.06 muM (mean +/- SE). The effects of the extracelluar matrix collagen coating of the microelectrodes on dopamine sensing behaviors, as well as the influences of K+ and l-3,4-digydroxyphenylalanine concentrations and incubation times on dopamine release, were extensively studied. The results show that our system is well suited for biologists to study chemical release from living cells as well as drug effects on secreting cells. The current system also shows a potential for further improvements toward a multichip array system for drug screening applications.

  11. Quantitative densitometry of neurotransmitter receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, T.C.; Bleisch, W.V.; Biegon, A.; McEwen, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure is described that allows the quantitative measurement of neurotransmitter receptors by optical density readings. Frozen brain sections are labeled in vitro with [ 3 H]ligands under conditions that maximize specific binding to neurotransmitter receptors. The labeled sections are then placed against the 3 H-sensitive LKB Ultrofilm to produce the autoradiograms. These autoradiograms resemble those produced by [ 14 C]deoxyglucose autoradiography and are suitable for quantitative analysis with a densitometer. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat and zebra finch brain and 5-HT receptors in rat brain were visualized by this method. When the proper combination of ligand concentration and exposure time are used, the method provides quantitative information about the amount and affinity of neurotransmitter receptors in brain sections. This was established by comparisons of densitometric readings with parallel measurements made by scintillation counting of sections. (Auth.)

  12. Neurotransmitters and putative neuromodulators in the gut of Anguilla anguilla (L.. Localizations in the enteric nervous and endocrine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Veggetti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gut of silver eels (Anguilla anguilla L. was investigated in order to describe both the cholinergic and adrenergic intramural innervations, and the localization of possible accessory neuromediators. Histochemical reactions for the demonstration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form-(NADPH-diaphorase and acetylcholinesterese (AChEase were performed, as well as the immunohistochemical testing of tyrosine hydroxylase, met-enkephalin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, bombesin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, neuropeptide Y (NPY, somatostatin, cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8, serotonin, cholineacetyltransferase. The results evidenced a different pattern in comparison with other vertebrates, namely mammals, and with other fish. Both NADPH-diaphorase and AChEase activities were histochemically detected all along the gut in the myenteric plexus, the inner musculature and the propria-submucosa. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was observed in the intestinal tract only, both in the myenteric plexus and in the inner musculature. Several neuropeptides (metenkephalin, CGRP, bombesin, substance P, VIP, NPY, somatostatin were, in addition, detected in the intramural innervation; some of them also in epithelial cells of the diffuse endocrine system (met-enkephalin, substance P, NPY, somatostatin. Serotonin was only present in endocrine cells. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was present in localizations to those of similar NADPHdiaphorase- reactivity, and in the same nerve bundles in which substance P- and CGRP-likeimmunoreactivities were detectable in the intestinal tract. In addition, NADPH-diaphorase-reactive neurons showed an anatomical relationship with AChEase-reactive nerve terminals, and a similar relationship existed between the latter and substance P-like immunoreactivity.

  13. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  14. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  15. The inhibition of the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus induces waking and the activation of all adrenergic and noradrenergic neurons: a combined pharmacological and functional neuroanatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Olivier; Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Arthaud, Sébastien; Fort, Patrice; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic neurons specifically active during paradoxical sleep (PS) localized in the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi) are known to be responsible for the cessation of activity of the noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus during PS. In the present study, we therefore sought to determine the role of the DPGi in PS onset and maintenance and in the inhibition of the LC noradrenergic neurons during this state. The effect of the inactivation of DPGi neurons on the sleep-waking cycle was examined in rats by microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, or clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist. Combining immunostaining of the different populations of wake-inducing neurons with that of c-FOS, we then determined whether muscimol inhibition of the DPGi specifically induces the activation of the noradrenergic neurons of the LC. Slow wave sleep and PS were abolished during 3 and 5 h after muscimol injection in the DPGi, respectively. The application of clonidine in the DPGi specifically induced a significant decrease in PS quantities and delayed PS appearance compared to NaCl. We further surprisingly found out that more than 75% of the noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons of all adrenergic and noradrenergic cell groups are activated after muscimol treatment in contrast to the other wake active systems significantly less activated. These results suggest that, in addition to its already know inhibition of LC noradrenergic neurons during PS, the DPGi might inhibit the activity of noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons from all groups during PS, but also to a minor extent during SWS and waking.

  16. The inhibition of the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus induces waking and the activation of all adrenergic and noradrenergic neurons: a combined pharmacological and functional neuroanatomical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Clément

    Full Text Available GABAergic neurons specifically active during paradoxical sleep (PS localized in the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi are known to be responsible for the cessation of activity of the noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus during PS. In the present study, we therefore sought to determine the role of the DPGi in PS onset and maintenance and in the inhibition of the LC noradrenergic neurons during this state. The effect of the inactivation of DPGi neurons on the sleep-waking cycle was examined in rats by microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, or clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist. Combining immunostaining of the different populations of wake-inducing neurons with that of c-FOS, we then determined whether muscimol inhibition of the DPGi specifically induces the activation of the noradrenergic neurons of the LC. Slow wave sleep and PS were abolished during 3 and 5 h after muscimol injection in the DPGi, respectively. The application of clonidine in the DPGi specifically induced a significant decrease in PS quantities and delayed PS appearance compared to NaCl. We further surprisingly found out that more than 75% of the noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons of all adrenergic and noradrenergic cell groups are activated after muscimol treatment in contrast to the other wake active systems significantly less activated. These results suggest that, in addition to its already know inhibition of LC noradrenergic neurons during PS, the DPGi might inhibit the activity of noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons from all groups during PS, but also to a minor extent during SWS and waking.

  17. Noradrenergic control of gene expression and long-term neuronal adaptation evoked by learned vocalizations in songbirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarciso A F Velho

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine (NE is thought to play important roles in the consolidation and retrieval of long-term memories, but its role in the processing and memorization of complex acoustic signals used for vocal communication has yet to be determined. We have used a combination of gene expression analysis, electrophysiological recordings and pharmacological manipulations in zebra finches to examine the role of noradrenergic transmission in the brain's response to birdsong, a learned vocal behavior that shares important features with human speech. We show that noradrenergic transmission is required for both the expression of activity-dependent genes and the long-term maintenance of stimulus-specific electrophysiological adaptation that are induced in central auditory neurons by stimulation with birdsong. Specifically, we show that the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM, an area directly involved in the auditory processing and memorization of birdsong, receives strong noradrenergic innervation. Song-responsive neurons in this area express α-adrenergic receptors and are in close proximity to noradrenergic terminals. We further show that local α-adrenergic antagonism interferes with song-induced gene expression, without affecting spontaneous or evoked electrophysiological activity, thus dissociating the molecular and electrophysiological responses to song. Moreover, α-adrenergic antagonism disrupts the maintenance but not the acquisition of the adapted physiological state. We suggest that the noradrenergic system regulates long-term changes in song-responsive neurons by modulating the gene expression response that is associated with the electrophysiological activation triggered by song. We also suggest that this mechanism may be an important contributor to long-term auditory memories of learned vocalizations.

  18. Noradrenergic enhancement of associative fear memory in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeter, M.; Kindt, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ample evidence in animals and humans supports the noradrenergic modulation in the formation of emotional memory. However, in humans the effects of stress on emotional memory are traditionally investigated by declarative memory tests (e.g., recall, recognition) for non-associative emotional stimuli

  19. Glucocorticoid enhancement of dorsolateral striatum-dependent habit memory requires concurrent noradrenergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, J; Leong, K-C; Packard, M G

    2015-12-17

    Previous findings indicate that post-training administration of glucocorticoid stress hormones can interact with the noradrenergic system to enhance consolidation of hippocampus- or amygdala-dependent cognitive/emotional memory. The present experiments were designed to extend these findings by examining the potential interaction of glucocorticoid and noradrenergic mechanisms in enhancement of dorsolateral striatum (DLS)-dependent habit memory. In experiment 1, different groups of adult male Long-Evans rats received training in two DLS-dependent memory tasks. In a cued water maze task, rats were released from various start points and were reinforced to approach a visibly cued escape platform. In a response-learning version of the water plus-maze task, animals were released from opposite starting positions and were reinforced to make a consistent egocentric body-turn to reach a hidden escape platform. Immediately post-training, rats received peripheral injections of the glucocorticoid corticosterone (1 or 3 mg/kg) or vehicle solution. In both tasks, corticosterone (3 mg/kg) enhanced DLS-dependent habit memory. In experiment 2, a separate group of animals received training in the response learning version of the water plus-maze task and were given peripheral post-training injections of corticosterone (3 mg/kg), the β-adrenoreceptor antagonist propranolol (3 mg/kg), corticosterone and propranolol concurrently, or control vehicle solution. Corticosterone injections again enhanced DLS-dependent memory, and this effect was blocked by concurrent administration of propranolol. Propranolol administration by itself (3 mg/kg) did not influence DLS-dependent memory. Taken together, the findings indicate an interaction between glucocorticoid and noradrenergic mechanisms in DLS-dependent habit memory. Propranolol administration may be useful in treating stress-related human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional DLS-dependent habit memory system. Copyright © 2015

  20. Prenatal drug exposures sensitize noradrenergic circuits to subsequent disruption by chlorpyrifos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-12-02

    We examined whether nicotine or dexamethasone, common prenatal drug exposures, sensitize the developing brain to chlorpyrifos. We gave nicotine to pregnant rats throughout gestation at a dose (3mg/kg/day) producing plasma levels typical of smokers; offspring were then given chlorpyrifos on postnatal days 1-4, at a dose (1mg/kg) that produces minimally-detectable inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity. In a parallel study, we administered dexamethasone to pregnant rats on gestational days 17-19 at a standard therapeutic dose (0.2mg/kg) used in the management of preterm labor, followed by postnatal chlorpyrifos. We evaluated cerebellar noradrenergic projections, a known target for each agent, and contrasted the effects with those in the cerebral cortex. Either drug augmented the effect of chlorpyrifos, evidenced by deficits in cerebellar β-adrenergic receptors; the receptor effects were not due to increased systemic toxicity or cholinesterase inhibition, nor to altered chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics. Further, the deficits were not secondary adaptations to presynaptic hyperinnervation/hyperactivity, as there were significant deficits in presynaptic norepinephrine levels that would serve to augment the functional consequence of receptor deficits. The pretreatments also altered development of cerebrocortical noradrenergic circuits, but with a different overall pattern, reflecting the dissimilar developmental stages of the regions at the time of exposure. However, in each case the net effects represented a change in the developmental trajectory of noradrenergic circuits, rather than simply a continuation of an initial injury. Our results point to the ability of prenatal drug exposure to create a subpopulation with heightened vulnerability to environmental neurotoxicants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Both a Nicotinic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) and a Noradrenergic SNP Modulate Working Memory Performance when Attention is Manipulated

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood, Pamela M.; Sundararajan, Ramya; Lin, Ming-Kuan; Kumar, Reshma; Fryxell, Karl J.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relation between the two systems of visuospatial attention and working memory by examining the effect of normal variation in cholinergic and noradrenergic genes on working memory performance under attentional manipulation. We previously reported that working memory for location was impaired following large location precues, indicating the scale of visuospatial attention has a role in forming the mental representation of the target. In one of the first studies to compare ef...

  2. NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND IMMUNITY: 1. DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is one of the principal neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNC, and its neuronal pathways are involved in several key functions such as behavior (Hefco et al., 2003a,b, control of movement, endocrine regulation, immune response (Fiserova et al., 2002; Levite et al., 2001, Hritcu et al., 2006a,b,c, and cardiovascular function. Dopamine has at least five G-protein, coupled receptor subtypes, D1-D5, each arising from a different gene (Sibley et al., 1993. Traditionally, these receptors have been classified into D1-like (the D1 and D5 and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4 receptors subtypes, primarily according to their ability to stimulate or inhibit adenylate cyclase, respectively, and to their pharmacological characteristics (Seeman et al., 1993. Receptors for dopamine (particularly of D2 subclass are the primary therapeutic target in a number of neuropathological disorders including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s chorea (Seeman et al., 1987. Neither dopamine by itself, nor dopaminergic agonists by themselves, has been shown to activate T cell function. Nevertheless, lymphocytes are most probably exposed to dopamine since the primary and secondary lymphoid organs of various mammals are markedly innervated, and contain nerve fibers which stain for tyrosine hydroxylase (Weihe et al., 1991, the enzyme responsible for dopamine synthesis. Moreover, cathecolamines and their metabolites are present in single lymphocytes and in extracts of T and B cell clones, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase reduces catecholamine levels, suggesting catecholamine synthesis by lymphocytes (Bergquist et al., 1994. The existence of putative dopamine receptors of D2, D3, D4 and D5 subtypes on immune cells has been proposed of several authors, primarily on the basis of dopaminergic ligand binding assays and specific mRNA expression as monitored by reverse transcription-PCR. Several experiments evoked the idea of a

  3. Analysis of drug effects on neurotransmitter release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowell, P.; Garner, A.

    1986-01-01

    The release of neurotransmitter is routinely studied in a superfusion system in which serial samples are collected and the effects of drugs or other treatments on the amount of material in the superfusate is determined. With frequent sampling interval, this procedure provides a mechanism for dynamically characterizing the release process itself. Using automated data collection in conjunction with polyexponential computer analysis, the equation which describes the release process in each experiment is determined. Analysis of the data during the nontreated phase of the experiment allows an internal control to be used for accurately assessing any changes in neurotransmitter release which may occur during a subsequent treatment phase. The use of internal controls greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and allows determinations of very low concentrations of drugs on small amounts of tissue to be made. In this presentation, the effects of 10 μM nicotine on 3 H-dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens is described. The time course, potency and efficacy of the drug treatment is characterized using this system. Determinations of the exponential order of the release as well as the rate constants allow one to study the mechanism of the release process. A description of 3 H-dopamine release in normal as well as Ca ++ -free medium is presented

  4. Dopamine modulates male sexual behavior in Japanese quail in part via actions on noradrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornil, Charlotte A; Dejace, Christel; Ball, Gregory F; Balthazart, Jacques

    2005-08-30

    In rats, dopamine (DA) facilitates male sexual behavior through its combined action on D1- and D2-like receptors, in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) as well as other brain areas. In Japanese quail, systemic injections of dopaminergic drugs suggested a similar pharmacology but central injections have never been performed. Recent electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that DA effects in the MPOA of quail are mediated mainly through the activation of alpha2-noradrenergic receptors. Previous studies of DA action on behavior used specific dopaminergic agonists/antagonists and therefore unintentionally avoided the potential cross-reaction with alpha2-receptors. The present study was thus designed to investigate directly the effects of DA on male sexual behavior and to test whether the interaction of DA with heterologous receptors affects this behavior. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of DA or NE inhibited copulation in a dose-dependent manner. Systemic injections of yohimbine, an alpha2-noradrenergic antagonist, modulated copulation in a bimodal manner depending on the dose injected. Interestingly, a behaviorally ineffective dose of yohimbine markedly reduced the inhibitory effects of DA when injected 15min before. Together, these results show for the first time that i.c.v. injections of DA itself inhibit male sexual behavior in quail and suggest that the interaction of DA with alpha2-receptors has behavioral significance.

  5. Peripheral markers of serotonergic and noradrenergic function in post-pubertal, caucasian males with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croonenberghs, J; Delmeire, L; Verkerk, R; Lin, A H; Meskal, A; Neels, H; Van der Planken, M; Scharpe, S; Deboutte, D; Pison, G; Maes, M

    2000-03-01

    Some studies have suggested that disorders in the peripheral and central metabolism of serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline may play a role in the pathophysiology of autistic disorder. This study examines serotonergic and noradrenergic markers in a study group of 13 male, post-pubertal, caucasian autistic patients (age 12-18 y; I.Q. > 55) and 13 matched volunteers. [3H]-paroxetine binding Kd values were significantly higher in patients with autism than in healthy volunteers. Plasma concentrations of tryptophan, the precursor of 5-HT, were significantly lower in autistic patients than in healthy volunteers. There were no significant differences between autistic and normal children in the serum concentrations of 5-HT, or the 24-hr urinary excretion of 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. There were no significant differences in [3H]-rauwolscine binding Bmax or Kd values, or in the serum concentrations of tyrosine, the precursor of noradrenaline, between both study groups. There were highly significant positive correlations between age and 24-hr urinary excretion of 5-HIAA and serum tryptophan. The results suggest that: 1) serotonergic disturbances, such as defects in the 5-HT transporter system and lowered plasma tryptophan, may play a role in the pathophysiology of autism; 2) autism is not associated with alterations in the noradrenergic system; and 3) the metabolism of serotonin in humans undergoes significant changes between the ages of 12 and 18 years.

  6. [Preliminary research on multi-neurotransmitters' change regulation in 120 depression patients' brains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Ming; Qing, Xue-Mei; Pan, Yan-Shu; Xu, Feng-Quan; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-04-01

    In view of the effective traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the treatment of clinical depression, the mechanism is not clear, this study attempts to research the cause of depression in a complex situation to lay the foundation for the next step of TCM curative effect evaluation. Based on the brain wave of 120 depression patients and 40 ordinary person, the change regulation of acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, depression neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters in the whole and various encephalic regions' multi-neurotransmitters of depression patients-serotonin are analysed by search of encephalo-telex (SET) system, which lays the foundation for the diagnosis of depression. The result showed that: contrased with the normal person group, the mean value of the six neurotransmitters in depression patients group are: (1) in the whole encephalic region of depression patients group the dopamine fall (P neurotransmitters and neurotransmitters: (1) the three antagonizing pairs of neurotransmitters-serotonin and dopamine, acetylcholine and norepinephrine, depression neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters, in ordinary person group and depression patients group are characterizeed by middle or strong negative correlation. Serotonin and dopamine, which are characterized by weak negative correlation in the right rear temporal region of ordinary person group, are characterized by strong negative correlation in the other encephalic regions and the whole encephalic (ordinary person group except the right rear temporal region: the range of [r] is [0.82, 0.92], P neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters are characterized by middle strong negative correlation (ordinary person group: the range of [r] is [0.57, 0.80], P neurotransmitters which are not antagonizing pairs of neurotransmitters, serotonin and excited neurotransmitters, or acetylcholine and depression neurotra-nsmitters, or dopamine and depression neurotransmitters in the various encephalic

  7. The Role of Ion Selectivity of the Fusion Pore on Transmission and the Exocytosis of Neurotransmitters and Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacruz, Joannalyn Bongar

    Healthy nervous system function depends on proper transmission. Synaptic transmission occurs by the release of transmitters from vesicles that fuse to the plasma membrane of a pre-synaptic cell. Regulated release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and hormones occurs by exocytosis, initiated by the formation of the fusion pore. The initial fusion pore has molecular dimensions with a diameter of 1-2 nm and a rapid lifetime on the millisecond time scale. It connects the vesicular lumen and extracellular space, serving as an important step for regulating the release of charged transmitters. Comprehending the molecular structure and biophysical properties of the fusion pore is essential for a mechanistic understanding of vesicle-plasma membrane fusion and transmitter release. Release of charged transmitter molecules such as glutamate, acetylcholine, dopamine, or noradrenaline through a narrow fusion pore requires compensation of change in charge. Transmitter release through the fusion pore is therefore an electrodiffusion process. If the fusion pore is selective for specific ions, then its selectivity will affect the rate of transmitter release via the voltage gradient that develops across the fusion pore. The elucidation of these mechanisms can lead to a better understanding of nervous system cell biology, neural and endocrine signaling, learning, memory, motor control, sensory function and integration, and in particular synaptic transmission. This investigation can advance our understanding of neurological disorders in which noradrenergic and dopaminergic exocytosis is disturbed, leading to neurological consequences of developmental disorders, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases. Ultimately, understanding the role of selectivity in the fusion pore and its effects on exocytosis can contribute to the development of more effective therapies. This study investigates the selectivity of the fusion pore by observing the effects of ion

  8. The dorsal tegmental noradrenergic projection: an analysis of its role in maze learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D C; Price, M T; Fibiger, H C

    1976-04-01

    The hypothesis that the noradrenergic projection from the locus coeruleus (LC) to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus is an important neural substrate for learning was evaluated. Maze performance was studied in rats receiving either electrolytic lesions of LC or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the dorsal tegmental noradrenergic projection. The LC lesions did not disrupt the acquisition of a running response for food reinforcement in an L-shaped runway, even though hippocampal-cortical norepinephrine (NE) was reduced to 29%. Greater telencephalic NE depletions (to 6% of control levels) produced by 6-OHDA also failed to disrupt the acquisition of this behavior or to impair the acquisition of a food-reinforced position habit in a T-maze. Neither locomotor activity nor habituation to a novel environment was affected by the 6-OHDA lesions. Rats with such lesions were, however, found to be significantly more distractible than were controls during the performance of a previously trained response. The hypothesis that telencephalic NE is of fundamental importance in learning was not supported. The data suggest that this system may participate in attentional mechanisms.

  9. The discovery of chemical neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenstein, Elliot S

    2002-06-01

    Neurotransmitters have become such an intrinsic part of our theories about brain function that many today are unaware of how difficult it was to prove their existence or the protracted dispute over the nature of synaptic transmission. The story is important not only because it is fascinating science history, but also because it exemplifies much of what is best in science and deserving to be emulated. The friendships formed among such major figures in this history as Henry Dale, Otto Loewi, Wilhelm Feldberg, Walter Cannon, and others extended over two world wars, enriching their lives and facilitating their research. Even the dispute-the "war of the sparks and the soups"--between neurophysiologists and pharmacologists over whether synaptic transmission is electrical or chemical played a positive role in stimulating the research needed to provide convincing proof. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  10. Zn2+ modulation of neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, K.; Gether, U.

    2006-01-01

    of neurotransmitter transporters have been identified based on sequence homology: (1) the neurotransmitter sodium symporter family (NSS), which includes the Na+/C1(-)-dependent transporters for dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin; and (2) the dicarboxylate/amino acid cation symporter family (DAACS), which...

  11. Neurotransmitter: Sodium Symporters: Caught in the Act!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinauskaite, Lina

    The neurotransmitter: sodium symporters in the neurons. Communication between neurons is mediated by the release of molecules called neurotransmitters (blue dots) from first neuron and sensed by receptors on the surface of the second (purple sphere). The signal is ended by active reuptake...

  12. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  13. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Randy D.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoactive drugs, these transport systems have important roles in transmitter release, but we are only beginning to understand their contribution to synaptic transmission, plasticity, behavior, and disease. Recent work has started to provide a structural basis for their activity, to characterize their trafficking and potential for regulation. The results indicate that far from the passive target of psychoactive drugs, neurotransmitter transporters undergo regulation that contributes to synaptic plasticity. PMID:22199021

  14. Measurement of neurotransmitters with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laruelle, M.; Erritzoe, D.; Abi-Dargham, A.; Huang, Y. [Columbia Univ., Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons, Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Over the last decade several groups have provided evidence that PET and SPECT neuro-receptor imaging techniques might be applied to measure fluctuations of dopamine (DA) synaptic concentrations in the living human brain. It is generally believed that changes in the in vivo binding of radioligands following acute changes in transmitter levels are driven by binding competition. These techniques have been very successful in giving dynamic information regarding DA transmission. However, the development of similar techniques to study other neurotransmitter systems has proven difficult. This review paper first summarizes endogenous competition studies performed in animals and humans. The validity of the model underlying the interpretation of these data is critically assessed. Emerging data suggest that simple binding competition might not be the only phenomenon involved in these interactions; receptor trafficking might play an important role. A better understanding of the radioligand properties that determine sensitivity to endogenous molecules might facilitate the selective development of this type of radiotracer. (authors)

  15. Physiological Measures of Dopaminergic and Noradrenergic Activity During Attentional Set Shifting and Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Pajkossy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA and noradrenaline (NA are important neurotransmitters, which are suggested to play a vital role in modulating the neural circuitry involved in the executive control of cognition. One way to investigate the functions of these neurotransmitter systems is to assess physiological indices of DA and NA transmission. Here we examined how variations of spontaneous eye-blink rate and pupil size, as indirect measures of DA and NA activity, respectively, are related to performance in a hallmark aspect of executive control: attentional set shifting. We used the Intra/Extradimensional Set Shifting Task, where participants have to choose between different compound stimuli while the stimulus-reward contingencies change periodically. During such rule shifts, participants have to refresh their attentional set while they reassess which stimulus-features are relevant. We found that both eye-blink rate (EBR and pupil size increased after rule shifts, when explorative processes are required to establish stimulus–reward contingencies. Furthermore, baseline pupil size was related to performance during the most difficult, extradimensional set shifting stage, whereas baseline EBR was associated with task performance prior to this stage. Our results support a range of neurobiological models suggesting that the activity of DA and NA neurotransmitter systems determines individual differences in executive functions (EF, possibly by regulating neurotransmission in prefrontal circuits. We also suggest that assessing specific, easily accessible indirect physiological markers, such as pupil size and blink rate, contributes to the comprehension of the relationship between neurotransmitter systems and EF.

  16. Therapeutics of Neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandimalla, Ramesh; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the loss of memory, multiple cognitive impairments and changes in the personality and behavior. Several decades of intense research have revealed that multiple cellular changes are involved in disease process, including synaptic damage, mitochondrial abnormalities and inflammatory responses, in addition to formation and accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the impact of neurotransmitters in the progression and pathogenesis of AD, we still do not have a drug molecule associated with neurotransmitter(s) that can delay disease process in elderly individuals and/or restore cognitive functions in AD patients. The purpose of our article is to assess the latest developments in neurotransmitters research using cell and mouse models of AD. We also updated the current status of clinical trials using neurotransmitters' agonists/antagonists in AD.

  17. Noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala modulates the consolidation of object-in-context recognition memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsegyan, Areg; McGaugh, James L.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2014-01-01

    Noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) is well known to enhance the consolidation of long-term memory of highly emotionally arousing training experiences. The present study investigated whether such noradrenergic activation of the BLA also influences the

  18. Noradrenergic Modulation of Fear Conditioning and Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustino, Thomas F; Maren, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    The locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) system plays a broad role in learning and memory. Here we begin with an overview of the LC-NE system. We then consider how both direct and indirect manipulations of the LC-NE system affect cued and contextual aversive learning and memory. We propose that NE dynamically modulates Pavlovian conditioning and extinction, either promoting or impairing learning aversive processes under different levels of behavioral arousal. We suggest that under high levels of stress (e.g., during/soon after fear conditioning) the locus coeruleus (LC) promotes cued fear learning by enhancing amygdala function while simultaneously blunting prefrontal function. Under low levels of arousal, the LC promotes PFC function to promote downstream inhibition of the amygdala and foster the extinction of cued fear. Thus, LC-NE action on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) might be described by an inverted-U function such that it can either enhance or hinder learning depending on arousal states. In addition, LC-NE seems to be particularly important for the acquisition, consolidation and extinction of contextual fear memories. This may be due to dense adrenoceptor expression in the hippocampus (HPC) which encodes contextual information, and the ability of NE to regulate long-term potentiation (LTP). Moreover, recent work reveals that the diversity of LC-NE functions in aversive learning and memory are mediated by functionally heterogeneous populations of LC neurons that are defined by their projection targets. Hence, LC-NE function in learning and memory is determined by projection-specific neuromodulation that accompanies various states of behavioral arousal.

  19. Noradrenergic Modulation of Fear Conditioning and Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Giustino

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE system plays a broad role in learning and memory. Here we begin with an overview of the LC-NE system. We then consider how both direct and indirect manipulations of the LC-NE system affect cued and contextual aversive learning and memory. We propose that NE dynamically modulates Pavlovian conditioning and extinction, either promoting or impairing learning aversive processes under different levels of behavioral arousal. We suggest that under high levels of stress (e.g., during/soon after fear conditioning the locus coeruleus (LC promotes cued fear learning by enhancing amygdala function while simultaneously blunting prefrontal function. Under low levels of arousal, the LC promotes PFC function to promote downstream inhibition of the amygdala and foster the extinction of cued fear. Thus, LC-NE action on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC might be described by an inverted-U function such that it can either enhance or hinder learning depending on arousal states. In addition, LC-NE seems to be particularly important for the acquisition, consolidation and extinction of contextual fear memories. This may be due to dense adrenoceptor expression in the hippocampus (HPC which encodes contextual information, and the ability of NE to regulate long-term potentiation (LTP. Moreover, recent work reveals that the diversity of LC-NE functions in aversive learning and memory are mediated by functionally heterogeneous populations of LC neurons that are defined by their projection targets. Hence, LC-NE function in learning and memory is determined by projection-specific neuromodulation that accompanies various states of behavioral arousal.

  20. Combined Effects of Glucocorticoid and Noradrenergic Activity on Loss Aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margittai, Zsofia; Nave, Gideon; Van Wingerden, Marijn; Schnitzler, Alfons; Schwabe, Lars; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Loss aversion is a well-known behavioral regularity in financial decision making, describing humans' tendency to overweigh losses compared to gains of the same amount. Recent research indicates that stress and associated hormonal changes affect loss aversion, yet the underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the causal influence of two major stress neuromodulators, cortisol and noradrenaline, on loss aversion during financial decision making. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled between-subject design, we orally administered either the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine (increasing noradrenergic stimulation), hydrocortisone, both substances, or a placebo to healthy young men. We tested the treatments' influence on a financial decision-making task measuring loss aversion and risk attitude. We found that both drugs combined, relative to either drug by itself, reduced loss aversion in the absence of an effect on risk attitude or choice consistency. Our data suggest that concurrent glucocorticoid and noradrenergic activity prompts an alignment of reward- with loss-sensitivity, and thus diminishes loss aversion. Our results have implications for the understanding of the susceptibility to biases in decision making.

  1. Tunable Molecular Logic Gates Designed for Imaging Released Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockow, Jessica L; Hettie, Kenneth S; Secor, Kristen E; Barman, Dipti N; Glass, Timothy E

    2015-08-03

    Tunable dual-analyte fluorescent molecular logic gates (ExoSensors) were designed for the purpose of imaging select vesicular primary-amine neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. ExoSensors are based on the coumarin-3-aldehyde scaffold and rely on both neurotransmitter binding and the change in environmental pH associated with exocytosis to afford a unique turn-on fluorescence output. A pH-functionality was directly integrated into the fluorophore π-system of the scaffold, thereby allowing for an enhanced fluorescence output upon the release of labeled neurotransmitters. By altering the pH-sensitive unit with various electron-donating and -withdrawing sulfonamide substituents, we identified a correlation between the pKa of the pH-sensitive group and the fluorescence output from the activated fluorophore. In doing so, we achieved a twelvefold fluorescence enhancement upon evaluating the ExoSensors under conditions that mimic exocytosis. ExoSensors are aptly suited to serve as molecular imaging tools that allow for the direct visualization of only the neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Inherited disorders of brain neurotransmitters: pathogenesis and diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Krystyna; Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) play a central role in the efficient communication between neurons necessary for normal functioning of the nervous system. NTs can be divided into two groups: small molecule NTs and larger neuropeptide NTs. Inherited disorders of NTs result from a primary disturbance of NTs metabolism or transport. This group of disorders requires sophisticated diagnostic procedures. In this review we discuss disturbances in the metabolism of tetrahydrobiopterin, biogenic amines, γ-aminobutyric acid, foliate, pyridoxine-dependent enzymes, and also the glycine-dependent encephalopathy. We point to pathologic alterations of proteins involved in synaptic neurotransmission that may cause neurological and psychiatric symptoms. We postulate that synaptic receptors and transporter proteins for neurotransmitters should be investigated in unresolved cases. Patients with inherited neurotransmitters disorders present various clinical presentations such as mental retardation, refractory seizures, pyramidal and extrapyramidal syndromes, impaired locomotor patterns, and progressive encephalopathy. Every patient with suspected inherited neurotransmitter disorder should undergo a structured interview and a careful examination including neurological, biochemical, and imaging.

  3. A neurotransmitter transporter encoded by the Drosophila inebriated gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehnge, Holly; Huang, Xi; Becker, Marie; Whitley, Penn; Conover, Diana; Stern, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological studies on mutants defective in the Drosophila inebriated (ine) gene demonstrated increased excitability of the motor neuron. In this paper, we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of ine. Mutations in ine were localized on cloned DNA by restriction mapping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) mapping of ine mutants. DNA from the ine region was then used to isolate an ine cDNA. In situ hybridization of ine transcripts to developing embryos revealed expression of this gene in several cell types, including the posterior hindgut, Malpighian tubules, anal plate, garland cells, and a subset of cells in the central nervous system. The ine cDNA contains an open reading frame of 658 amino acids with a high degree of sequence similarity to members of the Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family. Members of this family catalyze the rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters released into the synapse and thereby play key roles in controlling neuronal function. We conclude that ine mutations cause increased excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron by causing the defective reuptake of the substrate neurotransmitter of the ine transporter and thus overstimulation of the motor neuron by this neurotransmitter. From this observation comes a unique opportunity to perform a genetic dissection of the regulation of excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron. PMID:8917579

  4. Neurobeachin regulates neurotransmitter receptor trafficking to synapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, R.; Lauks, J.; Jung, S; Cooke, N.E.; de Wit, H.; Brose, N.; Kilimann, M.W.; Verhage, M.; Rhee, J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface density of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses is a key determinant of synaptic efficacy. Synaptic receptor accumulation is regulated by the transport, postsynaptic anchoring, and turnover of receptors, involving multiple trafficking, sorting, motor, and scaffold proteins. We found

  5. Changes in Neurotransmitter Profiles during Early Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Development and after Pesticide Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufi, Sara; Leonards, Pim; Lamoree, Marja; de Boer, Jacob; Legler, Juliette; Legradi, Jessica

    2016-03-15

    During early development, neurotransmitters are important stimulants for the development of the central nervous system. Although the development of different neuronal cell types during early zebrafish (Danio rerio) development is well-studied, little is known of the levels of neurotransmitters, their precursors and metabolites during development, and how these levels are affected by exposure to environmental contaminants. A method based on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry has been applied for the first time to zebrafish embryos and larvae to study five neurotransmitter systems in parallel, including the dopaminergic-andrenergic, glutaminergic-GABAnergic, serotoninergic, histaminergic, and cholinergic systems. Our method enables the quantification of neurotransmitters and their precursors and metabolites in whole zebrafish from the period of zygote to free-swimming larvae 6 days postfertilization (dpf). We observed a developmental stage-dependent pattern with clear differences between the first 2 days of development and the following days. Whereas the neurotransmitter levels steadily increased, the precursors showed a peak at 3 dpf. After exposure to several pesticides, significant differences in concentrations of neurotransmitters and precursors were observed. Our study revealed new insights about neurotransmitter systems during early zebrafish development and showed the usefulness of our approach for environmental neurotoxicity studies.

  6. Detection and monitoring of neurotransmitters--a spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia S; Lee, Kendall H; Durrer, William G; Bennet, Kevin E

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that confocal Raman mapping spectroscopy provides rapid, detailed, and accurate neurotransmitter analysis, enabling millisecond time resolution monitoring of biochemical dynamics. As a prototypical demonstration of the power of the method, we present real-time in vitro serotonin, adenosine, and dopamine detection, and dopamine diffusion in an inhomogeneous organic gel, which was used as a substitute for neurologic tissue.  Dopamine, adenosine, and serotonin were used to prepare neurotransmitter solutions in distilled water. The solutions were applied to the surfaces of glass slides, where they interdiffused. Raman mapping was achieved by detecting nonoverlapping spectral signatures characteristic of the neurotransmitters with an alpha 300 WITec confocal Raman system, using 532 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser excitation. Every local Raman spectrum was recorded in milliseconds and complete Raman mapping in a few seconds.  Without damage, dyeing, or preferential sample preparation, confocal Raman mapping provided positive detection of each neurotransmitter, allowing association of the high-resolution spectra with specific microscale image regions. Such information is particularly important for complex, heterogeneous samples, where changes in composition can influence neurotransmission processes. We also report an estimated dopamine diffusion coefficient two orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated by the flow-injection method.  Accurate nondestructive characterization for real-time detection of neurotransmitters in inhomogeneous environments without the requirement of sample labeling is a key issue in neuroscience. Our work demonstrates the capabilities of Raman spectroscopy in biological applications, possibly providing a new tool for elucidating the mechanism and kinetics of deep brain stimulation. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  7. Noradrenergic stimulation modulates activation of extinction-related brain regions and enhances contextual extinction learning without affecting renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eLissek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Renewal in extinction learning describes the recovery of an extinguished response if the extinction context differs from the context present during acquisition and recall. Attention may have a role in contextual modulation of behavior and contribute to the renewal effect, while noradrenaline is involved in attentional processing. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study we investigated the role of the noradrenergic system for behavioral and brain activation correlates of contextual extinction and renewal, with a particular focus upon hippocampus and ventromedial PFC, which have crucial roles in processing of renewal. Healthy human volunteers received a single dose of the NA reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine prior to extinction learning. During extinction of previously acquired cue-outcome associations, cues were presented in a novel context (ABA or in the acquisition context (AAA. In recall, all cues were again presented in the acquisition context. Atomoxetine participants (ATO showed significantly faster extinction compared to placebo (PLAC. However, atomoxetine did not affect renewal. Hippocampal activation was higher in ATO during extinction and recall, as was ventromedial PFC activation, except for ABA recall. Moreover, ATO showed stronger recruitment of insula, anterior cingulate, and dorsolateral/orbitofrontal PFC. Across groups, cingulate, hippocampus and vmPFC activity during ABA extinction correlated with recall performance, suggesting high relevance of these regions for processing the renewal effect. In summary, the noradrenergic system appears to be involved in the modification of established associations during extinction learning and thus has a role in behavioral flexibility. The assignment of an association to a context and the subsequent decision on an adequate response, however, presumably operate largely independently of noradrenergic mechanisms.

  8. Radiotracers for per studies of neurotransmitter binding sites: Design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbourn, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Neurotransmitter binding sites, such as receptors, neuronal uptake systems, and vesicular uptake systems, are important targets for new radiopharmaceutical design. Selection of potential radioligands can be guided by in vitro laboratory data including such characteristics as selectivity and affinity for specific binding sites. However, development of PET radiotracers for use in vivo must include considerations of in vivo pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Introduction of potential radioligands is further narrowed by the demands of the radiochemical synthesis, which must produce radioligands of high chemical and radiochemical purity and of high specific activity. This paper will review examples of previous and current attempts by radiopharmaceutical chemists to meet these demands for new positron emitter-labeled radioligands for PET studies of a wide array of neurotransmitter binding sites

  9. Nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensing of neurological drugs and neurotransmitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghavi, Bankim J.; Swami, Nathan S.; Wolfbeis, Otto S.; Hirsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterial-modified detection systems represent a chief driver towards the adoption of electrochemical methods, since nanomaterials enable functional tunability, ability to self-assemble, and novel electrical, optical and catalytic properties that emerge at this scale. This results in tremendous gains in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and versatility. We review the electrochemical methods and mechanisms that may be applied to the detection of neurological drugs. We focus on understanding how specific nano-sized modifiers may be applied to influence the electron transfer event to result in gains in sensitivity, selectivity and versatility of the detection system. This critical review is structured on the basis of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System, specifically ATC Code N (neurotransmitters). Specific sections are dedicated to the widely used electrodes based on the carbon materials, supporting electrolytes, and on electrochemical detection paradigms for neurological drugs and neurotransmitters within the groups referred to as ATC codes N01 to N07. We finally discuss emerging trends and future challenges such as the development of strategies for simultaneous detection of multiple targets with high spatial and temporal resolutions, the integration of microfluidic strategies for selective and localized analyte pre-concentration, the real-time monitoring of neurotransmitter secretions from active cell cultures under electro- and chemotactic cues, aptamer-based biosensors, and the miniaturization of the sensing system for detection in small sample volumes and for enabling cost savings due to manufacturing scale-up. The Electronic Supporting Material (ESM) includes review articles dealing with the review topic in last 40 years, as well as key properties of the analytes, viz., pK a values, half-life of drugs and their electrochemical mechanisms. The ESM also defines analytical figures of merit of the drugs and neurotransmitters. The

  10. Contribution of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle to the effect of amphetamine on acetylcholine turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine the contribution of the noradrenergic projections of the locus coeruleus to the action of amphetamine on cholinergic neurons in several areas of the brain, the dorsal noradrenergic bundle was selectively lesioned by injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. The bundles of Equithesin-anesthetized male rats were lesioned bilaterally by stereotaxically-placed injections of 6-OHDA. The animals were killed in the microwave and constant rate infusion with phosphoryl ( 2 H 9 )-choline was begun. Levels of ACh and choline and TR /SUB ACh/ were determined by a mass fragmentographic technique. Rats not exhibiting the proper decrease in NE were excluded from all data calculations. It is shown that noradrenergic neurons travelling in the dorsal noradrenergic bundle do not exert a tonic action on cholinergic neurons in the cortex, hippocampus or hypothalamus

  11. Noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala modulates the consolidation of object-in-context recognition memory

    OpenAIRE

    Barsegyan, Areg; McGaugh, James L.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2014-01-01

    Noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) is well known to enhance the consolidation of long-term memory of highly emotionally arousing training experiences. The present study investigated whether such noradrenergic activation of the BLA also influences the consolidation of object-in-context recognition memory, a low-arousing training task assessing episodic-like memory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two identical objects in one context for either 3 ...

  12. Thin film microelectrodes for electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard

    An important signaling process in the nervous system is the release of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters from neurons. In this thesis alternative thin film electrode materials for applications targeting electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters in chip devices were evaluated...... and conductive polymer microelectrodes made of Pedot:Pss were also fabricated and used successfully to measure transmitter release from cells. The use of different thin film electrodes for low-noise amperometric measurements of single events of transmitter release from neuronal cells was studied....... For this application a very low current noise is needed together with a large temporal resolution. It was shown, that resistive and capacitive properties of thin film electrode materials are determining their usefulness in low-noise amperometric measurements. An analytical expression for the noise was derived...

  13. Peripheral Nerve Fibers and Their Neurotransmitters in Osteoarthritis Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grässel, Susanne; Muschter, Dominique

    2017-04-28

    The importance of the nociceptive nervous system for maintaining tissue homeostasis has been known for some time, and it has also been suggested that organogenesis and tissue repair are under neuronal control. Changes in peripheral joint innervation are supposed to be partly responsible for degenerative alterations in joint tissues which contribute to development of osteoarthritis. Various resident cell types of the musculoskeletal system express receptors for sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters, allowing response to peripheral neuronal stimuli. Among them are mesenchymal stem cells, synovial fibroblasts, bone cells and chondrocytes of different origin, which express distinct subtypes of adrenoceptors (AR), receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Some of these cell types synthesize and secrete neuropeptides such as SP, and they are positive for tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of catecholamines. Sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters are involved in the pathology of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which manifests mainly in the joints. In addition, they seem to play a role in pathogenesis of priori degenerative joint disorders such as osteoarthritis (OA). Altogether it is evident that sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters have crucial trophic effects which are critical for joint tissue and bone homeostasis. They modulate articular cartilage, subchondral bone and synovial tissue properties in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, in addition to their classical neurological features.

  14. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Critical Assessment of Research on Neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this mini-forum, "Neurotransmitters and Alzheimer's Disease", is to critically assess the current status of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's disease. Neurotransmitters are essential neurochemicals that maintain synaptic and cognitive functions in mammals, including humans, by sending signals across pre- to post-synaptic neurons. Authorities in the fields of synapses and neurotransmitters of Alzheimer's disease summarize the current status of basic biology of synapses and neurotransmitters, and also update the current status of clinical trials of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's disease. This article discusses the prevalence, economic impact, and stages of Alzheimer's dementia in humans.

  16. Neurotransmitter signaling pathways required for normal development in Xenopus laevis embryos: a pharmacological survey screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kelly G; Levin, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Neurotransmitters are not only involved in brain function but are also important signaling molecules for many diverse cell types. Neurotransmitters are widely conserved, from evolutionarily ancient organisms lacking nervous systems through man. Here, results are reported from a loss- and gain-of-function survey, using pharmacological modulators of several neurotransmitter pathways to examine possible roles for these pathways in normal embryogenesis. Applying reagents targeting the glutamatergic, adrenergic and dopaminergic pathways to embryos of Xenopus laevis from gastrulation to organogenesis stages, we observed and quantified numerous malformations, including craniofacial defects, hyperpigmentation, muscle mispatterning and miscoiling of the gut. These data implicate several key neurotransmitters in new embryonic patterning roles, reveal novel earlier stages for processes involved in eye development, suggest new targets for subsequent molecular-genetic investigation, and highlight the necessity for in-depth toxicology studies of psychoactive compounds to which human embryos might be exposed during pregnancy. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  17. [Brain repair after ischemic stroke: role of neurotransmitters in post-ischemic neurogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Mendoza, Eduardo; Bellver-Landete, Víctor; González, María Pilar; Merino, José Joaquín; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús

    2012-11-01

    Brain ischemia and reperfusion produce alterations in the microenvironment of the parenchyma, including ATP depletion, ionic homeostasis alterations, inflammation, release of multiple cytokines and abnormal release of neurotransmitters. As a consequence, the induction of proliferation and migration of neural stem cells towards the peri-infarct region occurs. The success of new neurorestorative treatments for damaged brain implies the need to know, with greater accuracy, the mechanisms in charge of regulating adult neurogenesis, both under physiological and pathological conditions. Recent evidence demonstrates that many neurotransmitters, glutamate in particular, control the subventricular zone, thus being part of the complex signalling network that influences the production of new neurons. Neurotransmitters provide a link between brain activity and subventricular zone neurogenesis. Therefore, a deeper knowledge of the role of neurotransmitters systems, such as glutamate and its transporters, in adult neurogenesis, may provide a valuable tool to be used as a neurorestorative therapy in this pathology.

  18. Interaction of neurotransmitters with a phospholipid bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated/acetylated γ-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) and the osmolyte molecule glycerol...

  19. Dissociable roles of glucocorticoid and noradrenergic activation on social discounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margittai, Zsofia; van Wingerden, Marijn; Schnitzler, Alfons; Joëls, Marian; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2018-04-01

    People often exhibit prosocial tendencies towards close kin and friends, but generosity decreases as a function of increasing social distance between donor and recipient, a phenomenon called social discounting. Evidence suggests that acute stress affects prosocial behaviour in general and social discounting in particular. We tested the causal role of the important stress neuromodulators cortisol (CORT) and noradrenaline (NA) in this effect by considering two competing hypotheses. On the one hand, it is possible that CORT and NA act in concert to increase generosity towards socially close others by reducing the aversiveness of the cost component in costly altruism and enhancing the emotional salience of vicarious reward. Alternatively, it is equally plausible that CORT and NA exert dissociable, opposing effects on prosocial behaviour based on prior findings implicating CORT in social affiliation, and NA in aggressive and antagonistic tendencies. We pharmacologically manipulated CORT and NA levels in a sample of men (N = 150) and found that isolated hydrocortisone administration promoted prosocial tendencies towards close others, reflected in an altered social discount function, but this effect was offset by concurrent noradrenergic activation brought about by simultaneous yohimbine administration. These results provide inceptive evidence for causal, opposing roles of these two important stress neuromodulators on prosocial behaviour, and give rise to the possibility that, depending on the neuroendocrine response profile, stress neuromodulator action can foster both tend-and-befriend and fight-or-flight tendencies at the same time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Rat Model of Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Abeta42 and Pro-oxidative Substances Exhibits Cognitive Deficit and Alterations in Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Neurotransmitter Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrásek, Tomáš; Škurlová, Martina; Malenínská, Kristýna; Vojtěchová, Iveta; Krištofíková, Z.; Matušková, H.; Šírová, J.; Valeš, Karel; Řípová, D.; Stuchlík, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, APR 20 (2016), s. 83 ISSN 1663-4365 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14053 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : animal model * Alzheimer’s disease * sporadic AD * learning and memory * cognition * neurochemistry of the acetylcholine system * hippocampus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2016

  1. Locus coeruleus to basolateral amygdala noradrenergic projections promote anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Jordan G; Siuda, Edward R; Bhatti, Dionnet L; Lawson, Lamley A; McElligott, Zoe A; Stuber, Garret D; Bruchas, Michael R

    2017-07-14

    Increased tonic activity of locus coeruleus noradrenergic (LC-NE) neurons induces anxiety-like and aversive behavior. While some information is known about the afferent circuitry that endogenously drives this neural activity and behavior, the downstream receptors and anatomical projections that mediate these acute risk aversive behavioral states via the LC-NE system remain unresolved. Here we use a combination of retrograde tracing, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, electrophysiology, and in vivo optogenetics with localized pharmacology to identify neural substrates downstream of increased tonic LC-NE activity in mice. We demonstrate that photostimulation of LC-NE fibers in the BLA evokes norepinephrine release in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), alters BLA neuronal activity, conditions aversion, and increases anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, we report that β-adrenergic receptors mediate the anxiety-like phenotype of increased NE release in the BLA. These studies begin to illustrate how the complex efferent system of the LC-NE system selectively mediates behavior through distinct receptor and projection-selective mechanisms.

  2. Statins Promote Long-Term Recovery after Ischemic Stroke by Reconnecting Noradrenergic Neuronal Circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Joo Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase (statins, widely used to lower cholesterol in coronary heart and vascular disease, are effective drugs in reducing the risk of stroke and improving its outcome in the long term. After ischemic stroke, cardiac autonomic dysfunction and psychological problems are common complications related to deficits in the noradrenergic (NA system. This study investigated the effects of statins on the recovery of NA neuron circuitry and its function after transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI. Using the wheat germ agglutinin (WGA transgene technique combined with the recombinant adenoviral vector system, NA-specific neuronal pathways were labeled, and were identified in the locus coeruleus (LC, where NA neurons originate. NA circuitry in the atorvastatin-treated group recovered faster than in the vehicle-treated group. The damaged NA circuitry was partly reorganized with the gradual recovery of autonomic dysfunction and neurobehavioral deficit. Newly proliferated cells might contribute to reorganizing NA neurons and lead anatomic and functional recovery of NA neurons. Statins may be implicated to play facilitating roles in the recovery of the NA neuron and its function.

  3. Psychotropic and neurotropic drugs and neurotransmitter receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryo

    1986-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are important in nervous and mental diseases because of their part in the pathogenesis of such diseases; at the same time, they play significant roles in the actions of effective therapeutic drugs. Studies of the mechanisms involved in the actions of such drugs not only generate useful methods to elucidate the pathogenesis of nervous and mental disorders but also serve as indispensable means of developing new drugs. In this field, investigations using both animal models of certain diseases and healthy animals are essential. Development of these animal models is urgently required. In this workshop, studies were presented of the mechanisms of action of major neuropsychotropic drugs such as anxiolytics, antidepressants, and antipsychotics, assessed in terms of the parts played by neurotransmitters and receptors. (Auth.)

  4. Pattern recognition of neurotransmitters using multimode sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Moldoveanu, Iuliana; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick

    2014-05-30

    Pattern recognition is essential in chemical analysis of biological fluids. Reliable and sensitive methods for neurotransmitters analysis are needed. Therefore, we developed for pattern recognition of neurotransmitters: dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine a method based on multimode sensing. Multimode sensing was performed using microsensors based on diamond paste modified with 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrine, hemin and protoporphyrin IX in stochastic and differential pulse voltammetry modes. Optimized working conditions: phosphate buffer solution of pH 3.01 and KCl 0.1mol/L (as electrolyte support), were determined using cyclic voltammetry and used in all measurements. The lowest limits of quantification were: 10(-10)mol/L for dopamine and epinephrine, and 10(-11)mol/L for norepinephrine. The multimode microsensors were selective over ascorbic and uric acids and the method facilitated reliable assay of neurotransmitters in urine samples, and therefore, the pattern recognition showed high reliability (RSDneurotransmitters on biological fluids at a lower determination level than chromatographic methods. The sampling of the biological fluids referees only to the buffering (1:1, v/v) with a phosphate buffer pH 3.01, while for chromatographic methods the sampling is laborious. Accordingly with the statistic evaluation of the results at 99.00% confidence level, both modes can be used for pattern recognition and quantification of neurotransmitters with high reliability. The best multimode microsensor was the one based on diamond paste modified with protoporphyrin IX. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurotransmitters Drive Combinatorial Multistate Postsynaptic Density Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Coba, Marcelo P; Pocklington, Andrew J; Collins, Mark O; Kopanitsa, Maksym V; Uren, Rachel T; Swamy, Sajani; Croning, Mike D R; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Grant, Seth G N

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian postsynaptic density (PSD) comprises a complex collection of approximately 1100 proteins. Despite extensive knowledge of individual proteins, the overall organization of the PSD is poorly understood. Here, we define maps of molecular circuitry within the PSD based on phosphorylation of postsynaptic proteins. Activation of a single neurotransmitter receptor, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), changed the phosphorylation status of 127 proteins. Stimulation of ionotropic an...

  6. Slitrk1-deficient mice display elevated anxiety-like behavior and noradrenergic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, K; Yamada, K; Ornthanalai, V G; Inoue, T; Ota, M; Murphy, N P; Aruga, J

    2010-02-01

    Mutations in SLITRK1 are found in patients with Tourette's syndrome and trichotillomania. SLITRK1 encodes a transmembrane protein containing leucine-rich repeats that is produced predominantly in the nervous system. However, the role of this protein is largely unknown, except that it can modulate neurite outgrowth in vitro. To clarify the role of Slitrk1 in vivo, we developed Slitrk1-knockout mice and analyzed their behavioral and neurochemical phenotypes. Slitrk1-deficient mice exhibited elevated anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze test as well as increased immobility time in forced swimming and tail suspension tests. Neurochemical analysis revealed that Slitrk1-knockout mice had increased levels of norepinephrine and its metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol. Administration of clonidine, an alpha2-adrenergic agonist that is frequently used to treat patients with Tourette's syndrome, attenuated the anxiety-like behavior of Slitrk1-deficient mice in the elevated plus-maze test. These results lead us to conclude that noradrenergic mechanisms are involved in the behavioral abnormalities of Slitrk1-deficient mice. Elevated anxiety due to Slitrk1 dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases such as Tourette's syndrome and trichotillomania.

  7. Neurotransmitter measures in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strac, Dubravka Svob; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and functional decline, as well as by a variety of neuropsychiatric and psychological symptoms and behavioral dysfunctions. Various studies proposed the role of different neurotransmitter systems not only in AD-related cognitive, but also psychotic symptoms and behavioral and emotional deficits. Due to the close proximity, pathological neurochemical changes in brain occurring in AD are likely to be reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the CSF neurotransmitter correlates of AD in order to get further insights into the potential role of altered neurotransmitters in the pathophysiology of AD and to offer novel AD biomarkers. PubMed and MEDLINE data bases were searched for English-language articles by using "Alzheimer's disease", "CSF" and "neurotransmitter" as primary terms. No time or article type constraints were applied. Moreover, the lists of references were searched manually for additional articles. Changes in various correlates of cholinergic, monoaminergic and amino acid neurotransmitter systems, as well as neuropeptides, have been observed in CSF of AD patients. However, as the results of these studies have been controversial, the importance of CSF neurotransmitter parameters as potential biomarkers in AD remains quite unclear. The observed discrepancies could be bypassed by implementation of new sensitive methods, such as novel proteomics approaches that include protein separation techniques, mass spectroscopy and targeted multiplex panels of specific analytes. Although no individual CSF neurotransmitter correlate was demonstrated as suitable biomarker of AD, a combined profile of several CSF neurochemical parameters might show enhanced sensitivity and specificity and thus contribute to earlier and more accurate diagnosis of AD, crucial for application of effective treatments.

  8. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  9. Selective inhibition of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase enhances dopamine release from noradrenergic terminals in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, Paola; Flore, Giovanna; Saba, Pierluigi; Frau, Roberto; Gessa, Gian L

    2015-10-01

    Disulfiram has been claimed to be useful in cocaine addiction therapy, its efficacy being attributed to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibition. Our previous results indicate that disulfiram and the selective DBH inhibitor nepicastat increase extracellular dopamine (DA) in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and markedly potentiated cocaine-induced increase. Concomitantly, in rats with cocaine self-administration history, cocaine-seeking behavior induced by drug priming was prevented, probably through overstimulation of D1 receptors due to the DA increase. The present research was aimed at studying the neurochemical mechanisms originating the enhanced DA release. Noradrenergic system ablation was attained by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the neurotoxin anti-DBH-saporin (aDBH-sap). DA, noradrenaline (NA), and DOPAC were assessed by HPLC after ex vivo tissue extraction or in vivo microdialysis. Control and denervated rats were subjected to microdialysis in the mPFC and caudate nucleus to evaluate the effect of nepicastat-cocaine combination on extracellular DA levels and their regulation by α2-adrenoceptors. Fifteen days after neurotoxin or its vehicle administration, tissue and extracellular NA were reduced to less than 2% the control value, while extracellular DA was increased by approximately 100%. In control rats, nepicastat given alone and in combination with cocaine increased extracellular DA by about 250% and 1100%, respectively. In denervated rats, nepicastat slightly affected extracellular DA, while in combination with cocaine increased extracellular DA by 250%. No differences were found in the caudate nucleus. Clonidine almost totally reversed the extracellular DA elevation produced by nepicastat-cocaine combination, while it was ineffective in denervated rats. This research shows that the increase of extracellular DA produced by nepicastat alone or in combination with cocaine was prevented by noradrenergic denervation. The

  10. Neurotransmitter transporters in schistosomes: structure, function and prospects for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Paula; Patocka, Nicholas

    2013-12-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) play a fundamental role in the control of neurotransmitter signaling and homeostasis. Sodium symporters of the plasma membrane mediate the cellular uptake of neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, whereas proton-driven vesicular transporters sequester the neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles for subsequent release. Together these transporters control how much transmitter is released and how long it remains in the synaptic cleft, thereby regulating the intensity and duration of signaling. NTTs have been the subject of much research in mammals and there is growing interest in their activities among invertebrates as well. In this review we will focus our attention on NTTs of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni. Bloodflukes of the genus Schistosoma are the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, a devastating disease that afflicts over 200 million people worldwide. Schistosomes have a well-developed nervous system and a rich diversity of neurotransmitters, including many of the small-molecule ("classical") neurotransmitters that normally employ NTTs in their mechanism of signaling. Recent advances in schistosome genomics have unveiled numerous NTTs in this parasite, some of which have now been cloned and characterized in vitro. Moreover new genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests that NTTs are required for proper control of neuromuscular signaling and movement of the worm. Among these carriers are proteins that have been successfully targeted for drug discovery in other organisms, in particular sodium symporters for biogenic amine neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine. Our goal in this chapter is to review the current status of research on schistosome NTTs, with emphasis on biogenic amine sodium symporters, and to evaluate their potential for anti-schistosomal drug targeting. Through this discussion we hope to draw attention to this important superfamily of parasite proteins and to identify new

  11. Changes of the rats’ heart rate variability caused by chlorpromazine modulation of central noradrenergic neurotransmission during prolonged stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Z. Мelnikova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It’s established that under the prolonged stress there were changes of geometric and spectral indices of the rats’ heart rate variability (HRV, manifestations of which depended on duration of stressful factors acting and represented the stress reaction development from the stage of anxiety to the exhaustion phase. Application of chlorpromazine at the beginning and against the background of stress blocked the central alpha adrenoceptors and contributed to renewal of the most HRV indices into the limits of control values at the end of experiment. The results of research show that the modulation of functional state of central noradrenergic system plays a great role in the changes of HRV during prolonged stress.

  12. Characterizing Enzymatic Deposition for Microelectrode Neurotransmitter Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosein, W. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yorita, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tolosa, V. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    The enzyme immobilization process, one step in creating an enzymatic biosensor, was characterized and analyzed as a function of its physical properties. The neural glutamic biosensor is a flexible device, effectively minimizing trauma to the area of implantation. The Multielectrode Array (MEA) is composed primarily of a proprietary polymer which has been successfully implanted into human subjects in recent years. This polymer allows the device the pliability that other devices normally lack, though this poses some challenges to implantation. The electrodes are made of Platinum (Pt), and can range in number from eight to thirty two electrodes per device. These electrodes are electroplated with a semipermeable polymer layer to improve selectivity of the electrode to the neurotransmitter of interest, in this case glutamate. A signal is created from the interaction of glutamate in the brain with the glutamate oxidase (GluOx) which is immobilized on the surface of the electrode by using crosslinking chemistry in conjunction with glutaraldehyde and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The glutamate is oxidized by glutamate oxidase, producing α-ketoglutarate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a by-product. The production of H2O2 is crucial for detection of the presence of the glutamate within the enzymatic coating, as it diffuses through the enzyme layer and oxidizes at the surface of the electrode. This oxidation is detectable by measurable change in the current using amperometry. Hence, the MEA allows for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitter activity in real time. The sensitivity of the sensor to these neurotransmitters is dependent on the thickness of the layer, which is investigated in these experiments in order to optimize the efficacy of the device to detecting the substrate, once implanted.

  13. Noradrenergic deficits in Parkinson's disease imaged with (11)C-MeNER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nahimi, Adjmal; Sommerauer, Michael; Kinnerup, Martin B

    2017-01-01

    significant declines in the thalamus, hypothalamus, and nucleus ruber. Tremor was significantly associated with preserved tracer binding. Conclusion: This is first specific quantification of noradrenergic denervation in Parkinsonńs disease patients in vivo. In agreement with predictions from determinations...

  14. Human amygdala reactivity is diminished by the beta-noradrenergic antagonist propranolol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurlemann, R.; Walter, H.; Rehme, A. K.; Kukolja, J.; Santoro, S. C.; Schmidt, C.; Schnell, K.; Musshoff, F.; Keysers, C.; Maier, W.; Kendrick, K. M.; Onur, O. A.

    Background. Animal models of anxiety disorders emphasize the crucial role of locus ceruleus-noradrenergic (norepinephrine, NE) signaling, the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and their interactions in the expression of anxiety-like behavioral responses to stress. Despite clinical evidence for the efficacy

  15. Complementary neural correlates of motivation in dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons of monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eBouret

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Rewards have many influences on learning, decision-making and performance. All seem to rely on complementary actions of two closely related catecholaminergic neuromodulators, dopamine and noradrenaline. We compared single unit activity of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus in monkeys performing a reward schedule task. Their motivation, indexed using operant performance, increased as they progressed through schedules ending in reward delivery. The responses of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons around the time of major task events, visual cues predicting trial outcome and operant action to complete a trial, were similar, in that they occurred at the same time. They were also similar in that they both responded most strongly to the first cues in schedules, which are the most informative cues. The neuronal responses around the time of the monkeys’ actions were different, in that the response intensity profiles changed in opposite directions. Dopaminergic responses were stronger around predictably rewarded correct actions whereas noradrenergic responses were greater around predictably unrewarded correct actions. The complementary response profiles related to the monkeys operant actions suggest that dopamine neurons might relate to the value of the current action whereas the noradrenergic neurons relate to the psychological cost of that action.

  16. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong M; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Nguyen, Minh Q; Dubey, Souvik; Rao, Smitha; Mays, Jeffrey; Chiao, J-C

    2015-09-23

    In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu). A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations.

  17. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuong M. Nguyen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu. A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations.

  18. Transcription factor activating protein 2 beta (TFAP2B) mediates noradrenergic neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, Fakhera; Ackermann, Sandra; Kahlert, Yvonne; Volland, Ruth; Roels, Frederik; Engesser, Anne; Hertwig, Falk; Kocak, Hayriye; Hero, Barbara; Dreidax, Daniel; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Berthold, Frank; Nürnberg, Peter; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal pediatric tumor that originates from the developing sympathetic nervous system and shows a broad range of clinical behavior, ranging from fatal progression to differentiation into benign ganglioneuroma. In experimental neuroblastoma systems, retinoic acid (RA) effectively induces neuronal differentiation, and RA treatment has been therefore integrated in current therapies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation are still poorly understood. We here investigated the role of transcription factor activating protein 2 beta (TFAP2B), a key factor in sympathetic nervous system development, in neuroblastoma pathogenesis and differentiation. Microarray analyses of primary neuroblastomas (n = 649) demonstrated that low TFAP2B expression was significantly associated with unfavorable prognostic markers as well as adverse patient outcome. We also found that low TFAP2B expression was strongly associated with CpG methylation of the TFAP2B locus in primary neuroblastomas (n = 105) and demethylation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in induction of TFAP2B expression in vitro, suggesting that TFAP2B is silenced by genomic methylation. Tetracycline inducible re-expression of TFAP2B in IMR-32 and SH-EP neuroblastoma cells significantly impaired proliferation and cell cycle progression. In IMR-32 cells, TFAP2B induced neuronal differentiation, which was accompanied by up-regulation of the catecholamine biosynthesizing enzyme genes DBH and TH, and down-regulation of MYCN and REST, a master repressor of neuronal genes. By contrast, knockdown of TFAP2B by lentiviral transduction of shRNAs abrogated RA-induced neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2)c neuroblastoma cells almost completely. Taken together, our results suggest that TFAP2B is playing a vital role in retaining RA responsiveness and mediating noradrenergic neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies

  19. Temperature dependence of electrical properties of mixture of exogenous neurotransmitters dopamine and epinephrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Patil, Vidya

    2016-05-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that support the communication between the neurons. In vitro study of exogenous neurotransmitters Dopamine and Epinephrine and their mixture, carried out to learn about their electrical properties being dielectric constant and conductivity amongst others. Dielectric constant and conductivity of the selected neurotransmitters are found to increase with temperature. As a result, the time constant of the system increases with temperature. This change leads to increase in the time taken by the synapse to transport the action potential. The correlation between physical properties of exogenous neurotransmitters and psychological and physiological behaviour of human being may be understood with the help of current study. The response time of Epinephrine is in microseconds whereas response time of Dopamine is in milliseconds. The response time for both the neurotransmitters and their mixture is found to be increasing with temperature indicating the symptoms such as depression, apathy, chronic fatigue and low physical energy with no desire to exercise the body, which are observed during the fever.

  20. Recent progress and challenges in nanotechnology for biomedical applications: an insight into the analysis of neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi; Miura, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers exciting opportunities and unprecedented compatibilities in manipulating chemical and biological materials at the atomic or molecular scale for the development of novel functional materials with enhanced capabilities. It plays a central role in the recent technological advances in biomedical technology, especially in the areas of disease diagnosis, drug design and drug delivery. In this review, we present the recent trend and challenges in the development of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with a special emphasis on the analysis of neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters are the chemical messengers which transform information and signals all over the body. They play prime role in functioning of the central nervous system (CNS) and governs most of the metabolic functions including movement, pleasure, pain, mood, emotion, thinking, digestion, sleep, addiction, fear, anxiety and depression. Thus, development of high-performance and user-friendly analytical methods for ultra-sensitive detection of neurotransmitters remain a major challenge in modern biomedical analysis. Nanostructured materials are emerging as a powerful mean for diagnosis of CNS disorders because of their unique optical, size and surface characteristics. This review provides a brief outline on the basic concepts and recent advancements of nanotechnology for biomedical applications, especially in the analysis of neurotransmitters. A brief introduction to the nanomaterials, bionanotechnology and neurotransmitters is also included along with discussions on most of the patents published in these areas.

  1. SLC6 Neurotransmitter Transporters: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Andersen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine N

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters...... for the monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), dopamine, and norepinephrine, and the amino acid neurotransmitters GABA and glycine. The SLC6 NTTs are widely expressed in the mammalian brain and play an essential role in regulating neurotransmitter signaling and homeostasis by mediating uptake...... of released neurotransmitters from the extracellular space into neurons and glial cells. The transporters are targets for a wide range of therapeutic drugs used in treatment of psychiatric diseases, including major depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and epilepsy...

  2. Relationship of neurotransmitters to the symptoms of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2008-01-01

    A relationship appears to exist between the 3 main monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain (i.e., dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin) and specific symptoms of major depressive disorder. Specific symptoms are associated with the increase or decrease of specific neurotransmitters, which suggests that specific symptoms of depression could be assigned to specific neurochemical mechanisms, and subsequently specific antidepressant drugs could target symptom-specific neurotransmitters. Research on electroconvulsive therapy has supported a correlation between neurotransmitters and depression symptoms. A 2-dimensional model of neurotransmitter functions is discussed that describes depression as a mixture of 2 separate components--negative affect and the loss of positive affect--that can be considered in relation to the 3 amine neurotransmitters. Owing to the different methods of action of available antidepressant agents and the depression symptoms thought to be associated with dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine, current treatments can be targeted toward patients' specific symptoms.

  3. Imaging neurotransmitter release by drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Diana; Narendran, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracers that are specific for brain dopamine receptors can be used to indirectly image the change in the levels of neurotransmitters within the brain. Most of the studies in addiction have focused on dopamine, since the dopamine neurons that project to the striatum have been shown to play a critical role in mediating addictive behavior. These imaging studies have shown that increased extracellular dopamine produced by psychostimulants can be measured with PET and SPECT. However, there are some technical issues associated with imaging changes in dopamine, and these are reviewed in this chapter. Among these are the loss of sensitivity, the time course of dopamine pulse relative to PET and SPECT imaging, and the question of affinity state of the receptor. In addition, animal studies have shown that most drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the striatum, yet not all produce a change in neurotransmitter that can be measured. As a result, imaging with a psychostimulant has become the preferred method for imaging presynaptic dopamine transmission, and this method has been used in studies of addiction. The results of these studies suggest that cocaine and alcohol addiction are associated with a loss of dopamine transmission, and a number of studies show that this loss correlates with severity of disease.

  4. Clinical features and pharmacotherapy of childhood monoamine neurotransmitter disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J; Heales, S J R; Kurian, M A

    2014-08-01

    Childhood neurotransmitter disorders are increasingly recognised as an expanding group of inherited neurometabolic syndromes. They are caused by disturbance in synthesis, metabolism, and homeostasis of the monoamine neurotransmitters, including the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine) and serotonin. Disturbances in monoamine neurotransmission will lead to neurological symptoms that often overlap with clinical features of other childhood neurological disorders (such as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, cerebral palsy, other movement disorders, and paroxysmal conditions); consequently, neurotransmitter disorders are frequently misdiagnosed. The diagnosis of neurotransmitter disorders is made through detailed clinical assessment, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters, and further supportive diagnostic investigations. Early and accurate diagnosis of neurotransmitter disorders is important, as many are amenable to therapeutic intervention. The principles of treatment for monoamine neurotransmitter disorders are mainly directly derived from understanding these metabolic pathways. In disorders characterized by enzyme deficiency, we aim to increase monoamine substrate availability, boost enzyme co-factor levels, reduce monoamine breakdown, and replace depleted levels of monoamines with pharmacological analogs as clinically indicated. Most monoamine neurotransmitter disorders lead to reduced levels of central dopamine and/or serotonin. Complete amelioration of motor symptoms is achievable in some disorders, such as Segawa's syndrome, and, in other conditions, significant improvement in quality of life can be attained with pharmacotherapy. In this review, we provide an overview of the clinical features and current treatment strategies for childhood monoamine neurotransmitter disorders.

  5. Angiotensinergic and noradrenergic neurons in the rat and human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Jaspal; Stucki, Silvan; Nussberger, Juerg; Schaffner, Thomas; Gygax, Susanne; Bohlender, Juergen; Imboden, Hans

    2011-02-25

    Although the physiological and pharmacological evidences suggest a role for angiotensin II (Ang II) with the mammalian heart, the source and precise location of Ang II are unknown. To visualize and quantitate Ang II in atria, ventricular walls and interventricular septum of the rat and human heart and to explore the feasibility of local Ang II production and function, we investigated by different methods the expression of proteins involved in the generation and function of Ang II. We found mRNA of angiotensinogen (Ang-N), of angiotensin converting enzyme, of the angiotensin type receptors AT(1A) and AT₂ (AT(1B) not detected) as well as of cathepsin D in any part of the hearts. No renin mRNA was traceable. Ang-N mRNA was visualized by in situ hybridization in atrial ganglial neurons. Ang II and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH) were either colocalized inside the same neuronal cell or the neurons were specialized for Ang II or DβH. Within these neurons, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was neither colocalized with Ang II nor DβH, but VAChT-staining was found with synapses en passant encircle these neuronal cells. The fibers containing Ang II exhibited with blood vessels and with cardiomyocytes supposedly angiotensinergic synapses en passant. In rat heart, right atrial median Ang II concentration appeared higher than septal and ventricular Ang II. The distinct colocalization of neuronal Ang II with DβH in the heart may indicate that Ang II participates together with norepinephrine in the regulation of cardiac functions: produced as a cardiac neurotransmitter Ang II may have inotropic, chronotropic or dromotropic effects in atria and ventricles and contributes to blood pressure regulation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis of symmetrical and non-symmetrical bivalent neurotransmitter ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Andersen, Jacob; Thygesen, Mikkel Boas

    2016-01-01

    A novel procedure for synthesis of bivalent neurotransmitter ligands was developed by reacting O-benzyl protected N-nosylated dopamine and serotonin with alkyl- or PEG-linked diols under Fukuyama-Mitsunobu conditions in the presence of DIAD/PPh3 generating three different bivalent neurotransmitte...

  7. Strategies for sensing neurotransmitters with responsive MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovski, Goran; Tóth, Éva

    2017-01-23

    A great deal of research involving multidisciplinary approaches is currently dedicated to the understanding of brain function. The complexity of physiological processes that underlie neural activity is the greatest hurdle to faster advances. Among imaging techniques, MRI has great potential to enable mapping of neural events with excellent specificity, spatiotemporal resolution and unlimited tissue penetration depth. To this end, molecular imaging approaches using neurotransmitter-sensitive MRI agents have appeared recently to study neuronal activity, along with the first successful in vivo MRI studies. Here, we review the pioneering steps in the development of molecular MRI methods that could allow functional imaging of the brain by sensing the neurotransmitter activity directly. We provide a brief overview of other imaging and analytical methods to detect neurotransmitter activity, and describe the approaches to sense neurotransmitters by means of molecular MRI agents. Based on these initial steps, further progress in probe chemistry and the emergence of innovative imaging methods to directly monitor neurotransmitters can be envisaged.

  8. Dynamic SERS nanosensor for neurotransmitter sensing near neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier, Félix; Brulé, Thibault; Bourque, Marie-Josée; Ducrot, Charles; Trudeau, Louis-Éric; Masson, Jean-François

    2017-12-04

    Current electrophysiology and electrochemistry techniques have provided unprecedented understanding of neuronal activity. However, these techniques are suited to a small, albeit important, panel of neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA and dopamine, and these constitute only a subset of the broader range of neurotransmitters involved in brain chemistry. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) provides a unique opportunity to detect a broader range of neurotransmitters in close proximity to neurons. Dynamic SERS (D-SERS) nanosensors based on patch-clamp-like nanopipettes decorated with gold nanoraspberries can be located accurately under a microscope using techniques analogous to those used in current electrophysiology or electrochemistry experiments. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that D-SERS can measure in a single experiment ATP, glutamate (glu), acetylcholine (ACh), GABA and dopamine (DA), among other neurotransmitters, with the potential for detecting a greater number of neurotransmitters. The SERS spectra of these neurotransmitters were identified with a barcoding data processing method and time series of the neurotransmitter levels were constructed. The D-SERS nanosensor was then located near cultured mouse dopaminergic neurons. The detection of neurotransmitters was performed in response to a series of K + depolarisations, and allowed the detection of elevated levels of both ATP and dopamine. Control experiments were also performed near glial cells, showing only very low basal detection neurotransmitter events. This paper demonstrates the potential of D-SERS to detect neurotransmitter secretion events near living neurons, but also constitutes a strong proof-of-concept for the broad application of SERS to the detection of secretion events by neurons or other cell types in order to study normal or pathological cell functions.

  9. Modulation of the noradrenergic receptor at uterine level by the 17 β-estradiol influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderlei, F.H.F.; Catanho, M.T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to asses the regulation of the noradrenergic receptor, by estrogens. We measured the uterotrophic response and the binding capacity of the noradrenergic receptor after the administration of 17 β-estradiol (E sub(2); 132 nmol/kg b.w., i.p.) to immature rats. The results showed that 2 and 4 hs after E sub(2) treatment, the total number of NA-receptors enhanced significantly (6 fold). Similarly, it was observed a significant increase in uterine weight, 24 h after E sub(2) administration. The results indicate that NA-receptors present in the uterus may be under a direct E sub(2) regulation, which suggests a possible participation on the uterotropic response induced by E sub(2). (author)

  10. The noradrenergic paradox: implications in the management of depression and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alonso Montoya,1 Robert Bruins,1 Martin A Katzman,2 Pierre Blier3 1Eli Lilly Canada Inc, 2START Clinic for the Mood and Anxiety Disorders, Toronto, 3Mood Disorders Research Unit, Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Both major depressive disorder and the anxiety disorders are major causes of ­disability and markedly contribute to a significant global burden of the disease worldwide. In part because of the significant socioeconomic burden associated with these disorders, theories have been developed to specifically build clinical treatment approaches. One such theory, the monoaminergic hypothesis, has led to the development of several generations of selective and nonselective inhibitors of transporters of serotonin and norepinephrine, with the goal of augmenting monoaminergic transmission. These efforts have led to considerable success in the development of antidepressant therapeutics. However, there is a strong correlation between enhanced noradrenergic activity and fear and anxiety. Consequently, some physicians have expressed concerns that the same enhanced noradrenergic activity that alleviates depression could also promote anxiety. The fact that the serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors are successfully used in the treatment of anxiety and panic disorders seems paradoxical. This review was undertaken to determine if any clinical evidence exists to show that serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors can cause anxiety. The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, and the results limited to randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies performed in nongeriatric adults and with clear outcome measures were reported. Based on these criteria, a total of 52 studies were examined. Patients in these studies suffered from depression or anxiety disorders (generalized and social anxiety disorders, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The

  11. Quantitative-profiling of neurotransmitter abnormalities in the disease progression of experimental diabetic encephalopathy rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xueyan; Zhu, Qiuxiang; Han, Xiaowen; Chen, Renguo; Liu, Yaowu; Fan, Hongbin; Yin, Xiaoxing

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy (DE) is one of the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), with neither effective prevention nor proven therapeutic regimen. This study aims to uncover the potential dysregulation pattern of the neurotransmitters in a rat model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental DE. For that purpose, male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ. Cognitive performance was detected with the Morris water maze (MWM) test. Serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and brain tissues were collected to measure the levels of neurotransmitters. Compared with the control rats, the acetylcholine (ACh) levels in serum, CSF, hippocampus, and cortex were all significantly down-regulated as early as 6 weeks in the STZ treatment group. In contrast, the glutamate (Glu) levels were decreased in CSF and the hippocampus, but unaffected in the serum and cortex of STZ-treated rats. As for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), it was down-regulated in serum, but up-regulated in CSF, hippocampus, and the cortex in the STZ-treated group. The mRNA expressions of neurotransmitter-related rate limiting enzymes (including AChE, GAD1, and GAD2) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β and TNF-α) were all increased in the DE rats. Our data suggest that DM induces isoform-dependent and tissue-specific neurotransmitter abnormalities, and that neuroinflammation may underlay the nervous system dysfunction observed in the progression of DE.

  12. Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides: New Players in the Control of Islet of Langerhans' Cell Mass and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cairano, Eliana S; Moretti, Stefania; Marciani, Paola; Sacchi, Vellea Franca; Castagna, Michela; Davalli, Alberto; Folli, Franco; Perego, Carla

    2016-04-01

    Islets of Langerhans control whole body glucose homeostasis, as they respond, releasing hormones, to changes in nutrient concentrations in the blood stream. The regulation of hormone secretion has been the focus of attention for a long time because it is related to many metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus. Endocrine cells of the islet use a sophisticate system of endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signals to synchronize their activities. These signals provide a fast and accurate control not only for hormone release but also for cell differentiation and survival, key aspects in islet physiology and pathology. Among the different categories of paracrine/autocrine signals, this review highlights the role of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. In a manner similar to neurons, endocrine cells synthesize, accumulate, release neurotransmitters in the islet milieu, and possess receptors able to decode these signals. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of neurotransmitter/neuropetide signaling pathways present within the islet. Then, we focus on evidence supporting the concept that neurotransmitters/neuropeptides and their receptors are interesting new targets to preserve β-cell function and mass. A greater understanding of how this network of signals works in physiological and pathological conditions would advance our knowledge of islet biology and physiology and uncover potentially new areas of pharmacological intervention. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 756-767, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Tyrosine 402 Phosphorylation of Pyk2 Is Involved in Ionomycin-Induced Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yun; Mou, Zheng; Chu, Shifeng; Chen, Xiaoyu; He, Wenbin; Guo, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Yuhe; Takahashi, Masami; Chen, Naihong

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed in the central nervous system, are implicated in many neural processes. However, the relationship between protein tyrosine kinases and neurotransmitter release remains unknown. In this study, we found that ionomycin, a Ca2+ ionophore, concurrently induced asynchronous neurotransmitter release and phosphorylation of a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), in clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and cerebellar granule cells, whereas introduction of Pyk2 siRNA dramatically suppressed ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release. Further study indicated that Tyr-402 (Y402) in Pyk2, instead of other tyrosine sites, underwent rapid phosphorylation after ionomycin induction in 1 min to 2 min. We demonstrated that the mutant of Pyk2 Y402 could abolish ionomycin-induced dopamine (DA) release by transfecting cells with recombinant Pyk2 and its mutants (Y402F, Y579F, Y580F, and Y881F). In addition, Src inhibition could prolong phosphorylation of Pyk2 Y402 and increase DA release. These findings suggested that Pyk2 was involved in ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release through phosphorylation of Y402. PMID:24718602

  14. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  15. General principles of neurotransmitter detection. Problems and application to catecholamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxi, Jacques

    1976-01-01

    The use of radioautography for neurotransmitter studies requires two preliminary conditions (in addition to the availability of tritiated molecules): there must be a selective uptake of the neurotransmitter itself, or of a related substance (precursor or false transmitter); the labelled substance must be preserved in situ by fixation and must not be removed by further treatments. Since the putative neurotransmitters are generally small, hydrosoluble molecules, they can be maintained in situ only if they are bound to structure made insoluble by the fixative. The technical indications are summarized so that the successive stages of experimentation can be considered in an attempt to answer the major questions posed by the experimenter

  16. Therapeutics of Neurotransmitters in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandimalla, Ramesh; Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the loss of memory, multiple cognitive impairments and changes in the personality and behavior. Several decades of intense research have revealed that multiple cellular changes are involved in disease process, including synaptic damage, mitochondrial abnormalities and inflammatory responses, in addition to formation and accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the impact of neurotransmitters in the progression and pathogenesis of AD, we still do not have a drug molecule associated with neurotransmitter(s) that can delay disease process in elderly individuals and/or restore cognitive functions in AD patients. The purpose of our article is to assess the latest developments in neurotransmitters research using cell and mouse models of AD. We also updated the current status of clinical trials using neurotransmitters’ agonists/antagonists in AD. PMID:28211810

  17. Affinity of four polar neurotransmitters for lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chunhua; Ye, Fengbin; Valardez, Gustavo F.

    2011-01-01

    . The simulations suggest that this attraction mainly relies on electrostatic interactions of the amino group of the neurotransmitter and the lipid phosphate. We conclude that moderate attraction to lipid membranes occurs for some polar neurotransmitters and hence that one premise for a theory of bilayer-mediated......Weak interactions of neurotransmitters and the lipid matrix in the synaptic membrane have been hypothesized to play a role in synaptic transmission of nerve signals, particularly with respect to receptor desensitization (Cantor, R. S. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 11891). The strength of such interactions......, however, was not measured, and this is an obvious impediment for further evaluation and understanding of a possible role for desensitization. We have used dialysis equilibrium to directly measure the net affinity of selected neurotransmitters for lipid membranes and analyzed this affinity data...

  18. Table S1 Basic characteristics of 32 SNPs of neurotransmitter ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    微软用户

    Basic characteristics of 32 SNPs in neurotransmitter-related genes. Gene .... rs45435444, rs80837467 and rs80980072, significant differences (P. *** * ... At the same age and environments, skin lesion scores on the ears (P < 0.001), front (P <.

  19. Communication networks in the brain: neurons, receptors, neurotransmitters, and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinger, David M

    2008-01-01

    Nerve cells (i.e., neurons) communicate via a combination of electrical and chemical signals. Within the neuron, electrical signals driven by charged particles allow rapid conduction from one end of the cell to the other. Communication between neurons occurs at tiny gaps called synapses, where specialized parts of the two cells (i.e., the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons) come within nanometers of one another to allow for chemical transmission. The presynaptic neuron releases a chemical (i.e., a neurotransmitter) that is received by the postsynaptic neuron's specialized proteins called neurotransmitter receptors. The neurotransmitter molecules bind to the receptor proteins and alter postsynaptic neuronal function. Two types of neurotransmitter receptors exist-ligand-gated ion channels, which permit rapid ion flow directly across the outer cell membrane, and G-protein-coupled receptors, which set into motion chemical signaling events within the cell. Hundreds of molecules are known to act as neurotransmitters in the brain. Neuronal development and function also are affected by peptides known as neurotrophins and by steroid hormones. This article reviews the chemical nature, neuronal actions, receptor subtypes, and therapeutic roles of several transmitters, neurotrophins, and hormones. It focuses on neurotransmitters with important roles in acute and chronic alcohol effects on the brain, such as those that contribute to intoxication, tolerance, dependence, and neurotoxicity, as well as maintained alcohol drinking and addiction.

  20. A Glutamate Homeostat Controls the Presynaptic Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiling Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We have interrogated the synaptic dialog that enables the bi-directional, homeostatic control of presynaptic efficacy at the glutamatergic Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We find that homeostatic depression and potentiation use disparate genetic, induction, and expression mechanisms. Specifically, homeostatic potentiation is achieved through reduced CaMKII activity postsynaptically and increased abundance of active zone material presynaptically at one of the two neuronal subtypes innervating the NMJ, while homeostatic depression occurs without alterations in CaMKII activity and is expressed at both neuronal subtypes. Furthermore, homeostatic depression is only induced through excess presynaptic glutamate release and operates with disregard to the postsynaptic response. We propose that two independent homeostats modulate presynaptic efficacy at the Drosophila NMJ: one is an intercellular signaling system that potentiates synaptic strength following diminished postsynaptic excitability, while the other adaptively modulates presynaptic glutamate release through an autocrine mechanism without feedback from the postsynaptic compartment. : Homeostatic mechanisms stabilize synaptic strength, but the signaling systems remain enigmatic. Li et al. suggest the existence of a homeostat operating at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction that responds to excess glutamate through an autocrine mechanism to adaptively inhibit presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This system parallels forms of plasticity at central synapses. Keywords: homeostatic synaptic plasticity, glutamate homeostasis, synaptic depression, Drosophila neuromuscular junction

  1. Noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala modulates the consolidation of object-in-context recognition memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areg eBarsegyan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA is well known to enhance the consolidation of long-term memory of highly emotionally arousing training experiences. The present study investigated whether such noradrenergic activation of the BLA also influences the consolidation of object-in-context recognition memory, a low-arousing training task assessing episodic-like memory. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to two identical objects in one context for either 3 or 10 min, immediately followed by exposure to two other identical objects in a distinctly different context. Immediately after the training they received bilateral intra-BLA infusions of norepinephrine (0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 μg or the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol (0.1, 0.3 or 1.0 μg. On the 24-h retention test, rats were placed back into one of the training contexts with one copy of each of the two training objects. Thus, although both objects were familiar, one of the objects had not previously been encountered in this particular test context. Hence, if the animal generated a long-term memory for the association between an object and its context, it would spend significantly more time exploring the object that was not previously experienced in this context. Saline-infused control rats exhibited poor 24-h retention when given 3 min of training and good retention when given 10 min of training. Norepinephrine administered after 3 min of object-in-context training induced a dose-dependent memory enhancement, whereas propranolol administered after 10 min of training produced memory impairment. These findings provide evidence that posttraining noradrenergic activation of the BLA also enhances the consolidation of memory of object-in-context recognition training, enabling accuracy of episodic-like memories.

  2. Protein kinase A mediates adenosine A2a receptor modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation in cultured cells from medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Joao Paulo Pontes; Almeida, Marina Gomes; Castilho-Martins, Emerson Augusto; Costa, Maisa Aparecida; Fior-Chadi, Debora Rejane

    2014-08-01

    Synaptic transmission is an essential process for neuron physiology. Such process is enabled in part due to modulation of neurotransmitter release. Adenosine is a synaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release in the Central Nervous System, including neurons of medulla oblongata, where several nuclei are involved with neurovegetative reflexes. Adenosine modulates different neurotransmitter systems in medulla oblongata, specially glutamate and noradrenaline in the nucleus tractussolitarii, which are involved in hypotensive responses. However, the intracellular mechanisms involved in this modulation remain unknown. The adenosine A2a receptor modulates neurotransmitter release by activating two cAMP protein effectors, the protein kinase A and the exchange protein activated by cAMP. Therefore, an in vitro approach (cultured cells) was carried out to evaluate modulation of neurotransmission by adenosine A2a receptor and the signaling intracellular pathway involved. Results show that the adenosine A2a receptor agonist, CGS 21680, increases neurotransmitter release, in particular, glutamate and noradrenaline and such response is mediated by protein kinase A activation, which in turn increased synapsin I phosphorylation. This suggests a mechanism of A2aR modulation of neurotransmitter release in cultured cells from medulla oblongata of Wistar rats and suggest that protein kinase A mediates this modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A.

    1990-01-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography

  4. Microfluidic in-channel multi-electrode platform for neurotransmitter sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, A.; Mathault, J.; Reitz, A.; Boisvert, M.; Tessier, F.; Greener, J.; Miled, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this project we present a microfluidic platform with in-channel micro-electrodes for in situ screening of bio/chemical samples through a lab-on-chip system. We used a novel method to incorporate electrochemical sensors array (16x20) connected to a PCB, which opens the way for imaging applications. A 200 μm height microfluidic channel was bonded to electrochemical sensors. The micro-channel contains 3 inlets used to introduce phosphate buffer saline (PBS), ferrocynide and neurotransmitters. The flow rate was controlled through automated micro-pumps. A multiplexer was used to scan electrodes and perform individual cyclic voltammograms by a custom potentiostat. The behavior of the system was linear in terms of variation of current versus concentration. It was used to detect the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and glutamate.

  5. The noradrenergic symptom cluster: clinical expression and neuropharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blier P

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pierre Blier1, Mike Briley21Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 2NeuroBiz Consulting and Communication, Castres, FranceAbstract: Signs and symptoms of depression can be linked to one or more monoaminergic systems, specifically the norepinephrine (NE, the dopamine (DA, and the serotonin (5-HT systems. In particular, the modulation of energy, vigilance, and arousal can be directly linked to the NE system. There is, however, a great deal of overlap in the modulation of the symptoms of depression between these monoaminergic systems. There are considerable reciprocal interactions between the NE, DA, and the 5-HT systems. When using a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, for example, 5-HT transmission is enhanced, but at the same time there is a dampening of the activity of NE and DA neurons through inhibitory 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors, respectively. This could explain the residual symptoms of fatigue, lack of energy, and anhedonia, often seen after patients present an overall positive response to a SSRI. Using a dual 5-HT and NE reuptake inhibitor (SNRI, such as milnacipran, would result in an additional increase in NE activity. Futhermore, inhibiting NE reuptake increases DA availability in the frontal cortex since DA is mainly cleared by the NE transporters in several brain regions. A risk inherent in increased NE activity is that of provoking anxiety. This is avoided however by the attenuation of the phasic reactivity of the firing of NE neurons through prolonged administration of SSRI and SNRI.Keywords: norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, residual symptoms, norepinephrine paradox

  6. Tuning Selectivity of Fluorescent Carbon Nanotube-Based Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Florian A; Herrmann, Niklas; Meyer, Daniel; Kruss, Sebastian

    2017-06-28

    Detection of neurotransmitters is an analytical challenge and essential to understand neuronal networks in the brain and associated diseases. However, most methods do not provide sufficient spatial, temporal, or chemical resolution. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been used as building blocks for sensors/probes that detect catecholamine neurotransmitters, including dopamine. This approach provides a high spatial and temporal resolution, but it is not understood if these sensors are able to distinguish dopamine from similar catecholamine neurotransmitters, such as epinephrine or norepinephrine. In this work, the organic phase (DNA sequence) around SWCNTs was varied to create sensors with different selectivity and sensitivity for catecholamine neurotransmitters. Most DNA-functionalized SWCNTs responded to catecholamine neurotransmitters, but both dissociation constants ( K d ) and limits of detection were highly dependent on functionalization (sequence). K d values span a range of 2.3 nM (SWCNT-(GC) 15 + norepinephrine) to 9.4 μM (SWCNT-(AT) 15 + dopamine) and limits of detection are mostly in the single-digit nM regime. Additionally, sensors of different SWCNT chirality show different fluorescence increases. Moreover, certain sensors (e.g., SWCNT-(GT) 10 ) distinguish between different catecholamines, such as dopamine and norepinephrine at low concentrations (50 nM). These results show that SWCNTs functionalized with certain DNA sequences are able to discriminate between catecholamine neurotransmitters or to detect them in the presence of interfering substances of similar structure. Such sensors will be useful to measure and study neurotransmitter signaling in complex biological settings.

  7. Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Studies of Neurotransmitters and Their Metabolites in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Uutela, Päivi

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters transfer chemically the electrical impulse from one neuron to another in the brain. The concentration of neurotransmitters in many neurological disorders is altered. The measurement of neurotransmitters in the brain is needed to understand how these diseases develop and how they can be treated. Neurotransmitters can be extracted from the brains of freely moving, alert animals by microdialysis technique. The concentration of neurotransmitters and their metabolites in brain mi...

  8. Dietary Neurotransmitters: A Narrative Review on Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Briguglio

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Foods are natural sources of substances that may exert crucial effects on the nervous system in humans. Some of these substances are the neurotransmitters (NTs acetylcholine (ACh, the modified amino acids glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, and the biogenic amines dopamine, serotonin (5-HT, and histamine. In neuropsychiatry, progressive integration of dietary approaches in clinical routine made it necessary to discern the more about some of these dietary NTs. Relevant books and literature from PubMed and Scopus databases were searched for data on food sources of Ach, glutamate, GABA, dopamine, 5-HT, and histamine. Different animal foods, fruits, edible plants, roots, and botanicals were reported to contain NTs. These substances can either be naturally present, as part of essential metabolic processes and ecological interactions, or derive from controlled/uncontrolled food technology processes. Ripening time, methods of preservation and cooking, and microbial activity further contributes to NTs. Moreover, gut microbiota are considerable sources of NTs. However, the significance of dietary NTs intake needs to be further investigated as there are no significant data on their bioavailability, neuronal/non neuronal effects, or clinical implications. Evidence-based interventions studies should be encouraged.

  9. Ca(2+) influx and neurotransmitter release at ribbon synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soyoun; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels triggers the release of neurotransmitters at presynaptic terminals. Some sensory receptor cells in the peripheral auditory and visual systems have specialized synapses that express an electron-dense organelle called a synaptic ribbon. Like conventional synapses, ribbon synapses exhibit SNARE-mediated exocytosis, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and short-term plasticity. However, unlike non-ribbon synapses, voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channel opening at ribbon synapses triggers a form of multiquantal release that can be highly synchronous. Furthermore, ribbon synapses appear to be specialized for fast and high throughput exocytosis controlled by graded membrane potential changes. Here we will discuss some of the basic aspects of synaptic transmission at different types of ribbon synapses, and we will emphasize recent evidence that auditory and retinal ribbon synapses have marked differences. This will lead us to suggest that ribbon synapses are specialized for particular operating ranges and frequencies of stimulation. We propose that different types of ribbon synapses transfer diverse rates of sensory information by expressing a particular repertoire of critical components, and by placing them at precise and strategic locations, so that a continuous supply of primed vesicles and Ca(2+) influx leads to fast, accurate, and ongoing exocytosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. REM sleep at its core—Circuits, neurotransmitters and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePeever

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available REM sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla (VMM, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi as well as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum (PPT in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie cataplexy/narcolepsy and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD. This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD.

  11. Does chronic nicotine alter neurotransmitter receptors involved in Parkinson's disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.; Lapin, E.P.; Lajtha, A.; Maker, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Cigarette smokers are fewer in number among Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients than among groups of persons who do not have PD. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. One which must be tested is the possibility that some pharmacologic agent present in cigarette smoke may interact with some central nervous system component involved in PD. To this end, they have investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on receptors for some of the neurotransmitters that are affected in PD. Rats were injected for six weeks with saline or nicotine 0.8 mg/kg S.C., then killed and brains removed and dissected. The binding of ( 3 H)-ketanserin to serotonin receptors in frontal cortex and of ( 3 H)-domperidone to dopamine receptors in caudate was not affected. However, the binding of ( 3 H)-domperidone in nucleus accumbens was altered: the K/sub d/ increased from 0.16 +/- 0.02 nM to 0.61 +/- 0.07 nM, and the B/sub max/ increased from 507 +/- 47 fmol/mg protein to 910 +/- 43 fmol/mg (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). These values are based on three ligand concentrations. Additional studies are in progress to substantiate the data. It is concluded that chronic nicotine administration may alter dopamine receptors in nucleus accumbens

  12. Behavioral correlates of cerebrospinal fluid amino acid and biogenic amine neurotransmitter alterations in dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Van Hemelrijck, An; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H.; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P.

    Background: Behavioral and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are a heterogeneous group of behavioral and psychiatric disturbances occurring in dementia patients of any etiology. Research suggests that altered activities of dopaminergic, serotonergic, (nor)adrenergic, as well as

  13. The Met receptor tyrosine kinase prevents zebrafish primary motoneurons from expressing an incorrect neurotransmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisen Judith S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of correct neurotransmitters is crucial for normal nervous system function. How neurotransmitter expression is regulated is not well-understood; however, previous studies provide evidence that both environmental signals and intrinsic differentiation programs are involved. One environmental signal known to regulate neurotransmitter expression in vertebrate motoneurons is Hepatocyte growth factor, which acts through the Met receptor tyrosine kinase and also affects other aspects of motoneuron differentiation, including axonal extension. Here we test the role of Met in development of motoneurons in embryonic zebrafish. Results We found that met is expressed in all early developing, individually identified primary motoneurons and in at least some later developing secondary motoneurons. We used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Met function and found that Met has distinct roles in primary and secondary motoneurons. Most secondary motoneurons were absent from met morpholino-injected embryos, suggesting that Met is required for their formation. We used chemical inhibitors to test several downstream pathways activated by Met and found that secondary motoneuron development may depend on the p38 and/or Akt pathways. In contrast, primary motoneurons were present in met morpholino-injected embryos. However, a significant fraction of them had truncated axons. Surprisingly, some CaPs in met morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO-injected embryos developed a hybrid morphology in which they had both a peripheral axon innervating muscle and an interneuron-like axon within the spinal cord. In addition, in met MO-injected embryos primary motoneurons co-expressed mRNA encoding Choline acetyltransferase, the synthetic enzyme for their normal neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, and mRNA encoding Glutamate decarboxylase 1, the synthetic enzyme for GABA, a neurotransmitter never normally found in these motoneurons, but

  14. Analysis of Neurotransmitter Tissue Content of Drosophila melanogaster in Different Life Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for studying neurological diseases with similar neurotransmission to mammals. While both larva and adult Drosophila have central nervous systems, not much is known about how neurotransmitter tissue content changes through development. In this study, we quantified tyramine, serotonin, octopamine, and dopamine in larval, pupal, and adult fly brains using capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Tyramine and octopamine content varied between life stages, with almost no octopamine being present in the pupa, while tyramine levels in the pupa were very high. Adult females had significantly higher dopamine content than males, but no other neurotransmitters were dependent on sex in the adult. Understanding the tissue content of different life stages will be beneficial for future work comparing the effects of diseases on tissue content throughout development. PMID:25437353

  15. Probe-pin device for optical neurotransmitter sensing in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Hyuck; Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Park, Yeonjoon; Choi, Sang H.; Lee, Dae-Sung; Shin, Kyu-Sik; Hwang, Hak-In; Lee, Uhn

    2015-04-01

    Development of an optical neurotransmitter sensing device using nano-plasmonic probes and a micro-spectrometer for real time monitoring of neural signals in the brain is underway. Clinical application of this device technology is to provide autonomous closed-loop feedback control to a deep brain stimulation (DBS) system and enhance the accuracy and efficacy of DBS treatment. By far, we have developed an implantable probe-pin device based on localized field enhancement of surface plasmonic resonance on a nanostructured sensing domain which can amplify neurochemical signals from evoked neural activity in the brain. In this paper, we will introduce the details of design and sensing performance of a proto-typed microspectrometer and nanostructured probing devices for real time measurement of neurotransmitter concentrations.

  16. The Dynamics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Neurotoxic Compounds and Neurotransmitters Interact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Van de Bor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years concern has risen about the increasing prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. Accumulating evidence shows that exposure to neurotoxic compounds is related to ASD. Neurotransmitters might play a key role, as research has indicated a connection between neurotoxic compounds, neurotransmitters and ASD. In the current review a literature overview with respect to neurotoxic exposure and the effects on neurotransmitter systems is presented. The aim was to identify mechanisms and related factors which together might result in ASD. The literature reported in the current review supports the hypothesis that exposure to neurotoxic compounds can lead to alterations in the GABAergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic system which have been related to ASD in previous work. However, in several studies findings were reported that are not supportive of this hypothesis. Other factors also might be related, possibly altering the mechanisms at work, such as time and length of exposure as well as dose of the compound. Future research should focus on identifying the pathway through which these factors interact with exposure to neurotoxic compounds making use of human studies.

  17. NEUROTRANSMITTER ABNORMALITIES AND RESPONSE TO SUPPLEMENTATION IN SPG11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderver, Adeline; Tonduti, Davide; Auerbach, Sarah; Schmidt, Johanna L.; Parikh, Sumit; Gowans, Gordon C.; Jackson, Kelly E.; Brock, Pamela L.; Patterson, Marc; Nehrebecky, Michelle; Godfrey, Rena; Zein, Wadih M.; Gahl, William; Toro, Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the detection of secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in a group of SPG11 patients and describe treatment with L-dopa/carbidopa and sapropterin. Design Case reports Setting National Institutes of Health in the context of the Undiagnosed Disease Program; Children’s National Medical Center in the context of Myelin Disorders Bioregistry Program Patients Four SPG11 patients with a clinical picture of progressive spastic paraparesis complicated by extrapyramidal symptoms and maculopathy Interventions L-dopa/carbidopa and sapropterin Results 3/4 patients presented secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities; 4/4 partially responded to L-dopa as well as sapropterin Conclusions In the SPG11 patient with extrapyramidal symptoms, a trial of L-dopa/carbidopa and sapropterin and/or evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters should be considered. PMID:22749184

  18. Pharmacological approaches for Alzheimer's disease: neurotransmitter as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Atish; Kalra, Jaspreet; Mani, Vasudevan; Ramasamy, Kalavathy; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common CNS disorder occurring worldwide. There is neither proven effective prevention for AD nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop safer and more efficacious drugs to help combat the tremendous increase in disease progression. The present review is an attempt at discussing the treatment strategies and drugs under clinical trials governing the modulation of neurotransmitter. Therefore, looking at neurotransmitter abnormalities, there is an urge for developing the pharmacological approaches aimed at correcting those abnormalities and dysfunctioning. In addition, this review also discusses the drugs that are in Phase III trials for the treatment of AD. Despite advances in treatment strategies aimed at correcting neurotransmitter abnormalities, there exists a need for the development of drug therapies focusing on the attempts to remove the pathogenomic protein deposits, thus combating the disease progression.

  19. Palmitoylation as a Functional Regulator of Neurotransmitter Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir S. Naumenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of neuronal proteins involved in cellular signaling undergo different posttranslational modifications significantly affecting their functions. One of these modifications is a covalent attachment of a 16-C palmitic acid to one or more cysteine residues (S-palmitoylation within the target protein. Palmitoylation is a reversible modification, and repeated cycles of palmitoylation/depalmitoylation might be critically involved in the regulation of multiple signaling processes. Palmitoylation also represents a common posttranslational modification of the neurotransmitter receptors, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and ligand-gated ion channels (LICs. From the functional point of view, palmitoylation affects a wide span of neurotransmitter receptors activities including their trafficking, sorting, stability, residence lifetime at the cell surface, endocytosis, recycling, and synaptic clustering. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the palmitoylation of neurotransmitter receptors and its role in the regulation of receptors functions as well as in the control of different kinds of physiological and pathological behavior.

  20. Chapter 54: the discovery of neurotransmitters, and applications to neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourkes, Theodore L

    2010-01-01

    The theory of chemical transmission has proved to be a powerful tool in the analysis of many aspects of neurological function, and its implications loom large on the horizon of neurology and psychiatry. Neurotransmitters are released at neuronal endings, diffuse rapidly across the synaptic cleft, and then act upon receptor proteins embedded in the membrane of the post-synaptic neuron or gland. Drugs are evaluated for their ability to stimulate or to block specific receptors, and in that way modify activity of the postsynaptic organ in order to achieve some desirable therapeutic effect. This chapter is concerned with our knowledge of some of the principal neurotransmitters, namely the primary amines: dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin; the quaternary amine: acetylcholine; and the aminoacids: gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamic acid and glycine. The historical background to the discovery of these molecules as physiological neurotransmitters is presented, and their relation to various clinical states is discussed.

  1. [Effect of occupational stress on neurotransmitters in petroleum workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Lian, Yulong; Tao, Ning; Ge, Hua; Liu, Jiwen

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effects of occupational stress on neurotransmitters in petroleum workers. 178 petroleum workers with the length of service ≥ 1 year were recruited to the subjects by the questionnaire of OSI-R. The levels of 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and substance P (SP) in serum were measured. The subjects were classified into 3 groups according to the scores of occupational stress. The levels of 5-HT NE and SP for over 15 working years were higher than those of less than 15 years (P occupational stress degree groups, multiple comparison showed high. occupational stress group was higher than those of low occupational stress group. Multivariate correlation analysis showed that the occupational stress and sleep quality component scores correlated positively with the 5-HT, NE and SP (P Occupational stress in petroleum workers is correlated with serum monoamine and neuropeptides neurotransmitters, and it may affect serum levels of monoamine and neuropeptides neurotransmitters.

  2. Autoradiographic localization of drug and neurotransmitter receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhar, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    By combining and adapting various methodologies, it is possible to develop radiohistochemical methods for the light microscopic localization of drug and neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. These methods are valuable complements to other histochemical methods for mapping neurotransmitters; they provide a unique view of neuroanatomy and they can be used to provide valuable new hypotheses about how drugs produce various effects. Interesting 'hot spots' of receptor localizations have been observed in some sensory and limbic areas of the brain. Because most available methods are light microscopic, the development of ultrastructural methods will be a necessary and important extension of this field. (Auth.)

  3. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchon, M.; Kopp, N.; Rouzioux, J.J.; Lecestre, D.; Deluermoz, S.; Miachon, S.

    1987-12-14

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. /sup 3/H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  4. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchon, M.; Kopp, N.; Rouzioux, J.J.; Lecestre, D.; Deluermoz, S.; Miachon, S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. 3 H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  5. Spinal cord regeneration by modulating bone marrow with neurotransmitters and Citicholine: Analysis at micromolecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Cheramadathukudiyil Skaria; John, Ponnezhathu Sebastian; Chinthu, Romeo; Akhilraj, Puthenveetil Raju; Anju, Thoppil Raveendran

    2017-04-01

    Spinal cord injury results in disruption of brain-spinal cord fibre connectivity, leading to progressive tissue damage at the site of injury and resultant paralysis of varying degrees. The current study investigated the role of autologous bone marrow modulated with neurotransmitters and neurotransmitter stimulating agent, Citicholine, in spinal cord of spinal cord injured rats. Radioreceptor assay using [3H] ligand was carried out to quantify muscarinic receptor. Gene expression studies were done using Real Time PCR analysis. Scatchard analysis of muscarinic M1 receptor showed significantly decreased B max (p neurotransmitters combination along with bone marrow or Citicholine with bone marrow can reverse the muscarinic receptor alterations in the spinal cord of spinal cord injured rats, which is a promising step towards a better therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury because of the positive role of cholinergic system in regulation of both locomotor activity and synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sympathetic Neurotransmitters Modulate Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity in the Context of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschter, Dominique; Schäfer, Nicole; Stangl, Hubert; Straub, Rainer H.; Grässel, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Excessive synovial osteoclastogenesis is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concomitantly, local synovial changes comprise neuronal components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Here, we wanted to analyze if collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) alters bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, and how sympathetic neurotransmitters participate in this process. Therefore, BMMs from Dark Agouti rats at different CIA stages were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro and osteoclast number, cathepsin K activity, matrix resorption and apoptosis were analyzed in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), noradrenaline (NA) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and assay-dependent, adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477. We observed modulation of neurotransmitter receptor mRNA expression in CIA osteoclasts without affecting protein level. CIA stage-dependently altered marker gene expression associated with osteoclast differentiation and activity without affecting osteoclast number or activity. Neurotransmitter stimulation modulated osteoclast differentiation, apoptosis and activity. VIP, NA and adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477 inhibited cathepsin K activity and osteoclastogenesis (NKH477, 10-6M NA) whereas ACh mostly acted pro-osteoclastogenic. We conclude that CIA alone does not affect metabolism of in vitro generated osteoclasts whereas stimulation with NA, VIP plus specific activation of adenylyl cyclase induced anti-resorptive effects probably mediated via cAMP signaling. Contrary, we suggest pro-osteoclastogenic and pro-resorptive properties of ACh mediated via muscarinic receptors. PMID:26431344

  7. Compartmental modeling alternatives for kinetic analysis of pet neurotransmitter receptor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppe, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    With the increased interest in studying neurotransmitter and receptor function in vivo, imaging procedures using positron emission tomography have presented new challenges for kinetic modeling and analysis of data. The in vivo behavior of radiolabeled markers for examining these neurotransmitter systems can be quite complex and, therefore, the implementation of compartmental models for data analysis is similarly complex. Often, the variability in the estimates of model parameters representing neurotransmitter or receptor densities, association and dissociation rates, or rates of incorporation or turnover does not permit reliable interpretation of the data. When less complex analyses are used, these model parameters may be biased and thus also do not yield the information being sought. Examination of trade-offs between uncertainty and bias in the parameters of interest may be used to select a compartmental model configuration with an appropriate level of complexity. Modeling alternatives will be discussed for radioligands with varying kinetic properties, such as those that bind reversibly and rapidly and others that bind nearly irreversibly. Specific problems, such as those occurring when a radioligand is open-quotes flow limitedclose quotes also will be discussed

  8. Simultaneous analysis of multiple neurotransmitters by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufi, Sara; Lamoree, Marja; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim

    2015-05-22

    Neurotransmitters are endogenous metabolites that allow the signal transmission across neuronal synapses. Their biological role is crucial for many physiological functions and their levels can be changed by several diseases. Because of their high polarity, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is a promising tool for neurotransmitter analysis. Due to the large number of HILIC stationary phases available, an evaluation of the column performances and retention behaviors has been performed on five different commercial HILIC packing materials (silica, amino, amide and two zwitterionic stationary phases). Several parameters like the linear correlation between retention and the distribution coefficient (logD), the separation factor k and the column resolution Rs have been investigated and the column performances have been visualized with a heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis. An optimized and validated HILIC-MS/MS method based on the ZIC-cHILIC column is proposed for the simultaneous detection and quantification of twenty compounds consisting of neurotransmitters, precursors and metabolites: 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), 5-hydroxy-L-tripthophan, acetylcholine, choline, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine, epinephrine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, glutamine, histamine, histidine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, norepinephrine, normetanephrine, phenylalanine, serotonin and tyramine. The method was applied to neuronal metabolite profiling of the central nervous system of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. This method is suitable to explore neuronal metabolism and its alteration in different biological matrices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sex and intrauterine growth restriction modify brain neurotransmitters profile of newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Gómez, M; Valent, D; García-Contreras, C; Arroyo, L; Óvilo, C; Isabel, B; Bassols, A; González-Bulnes, A

    2016-12-01

    The current study aimed to determine, using a swine model of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), whether short- and long-term neurological deficiencies and interactive dysfunctions of Low Birth-Weight (LBW) offspring might be related to altered pattern of neurotransmitters. Hence, we compared the quantities of different neurotransmitters (catecholamines and indoleamines), which were determined by HPLC, at brain structures related to the limbic system (hippocampus and amygdala) in 14 LBW and 10 Normal Body-Weight (NBW) newborn piglets. The results showed, firstly, significant effects of sex on the NBW newborns, with females having higher dopamine (DA) concentrations than males. The IUGR processes affected DA metabolism, with LBW piglets having lower concentrations of noradrenaline at the hippocampus and higher concentrations of the DA metabolites, homovanillic acid (HVA), at both the hippocampus and the amygdala than NBW neonates. The effects of IUGR were modulated by sex; there were no significant differences between LBW and NBW females, but LBW males had higher HVA concentration at the amygdala and higher concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, the serotonin metabolite, at the hippocampus than NBW males. In conclusion, the present study shows that IUGR is mainly related to changes, modulated by sex, in the concentrations of catecholamine neurotransmitters, which are related to adaptation to physical activity and to essential cognitive functions such as learning, memory, reward-motivated behavior and stress. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. GABA not only a neurotransmitter: osmotic regulation by GABAAR signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana eCesetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons the anionic channel γ-aminobutyric (GABA A receptor (GABAAR plays a central role in mediating both the neurotrophic and neurotransmitter role of GABA. Activation of this receptor by GABA also affects the function of non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (CNS, as GABAARs are expressed in mature macroglia and in almost all progenitor types, including neural stem cells. The relevance of GABA signalling in non-neuronal cells has been comparatively less investigated than in neurons. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these cells are direct targets of GABA regulation. In non-neuronal cells GABAAR activation leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl- depending on the electrochemical gradient. Ion transport is indissolubly associated to water fluxes across the plasma membrane and plays a key role in brain physiology. Therefore, GABAAR could affect osmotic tension in the brain by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signalling could affect the movement of water also by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. This regulation has consequences at the cellular level as it modulates cell volume and activates multiple intracellular signalling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation and survival. It may also have consequences at the systemic level. For example, it may indirectly control neuronal excitability, by regulating the extracellular space and interstitial concentration of Cl-, and contribute to brain water homeostasis. Therefore, GABAergic osmotic regulation should be taken into account during the treatment of pathologies requiring the administration of GABAAR modulators and for the development of therapies for diseases causing water unbalance in the brain.

  11. Noradrenergic Activation of Hypoglossal Nucleus Modulates the Central Regulation of Genioglossus in Chronic Intermittent Hypoxic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular compensation of the genioglossus muscle can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH in obstructive sleep apnea to maintain upper airway stability. Noradrenergic activation of hypoglossal nucleus plays a critical role in the central control of the genioglossus. However, it remains unknown whether norepinephrine takes part in the central regulation of the genioglossus during CIH. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 32 were studied to explore the influence of noradrenergic activation of hypoglossal nucleus on the central control of the genioglossus at different stages of CIH. The rats were divided into four groups: normal control or normoxic (NO group, CIH group, CIH + normal saline (NS group, and CIH + prazosin (PZ, α1-adrenergic antagonist group. PZ (0.2 mM, 60 nl and NS (0.9%, 60 nl were microinjected into the hypoglossal nucleus. The responses of the genioglossus corticomotor area to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS were recorded on the 1st, 7th, 14th, and 21st day of CIH. The CIH group showed significantly shorter TMS latencies on days 1, 7, and 14 (3.85 ± 0.37 vs. 4.58 ± 0.42, 3.93 ± 0.17 vs. 4.49 ± 0.55, 3.79 ± 0.38 vs. 4.39 ± 0.30 ms, P < 0.05, and higher TMS amplitudes on day 1 (2.74 ± 0.87 vs. 1.60 ± 0.52 mV, P < 0.05 of CIH than the NO group. Compared to the CIH + NS group, the CIH + PZ group showed decreased TMS responses (longer latencies and lower amplitudes only on the 14th day of CIH (3.99 ± 0.28 vs. 4.61 ± 0.48 ms, 2.51 ± 0.67 vs. 1.18 ± 0.62 mV, P < 0.05. These results indicated that noradrenergic activation of the hypoglossal nucleus played a role in the central compensation of genioglossus through α1-adrenoceptor on the 14th day of CIH.

  12. Ilex paraguariensis Promotes Orofacial Pain Relief After Formalin Injection: Involvement of Noradrenergic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Eudislaine Fonseca; de Oliveira, Simone Kobe; Nardi, Viviane Koepp; Gelinski, Tathiana Carla; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Maraschin, Marcelo; Nardi, Geisson Marcos

    2016-03-01

    Drinking mate or chimarrão, a hot infusion of Ilex paraguariensis (ILEX) leaves, is a common habit in Southern South America that has a social and almost ritualistic role. It has been used as a stimulant beverage in South America and analgesic in regions of Argentina for treatment of headache and others painful inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and rheumatism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological activity of I. paraguariensis infusion (ILEX) on orofacial nociception model induced by formalin, and study its mechanism of action. The analgesic effect of ILEX was assessed through writhing test, paw formalin test, paw edema induced by carrageenan, and orofacial pain induced by formalin. To study the action mechanism of ILEX, opioidergic, dopaminergic, nitrergic, and adrenergic pathways were investigated. The high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of ILEX infusion revealed caffeine and theobromine. The treatment with ILEX reduced the number of writhing. However, it was effective neither in the formalin paw test nor in the paw edema induced by carrageenan. Different from formalin paw test, ILEX was able to reduce the orofacial reactivity to formalin in 31.8% (70.4 ± 2.5 s; first phase), and 20% (127.3 ± 18.9 s; second phase). The analgesic effect of ILEX results from the modulation of noradrenergic pathways since prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, 0.15 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) reversed the analgesic effect of ILEX. The present report demonstrates that analgesic effect of ILEX in orofacial formalin test is due mainly to modulation of noradrenergic pathways. Ilex paraguariensis (ILEX) has been used as a stimulant beverage in South America and analgesic in regions of Argentina for the treatment of headache and others painful inflammatory conditions such arthritis and rheumatism.The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological activity of ILEX on orofacial nociception model induced by formalin, and study its mechanism of

  13. An Investigation into the Effects of Peptide Neurotransmitters and Intracellular Second Messengers in Rat Central Neurons in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-04

    Purkinje neurons. 3. Neuromodulation of synaptic efficacy in an invertebrate preparation that may be a useful model system for the actions of histamine in...neurotransmitters, neuromodulators , affect brain function. Nerve cells are the functional units of the brain, and changes in neuronal activity are ultimately

  14. A Critical Assessment of Research on Neurotransmitters in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this mini-forum, “Neurotransmitters and Alzheimer’s Disease”, is to critically assess the current status of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer’s disease. Neurotransmitters are essential neurochemicals that maintain synaptic and cognitive functions in mammals, including humans, by sending signals across pre- to post-synaptic neurons. Authorities in the fields of synapses and neurotransmitters of Alzheimer’s disease summarize the current status of basic biology of synapses and neurotransmitters, and also update the current status of clinical trials of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer’s disease. This article discusses the prevalence, economic impact, and stages of Alzheimer’s dementia in humans. PMID:28409748

  15. The Top 5 Neurotransmitters from a Clinical Neurologist's Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    that we routinely prescribe. Most of us can hardly come up with more than a handful of relevant neurochemicals. From our point of view the most important neurotransmitters are, in alphabetical order, acetylcholine (associated with Alzheimer's disease and myasthenia gravis), dopamine (Parkinson's disease...

  16. Article Neurotransmitters – A biochemical view | Shalayel | Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The neurotransmission at most if not all synapses is chemical and is of great biochemical, physiological and pharmacological importance. Neurons communicate with each other at synapses by a process called synaptic transmission in which the release of small quantities of chemical messengers, called neurotransmitters ...

  17. Impact of aspartame consumption on neurotransmitters in rat brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Aspartame (APM), a common artificial sweetener, has been used for diabetic subjects and body weight control for a long time. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the impact of APM consumption on neurotransmitters and oxidative stress in rat's brain. Materials and Methods: Four groups of male ...

  18. Glucagon-related peptide 1 (GLP-1): hormone and neurotransmitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Philip J; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    normal and pathophysiological role of GLP-1 have been published over the last two decades and our understanding of GLP-1 action has widened considerably. In the present review, we have tried to cover our current understanding of GLP-1 actions both as a peripheral hormone and as a central neurotransmitter...

  19. Regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc eDo-Rego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out to visualize the neurotransmitter- or neuropeptide-containing fibers contacting steroid-synthesizing neurons as well as the neurotransmitter, peptide hormones or neuropeptide receptors expressed in these neurons. Biochemical experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones or neuropeptides on neurosteroid biosynthesis, and to characterize the type of receptors involved. Thus, it has been found that glutamate, acting through kainate and/or AMPA receptors, rapidly inactivates P450arom, and that melatonin produced by the pineal gland and eye inhibits the biosynthesis of 7-hydroxypregnenolone (7-OH-5P, while prolactin produced by the adenohypophysis enhances the formation of 7-OH-5P. It has also been demonstrated that the biosynthesis of neurosteroids is inhibited by GABA, acting through GABAA receptors, and neuropeptide Y, acting through Y1 receptors. In contrast, it has been shown that the octadecaneuropetide ODN, acting through central-type benzodiazepine receptors, the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, acting though peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, and vasotocine, acting through V1a-like receptors, stimulate the production of neurosteroids. Since neurosteroids are implicated in the control of various neurophysiological and behavioral processes, these data suggest that some of the neurophysiological effects exerted by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides may be mediated via the regulation

  20. Inferior frontal gyrus preserves working memory and emotional learning under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eBecker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Compensation has been widely applied to explain neuroimaging findings in neuropsychiatric patients. Functional compensation is often invoked when patients display equal performance and increased neural activity in comparison to healthy controls. According to the compensatory hypothesis increased activity allows the brain to maintain cognitive performance despite underlying neuropathological changes. Due to methodological and pathology-related issues, however, the functional relevance of the increased activity and the specific brain regions involved in the compensatory response remain unclear. An experimental approach that allows a transient induction of compensatory responses in the healthy brain could help to overcome these issues. To this end we used the nonselective beta-blocker propranolol to pharmacologically induce sub-optimal noradrenergic signaling in healthy participants. In two independent fMRI experiments participants received either placebo or propranolol before they underwent a cognitive challenge (experiment 1: working memory; experiment 2: emotional learning: Pavlovian fear conditioning. In experiment 1 propranolol had no effects on working memory performance, but evoked stronger activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG. In experiment 2 propranolol produced no effects on emotional memory formation, but evoked stronger activity in the right IFG. The present finding that sub-optimal beta-adrenergic signaling did not disrupt performance and concomitantly increased IFG activity is consistent with, and extends, current perspectives on functional compensation. Together, our findings suggest that under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling, heightened activity in brain regions located within the cognitive control network, particularly the IFG, may reflect compensatory operations subserving the maintenance of behavioral performance.

  1. Acquisition and extinction of continuously and partially reinforced running in rats with lesions of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S; Boarder, M R; Gray, J A; Fillenz, M

    1982-05-01

    Local injection of 6-hydroxydopamine was used to selectively destroy the dorsal ascending noradrenergic bundle (DB) in rats. Two lesion procedures were used, differing in the extent of depletion of forebrain noradrenaline they produced (greater than 90% or 77%). In Experiments 1-3 the rats were run in a straight alley for food reward on continuous (CR) or partial (PR) reinforcement schedules. The smaller lesion reduced and the larger lesion eliminated the partial reinforcement acquisition effect (i.e. the faster start and run speeds produced by PR during training) and the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE, i.e. the greater resistance to extinction produced by PR training); these changes were due to altered performance only in the PR condition. Abolition of the PREE by the larger DB lesion occurred with 50 acquisition trials, but with 100 trials the lesion had no effect. In Experiment 4 rats were run in a double runway with food reward on CR in the second goal box, and on CR, PR or without reinforcement in the first. The larger lesion again eliminated the PREE in the first runway, but did not block the frustration effect in the second runway (i.e. the faster speeds observed in the PR condition after non-reward than after reward in the first goal box). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that DB lesions alter behavioural responses to signals of non-reward, but not to non-reward itself. They cannot be predicted from two other hypotheses: that the DB mediates responses to reward or that it subserves selective attention. Since septal and hippocampal, but not amygdalar, lesions have been reported to produced similar behavioural changes, it is proposed that the critical DB projection for the effects observed in these experiments is to the septo-hippocampal system.

  2. Bepaling van enkele neurotransmitters, monoaminen, en metabolieten, met behulp van Continuous Flowapparatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigeman L; Schonewille F; Borst M; van der Laan JW

    1986-01-01

    Bij het onderzoek in de psychofarmacologie kan kennis van de effecten van stoffen op de omzettingssnelheid van neurotransmitters een belangrijk aspect zijn. Met de huidige psychofarmaca lijken vooral de klassieke neurotransmitters zoals de monoaminen, noradrenaline, dopamine en serotonine van

  3. Historical review: ATP as a neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2006-03-01

    Purinergic signalling is now recognized to be involved in a wide range of activities of the nervous system, including neuroprotection, central control of autonomic functions, neural-glial interactions, control of vessel tone and angiogenesis, pain and mechanosensory transduction and the physiology of the special senses. In this article, I give a personal retrospective of the discovery of purinergic neurotransmission in the early 1970s, the struggle for its acceptance for approximately 20 years, the expansion into purinergic cotransmission and its eventual acceptance when receptor subtypes for ATP were cloned and characterized and when purinergic synaptic transmission between neurons in the brain and peripheral ganglia was described in the early 1990s. I also discuss the current status of the field, including recent interest in the pathophysiology of purinergic signalling and its therapeutic potential.

  4. A novel liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method for determination of neurotransmitters in brain tissue: Application to human tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgacsova, Andrea; Galba, Jaroslav; Garruto, Ralph M; Majerova, Petra; Katina, Stanislav; Kovac, Andrej

    2018-01-15

    Neurotransmitters, small molecules widely distributed in the central nervous system are essential in transmitting electrical signals across neurons via chemical communication. Dysregulation of these chemical signaling molecules is linked to numerous neurological diseases including tauopathies. In this study, a precise and reliable liquid chromatography method was established with tandem mass spectrometry detection for the simultaneous determination of aspartic acid, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, N-acetyl-l-aspartic acid, pyroglutamic acid, acetylcholine and choline in human brain tissue. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of human brain tissues from three different tauopathies; corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy and parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam. Neurotransmitters were analyzed on ultra-high performance chromatography (UHPLC) using an ethylene bridged hybrid amide column coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Identification and quantification of neurotransmitters was carried out by ESI+ mass spectrometry detection. We optimized sample preparation to achieve simple and fast extraction of all nine analytes. Our method exhibited an excellent linearity for all analytes (all coefficients of determination >0.99), with inter-day and intra-day precision yielding relative standard deviations 3.2%-11.2% and an accuracy was in range of 92.6%-104.3%. The present study, using the above method, is the first to demonstrate significant alterations of brain neurotransmitters caused by pathological processes in the brain tissues of patient with three different tauopathies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-assembly of SiO2 nanoparticles for the potentiometric detection of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and its inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Izabela G; Guimarães, Francisco E G; Ramos, Romildo J; Vieira, Nirton C S

    2014-09-01

    The detection and quantification of neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) are relevant because modifications in the ACh levels constitute a threat to human health. The biological regulator of this neurotransmitter is acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ACh to choline and acetic acid. However, its activity is inhibited in the presence of organophosphate and carbamate pesticides, compromising the degradation of the neurotransmitter. There has been a growing interest in faster and more sensitive detection systems that include new methods and materials for the determination of the ACh concentration. This paper proposes a potentiometric biosensor for the detection of neurotransmitter ACh and its inhibitors, specifically organophosphate pesticide methamidophos. The biosensor is based on a self-assembled platform formed by poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) and silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2-Np) that contains the immobilized enzyme AChE. First, the responses of the biosensor were investigated for different concentrations of ACh in buffer solutions. After quantifying ACh, the inhibition of AChE in the presence of methamidophos was determined, enabling the quantification of methamidophos expressed as the percentage of enzyme inhibition. The potential advantages of this biosensor include simplicity in building the electrode, possible production on an industrial scale, limited need for qualified personnel to operate the device and low processing cost.

  6. Evidence for cysteine sulfinate as a neurotransmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recasens, M.; Varga, V.; Nanopoulos, D.; Saadoun, F.; Vincendon, G.; Benavides, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Na + -independent binding of L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate and L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate uptake were investigated in rat brain membranes and vesicles. Specific binding of L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate was saturable and occurred by a single high affinity process with a Ksub(b) of 100 nM +- 9 and a capacity (Bsub(max)) of 2.4 +- 0.22 pmol/mg protein. The regional distribution of the binding of L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate in the brain was found to be heterogeneous. The rate of L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate uptake shows a biphasic dependence on the concentration of L-cysteine sulfinate, corresponding to a high affinity (27.2 μM) and a low affinity (398 μM) transport system. The maximum L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate uptake is reached at 2min and the uptake increases as a function of the sodium concentration. Chloride and potassium ions stimulate the uptake. (Auth.)

  7. Spectroscopic Analysis of Neurotransmitters: A Theoretical and Experimental Raman Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Matthew

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was applied to investigate the feasibility in the detection and monitoring of the dopamine (DA) neurotransmitter adsorbed onto silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) at 10-11 molar, a concentration far below physiological levels. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were obtained with the Gaussian-09 analytical suite software to generate the theoretical molecular configuration of DA in its neutral, cationic, anionic, and dopaminequinone states for the conversion of computer-simulated Raman spectra. Comparison of theoretical and experimental results show good agreement and imply the presence of dopamine in all of its molecular forms in the experimental setting. The dominant dopamine Raman bands at 750 cm-1 and 795 cm-1 suggest the adsorption of dopaminequinone onto the silver nanoparticle surface. The results of this experiment give good insight into the applicability of using Raman spectroscopy for the biodetection of neurotransmitters.

  8. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  9. The building of the neocortex with non-hyperpolarizing neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Matteo; Bony, Guillaume

    2017-09-01

    The development of the neocortex requires the synergic action of several secreted molecules to achieve the right amount of proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural cells. Neurons are well known to release neurotransmitters (NTs) in adult and a growing body of evidences describes the presence of NTs already in the embryonic brain, long before the generation of synapses. NTs are classified as inhibitory or excitatory based on the physiological responses of the target neuron. However, this view is challenged by the fact that glycine and GABA NTs are excitatory during development. Many reviews have described the role of nonhyperpolarizing GABA at this stage. Nevertheless, a global consideration of the inhibitory neurotransmitters and their downstream signaling during the embryonic cortical development is still needed. For example, taurine, the most abundant neurotransmitter during development is poorly studied regarding its role during cortical development. In the light of recent discoveries, we will discuss the functions of glycine, GABA, and taurine during embryonic cortical development with an emphasis on their downstream signaling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 1023-1037, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Neurotransmitter synthesis from CNS glutamine for central control of breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoop, B.; Systrom, D.; Chiang, C.H.; Shih, V.E.; Kazemi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The maximum rate at which CNS glutamine (GLN) derived from glutamate (GLU) can be sequestered for synthesis of neurotransmitter GLU and/or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been determined in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. A total of 57 animals were studied under normal, hypoxic (Pa/sub O2/ greater than or equal to 20 mmHg), or hypercapnic (Pa/sub CO2/ less than or equal to 71 mm Hg) conditions. Thirteen of these were bilaterally vagotomized and carotid body denervated and studied only under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. In 5 animals cerebrospinal fluid GLN transfer rate constant k was measured using 13 N-ammonia tracer. Measured cerebral cortical (CC) and medullary (MED) GLN concentrations c are found to vary with GLU metabolic rate r according to c-C/sub m/r/(r+R), where r, the product of k and corresponding tissue GLU concentration, is assumed equal to the maximum GLN metabolic rate via pathways other than for neurotransmitter synthesis. The constants C/sub m/ and R are the predicted maximum GLN concentration and its maximum rate of sequestration for neurotransmitter synthesis, respectively. For both CNS tissue types in all animals, C/sub m/ = 20.9 +- 7.4 (SD) mmoles/kg wet wt(mM) and R = 6.2 +- 2.3 mM/min. These values are consistent with results obtained in anesthetized rats

  11. Exploration of inclusion complexes of neurotransmitters with β-cyclodextrin by physicochemical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Saha, Subhadeep; Kundu, Mitali; Saha, Binoy Chandra; Barman, Siti

    2016-07-01

    Molecular assemblies of β-cyclodextrin with few of the most important neurotransmitters, viz., dopamine hydrochloride, tyramine hydrochloride and (±)-epinephrine hydrochloride in aqueous medium have been explored by reliable spectroscopic and physicochemical techniques as potential drug delivery systems. Job plots confirm the 1:1 host-guest inclusion complexes, while surface tension and conductivity studies illustrate the inclusion process. The inclusion complexes were characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and association constants have been calculated by using Benesi-Hildebrand method. Thermodynamic parameters for the formation of inclusion complexes have been derived by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrate that the overall inclusion processes are thermodynamically favorable.

  12. How LeuT shapes our understanding of the mechanisms of sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are ion-coupled symporters that drive the uptake of neurotransmitters from neural synapses. In the past decade, the structure of a bacterial amino acid transporter, leucine transporter (LeuT), has given valuable insights into the understanding of architecture and mechanism of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters. Different conformations of LeuT, including a substrate-free state, inward-open state, and competitive and non-competitive inhibitor-bound states, have revealed a mechanistic framework for the transport and transport inhibition of neurotransmitters. The current review integrates our understanding of the mechanistic and pharmacological properties of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters obtained through structural snapshots of LeuT.

  13. Paraquat and maneb co-exposure induces noradrenergic locus coeruleus neurodegeneration through NADPH oxidase-mediated microglial activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Liyan; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Ke; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Hongwei; Che, Yuning; Sun, Fuqiang; Zhou, Xueying; Zhao, Xiulan; Wang, Qingshan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Microglial activation induced by paraquat and maneb precedes noradrenergic neurodegeneration in locus coeruleus. • NADPH oxidase activation contributes to microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and related noradrenergic neurodegeneration. • Inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin protects noradrenergic neurons against paraquat and maneb-induced toxicity. - Abstract: Co-exposure to paraquat (PQ) and maneb (Mb) has been shown to increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dopaminergic (DA) neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) is observed in PQ and Mb-treated experimental animals. The loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC/NE) neurons in brainstem is a common feature shared by multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. However, whether PQ and Mb is able to damage LC/NE neurons remains undefined. In this study, mice treated with combined PQ and Mb displayed progressive LC/NE neurodegeneration. Time course studies revealed that the activation of microglia preceded LC/NE neurodegeneration. Mechanistically, the activation of NADPH oxidase contributed to microglial activation and subsequent LC/NE neurodegeneration. We found that PQ and Mb co-exposure induced activation of NADPH oxidase as shown by increased superoxide production and membrane translocation of p47 phox , a cytosolic subunit of NADPH oxidase. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin, a widely used NADPH oxidase inhibitor, suppressed microglial activation and gene expressions of proinflammatory factors. Furthermore, reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway was observed in apocynin-treated mice. More importantly, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin afforded LC/NE neuroprotection against PQ and Mb-induced neurotoxicity. Thus, our findings revealed the critical role NADPH oxidase-mediated microglial activation in driving LC/NE neurodegeneration induced by PQ and Mb, providing new insights into the pathogenesis of environmental

  14. Short-term serotonergic but not noradrenergic antidepressant administration reduces attentional vigilance to threat in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Susannah E; Yiend, Jenny; Lester, Kathryn J; Cowen, Philip J; Harmer, Catherine J

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety is associated with threat-related biases in information processing such as heightened attentional vigilance to potential threat. Such biases are an important focus of psychological treatments for anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are effective in the treatment of a range of anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an SSRI on the processing of threat in healthy volunteers. A selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), ...

  15. High dose sapropterin dihydrochloride therapy improves monoamine neurotransmitter turnover in murine phenylketonuria (PKU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Shelley R; Scherer, Tanja; Thöny, Beat; Harding, Cary O

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) deficiencies of the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in phenylketonuria (PKU). Increased brain phenylalanine concentration likely competitively inhibits the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate limiting steps in dopamine and serotonin synthesis respectively. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for TH and TPH activity. Our hypothesis was that treatment of hyperphenylalaninemic Pah(enu2/enu2) mice, a model of human PKU, with sapropterin dihydrochloride, a synthetic form of BH4, would stimulate TH and TPH activities leading to improved dopamine and serotonin synthesis despite persistently elevated brain phenylalanine. Sapropterin (20, 40, or 100mg/kg body weight in 1% ascorbic acid) was administered daily for 4 days by oral gavage to Pah(enu2/enu2) mice followed by measurement of brain biopterin, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and monoamine neurotransmitter content. A significant increase in brain biopterin content was detected only in mice that had received the highest sapropterin dose, 100mg/kg. Blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations were unchanged by sapropterin therapy. Sapropterin therapy also did not alter the absolute amounts of dopamine and serotonin in brain but was associated with increased homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine and serotonin metabolites respectively, in both wild type and Pah(enu2/enu2) mice. Oral sapropterin therapy likely does not directly affect central nervous system monoamine synthesis in either wild type or hyperphenylalaninemic mice but may stimulate synaptic neurotransmitter release and subsequent metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A1 noradrenergic neurons lesions reduce natriuresis and hypertensive responses to hypernatremia in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Fernanda da Silva

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic neurons in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM; A1 group contribute to cardiovascular regulation. The present study assessed whether specific lesions in the A1 group altered the cardiovascular responses that were evoked by hypertonic saline (HS infusion in non-anesthetized rats. Male Wistar rats (280-340 g received nanoinjections of antidopamine-β-hydroxylase-saporin (A1 lesion, 0.105 ng.nL(-1 or free saporin (sham, 0.021 ng.nL(-1 into their CVLMs. Two weeks later, the rats were anesthetized (2% halothane in O2 and their femoral artery and vein were catheterized and led to exit subcutaneously between the scapulae. On the following day, the animals were submitted to HS infusion (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml • kg(-1, b.wt., for longer than 1 min. In the sham-group (n = 8, HS induced a sustained pressor response (ΔMAP: 35±3.6 and 11±1.8 mmHg, for 10 and 90 min after HS infusion, respectively; P<0.05 vs. baseline. Ten min after HS infusion, the pressor responses of the anti-DβH-saporin-treated rats (n = 11were significantly smaller(ΔMAP: 18±1.4 mmHg; P<0.05 vs. baseline and vs. sham group, and at 90 min, their blood pressures reached baseline values (2±1.6 mmHg. Compared to the sham group, the natriuresis that was induced by HS was reduced in the lesioned group 60 min after the challenge (196±5.5 mM vs. 262±7.6 mM, respectively; P<0.05. In addition, A1-lesioned rats excreted only 47% of their sodium 90 min after HS infusion, while sham animals excreted 80% of their sodium. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed a substantial destruction of the A1 cell group in the CVLM of rats that had been nanoinjected withanti-DβH-saporin. These results suggest that medullary noradrenergic A1 neurons are involved in the excitatory neural pathway that regulates hypertensive and natriuretic responses to acute changes in the composition of body fluid.

  17. Affective spectrum disorders and role of serotonergic system of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timotijević Ivana P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective spectrum disorders include mood and anxiety disorders, whereas the term functional somatic syndromes describes disorders in which the main symptom is chronic pain, with no pathognomonic tissue damage, such as fibromyalgia, irritable colon, tension headache. Pain as a symptom is often present in patients with depression and anxiety, and similarly, depressed mood, anxiety and other psychiatric symptoms are common in patients with functional somatic syndromes. This explains attitudes that affective disorders and functional somatic syndromes should be found along the same spectrum, due to a similar neurobiochemicalmehanism and dysfunction of these CNS structures and neurotransmitter systems, which lead to similar symptoms in both groups. The symptoms of affective disorders, including somatic are associated with serotonin and serotonergic transmission in the CNS. The existence of depressive and anxiety disorders, such as fatigue, sleep disorders, cognitive disorders, depressed mood, anxiety, and functional somatic syndromes code indicate a similar mechanism of origin. Hypothesis of central neuropathic pain explains the possibility of the descending inhibitory pain mechanisms, including serotonergic and noradrenergic projections and their receptors. Central suprasegmental senzitization in nociceptive pathways, also at the level of the thalamus and the sensory cortex, trigered by an emotional stressors can cause painful symptoms in both groups of disorders. Serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways and voltage sensitive channels of their receptors are included in the mechanism. Modern psychopharmacology can no longer ignore the existence of painful symptoms in affective disorder or depressive and anxiety symptoms in functional somatic syndromes and their treatment can improve. Therapeutic effects of SSRI and SNRI antidepressants and alpha 2 delta ligands for all kinds of painful symptoms in affective disorders - serotonergic spectrum is

  18. Neuromodulatory neurotransmitters influence LTP-like plasticity in human cortex: a pharmaco-TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchounov, Alexei; Ziemann, Ulf

    2011-08-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic efficacy is considered a fundamental mechanism of learning and memory. At the cellular level a large body of evidence demonstrated that the major neuromodulatory neurotransmitters dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and acetylcholine (ACh) influence LTP magnitude. Noninvasive brain stimulation protocols provide the opportunity to study LTP-like plasticity at the systems level of human cortex. Here we applied paired associative stimulation (PAS) to induce LTP-like plasticity in the primary motor cortex of eight healthy subjects. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design, the acute effects of a single oral dose of the neuromodulatory drugs cabergoline (DA agonist), haloperidol (DA antagonist), methylphenidate (indirect NE agonist), prazosine (NE antagonist), tacrine (ACh agonist), and biperiden (ACh antagonist) on PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity were examined. The antagonists haloperidol, prazosine, and biperiden depressed significantly the PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity observed under placebo, whereas the agonists cabergoline, methylphenidate, and tacrine had no effect. Findings demonstrate that antagonists in major neuromodulatory neurotransmitter systems suppress LTP-like plasticity at the systems level of human cortex, in accord with evidence of their modulating action of LTP at the cellular level. This provides further supportive evidence for the known detrimental effects of these drugs on LTP-dependent mechanisms such as learning and memory.

  19. Neurotransmitter implications in descending motility of longitudinal and circular muscles in rat colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zornitsa V. Gorcheva

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The role of neurotransmitter systems in the motor activity of longitudinal or circular muscles in autonomic regulation of the motility of the colon by the nervous system is unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the neurotransmitter implications in descending motility of longitudinal and circular muscles in rat colon. Methods. Electrically-induced (2, 5 or 10 Hz, 0.8 ms, 40 V, 20 s local or descending motor responses of longitudinal and circular muscles in isolated preparations and drugs were used to define the neurotransmitters’ role in colonic motility. Results. The spontaneous activity of the distal part of preparations manifested as high-amplitude irregular contractions more expressed in the longitudinal muscles. The electrically-induced local responses differed considerably in the two muscles: in longitudinal muscle there were frequency-dependent contractions, while initial relaxation followed by contraction was observed in circular muscle. The descending motor response resembled the pattern of the local responses, but the amplitudes were significantly less expressed, as compared to the respective local responses.

  20. Role of perisynaptic parameters in neurotransmitter homeostasis - computational study of a general synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendyam, Sandeep; Mohan, Ashwin; Kalivas, Peter W.; Nair, Satish S.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations vary over a wide range depending on the type of neurotransmitter and location in the brain. Neurotransmitter homeostasis near a synapse is achieved by a balance of several mechanisms including vesicular release from the presynapse, diffusion, uptake by transporters, non-synaptic production, and regulation of release by autoreceptors. These mechanisms are also affected by the glia surrounding the synapse. However, the role of these mechanisms in achieving neurotransmitter homeostasis is not well understood. A biophysical modeling framework was proposed to reverse engineer glial configurations and parameters related to homeostasis for synapses that support a range of neurotransmitter gradients. Model experiments reveal that synapses with extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations in the micromolar range require non-synaptic neurotransmitter sources and tight synaptic isolation by extracellular glial formations. The model was used to identify the role of perisynaptic parameters on neurotransmitter homeostasis, and to propose glial configurations that could support different levels of extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations. Ranking the parameters based on their effect on neurotransmitter homeostasis, non-synaptic sources were found to be the most important followed by transporter concentration and diffusion coefficient. PMID:22460547

  1. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurotransmitter receptors as signaling platforms in anterior pituitary cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 463, C (2018), s. 49-64 ISSN 0303-7207 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12695S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : pituitary * ligand-gated receptor channels * G protein -coupled receptors * neurotransmitters * action potentials * calcium signaling * hormone secretion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.754, year: 2016

  3. Regulation of Neurotransmitter Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-05

    A~~ C-DSP 6C. ADORtESS tCIY State ad lip CodeA 7b. ADDRESS IYit. Stele end ZIP COO) ~ AJ C 6200 Freeport Centre Boiling Air Force Base P .A1...considered binding (Table 2). significantly different for a p value of :!0.05. Protein concentrations were determined using reagent kits from Bio -Rad (Richmond

  4. Opioid and noradrenergic contributions of tapentadol to the inhibition of locus coeruleus neurons in the streptozotocin rat model of polyneuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sanchez, Sonia; Borges, Gisela Da Silva; Mico, Juan A; Berrocoso, Esther

    2018-06-01

    Tapentadol is an analgesic that acts as an agonist of µ opioid receptors (MOR) and that inhibits noradrenaline reuptake. Data from healthy rats show that tapentadol inhibits neuronal activity in the locus coeruleus (LC), a nucleus regulated by both the noradrenergic and opioid systems. Thus, we set out to investigate the effect of tapentadol on LC activity in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, a model of diabetic polyneuropathy, by analyzing single-unit extracellular recordings of LC neurons. Four weeks after inducing diabetes, tapentadol dose-response curves were obtained from animals pre-treated with RX821002 or naloxone (alpha2-adrenoceptors and opioid receptors antagonists, respectively). In STZ rats, the spontaneous activity of LC neurons (0.9 ± 0.1 Hz) was lower than in naïve animals (1.5 ± 0.1 Hz), and tapentadol's inhibitory effect was also weaker. Alpha2-adrenoceptors blockade by RX821002 (100 μg/kg i.v.) in STZ animals significantly increased the spontaneous activity (from 0.8 ± 0.1 to 1.4 ± 0.2 Hz) and it dampened the inhibition of LC neurons produced by tapentadol. However, opioid receptors blockade following naloxone pre-treatment (5 mg/kg i.v.) did not alter the spontaneous firing rate (0.9 ± 0.2 vs 0.9 ± 0.2 Hz) or the inhibitory effect of tapentadol on LC neurons in STZ animals. Thus, diabetic polyneuropathy appears to exert neuroplastic changes in LC neurotransmission, enhancing the sensitivity of alpha2-adrenoceptors and dampening opioid receptors expression. Tapentadol's activity seems to be predominantly mediated through its noradrenergic effects rather than its influence on opioid receptors in the STZ model of diabetic polyneuropathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fife, a Drosophila Piccolo-RIM Homolog, Promotes Active Zone Organization and Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Joseph J.; Gratz, Scott J.; Slind, Jessica K.; Geske, Richard R.; Cummings, Alexander M.; Galindo, Samantha E.; Donohue, Laura K.; O'Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal communication depends on the precisely orchestrated release of neurotransmitter at specialized sites called active zones (AZs). A small number of scaffolding and cytoskeletal proteins comprising the cytomatrix of the active zone (CAZ) are thought to organize the architecture and functional properties of AZs. The majority of CAZ proteins are evolutionarily conserved, underscoring the fundamental similarities in neurotransmission at all synapses. However, core CAZ proteins Piccolo and Bassoon have long been believed exclusive to vertebrates, raising intriguing questions about the conservation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate presynaptic properties. Here, we present the identification of a piccolo-rim-related gene in invertebrates, together with molecular phylogenetic analyses that indicate the encoded proteins may represent Piccolo orthologs. In accordance, we find that the Drosophila homolog, Fife, is neuronal and localizes to presynaptic AZs. To investigate the in vivo function of Fife, we generated a deletion of the fife locus. We find that evoked neurotransmitter release is substantially decreased in fife mutants and loss of fife results in motor deficits. Through morphological analysis of fife synapses, we identify underlying AZ abnormalities including pervasive presynaptic membrane detachments and reduced synaptic vesicle clustering. Our data demonstrate the conservation of a Piccolo-related protein in invertebrates and identify critical roles for Fife in regulating AZ structure and function. These findings suggest the CAZ is more conserved than previously thought, and open the door to a more complete understanding of how CAZ proteins regulate presynaptic structure and function through genetic studies in simpler model systems. PMID:23197698

  6. Cerebellar level of neurotransmitters in rats exposed to paracetamol during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Joniec-Maciejak, Ilona; Jawna-Zboińska, Katarzyna; Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Piechal, Agnieszka; Wawer, Adriana; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa

    2016-12-01

    The present study was designed to clarify the effect of prenatal and postnatal paracetamol administration on the neurotransmitter level and balance of amino acids in the cerebellum. Biochemical analysis to determine the concentration of neurotransmitters in this brain structure was performed on two-month-old Wistar male rats previously exposed to paracetamol in doses of 5 (P5, n=10) or 15mg/kg (P15, n=10) throughout the entire prenatal period, lactation and until the completion of the second month of life, when the experiment was terminated. Control animals were given tapped water (Con, n=10). The cerebellar concentration of monoamines, their metabolites and amino acids were assayed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The present experiment demonstrates that prenatal and postnatal paracetamol exposure results in modulation of cerebellar neurotransmission with changes concerning mainly 5-HIAA and MHPG levels. The effect of paracetamol on monoaminergic neurotransmission in the cerebellum is reflected by changes in the level of catabolic end-products of serotonin (5-HIAA) and noradrenaline (MHPG) degradation. Further work is required to define the mechanism of action and impact of prenatal and postnatal exposure to paracetamol in the cerebellum and other structures of the central nervous system (CNS). Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurotransmitter Transporter-Like: a male germline-specific SLC6 transporter required for Drosophila spermiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita Chatterjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The SLC6 class of membrane transporters, known primarily as neurotransmitter transporters, is increasingly appreciated for its roles in nutritional uptake of amino acids and other developmentally specific functions. A Drosophila SLC6 gene, Neurotransmitter transporter-like (Ntl, is expressed only in the male germline. Mobilization of a transposon inserted near the 3' end of the Ntl coding region yields male-sterile mutants defining a single complementation group. Germline transformation with Ntl cDNAs under control of male germline-specific control elements restores Ntl/Ntl homozygotes to normal fertility, indicating that Ntl is required only in the germ cells. In mutant males, sperm morphogenesis appears normal, with elongated, individualized and coiled spermiogenic cysts accumulating at the base of the testes. However, no sperm are transferred to the seminal vesicle. The level of polyglycylation of Ntl mutant sperm tubulin appears to be significantly lower than that of wild type controls. Glycine transporters are the most closely related SLC6 transporters to Ntl, suggesting that Ntl functions as a glycine transporter in developing sperm, where augmentation of the cytosolic pool of glycine may be required for the polyglycylation of the massive amounts of tubulin in the fly's giant sperm. The male-sterile phenotype of Ntl mutants may provide a powerful genetic system for studying the function of an SLC6 transporter family in a model organism.

  8. Do Proxies for the Neurotransmitter Cortisol Predict Adaptation to Life with Chronic Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamond, Wade

    Among the numerous difficulties encountered by chronic pain patients, impulsive and dysfunctional decision-making complicate their already difficult life situations yet remains relatively understudied. This study examined a recently published neurobiological decision making model that identifies eight specific neurotransmitters and hormones (Dopamine, Testosterone, Endogenous Opioids Glutamate, Serotonin, Norepinephrine, Cortisol, and GABA) linked to unsound decision making related to cognitive, motivational and emotional dysregulation (Nussbaum et al., 2011) (see Appendix 2). The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), a proxy for the cortisol element in the pharmacological decision making model was analyzed for the neurotransmitter's relationship to functionality and quality of life in a group of 37 chronic pain patients. Participants were comprised of males and females ranging from 23 to 52 years of age and were classified with respect to levels of adjustment to living with chronic pain based on the Quality of Life Scale (QLS), the Dartmouth WONCA COOP Charts and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and Frontal System Behavioral Scale (FSBS) measured decision making related to immediate gratification and daily living respectively. Results suggest that emotional dysregulation, as measured by the PSS is a significant predictor for adaptation to life with chronic pain and the PSS is superior to predicting adaptation to life with chronic pain than reported levels of pain as measured by the McGill Pain Questionnaire.

  9. In vitro labelled neurotransmitters release for the study of neuro toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camillo, Maria A.P.; Rogero, Jose R.; Troncone, Lanfranco R.P.

    1995-01-01

    There is an increasing concern in the replacement of in vivo by in vitro methods in Pharmacology. Looking for a method which involves the most of the physiological aspects related to neural functions, a super fusion system designed to evaluate in vitro neurotransmitter release from brain striatal tissue is here described. The method is based on the basal and stimulated release of pre-loaded tritium-labelled neurotransmitters. This procedure bears an active uptake/release function which is fairly changed by membrane polarisation state, ion channel activation and enzymatic activity, as well as other still unknown steps involved in neurotransmission. Calcium dependency of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by high potassium depolarization or glutamate (Glu) stimulation was demonstrated employing calcium-free (+EGTA) super fusion or lanthanum/cadmium addition. Glutamate stimulation involved NMDA receptors since magnesium or MK801 blocks stimulated release. Uptake of DA and Ach was evidenced by using bupropione or hemicolinium-3. presynaptic inhibition of Ach release was evidenced by physostigmine-induced inhibitions of acetylcholinesterase. (author). 3 refs., 6 figs

  10. Fine-tuning of defensive behaviors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray by atypical neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Fogaça

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an up-to-date review of the evidence indicating that atypical neurotransmitters such as nitric oxide (NO and endocannabinoids (eCBs play an important role in the regulation of aversive responses in the periaqueductal gray (PAG. Among the results supporting this role, several studies have shown that inhibitors of neuronal NO synthase or cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor agonists cause clear anxiolytic responses when injected into this region. The nitrergic and eCB systems can regulate the activity of classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA that control PAG activity. We propose that they exert a ‘fine-tuning’ regulatory control of defensive responses in this area. This control, however, is probably complex, which may explain the usually bell-shaped dose-response curves observed with drugs that act on NO- or CB1-mediated neurotransmission. Even if the mechanisms responsible for this complex interaction are still poorly understood, they are beginning to be recognized. For example, activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1 receptors by anandamide seems to counteract the anxiolytic effects induced by CB1 receptor activation caused by this compound. Further studies, however, are needed to identify other mechanisms responsible for this fine-tuning effect.

  11. Brain structures and neurotransmitters regulating aggression in cats: implications for human aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, T R; Siegel, A

    2001-01-01

    1. Violence and aggression are major public health problems. 2. The authors have used techniques of electrical brain stimulation, anatomical-immunohistochemical techniques, and behavioral pharmacology to investigate the neural systems and circuits underlying aggressive behavior in the cat. 3. The medial hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray are the most important structures mediating defensive rage behavior, and the perifornical lateral hypothalamus clearly mediates predatory attack behavior. The hippocampus, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, septal area, cingulate gyrus, and prefrontal cortex project to these structures directly or indirectly and thus can modulate the intensity of attack and rage. 4. Evidence suggests that several neurotransmitters facilitate defensive rage within the PAG and medial hypothalamus, including glutamate, Substance P, and cholecystokinin, and that opioid peptides suppress it; these effects usually depend on the subtype of receptor that is activated. 5. A key recent discovery was a GABAergic projection that may underlie the often-observed reciprocally inhibitory relationship between these two forms of aggression. 6. Recently, Substance P has come under scrutiny as a possible key neurotransmitter involved in defensive rage, and the mechanism by which it plays a role in aggression and rage is under investigation. 7. It is hoped that this line of research will provide a better understanding of the neural mechanisms and substrates regulating aggression and rage and thus establish a rational basis for treatment of disorders associated with these forms of aggression.

  12. MRI sensing of neurotransmitters with a crown ether appended Gd(3+) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukhatar, Fatima; Même, Sandra; Même, William; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Logothetis, Nikos K; Angelovski, Goran; Tóth, Éva

    2015-02-18

    Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches that detect biomarkers associated with neural activity would allow more direct observation of brain function than current functional MRI based on blood-oxygen-level-dependent contrast. Our objective was to create a synthetic molecular platform with appropriate recognition moieties for zwitterionic neurotransmitters that generate an MR signal change upon neurotransmitter binding. The gadolinium complex (GdL) we report offers ditopic binding for zwitterionic amino acid neurotransmitters, via interactions (i) between the positively charged and coordinatively unsaturated metal center and the carboxylate function and (ii) between a triazacrown ether and the amine group of the neurotransmitters. GdL discriminates zwitterionic neurotransmitters from monoamines. Neurotransmitter binding leads to a remarkable relaxivity change, related to a decrease in hydration number. GdL was successfully used to monitor neural activity in ex vivo mouse brain slices by MRI.

  13. Detection and Monitoring of Neurotransmitters - a Spectroscopic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia; Lee, Kendall; Durrer, William; Bennet, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman mapping spectroscopy for simultaneously and locally detecting important compounds in neuroscience such as dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine. The Raman results show shifting of the characteristic vibrations of the compounds, observations consistent with previous spectroscopic studies. Although some vibrations are common in these neurotransmitters, Raman mapping was achieved by detecting non-overlapping characteristic spectral signatures of the compounds, as follows: for dopamine the vibration attributed to C-O stretching, for serotonin the indole ring stretching vibration, and for adenosine the adenine ring vibrations. Without damage, dyeing, or preferential sample preparation, confocal Raman mapping provided positive detection of each neurotransmitter, allowing association of the high-resolution spectra with specific micro-scale image regions. Such information is particularly important for complex, heterogeneous samples, where modification of the chemical or physical composition can influence the neurotransmission processes. We also report an estimated dopamine diffusion coefficient two orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated by the flow-injection method.

  14. "Stiff neonate" with mitochondrial DNA depletion and secondary neurotransmitter defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Margaret M

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders comprise a heterogenous group. A neonate who presented with episodes of severe truncal hypertonia and apnea progressed to a hypokinetic rigid syndrome characterized by hypokinesia, tremulousness, profound head lag, absent suck and gag reflexes, brisk deep tendon reflexes, ankle and jaw clonus, and evidence of autonomic dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters from age 7 weeks demonstrated low levels of amine metabolites (homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid), tetrahydrobiopterin, and pyridoxal phosphate. Mitochondrial DNA quantitative studies on muscle homogenate demonstrated a mitochondrial DNA depletion disorder. Respiratory chain enzymology demonstrated decreased complex IV activity. Screening for mitochondrial DNA rearrangement disorders and sequencing relevant mitochondrial genes produced negative results. No clinical or biochemical response to treatment with pyridoxal phosphate, tetrahydrobiopterin, or l-dopa occurred. The clinical course was progressive, and the patient died at age 19 months. Mitochondrial disorders causing secondary neurotransmitter diseases are usually severe, but are rarely reported. This diagnosis should be considered in neonates or infants who present with hypertonia, hypokinesia rigidity, and progressive neurodegeneration.

  15. Identification of catecholamine neurotransmitters using fluorescence sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi, Forough [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hormozi-Nezhad, M. Reza, E-mail: hormozi@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, Morteza, E-mail: mahmoudi@stanford.edu [Department of Nanotechnology and Nanotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 13169-43551 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5101 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    A nano-based sensor array has been developed for identification and discrimination of catecholamine neurotransmitters based on optical properties of their oxidation products under alkaline conditions. To produce distinct fluorescence response patterns for individual catecholamine, quenching of thioglycolic acid functionalized cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots, by oxidation products, were employed along with the variation of fluorescence spectra of oxidation products. The spectral changes were analyzed with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to identify catecholamine patterns. The proposed sensor could efficiently discriminate the individual catecholamine (i.e., dopamine, norepinephrine, and L-DOPA) and their mixtures in the concentration range of 0.25–30 μmol L{sup −1}. Finally, we found that the sensor had capability to identify the various catecholamines in urine sample. - Highlights: • We have proposed a fluorescence sensor array to detect catecholamine neurotransmitters. • Visual differentiation of catecholamines is provided by fluorescence array fingerprints. • Discrimination of catecholamines from each other, and from their mixture is obtained on a PCA plot. • Proposed sensor array can be used for detection of catecholamines in urine samples.

  16. Effects of occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls on urinary metabolites of neurotransmitters: A cross-sectional and longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putschögl, Franziska Maria; Gaum, Petra Maria; Schettgen, Thomas; Kraus, Thomas; Gube, Monika; Lang, Jessica

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are chemicals which were used for industrial purposes and are known to induce various adverse health effects. They are also known to be neurotoxic and numerous targets within the central nervous system have been identified in previous studies. Specifically, the neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) are influenced by PCBs as indicated in studies involving animals. However, limited evidence has been published documenting PCB induced changes in the neurotransmitter system in humans. In the present study, we examined the association between a higher PCB body burden following occupational exposure and possible changes in human neurotransmitter metabolites. Within a medical surveillance programme called HELPcB (Health Effects in High-Level Exposure to PCB) that monitors adverse health effects of occupational PCB exposure, urine samples were obtained (n(T1) = 166; n(T2) = 177 and n(T3) = 141). The urinary concentrations of the metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA; for DA) and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA; for NE) were analyzed. Blood samples were obtained by vena puncture in order to determine the internal exposure to PCBs with human biomonitoring. A cross-sectional analysis indicated a significant negative effect of PCB exposure on HVA and VMA. Longitudinally, an initially higher exposure to higher chlorinated PCBs was followed by constant reduced HVA level over three consecutive years. Exploratory analyses show different long-term effects for different PCBs according to their chlorination degree. A higher exposure with lower chlorinated PCBs leads to an increase of VMA and HVA. Conversely, a higher exposure to all PCBs results in a reduction of HVA. This study, to our knowledge, is the first to document changes in neurotransmitter metabolites after occupational PCB exposure in humans. This finding advances evidence obtained from past research, and identifies one potential pathomechanism in the central dopaminergic system of

  17. Effects of lesions to the dorsal noradrenergic bundle on counterconditioning of punished barpressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, E; Gray, J A; Preston, G C

    1987-01-01

    The possible contribution of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle (DB) to the development of a simple form of counterconditioning (an associative mechanism leading to behavioural tolerance for stress) was assessed by comparison of the performance of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions of the DB to that of sham-operated (SH) animals. Animals engaging in barpressing for food reward on a random-interval (RI) 64 sec schedule were presented with a stimulus signalling the concurrent operation of an RI-64 sec schedule of response-contingent shock. In the control condition (punishment), shock and reward never occurred as a result of the same barpress. In the experimental condition (counterconditioning), the frequency of shock and reward were the same as for the punishment condition but the two events always occurred in succession, with food following shock, as a consequence of the same barpress. DB lesions had no effect on the acquisition of rewarded barpressing or on the initial acquisition of the discrimination between the shock-free and shock-containing (signalled) components of the schedule. However, once performance on the discrimination had reached asymptote, DB animals in the punishment control group showed significantly less suppression to the signal than SH animals. The counterconditioning schedule used was effective, leading to significantly reduced response suppression in the SH animals in comparison to the SH group subjected to punishment. The pattern of findings in the DB groups was consistent with a blockade by the lesion of the development of counterconditioning. These results suggest, therefore, that the DB is involved in at least one associative mechanism leading to tolerance for stress.

  18. Development of clinical study and application on dopaminergic neurotransmitters and neuroreceptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongfu

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, the neurotransmitter mapping has been rapidly developed from a lot of fundamental researches to the studies of clinical applications. At present, the dopaminergic neurotransmitter and receptor imaging in the central neurotransmitter mapping study are the most active area including dopaminergic receptor, dopaminergic neurotransmitter and dopaminergic transporter imaging, etc,. The nuclear medicine functional imaging technique with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography possesses potential advantages in the diagnosis and distinguished diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders and movement disorders, and in the study of recognition function

  19. The selective neurotoxin DSP-4 impairs the noradrenergic projections from the locus coeruleus to the inferior colliculus in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián eHormigo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The inferior colliculus (IC and the locus coeruleus (LC are two midbrain nuclei that integrate multimodal information and play a major role in novelty detection to elicit an orienting response. Despite the reciprocal connections between these two structures, the projection pattern and target areas of the LC within the subdivisions of the rat IC are still unknown. Here, we used tract-tracing approaches combined with immunohistochemistry, densitometry and confocal microscopy analysis to describe a projection from the LC to the IC. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA injections into the LC showed that the LC-IC projection is mainly ipsilateral (90% and reaches, to a major extent, the dorsal and lateral part of the IC and the intercollicular commissure. Additionally, some LC fibers extend into the central nucleus of the IC. The neurochemical nature of this projection is noradrenergic, given that tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH colocalize with the BDA-labeled fibers from the LC. To determine the total field of the LC innervations in the IC, we destroyed the LC neurons and fibers using a highly selective neurotoxin, DSP-4, and then studied the distribution and density of TH- and DBH-immunolabeled axons in the IC. In the DSP-4 treated animals, the number of axonal fibers immunolabeled for TH and DBH were deeply decreased throughout the entire rostrocaudal extent of the IC and its subdivisions compared to controls. Our densitometry results showed that the IC receives up to 97% of its noradrenergic innervations from the LC neurons and only 3% from non-coeruleus neurons. Our results also indicate that TH immunoreactivity in the IC was less impaired than the immunoreactivity for DBH after DSP-4 administration. This is consistent with the existence of an important dopaminergic projection from the substantia nigra to the IC. In conclusion, our study demonstrates and quantifies the noradrenergic projection from the LC to the IC and its

  20. Noradrenergic Activation of the Basolateral Amygdala Enhances Object Recognition Memory and Induces Chromatin Remodeling in the Insular Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassiba eBeldjoud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that arousal-induced memory enhancement requires noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA and modulatory influences on information storage processes in its many target regions. While this concept is well accepted, the molecular basis of such BLA effects on neural plasticity changes within other brain regions remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether noradrenergic activation of the BLA after object recognition training induces chromatin remodeling through histone post-translational modifications in the insular cortex (IC, a brain region that is importantly involved in object recognition memory. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were trained on an object recognition task, followed immediately by bilateral microinfusions of norepinephrine (1.0 µg or saline administered into the BLA. Saline-treated control rats exhibited poor 24-h retention, whereas norepinephrine treatment induced robust 24-h object recognition memory. Most importantly, this memory-enhancing dose of norepinephrine induced a global reduction in the acetylation levels of histone H3 at lysine 14, H2B and H4 in the IC 1 h later, whereas it had no effect on the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 or tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. Norepinephrine administered into the BLA of non-trained control rats did not induce any changes in the histone marks investigated in this study. These findings indicate that noradrenergic activation of the BLA induces training-specific effects on chromatin remodeling mechanisms, and presumably gene transcription, in its target regions, which may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress and emotional arousal effects on memory consolidation.

  1. Noradrenergic α1 Receptor Antagonist Treatment Attenuates Positive Subjective Effects of Cocaine in Humans: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Thomas F.; De La Garza, Richard; Brown, Gregory; Kosten, Thomas R.; Mahoney, James J.; Haile, Colin N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Preclinical research implicates dopaminergic and noradrenergic mechanisms in mediating the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, including cocaine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of treatment with the noradrenergic α1 receptor antagonist doxazosin on the positive subjective effects of cocaine. Methods Thirteen non-treatment seeking, cocaine-dependent volunteers completed this single-site, randomized, placebo-controlled, within-subjects study. In one study phase volunteers received placebo and in the other they received doxazosin, with the order counterbalanced across participants. Study medication was masked by over-encapsulating doxazosin tablets and matched placebo lactose served as the control. Study medication treatment was initiated at 1 mg doxazosin or equivalent number of placebo capsules PO/day and increased every three days by 1 mg. After receiving 4 mg doxazosin or equivalent number of placebo capsules participants received masked doses of 20 and 40 mg cocaine IV in that order with placebo saline randomly interspersed to maintain the blind. Results Doxazosin treatment was well tolerated and doxazosin alone produced minimal changes in heart rate and blood pressure. During treatment with placebo, cocaine produced dose-dependent increases in subjective effect ratings of “high”, “stimulated”, “like cocaine”, “desire cocaine”, “any drug effect”, and “likely to use cocaine if had access” (p<.001). Doxazosin treatment significantly attenuated the effects of 20 mg cocaine on ratings of “stimulated”, “like cocaine”, and “likely to use cocaine if had access” (p<.05). There were trends for doxazosin to reduce ratings of “stimulated”, “desire cocaine”, and “likely to use cocaine if had access” (p<.10). Conclusions Medications that block noradrenergic α1 receptors, such as doxazosin, may be useful as treatments for cocaine dependence, and should be evaluated further. Trial

  2. Tonic noradrenergic activity modulates explorative behavior and attentional set shifting: Evidence from pupillometry and gaze pattern analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajkossy, Péter; Szőllősi, Ágnes; Demeter, Gyula; Racsmány, Mihály

    2017-12-01

    A constant task for every living organism is to decide whether to exploit rewards associated with current behavior or to explore the environment for more rewarding options. Current empirical evidence indicates that exploitation is related to phasic whereas exploration is related to tonic firing mode of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. In humans, this exploration-exploitation trade-off is subserved by the ability to flexibly switch attention between task-related and task-irrelevant information. Here, we investigated whether this function, called attentional set shifting, is related to exploration and tonic noradrenergic discharge. We measured pretrial baseline pupil dilation, proved to be strongly correlated with the activity of the locus coeruleus, while human participants took part in well-known tasks of attentional set shifting. Study 1 used the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, whereas in Study 2, the Intra/Extradimensional Set Shifting Task was used. Both tasks require participants to choose between different compound stimuli based on feedback provided for their previous decisions. During the task, stimulus-reward contingencies change periodically, thus participants are repeatedly required to reassess which stimulus features are relevant (i.e., they shift their attentional set). Our results showed that baseline pupil diameter steadily decreased when the stimulus-reward contingencies were stable, whereas they suddenly increased when these contingencies changed. Analysis of looking patterns also confirmed the presence of exploratory behavior during attentional set shifting. Thus, our results suggest that tonic firing mode of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus is implicated in attentional set shifting, as it regulates the amount of exploration. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  3. Effects of chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration on neurotransmitter concentrations and receptor binding in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.F.; Newport, G.D.; Scallet, A.C.; Gee, K.W.; Paule, M.G.; Brown, R.M.; Slikker, W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is also known as an hallucinogenic compound. Numerous reports have shown that large doses of THC produce significant alterations in various neurotransmitter systems. The present study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to THC produces significant alterations in selected neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, GABAergic, benzodiazepine, and opiate) in the rat brain. In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with vehicle, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg body weight daily, 5 days/week for 90 days. Animals were killed either 24 hours or two months after the last dose. Brains were dissected into different regions for neurochemical analyses. Two months after the cessation of chronic administration, there was a significant decrease in GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus of animals in the high dose group. However, no other significant changes were found in neurotransmitter receptor binding characteristics in the hippocampus or in neurotransmitter concentrations in the caudate nucleus, hypothalamus or septum after chronic THC administration. In an attempt to replicate the GABA receptor binding changes and also to determine the [35S]TBPS binding in hippocampus, we designed Experiment 2. In this experiment, we dosed the animals by gavage with 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week or with 20 mg THC/kg Monday through Thursday and 60 mg/kg on Friday for 90 days. Results from this experiment failed to replicate the dose-dependent effect of THC on GABA receptor binding in hippocampus. Modulation of [35S]TBPS binding by GABA or 3 alpha-OH-DHP or inhibition by cold TBPS in frontal cortex did not show any significant dose-related effects

  4. Identification of catecholamine neurotransmitters using fluorescence sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Forough; Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-04-21

    A nano-based sensor array has been developed for identification and discrimination of catecholamine neurotransmitters based on optical properties of their oxidation products under alkaline conditions. To produce distinct fluorescence response patterns for individual catecholamine, quenching of thioglycolic acid functionalized cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots, by oxidation products, were employed along with the variation of fluorescence spectra of oxidation products. The spectral changes were analyzed with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to identify catecholamine patterns. The proposed sensor could efficiently discriminate the individual catecholamine (i.e., dopamine, norepinephrine, and l-DOPA) and their mixtures in the concentration range of 0.25-30 μmol L(-1). Finally, we found that the sensor had capability to identify the various catecholamines in urine sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The 'sniffer-patch' technique for detection of neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T G

    1997-05-01

    A wide variety of techniques have been employed for the detection and measurement of neurotransmitter release from biological preparations. Whilst many of these methods offer impressive levels of sensitivity, few are able to combine sensitivity with the necessary temporal and spatial resolution required to study quantal release from single cells. One detection method that is seeing a revival of interest and has the potential to fill this niche is the so-called 'sniffer-patch' technique. In this article, specific examples of the practical aspects of using this technique are discussed along with the procedures involved in calibrating these biosensors to extend their applications to provide quantitative, in addition to simple qualitative, measurements of quantal transmitter release.

  6. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  7. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 (angstrom) above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  8. GABA and glycine as neurotransmitters: a brief history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowery, N G; Smart, T G

    2006-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) emerged as a potentially important brain chemical just over 50 years ago, but its significance as a neurotransmitter was not fully realized until over 16 years later. We now know that at least 40% of inhibitory synaptic processing in the mammalian brain uses GABA. Establishing its role as a transmitter was a lengthy process and it seems hard to believe with our current knowledge that there was ever any dispute about its role in the mammalian brain. The detailed information that we now have about the receptors for GABA together with the wealth of agents which facilitate or reduce GABA receptor mechanisms make the prospects for further research very exciting. The emergence of glycine as a transmitter seems relatively painless by comparison to GABA. Perhaps this is appropriate for the simplest of transmitter structures! Its discovery within the spinal cord and brainstem approximately 40 years ago was followed only 2 years later by the proposal that it be conferred with 'neurotransmitter' status. It was another 16 years before the receptor was biochemically isolated. Now it is readily accepted as a vital spinal and supraspinal inhibitory transmitter and we know many details regarding its molecular structure and trafficking around neurones. The pharmacology of these receptors has lagged behind that of GABA. There is not the rich variety of allosteric modulators that we have come to readily associate with GABA receptors and which has provided us with a virtual treasure trove of important drugs used in anxiety, insomnia, epilepsy, anaesthesia, and spasticity, all stemming from the actions of the simple neutral amino acid GABA. Nevertheless, the realization that glycine receptors are involved in motor reflexes and nociceptive pathways together with the more recent advent of drugs that exhibit some subtype selectivity make the goal of designing selective therapeutic ligands for the glycine receptor that much closer.

  9. Alleviation of response suppression to conditioned aversive stimuli by lesions of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, E; Gray, J A; Fillenz, M

    1984-08-01

    Rats with neurotoxic lesions of the dorsal ascending noradrenergic bundle (DB) were compared with sham-operated (SH) controls on the acquisition, steady state and extinction of response suppression maintained by a classical (conditioned suppression) or an instrumental (discriminated punishment) contingency. DB lesions interfered neither with the acquisition of the reference response of sucrose-rewarded barpressing nor with unconditioned responding to the overhead flashing light subsequently used as a signal of shock. The acquisition of discriminated response suppression was also unaffected by the lesion under both types of contingency. However, once discriminated suppression had stabilized, both the conditioned and the discriminative stimulus used were significantly less effective in maintaining suppression in DB animals than in SH controls provided that low intensity footshock (0.2 mA) was used as the unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Upon increase of UCS intensity (to 0.5 mA) normal suppression was observed in the DB group under both contingencies. Extinction of the classical contingency reinstated the difference between DB and SH performance: DB lesion resulted in significantly faster extinction of fear. In contrast, extinction of the discriminated punishment contingency was unaffected by the lesion, although generalized response suppression dissipated faster in the DB than in the SH animals trained under this condition. Our results offer no support for the reinforcement hypothesis of DB function (normal acquisition of barpressing and of discriminated suppression of barpressing); mixed support (greater initial generalization of suppression in DB animals) and contradiction (more rapid extinction of conditioned suppression in DB animals) for the attentional hypothesis; and weak support (reduced suppression and more rapid extinction of suppression in DB animals, but only within limited experimental parameters) for the anxiety hypothesis of DB function. Hence none of

  10. Disinhibition by propranolol and chlordiazepoxide of nonrewarded lever-pressing in the rat is unaffected by dorsal noradrenergic bundle lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, P; Tsaltas, E; Gray, J A

    1989-03-01

    Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats received 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle and 10 others underwent control operations. The lesion depleted levels of noradrenaline in the hippocampus to 2% of those in the controls. All rats were then trained for 16 sessions to lever-press in a Skinner box on a variable interval 18 sec schedule of food-reinforcement, then for 42 days on a successive discrimination between periods of variable interval (VI 18 sec) food-reinforcement and periods of extinction. This report describes the effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDP; 5 mg/kg) and propranolol (5 and 10 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally in both groups on modified ABBA designs after this training. Both drugs increased the response rates in extinction periods. The effect of propranolol was similar at each dose and smaller than that of CDP. Although CDP and propranolol (5 mg/kg) increased variable interval response rates also, this could not account for the effect on extinction response rates. Responding did not differ between the lesioned and control animals and the effects of drugs were similar in each group. It is unlikely that CDP or propranolol release nonrewarded responding by disrupting transmission in the dorsal noradrenergic bundle.

  11. Macrocyclic Gd(3+) complexes with pendant crown ethers designed for binding zwitterionic neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukhatar, Fatima; Meudal, Hervé; Landon, Céline; Logothetis, Nikos K; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Angelovski, Goran; Tóth, Éva

    2015-07-27

    A series of Gd(3+) complexes exhibiting a relaxometric response to zwitterionic amino acid neurotransmitters was synthesized. The design concept involves ditopic interactions 1) between a positively charged and coordinatively unsaturated Gd(3+) chelate and the carboxylate group of the neurotransmitters and 2) between an azacrown ether appended to the chelate and the amino group of the neurotransmitters. The chelates differ in the nature and length of the linker connecting the cyclen-type macrocycle that binds the Ln(3+) ion and the crown ether. The complexes are monohydrated, but they exhibit high proton relaxivities (up to 7.7 mM(-1)  s(-1) at 60 MHz, 310 K) due to slow molecular tumbling. The formation of ternary complexes with neurotransmitters was monitored by (1) H relaxometric titrations of the Gd(3+) complexes and by luminescence measurements on the Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) analogues at pH 7.4. The remarkable relaxivity decrease (≈80 %) observed on neurotransmitter binding is related to the decrease in the hydration number, as evidenced by luminescence lifetime measurements on the Eu(3+) complexes. These complexes show affinity for amino acid neurotransmitters in the millimolar range, which can be suited to imaging concentrations of synaptically released neurotransmitters. They display good selectivity over non-amino acid neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, serotonin, and noradrenaline) and hydrogenphosphate, but selectivity over hydrogencarbonate was not achieved. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K(+) regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billesbølle, Christian B; Mortensen, Jonas S; Sohail, Azmat

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na(+)-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K...

  13. Estimation of in-vivo neurotransmitter release by brain microdialysis: the issue of validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Chiara, G.; Tanda, G.; Carboni, E.

    1996-11-01

    Although microdialysis is commonly understood as a method of sampling low molecular weight compounds in the extracellular compartment of tissues, this definition appears insufficient to specifically describe brain microdialysis of neurotransmitters. In fact, transmitter overflow from the brain into dialysates is critically dependent upon the composition of the perfusing Ringer. Therefore, the dialysing Ringer not only recovers the transmitter from the extracellular brain fluid but is a main determinant of its in-vivo release. Two types of brain microdialysis are distinguished: quantitative micro-dialysis and conventional microdialysis. Quantitative microdialysis provides an estimate of neurotransmitter concentrations in the extracellular fluid in contact with the probe. However, this information might poorly reflect the kinetics of neurotransmitter release in vivo. Conventional microdialysis involves perfusion at a constant rate with a transmitter-free Ringer, resulting in the formation of a steep neurotransmitter concentration gradient extending from the Ringer into the extracellular fluid. This artificial gradient might be critical for the ability of conventional microdialysis to detect and resolve phasic changes in neurotransmitter release taking place in the implanted area. On the basis of these characteristics, conventional microdialysis of neurotransmitters can be conceptualized as a model of the in-vivo release of neurotransmitters in the brain. As such, the criteria of face-validity, construct-validity and predictive-validity should be applied to select the most appropriate experimental conditions for estimating neurotransmitter release in specific brain areas in relation to behaviour.

  14. Discovery and characterization of gut microbiota decarboxylases that can produce the neurotransmitter tryptamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brianna B; Van Benschoten, Andrew H; Cimermancic, Peter; Donia, Mohamed S; Zimmermann, Michael; Taketani, Mao; Ishihara, Atsushi; Kashyap, Purna C; Fraser, James S; Fischbach, Michael A

    2014-10-08

    Several recent studies describe the influence of the gut microbiota on host brain and behavior. However, the mechanisms responsible for microbiota-nervous system interactions are largely unknown. Using a combination of genetics, biochemistry, and crystallography, we identify and characterize two phylogenetically distinct enzymes found in the human microbiome that decarboxylate tryptophan to form the β-arylamine neurotransmitter tryptamine. Although this enzymatic activity is exceedingly rare among bacteria more broadly, analysis of the Human Microbiome Project data demonstrate that at least 10% of the human population harbors at least one bacterium encoding a tryptophan decarboxylase in their gut community. Our results uncover a previously unrecognized enzymatic activity that can give rise to host-modulatory compounds and suggests a potential direct mechanism by which gut microbiota can influence host physiology, including behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [The interaction between gamma-aminobutyric acid and other related neurotransmitters in depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; An, Shu-Cheng; Li, Jiang-Na

    2014-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS) in mammalian, which involved in several mood disorders such as anxiety, depression and schizophrenia. Nowadays, there are growing evidences showed that the depression is concerned with a deficiency in brain GABA. However, there are numerous studies based on the monoamine hypothesis and glutamatergic dysfunction, while the study on GABA is relatively less and scattered. Our aim is to discuss the relationship between depression and GABA by introducing the role of GABA receptors and the interaction between GABA and 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine and glutamic acid. It provides new ideas for further study on the pathogenesis and therapy of depression.

  16. Proton MR Spectroscopy—Detectable Major Neurotransmitters of the Brain: Biology and Possible Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, N.; Renshaw, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurotransmitters are chemical substances that, by definition, allow communication between neurons and permit most neuronal-glial interactions in the CNS. Approximately 80% of all neurons use glutamate, and almost all interneurons use GABA. A third neurotransmitter, NAAG, modulates glutamatergic neurotransmission. Concentration changes in these molecules due to defective synthetic machinery, receptor expression, or errors in their degradation and metabolism are accepted causes of several neurologic disorders. Knowledge of changes in neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain can add useful information in making a diagnosis, helping to pick the right drug of treatment, and monitoring patient response to drugs in a more objective manner. Recent advances in 1H-MR spectroscopy hold promise in providing a more reliable in vivo detection of these neurotransmitters. In this article, we summarize the essential biology of 3 major neurotransmitters: glutamate, GABA, and NAAG. Finally we illustrate possible applications of 1H-MR spectroscopy in neuroscience research. PMID:22207303

  17. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sanchez, Brian C. [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sepulveda, Maria S., E-mail: mssepulv@purdue.edu [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens ({mu}g/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl{sub 2}) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 {mu}g/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 {mu}g/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 {mu}g/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 {mu}g/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  18. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Sanchez, Brian C.; Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Sepulveda, Maria S.

    2009-01-01

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens (μg/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl 2 ) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 μg/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 μg/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 μg/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 μg/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  19. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Sanchez, Brian C; Szabo, Nancy J; Denslow, Nancy D; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens (microg/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl(2)) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 microg/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 microg/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 microg/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 microg/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  20. Substrates for Neuronal Cotransmission With Neuropeptides and Small Molecule Neurotransmitters in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick R. Nässel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known for more than 40 years that individual neurons can produce more than one neurotransmitter and that neuropeptides often are colocalized with small molecule neurotransmitters (SMNs. Over the years much progress has been made in understanding the functional consequences of cotransmission in the nervous system of mammals. There are also some excellent invertebrate models that have revealed roles of coexpressed neuropeptides and SMNs in increasing complexity, flexibility, and dynamics in neuronal signaling. However, for the fly Drosophila there are surprisingly few functional studies on cotransmission, although there is ample evidence for colocalization of neuroactive compounds in neurons of the CNS, based both on traditional techniques and novel single cell transcriptome analysis. With the hope to trigger interest in initiating cotransmission studies, this review summarizes what is known about Drosophila neurons and neuronal circuits where different neuropeptides and SMNs are colocalized. Coexistence of neuroactive substances has been recorded in different neuron types such as neuroendocrine cells, interneurons, sensory cells and motor neurons. Some of the circuits highlighted here are well established in the analysis of learning and memory, circadian clock networks regulating rhythmic activity and sleep, as well as neurons and neuroendocrine cells regulating olfaction, nociception, feeding, metabolic homeostasis, diuretic functions, reproduction, and developmental processes. One emerging trait is the broad role of short neuropeptide F in cotransmission and presynaptic facilitation in a number of different neuronal circuits. This review also discusses the functional relevance of coexisting peptides in the intestine. Based on recent single cell transcriptomics data, it is likely that the neuronal systems discussed in this review are just a fraction of the total set of circuits where cotransmission occurs in Drosophila. Thus, a

  1. Substrates for Neuronal Cotransmission With Neuropeptides and Small Molecule Neurotransmitters in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, Dick R.

    2018-01-01

    It has been known for more than 40 years that individual neurons can produce more than one neurotransmitter and that neuropeptides often are colocalized with small molecule neurotransmitters (SMNs). Over the years much progress has been made in understanding the functional consequences of cotransmission in the nervous system of mammals. There are also some excellent invertebrate models that have revealed roles of coexpressed neuropeptides and SMNs in increasing complexity, flexibility, and dynamics in neuronal signaling. However, for the fly Drosophila there are surprisingly few functional studies on cotransmission, although there is ample evidence for colocalization of neuroactive compounds in neurons of the CNS, based both on traditional techniques and novel single cell transcriptome analysis. With the hope to trigger interest in initiating cotransmission studies, this review summarizes what is known about Drosophila neurons and neuronal circuits where different neuropeptides and SMNs are colocalized. Coexistence of neuroactive substances has been recorded in different neuron types such as neuroendocrine cells, interneurons, sensory cells and motor neurons. Some of the circuits highlighted here are well established in the analysis of learning and memory, circadian clock networks regulating rhythmic activity and sleep, as well as neurons and neuroendocrine cells regulating olfaction, nociception, feeding, metabolic homeostasis, diuretic functions, reproduction, and developmental processes. One emerging trait is the broad role of short neuropeptide F in cotransmission and presynaptic facilitation in a number of different neuronal circuits. This review also discusses the functional relevance of coexisting peptides in the intestine. Based on recent single cell transcriptomics data, it is likely that the neuronal systems discussed in this review are just a fraction of the total set of circuits where cotransmission occurs in Drosophila. Thus, a systematic search for

  2. Stress-Induced Synaptic Dysfunction and Neurotransmitter Release in Alzheimer's Disease: Can Neurotransmitters and Neuromodulators be Potential Therapeutic Targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj; Sharma, Renu; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Ambasta, Rashmi K; Kumar, Pravir

    2017-01-01

    The communication between neurons at synaptic junctions is an intriguing process that monitors the transmission of various electro-chemical signals in the central nervous system. Albeit any aberration in the mechanisms associated with transmission of these signals leads to loss of synaptic contacts in both the neocortex and hippocampus thereby causing insidious cognitive decline and memory dysfunction. Compelling evidence suggests that soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau serve as toxins in the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity and aberrant neurotransmitter (NT) release at synapses consequently causing a cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Further, an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission systems induced by impaired redox signaling and altered mitochondrial integrity is also amenable for such abnormalities. Defective NT release at the synaptic junction causes several detrimental effects associated with altered activity of synaptic proteins, transcription factors, Ca2+ homeostasis, and other molecules critical for neuronal plasticity. These detrimental effects further disrupt the normal homeostasis of neuronal cells and thereby causing synaptic loss. Moreover, the precise mechanistic role played by impaired NTs and neuromodulators (NMs) and altered redox signaling in synaptic dysfunction remains mysterious, and their possible interlink still needs to be investigated. Therefore, this review elucidates the intricate role played by both defective NTs/NMs and altered redox signaling in synaptopathy. Further, the involvement of numerous pharmacological approaches to compensate neurotransmission imbalance has also been discussed, which may be considered as a potential therapeutic approach in synaptopathy associated with AD.

  3. CHOLINERGIC AND NORADRENERGIC MODULATION OF LONG-TERM EXPLICIT MEMORY ARE ALTERED BY CHRONIC LOW-LEVEL LEAD EXPOSURE. (U915393)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent evidence suggests that septohippocampal cholinergic activity is suppressed in rats exposed to low levels of lead (Pb). As a result, noradrenergic activity may be elevated due to compensatory sympathetic sprouting. Therefore, the goals of this study were to (a) determine...

  4. A computational psychiatry approach identifies how alpha-2a noradrenergic agonist guanfacine affects feature-based reinforcement learning in the macaque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassani, S.A.; Oemisch, M.; Balcarras, M.; Westendorff, S.; Ardid, S.; van der Meer, M.A.; Tiesinga, P.H.E.; Womelsdorf, T.

    2017-01-01

    Noradrenaline is believed to support cognitive flexibility through the alpha 2A noradrenergic receptor (a2A-NAR) acting in prefrontal cortex. Enhanced flexibility has been inferred from improved working memory with the a2A-NA agonist Guanfacine. But it has been unclear whether Guanfacine improves

  5. Loud Noise Exposure Produces DNA, Neurotransmitter and Morphological Damage within Specific Brain Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada Frenzilli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to loud noise is a major environmental threat to public health. Loud noise exposure, apart from affecting the inner ear, is deleterious for cardiovascular, endocrine and nervous systems and it is associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study we investigated DNA, neurotransmitters and immune-histochemical alterations induced by exposure to loud noise in three major brain areas (cerebellum, hippocampus, striatum of Wistar rats. Rats were exposed to loud noise (100 dBA for 12 h. The effects of noise on DNA integrity in all three brain areas were evaluated by using Comet assay. In parallel studies, brain monoamine levels and morphology of nigrostriatal pathways, hippocampus and cerebellum were analyzed at different time intervals (24 h and 7 days after noise exposure. Loud noise produced a sudden increase in DNA damage in all the brain areas under investigation. Monoamine levels detected at 7 days following exposure were differently affected depending on the specific brain area. Namely, striatal but not hippocampal dopamine (DA significantly decreased, whereas hippocampal and cerebellar noradrenaline (NA was significantly reduced. This is in line with pathological findings within striatum and hippocampus consisting of a decrease in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH combined with increased Bax and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Loud noise exposure lasting 12 h causes immediate DNA, and long-lasting neurotransmitter and immune-histochemical alterations within specific brain areas of the rat. These alterations may suggest an anatomical and functional link to explain the neurobiology of diseases which prevail in human subjects exposed to environmental noise.

  6. Evaluation of common variants in 16 genes involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Cormand, Bru; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Hervás, Amaia; Bosch, Rosa; Palomar, Glòria; Nogueira, Mariana; Gómez-Barros, Núria; Richarte, Vanesa; Corrales, Montse; Garcia-Martinez, Iris; Corominas, Roser; Guijarro, Silvina; Bigorra, Aitana; Bayés, Mònica; Casas, Miguel; Ribasés, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by inappropriate difficulties to sustain attention, control impulses and modulate activity level. Although ADHD is one of the most prevalent childhood psychiatric disorders, it also persists into adulthood in around 30-50% of the cases. Based on the effect of psychostimulants used in the pharmacological treatment of ADHD, dysfunctions in neuroplasticity mechanisms and synapses have been postulated to be involved in the pathophysiology of ADHD. With this background, we evaluated, both in childhood and adulthood ADHD, the role of several genes involved in the control of neurotransmitter release through synaptic vesicle docking, fusion and recycling processes by means of a population-based association study. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms across 16 genes in a clinical sample of 950 ADHD patients (506 adults and 444 children) and 905 controls. Single and multiple-marker analyses identified several significant associations after correcting for multiple testing with a false discovery rate (FDR) of 15%: (i) the SYT2 gene was strongly associated with both adulthood and childhood ADHD (p=0.001, OR=1.49 (1.18-1.89) and p=0.007, OR=1.37 (1.09-1.72), respectively) and (ii) STX1A was found associated with ADHD only in adults (p=0.0041; OR=1.28 (1.08-1.51)). These data provide preliminary evidence for the involvement of genes that participate in the control of neurotransmitter release in the genetic predisposition to ADHD through a gene-system association study. Further follow-up studies in larger cohorts and deep-sequencing of the associated genomic regions are required to identify sequence variants directly involved in ADHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  7. Noradrenergic facilitation of shock-probe defensive burying in lateral septum of rats, and modulation by chronic treatment with desipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Corina O; Barrera, Gabriel; Lapiz, M Danet S; Bedard, Tania; Mahan, Amy; Morilak, David A

    2007-03-30

    We have previously shown that acute stress-induced release of norepinephrine (NE) facilitates anxiety-like behavioral responses to stress, such as reduction in open-arm exploration on the elevated-plus maze and in social behavior on the social interaction test. Since these responses represent inhibition of ongoing behavior, it is important to also address whether NE facilitates a response that represents an activation of behavior. Correspondingly, it is unknown how a chronic elevation in tonic steady-state noradrenergic (NA) neurotransmission induced by NE reuptake blockade might alter this acute modulatory function, a regulatory process that may be pertinent to the anxiolytic effects of NE reuptake blockers such as desipramine (DMI). Therefore, in this study, we investigated noradrenergic modulation of the shock-probe defensive burying response in the lateral septum (LS). In experiment 1, shock-probe exposure induced an acute 3-fold increase in NE levels measured in LS of male Sprague-Dawley rats by microdialysis. Shock-probe exposure also induced a modest rise in plasma ACTH, taken as an indicator of perceived stress, that returned to baseline more rapidly in rats that were allowed to bury the probe compared to rats prevented from burying by providing them with minimal bedding, indicating that the active defensive burying behavior is an effective coping strategy that reduces the impact of acute shock probe-induced stress. In experiment 2, blockade of either alpha(1)- or beta-adrenergic receptors in LS by local antagonist microinjection immediately before testing reduced defensive burying and increased immobility. In the next experiment, chronic DMI treatment increased basal extracellular NE levels in LS, and attenuated the acute shock probe-induced increase in NE release in LS relative to baseline. Chronic DMI treatment decreased shock-probe defensive burying behavior in a time-dependent manner, apparent only after 2 weeks or more of drug treatment. Moreover

  8. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  9. Contributions to the field of neurotransmitters by Japanese scientists, and reflections on my own research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Masanori

    2007-03-01

    PART I DESCRIBES IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS MADE BY SOME JAPANESE PIONEERS IN THE FIELD OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS: (their achievements in parentheses) J. Takamine (isolation and crystallization of adrenaline); K. Shimidzu (early hint for acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter); F. Kanematsu (donation of the Kanematsu Memorial Institute in Sydney); T. Hayashi (discovery of the excitatory action of glutamate and the inhibitory action of GABA); and I. Sano (discovery of a high concentration of dopamine in striatum, its reduction in a patient with Parkinson's disease and the treatment with DOPA). In Part II, I present some of my reflections on my research on neurotransmitters. The work of my colleagues and myself has made some significant contributions to the establishment of neurotransmitter roles played by GABA and substance P, the first amino acid and the first peptide neurotransmitters, respectively. By the early 1960s, 3 substances, i.e., acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline, had been established as neurotransmitters. Now the number of neurotransmitters is believed to be as many as 50 or even more mainly due to the inclusion of several amino acids and a large number of peptide transmitters.

  10. Amino acid neurotransmitters and new approaches to anticonvulsant drug action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, B

    1984-01-01

    Amino acids provide the most universal and important inhibitory (gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine) and excitatory (glutamate, aspartate, cysteic acid, cysteine sulphinic acid) neurotransmitters in the brain. An anticonvulsant action may be produced (1) by enhancing inhibitory (GABAergic) processes, and (2) by diminishing excitatory transmission. Possible pharmacological mechanisms for enhancing GABA-mediated inhibition include (1) GABA agonist action, (2) GABA prodrugs, (3) drugs facilitating GABA release from terminals, (4) inhibition of GABA-transaminase, (5) allosteric enhancement of the efficacy of GABA at the receptor complex, (6) direction action on the chloride ionophore, and (7) inhibition of GABA reuptake. Examples of these approaches include the use of irreversible GABA-transaminase inhibitors, such as gamma-vinyl GABA, and the development of anticonvulsant beta-carbolines that interact with the "benzodiazepine receptor." Pharmacological mechanisms for diminishing excitatory transmission include (1) enzyme inhibitors that decrease the maximal rate of synthesis of glutamate or aspartate, (2) drugs that decrease the synaptic release of glutamate or aspartate, and (3) drugs that block the post-synaptic action of excitatory amino acids. Compounds that selectively antagonise excitation due to dicarboxylic amino acids have recently been developed. Those that selectively block excitation produced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (and aspartate) have proved to be potent anticonvulsants in many animal models of epilepsy. This provides a novel approach to the design of anticonvulsant drugs.

  11. Endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumaier, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The role of endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus was investigated by using extracellular recording and radioligand binding techniques in the hippocampal slice preparation. Synaptic conductances from endogenously released opioid peptides have been difficult to detect. This problem was approach by designing a novel assay of opioid peptide release, in which release was detected by measuring binding competition between endogenous opioids and added radioligand. Membrane depolarization displaced [ 3 H]-diprenorphine binding in a transient, calcium-dependent, and peptidase-sensitive manner. Autoradiographic localization of the sites of [ 3 H]-diprenorphine binding displacement showed that significant opioid peptide release and receptor occupancy occurred in each major subregion of the hippocampal slices. This assay method can not be used to define optimal electrical stimulation conditions for releasing endogenous opioids. The binding displacement method was extended to the study of the sigma receptor. Depolarization of hippocampal slices was found to reduce the binding of the sigma-selective radioligand [ 3 H]-ditolylguanidine in a transient and calcium-dependent manner with no apparent direct effects on sigma receptor affinity

  12. Mechanical Regulation in Cell Division and in Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Sathish

    During their lifecycle, cells must produce forces which play important roles in several subcellular processes. Force-producing components are organized into macromolecular assemblies of proteins that are often dynamic, and are constructed or disassembled in response to various signals. The forces themselves may directly be involved in subcellular mechanics, or they may influence mechanosensing proteins either within or outside these structures. These proteins play different roles: they may ensure the stability of the force-producing structure, or they may send signals to a coupled process. The generation and sensing of subcellular forces is an active research topic, and this thesis focusses on the roles of these forces in two key areas: cell division and neurotransmitter release. The first part of the thesis deals with the effect of force on cell wall growth regulation during division in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a cigar-shaped, unicellular organism. During cytokinesis, the last stage of cell division in which the cell physically divides into two, a tense cytokinetic ring anchored to the cellular membrane assembles and constricts, accompanied by the inward centripetal growth of new cell wall, called septum, in the wake of the inward-moving membrane. The contour of the septum hole maintains its circularity as it reduces in size--an indication of regulated growth. To characterize the cell wall growth process, we performed image analysis on contours of the leading edge of the septum obtained via fluorescence microscopy in the labs of our collaborators. We quantified the deviations from circularity using the edge roughness. The roughness was spatially correlated, suggestive of regulated growth. We hypothesized that the cell wall growers are mechanosensitive and respond to the force exerted by the ring. A mathematical model based on this hypothesis then showed that this leads to corrections of roughness in a curvature-dependent fashion. Thus, one of

  13. Neurotransmitter regulation of adult neurogenesis: putative therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, V A; Vadodaria, K C; Jha, S

    2007-10-01

    The evidence that new neuron addition takes place in the mammalian brain throughout adult life has dramatically altered our perspective of the potential for plasticity in the adult CNS. Although several recent reports suggest a latent neurogenic capacity in multiple brain regions, the two major neurogenic niches that retain the ability to generate substantial numbers of new neurons in adult life are the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampal formation. The discovery of adult neurogenesis has also unveiled a novel therapeutic target for the repair of damaged neuronal circuits. In this regard, understanding the endogenous mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis holds promise both for a deeper understanding of this form of structural plasticity, as well as the identification of pathways that can serve as therapeutic targets to manipulate adult neurogenesis. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the regulation of adult neurogenesis by neurotransmitters and to highlight the relevance of these endogenous regulators as targets to modulate adult neurogenesis in a clinical context.

  14. Pyrethroid insecticides evoke neurotransmitter release from rabbit striatal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eells, J.T.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of the synthetic pyrethroid insecticide fenvalerate ([R,S]-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl[R,S]-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3- methylbutyrate) on neurotransmitter release in rabbit brain slices were investigated. Fenvalerate evoked a calcium-dependent release of [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]acetylcholine from rabbit striatal slices that was concentration-dependent and specific for the toxic stereoisomer of the insecticide. The release of [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]acetylcholine by fenvalerate was modulated by D2 dopamine receptor activation and antagonized completely by the sodium channel blocker, tetrodotoxin. These findings are consistent with an action of fenvalerate on the voltage-dependent sodium channels of the presynaptic membrane resulting in membrane depolarization, and the release of dopamine and acetylcholine by a calcium-dependent exocytotic process. In contrast to results obtained in striatal slices, fenvalerate did not elicit the release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine or [ 3 H]acetylcholine from rabbit hippocampal slices indicative of regional differences in sensitivity to type II pyrethroid actions

  15. Adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behavior and ethanol intake and impairs fear extinction in adulthood: Possible role of disrupted noradrenergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, M J; Chappell, A E; Carter, E; Weiner, J L

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol use disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are highly comorbid, and exposure to chronic stress during adolescence may increase the incidence of these conditions in adulthood. Efforts to identify the common stress-related mechanisms driving these disorders have been hampered, in part, by a lack of reliable preclinical models that replicate their comorbid symptomatology. Prior work by us, and others, has shown that adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behaviors and voluntary ethanol consumption in adult male Long-Evans rats. Here we examined whether social isolation also produces deficiencies in extinction of conditioned fear, a hallmark symptom of PTSD. Additionally, as disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to alcoholism, we examined the effect of anxiolytic medications that target noradrenergic signaling on ethanol intake following adolescent social isolation. Our results confirm and extend previous findings that adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behavior and enhances ethanol intake and preference in adulthood. Additionally, social isolation is associated with a significant deficit in the extinction of conditioned fear and a marked increase in the ability of noradrenergic therapeutics to decrease ethanol intake. These results suggest that adolescent social isolation not only leads to persistent increases in anxiety-like behaviors and ethanol consumption, but also disrupts fear extinction, and as such may be a useful preclinical model of stress-related psychopathology. Our data also suggest that disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to escalated ethanol drinking following social isolation, thus further highlighting the potential utility of noradrenergic therapeutics in treating the deleterious behavioral sequelae associated with early life stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  17. The subpopulation of microglia sensitive to neurotransmitters/neurohormones is modulated by stimulation with LPS, interferon-γ, and IL-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, Maria; Szulzewsky, Frank; Matyash, Vitali; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Recently, neurotransmitters/neurohormones have been identified as factors controlling the function of microglia, the immune competent cells of the central nervous system. In this study, we compared the responsiveness of microglia to neurotransmitters/neurohormones. We freshly isolated microglia from healthy adult C57Bl/6 mice and found that only a small fraction (1-20%) responded to the application of endothelin, histamine, substance P, serotonin, galanin, somatostatin, angiotensin II, vasopressin, neurotensin, dopamine, or nicotine. In cultured microglia from neonatal and adult mice, a similarly small population of cells responded to these neurotransmitters/neurohormones. To induce a proinflammatory phenotype, we applied lipopolysaccaride (LPS) or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) to the cultures for 24 h. Several of the responding populations increased; however, there was no uniform pattern when comparing adult with neonatal microglia or LPS with IFN-γ treatment. IL-4 as an anti-inflammatory substance increased the histamine-, substance P-, and somatostatin-sensitive populations only in microglia from adult, but not in neonatal cells. We also found that the expression of different receptors was not strongly correlated, indicating that there are many different populations of microglia with a distinct set of receptors. Our results demonstrate that microglial cells are a heterogeneous population with respect to their sensitivity to neurotransmitters/neurohormones and that they are more responsive in defined activation states. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The nitric oxide donor SNAP-induced amino acid neurotransmitter release in cortical neurons. Effects of blockers of voltage-dependent sodium and calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons.

  19. The nitric oxide donor SNAP-induced amino acid neurotransmitter release in cortical neurons. Effects of blockers of voltage-dependent sodium and calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Joaquín Merino

    Full Text Available The discovery that nitric oxide (NO functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated.The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated.Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons.

  20. Three Gaseous Neurotransmitters, Nitric oxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Hydrogen Sulfide, Are Involved in the Neurogenic Relaxation Responses of the Porcine Internal Anal Sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folasire, Oladayo; Mills, Kylie A; Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-31

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) plays an important role in maintaining continence and a number of neurotransmitters are known to regulate IAS tone. The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of the neurotransmitters involved in the relaxant and contractile responses of the porcine IAS. Responses of isolated strips of IAS to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were obtained in the absence and presence of inhibitors of neurotransmitter systems. Contractile responses of the sphincter to EFS were unaffected by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (1 μM), but were almost completely abolished by the adrenergic neuron blocker guanethidine (10 μM). Contractile responses were also reduced (by 45% at 5 Hz, P 40-50% reduction), zinc protoprophyrin IX (10 μM), an inhibitor of carbon monoxide synthesis (20-40% reduction), and also propargylglycine (30 μM) and aminooxyacetic acid (30 μM), inhibitors of hydrogen sulphide synthesis (15-20% reduction). Stimulation of IAS efferent nerves releases excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: noradrenaline is the predominant contractile transmitter with a smaller component from ATP, whilst 3 gases mediate relaxation responses to EFS, with the combined contributions being nitric oxide > carbon monoxide > hydrogen sulfide.

  1. Outside-out "sniffer-patch" clamp technique for in situ measures of neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Chrétien, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism underlying neurotransmitter release is a critical research domain for the understanding of neuronal network function; however, few techniques are available for the direct detection and measurement of neurotransmitter release. To date, the sniffer-patch clamp technique is mainly used to investigate these mechanisms from individual cultured cells. In this study, we propose to adapt the sniffer-patch clamp technique to in situ detection of neurosecretion. Using outside-out patches from donor cells as specific biosensors plunged in acute cerebral slices, this technique allows for proper detection and quantification of neurotransmitter release at the level of the neuronal network.

  2. Ethylbenzene-induced hearing loss, neurobehavioral function, and neurotransmitter alterations in petrochemical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Yanrang; Wang, Qian; Yang, Deyi; Zhang, Jingshu; Wang, Fengshan; Gu, Qing

    2013-09-01

    To estimate hearing loss, neurobehavioral function, and neurotransmitter alteration induced by ethylbenzene in petrochemical workers. From two petrochemical plants, 246 and 307 workers exposed to both ethylbenzene and noise were recruited-290 workers exposed to noise only from a power station plant and 327 office personnel as control group, respectively. Hearing and neurobehavioral functions were evaluated. Serum neurotransmitters were also determined. The prevalence of hearing loss was much higher in petrochemical groups than that in power station and control groups (P workers (P hearing loss, neurobehavioral function impairment, and imbalance of neurotransmitters.

  3. Neurotransmitter-based strategies for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Devsmita; Phillips, Cristy; Hsieh, Wayne; Sumanth, Krithika; Dang, Van; Salehi, Ahmad

    2014-10-03

    Down syndrome (DS) is a multisystem disorder affecting the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, neurological, hematopoietic, and musculoskeletal systems and is characterized by significant cognitive disability and a possible common pathogenic mechanism with Alzheimer's disease. During the last decade, numerous studies have supported the notion that the triplication of specific genes on human chromosome 21 plays a significant role in cognitive dysfunction in DS. Here we reviewed studies in trisomic mouse models and humans, including children and adults with DS. In order to identify groups of genes that contribute to cognitive disability in DS, multiple mouse models of DS with segmental trisomy have been generated. Over-expression of these particular genes in DS can lead to dysfunction of several neurotransmitter systems. Therapeutic strategies for DS have either focused on normalizing the expression of triplicated genes with important roles in DS or restoring the function of these systems. Indeed, our extensive review of studies on the pathogenesis of DS suggests that one plausible strategy for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction is to target the cholinergic, serotonergic, GABA-ergic, glutamatergic, and norepinephrinergic system. However, a fundamental strategy for treatment of cognitive dysfunction in DS would include reducing to normal levels the expression of specific triplicated genes in affected systems before the onset of neurodegeneration. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Selective Serotonergic (SSRI) Versus Noradrenergic (SNRI) Reuptake Inhibitors with and without Acetylsalicylic Acid in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Reynaert, Christine; Jacques, Denis; Lepiece, Brice; Dubois, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Antidepressant medication efficacy remains a major research challenge. Here, we explored four questions: whether noradrenergic antidepressants are more effective than serotonergic antidepressants; whether the addition of 100 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) changes antidepressant efficacy; whether the long-term efficacy differs depending on the antidepressant and the addition of ASA; and whether serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are clinically informative. In a two-year study, forty people with major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to groups that received an SSRI (escitalopram) or an SNRI (duloxetine), each group received concomitant ASA (100 mg) or a placebo. Sociodemographic data were recorded and patients under went regular assessments with the Hamilton depression scale (HDS) and clinical global impression (CGI) scale. Serum levels of BDNF were measured four times per year. There was no significant difference in efficacy between the two antidepressants or between antidepressant treatment with and without ASA. However, subgroup comparisons revealed that the duloxetine + ASA (DASA) subgroup showed a more rapid improvement in HDS score as early as 2 months (t=-3.114, p=0.01), in CGI score at 5 months (t=-2.119, p=0.05), and a better remission rate (χ 2 =6.296, p 0.012) than the escitalopram + placebo (EP) subgroup. Serum BDNF before treatment was also higher in the DASA subgroup than in the EP subgroup (t=3.713; p=0.002). This suggest two hypotheses: either a noradrenergic agent combined with ASA is more effective in treating depression than a serotonergic agent alone, or the level of serum BDNF before treatment is a precursor marker of the response to antidepressants. Further research is needed to test these hypotheses.

  5. Mimicking Neurotransmitter Release in Chemical Synapses via Hysteresis Engineering in MoS2 Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andrew J; Razavieh, Ali; Nasr, Joseph R; Schulman, Daniel S; Eichfeld, Chad M; Das, Saptarshi

    2017-03-28

    Neurotransmitter release in chemical synapses is fundamental to diverse brain functions such as motor action, learning, cognition, emotion, perception, and consciousness. Moreover, improper functioning or abnormal release of neurotransmitter is associated with numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy, sclerosis, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. We have utilized hysteresis engineering in a back-gated MoS 2 field effect transistor (FET) in order to mimic such neurotransmitter release dynamics in chemical synapses. All three essential features, i.e., quantal, stochastic, and excitatory or inhibitory nature of neurotransmitter release, were accurately captured in our experimental demonstration. We also mimicked an important phenomenon called long-term potentiation (LTP), which forms the basis of human memory. Finally, we demonstrated how to engineer the LTP time by operating the MoS 2 FET in different regimes. Our findings could provide a critical component toward the design of next-generation smart and intelligent human-like machines and human-machine interfaces.

  6. ISSUES OF THE ACCOUNTING OF A WEAK NEUROTRANSMITTER COMPONENT IN THE PHARMACOTHERAPY OF POSTCOMATOSE STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Zaitsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle in the accounting of a weak neurotransmitter component is considered as one of the most specific and promising ones for the study and practical introduction of therapy for postcomatous states. The paper outlines problems in the accurate determination of the lack and excess of neurotransmitters by up-to-date techniques (biochemical and neurophysiological tests, magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It gives the reasons for clinical doubts and difficulties in the practical use of ideas about the relationship of the clinical picture to one or another disorder of neurotransmitter metabolism and to the feasibilities of its effective correction. It is concluded that the main method for the individualized therapy of postcomatous states is the clinical analysis of neurological and psychiatric symptoms, only upon its completion, the consideration of a weak neurotransmitter component can be taken into account. The main possible and currently preferable ways to correct cholinergic and GABAergic deficiency and redundancy and deficiency in glutamate and dopamine are considered.

  7. Contributions to the field of neurotransmitters by Japanese scientists, and reflections on my own research

    OpenAIRE

    Otsuka, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    Part I describes important contributions made by some Japanese pioneers in the field of neurotransmitters: (their achievements in parentheses) J. Takamine (isolation and crystallization of adrenaline); K. Shimidzu (early hint for acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter); F. Kanematsu (donation of the Kanematsu Memorial Institute in Sydney); T. Hayashi (discovery of the excitatory action of glutamate and the inhibitory action of GABA); and I. Sano (discovery of a high concentration of dopamine in ...

  8. Functional characterization of neurotransmitter activation and modulation in a nematode model ligand-gated ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Stephanie A; Yoluk, Özge; Klement, Göran; Riederer, Erika A; Lindahl, Erik; Howard, Rebecca J

    2016-07-01

    The superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels includes neurotransmitter receptors that mediate fast synaptic transmission in vertebrates, and are targets for drugs including alcohols, anesthetics, benzodiazepines, and anticonvulsants. However, the mechanisms of ion channel opening, gating, and modulation in these receptors leave many open questions, despite their pharmacological importance. Subtle conformational changes in both the extracellular and transmembrane domains are likely to influence channel opening, but have been difficult to characterize given the limited structural data available for human membrane proteins. Recent crystal structures of a modified Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) in multiple states offer an appealing model system for structure-function studies. However, the pharmacology of the crystallographic GluCl construct is not well established. To establish the functional relevance of this system, we used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes to characterize activation of crystallographic and native-like GluCl constructs by L-glutamate and ivermectin. We also tested modulation by ethanol and other anesthetic agents, and used site-directed mutagenesis to explore the role of a region of Loop F which was implicated in ligand gating by molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings indicate that the crystallographic construct functionally models concentration-dependent agonism and allosteric modulation of pharmacologically relevant receptors. Specific substitutions at residue Leu174 in loop F altered direct L-glutamate activation, consistent with computational evidence for this region's role in ligand binding. These insights demonstrate conservation of activation and modulation properties in this receptor family, and establish a framework for GluCl as a model system, including new possibilities for drug discovery. In this study, we elucidate the validity of a modified glutamate

  9. The neurobiology of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: from neurotransmitters to neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Chris

    2018-01-30

    Impulse control disorders (ICD) are common neuropsychiatric disorders that can arise in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients after commencing dopamine replacement therapy. Approximately 15% of all patients develop these disorders and many more exhibit subclinical symptoms of impulsivity. ICD is thought to develop due to an interaction between the use of dopaminergic medication and an as yet unknown neurobiological vulnerability that either pre-existed before PD onset (possibly genetic) or is associated with neural alterations due to the PD pathology. This review discusses genes, neurotransmitters and neural networks that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ICD in PD. Although dopamine and the related reward system have been the main focus of research, recently, studies have started to look beyond those systems to find new clues to the neurobiological underpinnings of ICD and come up with possible new targets for treatment. Studies on the whole-brain connectome to investigate the global alterations due to ICD development are currently lacking. In addition, there is a dire need for longitudinal studies that are able to disentangle the contributions of individual (genetic) traits and secondary effects of the PD pathology and chronic dopamine replacement therapy to the development of ICD in PD.

  10. Mechanisms of multiple neurotransmitters in the effects of Lycopene on brain injury induced by Hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weichun; Shen, Ziyi; Wen, Sixian; Wang, Wei; Hu, Minyu

    2018-02-07

    Lycopene is a kind of carotenoid, with a strong capacity of antioxidation and regulating the bloodlipid. There has been some evidence that lycopene has protective effects on the central nervous system, but few studies have rigorously explored the role of neurotransmitters in it. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effects of several neurotransmitters as lycopene exerts anti-injury effects induced by hyperlipidemia. Eighty adult SD rats, half male and half female, were randomly divided into eight groups on the basis of serum total cholesterol (TC) levels and body weight. There was a control group containing rats fed a standard laboratory rodent chow diet (CD); a hypercholesterolemic diet (rat chow supplemented with 4% cholesterol, 1% cholic acid and 0.5% thiouracil - this is also called a CCT diet) group; a positive group (CCT + F) fed CCT, supplemented with 10 mg·kg·bw - 1 ·d - 1 fluvastatin sodium by gastric perfusion; and lycopene groups at five dose levels (CCT + LYCO) fed with CCT and supplied lycopene at doses of 5, 25, 45, 65, and 85 mg·kg·bw - 1 ·d - 1 . The levels of TC, triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), nerve growth factor (NGF), glutamic acid (Glu), Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA1R), GABA A , 5-HT 1 , D 1 , and apoptosis-related proteins Caspase3, bax, and bcl-2 were measured after the experiment. Nissl staining was adopted to observe the morphological changes in neurons. At the end of the experiment, the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C, IL-1, TNF-α, and ox-LDL in the serum and brain as well as the content of Glu, DA, NMDA, and D 1 in the brain of rats in the CCT group were higher than those in the control group (Plycopene (25

  11. Noradrenergic mechanisms and high blood pressure maintenance in genetic hypertension: The role of Gi proteins and voltage-dependent calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zicha, Josef; Pintérová, Mária; Líšková, Silvia; Dobešová, Zdenka; Kuneš, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 4 (2007), s. 229-229 ISSN 1064-1963. [International symposium on SHR /12./. 20.10.2006-21.10.2006, Kyoto] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7786 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : genetic hypertension * noradrenergic mechanisms * Gi proteins * voltage-dependent calcium channels Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  12. Brain Pharmacokinetics and the Pharmacological Effects on Striatal Neurotransmitter Levels of Pueraria lobata Isoflavonoids in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxin Xiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavonoids are putatively active components of Pueraria lobata and has been demonstrated prominent neuro-protection effect against cerebrovascular disorders, hypertension or Parkinson's disease (PD. However, the molecular basis for the beneficial effect of Pueraria lobata on nervous systems has not been well revealed. The present study aims to assess striatum exposure to main active isoflavonoids and changes of striatal extracellular neurotransmitters levels in rat brain after intravenous administration of Pueraria lobata isoflavonoids extracts (PLF, to further elucidate its' substantial bases for neuro activities. Fifteen rats were divided into 3 groups (five rats in each group to receive a dose of PLF at 80 or 160 mg/kg or normal saline (vehicle, respectively. An LC-MS/MS method was employed to determine the concentrations of five main isoflavonoids and multiple neurotransmitters in microdialysate from striatal extracellular fluid (ECF of the rats. The exposed quantities of puerarin (PU, 3′-methoxypuerarin (MPU, daidzein-8-C-apiosyl-(1-6-glucoside (DAC, and 3′-hydroxypuerarin (HPU in striatum were dose-dependent. The content of daidzein (DAZ was too low to be detected in all dialysate samples through the experiment. Optimal dose PLF (80 mg/kg promoted DA metabolism and inhibited 5-HT metabolism. No obvious change in the level of GLu was determined. The concentration of GABA presented a temporary decline firstly and then a gradual uptrend followed by a further downtrend. Higher dose (160 mg/kg PLF could enhance the metabolism of both DA and 5-HT, and lower the extracellular level of GLu, without changing GABA concentrations, which might result in alleviation on excitatory toxicity under conditions, such as ischemia. The results infer that different dose of PLF should be chosen to achieve appropriate neurochemical modulation effects under conditions, such as hypertension or ischemia/stroke. These findings may significantly contribute to a

  13. Polymorphic variants of neurotransmitter receptor genes may affect sexual function in aging males: data from the HALS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźków, Paweł; Słowińska-Lisowska, Małgorzata; Łaczmański, Łukasz; Mędraś, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Human behavior is influenced by a number of brain neurotransmitters. Central dopamine, serotonin and melanocortin systems have special importance for male sexual function. We searched for associations between male aging symptoms and polymorphic sites of serotonin (5-HTR1B), melanocortin (MC4R) and dopamine (DRD2, DRD4) receptors. In a population-based sample, genotyping of 5-HTR1B (polymorphism: G861C), MC4R (polymorphisms: C-2745T, Val103Ile), DRD2 (polymorphism: C313T) and DRD4 (polymorphism: 48-bp VNTR) was performed in 387 healthy men. The Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale was used to evaluate specific ailments of aging men. We analyzed answers to questions from the AMS scale. Five points of the questionnaire addressed sexual symptoms of the aging male: feeling of passing one's peak, decrease in beard growth, decrease in ability/frequency to perform sexually, decrease in the number of morning erections, and decrease in sexual desire/libido (lacking pleasure in sex, lacking desire for sexual intercourse). Relations between reported symptoms and variants of the polymorphic sites of the studied genes were assessed. After adjusting for confounding factors (education, arterial hypertension, physical activity, weight, waist circumference) an association between the sexual dimension of AMS and genetic variants of 5-HTR1B G861C (p = 0.04) was observed. Variability of neurotransmitter receptor genes may be associated with sexual symptoms of aging in men. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Methanol extract of Nigella sativa seed induces changes in the levels of neurotransmitter amino acids in male rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Tarek; Carretero, María Emilia; Arce, Carmen; Gómez-Serranillos, María Pilar

    2017-12-01

    Nigella sativa L. (Ranunculaceae) (NS) has been used for medicinal and culinary purposes. Different parts of the plant are used to treat many disorders. This study investigates the effects of NS methanol extract on brain neurotransmitter amino acid levels. We measured the changes in aspartate, glutamate, glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid in five brain regions of male Wistar rats after methanol extract treatment. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with saline solution (controls) or NS methanol extract (equivalent of 2.5 g/kg body weight) and sacrificed 1 h later or after administering 1 daily dose for 8 days. The neurotransmitters were measured in the hypothalamus, cortex, striatum, hippocampus and thalamus by HPLC. Results showed significant changes in amino acids compared to basal values. Glutamate increased significantly (16-36%) in the regions analyzed except the striatum. Aspartate in the hypothalamus (50 and 76%) and glycine in hippocampus (32 and 25%), thalamus (66 and 29%) and striatum (75 and 48%) also increased with the two treatment intervals. γ-Aminobutyric acid significantly increased in the hippocampus (38 and 32%) and thalamus (22 and 40%) but decreased in the cortex and hypothalamus although in striatum only after eight days of treatment (24%). Our results suggest that injected methanol extract modifies amino acid levels in the rat brain regions. These results could be of interest since some neurodegenerative diseases are related to amino acid level imbalances in the central nervous system, suggesting the prospect for therapeutic use of NS against these disorders.

  15. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Evert; de Kleijn, Roy; Colzato, Lorenza S; Alkemade, Anneke; Forstmann, Birte U; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but the studies that have assessed this issue are often contradictory and range widely in their employed methods. Accordingly, future research needs to establish the effects of oral GABA administration on GABA levels in the human brain, for example using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There is some evidence in favor of a calming effect of GABA food supplements, but most of this evidence was reported by researchers with a potential conflict of interest. We suggest that any veridical effects of GABA food supplements on brain and cognition might be exerted through BBB passage or, more indirectly, via an effect on the enteric nervous system. We conclude that the mechanism of action of GABA food supplements is far from clear, and that further work is needed to establish the behavioral effects of GABA.

  16. Soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of selected neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther [Dipartimento di Chimica ' G. Ciamician' dell' Universita, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Giuliano, Barbara M. [Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Plekan, Oksana [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Feyer, Vitaliy [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Electronic Properties (PGI-6), Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Strasse, 52428 Juelich (Germany); Richter, Robert [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, I-00016 Rome (Italy); Prince, Kevin C., E-mail: kevin.prince@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurotransmitter molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoelectron spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak hydrogen bonding. -- Abstract: The valence molecular orbitals and core levels of tyramine, tryptamine and tryptophol in the gas phase have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and theoretical methods. The energies of the outer valence region spectrum are found to be in agreement with previously reported He I spectra, while new data on the inner valence molecular orbitals are reported. The structures in the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen core level spectra of these molecules have been identified and assigned. These compounds are characterised by conformers with hydrogen bonding in which the {pi} systems of the phenol and indole groups act as hydrogen acceptors, but a spectroscopic signature of this hydrogen bond was not observed. This is in contrast with our previous spectra of amino acids, where conformers with specific hydrogen bonding showed strong effects in core level spectra. We attribute the difference to the weaker strength of the {pi}-hydrogen bonding.

  17. Novel perspectives of neural stem cell differentiation: from neurotransmitters to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Cleber A; Schwindt, Telma T; Martins, Antonio H; Alves, Janaína M; Mello, Luiz Eugênio; Ulrich, Henning

    2009-01-01

    In the past years, many reports have described the existence of neural progenitor and stem cells in the adult central nervous system capable of generating new neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. This discovery has overturned the central assumption in the neuroscience field, of no new neurons being originated in the brain after birth and provided the fundaments to understand the molecular basis of neural differentiation and to develop new therapies for neural tissue repair. Although the mechanisms underlying cell fate during neural development are not yet understood, the importance of intrinsic and extrinsic factors and of an appropriate microenvironment is well known. In this context, emerging evidence strongly suggests that glial cells play a key role in controlling multiple steps of neurogenesis. Those cells, of particular radial glia, are important for migration, cell specification, and integration of neurons into a functional neural network. This review aims to present an update in the neurogenesis area and highlight the modulation of neural stem cell differentiation by neurotransmitters, growth factors, and their receptors, with possible applications for cell therapy strategies of neurological disorders.

  18. Sex hormones affect neurotransmitters and shape the adult female brain during hormonal transition periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eBarth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sex hormones have been implicated in neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, dendritic branching, myelination and other important mechanisms of neural plasticity. Here we review the evidence from animal experiments and human studies reporting interactions between sex hormones and the dominant neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, GABA and glutamate. We provide an overview of accumulating data during physiological and pathological conditions and discuss currently conceptualized theories on how sex hormones potentially trigger neuroplasticity changes through these four neurochemical systems. Many brain regions have been demonstrated to express high densities for estrogen- and progesterone receptors, such as the amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the hippocampus. As the hippocampus is of particular relevance in the context of mediating structural plasticity in the adult brain, we put particular emphasis on what evidence could be gathered thus far that links differences in behavior, neurochemical patterns and hippocampal structure to a changing hormonal environment. Finally, we discuss how physiologically occurring hormonal transition periods in humans can be used to model how changes in sex hormones influence functional connectivity, neurotransmission and brain structure in vivo.

  19. Urinary Neurotransmitters Are Selectively Altered in Children With Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Predict Cognitive Morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; McManus, Corena J. T.; Kellermann, Gottfried H.; Samiei, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cognitive dysfunction, suggesting altered neurotransmitter function. We explored overnight changes in neurotransmitters in the urine of children with and without OSA. Methods: Urine samples were collected from children with OSA and from control subjects before and after sleep studies. A neurocognitive battery assessing general cognitive ability (GCA) was administered to a subset of children with OSA. Samples were subjected to multiple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for 12 neurotransmitters, and adjusted for creatinine concentrations. Results: The study comprised 50 children with OSA and 20 control subjects. Of the children with OSA, 20 had normal GCA score (mean ± SD) (101.2 ± 14.5) and 16 had a reduced GCA score (87.3 ± 13.9; P neurotransmitters enabled prediction of OSA (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.923; P neurotransmitters in urine may not only predict OSA but also the presence of cognitive deficits. Larger cohort studies appear warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:23306904

  20. Short-term serotonergic but not noradrenergic antidepressant administration reduces attentional vigilance to threat in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Susannah E; Yiend, Jenny; Lester, Kathryn J; Cowen, Philip J; Harmer, Catherine J

    2009-03-01

    Anxiety is associated with threat-related biases in information processing such as heightened attentional vigilance to potential threat. Such biases are an important focus of psychological treatments for anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are effective in the treatment of a range of anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an SSRI on the processing of threat in healthy volunteers. A selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), which is not generally used in the treatment of anxiety, was used as a contrast to assess the specificity of SSRI effects on threat processing. Forty-two healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to 7 d double-blind intervention with the SSRI citalopram (20 mg/d), the SNRI reboxetine (8 mg/d), or placebo. On the final day, attentional and interpretative bias to threat was assessed using the attentional probe and the homograph primed lexical decision tasks. Citalopram reduced attentional vigilance towards fearful faces but did not affect the interpretation of ambiguous homographs as threatening. Reboxetine had no significant effect on either of these measures. Citalopram reduces attentional orienting to threatening stimuli, which is potentially relevant to its clinical use in the treatment of anxiety disorders. This finding supports a growing literature suggesting that an important mechanism through which pharmacological agents may exert their effects on mood is by reversing the cognitive biases that characterize the disorders that they treat. Future studies are needed to clarify the neural mechanisms through which these effects on threat processing are mediated.

  1. Presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors in guinea pig papillary muscle: evidence for adrenaline-mediated positive feedback on noradrenergic transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenta, B.; Singer, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Guinea pig papillary muscles were preincubated in the presence of 5 x 10 - 9 mol/L unlabeled noradrenaline or adrenaline then incubated with ( 3 H)-noradrenaline and superfused. Electrical field stimulation with 180 pulses delivered at 1 or 3 Hz was used to induce overflow of radioactivity. Comparison of the effects of preexposure of the tissue to adrenaline or noradrenaline revealed that adrenaline incubation caused an enhancement of stimulation-evoked overflow of ( 3 H)noradrenaline and a reduction of the effect of exogenously added isoprenaline. Furthermore, the selective beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551 (10 - 7 mol/L), but not the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 89,406 (10 - 7 mol/L), reduced electrically evoked overflow of ( 3 H)noradrenaline in tissue preincubated with adrenaline but not in tissue preincubated with noradrenaline. The overflow-reducing effect of ICI 118.551 occurred at stimulation with 3 Hz but not at stimulation with 1 Hz. The present results support the hypothesis that noradrenergic transmission in guinea pig papillary muscle is facilitated via beta 2-adrenoceptors, and that adrenaline may serve as transmitter in this positive feedback mechanism after its incorporation into sympathetic nerves

  2. Insertion of Neurotransmitters into a Lipid Bilayer Membrane and Its Implication on Membrane Stability: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Xue, Minmin; Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-03-17

    The signaling molecules in neurons, called neurotransmitters, play an essential role in the transportation of neural signals, during which the neurotransmitters interact with not only specific receptors, but also cytomembranes, such as synaptic vesicle membranes and postsynaptic membranes. Through extensive molecular dynamics simulations, the atomic-scale insertion dynamics of typical neurotransmitters, including methionine enkephalin (ME), leucine enkephalin (LE), dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh), and aspartic acid (ASP), into lipid bilayers is investigated. The results show that the first three neurotransmitters (ME, LE, and DA) are able to diffuse freely into both 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) membranes, and are guided by the aromatic residues Tyr and Phe. Only a limited number of these neurotransmitters are allowed to penetrate into the membrane, which suggests an intrinsic mechanism by which the membrane is protected from being destroyed by excessive inserted neurotransmitters. After spontaneous insertion, the neurotransmitters disturb the surrounding phospholipids in the membrane, as indicated by the altered distribution of components in lipid leaflets and the disordered lipid tails. In contrast, the last two neurotransmitters (ACh and ASP) cannot enter the membrane, but instead always diffuse freely in solution. These findings provide an understanding at the atomic level of how neurotransmitters interact with the surrounding cytomembrane, as well as their impact on membrane behavior. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in a mouse brain microdialysate by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with gold nanoparticle-initiated chemiluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Na; Guo Jizhao; Liu Bo; Yu Yuqi; Cui Hua; Mao Lanqun; Lin Yuqing

    2009-01-01

    Our previous work showed that gold nanoparticles could trigger chemiluminescence (CL) between luminol and AgNO 3 . In the present work, the effect of some biologically important reductive compounds, including monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites, reductive amino acids, ascorbic acid, uric acid, and glutathione, on the novel CL reaction were investigated for analytical purpose. It was found that all of them could inhibit the CL from the luminol-AgNO 3 -Au colloid system. Among them, monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites exhibited strong inhibition effect. Taking dopamine as a model compound, the CL mechanism was studied by measuring absorption spectra during the CL reaction and the reaction kinetics via stopped-flow technique. The CL inhibition mechanism is proposed to be due to that these tested compounds competed with luminol for AgNO 3 to inhibit the formation of luminol radicals and to accelerate deposition of Ag atoms on surface of gold nanoparticles, leading to a decrease in CL intensity. Based on the inhibited CL, a novel method for simultaneous determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites was developed by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with this CL reaction. The new method was successfully applied to determine the compounds in a mouse brain microdialysate. Compared with the reported HPLC-CL methods, the proposed method is simple, fast, and could determine more analytes. Moreover, the limits of linear ranges for NE, E, and DA using the proposed method were one order of magnitude lower than the luminol system without gold nanoparticles.

  4. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  5. Multi-metal, Multi-wavelength Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Detection of Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Amber S; Sharma, Bhavya

    2018-04-05

    The development of a sensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of neurotransmitters could provide a pathway for the diagnosis of neurological diseases, leading to the discovery of more effective treatment methods. We investigate the use of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based sensors for the rapid detection of melatonin, serotonin, glutamate, dopamine, GABA, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Previous studies have demonstrated SERS detection of neurotransmitters; however, there has been no comprehensive study on the effect of the metal used as the SERS substrate or the excitation wavelength used for detection. Here, we present the detection of 7 neurotransmitters using both silver and gold nanoparticles at excitation wavelengths of 532, 633, and 785 nm. Over the range of wavelengths investigated, the SERS enhancement on the silver and gold nanoparticles varies, with an average enhancement factor of 10 5 -10 6 . The maximum SERS enhancement occurs at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm for the gold nanoparticles and at 633 nm for the silver nanoparticles.

  6. The molecular mechanism for overcoming the rate-limiting step in monoamine neurotransmitter transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinning, Steffen; Said, Saida; Malinauskaite, Lina

    The monoamine transporter family consists of dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine (NET) and serotonin transporters (SERT) that mediate the reuptake of the monoamine neurotransmitters after their release during neurotransmission. These transporters play prominent roles in psychiatric disorders and are t......The monoamine transporter family consists of dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine (NET) and serotonin transporters (SERT) that mediate the reuptake of the monoamine neurotransmitters after their release during neurotransmission. These transporters play prominent roles in psychiatric disorders...... membrane. The rate-limiting step in monoamine reuptake is the return of the empty transporter from an inward-facing to an outward-facing conformation without neurotransmitter and sodium bound. The molecular mechanism underlying this important conformational transition has not been described. Crystal...

  7. Neurotransmitter alteration in a testosterone propionate-induced polycystic ovarian syndrome rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nirja K; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya P

    2017-02-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), one of the leading causes of infertility seen in women, is characterized by anovulation and hyperandrogenism, resulting in ovarian dysfunction. In addition, associations of several metabolic complications like insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia and psychological co-morbidities are well known in PCOS. One of the major factors influencing mood and the emotional state of mind is neurotransmitters. Also, these neurotransmitters are very crucial for GnRH release. Hence, the current study investigates the status of neurotransmitters in PCOS. A PCOS rat model was developed using testosterone. Twenty-one-day-old rats were subcutaneously injected with 10 mg/kg body weight of testosterone propionate (TP) for 35 days. The animals were validated for PCOS characteristics by monitoring estrus cyclicity, serum testosterone and estradiol levels and by histological examination of ovarian sections. Neurotransmitter estimation was carried out using fluorometric and spectrophotometric methods. TP-treated animals demonstrated increased serum testosterone levels with unaltered estradiol content, disturbed estrus cyclicity and many peripheral cysts in the ovary compared to control rats mimicking human PCOS. Norepinephrine (NE), dopamine, serotonin, γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and epinephrine levels were significantly low in TP-induced PCOS rats compared to control ones, whereas the activity of acetylcholinesterase in the PCOS brain was markedly elevated. Neurotransmitter alteration could be one of the reasons for disturbed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release, consequently directing the ovarian dysfunction in PCOS. Also, decrease in neurotransmitters, mainly NE, serotonin and dopamine (DA) attributes to mood disorders like depression and anxiety in PCOS.

  8. A linear model for estimation of neurotransmitter response profiles from dynamic PET data

    OpenAIRE

    Normandin, M.D.; Schiffer, W.K.; Morris, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    The parametric ntPET model (p-ntPET) estimates the kinetics of neurotransmitter release from dynamic PET data with receptor-ligand radiotracers. Here we introduce a linearization (lp-ntPET) that is computationally efficient and can be applied to single-scan data. lp-ntPET employs a non-invasive reference region input function and extends the LSRRM of Alpert et al. (2003) using basis functions to characterize the time course of neurotransmitter activation. In simulation studies, the temporal p...

  9. Contributions of the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Mediating the Enhancement in Memory Following Noradrenergic Activation of Either the Amygdala or Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C. Kerfoot

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens shell is a site of converging inputs during memory processing for emotional events. The accumbens receives input from the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS regarding changes in peripheral autonomic functioning following emotional arousal. The shell also receives input from the amygdala and hippocampus regarding affective and contextual attributes of new learning experiences. The successful encoding of affect or context is facilitated by activating noradrenergic systems in either the amygdala or hippocampus. Recent findings indicate that memory enhancement produced by activating NTS neurons, is attenuated by suppressing accumbens functioning after learning. This finding illustrates the significance of the shell in integrating information from the periphery to modulate memory for arousing events. However, it is not known if the accumbens shell plays an equally important role in consolidating information that is initially processed in the amygdala and hippocampus. The present study determined if the convergence of inputs from these limbic regions within the nucleus accumbens contributes to successful encoding of emotional events into memory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral cannula implants 2 mm above the accumbens shell and a second bilateral implant 2 mm above either the amygdala or hippocampus. The subjects were trained for 6 days to drink from a water spout. On day 7, a 0.35 mA footshock was initiated as the rat approached the spout and was terminated once the rat escaped into a white compartment. Subjects were then given intra-amygdala or hippocampal infusions of PBS or a dose of norepinephrine (0.2 μg previously shown to enhance memory. Later, all subjects were given intra-accumbens infusion of muscimol to functionally inactivate the shell. Muscimol inactivation of the accumbens shell was delayed to allow sufficient time for norepinephrine to activate intracellular cascades that lead to long-term synaptic

  10. Contributions of the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Mediating the Enhancement in Memory Following Noradrenergic Activation of Either the Amygdala or Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Erin C; Williams, Cedric L

    2018-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens shell is a site of converging inputs during memory processing for emotional events. The accumbens receives input from the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) regarding changes in peripheral autonomic functioning following emotional arousal. The shell also receives input from the amygdala and hippocampus regarding affective and contextual attributes of new learning experiences. The successful encoding of affect or context is facilitated by activating noradrenergic systems in either the amygdala or hippocampus. Recent findings indicate that memory enhancement produced by activating NTS neurons, is attenuated by suppressing accumbens functioning after learning. This finding illustrates the significance of the shell in integrating information from the periphery to modulate memory for arousing events. However, it is not known if the accumbens shell plays an equally important role in consolidating information that is initially processed in the amygdala and hippocampus. The present study determined if the convergence of inputs from these limbic regions within the nucleus accumbens contributes to successful encoding of emotional events into memory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral cannula implants 2 mm above the accumbens shell and a second bilateral implant 2 mm above either the amygdala or hippocampus. The subjects were trained for 6 days to drink from a water spout. On day 7, a 0.35 mA footshock was initiated as the rat approached the spout and was terminated once the rat escaped into a white compartment. Subjects were then given intra-amygdala or hippocampal infusions of PBS or a dose of norepinephrine (0.2 μg) previously shown to enhance memory. Later, all subjects were given intra-accumbens infusion of muscimol to functionally inactivate the shell. Muscimol inactivation of the accumbens shell was delayed to allow sufficient time for norepinephrine to activate intracellular cascades that lead to long-term synaptic modifications

  11. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System–based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J.; Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Sieck, Gary C.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Garris, Paul A.; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2009-01-01

    Object In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. Methods The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal

  12. Optimization of ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with fluorescence detector (FLD) method for the quantitative determination of selected neurotransmitters in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stragierowicz, Joanna; Daragó, Adam; Brzeźnicki, Sławomir; Kilanowicz, Anna

    2017-07-26

    Glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are the main neurotransmitters in the central nervous system for excitatory and inhibitory processes, respectively. Monitoring these neurotransmitters is an essential tool in establishing pathological functions, among others in terms of occupational exposure to toxic substances. We present modification of the HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) to the UPLC (ultra-performance liquid chromatography) method for the simultaneous determination of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in a single injection. The isocratic separation of these neurotransmitter derivatives was performed on Waters Acquity BEH (ethylene bridged hybrid) C18 column with particle size of 1.7 μm at 35°C using a mobile phase consisting of 0.1 M acetate buffer (pH 6.0) and methanol (60:40, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min. The analytes were detected with the fluorescence detector (FLD) using derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA), resulting in excitation at 340 nm and emission at 455 nm. Several validation parameters including linearity (0.999), accuracy (101.1%), intra-day precision (1.52-1.84%), inter-day precision (2.47-3.12%), limit of detection (5-30 ng/ml) and quantification (100 ng/ml) were examined. The developed method was also used for the determination of these neurotransmitters in homogenates of selected rat brain structures. The presented UPLC-FLD is characterized by shorter separation time (3.5 min), which is an adaptation of the similar HPLC methods and is an alternative for more expensive references techniques such as liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. Med Pr 2017;68(5):583-591. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, and metabolites of the catecholamine neurotransmitters are agonists of a rat trace amine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzow, J R; Sonders, M S; Arttamangkul, S; Harrison, L M; Zhang, G; Quigley, D I; Darland, T; Suchland, K L; Pasumamula, S; Kennedy, J L; Olson, S B; Magenis, R E; Amara, S G; Grandy, D K

    2001-12-01

    The trace amine para-tyramine is structurally and functionally related to the amphetamines and the biogenic amine neurotransmitters. It is currently thought that the biological activities elicited by trace amines such as p-tyramine and the psychostimulant amphetamines are manifestations of their ability to inhibit the clearance of extracellular transmitter and/or stimulate the efflux of transmitter from intracellular stores. Here we report the discovery and pharmacological characterization of a rat G protein-coupled receptor that stimulates the production of cAMP when exposed to the trace amines p-tyramine, beta-phenethylamine, tryptamine, and octopamine. An extensive pharmacological survey revealed that psychostimulant and hallucinogenic amphetamines, numerous ergoline derivatives, adrenergic ligands, and 3-methylated metabolites of the catecholamine neurotransmitters are also good agonists at the rat trace amine receptor 1 (rTAR1). These results suggest that the trace amines and catecholamine metabolites may serve as the endogenous ligands of a novel intercellular signaling system found widely throughout the vertebrate brain and periphery. Furthermore, the discovery that amphetamines, including 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy"), are potent rTAR1 agonists suggests that the effects of these widely used drugs may be mediated in part by this receptor as well as their previously characterized targets, the neurotransmitter transporter proteins.

  14. Direct assessment of substrate binding to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter LeuT by solid state NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Simon; Gotfryd, Kamil; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann

    2017-01-01

    The Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSSs) represent an important class of proteins mediating sodium-dependent uptake of neurotransmitters from the extracellular space. The substrate binding stoichiometry of the bacterial NSS protein, LeuT, and thus the principal transport mechanism, has been...

  15. New mechanisms of the TCM spleen-based treatment of immune thrombocytopenia purpura from the perspective of blood neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The JYS prescription may regulate the expression levels of blood neurotransmitters via the brain-gut axis in patients with “spleen deficiency” ITP and thus activate hemostatic mechanisms to promote hemostasis. β-EP and VIP are key neurotransmitters of the JYS-induced functional regulation.

  16. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, E.; Kleijn, R.; Colzato, L.S.; Alkemade, A.; Forstmann, B.U.; Nieuwenhuis, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer

  17. Altered neurotransmitter expression profile in the ganglionic bowel in Hirschsprung's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, David; O'Donnell, Anne Marie; Gillick, John; Puri, Prem

    2016-05-01

    Despite having optimal pull-through (PT) surgery for Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR), many patients experience persistent bowel symptoms with no mechanical/histopathological cause. Murine models of HSCR suggest that expression of key neurotransmitters is unbalanced proximal to the aganglionic colonic segment. We aimed to investigate expression of key enteric neurotransmitters in the colon of children with HSCR. Full-length PT specimens were collected fresh from children with HSCR (n=10). Control specimens were collected at colostomy closure from children with anorectal malformation (n=8). The distributions of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P (SP) were evaluated using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Neurotransmitter quantification was with Western blot analysis. ChAT expression was high in aganglionic bowel and transition zone but reduced in ganglionic bowel in HSCR relative to controls. Conversely, nNOS expression was markedly reduced in aganglionic bowel but high in ganglionic bowel in HSCR relative to controls. VIP expression was similar in ganglionic HSCR and control colon. SP expression was similar in all tissue types. Imbalance of key excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the ganglionic bowel in HSCR may explain the basis of bowel dysmotility after an optimal pull-through operation in some patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous quantification of seven hippocampal neurotransmitters in depression mice by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Li, Jia; Shi, Hai-Lian; Wang, Ting-ting; Muhtar, Wahaf; Du, Min; Zhang, Bei-bei; Wu, Hui; Yang, Li; Hu, Zhi-bi; Wu, Xiao-jun

    2014-05-30

    There is no method available to simultaneously detect GABA, Glu, Epi, NE, DA, 5-HT and 5-HIAA in mouse hippocampus. A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method has been developed for simultaneously measuring seven neurotransmitters in mouse hippocampus. The analytes were detected in positive mode with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and the procedure was completed in less than 9min. This method exhibited excellent linearity for all of the analytes with regression coefficients higher than 0.99, and showed good intra- and inter-day precisions (RSDneurotransmitters in a mouse depression model induced by successive methylprednisolone injections. The results indicated that this depression model was closely associated with the decreased level of Epi (p=0.002) and elevated ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT (p=0.01), which has never been reported elsewhere. Compared with previous methods, current approach is more convenient without any pre-column derivatization of the analytes but enhances detectability with incremental neurotransmitter profile and shortens detection time. This work represents the first accurate simultaneous determination of seven neurotransmitters in the mouse depression model induced by methylprednisolone. The reliable method will benefit the research of neurological diseases with the altered neurotransmitter profile in brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Aging rather than aneuploidy affects monoamine neurotransmitters in brain regions of Down syndrome mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Alain D; Vermeiren, Yannick; Albac, Christelle; Lana-Elola, Eva; Watson-Scales, Sheona; Gibbins, Dorota; Aerts, Tony; Van Dam, Debby; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Potier, Marie-Claude; De Deyn, Peter P

    Altered concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolites have been repeatedly found in people with Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21). Because of the limited availability of human post-mortem tissue, DS mouse models are of great interest to study these changes and the underlying

  20. [Hormones and osteoporosis update. Regulation of bone remodeling by neuropeptides and neurotransmitters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shu

    2009-07-01

    From the discovery of the regulation of bone remodelling by leptin, much attention has been focused on neurogenic control of bone remodelling. Various hypothalamic neuropeptides, which are involved in appetite regulation, are now revealed to be important regulators of bone remodelling. More recently, neurotransmitters, such as serotonin or catecholamines, are proven to be bone remodelling regulators.

  1. Artificial neural network and classical least-squares methods for neurotransmitter mixture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, H G; Greek, L S; Gorzalka, B B; Bree, A V; Blades, M W; Turner, R F

    1995-02-01

    Identification of individual components in biological mixtures can be a difficult problem regardless of the analytical method employed. In this work, Raman spectroscopy was chosen as a prototype analytical method due to its inherent versatility and applicability to aqueous media, making it useful for the study of biological samples. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) and the classical least-squares (CLS) method were used to identify and quantify the Raman spectra of the small-molecule neurotransmitters and mixtures of such molecules. The transfer functions used by a network, as well as the architecture of a network, played an important role in the ability of the network to identify the Raman spectra of individual neurotransmitters and the Raman spectra of neurotransmitter mixtures. Specifically, networks using sigmoid and hyperbolic tangent transfer functions generalized better from the mixtures in the training data set to those in the testing data sets than networks using sine functions. Networks with connections that permit the local processing of inputs generally performed better than other networks on all the testing data sets. and better than the CLS method of curve fitting, on novel spectra of some neurotransmitters. The CLS method was found to perform well on noisy, shifted, and difference spectra.

  2. Neuroglobin in the rat brain (II): co-localisation with neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Kelsen, Jesper; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    In an accompanying article, we found that neuroglobin (Ngb) was expressed in a few well-defined nuclei in the rat brain. Here, we show by use of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation (ISH) that Ngb co-localise with several specific neurotransmitters. Ngb co-localise consistently with tyr...

  3. Effects of lesions of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle on conditioned suppression to a CS and to a contextual background stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, E; Schugens, M M; Gray, J A

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the experiment was to determine whether the dorsal noradrenergic bundle (DB) plays a role in conditioning to context. Rats received either bilateral lesions of the DB by local injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, vehicle injections only, or sham operations. All animals were then trained to barpress for food on a variable interval (VI) schedule. Two 5-min intrusion periods were superimposed on the VI baseline during each session. An 'envelope' stimulus (flashing light) was on throughout each intrusion period. In addition, embedded in the two intrusion periods of each session, there occurred 8 presentations of a 'punctate' conditioned stimulus (CS) (a 15-s clicker), and 8 presentations of a 0.5-s footshock. Within each surgical condition rats were randomly allocated to one of three conditioning groups, receiving 100%, 50% or 0% temporal association between CS and shock. Conditioning to the punctate CS and to the context provided by the envelope stimulus was assessed by the degree of suppression of the barpress response relative to the VI baseline. Responding was most suppressed in the punctate CS in the 100 and 50% conditions, and most suppressed in the envelope stimulus in the 0% condition. DB lesions released response suppression to the punctate CS, had no effect on suppression to the envelope stimulus, and reduced sensitivity to CS-shock probability as measured by response suppression during the punctate CS. These results confirm previous reports that DB lesions alleviate response suppression to shock-associated cues, identify some of the parameters that affect this phenomenon, but fail to support a role for the DB in contextual conditioning.

  4. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP induces differentiation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells into a noradrenergic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Toshiaki; Kawato, Yuka; Osakada, Fumitaka; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Akaike, Akinori

    2008-10-10

    Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) and retinoic acid (RA) have been demonstrated to be the inducers of morphological differentiation in SH-SY5Y cells, a human catecholaminergic neuroblastoma cell line. However, it remains unclear whether morphologically differentiated SH-SY5Y cells by these compounds acquire catecholaminergic properties. We focused on the alteration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and intracellular content of noradrenaline (NA) as the indicators of functional differentiation. Three days treatment with dbcAMP (1mM) and RA (10microM) induced morphological changes and an increase of TH-positive cells using immunocytochemical analysis in SH-SY5Y cells. The percentage of TH-expressing cells in dbcAMP (1mM) treatment was larger than that in RA (10microM) treatment. In addition, dbcAMP increased intracellular NA content, whereas RA did not. The dbcAMP-induced increase in TH-expressing cells is partially inhibited by KT5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. We also investigated the effect of butyrate on SH-SY5Y cells, because dbcAMP is enzymatically degraded by intracellular esterase, thereby resulting in the formation of butyrate. Butyrate induced the increase of NA content at lower concentrations than dbcAMP, although the increase in TH-expressing cells by butyrate was smaller than that by dbcAMP. The dbcAMP (1mM)- and butyrate (0.3mM)-induced increase in NA content was completely suppressed by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (1mM), an inhibitor of TH. These results suggest that dbcAMP induces differentiation into the noradrenergic phenotype through both PKA activation and butyrate.

  5. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Herman, James P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NTS NA A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n = 5; HPA study, n = 5] or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n = 6; HPA study, n = 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 d of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress.

  6. Metformin normalizes the structural changes in glycogen preceding prediabetes in mice overexpressing neuropeptide Y in noradrenergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailanen, Liisa; Bezborodkina, Natalia N; Virtanen, Laura; Ruohonen, Suvi T; Malova, Anastasia V; Okovityi, Sergey V; Chistyakova, Elizaveta Y; Savontaus, Eriika

    2018-04-01

    Hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis are known therapeutic targets of metformin, but the role of hepatic glycogen in the pathogenesis of diabetes is less clear. Mouse model of neuropeptide Y (NPY) overexpression in noradrenergic neurons (OE-NPY D βH ) with a phenotype of late onset obesity, hepatosteatosis, and prediabetes was used to study early changes in glycogen structure and metabolism preceding prediabetes. Furthermore, the effect of the anti-hyperglycemic agent, metformin (300 mg/kg/day/4 weeks in drinking water), was assessed on changes in glycogen metabolism, body weight, fat mass, and glucose tolerance. Glycogen structure was characterized by cytofluorometric analysis in isolated hepatocytes and mRNA expression of key enzymes by qPCR. OE-NPY D βH mice displayed decreased labile glycogen fraction relative to stabile fraction (the intermediate form of glycogen) suggesting enhanced glycogen cycling. This was supported by decreased filling of glucose residues in the 10th outer tier of the glycogen molecule, which suggests accelerated glycogen phosphorylation. Metformin reduced fat mass gain in both genotypes, but glucose tolerance was improved mostly in wild-type mice. However, metformin inhibited glycogen accumulation and normalized the ratio between glycogen structures in OE-NPY D βH mice indicating decreased glycogen synthesis. Furthermore, the presence of glucose residues in the 11th tier together with decreased glycogen phosphorylase expression suggested inhibition of glycogen degradation. In conclusion, structural changes in glycogen of OE-NPY D βH mice point to increased glycogen metabolism, which may predispose them to prediabetes. Metformin treatment normalizes these changes and suppresses both glycogen synthesis and phosphorylation, which may contribute to its preventive effect on the onset of diabetes.

  7. [Glucagon-like peptide 2, a neurotransmitter with a newly discovered role in the regulation of food ingestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang-Christensen, M; Larsen, P J; Thulesen, J; Nielsen, J R; Vrang, N

    2001-01-15

    We report here that glucagon-like peptide 2(GLP-2) and its receptor constitute a distinct projection system connecting the nucleus of the solitary tract with the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH). The DMH contains a dense plexus of GLP-2 immunoreactive fibres and is the only hypothalamic nucleus expressing GLP-2 receptor mRNA. Consistent with this, central application of GLP-2 activates the expression of neurones solely in the DMH. Furthermore, central administration of GLP-2 causes a dose-related, a pharmacologically and behaviourally specific inhibition of food intake in rats. Surprisingly, the alleged GLP-1 receptor antagonist, Exending (9-39), proved a functional antagonist of centrally applied GLP-2. These data implicate GLP-2 as an important neurotransmitter in the regulation of food intake and likely bodyweight. Our data therefore point to the DMH as a crossroad for endocrine and visceral information affecting feeding behaviour.

  8. Transcriptomic responses in mouse brain exposed to chronic excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Ranu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases during aging in extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, may be linked to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the molecular responses of neurons to chronic, moderate increases in Glu levels. Genome-wide gene expression in brain hippocampus was examined in a unique transgenic (Tg mouse model that exhibits moderate Glu hyperactivity throughout the lifespan, the neuronal Glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1 mouse, and littermate 9 month-old wild type mice. Results Integrated bioinformatic analyses on transcriptomic data were used to identify bio-functions, pathways and gene networks underlying neuronal responses to increased Glu synaptic release. Bio-functions and pathways up-regulated in Tg mice were those associated with oxidative stress, cell injury, inflammation, nervous system development, neuronal growth, and synaptic transmission. Increased gene expression in these functions and pathways indicated apparent compensatory responses offering protection against stress, promoting growth of neuronal processes (neurites and re-establishment of synapses. The transcription of a key gene in the neurite growth network, the kinase Ptk2b, was significantly up-regulated in Tg mice as was the activated (phosphorylated form of the protein. In addition to genes related to neurite growth and synaptic development, those associated with neuronal vesicle trafficking in the Huntington's disease signalling pathway, were also up-regulated. Conclusions This is the first study attempting to define neuronal gene expression patterns in response to chronic, endogenous Glu hyperactivity at brain synapses. The patterns observed were characterized by a combination of responses to stress and stimulation of nerve growth, intracellular transport and recovery.

  9. Brain neurotransmitters and hippocampal proteome in pigs under stress and environmental enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arroyo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress and wellbeing are psychological conditions that are mediated by the central nervous system. In the brain, stress is mediated mainly by the hypothalamus, which will activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, leading to the secretion of cortisol, the paradigmatic stress hormone. Other brain areas as the amygdala, the hippocampus or the prefrontal cortex (PFC are involved in emotions such as happiness, anxiety and fear. Communication between brain areas is achieved by chemical neurotransmitters (NTs, which are secreted by presynaptic neurons to reach postsynaptic neurons, where they will cause a variation in membrane polarization and other cell signaling actions, leading to physiological responses. Amongst these NTs, catecholamines (noradrenaline and dopamine and serotonin play an important role. On the other hand, the adverse effects of stress may be counteracted by housing the individuals under environmental enrichment conditions. This long-term situation should have an effect, not only on NTs, but also on the brain proteome. Under the hypothesis that different stress situations will lead to changes in NT composition that will be specific for crucial brain areas, we have tested the effects of transport stress, handling stress at the slaughterhouse, and the stress-susceptible genotype (Ryr1 on the amine NT concentration in amygdala, hippocampus, PFC and hypothalamus of pigs. The effects of living under environmentally enriched or control conditions on the NT concentration in several brain regions and on the hippocampus proteome has been also analyzed. In conclusion, genetic factors as well as management conditions related to housing, transport and slaughterhouse alter in different degree the catecholaminergic and the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the brain, and give clues about how different individual types are able to react to external challenges. Likewise, environmental enrichment leads to changes in the proteome

  10. Anxiolytic action of neuromedin-U and neurotransmitters involved in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegdy, G; Adamik, A

    2013-09-10

    Peptide Neuromedin-U (NmU) is widely distributed in the central nervous system and the peripheral tissues. Its physiological effects include the regulation of blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature, and the inhibition of gastric acid secretion. The action of NmU in rats is mediated by two G-protein-coupled receptors, NmU-1R and NmU-2R. NmU-2R is present mainly in the brain, and NmU-1R mainly in the periphery. Despite the great variety of the physiological action of NmU, little is known about its possible effects in different forms of behavior, such as anxiety. In the present work, NmU-23 (the rodent form of the peptide) was tested for its effect on anxiety in elevated plus maze test in mice. For detection of the possible involvement of neurotransmitters, the mice were pretreated with receptor blockers: haloperidol (a D2, dopamine receptor antagonist), propranolol (a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist), atropine (a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist), phenoxybenzamine (a nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist) or nitro-l-arginine (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor). The peptide and nitro-l-arginine were administered into the lateral brain ventricle, while the receptor blockers were applied intraperitoneally. An NmU-23 dose 0.5μg elicited anxiolytic action, whereas this action is faded away when the dose was increased. For further testing therefore 0.5μg i.c.v. was used. Propranolol and atropine fully blocked the NmU-induced anxiolytic action, while haloperidol, phenoxybenzamine and nitro-l-arginine were ineffective. The results suggest that β-adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are involved in the anxiolytic action of NmU. © 2013.

  11. [Study on psychoprophylaxis and monoamines neurotransmitter of patients with burning mouth syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M; Li, B; Gu, F; Yue, Y; Huang, Y; Chen, Q; Zeng, G; Xia, J

    2001-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic ache disease, usually occurring in middle aged and old women. This study sought to understand the psychopathologic aspect and monoamines neurotransmitters in the plasma of the patients with BMS. Thirty cases were selected (26 females, 4 males); 30 normal control subjects were similar to the BMS cases on age and sex. All subjects were required to complete the Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ), and the Self-report Symptom Inventory, Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90) questionnaire. In case a subject's L (lie) score exceeded 50, she (he) would be removed from the test. 2 ml of blood was drawn from the subject under restine conditions with a fast in the morning to examine norepinephrine and epinephrine contents by high efficient liquid chromatography. Chi-square test, analysis of variance and t'-test were performed. The BMS group had higher scores of nervousness (N) and poikilergasia (P) and lower score of extro/introversion (E) as compared with the control (P < 0.05). The personality types in BMS group were focused on introversion and instability, but in the control group the types were focused on extroversion and stability (P < 0.05). The scores of 9 emotional factors of BMS group were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.05), which indicated that the BMS patients had suffered from serial psychic disorders. The level of plasma norepinephrine in the BMS patients was higher than that of the control (P < 0.01). The personality of BMS patients raised body response to harmful stimulations, and obvious psychic disorders in the patient may cause the functional disorders in central and sympathetic nervous systems, which may be associated with BMS' occurrence.

  12. Characterization of dendritic morphology and neurotransmitter phenotype of thoracic descending propriospinal neurons after complete spinal cord transection and GDNF treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lingxiao; Ruan, Yiwen; Chen, Chen; Frye, Christian Corbin; Xiong, Wenhui; Jin, Xiaoming; Jones, Kathryn; Sengelaub, Dale; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), poor regeneration of damaged axons of the central nervous system (CNS) causes limited functional recovery. This limited spontaneous functional recovery has been attributed, to a large extent, to the plasticity of propriospinal neurons, especially the descending propriospinal neurons (dPSNs). Compared with the supraspinal counterparts, dPSNs have displayed significantly greater regenerative capacity, which can be further enhanced by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In the present study, we applied a G-mutated rabies virus (G-Rabies) co-expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) to reveal Golgi-like dendritic morphology of dPSNs. We also investigated the neurotransmitters expressed by dPSNs after labeling with a retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG). dPSNs were examined in animals with sham injuries or complete spinal transections with or without GDNF treatment. Bilateral injections of G-Rabies and FG were made into the 2nd lumbar (L2) spinal cord at 3 days prior to a spinal cord transection performed at the 11th thoracic level (T11). The lesion gap was filled with Gelfoam containing either saline or GDNF in the injury groups. Four days post-injury, the rats were sacrificed for analysis. For those animals receiving G-rabies injection, the GFP signal in the T7–9 spinal cord was visualized via 2-photon microscopy. Dendritic morphology from stack images was traced and analyzed using a Neurolucida software. We found that dPSNs in sham injured animals had a predominantly dorsal-ventral distribution of dendrites. Transection injury resulted in alterations in the dendritic distribution with dorsal-ventral retraction and lateral-medial extension. Treatment with GDNF significantly increased the terminal dendritic length of dPSNs. The density of spine-like structures was increased after injury, and treatment with GDNF enhanced this effect. For the group receiving FG injections, immunohistochemistry for glutamate, choline

  13. Dopamine in the Auditory Brainstem and Midbrain: Co-localization with Amino Acid Neurotransmitters and Gene Expression following Cochlear Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avril Genene eHolt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA modulates the effects of amino acid neurotransmitters, including GABA and glutamate, in motor, visual, olfactory and reward systems (Hnasko et al., 2010; Stuber et al., 2010; Hnasko and Edwards, 2012. The results suggest that DA may play a similar modulatory role in the auditory pathways. Previous studies have shown that deafness results in decreased GABA release, changes in excitatory neurotransmitter levels, and increased spontaneous neuronal activity within brainstem regions related to auditory function. Modulation of the expression and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate limiting enzyme in the production of DA in the IC following cochlear trauma has been previously reported (Tong et al., 2005. In the current study the possibility of co-localization of TH with amino acid neurotransmitters (AANs was examined. Changes in the gene expression of TH were compared with changes in the gene expression of markers for AANs in the cochlear nucleus (CN and IC to determine whether those deafness related changes occur concurrently. The results indicate that bilateral cochlear ablation significantly reduced TH gene expression in the CN after two months while in the IC the reduction in TH was observed at both three days and two months following ablation. Furthermore, in the CN, glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2 and the GABA transporter (GABAtp were also significantly reduced only after two months. However, in the IC, DA receptor 1 (DRDA1, vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3 (vGluT2, vGluT3, GABAtp and GAD67 were reduced in expression both at the three day and two month time points. A close relationship between the distribution of TH and several of the AANs was determined in both the CN and the IC. In addition, GlyT2 and vGluT3 each co-localized with TH within IC somata and dendrites. Therefore, the results of the current study suggest that DA is spatially well positioned to influence the effects of AANs on auditory neurons.

  14. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively) as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words) is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms. This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation of Hebbian mechanism with regulation of neurotransmitter release induced by rapid diffused retrograde

  15. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides/neurotransmitters

  16. Too much of a good thing: blocking noradrenergic facilitation in medial prefrontal cortex prevents the detrimental effects of chronic stress on cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Julianne D; Morilak, David A

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive impairments associated with dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are prominent in stress-related psychiatric disorders. We have shown that enhancing noradrenergic tone acutely in the rat mPFC facilitated extra-dimensional (ED) set-shifting on the attentional set-shifting test (AST), whereas chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) impaired ED. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the acute facilitatory effect of norepinephrine (NE) in mPFC becomes detrimental when activated repeatedly during CUS. Using microdialysis, we showed that the release of NE evoked in mPFC by acute stress was unchanged at the end of CUS treatment. Thus, to then determine if repeated elicitation of this NE activity in mPFC during CUS may have contributed to the ED deficit, we infused a cocktail of α(1)-, β(1)-, and β(2)-adrenergic receptor antagonists into the mPFC prior to each CUS session, then tested animals drug free on the AST. Antagonist treatment prevented the CUS-induced ED deficit, suggesting that NE signaling during CUS compromised mPFC function. We confirmed that this was not attributable to sensitization of adrenergic receptor function following chronic antagonist treatment, by administering an additional microinjection into the mPFC immediately prior to ED testing. Acute antagonist treatment did not reverse the beneficial effects of chronic drug treatment during CUS, nor have any effect on baseline ED performance in chronic vehicle controls. Thus, we conclude that blockade of noradrenergic receptors in mPFC protected against the detrimental cognitive effects of CUS, and that repeated elicitation of noradrenergic facilitatory activity is one mechanism by which chronic stress may promote mPFC cognitive dysfunction.

  17. Mechanisms underlying the noradrenergic modulation of longitudinal coordination during swimming in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrywest, Simon D; McDearmid, Jonathan R; Kjaerulff, Ole

    2003-01-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) is a potent modulator of locomotion in many vertebrate nervous systems. When Xenopus tadpoles swim, waves of motor neuron activity alternate across the body and propagate along it with a brief rostro-caudal delay (RC-delay) between segments. We have now investigated the mechani......Noradrenaline (NA) is a potent modulator of locomotion in many vertebrate nervous systems. When Xenopus tadpoles swim, waves of motor neuron activity alternate across the body and propagate along it with a brief rostro-caudal delay (RC-delay) between segments. We have now investigated...... might promote postinhibitory rebound firing. The synaptic inputs during swimming were simulated using a sustained positive current, superimposed upon which were brief negative currents. When these conditions were held constant NA enhanced the probability of rebound firing--indicating a direct effect...

  18. Effects on pig immunophysiology, PBMC proteome and brain neurotransmitters caused by group mixing stress and human-animal relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Daniel; Arroyo, Laura; Peña, Raquel; Yu, Kuai; Carreras, Ricard; Mainau, Eva; Velarde, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are an interesting sample for searching for biomarkers with proteomic techniques because they are easy to obtain and do not contain highly abundant, potentially masking proteins. Two groups of pigs (n = 56) were subjected to mixing under farm conditions and afterwards subjected to different management treatments: negative handling (NH) and positive handling (PH). Serum and PBMC samples were collected at the beginning of the experiment one week after mixing (t0) and after two months of different handling (t2). Brain areas were collected after slaughter and neurotransmitters quantified by HPLC. Hair cortisol and serum acute phase proteins decreased and serum glutathione peroxidase increased at t2, indicating a lower degree of stress at t2 after adaptation to the farm. Differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) was applied to study the effects of time and treatment on the PBMC proteome. A total of 54 differentially expressed proteins were identified, which were involved in immune system modulation, cell adhesion and motility, gene expression, splicing and translation, protein degradation and folding, oxidative stress and metabolism. Thirty-seven protein spots were up-regulated at t2 versus t0 whereas 27 were down-regulated. Many of the identified proteins share the characteristic of being potentially up or down-regulated by cortisol, indicating that changes in protein abundance between t0 and t2 are, at least in part, consequence of lower stress upon adaptation to the farm conditions after group mixing. Only slight changes in brain neurotransmitters and PBMC oxidative stress markers were observed. In conclusion, the variation in hair cortisol and serum APPs as well as the careful analysis of the identified proteins indicate that changes in protein composition in PBMC throughout time is mainly due to a decrease in the stress status of the individuals, following accommodation to the farm and the new group. PMID:28475627

  19. Alterations of neurotransmitter norepinephrine and gamma-aminobutyric acid correlate with murine behavioral perturbations related to bisphenol A exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Humans are commonly exposed to endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA), giving rise to concern over the psychobehavioral effects of BPA. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prenatal and lactational BPA exposure on neurotransmitters, including norepinephrine (NE), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu), and to assess the association with behavioral phenotypes. C57BL/6J mice were orally administered with BPA (500 μg/bwkg/day) or vehicle daily from embryonic day 0 to postnatal week 3 (P3W), through their dams. The IntelliCage behavioral experiments were conducted from P11W to P15W. At around P14-16W, NE, GABA and Glu levels in nine brain regions were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Furthermore, the associations between the neurotransmitter levels and the behavioral indices were statistically analyzed. In females exposed to BPA, the GABA and Glu levels in almost all regions, and the NE levels in the cortex, hypothalamus and thalamus were higher than those in the controls. In males exposed to BPA, the GABA levels in the amygdala and hippocampus showed lower values, while Glu levels were higher in some regions, compared with the controls. In regard to the associations, the number of "diurnal corner visits without drinking" was correlated with the NE levels in the cortex and thalamus in females. The "nocturnal corner visit duration without drinking" was correlated with the GABA level in the hippocampus in males. These results suggest that prenatal and lactational exposure to low doses of BPA might modulate the NE, GABA and Glu systems, resulting in behavioral alterations. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects on pig immunophysiology, PBMC proteome and brain neurotransmitters caused by group mixing stress and human-animal relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Daniel; Arroyo, Laura; Peña, Raquel; Yu, Kuai; Carreras, Ricard; Mainau, Eva; Velarde, Antonio; Bassols, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are an interesting sample for searching for biomarkers with proteomic techniques because they are easy to obtain and do not contain highly abundant, potentially masking proteins. Two groups of pigs (n = 56) were subjected to mixing under farm conditions and afterwards subjected to different management treatments: negative handling (NH) and positive handling (PH). Serum and PBMC samples were collected at the beginning of the experiment one week after mixing (t0) and after two months of different handling (t2). Brain areas were collected after slaughter and neurotransmitters quantified by HPLC. Hair cortisol and serum acute phase proteins decreased and serum glutathione peroxidase increased at t2, indicating a lower degree of stress at t2 after adaptation to the farm. Differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) was applied to study the effects of time and treatment on the PBMC proteome. A total of 54 differentially expressed proteins were identified, which were involved in immune system modulation, cell adhesion and motility, gene expression, splicing and translation, protein degradation and folding, oxidative stress and metabolism. Thirty-seven protein spots were up-regulated at t2 versus t0 whereas 27 were down-regulated. Many of the identified proteins share the characteristic of being potentially up or down-regulated by cortisol, indicating that changes in protein abundance between t0 and t2 are, at least in part, consequence of lower stress upon adaptation to the farm conditions after group mixing. Only slight changes in brain neurotransmitters and PBMC oxidative stress markers were observed. In conclusion, the variation in hair cortisol and serum APPs as well as the careful analysis of the identified proteins indicate that changes in protein composition in PBMC throughout time is mainly due to a decrease in the stress status of the individuals, following accommodation to the farm and the new group.

  1. Effect of canagliflozin and metformin on cortical neurotransmitters in a diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Nadia M S; Marie, Mohamed-Assem S; AlAzimi, Sara Abdullah Mubarak

    2016-10-25

    The rapid economic development in the Arabian Gulf has resulted in lifestyle changes that have increased the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, with the greatest increases observed in Kuwait. Dyslipidemia and diabetes are risk factors for disruptions in cortical neurotransmitter homeostasis. This study investigated the effect of the antidiabetic medications canagliflozin (CAN) and metformin (MET) on the levels of cortical neurotransmitters in a diabetic rat model. The rats were assigned to the control (C) group, the diabetic group that did not receive treatment (D) or the diabetic group treated with either CAN (10 mg/kg) or MET (100 mg/kg) for 2 or 4 weeks. Blood and urine glucose levels and cortical acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were assayed, and amino acid and monoamine levels were measured using HPLC. The diabetic group exhibited a significant increase in AChE activity and a decrease in monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitter levels. In the CAN group, AChE was significantly lower than that in the D and D + MET groups after 2 weeks of treatment. In addition, a significant increase in some cortical monoamines and amino acids was observed in the D + MET and D + CAN groups compared with the D group. Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of severe focal hemorrhage, neuronal degeneration, and cerebral blood vessel congestion, with gliosis in the cerebrum of rats in the D group. The CAN-treated group exhibited severe cerebral blood vessel congestion after 2 weeks of treatment and focal gliosis in the cerebrum after 4 weeks of treatment. Focal gliosis in the cerebrum of rats in the MET-treated group was observed after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. We conclude that the effect of CAN and MET on neurotransmitters is potentially mediated by their antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects. In addition, the effects of CAN on neurotransmitters might be associated with its receptor activity, and the effect of MET on neurotransmitters

  2. Selective Detection of Neurotransmitters by Fluorescence and Chemiluminescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziqiang Wang; Edward S. Yeung

    2001-08-06

    In recent years, luminescence imaging has been widely employed in neurochemical analysis. It has a number of advantages for the study of neuronal and other biological cells: (1) a particular molecular species or cellular constituent can be selectively visualized in the presence of a large excess of other species in a heterogeneous environment; (2) low concentration detection limits can be achieved because of the inherent sensitivity associated with fluorescence and chemiluminescence; (3) low excitation intensities can be used so that long-term observation can be realized while the viability of the specimen is preserved; and (4) excellent spatial resolution can be obtained with the light microscope so subcellular compartments can be identified. With good sensitivity, temporal and spatial resolution, the flux of ions and molecules and the distribution and dynamics of intracellular species can be measured in real time with specific luminescence probes, substrates, or with native fluorescence. A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with CCD imaging is down to {micro}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time. They also found that chemiluminescence associated with the ATP-dependent reaction between luciferase and luciferin can be used to image ATP at levels down to 10 nM in the millisecond time scale. Similar imaging experiments should be feasible in a broad spectrum of biological systems.

  3. MIBG: A model for therapy with a neurotransmitter analog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1980 as a radiotracer mimic of norepinephrine, radiolabeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine has undergone world-wide study as a therapeutic agent for treatment of tumors of sympathetic nervous system origin. The design rationale and structure-activity studies that led to the discovery of MIBG will be presented, as will the practical difficulties encountered in synthesizing and administering large (> 250 mCi) batches of 131 I-MIBG on a routine basis. The efficacy of treatment strategies such as the multiple, escalating dose regimen and the more recent use of 125 I-MIBG in treatment of neuroblastoma, a virulent childhood cancer, will be reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on the challenges that remain in this important research are for medicinal chemists

  4. Involvement of noradrenergic and corticoid receptors in the consolidation of the lasting anxiogenic effects of predator stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, R; Muir, C; Grimes, M; Pearcey, K

    2007-05-16

    The roles of beta-NER (beta-noradrenergic receptor), GR (glucocorticoid) and mineral corticoid receptors (MR) in the consolidation of anxiogenic effects of predator stress were studied. One minute after predator stress, different groups of rats were injected (ip) with vehicle, propranolol (beta-NER blocker, 5 and 10 mg/kg), mifepristone (RU486, GR blocker, 20 mg/kg), spironolactone (MR blocker, 50 mg/kg), propranolol (5 mg/kg) plus RU486 (20 mg/kg) or the anxiolytic, chloradiazepoxide (CPZ, 10 mg/kg). One week later, rodent anxiety was assessed in elevated plus maze, hole board, light/dark box, social interaction and acoustic startle. Considering all tests except startle, propranolol dose dependently blocked consolidation of lasting anxiogenic effects of predator stress in all tests. GR receptor block alone was ineffective. However, GR block in combination with an ineffective dose of propranolol did blocked consolidation of predator stress effects in all tests, suggesting a synergism between beta-NER and GR. Surprisingly, MR block prevented consolidation of anxiogenic effects in all tests except the light/dark box. CPZ post stress was ineffective against the anxiogenic impact of predator stress. Study of startle was complicated by the fact that anxiogenic effects of stress on startle amplitude manifested as both an increase and a decrease in startle amplitude. Suppression of startle occurred in stressed plus vehicle injected groups handled three times prior to predator stress. In contrast, stressed plus vehicle rats handled five times prior to predator stress showed increases in startle, as did all predator stressed only groups. Mechanisms of consolidation of the different startle responses appear to differ. CPZ post stress blocked startle suppression but not enhancement of startle. Propranolol post stress had no effect on either suppression or enhancement of startle. GR block alone post stress prevented suppression of startle, but not enhancement. In contrast

  5. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny J Sun

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6-8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD. Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone.

  6. Parallel expression of synaptophysin and evoked neurotransmitter release during development of cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Treiman, M; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1991-01-01

    Primary cultures of GABAergic cerebral cortex neurons and glutamatergic cerebellar granule cells were used to study the expression of synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle marker protein, along with the ability of each cell type to release neurotransmitter upon stimulation. The synaptophysin expression...... by quantitative immunoblotting and light microscope immunocytochemistry, respectively. In both cell types, a close parallelism was found between the temporal pattern of development in synaptophysin expression and neurotransmitter release. This temporal pattern differed between the two types of neurons....... The cerebral cortex neurons showed a biphasic time course of increase in synaptophysin content, paralleled by a biphasic pattern of development in their ability to release [3H]GABA in response to depolarization by glutamate or elevated K+ concentrations. In contrast, a monophasic, approximately linear increase...

  7. Use of neurotransmitter regulators in functional gastrointestinal disorders based on symptom analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qing Qing; Chen, Sheng Liang

    2017-04-01

    It has been a great challenge for gastroenterologists to cope with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in clinical practice due to the contemporary increase in stressful events. A growing body of evidence has shown that neuroregulators such as anti-anxiety agents and antidepressants function well on FGIDs, particularly in cases that are refractory to classical gastrointestinal (GI) medications. Among these central-acting agents, small individualized doses of tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are usually recommended as a complement to routine GI management. When these drugs are chosen to treat FGIDs, both their central effects and the modulation of peripheral neurotransmitters should be taken into consideration. In this article we recommend strategies for choosing drugs based on an analysis of psychosomatic GI symptoms. The variety and dosage of the neurotransmitter regulators are also discussed. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Astrocytic control of biosynthesis and turnover of the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate and GABA are the quantitatively major neurotransmitters in the brain mediating excitatory and inhibitory signaling, respectively. These amino acids are metabolically interrelated and at the same time they are tightly coupled to the intermediary metabolism including energy homeostasis....... Astrocytes play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA since only these cells express pyruvate carboxylase, the enzyme required for de novo synthesis of the two amino acids. Such de novo synthesis is obligatory to compensate for catabolism of glutamate and GABA...... related to oxidative metabolism when the amino acids are used as energy substrates. This, in turn, is influenced by the extent to which the cycling of the amino acids between neurons and astrocytes may occur. This cycling is brought about by the glutamate/GABA - glutamine cycle the operation of which...

  9. Effects of the Bee Venom Herbal Acupuncture on the Neurotransmitters of the Rat Brain Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Seok Yun

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of bee venom Herbal Acupuncture on neurotransmitters in the rat brain cortex, herbal acupuncture with bee venom group and normal saline group was performed at LI4 bilaterally of the rat. the average optical density of neurotransmitters from the cerebral cortex was analysed 30 minutes after the herbal aqupuncture, by the immunohistochemistry. The results were as follows: 1. The density of NADPH-diaphorase in bee venom group was increased significantly at the motor cortex, visual cortex, auditory cortex, cingulate cortex, retrosplenial cortex and perirhinal cortex compared to the normal saline group. 2. The average optical density of vasoactive intestinal peptide in bee venom group had significant changes at the insular cortex, retrosplenial cortex and perirhinal cortex, compared to the normal saline group. 3. The average optical density of neuropeptide-Y in bee venom group increased significantly at the visual cortex and cingulate cortex, compared to the normal saline group.

  10. New Trends and Perspectives in the Evolution of Neurotransmitters in Microbial, Plant, and Animal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchina, Victoria V

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary perspective on the universal roles of compounds known as neurotransmitters may help in the analysis of relations between all organisms in biocenosis-from microorganisms to plant and animals. This phenomenon, significant for chemosignaling and cellular endocrinology, has been important in human health and the ability to cause disease or immunity, because the "living environment" influences every organism in a biocenosis relationship (microorganism-microorganism, microorganism-plant, microorganism-animal, plant-animal, plant-plant and animal-animal). Non-nervous functions of neurotransmitters (rather "biomediators" on a cellular level) are considered in this review and ample consideration is given to similarities and differences that unite, as well as distinguish, taxonomical kingdoms.

  11. Chronic Effect of Aspartame on Ionic Homeostasis and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, M; Alex, Manju; Mathews, Varghese V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2014-07-01

    Aspartame is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners globally. Data concerning acute neurotoxicity of aspartame is controversial, and knowledge on its chronic effect is limited. In the current study, we investigated the chronic effects of aspartame on ionic homeostasis and regional monoamine neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. Our results showed that aspartame at high dose caused a disturbance in ionic homeostasis and induced apoptosis in the brain. We also investigated the effects of aspartame on brain regional monoamine synthesis, and the results revealed that there was a significant decrease of dopamine in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex and of serotonin in corpus striatum. Moreover, aspartame treatment significantly alters the tyrosine hydroxylase activity and amino acids levels in the brain. Our data suggest that chronic use of aspartame may affect electrolyte homeostasis and monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis dose dependently, and this might have a possible effect on cognitive functions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Miniaturized and Wireless Optical Neurotransmitter Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Dopamine in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min H; Yoon, Hargsoon; Choi, Sang H; Zhao, Fei; Kim, Jongsung; Song, Kyo D; Lee, Uhn

    2016-11-10

    Real-time monitoring of extracellular neurotransmitter concentration offers great benefits for diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders and diseases. This paper presents the study design and results of a miniaturized and wireless optical neurotransmitter sensor (MWONS) for real-time monitoring of brain dopamine concentration. MWONS is based on fluorescent sensing principles and comprises a microspectrometer unit, a microcontroller for data acquisition, and a Bluetooth wireless network for real-time monitoring. MWONS has a custom-designed application software that controls the operation parameters for excitation light sources, data acquisition, and signal processing. MWONS successfully demonstrated a measurement capability with a limit of detection down to a 100 nanomole dopamine concentration, and high selectivity to ascorbic acid (90:1) and uric acid (36:1).

  13. [The association between plasma neurotransmitters levels and depression in acute hemorrhagic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huai-wu; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Chun-xue; Shi, Yu-zhi; Qi, Dong; Luo, Ben-yan; Wang, Yong-jun

    2013-08-01

    To explore the relation between plasma neurotransmitters (Glutamic acid, GAA; γ-aminobutyric acid, GABA; 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT; and noradrenaline, NE) and depression in acute hemorrhagic stroke. Objectives were screened from consecutive hospitalized patients with acute stroke. Fasting blood samples were taken on the day next to hospital admission, and neurotransmitters were examined by the liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The fourth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) was used to diagnose depression at two weeks after onset of stroke. The modified Ranking Scale (mRS) was followed up at 1 year. Pearson test was used to analyse the correlation between serum concentration of neurotransmitters and the Hamilton Depression scale-17-items (HAMD-17) score. Logistic regression was used to analyse the relation of serum concentration of neurotransmitters and depression and outcome of stroke. One hundred and eighty-one patients were included in this study. GABA significantly decreased [6.1(5.0-8.2) µg/L vs 8.1(6.3-14.7) µg/L, P depression in hemorrhagic stroke, and there was no significant difference in GAA, 5-HT, or NE. GABA concentration was negatively correlated with HAMD-17 score (r = -0.131, P depression in acute phase of hemorrhagic stroke was reduced by 5.6% (OR 0.944, 95%CI 0.893-0.997). While concentration of serum GAA rose by 1 µg/L, risk of worse outcome at 1 year was raised by 0.1%, although a statistic level was on marginal status (OR 1.001, 95%CI 1.000-1.002). In patients with depression in the acute phase of hemorrhagic stroke, there was a significant reduction in plasma GABA concentration. GABA may have a protective effect on depression in acute phase of hemorrhagic stroke. Increased concentrations of serum GAA may increase the risk of worse outcomes at 1 year after stroke.

  14. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Boonstra, Evert; de Kleijn, Roy; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Alkemade, Anneke; Forstmann, Birte U.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB), but the studie...

  15. Regulation of nonsmall-cell lung cancer stem cell like cells by neurotransmitters and opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Jheelam; Papu John, Arokya M S; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2015-12-15

    Nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis. We have shown that chronic stress promoted NSCLC xenografts in mice via stress neurotransmitter-activated cAMP signaling downstream of beta-adrenergic receptors and incidental beta-blocker therapy was reported to improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. These findings suggest that psychological stress promotes NSCLC whereas pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP may inhibit NSCLC. Cancer stem cells are thought to drive the development, progression and resistance to therapy of NSCLC. However, their potential regulation by stress neurotransmitters has not been investigated. In the current study, epinephrine increased the number of cancer stem cell like cells (CSCs) from three NSCLC cell lines in spheroid formation assays while enhancing intracellular cAMP and the stem cell markers sonic hedgehog (SHH), aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH-1) and Gli1, effects reversed by GABA or dynorphin B via Gαi -mediated inhibition of cAMP formation. The growth of NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model of stress reduction was significantly reduced as compared with mice maintained under standard conditions. Stress reduction reduced serum levels of corticosterone, norepinephrine and epinephrine while the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and opioid peptides increased. Stress reduction significantly reduced cAMP, VEGF, p-ERK, p-AKT, p-CREB, p-SRc, SHH, ALDH-1 and Gli1 in xenograft tissues whereas cleaved caspase-3 and p53 were induced. We conclude that stress neurotransmitters activate CSCs in NSCLC via multiple cAMP-mediated pathways and that pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP signaling may improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. © 2015 UICC.

  16. Effects of focal brain cooling on extracellular concentrations of neurotransmitters in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Sadahiro; Inoue, Takao; Imoto, Hirochika; Suehiro, Eiichi; Maruta, Yuichi; Hirayama, Yuya; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2017-04-01

    Brain hypothermia controls epileptic discharge and reduces extracellular concentrations of glutamate (Glu), an excitatory neurotransmitter. We aimed to determine the effects of focal brain cooling (FBC) on levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter. The relationship between Glu or GABA concentrations and the severity of epileptic symptoms was also analyzed. Patients with intractable epilepsy underwent FBC at lesionectomized (n = 11) or hippocampectomized (n = 8) regions at 15°C for 30 min using custom-made cooling devices. Concentrations of Glu (n = 18) and GABA (n = 12) were measured in extracellular fluid obtained through microdialysis using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The reduction rate of neurotransmitter levels and its relationship with electrocorticography (ECoG) signal changes in response to FBC were measured. We found no relationship between the concentrations of Glu or GABA and seizure severity. There was a significant decrease in the concentration of Glu to 66.3% of control levels during the cooling period (p = 0.001). This rate of reduction correlated with ECoG power (r 2 = 0.68). Cortical and hippocampal GABA levels significantly (p = 0.02) and nonsignificantly decreased to 47.7% and 32.4% of control levels, respectively. However, the rate of this reduction did not correlate with ECoG (r 2 = 0.11). Although the decrease in hippocampal GABA levels was not significant due to wide variations in its concentration, the levels of cortical GABA and Glu were decreased following FBC. FBC suppresses epileptic discharge and the release of both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. The reduction in Glu levels further contributes to the reduction in epileptic discharge. However, the reduction in the levels of GABA has no impact on ECoG. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz eFaghihi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms.

  18. Sensing small neurotransmitter-enzyme interaction with nanoporous gated ion-sensitive field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Alexandre; Stockmann, Regina; Jansen, Michael; Yegin, Ugur; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Mourzina, Yulia

    2012-01-15

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors with gates having a high density of nanopores were fabricated and employed to sense the neurotransmitter dopamine with high selectivity and detectability at micromolar range. The nanoporous structure of the gates was produced by applying a relatively simple anodizing process, which yielded a porous alumina layer with pores exhibiting a mean diameter ranging from 20 to 35 nm. Gate-source voltages of the transistors demonstrated a pH-dependence that was linear over a wide range and could be understood as changes in surface charges during protonation and deprotonation. The large surface area provided by the pores allowed the physical immobilization of tyrosinase, which is an enzyme that oxidizes dopamine, on the gates of the transistors, and thus, changes the acid-base behavior on their surfaces. Concentration-dependent dopamine interacting with immobilized tyrosinase showed a linear dependence into a physiological range of interest for dopamine concentration in the changes of gate-source voltages. In comparison with previous approaches, a response time relatively fast for detecting dopamine was obtained. Additionally, selectivity assays for other neurotransmitters that are abundantly found in the brain were examined. These results demonstrate that the nanoporous structure of ion-sensitive field effect transistors can easily be used to immobilize specific enzyme that can readily and selectively detect small neurotransmitter molecule based on its acid-base interaction with the receptor. Therefore, it could serve as a technology platform for molecular studies of neurotransmitter-enzyme binding and drugs screening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy......-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation....

  20. A cellular and regulatory map of the cholinergic nervous system of C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Laura; Kratsios, Paschalis; Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi E; Hall, David H; White, John G; LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Garcia, L Rene; Alon, Uri; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Nervous system maps are of critical importance for understanding how nervous systems develop and function. We systematically map here all cholinergic neuron types in the male and hermaphrodite C. elegans nervous system. We find that acetylcholine (ACh) is the most broadly used neurotransmitter and we analyze its usage relative to other neurotransmitters within the context of the entire connectome and within specific network motifs embedded in the connectome. We reveal several dynamic aspects of cholinergic neurotransmitter identity, including a sexually dimorphic glutamatergic to cholinergic neurotransmitter switch in a sex-shared interneuron. An expression pattern analysis of ACh-gated anion channels furthermore suggests that ACh may also operate very broadly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a first application of this comprehensive neurotransmitter map, we identify transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control cholinergic neurotransmitter identity and cholinergic circuit assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12432.001 PMID:26705699

  1. [Single and combining effects of Calculus Bovis and zolpidem on inhibitive neurotransmitter of rat striatum corpora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; He, Xinrong; Guo, Mei

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the correlation effects between single or combined administration of Calculus Bovis or zolpidem and changes of inhibitive neurotransmitter in rat striatum corpora. Sampling from rat striatum corpora was carried out through microdialysis. The content of two inhibitive neurotransmitters in rat corpus striatum- glycine (Gly) and gama aminobutyric acid (GABA), was determined by HPLC, which involved pre-column derivation with orthophthaladehyde, reversed-phase gradient elution and fluorescence detection. GABA content of rat striatum corpora in Calculus Bovis group was significantly increased compared with saline group (P Calculus Boris plus zolpidem group were increased largely compared with saline group as well (P Calculus Bovis group was higher than combination group (P Calculus Bovis or zolpidem group was markedly increased compared with saline group or combination group (P Calculus Bovis group, zolpidem group and combination group. The magnitude of increase was lower in combination group than in Calculus Bovis group and Zolpidem group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis promoted encephalon inhibition is more powerful than zolpidem. The increase in two inhibitive neurotransmitters did not show reinforcing effect in combination group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis and zolpidem may compete the same receptors. Therefore, combination of Calculus Bovis containing drugs and zolpidem has no clinical significance. Calculus Bovis shouldn't as an aperture-opening drugs be used for resuscitation therapy.

  2. Glycine receptors support excitatory neurotransmitter release in developing mouse visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Portia A; Burette, Alain C; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are found in most areas of the brain, and their dysfunction can cause severe neurological disorders. While traditionally thought of as inhibitory receptors, presynaptic-acting GlyRs (preGlyRs) can also facilitate glutamate release under certain circumstances, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, we sought to better understand the role of GlyRs in the facilitation of excitatory neurotransmitter release in mouse visual cortex. Using whole-cell recordings, we found that preGlyRs facilitate glutamate release in developing, but not adult, visual cortex. The glycinergic enhancement of neurotransmitter release in early development depends on the high intracellular to extracellular Cl− gradient maintained by the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter and requires Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The glycine transporter 1, localized to glial cells, regulates extracellular glycine concentration and the activation of these preGlyRs. Our findings demonstrate a developmentally regulated mechanism for controlling excitatory neurotransmitter release in the neocortex. PMID:22988142

  3. Monitoring the electrochemical responses of neurotransmitters through localized surface plasmon resonance using nanohole array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nantao; Lu, Yanli; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiajia; Jiang, Jing; Liu, Gang Logan; Liu, Qingjun

    2017-07-15

    In this study, a novel spectroelectrochemical method was proposed for neurotransmitters detection. The central sensing device was a hybrid structure of nanohole array and gold nanoparticles, which demonstrated good conductivity and high localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensitivity. By utilizing such specially-designed nanoplasmonic sensor as working electrode, both electrical and spectral responses on the surface of the sensor could be simultaneously detected during the electrochemical process. Cyclic voltammetry was implemented to activate the oxidation and recovery of dopamine and serotonin, while transmission spectrum measurement was carried out to synchronously record to LSPR responses of the nanoplasmonic sensor. Coupling with electrochemistry, LSPR results indicated good integrity and linearity, along with promising accuracy in qualitative and quantitative detection even for mixed solution and in brain tissue homogenates. Also, the detection results of other negatively-charged neurotransmitters like acetylcholine demonstrated the selectivity of our detection method for transmitters with positive charge. When compared with traditional electrochemical signals, LSPR signals provided better signal-to-noise ratio and lower detection limits, along with immunity against interference factors like ascorbic acid. Taking the advantages of such robustness, the coupled detection method was proved to be a promising platform for point-of-care testing for neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  5. The Leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus as a model for the Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporters – insights into function and ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova

    In her PhD studies, Adriana K. Kantcheva looked into the structural perspective of a bacterial transporter – the leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus (LeuT) – which is a homologue to neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSS) found in humans, such as the serotonin transporter. Two crystal...... structures of LeuT elucidated new insights regarding ion and substrate binding to this transporter. Studying members of the NSS family is important as these proteins are found in the central nervous system of humans at the synaptic cleft and are implicated in serious conditions such as Parkinson’s disease...

  6. Determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in a mouse brain microdialysate by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with gold nanoparticle-initiated chemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Na; Guo Jizhao; Liu Bo; Yu Yuqi [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), JinZhai Road No: 96, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Cui Hua, E-mail: hcui@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), JinZhai Road No: 96, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Mao Lanqun; Lin Yuqing [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 100080 Beijing (China)

    2009-07-10

    Our previous work showed that gold nanoparticles could trigger chemiluminescence (CL) between luminol and AgNO{sub 3}. In the present work, the effect of some biologically important reductive compounds, including monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites, reductive amino acids, ascorbic acid, uric acid, and glutathione, on the novel CL reaction were investigated for analytical purpose. It was found that all of them could inhibit the CL from the luminol-AgNO{sub 3}-Au colloid system. Among them, monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites exhibited strong inhibition effect. Taking dopamine as a model compound, the CL mechanism was studied by measuring absorption spectra during the CL reaction and the reaction kinetics via stopped-flow technique. The CL inhibition mechanism is proposed to be due to that these tested compounds competed with luminol for AgNO{sub 3} to inhibit the formation of luminol radicals and to accelerate deposition of Ag atoms on surface of gold nanoparticles, leading to a decrease in CL intensity. Based on the inhibited CL, a novel method for simultaneous determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites was developed by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with this CL reaction. The new method was successfully applied to determine the compounds in a mouse brain microdialysate. Compared with the reported HPLC-CL methods, the proposed method is simple, fast, and could determine more analytes. Moreover, the limits of linear ranges for NE, E, and DA using the proposed method were one order of magnitude lower than the luminol system without gold nanoparticles.

  7. Simultaneous imaging of multiple neurotransmitters and neuroactive substances in the brain by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Strittmatter, Nicole; Nilsson, Anna; Kallbäck, Patrik; Alvarsson, Alexandra; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Svenningsson, Per; Goodwin, Richard J. A.; Andrén, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    With neurological processes involving multiple neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, it is important to have the ability to directly map and quantify multiple signaling molecules simultaneously in a single analysis. By utilizing a molecular-specific approach, namely desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI), we demonstrated that the technique can be used to image multiple neurotransmitters and their metabolites (dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyr...

  8. GnRH dysregulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a manifestation of an altered neurotransmitter profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nirja; Dawalbhakta, Mitali; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya

    2018-04-11

    GnRH is the master molecule of reproduction that is influenced by several intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. Any alteration in these regulatory loops may result in reproductive-endocrine dysfunction such as the polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Although low dopaminergic tone has been associated with PCOS, the role of neurotransmitters in PCOS remains unknown. The present study was therefore aimed at understanding the status of GnRH regulatory neurotransmitters to decipher the neuroendocrine pathology in PCOS. PCOS was induced in rats by oral administration of letrozole (aromatase inhibitor). Following PCOS validation, animals were assessed for gonadotropin levels and their mRNA expression. Neurotrasnmitter status was evaluated by estimating their levels, their metabolism and their receptor expression in hypothalamus, pituitary, hippocampus and frontal cortex of PCOS rat model. We demonstrate that GnRH and LH inhibitory neurotransmitters - serotonin, dopamine, GABA and acetylcholine - are reduced while glutamate, a major stimulator of GnRH and LH release, is increased in the PCOS condition. Concomitant changes were observed for neurotransmitter metabolising enzymes and their receptors as well. Our results reveal that increased GnRH and LH pulsatility in PCOS condition likely result from the cumulative effect of altered GnRH stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in hypothalamic-pituitary centre. This, we hypothesise, is responsible for the depression and anxiety-like mood disorders commonly seen in PCOS women.

  9. A Multi-Functional Microelectrode Array Featuring 59760 Electrodes, 2048 Electrophysiology Channels, Stimulation, Impedance Measurement and Neurotransmitter Detection Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragas, Jelena; Viswam, Vijay; Shadmani, Amir; Chen, Yihui; Bounik, Raziyeh; Stettler, Alexander; Radivojevic, Milos; Geissler, Sydney; Obien, Marie; Müller, Jan; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Biological cells are characterized by highly complex phenomena and processes that are, to a great extent, interdependent. To gain detailed insights, devices designed to study cellular phenomena need to enable tracking and manipulation of multiple cell parameters in parallel; they have to provide high signal quality and high spatiotemporal resolution. To this end, we have developed a CMOS-based microelectrode array system that integrates six measurement and stimulation functions, the largest number to date. Moreover, the system features the largest active electrode array area to date (4.48×2.43 mm 2 ) to accommodate 59,760 electrodes, while its power consumption, noise characteristics, and spatial resolution (13.5 μm electrode pitch) are comparable to the best state-of-the-art devices. The system includes: 2,048 action-potential (AP, bandwidth: 300 Hz to 10 kHz) recording units, 32 local-field-potential (LFP, bandwidth: 1 Hz to 300 Hz) recording units, 32 current recording units, 32 impedance measurement units, and 28 neurotransmitter detection units, in addition to the 16 dual-mode voltage-only or current/voltage-controlled stimulation units. The electrode array architecture is based on a switch matrix, which allows for connecting any measurement/stimulation unit to any electrode in the array and for performing different measurement/stimulation functions in parallel.

  10. Metabolomics of Neurotransmitters and Related Metabolites in Post-Mortem Tissue from the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum of Alcoholic Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashem, Mohammed Abul; Ahmed, Selina; Sultana, Nilufa; Ahmed, Eakhlas U; Pickford, Russell; Rae, Caroline; Šerý, Omar; McGregor, Iain S; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-02-01

    We report on changes in neurotransmitter metabolome and protein expression in the striatum of humans exposed to heavy long-term consumption of alcohol. Extracts from post mortem striatal tissue (dorsal striatum; DS comprising caudate nucleus; CN and putamen; P and ventral striatum; VS constituted by nucleus accumbens; NAc) were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomics was studied in CN by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry. Proteomics identified 25 unique molecules expressed differently by the alcohol-affected tissue. Two were dopamine-related proteins and one a GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD65. Two proteins that are related to apoptosis and/or neuronal loss (BiD and amyloid-β A4 precursor protein-binding family B member 3) were increased. There were no differences in the levels of dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5HT), homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (HIAA), histamine, L-glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Tryp) between the DS (CN and P) and VS (NAc) in control brains. Choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (Ach) were higher and norepinephrine (NE) lower, in the VS. Alcoholic striata had lower levels of neurotransmitters except for Glu (30 % higher in the alcoholic ventral striatum). Ratios of DOPAC/DA and HIAA/5HT were higher in alcoholic striatum indicating an increase in the DA and 5HT turnover. Glutathione was significantly reduced in all three regions of alcohol-affected striatum. We conclude that neurotransmitter systems in both the DS (CN and P) and the VS (NAc) were significantly influenced by long-term heavy alcohol intake associated with alcoholism.

  11. Analysis of 17 neurotransmitters, metabolites and precursors in zebrafish through the life cycle using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Fandila, A; Vázquez, E; Barranco, A; Zafra-Gómez, A; Navalón, A; Rueda, R; Ramírez, M

    2015-09-15

    An ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of neurotransmitters, metabolites and precursors at different stages in zebrafish life was developed. Betaine, glutamine, glutamic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, phosphocholine, glycerophosphocholine, cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine, choline, acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, tyrosine, epinephrine, tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and agmatine were selected as analytes. The method consisted of a simple deproteinization of samples using methanol and formic acid, subsequent injection onto the chromatographic equipment and quantification with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer detector using an electrospray ionization interface in positive mode. Limits of detection ranged from 0.02 to 11ngmL(-1) and limits of quantification from 0.1 to 38ngmL(-1), depending on the analyte. The method was validated according to US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) guideline for bioanalytical assays. Precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (%RSD), was lower than 15% in all cases, and the determination coefficient (R(2)) was equal or higher than 99.0% with a residual deviation for each calibration point lower than ±25%. Mean recoveries were between 85% and 115%. The method was applied to determine of these compounds in zebrafish from early stages of development to adulthood and showed the time-course of neurotransmitters and others neurocompounds through the life cycle. The possibility of measuring up to 17 compounds related with the main neurotransmitter systems in a simple analytical method will complement and reinforce the use of zebrafish in multiple applications in the field of neurosciences. The proposed method will facilitate future studies related with brain development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of N-Arachidonoyl-Serotonin (AA-5-HT in Sleep-Wake Cycle Architecture, Sleep Homeostasis, and Neurotransmitters Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Murillo-Rodríguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system comprises several molecular entities such as endogenous ligands [anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG], receptors (CB1 and CB2, enzymes such as [fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAHH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL], as well as the anandamide membrane transporter. Although the role of this complex neurobiological system in the sleep–wake cycle modulation has been studied, the contribution of the blocker of FAAH/transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1, N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT in sleep has not been investigated. Thus, in the present study, varying doses of AA-5-HT (5, 10, or 20 mg/Kg, i.p. injected at the beginning of the lights-on period of rats, caused no statistical changes in sleep patterns. However, similar pharmacological treatment given to animals at the beginning of the dark period decreased wakefulness (W and increased slow wave sleep (SWS as well as rapid eye movement sleep (REMS. Power spectra analysis of states of vigilance showed that injection of AA-5-HT during the lights-off period diminished alpha spectrum across alertness in a dose-dependent fashion. In opposition, delta power spectra was enhanced as well as theta spectrum, during SWS and REMS, respectively. Moreover, the highest dose of AA-5-HT decreased wake-related contents of neurotransmitters such as dopamine (DA, norepinephrine (NE, epinephrine (EP, serotonin (5-HT whereas the levels of adenosine (AD were enhanced. In addition, the sleep-inducing properties of AA-5-HT were confirmed since this compound blocked the increase in W caused by stimulants such as cannabidiol (CBD or modafinil (MOD during the lights-on period. Additionally, administration of AA-5-HT also prevented the enhancement in contents of DA, NE, EP, 5-HT and AD after CBD of MOD injection. Lastly, the role of AA-5-HT in sleep homeostasis was tested in animals that received either CBD or MOD after total sleep deprivation (TSD. The

  13. Effects of subchronic benzo(a)pyrene exposure on neurotransmitter receptor gene expression in the rat hippocampus related with spatial learning and memory change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chongying; Cheng, Shuqun; Xia, Yinyin; Peng, Bin; Tang, Qian; Tu, Baijie

    2011-11-18

    Exposure of laboratory rats to Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental contaminant with its high lipophilicify which is widely dispersed in the environment and can easily cross the blood brain barrier presenting in the central nervous system, is associated with impaired learning and memory. The purpose of the research was to examine whether subchronic exposure to BaP affects spatial learning and memory, and how it alters normal gene expression in hippocampus, as well as selection of candidate genes involving neurotransmitter receptor attributed to learning and memory. Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate behavioral differences between BaP-treated and vehicle-treated groups. To gain a better insight into the mechanism of BaP-induced neurotoxicity on learning and memory, we used whole genome oligo microarrays as well as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to assess the global impact of gene expression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with 6.25mg/kg of BaP or vehicle for 14 weeks. The results from the Morris water maze (MWM) test showed that rats treated with BaP exhibited significantly higher mean latencies as compared to vehicle controls. BaP exposure significantly decreased the number of crossing the platform and the time spent in the target area. After the hippocampus was collected from each rat, total RNA was isolated. Microarray and PCR revealed that exposure to BaP affected mRNA expression of neurotransmitter receptors. The web tool DAVID was used to analyze the significantly enriched gene ontology (GO) and KEGG pathways in the differentially expressed genes. Analysis showed that the most significantly affected gene ontology category was behavior. Furthermore, the fourth highest significantly affected gene ontology category was learning and memory. KEGG molecular pathway analysis showed that "neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction" was affected by BaP with highest statistical significance, and 9 candidate neurotransmitter receptor

  14. Chronic infusion of enalaprilat into hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy by restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Qing; Qi, Jie; Su, Qing; Suo, Yu-Ping; Yue, Li-Ying; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Qin, Da-Nian

    2014-01-01

    The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We hypothesized that inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension via restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines. Rats underwent subcutaneous infusions of ANG II or saline and bilateral PVN infusions of ACE inhibitor enalaprilat (ENL, 2.5 μg/h) or vehicle for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in higher mean arterial pressure and cardiac hypertrophy as indicated by increased whole heart weight/body weight ratio, whole heart weight/tibia length ratio, left ventricular weight/tibia length ratio, and mRNA expressions of cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide and beta-myosin heavy chain. These ANG II-infused rats had higher PVN levels of glutamate, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) and the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and lower PVN levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, interleukin (IL)-10 and the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), and higher plasma levels of PICs, norepinephrine and aldosterone, and lower plasma IL-10, and higher renal sympathetic nerve activity. However, PVN treatment with ENL attenuated these changes. PVN microinjection of ANG II induced increases in IL-1β and IL-6, and a decrease in IL-10 in the PVN, and pretreatment with angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) antagonist losartan attenuated these changes. These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the PVN, and PVN inhibition of the RAS restores neurotransmitters and cytokines in the PVN, thereby attenuating ANG II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. - Highlights: • Chronic ANG II infusion results in sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiac hypertrophy. • PVN inhibition of ACE

  15. Chronic infusion of enalaprilat into hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy by restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ykang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Zhang, Dong-Mei [Department of Physiology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Yu, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Qing; Qi, Jie; Su, Qing [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Suo, Yu-Ping [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, Taiyuan 030012 (China); Yue, Li-Ying [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Zhu, Guo-Qing [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Physiology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Qin, Da-Nian, E-mail: dnqin@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041 (China)

    2014-02-01

    The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We hypothesized that inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension via restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines. Rats underwent subcutaneous infusions of ANG II or saline and bilateral PVN infusions of ACE inhibitor enalaprilat (ENL, 2.5 μg/h) or vehicle for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in higher mean arterial pressure and cardiac hypertrophy as indicated by increased whole heart weight/body weight ratio, whole heart weight/tibia length ratio, left ventricular weight/tibia length ratio, and mRNA expressions of cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide and beta-myosin heavy chain. These ANG II-infused rats had higher PVN levels of glutamate, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) and the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and lower PVN levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, interleukin (IL)-10 and the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), and higher plasma levels of PICs, norepinephrine and aldosterone, and lower plasma IL-10, and higher renal sympathetic nerve activity. However, PVN treatment with ENL attenuated these changes. PVN microinjection of ANG II induced increases in IL-1β and IL-6, and a decrease in IL-10 in the PVN, and pretreatment with angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) antagonist losartan attenuated these changes. These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the PVN, and PVN inhibition of the RAS restores neurotransmitters and cytokines in the PVN, thereby attenuating ANG II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. - Highlights: • Chronic ANG II infusion results in sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiac hypertrophy. • PVN inhibition of ACE

  16. The structure and diffusion behaviour of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in neutral aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, M.M.; Esteso, M.A.; Barros, M.F.; Verissimo, L.M.P.; Romero, C.M.; Suarez, A.F.; Ramos, M.L.; Valente, A.J.M.; Burrows, H.D.; Ribeiro, A.C.F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Diffusion coefficients and densities of binary aqueous solutions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). • Dependence on both shape and size of GABA on its diffusion. • Interactions intramolecular and the solute-water interactions in these systems. - Abstract: GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a non-protein amino acid with important physiological properties, and with considerable relevance to the food and pharmaceutical industries. Particular interest has focused on its role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian cerebral cortex. In this paper, we report density and mutual diffusion coefficients of GABA in non-buffered aqueous solutions (0.001–0.100) mol·dm −3 at 298.15 K. Under these conditions, 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy and pH measurements show that it is present predominantly as a monomeric zwitterionic species. Diffusion coefficients have been computed assuming that this behaves as the binary system GABA/water. From density and intermolecular diffusion coefficients measurements, the molar volume, hydrodynamic radii, R h , diffusion coefficients at infinitesimal concentration, D 0 , activity coefficients and the thermodynamic factors, F T , have been estimated. Within experimental error, the hydrodynamic volume calculated from this is identical to the molar volume obtained from density measurements. From the NMR spectra and literature data, it is suggested that this amino acid diffuses in aqueous solution as a curved, coil-like hydrated zwitterionic entity.

  17. Chronic treatment with prazosin or duloxetine lessens concurrent anxiety-like behavior and alcohol intake: evidence of disrupted noradrenergic signaling in anxiety-related alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, Mary J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol use disorders have been linked to increased anxiety, and enhanced central noradrenergic signaling may partly explain this relationship. Pharmacological interventions believed to reduce the excitatory effects of norepinephrine have proven effective in attenuating ethanol intake in alcoholics as well as in rodent models of ethanol dependence. However, most preclinical investigations into the effectiveness of these drugs in decreasing ethanol intake have been limited to acute observations, and none have concurrently assessed their anxiolytic effects. The purpose of these studies was to examine the long-term effectiveness of pharmacological interventions presumed to decrease norepinephrine signaling on concomitant ethanol self-administration and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats with relatively high levels of antecedent anxiety-like behavior. Adult male Long-Evans rats self-administered ethanol on an intermittent access schedule for eight to ten weeks prior to being implanted with osmotic minipumps containing either an a1-adrenoreceptor antagonist (prazosin, 1.5 mg/kg/day), a β1/2-adrenoreceptor antagonist (propranolol, 2.5 mg/kg/day), a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (duloxetine, 1.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (10% dimethyl sulfoxide). These drugs were continuously delivered across four weeks, during which animals continued to have intermittent access to ethanol. Anxiety-like behavior was assessed on the elevated plus maze before treatment and again near the end of the drug delivery period. Our results indicate that chronic treatment with a low dose of prazosin or duloxetine significantly decreases ethanol self-administration (P chronic treatment with putative inhibitors of central noradrenergic signaling may attenuate ethanol intake via a reduction in anxiety-like behavior.

  18. Differential effects of ethanol on regional glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter pathways in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Subramaniam, Vaidyanathan; Patel, Anant Bahadur

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of ethanol on neuronal and astroglial metabolism using (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with infusion of [1,6-(13)C2]/[1-(13)C]glucose or [2-(13)C]acetate, respectively. A three-compartment metabolic model was fitted to the (13)C turnover of GluC3 , GluC4, GABAC 2, GABAC 3, AspC3 , and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2 ]glucose to determine the rates of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and neurotransmitter cycle associated with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. The ratio of neurotransmitter cycle to TCA cycle fluxes for glutamatergic and GABAegic neurons was obtained from the steady-state [2-(13)C]acetate experiment and used as constraints during the metabolic model fitting. (1)H MRS measurement suggests that depletion of ethanol from cerebral cortex follows zero order kinetics with rate 0.18 ± 0.04 μmol/g/min. Acute exposure of ethanol reduces the level of glutamate and aspartate in cortical region. GlnC4 labeling was found to be unchanged from a 15 min infusion of [2-(13)C]acetate suggesting that acute ethanol exposure does not affect astroglial metabolism in naive mice. Rates of TCA and neurotransmitter cycle associated with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons were found to be significantly reduced in cortical and subcortical regions. Acute exposure of ethanol perturbs the level of neurometabolites and decreases the excitatory and inhibitory activity differentially across the regions of brain. Depletion of ethanol and its effect on brain functions were measured using (1)H and (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with infusion of (13)C-labeled substrates. Ethanol depletion from brain follows zero order kinetics. Ethanol perturbs level of glutamate, and the excitatory and inhibitory activity in mice brain. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  20. In Vivo Assessment of Neurotransmitters and Modulators with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Application to Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Yang, Shaolin; Fischer, Bernard A.; Rowland, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo measurement of neurotransmitters and modulators is now feasible with advanced proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) techniques. This review provides a basic tutorial of MRS, describes the methods available to measure brain glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutathione, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glycine, and serine at magnetic field strengths of 3Tesla or higher, and summarizes the neurochemical findings in schizophrenia. Overall, 1H-MRS holds great promise for producing biomarkers that can serve as treatment targets, prediction of disease onset, or illness exacerbation in schizophrenia and other brain diseases. PMID:25614132

  1. Effect of realgar on extracellular amino acid neurotransmitters in hippocampal CA1 region determined by online microdialysis–dansyl chloride derivatization–high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Taoguang; Zhang, Yinghua; Li, Weikai; Yang, Huilei; Jiang, Hong; Sun, Guifan

    2014-09-01

    An online microdialysis (MD)–dansyl chloride (Dns) derivatization–high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and fluorescence detection (FD) system was developed for simultaneous determination of eight extracellular amino acid neurotransmitters in hippocampus. The MD probe was implanted in hippocampal CA1 region. Dialysate and Dns were online mixed and derivatized. The derivatives were separated on an ODS column and detected by FD. The developed online system showed good linearity, precision, accuracy and recovery. This online MD-HPLC system was applied to monitor amino acid neurotransmitters levels in rats exposed to realgar (0.3, 0.9 and 2.7 g/kg body weight). The result shows that glutamate concentrations were significantly increased (p<0.05) in hippocampal CA1 region of rats exposed to three doses of realgar. A decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid concentrations was found in rats exposed to medium and high doses of realgar (p<0.05). Elevation of excitotoxic index (EI) values in hippocampal CA1 region of realgar-exposed rats was observed (p<0.05). Positive correlation was found between EI values and arsenic contents in hippocampus of realgar-exposed rats, which indicates that the change in extracellular EI values is associated with arsenic accumulation in hippocampus. The developed online MD–Dns derivatization–HPLC–FD system provides a new experimental method for studying the effect of toxic Chinese medicines on amino acid neurotransmitters.

  2. Cerebellar Norepinephrine Modulates Learning of Delay Classical Eyeblink Conditioning: Evidence for Post-Synaptic Signaling via PKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Mathew; Bickford, Paula C.; Cartford, M. Claire; Samec, Amy

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to modulate cerebellar-dependent learning and memory. Lesions of the nucleus locus coeruleus or systemic blockade of noradrenergic receptors has been shown to delay the acquisition of several cerebellar-dependent learning tasks. To date, no studies have shown a direct involvement of…

  3. Effect of Low Level Laser Irradiation at Wavelengths 488 and 515 nm on Glutamate Neurotransmitter in Mitochondria of Visual Brain Cortex in Albino Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, M.F.; El-Ahdal, M.A.; El-Kady, M.H.; Yousri, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of glutamate in the visual cortex and mitochondria could be used as a measure for the argon laser effect having wavelengths 488 and 515 nm, on the mitochondria. A comparative response for the bound and free glutamate was found. Irradiation with different energies 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 J for both wavelengths were accomplished. This study makes us to recommend the advantage of using argon laser having wavelength 515 nm to enhance the blocking of glutamate and hence the reduction of brain toxicity. Most of the energy required for cellular functions comes from mitochondria (Shepherd, 1994). Glutamate, which is present in central nervous system at very high level is essential for brain intermediary metabolism (Frazer et al., 1994; Meldrum et al., 2000 and Blumcke et al., 2000). Glutamate is enriched in synaptic vesicles, the subcellular organelles, which are associated with the storage and release of neurotransmitters. Also, biochemical evidence for glutamate as neurotransmitter in fibers from the visual cortex to the subcortical visual relay nuclei has been indicated (Fose and Fonnum, 1987 and George, 1998)

  4. Determination of the levels of two types of neurotransmitter and the anti-migraine effects of different dose-ratios of Ligusticum chuanxiong and Gastrodia elata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligusticum chuanxiong (LC–Gastrodia elata (GE compatibility is widely used in the clinic for the treatment of migraine. It has been shown that the changes of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system are closely related to the pathogenesis of migraine; whether LC–GE compatibility might affect the neurotransmitters in migraine rats has not yet been studied. In this study, high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector methods for quantification of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT and excitatory amino acids (EAAs in rat brain were developed. The 5-HT was measured directly, while EAAs were determined by using dansyl chloride as precolumn derivative reagent. The validation of the methods, including selectivity, linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy, recoveries, and stability were carried out and demonstrated to meet the requirements of quantitative analysis. Compared with the model group, the expression of 5-HT in migraine rat brain was enhanced from 30 minutes to 120 minutes and glutamate (L-Glu was suppressed from 30 minutes to 60 minutes in an LC–GE (4:3 group compared with the model group (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively. These findings showed that the analytical methods were simple, sensitive, selective, and low cost, and LC–GE 4:3 compatibility could have better efficacy for treating migraine through upregulating 5-HT levels and downregulating L-Glu levels.

  5. Altered neurotransmitter function in CO2-exposed stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): a temperate model species for ocean acidification research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Floriana; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Nilsson, Göran E

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the consequences of ocean acidification for the marine ecosystem have revealed behavioural changes in coral reef fishes exposed to sustained near-future CO2 levels. The changes have been linked to altered function of GABAergic neurotransmitter systems, because the behavioural alterations can be reversed rapidly by treatment with the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved would be greatly aided if these can be examined in a well-characterized model organism with a sequenced genome. It was recently shown that CO2-induced behavioural alterations are not confined to tropical species, but also affect the three-spined stickleback, although an involvement of the GABAA receptor was not examined. Here, we show that loss of lateralization in the stickleback can be restored rapidly and completely by gabazine treatment. This points towards a worrying universality of disturbed GABAA function after high-CO2 exposure in fishes from tropical to temperate marine habitats. Importantly, the stickleback is a model species with a sequenced and annotated genome, which greatly facilitates future studies on underlying molecular mechanisms.

  6. Chitosan coated carbon fiber microelectrode for selective in vivo detection of neurotransmitters in live zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozel, Rifat Emrah; Wallace, Kenneth N.; Andreescu, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Chitosan coated fiber electrodes are sensitive to serotonin detection while rejecting physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences. - Abstract: We report the development of a chitosan modified carbon fiber microelectrode for in vivo detection of serotonin. We find that chitosan has the ability to reject physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences and facilitate selective and sensitive detection of in vivo levels of serotonin, a common catecholamine neurotransmitter. Presence of chitosan on the microelectrode surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A detection limit of 1.6 nM serotonin with a sensitivity of 5.12 nA/μM, a linear range from 2 to 100 nM and a reproducibility of 6.5% for n = 6 electrodes were obtained. Chitosan modified microelectrodes selectively measure serotonin in presence of physiological levels of ascorbic acid. In vivo measurements were performed to measure concentration of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine. The sensor quantifies in vivo intestinal levels of serotonin while successfully rejecting ascorbic acid interferences. We demonstrate that chitosan can be used as an effective coating to reject ascorbic acid interferences at carbon fiber microelectrodes, as an alternative to Nafion, and that chitosan modified microelectrodes are reliable tools for in vivo monitoring of changes in neurotransmitter levels.

  7. Synthesis on accumulation of putative neurotransmitters by cultured neural crest cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, G.D.; Sietz, P.D.; Rafford, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    The events mediating the differentiation of embryonic neural crest cells into several types of neurons are incompletely understood. In order to probe one aspect of this differentiation, we have examined the capacity of cultured quail trunk neural crest cells to synthesize, from radioactive precursors, and store several putative neurotransmitter compounds. These neural crest cultures develop the capacity to synthesize and accumulate acetylcholine and the catecholamines norepinephrine and dopamine. In contrast, detectable but relatively little synthesis and accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine gamma-aminobutyric acid, or octopamine from the appropriate radiolabeled precursors were observed. The capacity for synthesis and accumulation of radiolabeled acetylcholine and catecholamines is very low or absent at 2 days in vitro. Between 3 and 7 days in vitro, there is a marked rise in both catecholamine and acetylcholine accumulation in the cultures. These findings suggest that, under the particular conditions used in these experiments, the development of neurotransmitter biosynthesis in trunk neural crest cells ijs restricted and resembles, at least partially, the pattern observed in vivo. The development of this capacity to synthesize and store radiolabeled acetylcholine and catecholamines from the appropriate radioactive precursors coincides closely with the development of the activities of the synthetic enzymes choline acetyltransferase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase reported by others

  8. Metabolic Profiling and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Mouse Brain by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buttini, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Metabolites are key mediators of cellular functions, and have emerged as important modulators in a variety of diseases. Recent developments in translational biomedicine have highlighted the importance of not looking at just one disease marker or disease inducing molecule, but at populations thereof to gain a global understanding of cellular function in health and disease. The goal of metabolomics is the systematic identification and quantification of metabolite populations. One of the most pressing issues of our times is the understanding of normal and diseased nervous tissue functions. To ensure high quality data, proper sample processing is crucial. Here, we present a method for the extraction of metabolites from brain tissue, their subsequent preparation for non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement, as well as giving some guidelines for processing of raw data. In addition, we present a sensitive screening method for neurotransmitters based on GC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The precise multi-analyte detection and quantification of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters can be used for further studies such as metabolic modeling. Our protocol can be applied to shed light on nervous tissue function in health, as well as neurodegenerative disease mechanisms and the effect of experimental therapeutics at the metabolic level. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. The influence of aripiprazole and olanzapine on neurotransmitters level in frontal cortex of prenatally stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, P; Kus, K; Gołembiowska, K; Noworyta-Sokołowska, K; Woźniak, A; Zaprutko, T; Nowakowska, E

    2016-09-01

    The study aims to verify whether alterations in the level of neurotransmitters have occurred in prenatally stressed rats (animal model of schizophrenia), and whether aripiprazole (ARI) and olanzapine (OLA) modify this level. The effects of ARI (1.5mg/kg) and OLA (0.5mg/kg) were studied by means of microdialysis in freely moving rats (observation time 120min). The level of neurotransmitters (DA, 5-HT, NA) and their metabolites (DOPAC, HVA, 5-HIAA) was analyzed by HPLC with coulochemical detection. Obtained results indicate that after a single administration of ARI and OLA in the prenatally stressed rats the increase of DA, DOPAC, and 5-HT was observed. In turn ARI administration increase the level of HVA and 5-HIAA and also decrease the level of NA. After OLA administration the level of NA and HVA increased and no significant change in 5-HIAA was observed. Alterations observed as a result of ARI and OLA administration may be pivotal in identifying animal models of mental disorders and in the analysis of neuroleptics effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Unsupported platinum nanoparticles as effective sensors of neurotransmitters and possible drug curriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tąta, Agnieszka; Gralec, Barbara; Proniewicz, Edyta

    2018-03-01

    Herein, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of positively charged unsupported platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) with ∼12 nm size and narrow size distribution, in an aqueous solution, towards neurotransmitters was monitored at 785 nm excitation wavelength. The pure PtNPs were synthetized by polyol method. Their morphology and structure were checked by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) measurements. As a neurotransmitter bombesin (BN), which exhibits autocrine effect on the growth of normal and tumour tissues, and its fragments from the C-terminal end: BN13-14, BN12-14, BN11-14, BN10-14, BN9-14, and BN8-14 (X-14 fragments of the BN amino acid sequence) were chosen. The collected spectra were interpreted and discussed. This is to determine the adsorption mode of bombesin onto the PtNPs surface and changes in this mode as a result of the bombesin backbone shortening from the N-terminal end. This is important from the point of using PtNPs as potential BN carrier into the cancerous tissue and antitumor drug.

  11. Immunohistochemical profile of various neurotransmitters, neurotrophins and MIB-1 in cholesteatomas of the petrous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Bronzetti, Elena; Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Ionta, Brunella; Alicino, Valentina; D'Ambrosio, Anna; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Compared to the normal epidermal epithelium, cholesteatomas have altered growth properties characterized by the excessive growth of keratinocytes leading to mucosal destruction. Either congenital or acquired, these lesions, which grow in the middle ear space, the petrous apex or the mastoid of temporal bones, are mostly considered benign skin tumoral lesions. However, many questions remain concerning their pathophysiology. Numerous studies have been proposed to identify those cholesteatoma lesions at risk of recurrence, a possible event that may cause hearing loss. We examined patients with petrous apex or mastoid cholesteatoma in order to analyze the expression of various neurotransmitters, neurotrophins and their receptors and the Ki-67 antigen for identification of a possible relationship between clinical outcome and histopathological behaviour in terms of the proliferative activity of cholesteatomas. Expression of the analyzed molecules was studied using immunohistochemical methods in seven adult patients with petrous apex cholesteatoma who underwent surgical removal of the lesion. Our results, in accordance with published data, confirm that Molecular Immunology Borstel-1 (MIB-1) and certain neurotransmitters could be useful in the prognostic evaluation of the risk of recurrence of aggressive forms of cholesteatoma.

  12. Validity of urinary monoamine assay sales under the "spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Uncini, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Spot baseline urinary monoamine assays have been used in medicine for over 50 years as a screening test for monoamine-secreting tumors, such as pheochromocytoma and carcinoid syndrome. In these disease states, when the result of a spot baseline monoamine assay is above the specific value set by the laboratory, it is an indication to obtain a 24-hour urine sample to make a definitive diagnosis. There are no defined applications where spot baseline urinary monoamine assays can be used to diagnose disease or other states directly. No peer-reviewed published original research exists which demonstrates that these assays are valid in the treatment of individual patients in the clinical setting. Since 2001, urinary monoamine assay sales have been promoted for numerous applications under the "spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model". There is no published peer-reviewed original research that defines the scientific foundation upon which the claims for these assays are made. On the contrary, several articles have been published that discredit various aspects of the model. To fill the void, this manuscript is a comprehensive review of the scientific foundation and claims put forth by laboratories selling urinary monoamine assays under the spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model.

  13. Vitis vinifera juice ameliorates depression-like behavior in mice by modulating biogenic amine neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The advantageous effects of Vitis vinifera juice on depressive model mice were examined utilizing a blend of behavioral evaluations and biogenic amine neurotransmitter estimations. During the behavioral evaluations, immobility time on the forced swimming test and tail suspension test were measured in unstressed and immobilization-induced stressed mice. V. vinifera juice (4 mL/kg and 8 mL/kg and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg produced a significant decrease in immobility time of both unstressed and stressed mice when compared with their respective saline-treated control groups in both paradigms. Neurotransmitters were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detector. V. vinifera juice raised the levels of both serotonin (p<0.001 and noradrenalin (p<0.001 in brain tissue. These outcomes give significant mechanistic insights into the protective effect of V. vinifera juice against depressive disorders. Our results showed that V. vinifera juice could relieve depressive manifestations in the rodent model of depression.

  14. Glucose is necessary to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis during synaptic activity in cultured glutamatergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2006-01-01

    Glucose is the primary energy substrate for the adult mammalian brain. However, lactate produced within the brain might be able to serve this purpose in neurons. In the present study, the relative significance of glucose and lactate as substrates to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis was inves......Glucose is the primary energy substrate for the adult mammalian brain. However, lactate produced within the brain might be able to serve this purpose in neurons. In the present study, the relative significance of glucose and lactate as substrates to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis...... was investigated. Cultured cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons were superfused in medium containing [U-13C]glucose (2.5 mmol/L) and lactate (1 or 5 mmol/L) or glucose (2.5 mmol/L) and [U-13C]lactate (1 mmol/L), and exposed to pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 micromol/L), leading to synaptic activity...... significantly during induced depolarization. In contrast, at both concentrations of extracellular lactate, the metabolism of [U-13C]glucose was increased during neuronal depolarization. The role of glucose and lactate as energy substrates during vesicular release as well as transporter-mediated influx...

  15. The transcription factor ERG increases expression of neurotransmitter receptors on prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, Haydn T.; On, Seung T.; Dunn, Laura K.; Sanda, Martin G.; Asara, John M.; Pellegrini, Kathryn L.; Noel, Jonathan K.; Arredouani, Mohamed S.

    2015-01-01

    The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion occurs in about half of prostate cancer (PCa) cases and results in overexpression of the transcription factor ERG. Overexpression of ERG has many effects on cellular function. However, how these changes enhance cell growth and promote tumor development is unclear. To investigate the role of ERG, LNCaP and PC3 cells were transfected with ERG and gene expression and metabolic profile were analyzed. Our data show that expression of ERG induces overexpression of many nicotinicacetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In addition, metabolic profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed elevated production of several neurotransmitters in cells expressing ERG. Consistently, treatment of ERG-expressing cells with nicotine induced elevated calcium influx, GSK3β (Ser9) phosphorylation and cell proliferation. Finally, we show that PCa patientswho are smokers have larger tumors if their tumors are TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion positive. Collectively, our data suggest that ERG sensitizes prostate tumor cells to neurotransmitter receptor agonists like nicotine. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1612-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  16. Near-future carbon dioxide levels alter fish behaviour by interfering with neurotransmitter function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Göran E.; Dixson, Danielle L.; Domenici, Paolo; McCormick, Mark I.; Sørensen, Christina; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L.

    2012-03-01

    Predicted future CO2 levels have been found to alter sensory responses and behaviour of marine fishes. Changes include increased boldness and activity, loss of behavioural lateralization, altered auditory preferences and impaired olfactory function. Impaired olfactory function makes larval fish attracted to odours they normally avoid, including ones from predators and unfavourable habitats. These behavioural alterations have significant effects on mortality that may have far-reaching implications for population replenishment, community structure and ecosystem function. However, the underlying mechanism linking high CO2 to these diverse responses has been unknown. Here we show that abnormal olfactory preferences and loss of behavioural lateralization exhibited by two species of larval coral reef fish exposed to high CO2 can be rapidly and effectively reversed by treatment with an antagonist of the GABA-A receptor. GABA-A is a major neurotransmitter receptor in the vertebrate brain. Thus, our results indicate that high CO2 interferes with neurotransmitter function, a hitherto unrecognized threat to marine populations and ecosystems. Given the ubiquity and conserved function of GABA-A receptors, we predict that rising CO2 levels could cause sensory and behavioural impairment in a wide range of marine species, especially those that tightly control their acid-base balance through regulatory changes in HCO3- and Cl- levels.

  17. Modulation of electrogenic transport processes in the porcine proximal colon by enteric neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuche, H; Mauksch, A; Gäbel, G

    2012-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the involvement of essential pro- and antisecretory neurotransmitters in regulation of secretion in porcine proximal colon. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), somatostatin (SOM) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were located immunohistochemically in the epithelium and subepithelial layer. Modulation of epithelial secretion was studied in Ussing chambers. Application of carbachol (CA), sodium nitroprussid (SNP), VIP and SP but not of NPY or SOM resulted in a chloride dependent increase in short circuit current (I(sc) ). I(sc) increase induced by CA, VIP or SNP was not altered by preincubation with tetrodotoxin or indomethacin. In contrast, SP-induced I(sc) increase was diminished by preincubation with tetrodotoxin, indomethacin, L-nitro-arginin-methyl-ester, and atropine but not hexamethonium. Simultaneous application of CA and VIP, or CA and SNP increased the I(sc) stronger as expected. Applying SP/CA led to a smaller increase in I(sc) as calculated. It is concluded that mainly prosecretory neurotransmitters are involved in regulation of colonic secretion. Cross-potentiations of acetylcholine and nitric oxide and acetylcholine and VIP suggest activation of different intracellular cascades. Similar intracellular pathways may be stimulated by acetylcholine and SP, thus preventing an additive effect of the transmitters. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Chitosan coated carbon fiber microelectrode for selective in vivo detection of neurotransmitters in live zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozel, Rifat Emrah [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science, 8 Clarkson Ave, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States); Wallace, Kenneth N. [Department of Biology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States); Andreescu, Silvana, E-mail: eandrees@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science, 8 Clarkson Ave, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Graphical abstract: Chitosan coated fiber electrodes are sensitive to serotonin detection while rejecting physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences. - Abstract: We report the development of a chitosan modified carbon fiber microelectrode for in vivo detection of serotonin. We find that chitosan has the ability to reject physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences and facilitate selective and sensitive detection of in vivo levels of serotonin, a common catecholamine neurotransmitter. Presence of chitosan on the microelectrode surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A detection limit of 1.6 nM serotonin with a sensitivity of 5.12 nA/{mu}M, a linear range from 2 to 100 nM and a reproducibility of 6.5% for n = 6 electrodes were obtained. Chitosan modified microelectrodes selectively measure serotonin in presence of physiological levels of ascorbic acid. In vivo measurements were performed to measure concentration of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine. The sensor quantifies in vivo intestinal levels of serotonin while successfully rejecting ascorbic acid interferences. We demonstrate that chitosan can be used as an effective coating to reject ascorbic acid interferences at carbon fiber microelectrodes, as an alternative to Nafion, and that chitosan modified microelectrodes are reliable tools for in vivo monitoring of changes in neurotransmitter levels.

  19. Levels in neurotransmitter precursor amino acids correlate with mental health in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüfner, K; Oberguggenberger, A; Kohl, C; Geisler, S; Gamper, E; Meraner, V; Egeter, J; Hubalek, M; Beer, B; Fuchs, D; Sperner-Unterweger, B

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among females. Approximately 30% of cancer patients develop depression or depressive adaptation disorder within 5 years post diagnosis. Low grade inflammation and subsequent changes in neurotransmitter levels could be the pathophysiological link. In the current study we investigated the association of neurotransmitter precursor amino acids with a diagnosis of depression or state anxiety in 154 subjects suffering from breast cancer (BCA(+)), depression (DPR(+)), both or neither. Sociodemographic parameters, severity of depressive symptoms, and state anxiety (ANX) were recorded. Neopterin, kynurenine/tryptophan and phenylalanine/tyrosine were analysed by HPLC or ELISA. Significantly higher serum neopterin values were found in DPR(+) patients (p = 0.034) and in ANX(+) subjects (p = 0.008), as a marker of Th1-related inflammation. The phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio (index of the catecholamine pathway) was associated with the factors "breast cancer" and "depression" and their interaction (all p depressive symptoms (r = 0.376, p precursor amino acids correlate with mental health, an effect which was much more pronounced in BCA(+) patients than in BCA(-) subjects. Aside from identifying underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, these results could be the basis for future treatment studies: in BCA(+) patients with depression the use of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors might be recommended while in those with predominant anxiety selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors might be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Lewis, Tommy L; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance.

  1. The use of LeuT as a model in elucidating binding sites for substrates and inhibitors in neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løland, Claus Juul

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mammalian neurotransmitter transporters are complex proteins playing a central role in synaptic transmission between neurons by rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters. The proteins which transport dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin belong to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters...... (NSS). Due to their important role, dysfunctions are associated with several psychiatric and neurological diseases and they also serve as targets for a wide range of therapeutic and illicit drugs. Despite the central physiological and pharmacological importance, direct evidence on structure......–function relationships on mammalian NSS proteins has so far been unsuccessful. The crystal structure of the bacterial NSS protein, LeuT, has been a turning point in structural investigations. Scope of review: To provide an update on what is known about the binding sites for substrates and inhibitors in the Leu...

  2. Two-step production of monoamines in monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord: a different control strategy of neurotransmitter supply?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mengliang

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitters play an important role in the modulation of sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the spinal cord. Although traditionally it is believed that in mammalian spinal cord, monoamine neurotransmitters mainly originate from the brain, accumulating evidence indicates...... that especially when the spinal cord is injured, they can also be produced in the spinal cord. In this review, I will present evidence for a possible pathway for two-step synthesis of dopamine and serotonin in the spinal cord. Published data from different sources and unpublished data from my own ongoing projects...... that dopamine and serotonin could be synthesized sequentially in two monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord via a TH-AADC and a TPH-AADC cascade respectively. The monoamines synthesized through this pathway may compensate for lost neurotransmitters following spinal cord injury and also may play specific roles...

  3. Diagnostic approach to neurotransmitter monoamine disorders: experience from clinical, biochemical, and genetic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Alice; Arnoux, Jean-Baptiste; Barth, Magalie; Lamireau, Delphine; Houcinat, Nada; Goizet, Cyril; Doray, Bérénice; Gobin, Stéphanie; Schiff, Manuel; Cano, Aline; Amsallem, Daniel; Barnerias, Christine; Chaumette, Boris; Plaze, Marion; Slama, Abdelhamid; Ioos, Christine; Desguerre, Isabelle; Lebre, Anne-Sophie; de Lonlay, Pascale; Christa, Laurence

    2018-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic work-up of patients with diverse neurological diseases, we have elaborated specific clinical and CSF neurotransmitter patterns. Neurotransmitter determinations in CSF from 1200 patients revealed abnormal values in 228 (19%) cases. In 54/228 (24%) patients, a final diagnosis was identified. We have reported primary (30/54, 56%) and secondary (24/54, 44%) monoamine neurotransmitter disorders. For primary deficiencies, the most frequently mutated gene was DDC (n = 9), and the others included PAH with neuropsychiatric features (n = 4), PTS (n = 5), QDPR (n = 3), SR (n = 1), and TH (n = 1). We have also identified mutations in SLC6A3, FOXG1 (n = 1 of each), MTHFR (n = 3), FOLR1, and MTHFD (n = 1 of each), for dopamine transporter, neuronal development, and folate metabolism disorders, respectively. For secondary deficiencies, we have identified POLG (n = 3), ACSF3 (n = 1), NFU1, and SDHD (n = 1 of each), playing a role in mitochondrial function. Other mutated genes included: ADAR, RNASEH2B, RNASET2, SLC7A2-IT1 A/B lncRNA, and EXOSC3 involved in nuclear and cytoplasmic metabolism; RanBP2 and CASK implicated in post-traductional and scaffolding modifications; SLC6A19 regulating amino acid transport; MTM1, KCNQ2 (n = 2), and ATP1A3 playing a role in nerve cell electrophysiological state. Chromosome abnormalities, del(8)(p23)/dup(12) (p23) (n = 1), del(6)(q21) (n = 1), dup(17)(p13.3) (n = 1), and non-genetic etiologies (n = 3) were also identified. We have classified the final 54 diagnoses in 11 distinctive biochemical profiles and described them through 20 clinical features. To identify the specific molecular cause of abnormal NT profiles, (targeted) genomics might be used, to improve diagnosis and allow early treatment of complex and rare neurological genetic diseases.

  4. Elevated Norepinephrine may be a Unifying Etiological Factor in the Abuse of a Broad Range of Substances: Alcohol, Nicotine, Marijuana, Heroin, Cocaine, and Caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Fitzgerald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of commonly abused drugs have effects on the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system, including alterations during acute intoxication and chronic use of these drugs. It is not established, however, that individual differences in noradrenergic signaling, which may be present prior to use of drugs, predispose certain persons to substance abuse. This paper puts forth the novel hypothesis that elevated noradrenergic signaling, which may be raised largely due to genetics but also due to environmental factors, is an etiological factor in the abuse of a wide range of substances, including alcohol, nicotine, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, and caffeine. Data are reviewed for each of these drugs comprising their interaction with norepinephrine during acute intoxication, long-term use, subsequent withdrawal, and stress-induced relapse. In general, the data suggest that these drugs acutely boost noradrenergic signaling, whereas long-term use also affects this neurotransmitter system, possibly suppressing it. During acute withdrawal after chronic drug use, noradrenergic signaling tends to be elevated, consistent with the observation that norepinephrine lowering drugs such as clonidine reduce withdrawal symptoms. Since psychological stress can promote relapse of drug seeking in susceptible individuals and stress produces elevated norepinephrine release, this suggests that these drugs may be suppressing noradrenergic signaling during chronic use or instead elevating it only in reward circuits of the brain. If elevated noradrenergic signaling is an etiological factor in the abuse of a broad range of substances, then chronic use of pharmacological agents that reduce noradrenergic signaling, such as clonidine, guanfacine, lofexidine, propranolol, or prazosin, may help prevent or treat drug abuse in general.

  5. Elevated Norepinephrine may be a Unifying Etiological Factor in the Abuse of a Broad Range of Substances: Alcohol, Nicotine, Marijuana, Heroin, Cocaine, and Caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Paul J

    2013-10-13

    A wide range of commonly abused drugs have effects on the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system, including alterations during acute intoxication and chronic use of these drugs. It is not established, however, that individual differences in noradrenergic signaling, which may be present prior to use of drugs, predispose certain persons to substance abuse. This paper puts forth the novel hypothesis that elevated noradrenergic signaling, which may be raised largely due to genetics but also due to environmental factors, is an etiological factor in the abuse of a wide range of substances, including alcohol, nicotine, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, and caffeine. Data are reviewed for each of these drugs comprising their interaction with norepinephrine during acute intoxication, long-term use, subsequent withdrawal, and stress-induced relapse. In general, the data suggest that these drugs acutely boost noradrenergic signaling, whereas long-term use also affects this neurotransmitter system, possibly suppressing it. During acute withdrawal after chronic drug use, noradrenergic signaling tends to be elevated, consistent with the observation that norepinephrine lowering drugs such as clonidine reduce withdrawal symptoms. Since psychological stress can promote relapse of drug seeking in susceptible individuals and stress produces elevated norepinephrine release, this suggests that these drugs may be suppressing noradrenergic signaling during chronic use or instead elevating it only in reward circuits of the brain. If elevated noradrenergic signaling is an etiological factor in the abuse of a broad range of substances, then chronic use of pharmacological agents that reduce noradrenergic signaling, such as clonidine, guanfacine, lofexidine, propranolol, or prazosin, may help prevent or treat drug abuse in general.

  6. Simultaneous determination of 8 neurotransmitters and their metabolite levels in rat brain using liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry: Application to the murine Nrf2 model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnicz, Aneta; Avendaño Ortiz, José; Casas, Ana I; Freitas, Andiara E; G López, Manuela; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana

    2016-01-30

    Analysis of neurotransmitters and their metabolites is useful for the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with protein precipitation was developed to monitor levels of adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), glutamic acid (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) in rat brain tissue. Isoprenaline was used as an internal standard (IS). Neurotransmitters and metabolites were eluted with a reverse phase column under gradient conditions through a mobile phase consisting of 0.2% formic acid water solution/acetonitrile. The compounds were detected and quantified by LC-MS/MS with positive or negative electrospray ionization, which operates in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The method was linear or polynomial (R(2)>0.99) for AD, NA, Glu, GABA, DA, 5-HT, 5-HIAA, and MHPG in the range of 0.25-200, 0.5-200, 250-20,000, 250-20,000, 0.25-200, 10-3000, 1-50, and 1-50ng/mL, respectively. The validation assays for accuracy and precision, matrix effect, extraction recovery, stability and carry-over of the samples for neurotransmitters and metabolites were consistent with the requirements of regulatory agencies. The method enables rapid quantification of neurotransmitters and their metabolites and has been applied in the nuclear factor (erythroid 2-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) knockout mouse model of depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. `Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering (`Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called `full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of `full fusion'.

  8. Photo-renewable electroanalytical sensor for neurotransmitters detection in body fluid mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Valentina; Soliveri, Guido; Panzarasa, Guido; Cappelletti, Giuseppe; Meroni, Daniela; Falciola, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    A composite electrode with a sandwich structure combining the properties of silver nanoparticles and a titania photoactive layer was used for the electroanalytical detection, by differential pulse voltammetry, of three neurotransmitters: dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. The three analytes were determined at low detection limits (around 0.03 μM) also in the presence of conventional interferents, such as uric and ascorbic acids. The fouling of the electrode surface was overcome by irradiating the device with UVA light, restoring the initial sensor sensitivity. Dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin were determined also in simulated biological matrices: liquor (artificially reproduced cerebrospinal fluid) and serum. Moreover, the contemporaneous detection of dopamine and norepinephrine in simulated human urine solutions was also demonstrated, representing the first step towards clinical applications of the proposed methodology. Graphical abstract The photo-renewable electroanalytical sensor.

  9. Relationship between chronic lead toxicity and plasma neurotransmitters in autistic patients from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ansary, Afaf K; Bacha, Abir Ben; Ayahdi, Layla Y Al-

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to clarify the relationship between blood Pb(2+) concentration as a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and plasma neurotransmitters as biochemical parameters that reflect brain function in Saudi autistic patients. RBC's lead content together with plasma concentration of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) were measured in 25 Saudi autistic patients and compared to 16 age-matching control samples. The obtained data recorded that Saudi autistic patients have a remarkable higher levels of Pb(2+) and significantly elevated levels of GABA, 5HT and DA compared to healthy subjects. ROC analysis revealed satisfactory values of specificity and sensitivity of the measured parameters. This study suggests that postnatal lead toxicity in autistic patients of Saudi Arabia could represent a causative factor in the pathogenesis of autism. Elevated GABA, 5HT and DA were discussed in relation to the chronic lead toxicity recorded in the investigated autistic samples. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Effects of dietary amino acids, carbohydrates, and choline on neurotransmitter synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a meal to increase or decrease brain neurotransmitter synthesis has been studied. It is concluded that brain serotonin synthesis is directly controlled by the proportions of carbohydrate to protein in meals and snacks that increase or decrease brain tryptophan levels, thereby changing the substrate saturation of tryptophan hydroxylase and the rate of serotonin synthesis. The ability of serotoninergic neurons to have their output coupled to dietary macronutrients enables them to function as sensors of peripheral metabolism, and to subserve an important role in the control of appetite. The robust and selective responses of catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurons to supplemental tyrosine and choline suggest that these compounds may become useful as a new type of drug for treating deseases or conditions in which adequate quantities of the transmitter would otherwise be unavailable.

  11. Neurosteroid biosynthesis: enzymatic pathways and neuroendocrine regulation by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Rego, Jean Luc; Seong, Jae Young; Burel, Delphine; Leprince, Jerôme; Luu-The, Van; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Pelletier, Georges; Vaudry, Hubert

    2009-08-01

    Neuroactive steroids synthesized in neuronal tissue, referred to as neurosteroids, are implicated in proliferation, differentiation, activity and survival of nerve cells. Neurosteroids are also involved in the control of a number of behavioral, neuroendocrine and metabolic processes such as regulation of food intake, locomotor activity, sexual activity, aggressiveness, anxiety, depression, body temperature and blood pressure. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the existence, neuroanatomical distribution and biological activity of the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of neurosteroids in the brain of vertebrates, and we review the neuronal mechanisms that control the activity of these enzymes. The observation that the activity of key steroidogenic enzymes is finely tuned by various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides strongly suggests that some of the central effects of these neuromodulators may be mediated via the regulation of neurosteroid production.

  12. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C.; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release. PMID:27052163

  13. Stress-induced cognitive dysfunction: hormone-neurotransmitter interactions in the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Shansky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms and neural circuits that drive emotion and cognition are inextricably linked. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis as a result of stress or other causes of arousal initiates a flood of hormone and neurotransmitter release throughout the brain, affecting the way we think, decide, and behave. This review will focus on factors that influence the function of the prefrontal cortex (PFC, a brain region that governs higher-level cognitive processes and executive function. The PFC becomes markedly impaired by stress, producing measurable deficits in working memory. These deficits arise from the interaction of multiple neuromodulators, including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, and gonadal hormones; here we will discuss the non- human primate and rodent literature that has furthered our understanding of the circuitry, receptors, and signaling cascades responsible for stress-induced prefrontal dysfunction.

  14. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Valente

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2 underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release.

  15. Glutamatergic and GABAergic TCA cycle and neurotransmitter cycling fluxes in different regions of mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ambadipudi, Susmitha; Patel, Anant B

    2013-10-01

    The (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies together with the infusion of (13)C-labeled substrates in rats and humans have provided important insight into brain energy metabolism. In the present study, we have extended a three-compartment metabolic model in mouse to investigate glutamatergic and GABAergic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and neurotransmitter cycle fluxes across different regions of the brain. The (13)C turnover of amino acids from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose was monitored ex vivo using (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. The astroglial glutamate pool size, one of the important parameters of the model, was estimated by a short infusion of [2-(13)C]acetate. The ratio Vcyc/VTCA was calculated from the steady-state acetate experiment. The (13)C turnover curves of [4-(13)C]/[3-(13)C]glutamate, [4-(13)C]glutamine, [2-(13)C]/[3-(13)C]GABA, and [3-(13)C]aspartate from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose were analyzed using a three-compartment metabolic model to estimate the rates of the TCA cycle and neurotransmitter cycle associated with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. The glutamatergic TCA cycle rate was found to be highest in the cerebral cortex (0.91 ± 0.05 μmol/g per minute) and least in the hippocampal region (0.64 ± 0.07 μmol/g per minute) of the mouse brain. In contrast, the GABAergic TCA cycle flux was found to be highest in the thalamus-hypothalamus (0.28 ± 0.01 μmol/g per minute) and least in the cerebral cortex (0.24 ± 0.02 μmol/g per minute). These findings indicate that the energetics of excitatory and inhibitory function is distinct across the mouse brain.

  16. Brain neurotransmitters in an animal model with postpartum depressive-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Y; Hants, Y; Vorobeiv, L; Staum, M; Abu Ahmad, Wiessam; Mankuta, D; Galun, E; Arbel-Alon, S

    2017-05-30

    Post-Partum Depression (PPD) occurs in 15% of pregnancies and its patho-physiology is not known. We studied female BALB/c ("depressive") and C57BL/6 (control) mice as a model for PPD and assessed their behavior and correlates with brain neurotransmitters (NTs) - norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and intermediates, during the pre-pregnancy (PREP), pregnancy (PREG) and post-partum (PP) periods. Depressive-like behavior was evaluated by the Open Field (OFT), Tail Suspension (TST) and Forced Swim (FST) tests. Neurotransmitters (NTs) were determined in the striatum (care-giving), hippocampus (cognitive function) and hypothalamus (maternal care & eating behavior). In the BALB/c mice, while their performance in all behavioral tests was significantly reduced during pregnancy and P-P indicative of the development of depressive-like responses, no changes were observed in the C57BL/6 mice. Changes in NTs in BALB/C were as follows: PREP, all NTs in the three brain areas were decreased, although an increase in dopamine release was observed in the hippocampus. PREG: No changes were observed in the NTs except for a decrease in 5-HT in the striatum. P-P: striatum, low 5-HT, NE and dopamine; Hippocampus: low 5-HT, NE and high Dopamine; hypothalamus: all NTs increased, especially NE. Following pregnancy and delivery, the BALB/c mice developed depressive-like behavior associated with a significant decrease in 5-HT, dopamine and NE in the striatum and 5-HT and NE in the hippocampus. Dopamine increased in the latter together with a significant increase in all NTs in the hypothalamus. These findings suggest that the development of PPD may be associated with NT changes. Normalization of these alterations may have a role in the treatment of PPD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Zuogui Pill () on monoamine neurotransmitters and sex hormones in climacteric rats with panic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2017-03-01

    To explore the effects of Chinese medicine prescription Zuogui Pill (, ZGP) on monoamine neurotransmitters and sex hormones in climacteric rats with induced panic attacks. Forty-eight climacteric female rats were randomized into 6 groups with 8 rats in each group: the control group, the model group, the low-, medium- and high-dose ZGP groups and the alprazolam group. Rats in the low-, medium- and high-dose ZGP groups were administered 4.725, 9.45, or 18.9 g/kg ZGP by gastric perfusion, respectively. The alprazolam group was treated by gastric perfusion with 0.036 mg/kg alprazolam. The control and model groups were treated with distilled water. The animals were pretreated once daily for 8 consecutive weeks. The behaviors of rats in the open fifield test and the elevated T-maze (ETM) were observed after induced panic attack, and the levels of brain monoamine neurotransmitters and the plasma levels of sex hormones were measured. Compared with the control group, the mean ETM escape time and the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenalin (NE) of the model group were signifificantly reduced (P<0.05), Compared with the model group, the mean ETM escape time and the 5-HT and NE levels of all the ZGP groups increased signifificantly (P<0.05 or P<0.01). However, no signifificant difference was observed in the levels of sex hormones between the groups. Pretreatment with ZGP in climacteric rats may improve the behavior of panic attack, which may be related to increased 5-HT and NE in the brain.

  18. Expression of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins in neurogenic inflammation of the rat retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Bronzetti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Antidromic stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion triggers the release of substance P (SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP from sensory nerve terminals of the capsaicin sensitive C-fibers. These pro-inflammatory neuropeptides produce a marked hyperemia in the anterior segment of the eye, accompanied by increased intraocular pressure, breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier and myosis. To assess the effects of neurogenic inflammation on the retina, specifically on the immunostaining of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins, as well as on the expression of neurotrophin receptors in the retina. RT-PCR was also accomplished in control and stimulated animals to confirm the immunohistochemical results. In the electrically stimulated eyes, immunostaining for SP, CGRP, VIP and nNOS demonstrated a marked increase in the RPE/POS (Retinal Pigment Epithelium/Photoreceptor Outer Segments, in the inner and outer granular layers and in the ganglion cells in comparison to the control eyes. CGRP and SP were found increased in stimulated animals and this result has been confirmed by RT- PCR. Changes in neurotrophin immunostaining and in receptor expression were also observed after electric stimulation of trigeminal ganglia. Decrease of BDNF and NT4 in the outer and inner layers and in ganglion cells was particularly marked. In stimulated rat retinas immunostaining and RT-PCR showed a NGF expression increase. Neurotrophin receptors remained substantially unchanged. These studies demonstrated, for the first time, that antidromic stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion and subsequent neurogenic inflammation affect immunostaining of retinal cell neurotransmitter/ neuropeptides and neurotrophins as well as the expression of neurotrophin receptors.

  19. Effect of antiparkinson drug HP-200 (Mucuna pruriens) on the central monoaminergic neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyam, Bala V; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Hare, Theodore A

    2004-02-01

    HP-200, which contains Mucuna pruriens endocarp, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Mucuna pruriens endocarp has also been shown to be more effective compared to synthetic levodopa in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. The present study was designed to elucidate the long-term effect of Mucuna pruriens endocarp in HP-200 on monoaminergic neurotransmitters and its metabolite in various regions of the rat brain. HP-200 at a dose of 2.5, 5.0 or 10.0 g/kg/day was mixed with rat chow and fed daily ad lib to Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 for each group) for 52 weeks. Controls (n = 6) received no drug. Random assignment was made for doses and control. The rats were sacrificed at the end of 52 weeks and the neurotransmitters were analyzed in the cortex, hippocampus, substantia nigra and striatum. Oral administration of Mucuna pruriens endocarp in the form of HP-200 had a significant effect on dopamine content in the cortex with no significant effect on levodopa, norepinephrine or dopamine, serotonin, and their metabolites- HVA, DOPAC and 5-HIAA in the nigrostriatal tract. The failure of Mucuna pruriens endocarp to significantly affect dopamine metabolism in the striatonigral tract along with its ability to improve Parkinsonian symptoms in the 6-hydorxydopamine animal model and humans may suggest that its antiparkinson effect may be due to components other than levodopa or that it has an levodopa enhancing effect. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Beneficial effects of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats: Possible neurotransmitters and neuroinflammation modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Swati; Jamwal, Sumit; Deshmukh, Rahul; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-01-15

    Tardive Dyskinesia is a severe side effect of chronic neuroleptic treatment consisting of abnormal involuntary movements, characterized by orofacial dyskinesia. The study was designed to investigate the protective effect of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia possibly by neurochemical and neuroinflammatory modulation in rats. Rats were administered with haloperidol (1mg/kg, i.p for 21 days) to induce orofacial dyskinesia. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) was given daily 1hour before haloperidol treatment for 21 days. Behavioral observations (vacuous chewing movements, tongue protrusions, facial jerking, rotarod activity, grip strength, narrow beam walking) were assessed on 0th, 7th(,) 14th(,) 21st day after haloperidol treatment. On 22nd day, animals were killed and striatum was excised for estimation of biochemical parameters (malondialdehyde, nitrite and endogenous enzyme (GSH), pro-inflammatory cytokines [Tumor necrosis factor, Interleukin 1β, Interleukin 6] and neurotransmitters level (dopamine, serotonin, nor epinephrine, 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), Homovanillic acid, 3,4- dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. Haloperidol treatment for 21 days impaired muscle co-ordination, motor activity and grip strength with an increased in orofacial dyskinetic movements. Further free radical generation increases MDA and nitrite levels, decreasing GSH levels in striatum. Neuroinflammatory markers were significantly increased with decrease in neurotransmitters levels. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) treatment along with haloperidol significantly attenuated impairment in behavioral, biochemical, neurochemical and neuroinflammatory markers. Results of the present study attributed the therapeutic potential of lycopene in the treatment (prevented or delayed) of typical antipsychotic induced orofacial dyskinesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurotransmitter modulation of extracellular H+ fluxes from isolated retinal horizontal cells of the skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Anthony J A; Verzi, Michael P; Birnbaum, Andrea D; Yamoah, Ebenezer N; Hammar, Katherine; Smith, Peter J S; Malchow, Robert Paul

    2004-01-01

    Self-referencing H+-selective microelectrodes were used to measure extracellular H+ fluxes from horizontal cells isolated from the skate retina. A standing H+ flux was detected from quiescent cells, indicating a higher concentration of free hydrogen ions near the extracellular surface of the cell as compared to the surrounding solution. The standing H+ flux was reduced by removal of extracellular sodium or application of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA), suggesting activity of a Na+–H+ exchanger. Glutamate decreased H+ flux, lowering the concentration of free hydrogen ions around the cell. AMPA/kainate receptor agonists mimicked the response, and the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) eliminated the effects of glutamate and kainate. Metabotropic glutamate agonists were without effect. Glutamate-induced alterations in H+ flux required extracellular calcium, and were abolished when cells were bathed in an alkaline Ringer solution. Increasing intracellular calcium by photolysis of the caged calcium compound NP-EGTA also altered extracellular H+ flux. Immunocytochemical localization of the plasmalemma Ca2+–H+-ATPase (PMCA pump) revealed intense labelling within the outer plexiform layer and on isolated horizontal cells. Our results suggest that glutamate modulation of H+ flux arises from calcium entry into cells with subsequent activation of the plasmalemma Ca2+–H+-ATPase. These neurotransmitter-induced changes in extracellular pH have the potential to play a modulatory role in synaptic processing in the outer retina. However, our findings argue against the hypothesis that hydrogen ions released by horizontal cells normally act as the inhibitory feedback neurotransmitter onto photoreceptor synaptic terminals to create the surround portion of the centre-surround receptive fields of retinal neurones. PMID:15272044

  2. ASTROCYTIC CONTROL OF BIOSYNTHESIS AND TURNOVER OF THE NEUROTRANSMITTERS GLUTAMATE AND GABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne eSchousboe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate and GABA are the quantitatively major neurotransmitters in the brain mediating excitatory and inhibitory signaling, respectively. These amino acids are metabolically interrelated and at the same time they are tightly coupled to the intermediary metabolism including energy homeostasis. Astrocytes play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA since only these cells express pyruvate carboxylase (PC, the enzyme required for de novo synthesis of the two amino acids. Such de novo synthesis is obligatory to compensate for catabolism of glutamate and GABA related to oxidative metabolism when the amino acids are used as energy substrates. This, in turn, is influenced by the extent to which the cycling of the amino acids between neurons and astrocytes may occur. This cycling is brought about by the glutamate/GABA – glutamine cycle the operation of which involves the enzymes glutamine synthetase (GS and glutaminase (PAG together with the plasma membrane transporters for glutamate, GABA and glutamine. The distribution of these proteins between neurons and astrocytes determines the efficacy of the cycle and it is of particular importance that GS is exclusively expressed in astrocytes. It should be kept in mind that the operation of the cycle is associated with movement of ammonia nitrogen between the two cell types and different mechanisms which can mediate this have been proposed.This review is intended to delineate the above mentioned processes and to discuss quantitatively their relative importance in the homeostatic mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of optimal conditions for the respective neurotransmission processes to operate.

  3. Onchocerca volvulus-neurotransmitter tyramine is a biomarker for river blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globisch, Daniel; Moreno, Amira Y; Hixon, Mark S; Nunes, Ashlee A K; Denery, Judith R; Specht, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim; Janda, Kim D

    2013-03-12

    Onchocerciasis, also known as "river blindness", is a neglected tropical disease infecting millions of people mainly in Africa and the Middle East but also in South America and Central America. Disease infectivity initiates from the filarial parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus, which is transmitted by the blackfly vector Simulium sp. carrying infectious third-stage larvae. Ivermectin has controlled transmission of microfilariae, with an African Program elimination target date of 2025. However, there is currently no point-of-care diagnostic that can distinguish the burden of infection--including active and/or past infection--and enable the elimination program to be effectively monitored. Here, we describe how liquid chromatography-MS-based urine metabolome analysis can be exploited for the identification of a unique biomarker, N-acetyltyramine-O,β-glucuronide (NATOG), a neurotransmitter-derived secretion metabolite from O. volvulus. The regulation of this tyramine neurotransmitter was found to be linked to patient disease infection, including the controversial antibiotic doxycycline treatment that has been shown to both sterilize and kill adult female worms. Further clues to its regulation have been elucidated through biosynthetic pathway determination within the nematode and its human host. Our results demonstrate that NATOG tracks O. volvulus metabolism in both worms and humans, and thus can be considered a host-specific biomarker for onchocerciasis progression. Liquid chromatography-MS-based urine metabolome analysis discovery of NATOG not only has broad implications for a noninvasive host-specific onchocerciasis diagnostic but provides a basis for the metabolome mining of other neglected tropical diseases for the discovery of distinct biomarkers and monitoring of disease progression.

  4. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in hypothalamic amenorrhea: spectrum, stability, and response to neurotransmitter modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R B; Hall, J E; Martin, K A

    1999-06-01

    To characterize the neuroendocrine patterns of abnormal GnRH secretion in hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA), 49 women with primary and secondary HA underwent frequent sampling of LH in a total of 72 baseline studies over 12-24 h. A subset of women participated in more than one study to address 1) the variability of LH pulse patterns over time; and 2) the impact of modulating opioid, dopaminergic, and adrenergic tone on LH secretory patterns. The frequency and amplitude of LH secretion was compared with that seen in the early follicular phase (EFP) of normally cycling women. The spectrum of abnormalities of LH pulses was 8% apulsatile, 27% low frequency/low amplitude, 8% low amplitude/normal frequency, 43% low frequency/normal amplitude, 14% normal frequency/normal amplitude. Of patients studied overnight, 45% demonstrated a pubertal pattern of augmented LH secretion during sleep. Of patients studied repeatedly, 75% demonstrated at least 2 different patterns of LH secretion, and 33% reverted at least once to a normal pattern of secretion. An increase in LH pulse frequency was seen in 12 of 15 subjects in response to naloxone (opioid receptor antagonist). Clonidine (alpha-2 adrenergic agonist) was associated with a decrease in mean LH in 3 of 3 subjects. An increase in LH pulse frequency was seen in 4 of 8 subjects in response to metoclopramide (dopamine receptor antagonist), but the response was not statistically significant. Baseline abnormalities in LH secretion did not appear to influence response to neurotransmitter modulation. 1) HA represents a spectrum of disordered GnRH secretion that can vary over time; 2) LH pulse patterns at baseline do not appear to influence the ability to respond to neurotransmitter modulation; 3) Opioid and adrenergic tone appear to influence the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator in some individuals with HA.

  5. Glucose is necessary to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis during synaptic activity in cultured glutamatergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-10-01

    Glucose is the primary energy substrate for the adult mammalian brain. However, lactate produced within the brain might be able to serve this purpose in neurons. In the present study, the relative significance of glucose and lactate as substrates to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis was investigated. Cultured cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons were superfused in medium containing [U-13C]glucose (2.5 mmol/L) and lactate (1 or 5 mmol/L) or glucose (2.5 mmol/L) and [U-13C]lactate (1 mmol/L), and exposed to pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 micromol/L), leading to synaptic activity including vesicular release. The incorporation of 13C label into intracellular lactate, alanine, succinate, glutamate, and aspartate was determined by mass spectrometry. The metabolism of [U-13C]lactate under non-depolarizing conditions was high compared with that of [U-13C]glucose; however, it decreased significantly during induced depolarization. In contrast, at both concentrations of extracellular lactate, the metabolism of [U-13C]glucose was increased during neuronal depolarization. The role of glucose and lactate as energy substrates during vesicular release as well as transporter-mediated influx and efflux of glutamate was examined using preloaded D-[3H]aspartate as a glutamate tracer and DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate to inhibit glutamate transporters. The results suggest that glucose is essential to prevent depolarization-induced reversal of the transporter (efflux), whereas vesicular release was unaffected by the choice of substrate. In conclusion, the present study shows that glucose is a necessary substrate to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis during synaptic activity and that synaptic activity does not induce an upregulation of lactate metabolism in glutamatergic neurons.

  6. Electrochemical Label-Free Aptasensor for Specific Analysis of Dopamine in Serum in the Presence of Structurally Related Neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Cellular and brain metabolism of dopamine can be correlated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders, and as such, in vivo analysis of dopamine in the presence of structurally related neurotransmitters (NT) represents a holy grail of neuroscience. Interference from those NTs generally does...

  7. A Preliminary Study of Gene Polymorphisms Involved in the Neurotransmitters Metabolism of a Homogeneous Spanish Autistic Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorro, Fernando; Alejandre, Encarna; Anaya, Nuria; Guijarro, Teresa; Sanz, Yolanza; Romero, Auxiliadora; Tienda, Pilar; Burgos, Rafael; Gay, Eudoxia; Sanchez, Vicente; Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Twin studies have shown a strong genetic component for autism. Neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and catecholamines, have been suggested to play a role in the disease since they have an essential function in synaptogenesis and brain development. In this preliminary study, polymorphism of genes implicated in the serotonergic and dopaminergic…

  8. Fetal growth-retardation and brain-sparing by malnutrition are associated to changes in neurotransmitters profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, C; Valent, D; Vázquez-Gómez, M; Arroyo, L; Isabel, B; Astiz, S; Bassols, A; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2017-04-01

    The present study assesses possible changes in the levels of different neurotransmitters (catecholamines and indoleamines) in fetuses affected by nutrient shortage. Hence, we determined the concentration of catecholamines and indoleamines at the hypothalamus of 56 swine fetuses obtained at both 70 and 90days of pregnancy (n=33 and 23 fetuses, respectively). The degree of fetal development and the fetal sex affected the neurotransmitters profile at both stages. At Day 70, there were found higher mean concentrations of l-DOPA in both female and male fetuses with severe IUGR; male fetuses with severe IUGR also showed higher concentrations of TRP than normal male littermates. At Day 90 of pregnancy, the differences between sexes were more evident. There were no significant effects from either severe IUGR on the neurotransmitter profile in male fetuses. However, in the females, a lower body-weight was related to lower concentrations of l-DOPA and TRP and those female fetuses affected by severe IUGR evidenced lower HVA concentration. In conclusion, the fetal synthesis and use of neurotransmitters increase with time of pregnancy but, in case of IUGR, both catecholamines and indoleamines pathways are affected by sex-related effects. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  10. Adaptive processes of the central and autonomic cholinergic neurotransmitter system: Age-related differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortuna, S.; Pintor, A.; Michalek, H.

    1991-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the response of the ileum strip longitudinal and circular muscle to repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The response was measured in terms of both biochemical parameters (acetylcholinesterase-AChE inhibition, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites-mAChRs, choline acetyltransferase-ChAT) and functional responsiveness (contractility of the isolated ileum stimulated by cholinergic agonists). The biochemical data were compared with those obtained for the cerebral cortex. In the ileum strip of control rats there was a significant age-related decline of AChE, maximal density of 3 H-QNB binding sites (Bmax) and ChAT. During the first week of DFP treatment the cholinergic syndrome was more pronounced in aged than in young rats, resulting in 35% and 10% mortality, respectively; subsequently the syndrome attenuated. At the end of DFP treatment ileal AChE were inhibited by about 30%; the down-regulation of mAChRs was about 50% in young and 35% in aged rats. No significant differences in the recovery rate of AChE were noted between young and aged rats. On the contrary, mAChRs normalized within 5 weeks in young and 3 weeks in aged rats

  11. Cultured neurons as model systems for biochemical and pharmacological studies on receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Drejer, J; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1985-01-01

    By the use of primary cultures of neurons consisting of cerebral cortex interneurons or cerebellar granule cells it is possible to study biochemical and pharmacological aspects of receptors for GABA and glutamate. Cerebellar granule cells have been shown to express both high- and low-affinity GAB...

  12. Mechanisms of action of antidepressants: from neurotransmitter systems to signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Chirisse; Fricker, Ashwana D.; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Gomes, Ivone

    2005-01-01

    Antidepressants are commonly used in the treatment of anxiety and depression, medical conditions that affect ~17–20% of the population. The clinical effects of antidepressants take several weeks to manifest, suggesting that these drugs induce adaptive changes in brain structures affected by anxiety and depression. In order to develop shorter-acting and more effective drugs for the treatment of anxiety and depression, it is important to understand how antidepressants bring about their benefici...

  13. The neurochemical correlate of consciousness: exploring neurotransmitter systems underlying conscious vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    How and where does our brain integrated the information that we get into our eyes into a unifying percept and into a conscious experience? Although different neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) have been proposed, depending on the kind of neural signals recorded, the type of manipulation used,

  14. Adaptive processes of the central and autonomic cholinergic neurotransmitter system: Age-related differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortuna, S.; Pintor, A.; Michalek, H. (Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the response of the ileum strip longitudinal and circular muscle to repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The response was measured in terms of both biochemical parameters (acetylcholinesterase-AChE inhibition, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites-mAChRs, choline acetyltransferase-ChAT) and functional responsiveness (contractility of the isolated ileum stimulated by cholinergic agonists). The biochemical data were compared with those obtained for the cerebral cortex. In the ileum strip of control rats there was a significant age-related decline of AChE, maximal density of {sup 3}H-QNB binding sites (Bmax) and ChAT. During the first week of DFP treatment the cholinergic syndrome was more pronounced in aged than in young rats, resulting in 35% and 10% mortality, respectively; subsequently the syndrome attenuated. At the end of DFP treatment ileal AChE were inhibited by about 30%; the down-regulation of mAChRs was about 50% in young and 35% in aged rats. No significant differences in the recovery rate of AChE were noted between young and aged rats. On the contrary, mAChRs normalized within 5 weeks in young and 3 weeks in aged rats.

  15. Noradrenergic neurotransmission within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulates the retention of immobility in the rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Michelly M; Gomes, Felipe V; Crestani, Carlos C; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2013-06-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is a limbic structure that has a direct influence on the autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral responses to stress. It was recently reported that reversible inactivation of synaptic transmission within this structure causes antidepressant-like effects, indicating that activation of the BNST during stressful situations would facilitate the development of behavioral changes related to the neurobiology of depression. Moreover, noradrenergic neurotransmission is abundant in the BNST and has an important role in the regulation of emotional processes related to the stress response. Thus, this study aimed to test the hypothesis that activation of adrenoceptors within the BNST facilitates the development of behavioral consequences of stress. To investigate this hypothesis, male Wistar rats were stressed (forced swimming, 15 min) and 24 h later received intra-BNST injections of vehicle, WB4101, RX821002, CGP20712, or ICI118,551, which are selective α(1), α(2), β(1), and β(2) adrenoceptor antagonists, respectively, 10 min before a 5-min forced swimming test. It was observed that administration of WB4101 (10 and 15 nmol), CGP20712 (5 and 10 nmol), or ICI118,551 (5 nmol) into the BNST reduced the immobility time of rats subjected to forced swimming test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. These findings suggest that activation of α(1), β(1), and β(2) adrenoceptors in the BNST could be involved in the development of the behavioral consequences of stress. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  16. The influence of botulinum toxin type A (BTX) on the immunohistochemical characteristics of noradrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibers supplying the porcine urinary bladder wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepiarczyk, E; Bossowska, A; Kaleczyc, J; Majewski, M

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) belongs to a family of neurotoxins which strongly influence the function of autonomic neurons supplying the urinary bladder. Accordingly, BTX has been used as an effective drug in experimental therapies of a range of neurogenic bladder disorders. However, there is no detailed information dealing with the influence of BTX on the morphological and chemical properties of nerve fibres supplying the urinary bladder wall. Therefore, the present study investigated, using double-labeling immunohistochemistry, the distribution, relative frequency and chemical coding of cholinergic and noradrenergic nerve fibers supplying the wall of the urinary bladder in normal female pigs (n = 6) and in the pigs (n = 6) after intravesical BTX injections. In the pigs injected with BTX, the number of adrenergic (DbetaH-positive) nerve fibers distributed in the bladder wall (urothelium, submucosa and muscle coat) was distinctly higher while the number of cholinergic (VAChT-positive) nerve terminals was lower than that found in the control animals. Moreover, the injections of BTX resulted in some changes dealing with the chemical coding of the adrenergic nerve fibers. In contrast to the normal pigs, in BTX injected animals the number of DbetaH/NPY- or DbetaH/CGRP-positive axons was higher in the muscle coat, and some fibres distributed in the urothelium and submucosa expressed immunoreactivity to CGRP. The results obtained suggest that the therapeutic effects of BTX on the urinary bladder might be dependent on changes in the distribution and chemical coding of nerve fibers supplying this organ.

  17. Glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter cycling and energy metabolism in rat cerebral cortex during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Golam M I; Patel, Anant B; Mason, Graeme F; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2007-12-01

    The contribution of glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons to oxidative energy metabolism and neurotransmission in the developing brain is not known. Glutamatergic and GABAergic fluxes were assessed in neocortex of postnatal day 10 (P10) and 30 (P30) urethane-anesthetized rats infused intravenously with [1,6-(13)C(2)]glucose for different time intervals (time course) or with [2-(13)C]acetate for 2 to 3 h (steady state). Amino acid levels and (13)C enrichments were determined in tissue extracts ex vivo using (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolic fluxes were estimated from the best fits of a three-compartment metabolic model (glutamatergic neurons, GABAergic neurons, and astroglia) to the (13)C-enrichment time courses of amino acids from [1,6-(13)C(2)]glucose, constrained by the ratios of neurotransmitter cycling (V(cyc))-to-tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux (V(TCAn)) calculated from the steady-state [2-(13)C]acetate enrichment data. From P10 to P30 increases in total neuronal (glutamate plus GABA) TCA cycle flux (3 x ; 0.24+/-0.05 versus 0.71+/-0.07 micromol per g per min, Pcycling flux (3.1 to 5 x ; 0.07 to 0.11 (+/-0.03) versus 0.34+/-0.03 micromol per g per min, Pcycling (DeltaV(cyc(tot))) and neuronal TCA cycle flux (DeltaV(TCAn(tot))) between P10 and P30 were 0.23 to 0.27 and 0.47 micromol per g per min, respectively, similar to the approximately 1:2 relationship previously reported for adult cortex. For the individual neurons, increases in V(TCAn) and V(cyc) were similar in magnitude (glutamatergic neurons, 2.7 x versus 2.8 to 4.6 x ; GABAergic neurons, approximately 5 x versus approximately 7 x), although GABAergic flux changes were larger. The findings show that glutamate and GABA neurons undergo large and approximately proportional increases in neurotransmitter cycling and oxidative energy metabolism during this major postnatal growth spurt.

  18. Availability of neurotransmitter glutamate is diminished when beta-hydroxybutyrate replaces glucose in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Trine M; Risa, Oystein; Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2009-07-01

    Ketone bodies serve as alternative energy substrates for the brain in cases of low glucose availability such as during starvation or in patients treated with a ketogenic diet. The ketone bodies are metabolized via a distinct pathway confined to the mitochondria. We have compared metabolism of [2,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate to that of [1,6-(13)C]glucose in cultured glutamatergic neurons and investigated the effect of neuronal activity focusing on the aspartate-glutamate homeostasis, an essential component of the excitatory activity in the brain. The amount of (13)C incorporation and cellular content was lower for glutamate and higher for aspartate in the presence of [2,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate as opposed to [1,6-(13)C]glucose. Our results suggest that the change in aspartate-glutamate homeostasis is due to a decreased availability of NADH for cytosolic malate dehydrogenase and thus reduced malate-aspartate shuttle activity in neurons using beta-hydroxybutyrate. In the presence of glucose, the glutamate content decreased significantly upon activation of neurotransmitter release, whereas in the presence of only beta-hydroxybutyrate, no decrease in the glutamate content was observed. Thus, the fraction of the glutamate pool available for transmitter release was diminished when metabolizing beta-hydroxybutyrate, which is in line with the hypothesis of formation of transmitter glutamate via an obligatory involvement of the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  19. Repellent