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Sample records for noradrenaline release evoked

  1. Effect of subarachnoid hemorrhage on contractile responses and noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine

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    Lobato, R.D.; Marin, J.; Salaices, M.; Rico, M.L.; Sanchez, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    This study analyzes the changes induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the contractile responses and the noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine. The dose-dependent vasoconstriction induced by histamine on the cerebral arteries of normal cats was significantly reduced by diphenhydramine and phentolamine. When SAH was produced 3 and 7 days before the experiment, the histamine-induced vasoconstriction also decreased. Thereafter, a tendency to normalization in the contractile vascular responses was observed such that in 15 days after the hemorrhage it was not significantly different from that found in controls animals. The decrease in the contractile responses to histamine provoked by SAH was similar to that seen after pretreatment with intracisternal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. The amount of radioactivity released by histamine following preincubation with /sup 3/H-noradrenaline from the cerebral arteries of cats exposed to SAH 3, 7, and 15 days before the experiment was significantly reduced when compared with controls. Moreover, the basal level of tritium release and the radioactivity retained at the end of the experiment were also decreased after SAH. Results indicate histamine releases noradrenaline from cat cerebral arteries, and SAH produce a transient denervation of the perivascular adrenergic nerve endings, which explained by the impairment of the indirect adrenergic mechanism involved in the overall contractile response elicited by this amine in cerebral arteries. Histamine does not seem to play a significant role in the production of the cerebral vasospasm occurring after SAH.

  2. Inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase potentiates the dimethylphenylpiperazinium-evoked carrier-mediated release of noradrenaline from rat hippocampal slices.

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    Kiss, J P; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A; Vizi, E S

    1996-09-06

    The effect of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) on the dimethylphenylpiperazinium(DMPP)-evoked release of [3H]noradrenaline ([3H]NA) from rat hippocampal slices was studied. The effect of DMPP (20 microM) to increase the basal release of [3H]NA was significantly potentiated by 7-NI (40 microM). In our previous study we showed that the response to DMPP has two components, a nicotinic receptor-mediated, [Ca2+]-dependent exocytosis followed by a [Ca2+]-independent, uptake blocker-sensitive carrier-mediated release. To clarify which part of the response was affected by the inhibition of nNOS, we investigated the effect of 7-NI on the nicotine-evoked NA release (nicotine has only receptor-mediated effect) and on the DMPP-evoked NA release in Ca(2+)-free medium where the receptor-mediated component is abolished. Nicotine (100 microM) significantly increased the basal release of [3H]NA but this release was not affected, whereas in Ca(2+)-free medium the response to DMPP (20 microM) was still potentiated by 7-NI (40 microM). In the presence of the NA uptake blocker desipramine (10 microM) DMPP (20 microM) was unable to provoke NA release independently from the presence or absence of 7-NI (40 microM). Our data show that 7-NI influences the carrier-mediated component of DMPP-evoked [3H]NA release, which indicates that nitric oxide produced by nNOS may play a role in the regulation of the NA uptake carrier.

  3. Control of noradrenaline release from hippocampal synaptosomes

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    West, D.P.; Fillenz, M.

    1981-10-01

    Potassium-evoked tritiated noradrenaline (NA) release from hippocampal synaptosomes was measured with a superfusion method. A single 2-min high-K+ pulse released 39% of the vesicular NA by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism: the Ca2+-independent release was negligible. After changing the vesicular NA store size by pretreating rats with either alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, 500 mg/kg, or tranylcypromine, 10 mg/kg, a single K+ pulse released a constant percentage of the vesicular NA. With two K+ pulses, however, there was a reduction in the percentage of vesicular NA released in response to the second pulse.

  4. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

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    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  5. Lack of CB1 receptors increases noradrenaline release in vas deferens without affecting atrial noradrenaline release or cortical acetylcholine release

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    Schlicker, Eberhard; Redmer, Agnes; Werner, André; Kathmann, Markus

    2003-01-01

    We studied whether cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene disruption (to yield CB1−/− mice) affects the electrically evoked tritium overflow from vas deferens and atrial pieces preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) (‘noradrenaline release') and from cerebral cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-choline (‘acetylcholine release').NA release was higher by 37% in vas deferens from CB1−/− mice than in vas deferens from CB1+/+ mice. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibited, and the CB1 re...

  6. Do sympathetic nerves release noradrenaline in "quanta"?

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    Stjärne, L

    2000-07-01

    The discovery of excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) in guinea-pig vas deferens by Burnstock and Holman (1960) showed for the first time that a sympathetic transmitter, now known to be ATP, is secreted in "quanta". As it was assumed at the time that EJPS are triggered by noradrenaline, this discovery led to attempts to use the fractional overflow of noradrenaline from sympathetically innervated tissues to assess, indirectly, the number of noradrenaline molecules in the average "quantum". The basic finding was that each pulse released 1/50000 of the tissue content of noradrenaline, when reuptake was blocked and prejunctional alpha(2)-adrenoceptors were intact. This provided the constraints, two extreme alternatives: (i) each pulse releases 0.2-3% of the content of a vesicle from all varicosities, or (ii) each pulse releases the whole content of a vesicle from 0.2 to 3% of the varicosities. New techniques have made it possible to address questions about the release probability in individual sites, or the "quantal" size, more directly. Results by optical (comparison of the labelling of SV2 and synaptotagmin, proteins in the membrane of transmitter vesicles), electrophysiological (excitatory junction currents, EJCs, at single visualized varicosities) and amperometric (the noradrenaline oxidation current at a carbon fibre electrode) methods reveal that transmitter exocytosis in varicosities is intermittent. The EJC and noradrenaline oxidation current responses (in rat arteries) to a train of single pulses were observed to be similar in intermittency and amplitude fluctuation. This suggests that they are caused by exocytosis of single or very few "quanta" of ATP and noradrenaline, respectively, equal to the contents of single vesicles, from a small population of release sites. These findings support, but do not conclusively prove the validity of the "intermittent" model of noradrenaline release. The question if noradrenaline is always secreted in packets of preset size

  7. Modulation of noradrenaline release in rat isolated stomach by prostanoids, but not by histaminergic mechanisms.

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    Racké, K; Berrino, L; Möhlig, A; Jäger, R; Griepenkerl, I; Bräutigam, M; Reimann, A

    1995-12-01

    Several gastric functions are modulated by the sympathetic nervous system, but local mechanisms involved in the control of noradrenaline release are largely unknown. Overflow of endogenous noradrenaline was studied from isolated rat stomach incubated in Ussing chambers allowing the separate determination of mucosal and serosal overflow. Spontaneous noradrenaline overflow was similar at the mucosal and serosal side, but electrical field stimulation caused a frequency-dependent increase in noradrenaline overflow selectively at the serosal side. Evoked noradrenaline overflow was blocked by tetrodotoxin, not affected by indometacin and markedly enhanced (by about 250%) by yohimbine. In the presence of indometacin and yohimbine, sulprostone (an agonist at EP1/EP3 receptors) and misoprostol (an agonist at EP2/EP3 receptors) reduced the noradrenaline overflow evoked by stimulation at 3 Hz maximally by about 80% (EC50: 6 nmol/l and 11 nmol/l, respectively). The EP1 receptor selective antagonist AH 6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid) did not antagonize the inhibition by sulprostone. Noradrenaline overflow evoked by stimulation at 1 Hz and 3 Hz was increased by scopolamine by about 50% and almost completely inhibited by oxotremorine. Neither, histamine nor the H3 receptor selective agonist (R)-alpha-methyl-histamine, nor the H1, H2 and H3 selective receptor antagonists mepyramine, cimetidine and thioperamide significantly affected noradrenaline overflow evoked by stimulation at 1 Hz or 3 Hz. In conclusion, impulse-induced noradrenaline release in the rat stomach is controlled by multiple presynaptic mechanisms involving alpha 2-adrenergic autoreceptors, EP3 prostanoid and muscarine heteroreceptors, whereas histaminergic mechanisms do not appear to be significant.

  8. Dual effect of DMPP on the resting release of noradrenaline from rat hippocampal slices.

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    Kiss, J P; Windisch, K; Balla, A; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A

    1997-01-01

    The effect of the nicotinic receptor agonist dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) on the resting release of [3H]noradrenaline from superfused hippocampal slices was studied in rat. Continuous administration of DMPP at a concentration range of 1-100 microM increased the [3H]noradrenaline release in a dose-dependent manner. The response to DMPP was characterized by an immediate steep increase (peak response) followed by a sudden decline to a lower level that was constant with time (tall response) and still was significantly higher than the spontaneous release. Further analysis revealed that the release of noradrenaline in response to DMPP consists of two components. While nicotinic receptor antagonists (mecamylamine 10 microM, pancuronium 10 microM, pipecuronium 10 microM), the nonselective Ca-antagonist Cd2+ (125 microM) and tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM) completely abolished the peak response (phase I), they had no effect on the tall response (phase II). Ca(2+)-free medium containing 1 mM EGTA also blocked phase I but in contrast with other drugs enhanced phase II. The release during phase I is subject to presynaptic feedback modulation, since the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist xylazine (3 microM) inhibited the DMPP-evoked stimulation of [3H]noradrenaline release, that inhibition was antagonized by a selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, (+/-)-[7,8-(methylenedioxy)-14-alpha-hydroxyalloberbane hydrochloride [(+/-)-CH-38083] (2 microM). (+/-)-CH-38083 (2 microM) alone significantly enhanced the DMPP-evoked increase of [3H]noradrenaline release. Phase II was not effected by alpha 2-adrenergic drugs. Whereas the noradrenaline uptake blockers despramine (DMI, 1-10 microM), nisoxetine (1-10 microM), and nomifensine (10 microM) inhibited both phases, nomifensine at a concentration of 1 microM selectively blocked only phase II. Our data indicate that DMPP has a dual effect on the hippocampal noradrenaline release: phase I is a transient, nicotinic receptor

  9. Presynaptic. cap alpha. -adrenoceptors and opiate receptors: inhibition of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline release from rat cerebral cortex slices by different mechanisms

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    Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; Mulder, A.H. (Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1982-04-23

    The inhibitory effects of morphine and Cd/sup 2 +/ on electrically evoked (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline release from superfused brain slices were unaffected when release was enhanced by increasing the pulse duration, while the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline and the enhancing effect of phentolamine were diminished. A similar enhancement of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline release by 4-aminopyridine reduced the modulatory effects of all drugs examined. Therefore there seem to be different mechanisms for the effect of presynaptic ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors and opiate receptors on the availability of Ca/sup 2 +/ for the stimulus-secretion coupling process in noradrenergic nerve terminals.

  10. Implication of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the release of noradrenaline in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subregions under oxygen and glucose deprivation.

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    Milusheva, E A; Baranyi, M

    2003-11-01

    A strong linkage between adrenergic and glutamatergic systems exists in the CNS but it is still unclear whether the excessive release of noradrenaline under ischemic conditions is modulated by excitatory amino acids. We studied the effect of selective glutamate receptor antagonists on the release of [3H]noradrenaline evoked by glucose and oxygen deprivation in hippocampal CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus subregions. The release of glutamate, aspartate and GABA was measured by HPLC. Omission of oxygen and glucose increased the release of [3H]noradrenaline as well as the release of amino acids. Maximum effect on noradrenaline release was observed in CA1 region. The relative increase of the release after 30 min energy deprivation (R(2)) versus the basal release under normal conditions (R(1)), i.e. the R(2)/R(1) ratio was 7.1+/-1.0, 3.87+/-0.4 and 3.26+/-0.27 for CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus, respectively. The [3H]noradrenaline outflow in response to glucose and oxygen deprivation was abolished at low temperature, but not by Ca(2+) removal, suggesting a cytoplasmic release process. In CA1 and CA3 [3H]noradrenaline release was significantly attenuated by MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist. The AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI-53784 had no effect in CA3, but partly reduced noradrenaline release in CA1. Our results suggest that ionotropic glutamate receptors seem to be implicated in the massive cytoplasmic release of noradrenaline in CA1 what may contribute to its selective vulnerability.

  11. Effect of the dihydropyridine Bay K 8644 on the release of [3H]-noradrenaline from the rat isolated vas deferens.

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    Ceña, V; García, A.G.; Khoyi, M. A.; Salaices, M.; Sanchez-García, P.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Bay K 8644 on the release of [3H]-noradrenaline evoked by potassium, electrical stimulation or tyramine from the rat isolated vas deferens labelled with [3H]-noradrenaline were investigated. Bay K 8644 (1 microM) by itself did not affect the spontaneous release of tritium from the rat isolated vas deferens. However, it increased the calcium-dependent release of tritium elicited by both high potassium (59 mM) and electrical field stimulation. The exposure of rat vas deferens to ...

  12. Effect of neostigmine on the hippocampal noradrenaline release : role of cholinergic receptors

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    Kiss, JP; Vizi, ES; Westerink, BHC

    1999-01-01

    THE effect of the cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine on hippocampal noradrenaline (NA) release was studied using in vivo microdialysis. Local application of neostigmine significantly increased the release of NA. The effect was potentiated by coperfusion of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine but

  13. Histamine H3A receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex.

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    Schlicker, E; Behling, A; Lümmen, G; Göthert, M

    1992-04-01

    Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine plus a drug with alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist properties, and the effects of histamine receptor ligands on the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow were studied. The evoked overflow (from slices superfused with phentolamine) was inhibited by histamine (pIC35 6.53), the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (7.47) and its S-(+)-enantiomer (5.82) but not influenced by the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)-ethylamine 3.2 mumol/l and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit 10 mumol/l. The inhibitory effect of histamine was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene 1 mumol/l and the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine 10 mumol/l. The concentration-response curve of histamine (determined in the presence of rauwolscine) was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide (apparent pA2 8.67), impromidine (7.30) and burimamide (6.82) as well as by dimaprit (6.16). The pA2 values of the four drugs were compared with their affinities for H3A and H3B binding sites in rat brain membranes (West et al. 1990 Mol Pharmacol 38:610); a significant correlation was obtained for the H3A, but not for the H3B sites. The results suggest that noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex is inhibited by histamine via H3A receptors and that dimaprit is an H3 receptor antagonist of moderate potency.

  14. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-stimulated noradrenaline (NA) release in rat brain cortex is modulated by presynaptic H3-receptors.

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    Fink, K; Schlicker, E; Göthert, M

    1994-02-01

    In superfused rat brain cortex slices and synaptosomes preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline the effect of agonists or antagonists at presynaptic H3 receptors on NMDA-evoked [3H]noradrenaline release was investigated. In experiments on slices, histamine and the preferential H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited NMDA-evoked tritium overflow (IC20 values 0.27 mumol/l or 0.032 mumol/l, respectively); S-(+)-alpha-methylhistamine (up to 10 mumol/l) as well as the selective H1 receptor agonist (2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine and the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (each up to 10 mumol/l) were ineffective. The H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide abolished the inhibitory effect of histamine whereas the preferential H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene and the preferential H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine were ineffective. In experiments on synaptosomes, histamine and R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited NMDA-evoked tritium overflow, whereas 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine or dimaprit had no effect. The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished by thioperamide. When tritium overflow was stimulated by NMDA in the presence of omega-conotoxin GVIA (which by itself decreased the response to NMDA by about 55%), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine did not inhibit NMDA-evoked overflow. It is concluded that NMDA-evoked noradrenaline release in the cerebral cortex can be modulated by inhibitory H3 receptors. NMDA receptors and H3 receptors are both located presynaptically and may interact at the same noradrenergic varicosity. An unimpaired function of the N-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel probably is a prerequisite for the inhibition of NMDA-evoked noradrenaline release by H3 receptor stimulation.

  15. Inhibition of noradrenaline release from the sympathetic nerves of the human saphenous vein by presynaptic histamine H3 receptors.

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    Molderings, G J; Weissenborn, G; Schlicker, E; Likungu, J; Göthert, M

    1992-07-01

    The human saphenous vein was used to examine whether presynaptic histamine receptors can modulate noradrenaline release and, if so, to determine their pharmacological characteristics. Strips of this blood vessel were incubated with [3H]noradrenaline and subsequently superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine and corticosterone. Electrically (2 Hz) evoked 3H overflow was inhibited by histamine and the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine. Histamine-induced inhibition of electrically evoked tritium overflow was not affected by alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockade by rauwolscine. S-(+)-alpha-methylhistamine (up to 10 mumol/l) as well as the histamine H1 and H2 receptor agonists 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine (up to 3 mumol/l) and dimaprit (up to 30 mumol/l), respectively, were ineffective. The selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide abolished the inhibitory effect of histamine. The histamine H2 and H1 receptor antagonists ranitidine and pheniramine, respectively, did not affect the histamine-induced inhibition of evoked tritium overflow. The present results are compatible with the suggestion that the sympathetic nerves of the human saphenous vein are endowed with inhibitory presynaptic histamine receptors of the H3 class.

  16. Characterization of nicotinic receptors involved in the release of noradrenaline from the hippocampus

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    Vizi, E.S. [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, H-1450 Budapest (Hungary); Lajtha, A. [Center of Neurochemistry, The Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY (United States); Balla, A. [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, H-1450 Budapest (Hungary); Sershen, H. [Center of Neurochemistry, The Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY (United States)

    1997-01-06

    The pharmacological features of putative nicotinic acetylcholine receptor sites involved in the release of [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline were assessed in rat hippocampus. The effect of nicotinic agonists to induce [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline release was examined in superfused slices. The nicotinic agonists (-)-epibatidine, (+)-anatoxin-a, dimethylphenylpiperazinium, (-)-nicotine and (-)-lobeline released [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline. The dose-response curves to nicotinic agonists were bell shaped, and indicated that their functional efficacies and potency vary across agonists. Maximal efficacy was seen with dimethylphenylpiperazinium and lobeline (E{sub max} values two to three times higher than other agonists). The rank order of potency for the agonists to release [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline was (-)-epibatidine (+)-anatoxin-a dimethylphenylpiperazinium cytisine nicotine (-)-lobeline. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists [n-bungarotoxin (+)-tubocurarine hexamethonium>>{alpha}-bungarotoxin=dihydro-{beta}-erythroidine] and tetrodotoxin antagonized the effect of dimethylphenylpiperazinium to release [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline. The results, based on these pharmacological profiles, suggest the possible involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}3 and {beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the control of [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline release from hippocampal slices. The absence of effect of {alpha}-bungarotoxin and {alpha}-conotoxin-IMI excludes the possible involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing the {alpha}7 subunit. The release of [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline by dimethylphenylpiperazinium was Ca{sup 2+} dependent. Nifedipine failed to prevent the dimethylphenylpiperazinium-induced release of [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline, but Cd{sup 2+}, {omega}-conotoxin and Ca{sup 2+}-free conditions significantly reduced the dimethylphenylpiperazinium-induced release, suggesting that N-type voltage-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} channels are involved in the nicotinic

  17. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in pig retina discs.

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    Schlicker, E; Schunack, W; Göthert, M

    1990-11-01

    Discs of pig retina were preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline, 3H-dopamine or 3H-serotonin and then superfused. Electrical field stimulation increased the outflow of tritium from discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline or 3H-dopamine, but no from discs preincubated with 3H-serotonin. The tritium content at the end of superfusion was similar in discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline or 3H-dopamine but about tenfold lower in discs preincubated with 3H-serotonin. The tritium content in discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline was markedly reduced when desipramine was present during preincubation but was not affected by selective inhibitors of dopamine and serotonin uptake. The tritium content in discs preincubated with 3H-dopamine and 3H-serotonin, in contrast, was reduced or tended to be reduced by a selective dopamine and serotonin uptake inhibitor, respectively. The electrically evoked overflow of tritium from discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline was abolished by tetrodotoxin or omission of Ca2+. In discs superfused with desipramine, the electrically evoked overflow was enhanced by phentolamine but not affected by histamine. When both desipramine and phentolamine were present in the superfusion medium, histamine inhibited the evoked overflow (pIC15 6.85). This effect was mimicked by the histamine H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine as well as by its S-(+)-enantiomer (pIC15 7.85 and 5.30, respectively) but not by the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (each 10 mumol/l).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. CO-RELEASED ADRENALINE MARKEDLY FACILITATES NORADRENALINE OVERFLOW THROUGH PREJUNCTIONAL BETA(2)-ADRENOCEPTORS DURING SWIMMING EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COPPES, RP; SMIT, J; BENTHEM, L; VANDERLEEST, J; ZAAGSMA, J

    1995-01-01

    The effect of intravenously applied (-)adrenaline, taken up by and released from sympathetic nerves, on swimming exercise-induced noradrenaline overflow in permanently cannulated adrenal demedullated rats was studied. Adrenaline (100 ng/min) was infused for 2 h, during which a plasma concentration o

  19. Possible participation of histamine H3 receptors in the modulation of noradrenaline release from rat spinal cord slices.

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    Celuch, S M

    1995-12-12

    Rat spinal cord slices prelabelled with [3H]noradrenaline were superfused with a medium containing 1 mu M desipramine plus 0.3 mu M phentolamine. Histamine (0.01-10 mu M) and the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (0.001-10 mu M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the release of radioactivity evoked by electrical field stimulation (0.8 Hz, 20 mA, 2 min). The inhibitory effect of histamine was not modified by either pyrilamine (1 mu M) or ranitidine (10 mu M), but it was antagonized by burimamide (1 mu M). The inhibitory action of histamine (1 mu M) was attenuated by pertussis toxin (3 mu g/ml) and was abolished by N-ethylmaleimide (30 mu M). Neither forskolin (10 mu M) nor rolipram (100 mu M), nor the combination of both drugs, modified the inhibitory effect of histamine. Histamine (1 mu M) did not modify the overflow of tritium induced by electrical stimulation in the absence of phentolamine. The present results suggest that in the rat spinal cord the release of noradrenaline elicited by electrical stimulation is negatively modulated by histamine, probably through the activation of histamine H3 receptors. This modulatory mechanism is likely to involve the participation of regulatory Go/Gi proteins.

  20. Noradrenaline release and the pathophysiology of primary human hypertension

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    Esler, M.; Jennings, G.; Lambert, G.

    1989-03-01

    Measurements of the overflow of norepinephrine to plasma from individual organs (using radiotracer methodology) were used to delineate the pattern of sympathetic nervous system activation present in primary human hypertension. Mean total norepinephrine (NE) spillover in hypertensive patients was 418 ng/min, 42% (124 ng/min) higher than in subjects with normal blood pressure (BP)(P less than .05). Norepinephrine spillover among hypertensive patients was a function of age, only being elevated in patients under 40 years of age. Half of the excess in total norepinephrine release in hypertensive patients was accounted for by increased cardiorenal spillover. Mean renal norepinephrine spillover was 120 ng/min, compared with 69 ng/min in healthy subjects (P less than .02). Renal spillover was highest in younger patients. Corresponding cardiac norepinephrine spillover values were 12.6 ng/min and 5.1 ng/min (P less than .01). The balance of the excess total norepinephrine spillover comes from undetermined sites, but not the lungs or hepatomesenteric circulation. These measurements of regional norepinephrine overflow suggest that sympathetic nervous outflow to the kidneys and heart is selectively activated in early hypertension. 21 references.

  1. Oral clonidine premedication exacerbates hypotension following tourniquet deflation by inhibiting noradrenaline release.

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    Maruyama, Koichi; Takeda, Shinhiro; Hongo, Takashi; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Kim, Chol; Ogawa, Ryo

    2004-02-01

    Clonidine premedication prevents tourniquet pain and reduces sympathetic nerve activity. We evaluated hemodynamic changes and catecholamine release following tourniquet deflation during spinal anesthesia in patients who received oral clonidine premedication. The final analysis included 24 otherwise healthy patients undergoing lower-limb surgery randomly assigned to two groups: those receiving approximately 5 micrograms/kg of oral clonidine 1 hr before anesthesia (clonidine group, n = 12), and those receiving no premedication (control group, n = 12). After lumbar anesthesia, a tourniquet was applied for approximately 60 minutes to each patient. Electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, and consumption of butorphanol for tourniquet pain were monitored. Blood samples were obtained at different times to measure serum concentration of catecholamine. In the clonidine group, mean blood pressure decreased from 87 +/- 7 mmHg at baseline to 65 +/- 10 mmHg after tourniquet deflation (P clonidine group was significantly lower than in the control group. After receiving clonidine premedication, the plasma noradrenaline concentrations in the clonidine group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Noradrenaline concentration increased in the control group from 162.3 +/- 89.2 pg/mL before tourniquet deflation to 199.3 +/- 95.7 pg/mL afterward (P clonidine group. We conclude that oral clonidine premedication exacerbated the reduction in mean blood pressure following tourniquet deflation by inhibiting noradrenaline release.

  2. Inhibition of noradrenaline release in the rat brain cortex via presynaptic H3 receptors.

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    Schlicker, E; Fink, K; Hinterthaner, M; Göthert, M

    1989-12-01

    The effects of histamine and related drugs on the evoked tritium overflow from superfused rat brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were determined. Tritium overflow was stimulated electrically (3 Hz; slices superfused with normal physiological salt solution) or by introduction of CaCl2 1.3 mmol/l (slices superfused with Ca2(+)-free medium containing K+ 20 mmol/l). Histamine slightly decreased the electrically evoked 3H overflow in slices superfused in the presence of desipramine. The degree of inhibition obtained with histamine was doubled when both desipramine and phentolamine were present in the superfusion medium (pIC15 6.46). Under the latter condition, the evoked overflow was inhibited by the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine and its S-(+) enantiomer (pIC15 7.36 and 5.09, respectively), but was not affected by the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit and the H1 receptor agonist 2-thiazolylethylamine (both at up to 32 mumols/l). The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide, impromidine and burimamide (apparent pA2 8.37, 6.86 and 7.05, respectively), by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (apparent pA2 4.27) and was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene (32 mumols/l). The inhibitory effect of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the evoked overflow was also counteracted by thioperamide. Given alone, none of the five histamine receptor antagonists affected the evoked overflow. In the absence of desipramine plus phentolamine, impromidine and burimamide facilitated the electrically evoked 3H overflow whereas thioperamide had no effect. The facilitatory effects of impromidine and burimamide were abolished by phentolamine, but not affected by desipramine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. High concentrations of KCl release noradrenaline from noradrenergic neurons in the rat anococcygeus muscle

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    C.B.L. Araujo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of high concentrations of KCl in releasing noradrenaline from sympathetic nerves and its actions on postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors. We measured the isotonic contractions induced by KCl in the isolated rat anococcygeus muscle under different experimental conditions. The contractile responses induced by KCl were inhibited by alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists in 2.5 mM Ca2+ solution. Prazosin reduced the maximum effect from 100 to 53.9 ± 10.2% (P<0.05 while the pD2 values were not changed. The contractile responses induced by KCl were abolished by prazosin in Ca2+-free solution (P<0.05. Treatment of the rats with reserpine reduced the maximum effect induced by KCl as compared to the contractile responses induced by acetylcholine from 339.5 ± 157.8 to 167.3 ± 65.5% (P<0.05, and increased the pD2 from 1.57 ± 0.01 to 1.65 ± 0.006 (P<0.05, but abolished the inhibitory effect of prazosin (P<0.05. In contrast, L-NAME increased the contractile responses induced by 120 mM KCl by 6.2 ± 2.3% (P<0.05, indicating that KCl could stimulate the neurons that release nitric oxide, an inhibitory component of the contractile response induced by KCl. Our results indicate that high concentrations of KCl induce the release of noradrenaline from noradrenergic neurons, which interacts with alpha1-adrenoceptors in smooth muscle cells, producing a contractile response in 2.5 mM Ca2+ (100% and in Ca2+-free solution, part of which is due to a direct effect of KCl on the rat anococcygeus muscle.

  4. Activation of gastric afferents increases noradrenaline release in the paraventricular nucleus and plasma oxytocin level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Y; Kannan, H; Higuchi, T; Negoro, H; Yamaguchi, K; Yamashita, H

    2000-01-14

    Effects of electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal nerves on plasma levels of oxytocin (OXT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) were examined in rats anesthetized with urethane. Electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal nerves increased the plasma levels of OXT, but not AVP. The concentrations of extracellular noradrenaline (NA) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were measured by in vivo microdialysis in rats anesthetized with urethane. Electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal nerves evoked an increase followed by a slight decrease in the concentrations of NA. The responses of spontaneous firing magnocellular neurosecretory neurons in the PVN to both electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal nerves and intravenous (i.v.) administration of CCK-8 were examined. Most of the putative OXT-secreting cells recorded were excited by both electrical stimulation of gastric vagal nerves and i.v. administration of CCK-8. These results suggest that gastric vagal afferents activate the central noradrenergic system from the brainstem to the PVN and secretion of OXT.

  5. Effects of collagenase on the release of [3H]-noradrenaline from bovine cultured adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazan, G.; Aunis, D.; García, A. G.; Montiel, C.; Nicolás, G. P.; Sánchez-García, P.

    1984-01-01

    Bovine isolated adrenal chromaffin cells maintained in culture at 37 degrees C for 1-7 days become polygonal and bipolar, with typical varicosity-like extensions. Catecholamine levels and dopamine beta-hydroxylase activity decreased after 24-48 h of culture, but recovered to normal levels 3-7 days later. Incubation of 1-7 day-old cells in the presence of increasing concentrations of [3H]-noradrenaline (3.91 to 125 nM) resulted in the retention by the cells of amounts of radioactivity directly proportional to the amine present in the media. One day-old cells took up and retained only one third of the radioactivity found in 2-7 day-old cells. The addition of collagenase to cultured cells caused a decrease in the uptake of tritium. However, the enzyme treatment did not affect the amine taken up by the cell before collagenase treatment. Release of tritium from cultured cells evoked by nicotine, acetylcholine (ACh) or 59 mM K+ was very poor in 24 h-old cells; the secretory response to nicotine, ACh or K+ was dramatically increased after 2-7 days of culture. Bethanecol did not cause any secretory response. When treated with collagenase, cultured cells which had recovered fully their secretory response, lost again the ability to release tritium evoked by ACh or nicotine. However, the responses to high K+, veratridine or ionophore X537A were not affected. The nicotinic response was recovered two days after collagenase treatment. The data suggest that the use of collagenase to disperse the adrenomedullary tissue during the isolation procedure might be responsible for the lost secretory response of young cultured chromaffin cells. Since collagenase specifically impairs the nicotinic cholinoceptor-mediated catecholamine release, it seems likely that the enzyme is exerting its action on the ACh receptor complex. It is unlikely that either voltage-sensitive Na+ or Ca2+ channels are affected by collagenase as the responses induced by high K+ or veratridine were unaffected by

  6. P2Y receptor mediated inhibitory modulation of noradrenaline release in response to electrical field stimulation and ischemic conditions in superfused rat hippocampus slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csölle, Cecília; Heinrich, Attila; Kittel, Agnes; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the inhibitory regulation of the release of noradrenaline (NA) by P2 receptors was investigated in hippocampus slices pre-incubated with [(3)H]NA. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 2 Hz, 240 shocks, and 1 ms) released NA in an outside [Ca(2+)]-dependent manner, and agonists of P2Y receptors inhibited the EFS-evoked [(3)H]NA release with pharmacological profile similar to that of the P2Y(1) and P2Y(13) receptor subtypes. This inhibitory modulation was counteracted by bicuculline and 6-cyano-2,3-dihydroxy-7-nitro-quinoxaline + 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate and 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. In contrast, the excess release in response to 30 min combined oxygen and glucose deprivation was outside [Ca(2+)] independent, but still sensitive to the inhibition of both facilitatory P2X(1) and inhibitory P2Y(1) receptors. Whereas mRNA encoding P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptor subunits were expressed in the brainstem, P2Y(1) receptor immunoreactivity was localized to neuronal somata and dendrites innervated by the mossy fiber terminals in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, as well as somata of granule cells and interneurons in the dentate gyrus. In summary, in addition to the known facilitatory modulation via P2X receptors, EFS-evoked [(3)H]NA outflow in the hippocampus is subject to inhibitory modulation by P2Y(1)/P2Y(13) receptors. Furthermore, endogenous activation of both facilitatory and inhibitory P2 receptors may participate in the modulation of pathological NA release under ischemic-like conditions.

  7. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    , hippocampal or hypothalamic slices were used instead of cortical slices. The Ca2+-induced tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine (in the presence of ranitidine); this effect was abolished by clobenpropit. In slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, impromidine failed to facilitate the Ca2+-evoked tritium overflow. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in mouse brain cortex slices was inhibited by histamine by about 60% (both in the absence or presence of ranitidine). The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished (but not reversed) by clobenpropit. In conclusion, noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain cortex is inhibited via presynaptic H3 receptors and facilitated via H2 receptors not located presynaptically. In the mouse brain cortex, only inhibitory H3 receptors occur. The extent of the H3 receptor-mediated effect is more marked in the mouse than in the guinea-pig brain cortex.

  8. Microdialysis reveals dynamics of coupling between noradrenaline release and melatonin secretion in conscious rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, W.J; van der Linde, A.G; de Vries, J.B; Grol, Cor; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1996-01-01

    The coupling between noradrenergic innervation of the pineal gland and melatonin production was investigated. Previously, the development of a microdialysis; technique was described which made it possible to study the noradrenaline (NA) input as well as the melatonin output with high time resolution

  9. H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release: an investigation into the involvement of Ca2+ and K+ ions, G protein and adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Kathmann, M; Detzner, M; Exner, H J; Göthert, M

    1994-07-01

    The present study was aimed at the identification of mechanisms following the activation of histamine H3 receptors. Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused and the (H3 receptor-mediated) effect of histamine on the electrically evoked tritium overflow was studied under a variety of conditions. The extent of inhibition produced by histamine was inversely related to the frequency of stimulation used to evoke tritium overflow and to the Ca2+ concentration in the superfusion medium. An activator (levcromakalim) and blocker (glibenclamide) of ATP-dependent K+ channels did not affect the electrically evoked tritium overflow and its inhibition by histamine. A blocker of voltage-sensitive K+ channels, tetraethylammonium (TEA), increased the evoked overflow and attenuated the inhibitory effect of histamine. TEA also reduced the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline and prostaglandin E2 on the evoked overflow. When the facilitatory effect of TEA on the evoked overflow was compensated for by reducing the Ca2+ concentration in the superfusion medium, TEA did no longer attenuate the effect of histamine. Exposure of the slices to the SH group-alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide increased the evoked overflow and attenuated the inhibitory effect of histamine; both effects were counteracted by the SH group-protecting agent dithiothreitol, which, by itself, did not affect the evoked overflow and its inhibition by histamine. Mouse brain cortex membranes were used to study the effect of the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the basal cAMP accumulation and on the accumulation stimulated by forskolin or noradrenaline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Tph2 gene deletion enhances amphetamine-induced hypermotility: effect of 5-HT restoration and role of striatal noradrenaline release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, Mirjana; Kostoula, Chrysaugi; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Mainolfi, Pierangela; Anastasia, Alessia; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William

    2015-11-01

    Variants of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), the gene encoding enzyme responsible for the synthesis of brain serotonin (5-HT), have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, substance abuse and addiction. This study assessed the effect of Tph2 gene deletion on motor behavior and found that motor activity induced by 2.5 and 5 mg/kg amphetamine was enhanced in Tph2(-/-) mice. Using the in vivo microdialysis technique we found that the ability of amphetamine to stimulate noradrenaline (NA) release in the striatum was reduced by about 50% in Tph2(-/-) mice while the release of dopamine (DA) was not affected. Tph2 deletion did not affect the release of NA and DA in the prefrontal cortex. The role of endogenous 5-HT in enhancing the effect of amphetamine was confirmed showing that treatment with the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (10 mg/kg) restored tissue and extracellular levels of brain 5-HT and the effects of amphetamine on striatal NA release and motor activity in Tph2(-/-) mice. Treatment with the NA precursor dihydroxyphenylserine (400 mg/kg) was sufficient to restore the effect of amphetamine on striatal NA release and motor activity in Tph2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that amphetamine-induced hyperactivity is attenuated by endogenous 5-HT through the inhibition of striatal NA release. Tph2(-/-) mice may be a useful preclinical model to assess the role of 5-HT-dependent mechanisms in the action of psychostimulants. Acute sensitivity to the motor effects of amphetamine has been associated to increased risk of psychostimulant abuse. Here, we show that deletion of Tph2, the gene responsible for brain 5-HT synthesis, enhances the motor effect of amphetamine in mice through the inhibition of striatal NA release. This suggests that Tph2(-/-) mice is a useful preclinical model to assess the role of 5-HT-dependent mechanisms in psychostimulants action. Tph2, tryptophan hydroxylase-2.

  11. Effects of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) on alpha2-adrenoceptors which regulate the synthesis and release of noradrenaline in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, M; Giralt, M T

    2001-03-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) induces a degeneration of noradrenergic axons originating in the locus coeruleus. The sensitivity of alpha2-adrenoceptors which regulate the synthesis and release of noradrenaline was investigated in three brain regions which receive an unequal innervation from locus coeruleus, 21 days after DSP4 (50 mg/kg) administration. After giving treated rats a dopa decarboxylase inhibitor, the in vivo tyrosine hydroxylase activity and the tissue concentrations of noradrenaline were also evaluated. Relevant reductions of noradrenaline levels were found in hippocampus and parietal cortex (91% and 77.5%, respectively; PDSP4 (10+/-5% vs 57+/-3% in the control group, PDSP4 for noradrenergic terminals arising from locus coeruleus and suggest a more severe lesioning of the hippocampus than the parietal cortex.

  12. Cutaneous noradrenaline measured by microdialysis in complex regional pain syndrome during whole-body cooling and heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Astrid Juhl; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Petersen, Lars J.

    2013-01-01

    noradrenaline, vasoconstriction, and reduction in skin temperature. The main findings were that the noradrenaline response did not differ between patients and controls or between the CRPS hand and the contralateral unaffected hand, suggesting that the evoked noradrenaline release from the cutaneous sympathetic......Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterised by autonomic, sensory, and motor disturbances. The underlying mechanisms of the autonomic changes in CPRS are unknown. However, it has been postulated that sympathetic inhibition in the acute phase with locally reduced levels of noradrenaline...... and in healthy volunteers. Seven patients and nine controls completed whole-body cooling (sympathetic activation) and heating (sympathetic inhibition) induced by a whole-body thermal suit with simultaneous measurement of the skin temperature, skin blood flow, and release of dermal noradrenaline. CRPS pain...

  13. Characteristics of chloride currents activated by noradrenaline in rabbit ear artery cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amédée, T; Large, W A; Wang, Q

    1990-09-01

    1. Responses to noradrenaline were studied in isolated rabbit ear artery cells with the nystatin method of whole-cell patch-clamp recording. With this technique it was possible to obtain reproducible responses to noradrenaline which was not possible with traditional whole-cell recording. 2. With NaCl as the major constituent of the bathing solution (potassium-free pipette and external solutions) the reversal potential (Er) of the noradrenaline-evoked current was about 0 mV. When external chloride was replaced by thiocyanate, iodide, nitrate and bromide, Er was shifted to more negative potentials which indicates that a chloride conductance increase contributes to the current activated by noradrenaline. 3. When sodium was substituted by Tris, N-methyl-D-glucamine, choline or barium, Er of the noradrenaline-evoked current did not alter. This result suggests that a cation conductance is not implicated in the response to noradrenaline recorded with the nystatin method of whole-cell recording. 4. The chloride current activated by noradrenaline was blocked by the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin but was not affected by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine. 5. When cells were exposed to zero calcium bathing solutions the amplitude of the current elicited by noradrenaline was unaffected when measured within 1-2 min in zero calcium conditions. Continued exposure to 0 Ca + 1 mM-EGTA solution reversibly abolished the chloride current to noradrenaline. 6. In the presence of caffeine, which releases Ca2+ from internal stores and itself induced an inward current (at a holding potential of -50 mV), noradrenaline did not elicit a current. These data suggest that the chloride current evoked by noradrenaline results from an increase in intracellular concentration of calcium derived from internal stores. 7. The chloride channel blocking agents 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS; 0.5 mM) and furosemide (0.5 mM) produced partial

  14. Different states of synaptotagmin regulate evoked versus spontaneous release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Xue, Renhao; Bao, Huan; Zhang, Leili; Yethiraj, Arun; Cui, Qiang; Chapman, Edwin R.

    2016-03-01

    The tandem C2-domains of synaptotagmin 1 (syt) function as Ca2+-binding modules that trigger exocytosis; in the absence of Ca2+, syt inhibits spontaneous release. Here, we used proline linkers to constrain and alter the relative orientation of these C2-domains. Short poly-proline helices have a period of three, so large changes in the relative disposition of the C2-domains result from changing the length of the poly-proline linker by a single residue. The length of the linker was varied one residue at a time, revealing a periodicity of three for the ability of the linker mutants to interact with anionic phospholipids and drive evoked synaptic transmission; syt efficiently drove exocytosis when its tandem C2-domains pointed in the same direction. Analysis of spontaneous release revealed a reciprocal relationship between the activation and clamping activities of the linker mutants. Hence, different structural states of syt underlie the control of distinct forms of synaptic transmission.

  15. NLP-12 engages different UNC-13 proteins to potentiate tonic and evoked release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhitao; Vashlishan-Murray, Amy B; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2015-01-21

    A neuropeptide (NLP-12) and its receptor (CKR-2) potentiate tonic and evoked ACh release at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions. Increased evoked release is mediated by a presynaptic pathway (egl-30 Gαq and egl-8 PLCβ) that produces DAG, and by DAG binding to short and long UNC-13 proteins. Potentiation of tonic ACh release persists in mutants deficient for egl-30 Gαq and egl-8 PLCβ and requires DAG binding to UNC-13L (but not UNC-13S). Thus, NLP-12 adjusts tonic and evoked release by distinct mechanisms.

  16. Ang II enhances noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings thus contributing to the up-regulation of metalloprotease-2 in aortic dissection patients' aorta wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Hu

    Full Text Available OBJECT: To test the hypothesis that angiotensin II (Ang II could enhance noradrenaline (NA release from sympathetic nerve endings of the aorta thus contributing to the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2 during the formation of aortic dissection (AD. METHODS: Ang II, NA, MMP-2, MMP-9 of the aorta sample obtained during operation from aortic dissection patients were detected by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and ELISA and compared with controls. Isotope labelling method was used to test the impact of exogenous Ang II and noradrenaline on the NA release and MMP-2, MMP-9 expression on Sprague Dawley (SD rat aorta rings in vitro. Two kidneys, one clip, models were replicated for further check of that impact in SD rats in vivo. RESULTS: The concentration of Ang II, MMP-2, 9 was increased and NA concentration was decreased in aorta samples from AD patients. Exogenous Ang II enhanced while exogenous NA restrained NA release from aortic sympathetic endings. The Ang II stimulated NA release and the following MMP-2 up-regulation could be weakened by Losartan and chemical sympathectomy. Beta blocker did not influence NA release but down-regulated MMP-2. Long term in vivo experiments confirmed that Ang II could enhance NA release and up-regulate MMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: AD is initiated by MMP-2 overexpression as a result of increased NA release from sympathetic nervous endings in response to Ang II. This indicates an interaction of RAS and SAS during the formation of AD.

  17. Antipsychotic drugs classified by their effects on the release of dopamine and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex and striatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, B.H.C.; Kawahara, Y; de Boer, P; Geels, C; de Vries, J.B; Wikström, H.V; van Kalkeren, A; van Vliet, B; Kruse, C.H; Long, S.K

    2001-01-01

    Dose-effect curves were established for the effects of the antipsychotic drugs haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone on extracellular levels of dopamine and noradrenaline in the medial prefrontal cortex, and of dopamine in the striatum. Haloperidol was more effective in sti

  18. O-2050 facilitates noradrenaline release and increases the CB1 receptor inverse agonistic effect of rimonabant in the guinea pig hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jergas, Bernd; Schulte, Kirsten; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2014-07-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptors on the noradrenergic neurons in guinea pig hippocampal slices show an endogenous endocannabinoid tone. This conclusion is based on rimonabant, the facilitatory effect of which on noradrenaline release might be due to its inverse CB1 receptor agonism and/or the interruption of a tonic inhibition elicited by endocannabinoids. To examine the latter mechanism, a neutral antagonist would be suitable. Therefore, we studied whether O-2050 is a neutral CB1 receptor antagonist in the guinea pig hippocampus and whether it mimics the facilitatory effect of rimonabant. CB1 receptor affinity of O-2050 was quantified in cerebrocortical membranes, using (3)H-rimonabant binding. Its CB1 receptor potency and effect on (3)H-noradrenaline release were determined in superfused hippocampal slices. Its intrinsic activity at CB1 receptors was studied in hippocampal membranes, using (35)S-GTPγS binding. Endocannabinoid levels in hippocampus were determined by liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring. O-2050 was about ten times less potent than rimonabant in its CB1 receptor affinity, potency and facilitatory effect on noradrenaline release. Although not affecting (35)S-GTPγS binding by itself, O-2050 shifted the concentration-response curve of a CB1 receptor agonist to the right but that of rimonabant to the left. Levels of anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol in guinea pig hippocampus closely resembled those in mouse hippocampus. In conclusion, our results with O-2050 confirm that the CB1 receptors on noradrenergic neurons of the guinea pig hippocampus show an endogenous tone. To differentiate between the two mechanisms leading to an endogenous tone, O-2050 is not superior to rimonabant since O-2050 may increase the inverse agonistic effect of endocannabinoids.

  19. Optical suppression of drug-evoked phasic dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, James E; Cone, Jackson J; Sinon, Christopher G; Fortin, Samantha M; Kantak, Pranish A; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2014-01-01

    Brief fluctuations in dopamine concentration (dopamine transients) play a key role in behavior towards rewards, including drugs of abuse. Drug-evoked dopamine transients may result from actions at both dopamine cell bodies and dopamine terminals. Inhibitory opsins can be targeted to dopamine neurons permitting their firing activity to be suppressed. However, as dopamine transients can become uncoupled from firing, it is unknown whether optogenetic hyperpolarization at the level of the soma is able to suppress dopamine transients. Here, we used in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to record transients evoked by cocaine and raclopride in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of urethane-anesthetized rats. We targeted halorhodopsin (NpHR) specifically to dopamine cells by injecting Cre-inducible virus into ventral tegmental area (VTA) of transgenic rats that expressed Cre recombinase under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre(+) rats). Consistent with previous work, co-administration of cocaine and raclopride led to the generation of dopamine transients in NAc shell. Illumination of VTA with laser strongly suppressed the frequency of transients in NpHR-expressing rats, but not in control rats. Laser did not have any effect on amplitude of transients. Thus, optogenetics can effectively reduce the occurrence of drug-evoked transients and is therefore a suitable approach for studying the functional role of such transients in drug-associated behavior.

  20. Optical suppression of drug-evoked phasic dopamine release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edgar Mccutcheon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brief fluctuations in dopamine concentration (dopamine transients play a key role in behavior towards rewards, including drugs of abuse. Drug-evoked dopamine transients may result from actions at both dopamine cell bodies and dopamine terminals. Inhibitory opsins can be targeted to dopamine neurons permitting their firing activity to be suppressed. However, as dopamine transients can become uncoupled from firing, it is unknown whether optogenetic hyperpolarization at the level of the soma is able to suppress dopamine transients. Here, we used in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to record transients evoked by cocaine and raclopride in nucleus accumbens (NAc of urethane-anesthetized rats. We targeted halorhodopsin (NpHR specifically to dopamine cells by injecting Cre-inducible virus into ventral tegmental area (VTA of transgenic rats that expressed Cre recombinase under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre+ rats. Consistent with previous work, co-administration of cocaine and raclopride led to the generation of dopamine transients in NAc shell. Illumination of VTA with laser strongly suppressed the frequency of transients in NpHR-expressing rats, but not in control rats. Laser did not have any effect on amplitude of transients. Thus, optogenetics can effectively reduce the occurrence of drug-evoked transients and is therefore a suitable approach for studying the functional role of such transients in drug-associated behavior.

  1. Differential Activation in Amygdala and Plasma Noradrenaline during Colorectal Distention by Administration of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone between Healthy Individuals and Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Tanaka

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS often comorbids mood and anxiety disorders. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis, but it is not clear how CRH agonists change human brain responses to interoceptive stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that brain activation in response to colorectal distention is enhanced after CRH injection in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Brain H215O- positron emission tomography (PET was performed in 16 male IBS patients and 16 age-matched male controls during baseline, no distention, mild and intense distention of the colorectum using barostat bag inflation. Either CRH (2 μg/kg or saline (1:1 was then injected intravenously and the same distention protocol was repeated. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma noradrenaline levels were measured at each stimulation. At baseline, CRH without colorectal distention induced more activation in the right amygdala in IBS patients than in controls. During intense distention after CRH injection, controls showed significantly greater activation than IBS patients in the right amygdala. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion showed a significant interaction between drug (CRH, saline and distention. Plasma noradrenaline at baseline significantly increased after CRH injection compared to before injection in IBS. Further, plasma noradrenaline showed a significant group (IBS, controls by drug by distention interaction. Exogenous CRH differentially sensitizes brain regions of the emotional-arousal circuitry within the visceral pain matrix to colorectal distention and synergetic activation of noradrenergic function in IBS patients and healthy individuals.

  2. Catecholamine release evoked by lithium from the perfused adrenal gland of the cat.

    OpenAIRE

    de Abajo, F. J.; Castro, M. A.; Garijo, B; Sánchez-García, P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of Li on catecholamine release by cat isolated retrogradely perfused adrenal gland was investigated. Replacement of Na (119 mM) by Li in the Krebs solution evoked a progressive increase in the spontaneous release of catecholamines that reached a maximum within 45 min and was Ca-dependent. This response was specific for Li, since sucrose or choline used as osmotic substitutes for Na, failed to increase the spontaneous release of catecholamines by the adrenal gland. In glands perfuse...

  3. Ca2+ sparks evoked by depolarization of rat ventricular myocytes involve multiple release sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZANGWei-Jin; YUXiao-Jiang; ZANGYi-Min

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the fundamental nature of calcium release events (Ca2+‘sparks’) evoked in rat ventricular myocytes during excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. METHODS: High-resolution line-scan confocal imaging with the fluorescent calcium indicator and patch-clamp techniques were used to study the spontaneous Ca2+ sparks and sparks evoked by depolarization. RESULTS: 1)Line scans oriented along the length of the cell showed that both spontaneous sparks and sparks evoked by depolarization to -35mV appeared to arise at single sites spacing about 1.80μm apart (ie, the sarcomere length), and measurements of their longitudinal spread (full-width at halfmaximal amplitude:FWHM) followed single Gaussian distributions with means of 2.6μm. 2)Different to this,transverse line scans often revealed spontaneous and evoked sparks that appeared to arise near-synchronously from paired sites. Measurements of transverse FWHM of both spontaneous and evoked sparks showed bimodal distributions, which were fit well by the sums of two Gaussian curves with means of 1.8 and 2.9μm for spontaneous sparks and ith means of 1.9 and 3.1 μm for evoked sparks. Relative areas under the two Gaussian curves were 1.73:1 and 1.85:1, respectively, for spontaneous and evoked sparks. CONCLUSIONS: Ca2+ sparks evoked by depolarization are not ′unitary′ events, but often involve multiple sites of origin along Z-lines, as previously shown for spontaneous sparks. Thus, Ca2+ released during sparks directly triggered by influx through L-type Ca2+ channels may, in turn, trigger neighboring sites. The restricted involvement of only a few transverse release sites preserves the essential feature of the ‘local control’ theory of E-C coupling.

  4. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Justin R; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2010-02-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (K(i) = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [(3)H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC(50) = 0.65 microM; I(max) = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC(50) = 0.42 microM, I(max) = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for

  5. Lobelane Inhibits Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine Release via Inhibition of the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Justin R.; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [3H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (Ki = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [3H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC50 = 0.65 μM; Imax = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC50 = 0.42 μM, Imax = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for the development of a

  6. A monovalent ion-selective cation current activated by noradrenaline in smooth muscle cells of rabbit ear artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Hogg, R C; Large, W A

    1993-04-01

    Membrane currents were recorded with the perforated-patch method with a low-chloride (35 mM) pipette solution in isolated smooth muscle cells of the rabbit ear artery. At a holding potential of -50 mV in potassium-free conditions spontaneous inward single-channel currents were observed and noradrenaline evoked a noisy inward current, which appeared to be comprised of the spontaneous currents. The reversal potential (Vr) of the spontaneous channel and noradrenaline-induced current was not affected in anion-substitution experiments but Vr was altered when external Na+ was replaced with choline or TRIS. The relationship between clamp potential and spontaneous single-channel current amplitude was linear and the mean unitary conductance was 28 pS. Caffeine, which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the calcium ionophore ionomycin activated the cation current and also blocked the response to noradrenaline. Spontaneous channel current activity and the noradrenaline-induced current were blocked when external NaCl was replaced with 89 mM CaCl2. The response to noradrenaline was blocked by prazosin but was not affected by yohimbine and therefore the response is mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors. It is concluded that in rabbit ear artery smooth muscle cells there is a calcium-activated cation channel of 28 pS conductance, which is relatively impermeable to calcium but can be activated by noradrenaline.

  7. Involvement of presynaptic voltage-dependent Kv3 channel in endothelin-1-induced inhibition of noradrenaline release from rat gastric sympathetic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kumiko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2012-11-05

    We previously reported that two types of K(+) channels, the BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel coupled with phospholipase C (PLC) and the voltage-dependent K(+) channel (Kv channel), are, respectively, involved in the prostanoid TP receptor- and muscarinic M(2) receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline (NA) release from rat gastric sympathetic nerves. In the present study, therefore, we examined whether these K(+) channels are involved in endothelin-1-induced inhibition of NA release, using an isolated, vascularly perfused rat stomach. The gastric sympathetic postganglionic nerves around the left gastric artery were electrically stimulated twice at 2.5 Hz for 1 min, and endothelin-1 was added during the second stimulation. Endothelin-1 (1, 2 and 10 nM) dose-dependently inhibited gastric NA release. Endothelin-1 (2 nM)-induced inhibition of NA release was neither attenuated by PLC inhibitors [U-73122 (3 μM) and ET-18-OCH(3) (3 μM)] nor by Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blockers [charybdotoxin (0.1 μM) (a blocker of BK type K(+) channel) and apamin (0.3 μM) (a blocker of SK type K(+) channel)]. The endothelin-1-induced inhibitory response was also not attenuated by α-dendrotoxin (0.1 μM) (a selective inhibitor of Kv1 channel), but abolished by 4-aminopyridine (20 μM) (a selectively inhibitory dose for Kv3 channel). These results suggest the involvement of a voltage-dependent Kv3 channel in the endothelin-1-induced inhibition of NA release from the gastric sympathetic nerves in rats.

  8. Noradrenaline modulates the presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in ovary. The importance of its interrelation on the ovarian steroidogenesis and apoptosis on dioestrus II in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronzi, Cynthia D; Orozco, Adriana S Vega; Rodriguez, Diego; Rastrilla, Ana María; Sosa, Zulema Y; Casais, Marilina

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate if noradrenaline (NA), added in the coeliac ganglion -superior ovarian nerve- ovary system (CG-SON-O) and in ovary incubation, modifies the release of ovarian progesterone (P4), gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and oestradiol (E2), and the expression of 3β-HSD and 20α-HSD and proapoptotic bax and antiapoptotic bcl-2 on dioestrus II in the rat. The CG-SON-O system and the ovary were removed and placed in one cuvette containing Krebs-Ringer solution (control groups), and NA was added to the ganglion compartment in the ex vivo system and in the ovary compartment in the ovary incubation (experimental groups). P4, GnRH and E2 were measured by RIA, and gene expression was measured by RT-PCR. In the ex-vivo system, the release of ovarian P4 and GnRH and the expression of 3β-HSD and bax decreased; E2 and bcl-2 increased, and the bax/bcl-2 ratio decreased. However, in the ovary incubation, P4, GnRH, the expression of 3β-HSD and bax increased; E2, the expression of 20α-HSD and bcl-2 decreased while the bax/bcl-2 ratio increased, thus favoring apoptosis. The peripheral nervous system protected the ovary from the apoptotic mechanisms while in the ovary incubation the effect was reverted. Our results indicate that NA regulates ovarian steroidogenesis and apoptosis by modulating GnRH release from the coeliac ganglion and ovary, being NA a possible generator of a GnRH-gonadotropins axis in the ovary. This work is expected to contribute with new evidence of the clinical importance of catecholamines and GnRH in therapy and prevention of ovarian pathologies.

  9. Evidence for evoked release of adenosine and glutamate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schousboe, A.; Frandsen, A.; Drejer, J. (Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1989-09-01

    Evoked release of ({sup 3}H)-D-aspartate which labels the neurotransmitter glutamate pool in cultured cerebellar granule cells was compared with evoked release of adenosine from similar cultures. It was found that both adenosine and (3H)-D-aspartate could be released from the neurons in a calcium dependent manner after depolarization of the cells with either 10-100 microM glutamate or 50 mM KCl. Cultures of cerebellar granule cells treated with 50 microM kainate to eliminate GABAergic neurons behaved in the same way. This together with the observation that cultured astrocytes did not exhibit a calcium dependent, potassium stimulated adenosine release strongly suggest that cerebellar granule cells release adenosine in a neurotransmitter-like fashion together with glutamate which is the classical neurotransmitter of these neurons. Studies of the metabolism of adenosine showed that in the granule cells adenosine is rapidly metabolized to ATP, ADP, and AMP, but in spite of this, adenosine was found to be released preferential to ATP.

  10. Serotonin, Dopamine and Noradrenaline Adjust Actions of Myelinated Afferents via Modulation of Presynaptic Inhibition in the Mouse Spinal Cord

    OpenAIRE

    García-Ramírez, David L.; Calvo, Jorge R.; Shawn Hochman; Jorge N Quevedo

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline...

  11. Noradrenaline-induced release of newly-synthesized accumbal dopamine: differential role of alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca eMeyer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that intra-accumbens infusion of isoproterenol (ISO, a beta-adrenoceptor-agonist, and phenylephrine (PE, an alpha-adrenoceptor-agonist, increase the release of accumbal dopamine (DA. In the present study we analyzed whether the ISO-induced release of DA is sensitive to pretreatment with the DA synthesis inhibitor alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT. Earlier studies have shown that the PE-induced release of DA is derived from DA pools that are resistant to AMPT. In addition to PE, the alpha-adrenoceptor-antagonist phentolamine (PA was also found to increase accumbal DA release. Therefore, we investigated whether similar to the DA-increasing effect of PE, the DA increase induced by PA is resistant to AMPT. Pretreatment with AMPT prevented the ISO-induced increase of accumbal DA. The accumbal DA increase after PA was not reduced by the DA synthesis inhibitor, independently of the amount of DA released. These results show that mesolimbic beta-, but not alpha-adrenoceptors, control the release of accumbal newly-synthesized DA pools. The DA-increasing effects of PE have previously been ascribed to stimulation of presynaptic receptors located on noradrenergic terminals, whereas the DA-increasing effects of PA and ISO have been ascribed to an action of these drugs at postsynaptic receptors on dopaminergic terminals. The fact that AMPT did not affect the accumbal DA response to PE and PA, whereas it did prevent the accumbal DA increase to ISO, supports our previously reported hypothesis that the noradrenergic neurons of the nucleus accumbens containing presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors impinge upon the dopaminergic terminals in the nucleus accumbens containing postsynaptic adrenoceptors of the alpha but not of the beta type. The putative therapeutic effects of noradrenergic agents in the treatment of DA-related disorders are shortly discussed.

  12. Co-release of noradrenaline and dopamine in the cerebral cortex elicited by single train and repeated train stimulation of the locus coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Pierluigi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies by our group suggest that extracellular dopamine (DA and noradrenaline (NA may be co-released from noradrenergic nerve terminals in the cerebral cortex. We recently demonstrated that the concomitant release of DA and NA could be elicited in the cerebral cortex by electrical stimulation of the locus coeruleus (LC. This study analyses the effect of both single train and repeated electrical stimulation of LC on NA and DA release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, occipital cortex (Occ, and caudate nucleus. To rule out possible stressful effects of electrical stimulation, experiments were performed on chloral hydrate anaesthetised rats. Results Twenty min electrical stimulation of the LC, with burst type pattern of pulses, increased NA and DA both in the mPFC and in the Occ. NA in both cortices and DA in the mPFC returned to baseline within 20 min after the end of the stimulation period, while DA in the Occ reached a maximum increase during 20 min post-stimulation and remained higher than baseline values at 220 min post-stimulation. Local perfusion with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM markedly reduced baseline NA and DA in the mPFC and Occ and totally suppressed the effect of electrical stimulation in both areas. A sequence of five 20 min stimulations at 20 min intervals were delivered to the LC. Each stimulus increased NA to the same extent and duration as the first stimulus, whereas DA remained elevated at the time next stimulus was delivered, so that baseline DA progressively increased in the mPFC and Occ to reach about 130 and 200% the initial level, respectively. In the presence of the NA transport (NAT blocker desipramine (DMI, 100 μM, multiple LC stimulation still increased extracellular NA and DA levels. Electrical stimulation of the LC increased NA levels in the homolateral caudate nucleus, but failed to modify DA level. Conclusion The results confirm and extend that LC stimulation induces a concomitant

  13. Apolipoprotein E4 reduces evoked hippocampal acetylcholine release in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolejší, Eva; Liraz, Ori; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) is the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. We utilized apoE4-targeted replacement mice (approved by the Tel Aviv University Animal Care Committee) to investigate whether cholinergic dysfunction, which increases during aging and is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, is accentuated by apoE4. This revealed that levels of the pre-synaptic cholinergic marker, vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the hippocampus and the corresponding electrically evoked release of acetylcholine, are similar in 4-month-old apoE4 and apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) mice. Both parameters decrease with age. This decrease is, however, significantly more pronounced in the apoE4 mice. The levels of cholinacetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were similar in the hippocampus of young apoE4 and apoE3 mice and decreased during aging. For ChAT, this decrease was similar in the apoE4 and apoE3 mice, whereas it was more pronounced in the apoE4 mice, regarding their corresponding AChE and BuChE levels. The level of muscarinic receptors was higher in the apoE4 than in the apoE3 mice at 4 months and increased to similar levels with age. However, the relative representation of the M1 receptor subtype decreased during aging in apoE4 mice. These results demonstrate impairment of the evoked release of acetylcholine in hippocampus by apoE4 in 12-month-old mice but not in 4-month-old mice. The levels of ChAT and the extent of the M2 receptor-mediated autoregulation of ACh release were similar in the adult mice, suggesting that the apoE4-related inhibition of hippocampal ACh release in these mice is not driven by these parameters. Evoked ACh release from hippocampal and cortical slices is similar in 4-month-old apoE4 and apoE3 mice but is specifically and significantly reduced in hippocampus, but not cortex, of 12-month-old apoE4 mice. This effect is accompanied by decreased VAChT levels. These findings show that

  14. Stress-evoked opioid release inhibits pain in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Ashley K; Drummond, Peter D

    2008-10-15

    To determine whether stress-evoked release of endogenous opioids might account for hypoalgesia in major depressive disorder (MDD), the mu-opioid antagonist naltrexone (50mg) or placebo was administered double-blind to 24 participants with MDD and to 31 non-depressed controls. Eighty minutes later participants completed a painful foot cold pressor test and, after a 5-min interval, began a 25-min arithmetic task interspersed with painful electric shocks. Ten minutes later participants completed a second cold pressor test. Negative affect was greater in participants with MDD than in non-depressed controls throughout the experiment, and increased significantly in both groups during mental arithmetic. Before the math task, naltrexone unmasked direct linear relationships between severity of depression, negative affect while resting quietly, and cold-induced pain in participants with MDD. In contrast, facilitatory effects of naltrexone on cold- and shock-induced pain were greatest in controls with the lowest depression scores. Naltrexone strengthened the relationship between negative affect and shock-induced pain during the math task, particularly in the depressed group, and heightened anxiety in both groups toward the end of the task. Thus, mu-opioid activity apparently masked a positive association between negative affect and pain in the most distressed participants. These findings suggest that psychological distress inhibits pain via stress-evoked release of opioid peptides in severe cases of MDD. In addition, tonic endogenous opioid neurotransmission could inhibit depressive symptoms and pain in people with low depression scores.

  15. Cholinergic regulation of the evoked quantal release at frog neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František; Bukharaeva, Ella A; Samigullin, Dmitry; Magazanik, Lev G

    2004-01-01

    The effects of cholinergic drugs on the quantal contents of the nerve-evoked endplate currents (EPCs) and the parameters of the time course of quantal release (minimal synaptic latency, main modal value of latency histogram and variability of synaptic latencies) were studied at proximal, central and distal regions of the frog neuromuscular synapse. Acetylcholine (ACh, 5 × 10−4 m), carbachol (CCh, 1 × 10−5 m) or nicotine (5 × 10−6 m) increased the numbers of EPCs with long release latencies mainly in the distal region of the endplate (90–120 μm from the last node of Ranvier), where the synchronization of transmitter release was the most pronounced. The parameters of focally recorded motor nerve action potentials were not changed by either ACh or CCh. The effects of CCh and nicotine on quantal dispersion were reduced substantially by 5 × 10−7 m (+)tubocurarine (TC). The muscarinic agonists, oxotremorine and the propargyl ester of arecaidine, as well as antagonists such as pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 and methoctramine, alone or in combination, did not affect the dispersion of the release. Muscarinic antagonists did not block the dispersion action of CCh. Cholinergic drugs either decreased the quantal content mo (muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine M, and nicotinic antagonist, TC), or decreased mo and dispersed the release (ACh, CCh and nicotine). The effects on mo were not related either to the endplate region or to the initial level of release dispersion. It follows that the mechanisms regulating the amount and the time course of transmitter release are different and that, among other factors, they are altered by presynaptic nicotinic receptors. PMID:15254150

  16. Determining Ca2+-sensor binding time and its variability in evoked neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ava Chomee; Kathpalia, Vinnie; D'Silva, Sahana; Cimenser, Aylin; Hua, Shao-Ying

    2008-02-15

    The speed and reliability of neuronal reactions are important factors for proper functioning of the nervous system. To understand how organisms use protein molecules to carry out very fast biological actions, we quantified single-molecule reaction time and its variability in synaptic transmission. From the synaptic delay of crayfish neuromuscular synapses the time for a few Ca(2+) ions to bind with their sensors in evoked neurotransmitter release was estimated. In standard crayfish saline at room temperature, the average Ca(2+) binding time was 0.12 ms for the first evoked quanta. At elevated extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations this binding time reached a limit due to saturation of Ca(2+) influx. Analysis of the synaptic delay variance at various Ca(2+) concentrations revealed that the variability of the Ca(2+)-sensor binding time is the major source of the temporal variability of synaptic transmission, and that the Ca(2+)-independent molecular reactions after Ca(2+) influx were less stochastic. The results provide insights into how organisms maximize reaction speed and reliability.

  17. Hypofunction of prefrontal cortex NMDA receptors does not change stress-induced release of dopamine and noradrenaline in amygdala but disrupts aversive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Alberto; Ronzoni, Giacomo; Mora, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    A dysfunction of prefrontal cortex has been associated with the exacerbated response to stress observed in schizophrenic patients and high-risk individuals to develop psychosis. The hypofunction of NMDA glutamatergic receptors induced by NMDA antagonists produces cortico-limbic hyperactivity, and this is used as an experimental model to resemble behavioural abnormalities observed in schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether injections of NMDA antagonists into the medial prefrontal cortex of the rat change (1) the increases of dopamine, noradrenaline and corticosterone concentrations produced by acute stress in amygdala, and (2) the acquisition of aversive memory related to a stressful event. Male Wistar rats were implanted with guide cannulae to perform microdialysis and bilateral microinjections (0.5 μl/side) of the NMDA antagonist 3-[(R)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propyl-1-phophonic acid (CPP) (25 and 100 ng). Prefrontal injections were performed 60 min before restraint stress in microdialysis experiments, or training (footshock; 0.6 mA, 2 s) in inhibitory avoidance test. Retention latency was evaluated 24 h after training as an index of aversive memory. Acute stress increased amygdala dialysate concentrations of dopamine (160% of baseline), noradrenaline (145% of baseline) and corticosterone (170% of baseline). Prefrontal injections of CPP did not change the increases of dopamine, noradrenaline or corticosterone produced by stress. In contrast, CPP significantly reduced the retention latency in the inhibitory avoidance test. These results suggest that the hypofunction of prefrontal NMDA receptors does not change the sensitivity to acute stress of dopamine and noradrenaline projections to amygdala but impairs the acquisition of aversive memory.

  18. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mina; Nagai, Taku; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2006-11-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. In the present study, we investigated the role of the tPA-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus, respectively, of mice, by using in vivo microdialysis. Microinjection of either tPA or plasmin significantly potentiated 40 mM KCl-induced DA release without affecting basal DA levels. In contrast, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 dose-dependently reduced 60 mM KCl-induced DA release. The 60 mM KCl-evoked DA release in the NAc was markedly diminished in tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice, although basal DA levels did not differ between the two groups. Microinjections of either exogenous tPA (100 ng) or plasmin (100 ng) into the NAc of tPA-/-mice restored 60 mM KCl-induced DA release, as observed in wild-type mice. In contrast, there was no difference in either basal or 60 mM KCl-induced ACh release in the hippocampus between wild-type and tPA-/-mice. Our findings suggest that the tPA-plasmin system is involved in the regulation of depolarization-evoked DA release in the NAc.

  19. Nitric oxide interacts with oxygen free radicals to evoke the release of adenosine and adenine nucleotides from rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, R M; Fallahi, N; Fredholm, B B

    2000-07-01

    The present study examined some possible mechanisms underlying the previously demonstrated release of adenosine by nitric oxide (NO) donors. Perfusion with the NO-donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP; 300 microM) led to a significant increase in the release of [3H]purines from both unstimulated and electrically stimulated hippocampal slices prelabeled with [3H]adenine. The NO-donor also evoked the release of endogenous ATP and ADP from unstimulated slices and, when combined with electrical stimulation, the release of ATP, AMP and adenosine. The SNAP-induced [3H]purine release was calcium-dependent, but not affected by the glutamate receptor antagonists MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a, d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine;100 nM) and CNQX (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione; 10 microM). Zaprinast (5 microM), an inhibitor of the cyclic GMP-dependent phosphodiesterase and 8-Br-cyclic GMP (0.01-1 mM) failed to evoke the release of purines, whereas generation of oxygen free radicals by xanthine plus xanthine oxidase did evoke purine release. Coperfusion of SNAP with the free radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD; 60 microg/ml) and catalase (50 microg/ml) reduced or eliminated the ability of the NO-donor to enhance [3H]purine release, but the poly (ADP-ribosyl) synthetase (PARS) inhibitor benzamide (500 microM) did not affect it. These data indicate that NO interacts with superoxide, likely forming peroxynitrite, which subsequently acts to release adenosine and adenine nucleotides from hippocampal tissue.

  20. Action potential-evoked calcium release is impaired in single skeletal muscle fibers from heart failure patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino DiFranco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+ release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms was markedly (2.6-fold and significantly (p<0.05 smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms. This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS: These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients.

  1. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Musazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated, and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486. On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats. Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes

  2. A planar microelectrode array for simultaneous detection of electrically evoked dopamine release from distinct locations of a single isolated neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavik Anil; Luk, Collin C; Leow, Pei Ling; Lee, Arthur J; Zaidi, Wali; Syed, Naweed I

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmission is a key process of communication between neurons. Although much is known about this process and the influence it has on the function of the body, little is understood about the dynamics of signalling from structural regions of a single neuron. In this study we have fabricated and characterised a microelectrode array (MEA) which was utilised for simultaneous multi-site recordings of dopamine release from an isolated single neuron. The MEA consisted of gold electrodes that were created in plane with the insulation layer using a chemical mechanical planarization process. The detection limit for dopamine measurements was 11 ± 3 nM and all the gold electrodes performed in a consistent fashion during amperometric recordings of 100 nM dopamine. Fouling of the gold electrode was investigated, where no significant change in the current was observed over 4 hours when monitoring 100 nM dopamine. The MEA was accessed using freshly isolated dopaminergic somas from the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, where electrically evoked dopamine release was clearly observed. Measurements were conducted at four structural locations of a single isolated neuron, where electrically evoked dopamine release was observed from the cell body, axonal regions and the terminal. Over time, the release of dopamine varied over the structural regions of the neuron. Such information can provide an insight into the signalling mechanism of neurons and how they potentially form synaptic connections.

  3. The key role of sodium in the ouabain-mediated potentiation of potassium-evoked catecholamine release in cat adrenal glands.

    OpenAIRE

    de Abajo, F. J.; Castro, M. A.; Sánchez-García, P.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of [Na]o on the catecholamine release evoked by K in ouabain pretreated, isolated adrenal glands of the cat, was investigated. 2. Reduction of [Na]o to 70, 50 and 25 mM, with sucrose as a substitute, did not modify the spontaneous catecholamine release but progressively increased the K (17.7 mM)-evoked secretory response. 3. Ouabain pretreatment (100 microM; 10 min) greatly increased the K (17.7 mM)-evoked catecholamine secretory response in glands perfused with normal Krebs. Su...

  4. Effect of niflumic acid on noradrenaline-induced contractions of the rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criddle, D N; de Moura, R S; Greenwood, I A; Large, W A

    1996-06-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-activated chloride channels, were compared with the actions of the calcium channel antagonist nifedipine on noradrenaline-evoked contractions in isolated preparations of the rat aorta. 2. The cumulative concentration-effect curve to noradrenaline (NA) was depressed by both nifedipine and niflumic acid in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. The degree of inhibition of the maximal contractile response to NA (1 microM) produced by 10 microM niflumic acid (38%) was similar to the effect of 1 microM nifedipine (39%). 3. Contractions to brief applications (30 s) of 1 microM NA were inhibited by 55% and 62% respectively by 10 microM niflumic acid and 1 microM nifedipine. 4. In the presence of 0.1 microM nifedipine, niflumic acid (10 microM) produced no further inhibition of the NA-evoked contractions. Thus, the actions of niflumic acid and nifedipine were not additive. 5. In Ca-free conditions the transient contraction induced by 1 microM NA was not inhibited by niflumic acid (10 microM) and therefore this agent does not reduce the amount of calcium released from the intracellular store or reduce the sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to calcium. 6. Niflumic acid 10 microM did not inhibit the contractions produced by KCl (up to 120 mM) which were totally blocked by nifedipine. Contractions induced by 25 mM KCl were completely inhibited by 1 microM levcromakalim but were unaffected by niflumic acid. 7. It was concluded that niflumic acid produces selective inhibition of a component of NA-evoked contraction which is probably mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels. These data are consistent with a model in which NA stimulates a calcium-activated chloride conductance which leads to the opening of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce contraction.

  5. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  6. ATP inhibits Ins(1,4,5)P3-evoked Ca2+ release in smooth muscle via P2Y1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, D; Kennedy, C; McCarron, J G

    2012-11-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) mediates a variety of biological functions following nerve-evoked release, via activation of either G-protein-coupled P2Y- or ligand-gated P2X receptors. In smooth muscle, ATP, acting via P2Y receptors (P2YR), may act as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. The underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear, but have been proposed to involve the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)] by phospholipase C (PLC), to evoke Ca(2+) release from the internal store and stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated potassium (K(Ca)) channels to cause membrane hyperpolarization. This mechanism requires Ca(2+) release from the store. However, in the present study, ATP evoked transient Ca(2+) increases in only ∼10% of voltage-clamped single smooth muscle cells. These results do not support activation of K(Ca) as the major mechanism underlying inhibition of smooth muscle activity. Interestingly, ATP inhibited Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release in cells that did not show a Ca(2+) rise in response to purinergic activation. The reduction in Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release was not mimicked by adenosine and therefore, cannot be explained by hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine. The reduction in Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release was, however, also observed with its primary metabolite, ADP, and blocked by the P2Y(1)R antagonist, MRS2179, and the G protein inhibitor, GDPβS, but not by PLC inhibition. The present study demonstrates a novel inhibitory effect of P2Y(1)R activation on Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release, such that purinergic stimulation acts to prevent Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-mediated increases in excitability in smooth muscle and promote relaxation.

  7. Effect of niflumic acid on noradrenaline-induced contractions of the rat aorta.

    OpenAIRE

    D.N. Criddle; de Moura,R.S.; Greenwood, I A; Large, W. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-activated chloride channels, were compared with the actions of the calcium channel antagonist nifedipine on noradrenaline-evoked contractions in isolated preparations of the rat aorta. 2. The cumulative concentration-effect curve to noradrenaline (NA) was depressed by both nifedipine and niflumic acid in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. The degree of inhibition of the maximal contractile response to NA (1 microM) produce...

  8. Involvement of ATP in noxious stimulus-evoked release of glutamate in rat medullary dorsal horn: a microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S; Chiang, C Y; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Sessle, Barry J; Coderre, Terence J

    2012-12-01

    Our electrophysiological studies have shown that both purinergic and glutamatergic receptors are involved in central sensitization of nociceptive neurons in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH). Here we assessed the effects of intrathecal administration of apyrase (a nucleotide degrading enzyme of endogenous adenosine 5-triphosphate [ATP]), a combination of apyrase and 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist), or 2,3-O-2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-adenosine triphosphate (TNP-ATP, a P2X1, P2X3, P2X2/3 receptor antagonist) on the release of glutamate in the rat MDH evoked by application of mustard oil (MO) to the molar tooth pulp. In vivo microdialysis was used to dialyse the MDH every 5 min, and included 3 basal samples, 6 samples after drug treatment and 12 samples following application of MO. Tooth pulp application of MO induced a significant increase in glutamate release in the MDH. Superfusion of apyrase or TNP-ATP alone significantly reduced the MO-induced glutamate release in the MDH, as compared to vehicle. Furthermore, the suppressive effects of apyrase on glutamate release were reduced by combining it with DPCPX. This study demonstrates that application of an inflammatory irritant to the tooth pulp induces glutamate release in the rat MDH in vivo that may be reduced by processes involving endogenous ATP and adenosine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Potentiation by choline of basal and electrically evoked acetylcholine release, as studied using a novel device which both stimulates and perfuses rat corpus striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, S. A.; Kischka, U.; Marshall, D. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the release of acetylcholine (ACh) and dopamine (DA) using a novel probe through which striatal neurons could be both superfused and stimulated electrically in both anesthetized and freely moving awake animals. Optimal stimulation parameters for eliciting ACh release from cholinergic neurons differed from those required for eliciting DA release from dopaminergic terminals: at 0.6 ms pulse duration, 20 Hz and 200 microA, ACh release increased to 357 +/- 30% (P < 0.01) of baseline and was blocked by the addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Pulse durations of 2.0 ms or greater were required to increase DA release. Unlike ACh release, DA release showed no frequency dependence above 5 Hz. The maximal evoked releases of ACh and DA were 556 +/- 94% (P < 0.01) and 254 +/- 38% (P < 0.05) of baseline, respectively. Peripheral administration of choline (Ch) chloride (30-120 mg/kg) to anesthetized animals caused dose-related (r = 0.994, P < 0.01) increases in ACh release; basal release rose from 117 +/- 7% to 141 +/- 5% of initial baseline levels (P < 0.05) and electrically evoked ACh release rose from 386 +/- 38% to 600 +/- 34% (P < 0.01) in rats given 120 mg/kg. However, Ch failed to affect basal or evoked DA release although neostigmine (10 microM) significantly elevated basal DA release (from 36.7 fmol/10 min to 71.5 fmol/10 min; P < 0.05). In awake animals, Ch (120 mg/kg) also elevated both basal (from 106 +/- 7% to 154 +/- 17%; P < 0.05) and electrically evoked (from 146 +/- 13 to 262 +/- 16%; P < 0.01) ACh release.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Veratridine-evoked release of dopamine from guinea pig isolated cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halmos, G; Gáborján, A; Lendvai, B; Répássy, G; Szabó, L Z; Vizi, E S

    2000-01-01

    Dopamine released from the lateral olivocochlear efferent system is thought to inhibit the toxic effect of the extreme glutamate outflow from the inner hair cells during ischemia or acoustic trauma. Using in vitro microvolume superfusion, we have studied the release of [(3)H]dopamine from the latera

  11. Noradrenaline and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eDelaville

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and motor symptoms including bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor at rest. These symptoms are manifest when around 70% of striatal DA is lost. In addition to motor deficits, PD is also characterized by the manifestation of non-motor symptoms. However, depletion of DA alone in animal models has failed to simultaneously elicit both the motor and non-motor deficits of PD because the disease is a multi-system disorder that features a profound loss of other neurotransmitter systems. There is growing evidence that additional loss of noradrenaline (NA neurons of the locus coeruleus, the principal source of NA in the brain, could be involved in the clinical expression of motor as well as in non-motor deficits. In the present review, we analyzed the latest data obtained from animal models of parkinsonism and from parkinsonian patients providing evidence for the implication of NA in the pathophysiology of PD. Recent studies have shown that NA depletion alone or combined with DA depletion resulted in motor as well as in non-motor dysfunctions. In addition, by using selective agonists and antagonists of alpha receptors we, and others, have shown that α2 receptors are implicated in the control of motor activity and that α2 receptor antagonists can improve PD motor symptoms as well as L-Dopa-induced dyskinesia. Here we provide arguments that the loss of NA neurons in PD has an impact on all PD symptoms and that the association of NAergic agents to dopaminergic medication can be beneficial in the treatment of the disease.

  12. Detection of basal and potassium-evoked acetylcholine release from embryonic DRG explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Nadia; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Tata, Ada Maria; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Biagioni, Stefano

    2004-03-01

    Spontaneous and potassium-induced acetylcholine release from embryonic (E12 and E18) chick dorsal root ganglia explants at 3 and 7 days in culture was investigated using a chemiluminescent procedure. A basal release ranging from 2.4 to 13.8 pm/ganglion/5 min was detected. Potassium application always induced a significant increase over the basal release. The acetylcholine levels measured in E12 explants were 6.3 and 38.4 pm/ganglion/5 min at 3 and 7 days in culture, respectively, while in E18 explant cultures they were 10.7 and 15.5 pm/ganglion/5 min. In experiments performed in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ ions, acetylcholine release, both basal and potassium-induced, was abolished and it was reduced by cholinergic antagonists. A morphometric analysis of explant fibre length suggested that acetylcholine release was directly correlated to neurite extension. Moreover, treatment of E12 dorsal root ganglion-dissociated cell cultures with carbachol as cholinergic receptor agonist was shown to induce a higher neurite outgrowth compared with untreated cultures. The concomitant treatment with carbachol and the antagonists at muscarinic receptors atropine and at nicotinic receptors mecamylamine counteracted the increase in fibre outgrowth. Although the present data have not established whether acetylcholine is released by neurones or glial cells, these observations provide the first evidence of a regulated release of acetylcholine in dorsal root ganglia.

  13. Novel bis-, tris-, and tetrakis-tertiary amino analogs as antagonists at neuronal nicotinic receptors that mediate nicotine-evoked dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenfa; Zheng, Guangrong; Pivavarchyk, Marharyta; Deaciuc, A Gabriela; Dwoskin, Linda P; Crooks, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    A series of tertiary amine analogs derived from lead azaaromatic quaternary ammonium salts has been designed and synthesized. The preliminary structure-activity relationships of these new analogs suggest that such tertiary amine analogs, which potently inhibit nicotine-evoked dopamine release from rat striatum, represent drug-like inhibitors of α6-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The bis-tertiary amine analog 7 exhibited an IC(50) of 0.95 nM, while the tris-tertiary amine analog 19 had an IC(50) of 0.35 nM at nAChRs mediating nicotine-evoked dopamine release.

  14. Parallel expression of synaptophysin and evoked neurotransmitter release during development of cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Treiman, M; Hansen, Gert Helge;

    1991-01-01

    and neurotransmitter release were measured in each of the culture types as a function of development for up to 8 days in vitro, using the same batch of cells for both sets of measurements to obtain optimal comparisons. The content and the distribution of synaptophysin in the developing cells were assessed...... by quantitative immunoblotting and light microscope immunocytochemistry, respectively. In both cell types, a close parallelism was found between the temporal pattern of development in synaptophysin expression and neurotransmitter release. This temporal pattern differed between the two types of neurons....... The cerebral cortex neurons showed a biphasic time course of increase in synaptophysin content, paralleled by a biphasic pattern of development in their ability to release [3H]GABA in response to depolarization by glutamate or elevated K+ concentrations. In contrast, a monophasic, approximately linear increase...

  15. Potentiation of K+-evoked catecholamine release in the cat adrenal gland treated with ouabain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A. G.; Garcia-Lopez, E.; Horga, J. F.; Kirpekar, S. M.; Montiel, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, P.

    1981-01-01

    1 A vigorous catecholamine secretory response was evoked by small increments (2-10 mM) of the extracellular concentration of K+ ([K+])o) in cat adrenal glands treated with ouabain (10(-4) M), and perfused with Krebs-bicarbonate solution at room temperature. 2 The secretory response depends on [K+]o; increments of [K+]o as small as 2 mM for 2 min evoked a clear secretory response; at 10-17.7 mM K+, the maximal secretory response was observed. In normal glands, not treated with ouabain, no increase of the rate of catecholamine output was observed by raising [K+]o up to 17.7 mM for 2 min. 3 The K+ secretory response was time-dependent, requiring at least 1 min to be initiated; on continued exposure to 10 mM [K+]o, the enhanced response remained for at least 1 h. 4 In low [Na+]o, the K+-secretory response was unchanged. However, in 0-Ca2+, high-Mg2+ solutions, or in the presence of D600, an organic Ca2+ antagonist, it was abolished. 5 The K+-induced secretory response was not altered in the presence of tetrodoxin or tetraethylammonium. 6 It is concluded that ouabain potentiated the catecholamine secretory response to raised [K+]o by increasing the amount of Ca2+ available to the secretory machinery through (a) mobilization of an enhanced pool of membrane-bound Ca2+, (b) activation of membrane Ca2+ inward current; or (c) decrease of intracellular Ca2+ buffering systems. The activation by ouabain of a membrane Na+-Ca2+ exchange system is not involved in this K+-secretory response. It is suggested that the plasma membrane ATPase enzyme system, by changing the affinity of its Ca2+ binding sites, might control the availability of this cation to the secretory machinery and, therefore, modulate catecholamine secretion in the adrenal gland. PMID:7296168

  16. Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors improve micturition control in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Redaelli

    Full Text Available Poor micturition control may cause profound distress, because proper voiding is mandatory for an active social life. Micturition results from the subtle interplay of central and peripheral components. It involves the coordination of autonomic and neuromuscular activity at the brainstem level, under the executive control of the prefrontal cortex. We tested the hypothesis that administration of molecules acting as reuptake inhibitors of serotonin, noradrenaline or both may exert a strong effect on the control of urine release, in a mouse model of overactive bladder. Mice were injected with cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg, to increase micturition acts. Mice were then given one of four molecules: the serotonin reuptake inhibitor imipramine, its metabolite desipramine that acts on noradrenaline reuptake, the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine or its active metabolite 4-hydroxy-duloxetine. Cyclophosphamide increased urine release without inducing overt toxicity or inflammation, except for increase in urothelium thickness. All the antidepressants were able to decrease the cyclophosphamide effects, as apparent from longer latency to the first micturition act, decreased number of urine spots and volume of released urine. These results suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors exert a strong and effective modulatory effect on the control of urine release and prompt to additional studies on their central effects on brain areas involved in the social and behavioral control of micturition.

  17. BDNF Evokes Release of Endogenous Cannabinoids at Layer 2/3 Inhibitory Synapses in the Neocortex

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent regulator of inhibitory synaptic transmission, although the locus of this effect and the underlying mechanisms are controversial. We explored a potential interaction between BDNF and endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) signaling because activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors potently regulates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release and both trkB tyrosine kinase receptors and CB1 receptors are highly expressed at ...

  18. Localized infusions of the partial alpha 7 nicotinic receptor agonist SSR180711 evoke rapid and transient increases in prefrontal glutamate release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Mikkelsen, J D; Bruno, J P

    2013-01-01

    The ability of local infusions of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetycholine receptor (α7 nAChR) partial agonist SSR180711 to evoke glutamate release in prefrontal cortex was determined in awake rats using a microelectrode array. Infusions of SSR180711 produced dose-dependent increases in glutamate level...

  19. Indolizidine (-)-235B' and related structural analogs: discovery of nicotinic receptor antagonists that inhibit nicotine-evoked [3H]dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivavarchyk, Marharyta; Smith, Andrew M; Zhang, Zhenfa; Zhou, Dejun; Wang, Xu; Toyooka, Naoki; Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu; McIntosh, J Michael; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-05-11

    Although several therapeutic agents are available to aid in tobacco smoking cessation, relapse rates continue to be high, warranting the development of alternative pharmacotherapies. Nicotine-evoked dopamine release from its presynaptic terminals in the central nervous system leads to reward which maintains continued tobacco use. The ability of indolizidine (-)-235B' and a sub-library of structurally related analogs to inhibit nicotine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine release from rat striatal slices was determined in the current study. Indolizidine (-)-235B' inhibited nicotine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50)=42 nM, I(max)=55%). Compound (-)-237D, the double bond-reduced analog, afforded the greatest inhibitory potency (IC(50)=0.18 nM, I(max)=76%), and was 233-fold more potent than indolizidine (-)-235B'. The des-8-methyl aza-analog of indolizidine (-)-235B', ZZ-272, also inhibited nicotine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine release (IC(50)=413 nM, I(max)=59%). Concomitant exposure to maximally effective concentrations of indolizidine (-)-235B', ZZ-272 or (-)-237D with a maximally effective concentration of α-conotoxin MII, a selective antagonist for α6β2-containing nicotinic receptors, resulted in inhibition of nicotine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine release no greater than that produced by each compound alone. The latter results suggest that indolizidine (-)-235B', (-)-237D, ZZ-272 and α-conotoxin MII inhibit the same α-conotoxin MII-sensitive nicotinic receptor subtypes. Thus, indolizidine (-)-235B' and its analogs act as antagonists of α6β2-nicotinic receptors and constitute a novel structural scaffold for the discovery of pharmacotherapies for smoking cessation.

  20. Regional influence of cocaine on evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens core: A role for the caudal brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, Ashlynn I; Alhadeff, Amber L; Grill, Harvey J; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2017-01-15

    Cocaine increases dopamine concentration in the nucleus accumbens through competitive binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT). However, it also increases the frequency of dopamine release events, a finding that cannot be explained by action at the DAT alone. Rather, this effect may be mediated by cocaine-induced modulation of brain regions that project to dopamine neurons. To explore regional contributions of cocaine to dopamine signaling, we administered cocaine to the lateral or fourth ventricles and compared the effects on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area to that of systemically-delivered cocaine. Stimulation trains caused a sharp rise in dopamine followed by a slower return to baseline. The magnitude of dopamine release ([DA]max) as well as the latency to decay to fifty percent of the maximum (t(1/2); index of DAT activity) by each stimulation train were recorded. All routes of cocaine delivery caused an increase in [DA]max; only systemic cocaine caused an increase in t(1/2). Importantly, these data are the first to show that hindbrain (fourth ventricle)-delivered cocaine modulates phasic dopamine signaling. Fourth ventricular cocaine robustly increased cFos immunoreactivity in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), suggesting a neural substrate for hindbrain cocaine-mediated effects on [DA]max. Together, the data demonstrate that cocaine-induced effects on phasic dopamine signaling are mediated via actions throughout the brain including the hindbrain. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise evokes epinephrine release resulting in β2-mediated vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Spranger, Marty D; Hammond, Robert L; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Alvarez, Alberto; Augustyniak, Robert A; O'Leary, Donal S

    2015-03-01

    Muscle metaboreflex-induced increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during submaximal dynamic exercise are mediated principally by increases in cardiac output. To what extent, if any, the peripheral vasculature contributes to this rise in MAP is debatable. In several studies, we observed that in response to muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA; induced by partial hindlimb ischemia) a small but significant increase in vascular conductance occurred within the nonischemic areas (calculated as cardiac output minus hindlimb blood flow and termed nonischemic vascular conductance; NIVC). We hypothesized that these increases in NIVC may stem from a metaboreflex-induced release of epinephrine, resulting in β2-mediated dilation. We measured NIVC and arterial plasma epinephrine levels in chronically instrumented dogs during rest, mild exercise (3.2 km/h), and MMA before and after β-blockade (propranolol; 2 mg/kg), α1-blockade (prazosin; 50 μg/kg), and α1 + β-blockade. Both epinephrine and NIVC increased significantly from exercise to MMA: 81.9 ± 18.6 to 141.3 ± 22.8 pg/ml and 33.8 ± 1.5 to 37.6 ± 1.6 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively. These metaboreflex-induced increases in NIVC were abolished after β-blockade (27.6 ± 1.8 to 27.5 ± 1.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)) and potentiated after α1-blockade (36.6 ± 2.0 to 49.7 ± 2.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)), while α1 + β-blockade also abolished any vasodilation (33.7 ± 2.9 to 30.4 ± 1.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)). We conclude that MMA during mild dynamic exercise induces epinephrine release causing β2-mediated vasodilation.

  2. Gastrin releasing peptide-29 requires vagal and splanchnic neurons to evoke satiation and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Susan A; Washington, Martha C; Garcia, Carlos; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that gastrin-releasing peptide-29 (GRP-29), the large molecular form of GRP in rats, reduces meal size (MS, intake of 10% sucrose solution) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). In these studies, we first investigated possible pathways for these responses in rats undergoing total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (VGX, removal of vagal afferent and efferent innervation of the gut), celiaco-mesenteric ganglionectomy (CMGX, removal of splanchnic afferent and efferent innervation of the gut) and combined VGX and CMGX. Second, we examined if the duodenum communicates the feeding signals (MS and IMI) of GRP-29 (0, 0.3, 1.0, 2.1, 4.1, 10.3 and 17.2 nmol/kg) with the feeding control areas of the hindbrain by performing duodenal myotomy (MYO), a procedure that severs some layers of the duodenal wall including the vagal, splanchnic and enteric neurons. We found that GRP-29 (2.1, 4.1, 10.3, 17.2 nmol/kg) reduced the size of the first meal (10% sucrose) and (1, 4.1, 10.3 nmol/kg) prolongs the first IMI but did not affect the subsequent meals or IMIs. In addition, CMGX and combined VGX/CMGX attenuated reduction of MS by GRP-29 and all surgeries attenuated the prolongation of the IMI. Therefore, reduction of MS and prolongation of IMI by GRP-29 require vagal and splanchnic nerves, and the duodenum is the major conduit that communicates prolongation of IMI by GRP-29 with the brain.

  3. Effects of lobeline and dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked acetylcholine release in vitro: evidence for a lack of involvement of classical neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T S; Correa, L D; Lloyd, G K

    1997-01-01

    Biochemical, behavioral and electrophysiological evidence suggests interactions between pathways containing neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (NAChRs) and excitatory amino acid receptors. Recently, protective effects of nicotine against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced toxicity in primary cortical cultures were reported. To address possible interactions between NAChR and NMDA receptor containing pathways, several NAChR agonists were evaluated for their effects on NMDA-evoked [3H]acetylcholine ([3H]ACh) release from slices of rat striatum. Nicotine, cytisine and epibatidine had no effect on NMDA-evoked release or basal release of [3H]ACh over a wide range of concentrations. Lobeline and dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP), however, decreased basal [3H]ACh release and attenuated NMDA-evoked [3H]ACh release with EC50 values of 35 and 155 microM, respectively. The NAChR antagonists, dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E) and d-tubocurarine had no effect on NMDA-evoked [3H]ACh release, whereas mecamylamine attenuated the NMDA-evoked [3H]ACh evoked release with an EC50 value of 144 microM. Methyllycaconitine (MLA), a highly selective and potent antagonist of the alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive alpha 7 NAChR subtype, also had no effect on NMDA-evoked [3H]ACh release at concentrations upto 10 microM. The inhibitory effects of DMPP and lobeline on NMDA-evoked [3H[ACh release were relatively insensitive to mecamylamine, d-tubocurarine, MLA and DH beta E. In addition, DMPP or lobeline-induced attenuation of basal [3H]ACh release was insensitive to blockade by sulpiride, a dopamine (D2) receptor antagonist. In contrast to their effects on NMDA-evoked striatal [3H]ACh release, both DMPP and lobeline increased basal release of striatal [3H]DA and hippocampal [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) and did not attenuate NMDA-evoked release of these two transmitters. Instead, DMPP and lobeline appeared to have an additive effect on both NMDA-evoked hippocampal [3H]NE release and

  4. Angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists modulate nicotine-evoked [³H]dopamine and [³H]norepinephrine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Vidya; Somkuwar, Sucharita S; Horton, David B; Cassis, Lisa A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2013-09-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. A major negative health consequence of chronic smoking is hypertension. Untoward addictive and cardiovascular sequelae associated with chronic smoking are mediated by nicotine-induced activation of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) within striatal dopaminergic and hypothalamic noradrenergic systems. Hypertension involves both brain and peripheral angiotensin systems. Activation of angiotensin type-1 receptors (AT1) release dopamine and norepinephrine. The current study determined the role of AT1 and angiotensin type-2 (AT2) receptors in mediating nicotine-evoked dopamine and norepinephrine release from striatal and hypothalamic slices, respectively. The potential involvement of nAChRs in mediating effects of AT1 antagonist losartan and AT2 antagonist, 1-[[4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]methyl]-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD123319) was evaluated by determining their affinities for α4β2* and α7* nAChRs using [³H]nicotine and [³H]methyllycaconitine binding assays, respectively. Results show that losartan concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-evoked [³H]dopamine and [³H]norepinephrine release (IC₅₀: 3.9 ± 1.2 and 2.2 ± 0.7 μM; Imax: 82 ± 3 and 89 ± 6%, respectively). In contrast, PD123319 did not alter nicotine-evoked norepinephrine release, and potentiated nicotine-evoked dopamine release. These results indicate that AT1 receptors modulate nicotine-evoked striatal dopamine and hypothalamic norepinephrine release. Furthermore, AT1 receptor activation appears to be counteracted by AT2 receptor activation in striatum. Losartan and PD123319 did not inhibit [³H]nicotine or [³H]methyllycaconitine binding, indicating that these AT1 and AT2 antagonists do not interact with the agonist recognition sites on α4β2* and α7* nAChRs to mediate these effects of nicotine. Thus, angiotensin receptors contribute to the effects of

  5. Serotonin, Dopamine and Noradrenaline Adjust Actions of Myelinated Afferents via Modulation of Presynaptic Inhibition in the Mouse Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramírez, David L.; Calvo, Jorge R.; Hochman, Shawn; Quevedo, Jorge N.

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs) or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs) recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75%) but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic transmission in the

  6. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline adjust actions of myelinated afferents via modulation of presynaptic inhibition in the mouse spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L García-Ramírez

    Full Text Available Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD. PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT, dopamine (DA and noradrenaline (NA on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs. The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75% but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic

  7. Characterization of Optically and Electrically Evoked Dopamine Release in Striatal Slices from Digenic Knock-in Mice with DAT-Driven Expression of Channelrhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FCV) is an established method to monitor increases in extracellular dopamine (DA) concentration ([DA]o) in the striatum, which is densely innervated by DA axons. Ex vivo brain slice preparations provide an opportunity to identify endogenous modulators of DA release. For these experiments, local electrical stimulation is often used to elicit release of DA, as well as other transmitters, in the striatal microcircuitry; changes in evoked increases in [DA]o after application of a pharmacological agent (e.g., a receptor antagonist) indicate a regulatory role for the transmitter system interrogated. Optogenetic methods that allow specific stimulation of DA axons provide a complementary, bottom-up approach for elucidating factors that regulate DA release. To this end, we have characterized DA release evoked by local electrical and optical stimulation in striatal slices from mice that genetically express a variant of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). Evoked increases in [DA]o in the dorsal and ventral striatum (dStr and vStr) were examined in a cross of a Cre-dependent ChR2 line (“Ai32” mice) with a DAT::Cre mouse line. In dStr, repeated optical pulse-train stimulation at the same recording site resulted in rundown of evoked [DA]o using heterozygous mice, which contrasted with the stability seen with electrical stimulation. Similar rundown was seen in the presence of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, implicating the absence of concurrent nAChR activation in DA release instability in slices. Rundown with optical stimulation in dStr could be circumvented by recording from a population of sites, each stimulated only once. Same-site rundown was less pronounced with single-pulse stimulation, and a stable baseline could be attained. In vStr, stable optically evoked increases in [DA]o at single sites could be achieved using heterozygous mice, although with relatively low peak [DA]o. Low release could be overcome by using mice with a

  8. N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine in striatal compartments of the rat: regulatory roles of dopamine and GABA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowinski, J.; Perez, S.; Desban, M.; Gauchy, C.; Kemel, M.L.; Blanchet, F. [Chaire de Neuropharmacologie, INSERM U114, College de France, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris (France)

    1997-08-26

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine previously formed from [{sup 3}H]choline was estimated in striosome- (identified by [{sup 3}H]naloxone binding) or matrix-enriched areas of the rat striatum using an in vitro microsuperfusion procedure. Experiments were performed in either the absence or the presence of dopaminergic and/or GABAergic receptor antagonists. Although the cell bodies of the cholinergic interneurons were mainly found in the matrix, in the absence of magnesium, N-methyl-d-aspartate (50 {mu}M) stimulated the release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine in both striatal compartments. These responses were blocked by either magnesium, dizocilpine maleate, 7-chlorokynurenate or tetrodotoxin. N-Methyl-d-aspartate responses were concentration-dependent, but the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate response was higher in striosomes than in the matrix. The co-application of d-serine (10 {mu}M) enhanced the 10 {mu}M N-methyl-d-aspartate response in both compartments, but reduced those induced by 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate, this reduction being higher in striosomes. The blockade of dopaminergic transmission with the D{sub 2} and D{sub 1} dopaminergic receptor antagonists, (-)-sulpiride (1 {mu}M) and SCH23390 (1 {mu}M), was without effect on the 50 {mu}M N-methyl-d-aspartate-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine, but markedly enhanced the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine-evoked response in striosomes and to a lesser extent in the matrix. Disinhibitory responses of similar amplitude were observed not only in striosomes but also in the matrix when (-)-sulpiride was used alone, while SCH23390 alone enhanced the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine response only in striosomes and to a lower extent than (-)-sulpiride. These results indicate that D{sub 2} receptors are mainly involved in the inhibitory effect of dopamine on the 1 mM N-methyl-d-aspartate + d-serine-evoked release of [{sup 3}H]acetylcholine. They also show that the stimulation of D{sub 1

  9. r-bPiDI, an α6β2* Nicotinic Receptor Antagonist, Decreases Nicotine-Evoked Dopamine Release and Nicotine Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Joshua S.; Meyer, Andrew C.; Pivavarchyk, M.; Horton, David B.; Zheng, Guangrong; Smith, Andrew M.; Wooters, Thomas E.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Crooks, Peter A.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    α6β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACh Rs) expressed by dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine-evoked dopamine (DA) release and nicotine reinforcement. α6β2* antagonists inhibit these effects of nicotine, such that α6β2* receptors serve as therapeutic targets for nicotine addiction. The present research assessed the neuropharmacology of 1,10-bis(3-methyl-5,6-dihydropyridin-1(2H)-yl)decane (r-bPiDI), a novel small-molecule, tertiary amino analog of its parent compound, N,N-decane-1,10-diyl-bis-3-picolinium diiodide (bPiDI). bPiDI was previously shown to inhibit both nicotine-evoked DA release and the reinforcing effects of nicotine. In the current study, r-bPiDI inhibition of [3H]nicotine and [3H]methyllyca-conitine binding sites was evaluated to assess interaction with the recognition binding sites on α4β2* and α7* nAChRs, respectively. Further, r-bPiDI inhibition of nicotine-evoked DA release in vitro in the absence and presence of α-conotoxin MII and following chronic in vivo nicotine administration were determined. The ability of r-bPiDI to decrease nicotine self-administration and food-maintained responding was also assessed. Results show that r-bPiDI did not inhibit [3H]nicotine or [3H]methylly-caconitine binding, but potently (IC50 = 37.5 nM) inhibited nicotine-evoked DA release from superfused striatal slices obtained from either drug naïve rats or from those repeatedly treated with nicotine. r-bPiDI inhibition of nicotine-evoked DA release was not different in the absence or presence of α-conotoxin MII, indicating that r-bPiDI acts as a potent, selective α6β2* nAChR antagonist. Acute systemic administration of r-bPiDI specifically decreased nicotine self-administration by 75 %, and did not alter food-maintained responding, demonstrating greater specificity relative to bPiDI and bPiDDB, as well as the tertiary amino analog r-bPiDDB. The current work describes the discovery of r-bPiDI, a tertiary amino, α-conotoxin MII-like small molecule

  10. RNA interference targeting mu-opioid receptors reverses the inhibition of fentanyl on glucose-evoked insulin release of rat islets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Tao-lai; ZHANG Lei; WANG Xin-hua; LIU Sheng; MA Liang; LU Ying

    2010-01-01

    Background Mu opioid receptor plays an important role in many physiological functions. Fentanyl is a widely used opioid receptor agonist for analgesia. This study was conducted to test the role of mu-opioid receptor on insulin release by determining whether fentanyl affected insulin release from freshly isolated rat pancreatic islets and if small interfering RNAs (siRNA) targeting mu-opioid receptor in the islets could knock down mu-opioid receptor expression.Methods Islets were isolated from ripe SD rats' pancreas by common bile duct intraductal collagenase V digestion and purified by discontinuous Ficoll density gradient centrifugation. The siRNA knock-down of mu-opioid receptor mRNA and protein in islet cells was analyzed by semi-quantitative real time-PCR and Western blotting. After siRNA-transfection for 48 hours, the islets were co-cultured with fentanyl as follows: 0 ng/ml, 3 ng/ml and 30 ng/ml for 48 hours. Then glucose-evoked insulin release was performed. As a control, the insulin release was also analyzed in islets without siRNA-trasfection after being co-cultured with fentanyl for 48 hours.Results After 48 hours of transfections, specific siRNA targeting of mu-opioid receptors produced significant reduction of mu-opioid receptor mRNA and protein (P <0.01). Fentanyl significantly inhibited glucose-evoked insulin release in islets in a concentration dependent manner (P <0.01). But after siRNA-transfection for 48 hours, the inhibition on glucose-evoked insulin reiease was reversed (P <0.01).Conclusions RNA interference specifically reduces mu-opioid receptor mRNA and protein expression, leading to reversal of the fentanyl-induced inhibition on glucose-evoked insulin release of rat islets. The activation of opioid receptor induced by fentanyl functions to inhibit insulin release. The use of RNAi presents a promising tool for future research in diabetic mechanisms and a novel therapy for diabetes.

  11. Pulmonary extraction of circulating noradrenaline in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christensen, N J; Ring-Larsen, H

    1986-01-01

    Pulmonary plasma kinetics of endogenous noradrenaline (NA) and tritium labelled L-noradrenaline (3H-NA) was studied in fifteen subjects during pulmonary arterial catheterization. Plasma NA concentration in femoral artery ranged from 0.5 to 8.2 nmol l-1, mean 2.3 nmol l-1, which was not significan...

  12. Age-related changes in the dynamics of potassium-evoked L-glutamate release in the striatum of Fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, J; Pomerleau, F; Allen, J; Gerhardt, G A

    2005-01-01

    In the present studies we used a multisite ceramic-based microelectrode for rapid (800 ms) and low level measures of L-glutamate in vivo. We measured the amplitude and clearance rate of phasic changes in L-glutamate release produced by local application of potassium by a micropipette placed adjacent to the recording sites in the striatum of young (6 month), late middle aged (18 month) and aged (24 month) Fischer 344 rats. Our results showed that the amplitudes and clearance rates of potassium-evoked release of L-glutamate in the striatum were significantly decreased in aged rats as compared to the other age groups. In addition, the sensitivity of glutamate fibers to depolarization with potassium was significantly decreased in the aged rats as compared to young animals. Taken together, these data are consistent with age-related alterations in glutamate release dynamics, which may involve a compensatory mechanism for maintaining static glutamate concentrations within the striatum.

  13. Objective measures of binaural masking level differences and comodulation masking release based on late auditory evoked potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Yasin, Ifat; Verhey, Jesko L.

    2013-01-01

    The audibility of important sounds is often hampered due to the presence of other masking sounds. The present study investigates if a correlate of the audibility of a tone masked by noise is found in late auditory evoked potentials measured from human listeners. The audibility of the target sound...

  14. α₂-Adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of catecholamine release from the adrenal medulla of spontaneously hypertensive rats is preserved in the early stages of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Eduardo; Pinto, Carina E; Caló, Ana; Serrão, Maria P; Afonso, Joana; Vieira-Coelho, Maria A

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of α(2) -adrenoceptor activation on catecholamine release from the adrenal medulla of pre-hypertensive (6-week-old) and hypertensive (16-week-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and of age-matched normotensive control Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Catecholamine overflow from isolated adrenal medullae was evoked by the nicotinic receptor agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) in the absence and presence of the α(2) -adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine (MED). The spontaneous outflow of adrenaline was similar between age-matched SHR and WKY rats. However, the spontaneous outflow of noradrenaline was significantly lower in SHR compared with age-matched WKY rats. DMPP (0.1-3 mM) increased the outflow of noradrenaline and adrenaline in a concentration-dependent manner. The E(max) values for adrenaline overflow were similar between strains, but the E(max) values for noradrenaline overflow were significantly lower in SHR. The EC(50) values for noradrenaline and adrenaline overflow were significantly higher in SHR compared with age-matched WKY rats. MED (0.1-300 nM) reduced the DMPP-evoked overflow (DMPP 500 μM) of noradrenaline and adrenaline in a concentration-dependent manner and was capable of totally inhibiting this effect. The inhibitory action of MED was similar between age-matched SHR and WKY rats. In the adrenals, the α(2A)- and α(2B)-adrenoceptor subtypes had the highest mRNA expression levels; the α(2C)-adrenoceptor subtype had the lowest mRNA expression levels. The mRNA levels for the three subtypes were similar between strains. In conclusion, in SHR during the development of hypertension, adrenal α(2) -adrenoceptor inhibitory function is conserved, accompanied by reduced noradrenaline release and unchanged adrenaline release.

  15. Influence of naloxone on catecholamine release evoked by nicotinic receptor stimulation in the isolated rat adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Min; Lim, Geon-Han; Lim, Dong-Yoon

    2005-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of naloxone, a well known opioid antagonist, on the secretion of catecholamines (CA) evoked by cholinergic stimulation and membrane-depolarization in the isolated perfused rat adrenal glands, and to establish its mechanism of action. Naloxone (10(-6) approximately 10(-5) M), perfused into an adrenal vein for 60 min, produced dose- and time-dependent inhibition of CA secretory responses evoked by ACh (5.32 x 10(-3) M), high K+ (5.6 x 10(-2) M), DMPP (10(-4) M) and McN-A-343 (10(-4) M). Naloxone itself also failed to affect the basal CA output. In adrenal glands loaded with naloxone (3 x 10(-6) M), the CA secretory responses evoked by Bay-K-8644, an activator of L-type Ca2+ channels, and cyclopiazonic acid, an inhibitor of cytoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase, were also inhibited. In the presence of met-enkephalin (5 x 10(-6) M), a well known opioid agonist, the CA secretory responses evoked by ACh, high K+, DMPP, McN-A-343, Bay-K-8644 and cyclopiazonic acid were also significantly inhibited. Taken together, these results suggest that naloxone greatly inhibits the CA secretion evoked by stimulation of cholinergic (both nicotinic and muscarinic) receptors as well as that by membrane depolarization. It seems that these inhibitory effects of naloxone does not involve opioid receptors, but might be mediated by blocking both the calcium influx into the rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells and the uptake of Ca2+ into the cytoplasmic calcium store, which are at least partly relevant to the direct interaction with the nicotinic receptor itself.

  16. Angiotensin II increases nerve-evoked contractions in mouse tail artery by a T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Trent F; Callaghan, Brid P; Brock, James A

    2015-08-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) increases sympathetic nerve-evoked contractions of arterial vessels. Here the mechanisms underlying this effect were investigated in mouse tail artery. Isometrically mounted segments of mouse distal tail artery were used to investigate the effects of endothelium denudation, blocking Ca(2+) channels and inhibiting superoxide signalling on Ang II-induced facilitation of nerve-evoked contractions. In addition, in situ amperometry was used to assess effects of Ang II on noradrenaline release. Ang II (0.1-1nM) increased nerve-evoked contractions but did not change noradrenaline release. Losartan (Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist), but not PD 123319 (Ang II type 2 receptor antagonist), blocked the facilitatory effect of Ang II on nerve-evoked contractions. Ang II increased vascular muscle reactivity to phenylephrine and UK-14304 (α1- and α2-adrenoceptor agonists, respectively). Endothelial denudation increased nerve-evoked contractions and reduced the facilitatory effect of Ang II on these responses. Efonidipine (L- and T-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) and NNC 55-0396 (T-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) also attenuated this effect of Ang II, while nifedipine (L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) did not. Blockers of superoxide generation/signalling did not change the facilitatory effect of Ang II on nerve-evoked contractions. The findings indicate that Ang II increases the contribution of T-type Ca(2+) channels to neural activation of the vascular muscle. In addition, Ang II appears to reduce the inhibitory influence of the endothelium on nerve-evoked contractions.

  17. Histamine H3 receptor activation counteracts adenosine A2A receptor-mediated enhancement of depolarization-evoked [3H]-GABA release from rat globus pallidus synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Figueroa, Guadalupe-Elide; Márquez-Gómez, Ricardo; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2014-08-20

    High levels of histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are found in the globus pallidus (GP), a neuronal nucleus in the basal ganglia involved in the control of motor behavior. By using rat GP isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes), we studied whether H3R activation modified the previously reported enhancing action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulation on depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release. At 3 and 10 nM, the A2AR agonist CGS-21680 enhanced [(3)H]-GABA release induced by high K(+) (20 mM) and the effect of 3 nM CGS-21680 was prevented by the A2AR antagonist ZM-241385 (100 nM). The presence of presynaptic H3Rs was confirmed by the specific binding of N-α-[methyl-(3)H]-histamine to membranes from GP synaptosomes (maximum binding, Bmax, 1327 ± 79 fmol/mg protein; dissociation constant, Kd, 0.74 nM), which was inhibited by the H3R ligands immepip, clobenpropit, and A-331440 (inhibition constants, Ki, 0.28, 8.53, and 316 nM, respectively). Perfusion of synaptosomes with the H3R agonist immepip (100 nM) had no effect on K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release, but inhibited the stimulatory action of A2AR activation. In turn, the effect of immepip was blocked by the H3R antagonist clobenpropit, which had no significant effect of its own on K(+)-induced [(3)H]-GABA release. These data indicate that H3R activation selectively counteracts the facilitatory action of A2AR stimulation on GABA release from striato-pallidal projections.

  18. Modified cytoplasmic Ca2+ sequestration contributes to spinal cord injury-induced augmentation of nerve-evoked contractions in the rat tail artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dera, Hussain; Callaghan, Brid P; Brock, James A

    2014-01-01

    In rat tail artery (RTA), spinal cord injury (SCI) increases nerve-evoked contractions and the contribution of L-type Ca2+ channels to these responses. In RTAs from unoperated rats, these channels play a minor role in contractions and Bay K8644 (L-type channel agonist) mimics the effects of SCI. Here we investigated the mechanisms underlying the facilitatory actions of SCI and Bay K8644 on nerve-evoked contractions of RTAs and the hypothesis that Ca2+ entering via L-type Ca2+ channels is rapidly sequestered by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) limiting its role in contraction. In situ electrochemical detection of noradrenaline was used to assess if Bay K8644 increased noradrenaline release. Perforated patch recordings were used to assess if SCI changed the Ca2+ current recorded in RTA myocytes. Wire myography was used to assess if SCI modified the effects of Bay K8644 and of interrupting SR Ca2+ uptake on nerve-evoked contractions. Bay K8644 did not change noradrenaline-induced oxidation currents. Neither the size nor gating of Ca2+ currents differed between myocytes from sham-operated (control) and SCI rats. Bay K8644 increased nerve-evoked contractions in RTAs from both control and SCI rats, but the magnitude of this effect was reduced by SCI. By contrast, depleting SR Ca2+ stores with ryanodine or cyclopiazonic acid selectively increased nerve-evoked contractions in control RTAs. Cyclopiazonic acid also selectively increased the blockade of these responses by nifedipine (L-type channel blocker) in control RTAs, whereas ryanodine increased the blockade produced by nifedipine in both groups of RTAs. These findings suggest that Ca2+ entering via L-type channels is normally rapidly sequestered limiting its access to the contractile mechanism. Furthermore, the findings suggest SCI reduces the role of this mechanism.

  19. Modified cytoplasmic Ca2+ sequestration contributes to spinal cord injury-induced augmentation of nerve-evoked contractions in the rat tail artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Al Dera

    Full Text Available In rat tail artery (RTA, spinal cord injury (SCI increases nerve-evoked contractions and the contribution of L-type Ca2+ channels to these responses. In RTAs from unoperated rats, these channels play a minor role in contractions and Bay K8644 (L-type channel agonist mimics the effects of SCI. Here we investigated the mechanisms underlying the facilitatory actions of SCI and Bay K8644 on nerve-evoked contractions of RTAs and the hypothesis that Ca2+ entering via L-type Ca2+ channels is rapidly sequestered by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR limiting its role in contraction. In situ electrochemical detection of noradrenaline was used to assess if Bay K8644 increased noradrenaline release. Perforated patch recordings were used to assess if SCI changed the Ca2+ current recorded in RTA myocytes. Wire myography was used to assess if SCI modified the effects of Bay K8644 and of interrupting SR Ca2+ uptake on nerve-evoked contractions. Bay K8644 did not change noradrenaline-induced oxidation currents. Neither the size nor gating of Ca2+ currents differed between myocytes from sham-operated (control and SCI rats. Bay K8644 increased nerve-evoked contractions in RTAs from both control and SCI rats, but the magnitude of this effect was reduced by SCI. By contrast, depleting SR Ca2+ stores with ryanodine or cyclopiazonic acid selectively increased nerve-evoked contractions in control RTAs. Cyclopiazonic acid also selectively increased the blockade of these responses by nifedipine (L-type channel blocker in control RTAs, whereas ryanodine increased the blockade produced by nifedipine in both groups of RTAs. These findings suggest that Ca2+ entering via L-type channels is normally rapidly sequestered limiting its access to the contractile mechanism. Furthermore, the findings suggest SCI reduces the role of this mechanism.

  20. Noradrenaline blocks potassium conductance in rat dentate granule cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, H L; Rose, G M

    1987-07-22

    The actions of noradrenaline and the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, were studied on the dentate gyrus in hippocampal slices from rats using extra- and intracellular recording. These agents facilitated field EPSPs (excitatory postsynaptic potentials) and population spikes evoked by perforant path stimulation. Intracellular recording revealed an attenuation of the long lasting afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and the accommodation of cell discharge in response to depolarizing current injection. It is suggested that beta-receptor activation blocks a calcium-dependent potassium current.

  1. QSAR study on maximal inhibition (Imax) of quaternary ammonium antagonists for S-(-)-nicotine-evoked dopamine release from dopaminergic nerve terminals in rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fang; McConnell, Matthew J; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Dwoskin, Linda P; Crooks, Peter A

    2009-07-01

    Maximal inhibition (I(max)) of the agonist effect is an important pharmacological property of inhibitors that interact with multiple receptor subtypes that are activated by the same agonist and which elicit the same functional response. This report represents the first QSAR study on a set of 66 mono- and bis-quaternary ammonium salts that act as antagonists at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediating nicotine-evoked dopamine release, conducted using multi-linear regression (MLR) and neural network (NN) analysis with the maximal inhibition (I(max)) values of the antagonists as target values. The statistical results for the generated MLR model were: r(2)=0.89, rmsd=9.01, q(2)=0.83 and loormsd=11.1; the statistical results for the generated NN model were: r(2)=0.89, rmsd=8.98, q(2)=0.83 and loormsd=11.2. The maximal inhibition values of the compounds exhibited a good correlation with the predictions made by the QSAR models developed, which provide a basis for rationalizing selection of compounds for synthesis in the discovery of effective and selective second generation inhibitors of nAChRs mediating nicotine-evoked dopamine release.

  2. 3-Hydroxybutyrate coinfused with noradrenaline decreases resulting plasma levels of noradrenaline in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cañas, X.; Sanchis, D.; Gómez, G.; Casanovas, J.M.; Artigas Pérez, Francesc; Fernández López, José Antonio; Remesar Betlloch, Xavier; Alemany, Marià

    1997-01-01

    Pentobarbital-anaesthetized male Wistar rats were infused with 6microgkg-1min-1 of noradrenaline. The infusion was supplemented with 8.5 mgkg-1min-1 of D-3-hydroxybutyrate (3-OHB) for 15 min in order to determine its effect on the adrenergic response of the rat. Plasma levels of noradrenaline rose to a plateau of approximately 50 nmoll-1 with infusion. In the group infused with noradrenaline alone, noradrenaline levels were maintained for 1h. Supplementation with 3-OHB induced a decrease in p...

  3. 3-Hydroxybutyrate co-infused with noradrenaline decreases resulting plasma levels of noradrenaline in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cañas, Xavier; Sanchís, Daniel; Gómez, Gloria; Casanovas, Josep M.; Artigas, Francesc; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Remesar, Xavier; Alemany, Marià

    1997-01-01

    Pentobarbital-anaesthetized male Wistar rats were infused with 6microgkg-1min-1 of noradrenaline. The infusion was supplemented with 8.5 mgkg-1min-1 of D-3-hydroxybutyrate (3-OHB) for 15 min in order to determine its effect on the adrenergic response of the rat. Plasma levels of noradrenaline rose to a plateau of approximately 50 nmoll-1 with infusion. In the group infused with noradrenaline alone, noradrenaline levels were maintained for 1h. Supplementation with 3-OHB induced a decrease in p...

  4. Dopamine versus noradrenaline in septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe ‘Surviving Sepsis’ Campaign guidelines recommend theuse of dopamine or noradrenaline as the first vasopressor inseptic shock. However, information that guides clinicians inchoosing between dopamine and noradrenaline as the firstvasopressor in patients with septic shock is limited.ObjectiveThis article presents a review of the literature regarding theuse of dopamine versus noradrenaline in patients with septicshock.ResultsTwo randomised controlled trials (RCT and two largeprospective cohort studies were analysed. RCT data showeddopamine was associated with increased arrhythmic events.One cohort study found dopamine was associated with higher30-day mortality. The other cohort study found noradrenalinewas associated with higher 28-day mortality.DiscussionData on the use of dopamine versus noradrenaline in patientswith septic shock is limited. Following the recent SOAP IIstudy, there is now strong evidence that the use of dopaminein septic shock is associated with significantly morecardiovascular adverse events, compared tonoradrenaline.ConclusionNoradrenaline should be used as the initial vasopressor inseptic shock to avoid the arrhythmic events associatedwith dopamine.

  5. Regulation of nerve-evoked contractions of rabbit vas deferens by acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Audrey; Gabriel, Deborah; McHale, Noel G; Hollywood, Mark A; Thornbury, Keith D; Sergeant, Gerard P

    2015-09-01

    Stimulation of intramural nerves in the vas deferens of many species yields a classical biphasic contraction comprised of an initial fast component, mediated by P2X receptors and a second slower component, mediated by α1-adrenoceptors. It is also recognized that sympathetic nerve-mediated contractions of the vas deferens can be modulated by acetylcholine (Ach), however there is considerable disagreement in the literature regarding the precise contribution of cholinergic nerves to contraction of the vas deferens. In this study we examined the effect of cholinergic modulators on electric field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractions of rabbit vas deferens and on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in isolated vas deferens smooth muscle cells (VDSMC). The sustained component of EFS-evoked contractions was inhibited by atropine and by the selective M3R antagonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP). EFS-evoked contractions were potentiated by Ach, carbachol (Cch), and neostigmine. The sustained phase of the EFS-evoked contraction was inhibited by prazosin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist and guanethidine, an inhibitor of noradrenaline release, even in the continued presence of Ach, Cch or neostigmine. The soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one enhanced the amplitude of EFS-evoked contractions and reduced the inhibitory effects of 4-DAMP. Isolated VDSMC displayed spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations, but did not respond to Cch. However, the α1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, evoked a Ca(2+) transient and contracted the cells. These data suggest that EFS-evoked contractions of the rabbit vas deferens are potentiated by activation of M3 receptors and reduced by activation of a sGC-dependent inhibitory pathway.

  6. Interactions between noradrenaline and corticosteroids in the brain: from electrical activity to cognitive performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krugers, H.J.; Karst, H.; Joëls, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the core reactions in response to a stressful situation is the activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis which increases the release of glucocorticoid hormones from the adrenal glands. In concert with other neuro-modulators, such as (nor)adrenaline, these hormones enable and promo

  7. Lack of uptake, release and action of UTP at sympathetic perivascular nerve terminals in rabbit ear artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïag, B; Shacoori, V; Bodin, P; Catheline, M; Burnstock, G

    1998-10-02

    A possible role of uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) and uridine at sympathetic nerve terminals was studied in the rabbit ear artery after incubation of isolated vessels with [3H]uridine or [3H]noradrenaline. It was found that [3H]uridine was taken up by rabbit ear artery. This uptake was largely suppressed after the removal of endothelium and was inhibited by ethidium bromide and dipyridamole. Chemical denervation of the vessels with 6-hydroxydopamine did not reduce the uptake. Following pre-incubation of the isolated vessels with [3H]uridine, there was a release of radioactivity from the superfused rabbit ear artery. UTP, UDP, UMP and uridine were detected by thin layer chromatography both in the superfusate and inside the vessels. Transmural electric stimulation (30 V, 5 Hz) induced a contraction of the vessels but did not increase the release of uridine nucleotides into the superfusate. [3H]Noradrenaline was released during electric stimulation and the addition of UTP (100 microM) had no effects on this release. To conclude, this study shows that in contrast to endothelial cells, the sympathetic nerve terminals of the rabbit ear artery do not take up uridine and do not release uridine-derived nucleotides. UTP at 100 microM is also unable to modulate the evoked release of noradrenaline. These results mainly confine the role of UTP in endothelium-derived vasodilatation via P2Y2 and/or P2Y4 receptors.

  8. Unimpaired thermogenic response to noradrenaline in genetic (ob/ob) and hypothalamic (MSG) obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duloo, A G; Miller, D S

    1984-04-01

    The thermogenic response to noradrenaline administration was investigated at 25 degrees C in two models of obese mice (genetic ob/ob obesity of the ' QEC ' strain and monosodium-glutamate-induced obesity) and in their respective lean littermates. Subcutaneous injections of a low dose of noradrenaline (100 micrograms/kg body wt.) elevated metabolic rate by about 30% in both obese models but not in their respective lean counterparts. In contrast, the increase in metabolic rate after injections of a high dose of noradrenaline (600 micrograms/kg body wt.) was of a similar magnitude in both lean and obese animals: metabolic rate was increased by 70-80%. These results indicate that the overall whole body thermogenic capacity is unimpaired at room temperature in this ' QEC ' strain of ob/ob mice and in the hypothalamic damaged obese mice. Obesity in these models is therefore not associated with a reduced ability to respond to noradrenaline but could rather be due to a failure to release noradrenaline.

  9. Interactions between noradrenaline and corticosteroids in the brain: from electrical activity to cognitive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmen J Krugers

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the core reactions in response to a stressful situation is the activation of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis which increases the release of glucocorticoid hormones from the adrenal glands. In concert with other neuro-modulators, such as (noradrenaline, these hormones enable and promote cognitive adaptation to stressful events. Recent studies have demonstrated that glucocorticoid hormones and noradrenaline, via their receptors, can both rapidly and persistently regulate the function of excitatory synapses which are critical for storage of information. Here we will review how glucocorticoids and noradrenaline alone and in synergy dynamically tune these synapses in the hippocampus and amygdala, and discuss how these hormones interact to promote behavioral adaptation to stressful situations.

  10. On the release of catecholamines and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase evoked by ouabain in the perfused cat adrenal gland.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, A. G.; Hernandez, M.; Horga, J. F.; Sanchez-Garcia, P.

    1980-01-01

    1 Secretion of catecholamines (CA) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) activity from the retrogradely perfused cat adrenal gland was studied following ouabain infusion. Perfusion with ouabain (10(-4) M) for 10 min caused a gradual release of CA in the effluent which reached its peak 30 min after the ouabain pulse, and was maintained constant for at least 1 h. The effect of ouabain seemed to be irreversible. 2 Mecamylamine, while blocking the CA secretory effects of acetylcholine (ACh) perfusi...

  11. κ-银环蛇毒素敏感的烟碱受体激活引起的去甲肾上腺素释放参与烟碱诱导的长时程增强样反应%Noradrenaline release by activation of κ-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors participates in long-term potentiation-like response inducea by nicotine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余剑平; 何进; 刘丹; 邓春玉; 朱小南; 汪雪兰; 王勇; 陈汝筑

    2007-01-01

    烟碱可以增强学习记忆功能,但其相关机制仍不清楚.海马长时程增强被认为是学习记忆的细胞机制.本研究室以往研究表明,当单脉冲的强度为诱发80%最大群体锋电位时,烟碱(10μmol/L)可以在海马CAI区诱导长时程增强样反应.本文通过细胞外记录离体海马脑片CA1区锥体细胞层群体锋电位,探讨烟碱诱导长时程增强样反应所涉及的烟碱受体亚型与相应的神经递质释放.结果显示,烟碱诱导的长时程增强样反应可以被美加明(mecamylamine,1 μmol/L)或κ-银环蛇毒素(κ-bungarotoxin,0.1μmol/L)阻断,但不被dihydro-β-erythtroidine(DHβE,10μmol/L)阻断.烟碱诱导的长时程增强样反应可以被普萘洛尔(propranolol,10μmol/L)阻断,但不被酚妥拉明(phentolamine,10μmol/L)或阿托品(atropine,10 μmol/L)阻断.以上结果提示,κ-银环蛇毒素敏感的烟碱受体激活引起的去甲肾上腺素释放参与烟碱诱导的海马CA1区长时程增强样反应.%Nicotine enhances the function of learning and memory,but the underlying mechanism still remains unclear.Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP)is assumed to be a cellular mechanism of learning and memory.Our previous experiments showed that with the single pulses evoking 80% of the maximal population spike(PS) amplitude,nicotine(10 μmol/L)induced LTP-like response in the hippocampal CA1 region.In the present study,the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor(nAChR)subtypes and relevant neurotransmitter releases involved in LTP-like response induced by nicotine were investigated by extracellularly recording the PS in the pyramidal cell layer in the hippocampal CA1 region in vitro.LTP-like response induced by nicotine was blocked by mecamylamine(1μmol/L) or κ-bungarotoxin(0.1 μmol/L),but not by dihydro-β-erythtroidine(DHIβE,10 μmol/L).Moreover,it was inhibited by propranolol(10μmol/L),but not by phentolamine(10 μmol/L)or atropine(10 μmol/L).The results suggest that

  12. The noradrenaline-dopamine interaction in the rat medial prefrontal cortex studied by multi-probe microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawahara, H; Kawahara, Y; Westerink, BHC

    2001-01-01

    Multi-probe microdialysis was used to investigate the interaction between the release of noradrenaline and dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex. Retrograde microdialysis was used to stimulate or inhibit the activity of the locus coeruleus for a restricted period of time, and the response of extr

  13. On the mechanism of noradrenaline-induced prostaglandin E2-Synthesis in primary cell cultures from rabbit splenic pulpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner-Schmidt, R; Jackisch, R; Hertting, G

    1981-10-01

    The role of Ca2+ and phospholipase A2 in alpha-adrenoceptor mediated stimulation of prostaglandin (PG)E2-release was investigated in primary cell cultures of rabbit splenic pulpa. Noradrenaline enhanced PGE2-release only in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. In contrast, PGE2-release induced by arachidonic acid was unchanged when Ca2+ was omitted. In the presence of Ca2+, the ionophore A 23187 increased PGE2-release concentration-dependently. During incubation in Ca2+-free medium, the ionophore was ineffective. Inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (mepacrine, p-bromophenacyl bromide) abolished the noradrenaline-induced PGE2-release and reduced the effect of A 23187; the stimulation of PGE2-release by arachidonic acid was not affected. Addition of exogenous phospholipase A2 enhances release of PGE2. From these results we suggest that noradrenaline-induced PGE2-release in rabbit splenic fibroblasts via alpha-adrenoceptors involves the following steps: influx of Ca2+, activation of a Ca2+-dependent phospholipase and liberation of arachidonic acid which is transformed into PGs.

  14. Noradrenaline: Central inhibitory control of blood pressure and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Wybren de

    Noradrenaline injected bilaterally into the brainstem in the area of the nucleus tractus solitarii decreased systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate of anesthetized rats. The effect of noradrenaline was prevented by a preceding injection of the α-adrenergic blocking agent phentolamine, at

  15. Noradrenaline: Central inhibitory control of blood pressure and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Wybren de

    1974-01-01

    Noradrenaline injected bilaterally into the brainstem in the area of the nucleus tractus solitarii decreased systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate of anesthetized rats. The effect of noradrenaline was prevented by a preceding injection of the α-adrenergic blocking agent phentolamine, at th

  16. Distinct effects of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors milnacipran and venlafaxine on rat pineal monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Kuwagata, Makiko; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-06-17

    Monoamine systems are involved in the pathology and therapeutic mechanism of depression. The pineal gland contains large amounts of serotonin as a precursor for melatonin, and its activity is controlled by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves. Pineal diurnal activity and its release of melatonin are relevant to aberrant states observed in depression. We investigated the effects on pineal monoamines of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, which are widely used antidepressants. Four days of milnacipran treatment led to an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin levels, whereas 4 days of venlafaxine treatment reduced 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels; both agents induced an increase in dopamine levels. Our data suggest that milnacipran increases levels of the precursor for melatonin synthesis by facilitating the noradrenergic regulation of pineal activity and that venlafaxine inhibits serotonin reuptake into noradrenergic terminals on the pineal gland.

  17. Effect of noradrenaline on tail arteries of SHR and WKY under perfusion at constant flow and constant pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Tarasova, Olga S; Timin, Eugeny N;

    1997-01-01

    pressure. Two series of experiments were performed. In the first series, vessels were perfused/superfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. In the second one a modified salt solution was used, in which NaCl was totally replaced by an equimolar amount of KCI. Under constant flow conditions noradrenaline evoked......, vasoconstriction at constant pressure in SHR became more pronounced than that in WKY. We suggest that there is greater wall thickness:lumen diameter ratio in SHR vessels and thus different contribution of distension-activated myogenic response is of primary importance for the data obtained....... a more prominent resistance increase in SHR compared with WKY independently of the composition of solution (normal or high-K+) used. At constant pressure perfusion with normal solution, the vasoconstrictor response to noradrenaline was more prominent in WKY. Under application of high-K+ solution...

  18. Stimulation of prostaglandin E2-synthesis by noradrenaline in primary cell cultures from rabbit splenic pulpa is mediated by atypical alpha-adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner-Schmidt, R; Jackisch, R; Hertting, G

    1981-02-01

    In primary cell cultures originating from rabbit splenic pulpa the effects of various adrenoceptor agonists on prostaglandin (PG)-synthesis were studied. The cells - microscopically identified as fibroblasts - released PGs into the medium: especially PGE2 besides small amounts of PGF2alpha and PGD2. Noradrenaline increased dose-dependently the amount of PGs released into the medium. Besides noradrenaline, only the catecholamines adrenaline and alpha-methylnoradrenaline strongly activated PG-synthesis. Other alpha-adrenoceptor agonists like the phenylethylamine and imidazoline derivatives were only weak agonists or completely ineffective. All adrenoceptor agonists without intrinsic activity in these cells antagonized the noradrenaline effect on PG-synthesis, the imidazolines being more potent antagonists than the phenylethylamines. The beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline stimulated PG-synthesis at high concentration only. The effects of both noradrenaline and isoprenaline were inhibited by low concentrations of phentolamine phenoxybenzamine, but not by propranolol. The preferential alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists yohimbine and rauwolscine were about 50 times more potent in blocking the noradrenaline effect on PG-synthesis than the more alpha1-specific antagonist corynanthine. However, prazosin, another alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, was about equipotent with yohimbine. It is concluded that noradrenaline elicits PG-synthesis in rabbit splenic fibroblasts via alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The alpha-adrenoceptor involved has properties which are different from those reported so far for alpha1- or alpha2-adrenoceptors.

  19. Prejunctional inhibition of sympathetically evoked pupillary dilation in cats by activation of histamine H3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, M C; Hey, J A

    1993-08-01

    Frequency-dependent pupillary dilations were evoked by electrical stimulation of the pre- or post-ganglionic cervical sympathetic nerve (sympatho-excitation) or the hypothalamus (parasympatho-inhibition) in sympathectomized anesthetized cats. Systemic administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) produced a dose-dependent depression of mydriasis due to direct neural sympathetic activation but had no effect on responses elicited by parasympathetic withdrawal. The histamine H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, was inactive. R alpha MeHA was much more effective in depressing sympathetic responses obtained at lower frequencies when compared to higher frequencies of stimulation. Responses evoked both pre- and postganglionically were inhibited by R alpha MeHA. This peripheral sympatho-inhibitory action of R alpha MeHA was antagonized by the histamine H3 receptor blocker thioperamide but not by intravenous pretreatment with the histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine. Histamine H2 receptor blockers cimetidine and ranitidine were also without effect. R alpha MeHA did not depress pupillary responses elicited by i.v. (-)-adrenaline. The results demonstrate that histamine H3 receptors modulate sympathetic activation of the iris at a site proximal to the iris dilator muscle. The predominant mechanism of action appears to the prejunctional inhibition of noradrenaline release from postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings. However, a concomitant ganglionic inhibitory action cannot be excluded.

  20. Noradrenalin and dopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu eNomura

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cerebral cortex, whereas the cortical distribution ofdopaminergic fibers is more restricted. However, the relative functional impact ofnoradrenalin and dopamine receptors in various cortical regions is largely unknown. Using aspecific genetic label, we first confirmed that noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cortexwhereas dopaminergic fibers were present in all layers of restricted medial and lateral areasbut only in deep layers of other areas. Imaging of a genetically-encoded sensor revealed thatnoradrenalin and dopamine widely activate PKA in cortical pyramidal neurons of frontal,parietal and occipital regions with scarce dopaminergic fibers. Responses to noradrenalin hadhigher amplitude, velocity and occurred at more than 10 fold lower dose than those elicited bydopamine, whose amplitude and velocity increased along the antero-posterior axis. Thepharmacology of these responses was consistent with the involvement of Gs-coupled beta1adrenergic and D1/D5 dopaminergic receptors, but the inhibition of both noradrenalin anddopamine responses by beta adrenergic antagonists was suggestive of the existence of beta1-D1/D5 heteromeric receptors. Responses also involved Gi-coupled alpha2 adrenergic and D2-like dopaminergic receptors that markedly reduced their amplitude and velocity andcontributed to their cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Our results reveal that noradrenalin anddopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex withmoderate regional and laminar differences. These receptors can thus mediate widespreadeffects of both catecholamines, which are reportedly co-released by cortical noradrenergicfibers beyond the territory of dopaminergic fibers.

  1. Plasma clearance of noradrenaline does not change with age in normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J; Larsen, S

    1985-01-01

    Noradrenaline kinetics (plasma concentrations, plasma clearance and appearance rates) were investigated in seven elderly healthy subjects and in six young healthy subjects. Forearm venous plasma noradrenaline concentrations were higher in the elderly subjects compared with the young subjects. Pla....... Plasma clearance of noradrenaline was identical in the two groups. The increase in plasma noradrenaline concentration, with age, probably reflects an increased sympathetic nervous activity....

  2. Noradrenaline blockade specifically enhances metacognitive performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Tobias U; Allen, Micah; Purg, Nina; Moutoussis, Michael; Rees, Geraint; Dolan, Raymond J

    2017-01-01

    Impairments in metacognition, the ability to accurately report one’s performance, are common in patients with psychiatric disorders, where a putative neuromodulatory dysregulation provides the rationale for pharmacological interventions. Previously, we have shown how unexpected arousal modulates metacognition (Allen et al., 2016). Here, we report a double-blind, placebo-controlled, study that examined specific effects of noradrenaline and dopamine on both metacognition and perceptual decision making. Signal theoretic analysis of a global motion discrimination task with adaptive performance staircasing revealed that noradrenergic blockade (40 mg propranolol) significantly increased metacognitive performance (type-II area under the curve, AUROC2), but had no impact on perceptual decision making performance. Blockade of dopamine D2/3 receptors (400 mg amisulpride) had no effect on either metacognition or perceptual decision making. Our study is the first to show a pharmacological enhancement of metacognitive performance, in the absence of any effect on perceptual decision making. This enhancement points to a regulatory role for noradrenergic neurotransmission in perceptual metacognition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24901.001 PMID:28489001

  3. The Novel Pyrrolidine Nor-Lobelane Analog UKCP-110 [cis-2,5-di-(2-phenethyl)-pyrrolidine hydrochloride] Inhibits VMAT2 Function, Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine Release, and Methamphetamine Self-Administration in RatsS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Joshua S.; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Nickell, Justin R.; Horton, David B.; Denehy, Emily D.; Vartak, Ashish; Crooks, Peter A.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Both lobeline and lobelane attenuate methamphetamine self-administration in rats by decreasing methamphetamine-induced dopamine release via interaction with vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2). A novel derivative of nor-lobelane, cis-2,5-di-(2-phenethyl)-pyrrolidine hydrochloride (UKCP-110), and its trans-isomers, (2R,5R)-trans-di-(2-phenethyl)-pyrrolidine hydrochloride (UKCP-111) and (2S,5S)-trans-di-(2-phenethyl)-pyrrolidine hydrochloride (UKCP-112), were evaluated for inhibition of [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding and [3H]dopamine uptake by using a rat synaptic vesicle preparation to assess VMAT2 interaction. Compounds were evaluated for inhibition of [3H]nicotine and [3H]methyllycaconitine binding to assess interaction with the major nicotinic receptor subtypes. In addition, compounds were evaluated for inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked endogenous dopamine release by using striatal slices. The most promising compound, UKCP-110, was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine discriminative stimulus cues and for its effect on food-maintained operant responding. UKCP-110, UKCP-111, and UKCP-112 inhibited [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding (Ki = 2.66 ± 0.37, 1.05 ± 0.10, and 3.80 ± 0.31 μM, respectively) and had high potency inhibiting [3H]dopamine uptake (Ki = 0.028 ± 0.001, 0.046 ± 0.008, 0.043 ± 0.004 μM, respectively), but lacked affinity at nicotinic receptors. Although the trans-isomers did not alter methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release, UKCP-110 inhibited (IC50 = 1.8 ± 0.2 μM; Imax = 67.18 ± 6.11 μM) methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release. At high concentrations, UKCP-110 also increased extracellular dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. It is noteworthy that UKCP-110 decreased the number of methamphetamine self-infusions, while having no effect on food-reinforced behavior or the methamphetamine stimulus cue. Thus, UKCP-110 represents a new lead in the development of novel pharmacotherapies for

  4. The novel pyrrolidine nor-lobelane analog UKCP-110 [cis-2,5-di-(2-phenethyl)-pyrrolidine hydrochloride] inhibits VMAT2 function, methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release, and methamphetamine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Joshua S; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Nickell, Justin R; Horton, David B; Denehy, Emily D; Vartak, Ashish; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P; Bardo, Michael T

    2010-12-01

    Both lobeline and lobelane attenuate methamphetamine self-administration in rats by decreasing methamphetamine-induced dopamine release via interaction with vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2). A novel derivative of nor-lobelane, cis-2,5-di-(2-phenethyl)-pyrrolidine hydrochloride (UKCP-110), and its trans-isomers, (2R,5R)-trans-di-(2-phenethyl)-pyrrolidine hydrochloride (UKCP-111) and (2S,5S)-trans-di-(2-phenethyl)-pyrrolidine hydrochloride (UKCP-112), were evaluated for inhibition of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake by using a rat synaptic vesicle preparation to assess VMAT2 interaction. Compounds were evaluated for inhibition of [(3)H]nicotine and [(3)H]methyllycaconitine binding to assess interaction with the major nicotinic receptor subtypes. In addition, compounds were evaluated for inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked endogenous dopamine release by using striatal slices. The most promising compound, UKCP-110, was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine discriminative stimulus cues and for its effect on food-maintained operant responding. UKCP-110, UKCP-111, and UKCP-112 inhibited [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding (K(i) = 2.66 ± 0.37, 1.05 ± 0.10, and 3.80 ± 0.31 μM, respectively) and had high potency inhibiting [(3)H]dopamine uptake (K(i) = 0.028 ± 0.001, 0.046 ± 0.008, 0.043 ± 0.004 μM, respectively), but lacked affinity at nicotinic receptors. Although the trans-isomers did not alter methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release, UKCP-110 inhibited (IC(50) = 1.8 ± 0.2 μM; I(max) = 67.18 ± 6.11 μM) methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release. At high concentrations, UKCP-110 also increased extracellular dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. It is noteworthy that UKCP-110 decreased the number of methamphetamine self-infusions, while having no effect on food-reinforced behavior or the methamphetamine stimulus cue. Thus, UKCP-110 represents a new lead in the development of novel

  5. Sodium-dependent inhibition by PN200-110 enantiomers of nicotinic adrenal catecholamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, A. M.; Montiel, C.; Artalejo, A. R.; Sánchez-García, P.; García, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    1. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) or high K concentrations evoke catecholamine release from perfused cat adrenal glands; in both cases the secretory response was significantly enhanced in the absence of Na. Tetrodotoxin did not modify the nicotinic secretory response. 2. The (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of the dihydropyridine Ca channel blocker PN200-110 show a high degree of stereoselectivity in the inhibition of catecholamine secretion evoked by high K or by DMPP in the presence of Na, the (+)-enantiomer being 57 and 80 times more potent, respectively, than the (-)-enantiomer. Both, noradrenaline and adrenaline release were equally depressed by PN200-110. 3. The IC50 values for (+)- and (-)-PN200-110 for blockade of the secretory response induced by K or DMPP in the presence of Na are in the same range. In the absence of Na, (-)-PN200-110 did not affect DMPP-evoked secretion; however, the (+)-enantiomer partially inhibited it. 4. The results suggest that the physiological catecholamine release from chromaffin cells is preceded by Na entry through the nicotinic receptor-associated ionophore; this causes cell depolarization, opening of voltage-dependent, dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca channels and Ca entry into the cell. In the absence of Na, additional Ca influx through an alternative pathway (the nicotinic cholinoceptor ionophore?) might also activate secretion. PMID:2975522

  6. Activation of histamine H3 receptors produces presynaptic inhibition of neurally evoked cat nictitating membrane responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, M C; Hey, J A

    1992-08-01

    This study was undertaken in order to determine the potential role of prejunctional histamine H3 receptors in an in vivo adrenergic model system. Frequency-dependent nictitating membrane responses were elicited by sympathetic nerve stimulation in anesthetized cats. Systemic administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) produced a dose-related depression of amplitude of the evoked nictitating membrane responses with a threshold of about 10 micrograms/kg and maximal effect (50% depression at the lowest frequency; 0.5 Hz) seen at 100-300 micrograms/kg. Responses obtained with low frequency stimulation were more sensitive to depression by R alpha MeHA than were responses evoked with higher frequencies of stimulation. Larger doses of R alpha MeHA given to the same animals, failed to produce additional inhibition. R alpha MeHA depressed the amplitude of nictitating membrane responses evoked by either pre- or postganglionic nerve stimulation to an equivalent degree. This depressant action of R alpha MeHA was antagonized by pretreatment with the specific histamine H3 antagonist, thioperamide (3 mg/kg), but not by combined pretreatment with histamine H1 and H2 blockers chlorpheniramine (300 micrograms/kg) and cimetidine (5 mg/kg). Intravenous administration of adrenaline (1-30 micrograms/kg) also produced graded nictitating membrane responses that were not altered by subsequent administration of R alpha MeHA. These results suggest that histamine H3 receptors are involved in the modulation of neurally evoked noradrenaline release in the cat nictitating membrane by an inhibitory presynaptic action.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Adrenergic drugs modify the level of noradrenaline in the insular cortex and alter extinction of conditioned taste aversion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresquet, Nadine; Angst, Marie-Josée; Schleef, Carmen; Gobaille, Serge; Sandner, Guy

    2007-03-12

    We compared the effect of conditioned taste aversion in rats by measuring the amount of sucrose that they drunk after conditioning, which differed according to whether rats had drunk the sucrose freely (SD: self drinking) during the conditioning session, or had been forced to drink it (IO: intra-oral administration through a chronically implanted cannula). The SD procedure delayed the extinction of conditioned taste aversion. Enhanced arousal, alertness, awareness or attention in the SD condition may have strengthened the memory of the taste. Brain noradrenergic networks are involved in such processes. We administered two noradrenergic drugs that produce opposite effects on noradrenaline release in the brain, methoxy-idazoxan, RX821002 (1mg/kg, i.p.), and guanfacine (0.12mg/kg, i.p.). We evaluated their effect (i) on the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex using microdialysis, (ii) on glycaemia that is an essential factor of taste learning and (iii) on the comparative SD versus IO conditioned taste aversion protocol mentioned above. Injecting RX821001 increased the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex up to two-fold of the baseline. This effect lasted 1h. The same dose of RX821002 did not elicit any alteration of glycaemia. It enhanced extinction of conditioned taste aversion in the SD group of rats. Injecting 0.12mg/kg of guanfacine produced the opposite effect. The noradrenaline level of the gustatory cortex decreased, but only down to 20% of the baseline. This decrease lasted 2h. Guanfacine increased glycaemia. Extinction of conditioned taste aversion was only marginally decreased by guanfacine in the SD group of rats. These results fit with Aston-Jones' point of view that the role of the noradrenergic coeruleo-cortical system may be to enhance arousal, alertness, awareness or attention to an event by a transient increase of cortical noradrenaline.

  8. Subcellular fractionation on Percoll gradient of mossy fiber synaptosomes: evoked release of glutamate, GABA, aspartate and glutamate decarboxylase activity in control and degranulated rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, P; Ben-Ari, Y; Roisin, M P

    1994-05-02

    Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation in isotonic Percoll sucrose, we have characterized two subcellular fractions (PII and PIII) enriched in mossy fiber synaptosomes and two others (SII and SIII) enriched in small synaptosomes. These synaptosomal fractions were compared with those obtained from adult hippocampus irradiated at neonatal stage to destroy granule cells and their mossy fibers. Synaptosomes were viable as judged by their ability to release aspartate, glutamate and GABA upon K+ depolarization. After irradiation, compared to the control values, the release of glutamate and GABA was decreased by 57 and 74% in the PIII fraction, but not in the other fractions and the content of glutamate, aspartate and GABA was also decreased in PIII fraction by 62, 44 and 52% respectively. These results suggest that mossy fiber (MF) synaptosomes contain and release glutamate and GABA. Measurement of the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase, exhibited no significant difference after irradiation, suggesting that GABA is not synthesized by this enzyme in mossy fibers.

  9. Electrochemically triggered release of acetylcholine from scCO2 impregnated conductive polymer films evokes intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in neurotypic SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Susanne; Seyock, Silke; Nybom, Rolf; Jacobson, Gunilla B; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2016-12-10

    Implantable devices for electronically triggered drug release are attractive to achieve spatial and temporal control over drug concentrations in patients. Realization of such devices is, however, associated with technical and biological challenges. Among these are containment of drug reservoirs, lack of precise control cues, as well as the charge and size of the drug. Here, we present a method for electronically triggered release of the quaternary ammonium cation acetylcholine (ACh) from an impregnated conductive polymer film. Using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), a film of PEDOT/PSS (poly(3,4)-ethylenedioxythiophene doped with poly(styrenesulfonate)) is impregnated with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. The gentle scCO2 process generated a dry, drug-impregnated surface, well suited for interaction with biological material, while maintaining normal electrochemical properties of the polymer. Electrochemical switching of impregnated PEDOT/PSS films stimulated release of ACh from the polymer matrix, likely due to swelling mediated by the influx and efflux of charged and solvated ions. Triggered release of ACh did not affect the biological activity of the drug. This was shown by real-time monitoring of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in neurotypic cells growing on the impregnated polymer surface. Collectively, scCO2 impregnation of conducting polymers offers the first one-step, dopant-independent drug impregnation process, potentially facilitating loading of both anionic and cationic drugs that can be dissolved in scCO2 on its own or by using a co-solvent. We foresee that scCO2-loaded devices for electronically triggered drug release will create novel opportunities when generating active bio-coatings, tunable for specific needs, in a variety of medical settings.

  10. Activity-dependent release of endogenous BDNF from mossy fibers evokes a TRPC3 current and Ca2+ elevations in CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Calfa, Gaston; Inoue, Takafumi; Amaral, Michelle D; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2010-05-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of neuronal structure and function in the hippocampus. However, the majority of studies to date have relied on the application of recombinant BDNF. We herein report that endogenous BDNF, released via theta burst stimulation of mossy fibers (MF), elicits a slowly developing cationic current and intracellular Ca(2+) elevations in CA3 pyramidal neurons with the same pharmacological profile of the transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3)-mediated I(BDNF) activated in CA1 neurons by brief localized applications of recombinant BDNF. Indeed, sensitivity to both the extracellular BDNF scavenger tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB)-IgG and small hairpin interference RNA-mediated TRPC3 channel knockdown confirms the identity of this conductance as such, henceforth-denoted MF-I(BDNF). Consistent with such activity-dependent release of BDNF, these MF-I(BDNF) responses were insensitive to manipulations of extracellular Zn(2+) concentration. Brief theta burst stimulation of MFs induced a long-lasting depression in the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) mediated by both AMPA and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors without changes in the NMDA receptor/AMPA receptor ratio, suggesting a reduction in neurotransmitter release. This depression of NMDAR-mediated EPSCs required activity-dependent release of endogenous BDNF from MFs and activation of Trk receptors, as it was sensitive to the extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-IgG and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor k-252b. These results uncovered the most immediate response to endogenously released--native--BDNF in hippocampal neurons and lend further credence to the relevance of BDNF signaling for synaptic function in the hippocampus.

  11. Activity-Dependent Release of Endogenous BDNF From Mossy Fibers Evokes a TRPC3 Current and Ca2+ Elevations in CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Yong LI; Calfa, Gaston; Inoue, Takafumi; Amaral, Michelle D.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of neuronal structure and function in the hippocampus. However, the majority of studies to date have relied on the application of recombinant BDNF. We herein report that endogenous BDNF, released via theta burst stimulation of mossy fibers (MF), elicits a slowly developing cationic current and intracellular Ca2+ elevations in CA3 pyramidal neurons with the same pharmacological profile of the...

  12. Adrenaline but not noradrenaline is a determinant of exercise-induced lipid mobilization in human subcutaneous adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Glisezinski, I; Larrouy, D; Bajzova, M

    2009-01-01

    The relative contribution of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) and adrenaline (epinephrine) in the control of lipid mobilization in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) during exercise was evaluated in men treated with a somatostatin analogue, octreotide. Eight lean and eight obese young men matched...... of octreotide suppressed plasma insulin and growth hormone levels at rest and during exercise. It blocked the exercise-induced increase in plasma adrenaline while that of noradrenaline was unchanged. Plasma natriuretic peptides (NPs) level was higher at rest and during exercise under octreotide infusion in lean...... contributing to exercise-induced lipolysis in SCAT. Moreover, it is the combined action of insulin suppression and NPs release which explains the lipolytic response which remains under octreotide after full local blockade of fat cell adrenergic receptors. For the moment, it is unknown if results apply...

  13. An examination of the 5-HT3 receptor mediating contraction and evoked [3H]-acetylcholine release in the guinea-pig ileum.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, A; Morton, I. K.

    1990-01-01

    1. The relative contributions of two classes of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor (5-HT2 and 5-HT3) to the contractile action of 5-HT, 2-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (2-methyl-5-HT) and alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (alpha-methyl-5-HT) were studied in the guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strip (LMMP) preparation. Contractility studies were combined with an analysis of the effects of the three agonists on [3H]-acetylcholine ([3H]-ACh) release from preparations preincuba...

  14. Single versus multiple impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: an ¹¹C-raclopride positron emission tomography study of reward cue-evoked striatal dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kit; Politis, Marios; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Lawrence, Andrew D; Warsi, Sarah; Bose, Subrata; Lees, Andrew J; Piccini, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are reported in Parkinson's disease (PD) in association with dopaminergic treatment. Approximately 25 % of patients with ICDs have multiple co-occurring ICDs (i.e. more than one diagnosed ICD). The extent to which dopaminergic neurotransmission in PD patients with multiple ICDs differs from those with only one diagnosed ICD is unknown. The aims of this study are: (1) to investigate dopamine neurotransmission in PD patients diagnosed with multiple ICDs, single ICDs and non-ICD controls in response to reward-related visual cues using positron emission tomography with (11)C-raclopride. (2) to compare clinical features of the above three groups. PD individuals with mulitple ICDs (n = 10), single ICD (n = 7) and no ICDs (n = 9) were recruited and underwent two positron emission tomography (PET) scans with (11)C-raclopride: one where they viewed neutral visual cues and the other where they viewed a range of visual cues related to different rewards. Individuals with both multiple ICDs and single ICDs showed significantly greater ventral striatal dopamine release compared to non-ICD PD individuals in response to reward cues, but the two ICD groups did not differ from each other in the extent of dopamine release. Subjects with multiple ICDs were, however, significantly more depressed, and had higher levels of impulsive sensation-seeking compared to subjects with single ICDs and without ICDs. This is the first study to compare dopamine neurotransmission using PET neuroimaging in PD subjects with multiple vs. single ICDs. Our results suggest that striatal dopamine neurotransmission is not directly related to the co-occurrence of ICDs in PD, potentially implicating non-dopaminergic mechanisms linked to depression; and suggest that physicians should be vigilant in managing depression in PD patients with ICDs.

  15. Enduring, Handling-Evoked Enhancement of Hippocampal Memory Function and Glucocorticoid Receptor Expression Involves Activation of the Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type 1 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoglio, Kristina A.; Brunson, Kristen L.; Avishai-Eliner, Sarit; Stone, Blake A.; Kapadia, Bhumika J.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2011-01-01

    Early-life experience, including maternal care, influences hippocampus-dependent learning and memory throughout life. Handling of pups during postnatal d 2–9 (P2–9) stimulates maternal care and leads to improved memory function and stress-coping. The underlying molecular mechanisms may involve early (by P9) and enduring reduction of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) expression and subsequent (by P45) increase in hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. However, whether hypothalamic CRF levels influence changes in hippocampal GR expression (and memory function), via reduced CRF receptor activation and consequent lower plasma glucocorticoid levels, is unclear. In this study we administered selective antagonist for the type 1 CRF receptor, NBI 30775, to nonhandled rats post hoc from P10–17 and examined hippocampus-dependent learning and memory later (on P50–70), using two independent paradigms, compared with naive and vehicle-treated nonhandled, and naive and antagonist-treated handled rats. Hippocampal GR and hypothalamic CRF mRNA levels and stress-induced plasma corticosterone levels were also examined. Transient, partial selective blockade of CRF1 in nonhandled rats improved memory functions on both the Morris watermaze and object recognition tests to levels significantly better than in naive and vehicle-treated controls and were indistinguishable from those in handled (naive, vehicle-treated, and antagonist-treated) rats. GR mRNA expression was increased in hippocampal CA1 and the dentate gyrus of CRF1-antagonist treated nonhandled rats to levels commensurate with those in handled cohorts. Thus, the extent of CRF1 activation, probably involving changes in hypothalamic CRF levels and release, contributes to the changes in hippocampal GR expression and learning and memory functions. PMID:15932935

  16. [Effect of nonachlazine on the processes of uptake and release of nordrenaline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaverina, N V; Arefolov, V A; Grigor'eva, E K; Panasiuk, L V

    1976-01-01

    Nonachlazine (2 micrometer) blocked significantly the uptake 1 of endogenic noradrenaline in the myocardial tissues and in adrenergic neurons of vas deferens. The uptake II, as well as the intensity and dynamics of the noradrenaline release were not affected by nonachlazine. These processes resulted in an increase of free noradrenaline concentrations in the synaptic space. The latter seems to be a result of the mediator's passage into the nerve fibers (through axonal membranes) and into the granule, this being due to the nonachlazine-induced block. It is suggested that the metabolic and functional nonachlazine effects are related to the beta-adrenergic receptors stimulation, mediated through the agency of noradrenaline.

  17. Effect of Noradrenaline on the Virulence Properties of Campylobacter Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sree V. Aroori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter species cause a spectrum of illnesses in humans. The type of illness and the outcome is dependent on the virulence of the infecting pathogen strain and host immune status. Acute stress can seriously compromise host immunity and increase susceptibility to infection. Noradrenaline (NA is a stress hormone. Several studies have shown that it stimulated growth and increased the pathogenicity of organisms including E. coli and Campylobacter jejuni. However, the effect of NA on other Campylobacter species is unknown. We have examined the effect of NA on growth rate, motility, invasion of T84 epithelial cells, and colonisation of chickens by diverse Campylobacter species. Campylobacter cultures grown with NA had reduced lag phases, increased growth rates, and higher final optical densities than controls. The motility of Campylobacter was also significantly increased in the presence of noradrenaline. Some of the Campylobacter strains tested also showed increased invasion of T84 epithelial cells, greater breakdown of tight junctions, and an enhanced potential to colonise chickens. Our results show that noradrenaline-induced enhancement of virulence of Campylobacter can influence the outcome of infection.

  18. Copper Induces Vasorelaxation and Antagonizes Noradrenaline -Induced Vasoconstriction in Rat Mesenteric Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Copper is an essential trace element for normal cellular function and contributes to critical physiological or pathological processes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of copper on vascular tone of rat mesenteric artery and compare the effects of copper on noradrenaline (NA and high K+ induced vasoconstriction. Methods: The rat mesenteric arteries were isolated and the vessel tone was measured by using multi wire myograph system in vitro. Blood pressure of carotid artery in rabbits was measured by using physiological data acquisition and analysis system in vivo. Results: Copper dose-dependently blunted NA-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. Copper-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited when the vessels were pretreated with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. Copper did not blunt high K+-induced vasoconstriction. Copper preincubation inhibited NA-evoked vasoconstriction and the inhibition was not affected by the presence of L-NAME. Copper preincubation showed no effect on high K+-evoked vasoconstriction. Copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (DTC antagonized the vasoactivity induced by copper in rat mesenteric artery. In vivo experiments showed that copper injection (iv significantly decreased blood pressure of rabbits and NA or DTC injection (iv did not rescue the copper-induced hypotension and animal death. Conclusion: Copper blunted NA but not high K+-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. The acute effect of copper on NA-induced vasoconstriction was depended on nitric oxide (NO, but the effect of copper pretreatment on NA-induced vasoconstriction was independed on NO, suggesting that copper affected NA-induced vasoconstriction by two distinct mechanisms.

  19. Tritium excretion after intravenous administration of tritium labelled adrenaline and noradrenaline and digital vascular reactivity to adrenaline and noradrenaline in normotensive and labile hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guia, D; Mendlowitz, M; Vlachakis, N D; Gitlow, S E; Nissenbaum, M

    1980-01-01

    1. The 24-h urinary excretion of tritium after tritiated adrenaline administration and digital vascular reactivity to exogenously administered adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured in ten normotensive and in twenty-eight labile essential hypertensive subjects. Tritiated noradrenaline excretion and apparent noradrenaline secretion rate were also measured in ten and eleven of these subjects, respectively. 2. Despite overlapping, the mean 24-h tritium excretion after 3H-adrenaline administration as well as reactivity to adrenaline were significantly greater in the hypertensive than in the normotensive subjects, whether or not they had increased responsiveness to noradrenaline. Significant correlation, however, was observed between tritium excretion of adrenaline and reactivity to adrenaline in both labile hypertensive and normotensive subjects. These measurements were also both significantly correlated with percentage variability in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the labile hypertensive subjects. 3. No significant correlation was observed between adrenaline as against noradrenaline measurements, whether physiological or biochemical, in either hypertensive or normotensive subjects.

  20. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef;

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...

  1. Complement selectively elicits glutamate release from nerve endings in different regions of mammal central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merega, Elisa; Di Prisco, Silvia; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Severi, Paolo; Pittaluga, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Our study was aimed at investigating whether complement, a complex of soluble and membrane-associated serum proteins, could, in addition to its well-documented post-synaptic activity, also pre-synaptically affect the release of classic neurotransmitters in central nervous system (CNS). Complement (dilution 1 : 10 to 1 : 10000) elicited the release of preloaded [(3) H]-d-aspartate ([(3) H]d-ASP) and endogenous glutamate from mouse cortical synaptosomes in a dilution-dependent manner. It also evoked [(3) H]d-ASP release from mouse hippocampal, cerebellar, and spinal cord synaptosomes, as well as from rat and human cortical nerve endings, but left unaltered the release of GABA, [(3) H]noradrenaline or [(3) H]acetylcholine. Lowering external Na(+) (from 140 to 40 mM) or Ca(2+) (from 1.2 to 0.1 mM) ions prevented the 1 : 300 complement-evoked [(3) H]d-ASP release from mouse cortical synaptosomes. Complement-induced releasing effect was unaltered in synaptosomes entrapped with the Ca(2+) ions chelator 1,2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N', tetra-acetic acid or with pertussis toxin. Nifedipine,/ω-conotoxin GVIA/ω-conotoxin MVIIC mixture as well as the vesicular ATPase blocker bafilomycin A1 were also inefficacious. The excitatory amino acid transporter blocker DL-threo-ß-benzyloxyaspartic acid, on the contrary, reduced the complement-evoked releasing effect in a concentration-dependent manner. We concluded that complement-induced releasing activity is restricted to glutamatergic nerve endings, where it was accounted for by carrier-mediated release. Our observations afford new insights into the molecular events accounting for immune and CNS crosstalk. We investigated whether complement, a complex of soluble and membrane-associated serum proteins, could pre-synaptically affect the release of classic neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our data provide evidence that complement-induced releasing activity is restricted to glutamatergic nerve endings

  2. Noradrenaline and isoproterenol kinetics in diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J

    1986-01-01

    Noradrenaline and isoproterenol kinetics using intravenous infusion of L-3H-NA and of 3H-isoproterenol were investigated in eight Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients without neuropathy and in eight Type 1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy matched for age, sex and duration...... of diabetes. Resting plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations were reduced in patients with autonomic failure (p less than 0.05). The metabolic clearance rate of noradrenaline was similar in both groups of patients, and the appearance rate of noradrenaline in plasma was reduced in patients...

  3. Role of glycogenolysis in memory and learning: regulation by noradrenaline, serotonin and ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Elizabeth Gibbs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role played by glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis and glycogen re-synthesis in memory processing in two different chick brain regions, (1 the hippocampus and (2 the avian equivalent of the mammalian cortex, the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM. Memory processing is regulated by the neuromodulators noradrenaline and serotonin soon after training and glycogen breakdown and re-synthesis are involved. In day-old domestic chicks, memory formation is dependent on the breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis at three specific times during the first 60 min after learning (around 2.5, 30 and 55 min. The chicks learn to discriminate in a single trial between beads of two colours and tastes. Inhibition of glycogen breakdown by the inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB given at specific times prior to the formation of long-term memory prevents memory forming. Noradrenergic stimulation of cultured chicken astrocytes by a selective β2-adrenergic (AR agonist reduces glycogen levels and we believe that in vivo this triggers memory consolidation at the second stage of glycogenolysis. Serotonin acting at 5-HT2B receptors acts on the first stage, but not on the second. We have shown that noradrenaline, acting via post-synaptic α2-ARs, is also responsible for the synthesis of glycogen and our experiments suggest that there is a readily accessible labile pool of glycogen in astrocytes which is depleted within 10 min if glycogen synthesis is inhibited. Endogenous ATP promotion of memory consolidation at 2.5 and 30 min is also dependent on glycogen breakdown. ATP acts at P2Y1 receptors and the action of thrombin suggests that it causes the release of internal calcium ([Ca2+]i] in astrocytes. Glutamate and GABA, the primary neurotransmitters in the brain, cannot be synthesized in neurons de novo. Neurons rely on astrocytic glutamate synthesis, requiring glycogenolysis.

  4. Role of Glycogenolysis in Memory and Learning: Regulation by Noradrenaline, Serotonin and ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Marie E

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the role played by glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis) and glycogen re-synthesis in memory processing in two different chick brain regions, (1) the hippocampus and (2) the avian equivalent of the mammalian cortex, the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM). Memory processing is regulated by the neuromodulators noradrenaline and serotonin soon after training glycogen breakdown and re-synthesis. In day-old domestic chicks, memory formation is dependent on the breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) at three specific times during the first 60 min after learning (around 2.5, 30, and 55 min). The chicks learn to discriminate in a single trial between beads of two colors and tastes. Inhibition of glycogen breakdown by the inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) given at specific times prior to the formation of long-term memory prevents memory forming. Noradrenergic stimulation of cultured chicken astrocytes by a selective β2-adrenergic (AR) agonist reduces glycogen levels and we believe that in vivo this triggers memory consolidation at the second stage of glycogenolysis. Serotonin acting at 5-HT2B receptors acts on the first stage, but not on the second. We have shown that noradrenaline, acting via post-synaptic α2-ARs, is also responsible for the synthesis of glycogen and our experiments suggest that there is a readily accessible labile pool of glycogen in astrocytes which is depleted within 10 min if glycogen synthesis is inhibited. Endogenous ATP promotion of memory consolidation at 2.5 and 30 min is also dependent on glycogen breakdown. ATP acts at P2Y1 receptors and the action of thrombin suggests that it causes the release of internal calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) in astrocytes. Glutamate and GABA, the primary neurotransmitters in the brain, cannot be synthesized in neurons de novo and neurons rely on astrocytic glutamate synthesis, requiring glycogenolysis.

  5. Inhibitory action of niflumic acid on noradrenaline- and 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced pressor responses in the isolated mesenteric vascular bed of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criddle, D N; de Moura, R S; Greenwood, I A; Large, W A

    1997-03-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-activated chloride currents, were compared with the actions of the calcium channel blocker nifedipine on noradrenaline- and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced pressor responses of the rat perfused isolated mesenteric vascular bed. 2. Bolus injections of noradrenaline (1 and 10 nmol) increased the perfusion pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Nifedipine (1 microM) inhibited the increase in pressure produced by 1 nmol noradrenaline by 31 +/- 5%. Niflumic acid (10 and 30 microM) also inhibited the noradrenaline-induced increase in perfusion pressure and 30 microM niflumic acid reduced the pressor response to 1 nmol noradrenaline by 34 +/- 6%. 3. The increases in perfusion elicited by 5-HT (0.3 and 3 nmol) were reduced by niflumic acid (10 and 30 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner and 30 microM niflumic acid inhibited responses to 0.3 and 3 nmol 5-HT by, respectively, 49 +/- 8% and 50 +/- 7%. Nifedipine (1 microM) decreased the pressor response to 3 nmol 5-HT by 44 +/- 9%. 4. In the presence of a combination of 30 microM niflumic acid and 1 microM nifedipine the inhibition of the pressor effects of noradrenaline (10 nmol) and 5-HT (3 nmol) was not significantly greater than with niflumic acid (30 microM) alone. Thus the effects of niflumic acid and nifedipine were not additive. 5. In Ca-free conditions the transient contractions induced by 5-HT (3 nmol) were not reduced by 30 microM niflumic acid, suggesting that this agent does not inhibit calcium release from the intracellular store or the binding of 5-HT to its receptor. 6. Niflumic acid 30 microM did not inhibit the pressor responses induced by KCl (20 and 60 mumol) which were markedly reduced by 1 microM nifedipine. In addition, 1 microM levcromakalim decreased pressor responses produced by 20 mumol KCl. These data suggest that niflumic acid does not block directly calcium channels or activate potassium channels. 7. It is concluded that niflumic

  6. Adrenaline but not noradrenaline is a determinant of exercise-induced lipid mobilization in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Glisezinski, I; Larrouy, D; Bajzova, M; Koppo, K; Polak, J; Berlan, M; Bulow, J; Langin, D; Marques, M A; Crampes, F; Lafontan, M; Stich, V

    2009-07-01

    The relative contribution of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) and adrenaline (epinephrine) in the control of lipid mobilization in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) during exercise was evaluated in men treated with a somatostatin analogue, octreotide. Eight lean and eight obese young men matched for age and physical fitness performed 60 min exercise bouts at 50% of their maximal oxygen consumption on two occasions: (1) during i.v. infusion of octreotide, and (2) during placebo infusion. Lipolysis and local blood flow changes in SCAT were evaluated using in situ microdialysis. Infusion of octreotide suppressed plasma insulin and growth hormone levels at rest and during exercise. It blocked the exercise-induced increase in plasma adrenaline while that of noradrenaline was unchanged. Plasma natriuretic peptides (NPs) level was higher at rest and during exercise under octreotide infusion in lean men. Under placebo, no difference was found in the exercise-induced increase in glycerol between the probe perfused with Ringer solution alone and that with phentolamine (an alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist) in lean subjects while a greater increase in glycerol was observed in the obese subjects. Under placebo, propranolol infusion in the probe containing phentolamine reduced by about 45% exercise-induced glycerol release; this effect was fully suppressed under octreotide infusion while noradrenaline was still elevated and exercise-induced lipid mobilization maintained in both lean and obese individuals. In conclusion, blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors during exercise performed during infusion of octreotide (blocking the exercise-induced rise in adrenaline but not that of noradrenaline) does not alter the exercise-induced lipolysis. This suggests that adrenaline is the main adrenergic agent contributing to exercise-induced lipolysis in SCAT. Moreover, it is the combined action of insulin suppression and NPs release which explains the lipolytic response which remains

  7. Tapentadol increases levels of noradrenaline in the rat spinal cord as measured by in vivo microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzschentke, Thomas M; Folgering, Joost H A; Flik, Gunnar; De Vry, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Spinal noradrenaline is thought to play an important role in descending pain inhibitory pathways and the modulation of nociceptive information at the spinal level. Tapentadol is a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NRI). We showed previously that tapentadol, in con

  8. Intravenous tryptophan administration attenuates cortisol secretion induced by intracerebroventricular injection of noradrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutoh, Madoka; Kasuya, Etsuko; Yayou, Ken-ichi; Ohtani, Fumihiro; Kobayashi, Yosuke

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of suppression of stress-induced cortisol (CORT) secretion by tryptophan (TRP) administration and to better understand its regulatory mechanisms by using a noradrenaline (NA) injection into the third ventricle (3V) as a stress model in cattle. A total of 25 Holstein steers with a cannula in the 3V were used. First, the increase in CORT secretion was observed following a NA injection into the 3V in a dose-dependent manner, verifying the appropriateness of this treatment as a stress model of CORT secretion (Experiment 1). The effect of prior-administration of TRP into peripheral blood with a dose that has been demonstrated to increase brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels on the elevation of plasma CORT induced by NA or corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) was then examined (Experiment 2). The prior administration of TRP suppressed NA-induced, but not CRH-induced, CORT elevation. These results suggest that an increase in TRP absorption into peripheral blood could suppress the stress-induced CORT secretion in cattle via the attenuation of the stimulatory effect of NA on the hypothalamic CRH release.

  9. An electrophysiological analysis of the effects of noradrenaline and alpha-receptor antagonists on neuromuscular transmission in mammalian muscular arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, M E; Surprenant, A

    1980-01-01

    1 The effects of exogenously applied noradrenaline (NA) and alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists on the mechanical and intracellularly recorded responses to perivascular nerve stimulation were examined in the rabbit ear artery, rabbit saphenous artery and rat tail artery. 2 Excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) and action potentials recorded from these smooth muscles were not blocked or depressed by phentolamine, phenoxybenzamine, prazosin, or labetolol in concentrations as high as 10 microgram/ml. Phentolamine (1 to 10 microgram/ml) depressed neurally-evoked contractions of the ear and saphenous, but not the tail artery, and also depressed the contractions produced by direct muscle stimulation in the ear and saphenous arteries. Prazosin and labetolol (0.1 to 10 microgram/ml) had no effect on the neurally evoked contractile response in any of the arteries examined. 3 The amplitude of the steady-state e.j.p. during repetitive stimulation at 0.45 to 2 Hz was increased by phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine but not by prazosin or labetolol. Phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine also increased the amplitude of the e.j.p. evoked by a single stimulus in the majority of the preparations. 4 Concentrations of NA greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml depolarized the smooth muscle while concentrations greater than or equal to 0.5 microgram/ml depressed the amplitude of the e.j.ps recorded from these arteries. alpha-Antagonists did not suppress either the NA-induced membrane depolarization or depression of e.j.ps. 5 These observations call into question the physiological relevance of both pre- and postsynaptic alpha-receptors in regard to adrenergic neuromuscular transmission in muscular arteries.

  10. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...

  11. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  12. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.;

    2007-01-01

    to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  13. A dopaminergic receptor modulates catecholamine release from the cat adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artalejo, A R; García, A G; Montiel, C; Sánchez-García, P

    1985-01-01

    Nicotine evokes the release of catecholamines from perfused cat adrenal glands in a concentration-dependent manner, the median effective concentration for nicotine being 5 microM. Two 2 min pulses of 5 microM-nicotine, 40 min apart (S1 and S2) gave net catecholamine outputs of 7.64 and 3.55 micrograms/8 min, respectively. The ratio S2/S1 in control glands was 0.5. Increasing concentrations of apomorphine (1-10 microM) markedly inhibited catecholamine release during the second nicotine pulse (S2). At 1 microM-apomorphine, the release during S2 was significantly reduced to 16% of S1; with 10 microM-apomorphine, the secretory response was reduced further to only 3% of S1, the ratio S2/S1 being 0.03. The presence of haloperidol, sulpiride or picobenzide (each 0.5 microM) during S2, completely reversed the inhibition of catecholamine release produced by apomorphine. Haloperidol itself increased the nicotinic secretory response during S2; so, while the ratio S2/S1 was 0.5 in control conditions, this ratio increased significantly to 0.95 if haloperidol (0.5 microM) was present during S2, suggesting that the presence of this dopaminergic antagonist removed a negative feed-back mechanism that inhibits nicotine-evoked catecholamine release. If present during S2, dopamine (1 microM) also markedly inhibited catecholamine release evoked by nicotine; this inhibition was again reversed by 0.5 microM-haloperidol. Neither the opiate antagonist naloxone nor the alpha-adrenoceptor blocking agent phentolamine (at concentrations of 0.5-5 microM) affected the inhibition by apomorphine of the secretory response to nicotine. These data strongly suggest that the cat adrenal medulla chromaffin cell membrane contains a dopaminergic receptor which modulates the catecholamine secretory process triggered by stimulation of the nicotinic cholinoceptor. The fact that dopamine is released in measurable amounts, together with adrenaline and noradrenaline, from perfused cat adrenal glands in response

  14. Inhibition of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid of depolarization-induced release of (/sup 14/C)cysteine sulfinate and (/sup 3/H)glutamate in rat hippocampal slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, A.; Okumura, S.; Mizuo, H.; Iwata, H.

    1983-01-01

    Effects of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid-related compounds on the release of (/sup 14/C)cysteine sulfinate and (/sup 3/H)glutamate from preloaded hippocampal slices of rat brain were examined by a superfusion method. Diazepam markedly inhibited the release of cysteine sulfinate and glutamate evoked either by high K/sup +/ or veratridine without affecting that of other neurotransmitter candidates, e.g., gamma-aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and dopamine; IC50 values for the release of cysteine sulfinate and glutamate were about 20 and 7 microM, respectively. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (1 to 10 microM) and muscimol (100 microM) significantly reduced high K+-stimulated release of glutamate. Bicuculline, which had no effect on the release at a concentration of 50 microM by itself, antagonized the inhibitor effects of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid on glutamate release. Similar results were obtained with the release of cysteine sulfinate except that a high concentration (100 microM) of gamma-aminobutyric acid was required for the inhibition. These results indicate the modulation by gamma-aminobutyric acid innervation of the release of excitatory amino acids in rat hippocampal formation, and also suggest that some of the pharmacological effects of diazepam may be a consequence of inhibition of excitatory amino acid transmission.

  15. 中枢N-型钙离子通道对应激性高血压大鼠去甲肾上腺素释放的影响%Effects of central N-type calcium channels on noradrenaline release from locus coeruleus projecting to hypothalamus in stress induced hypertension rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴军同; 巩万坤; 夏兆俊; 王峰; 黄宏平; 汪萌芽

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究N-型电压门控性钙离子通道影响高血压大鼠的血压以及蓝斑投射到下丘脑去甲肾上腺素释放动力学的机制。方法:将24只雄性SD大鼠(180~200 g)随机分为对照组和模型组,模型组大鼠用噪声和足底电击刺激大鼠血压升高,在建立慢性应激性高血压大鼠模型的基础上,电刺激蓝斑核,运用碳纤维电极检测技术测定大鼠下丘脑内去甲肾上腺素( NE)的释放量,进一步观察给予电压门控性钙离子通道阻断剂对NE的刺激-分泌量和在体血压的影响。结果:与对照组相比,高血压模型组大鼠血压升高(P<0.05),电刺激蓝斑核,下丘脑检测到的去甲肾上腺素的释放信号幅度增大(P<00.5)。侧脑室给予N-型钙离子通道阻断剂使模型组大鼠的血压下降(P<0.05),去甲肾上腺素的释放信号幅度减少(P<0.05)。结论:中枢部位的电压门控N-型钙离子通道参与应激性高血压大鼠下丘脑去甲肾上腺素的释放和血压的调控。%Objective:To observe the dynamic characteristics of norepinephrine ( NE) release in hypothalamus followed by electrical stimulation in locus coeruleus in the rat model of stress-induced hypertension (SIH) and investigate the role of central N-type calcium channel in the pathogenesis of SIH. Methods:24 Male Sprague-Dawley rats (180-200 g) were randomly divided into control and SIH group.The SIH model rats were induced by both noise and foot-shock stresses.After modeling,NE release in the hypothalamus by electrical stimulation in locus coeruleus was determined and NE signal was re-corded by carbon fiber electrode.Results:Blood pressure and the peak value of NE signal in the hypothalamus following electrical stimulation in locus coer-uleus were elevated and higher in SIH rats than the controls ( P<0 .05 ) .Intracerebroventricular administration of ralfinamide mesylate ( sodium and N-type calcium

  16. Attempt to separate the fluorescence spectra of adrenaline and noradrenaline using chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Rikke P; Hansen, Åse Marie; Bro, R

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on whether the fluorescence spectra of the very similar catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline could be separated using chemometric methods. The fluorescence landscapes (several excitation and emission spectra were measured) of two data sets with respectively 16...... regression (Unfold-PLSR) on the larger data set and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of the six samples of the smaller set showed that there was no difference between the fluorescence landscapes of adrenaline and noradrenaline. It can be concluded that chemometric separation of adrenaline and noradrenaline...

  17. Noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations in various vascular beds in patients with cirrhosis. Relation to haemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christensen, N J; Ring-Larsen, H

    1981-01-01

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA) and adrenaline (A) concentrations were related to various haemodynamic parameters in fifteen patients with cirrhosis. In supine position at rest plasma NA and A in peripheral venous blood were significantly higher in patients with cirrhosis than in normal subjects. Mean...... plasma NA averaged 0.66 and 0.21 ng/ml, respectively (P less than 0.01). The corresponding values for plasma A were 0.14 and 0.05 ng/ml (P less than 0.03). Splanchnic arterial-hepatic venous extraction ratio of NA in patients with cirrhosis averaged 0.46 (P less than 0.01). The right kidney released NA.......001) and to heart rate (r = 0.61, P less than 0.02), but inversely correlated to plasma volume (r = 0.83, P less than 0.01) in cirrhotic patients. Arterial blood pressure was reduced in these patients compared to controls (P less than 0.02), but not significantly correlated to plasma NA. The increased plasma NA...

  18. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of noradrenaline synthesis enhances the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinshenker, David; Ferrucci, Michela; Busceti, Carla L.; Biagioni, Francesca; Lazzeri, Gloria; Liles, L. Cameron; Lenzi, Paola; Murri, Luigi; Paparelli, Antonio; Fornai, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) lesions of the locus coeruleus (LC), the major brain noradrenergic nucleus, exacerbate the damage to nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) terminals caused by the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH). However, because noradrenergic terminals contain other neuromodulators and the noradrenaline (NA) transporter, which may act as a neuroprotective buffer, it was unclear whether this enhancement of METH neurotoxicity was caused by the loss of noradrenergic innervation or the loss of NA itself. We addressed the specific role of NA by comparing the effects of METH in mice with noradrenergic lesions (DSP-4) and those with intact noradrenergic terminals but specifically lacking NA (genetic or acute pharmacological blockade of the NA biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase; DBH). We found that genetic deletion of DBH (DBH −/− mice) and acute treatment of wild-type mice with a DBH inhibitor (fusaric acid) recapitulated the effects of DSP-4 lesions on METH responses. All three methods of NA depletion enhanced striatal DA release, extracellular oxidative stress (as measured by in vivo microdialysis of DA and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), and behavioural stereotypies following repeated METH administration. These effects accompanied a worsening of the striatal DA neuron terminal damage and ultrastructural changes to medium spiny neurons. We conclude that NA itself is neuroprotective and plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of striatal DA terminals to the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of METH. PMID:18042179

  19. Selecting and evoking innovators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The practical undertaking of selecting users to work as innovators and of evoking their creative potential is crucial, but underexposed in the literature on user involvement in design. This paper reports findings from a recent case of user-driven innovation, the FEEDBACK-project, where the authors...... prepared for and conducted selection of and collaboration with innovators. The outcome was successful in the sense that the innovators produced excellent foundation for conceptual interaction design by creating mock-ups and explanations incarnating their preferences, attitudes and habits. By referring...... to theories of learning we try to explain how our way of working with selection and evoking of innovators has contributed to this positive result and how our approach to user-driven innovation can be regarded as a way to combine democracy and creativity in design....

  20. Guanfacine in essential hypertension: Effect on blood pressure, plasma noradrenaline concentration and plasma renin activity

    OpenAIRE

    Schoeppe, W.; Brecht, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    1 The acute and chronic effects of guanfacine on blood pressure, plasma noradrenaline concentration and plasma renin activity were investigated in 23 patients (15 males, 8 females) with essential hypertension (WHO grade I-II).

  1. Effects of lamotrigine on PCP-evoked elevations in monoamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Davide; Large, Charles H

    2011-12-01

    Lamotrigine is suggested to have potential as an add-on treatment for patients with schizophrenia. Supporting evidence comes from the efficacy of the drug in models of psychotic-like behaviour induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as phencyclidine (PCP). These drugs enhance levels of the monoamines in the cortex, which may contribute to their psychotomimetic effects. The ability of lamotrigine to prevent these neurochemical changes has not been examined. We studied PCP-evoked overflow of noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin in the medial prefrontal cortex of awake rats using microdialysis. Rats were administered lamotrigine or vehicle, followed by PCP. Locomotor activity was also recorded before and after drug treatment. Lamotrigine did not have an influence on basal levels of the monoamines, but significantly reduced PCP-evoked overflow of dopamine and serotonin; PCP-evoked overflow of noradrenaline was also reduced by lamotrigine, but not to a significant degree. In contrast, PCP-induced hyperactivity was unaffected by lamotrigine. It is concluded that lamotrigine can modify PCP-evoked monoamine overflow in the cortex, consistent with an ability to prevent the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA receptor antagonists in rodents and humans. The dissociation between monoamine overflow and locomotor activity suggests the involvement of different brain circuits; relevance to the treatment of schizophrenia is also discussed.

  2. Carrier-mediated release of monoamines induced by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist DMPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szász, Bernadett K; Mayer, Aliz; Zsilla, Gabriella; Lendvai, Balázs; Vizi, E Sylvester; Kiss, János P

    2005-09-01

    We have previously shown that dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) increases the release of noradrenaline (NA) from rat hippocampal slices via two distinct mechanisms: a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated exocytosis and a carrier-mediated release induced by the reversal of NA transporters. Our aim was to investigate whether other monoaminergic systems are also affected by the multiple actions of DMPP. In our experiments DMPP dose-dependently increased the release of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) from rat striatal and hippocampal slices, respectively. The dual effect was observed, however, only in case of DA at a lower DMPP concentration (30 microM), where the response was partly inhibited by mecamylamine, TTX and Ca2+-free medium (nAChR-mediated exocytosis) while the other part of the response was blocked only by the DA uptake inhibitor nomifensine (carrier-mediated release). In contrast, the DMPP-evoked 5-HT release and the DA release induced by high concentration DMPP was not inhibited by nicotinic antagonists, TTX and Ca2+-free medium but only by selective uptake inhibitors. In addition, DMPP dose-dependently inhibited the [3H]DA and [3H]5-HT uptake in striatal and hippocampal synaptosome preparation with an IC50 of 3.18 and 0.49 microM, respectively. Our data show that DMPP interacts with monoamine transporters and induces a substantial carrier-mediated release of DA and 5-HT, therefore caution is needed for the interpretation of data, when this drug is used as a nAChR agonist.

  3. Suppression of oocyte release in rats by local administration of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, J M; Stoker, T E; Cooper, R L; McElroy, W K; Parrish, M B

    1996-03-01

    The presence of noradrenergic neuronal innervation in the ovaries and cyclic alterations in ovarian noradrenaline suggest a role for such innervation in oocyte release. The current experiments evaluated the relationship between ovulation and alterations in ovarian concentrations of noradrenaline induced by unilateral, intrabursal administration of the specific noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP4. Intrabursal injections of DSP4 (0-10 mumoles per ovary) given at 19:00 h at pro-oestrus induced a prompt, dose-related reduction in ovarian noradrenaline on the injected and non-injected sides. Although this result suggests that injected material was reaching the contralateral ovary, ovulation was suppressed only on the injected side. This suppression was persistent, and lasted through at least the next two cycles following either unilateral or bilateral treatment. The reductions in noradrenaline could be mostly, if not entirely, attenuated by prior administration of desipramine which blocks re-uptake of noradrenaline, while the ipsilateral ovulatory effects remained unchanged. Although it has been reported that DSP4 binds the opiate receptor, intrabursal co-administration of the antagonist naloxone was ineffective in altering ovulatory suppression. These results suggest that while decreases in ovarian noradrenaline in response to local exposure to a noradrenergic neurotoxin may accompany a reduction in oocyte release or a block in ovulation, the anti-ovulatory effect of DSP4 is independent of the changes in noradrenaline concentrations and may be due to some other ovarian response.

  4. Fluxes of lactate into, from, and among gap junction-coupled astrocytes and their interaction with noradrenaline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactate is a versatile metabolite with important roles in modulation of brain glucose utilization rate (CMRglc, diagnosis of brain-injured patients, redox- and receptor-mediated signaling, memory, and alteration of gene transcription. Neurons and astrocytes release and accumulate lactate using equilibrative monocarboxylate transporters that carry out net transmembrane transport of lactate only until intra- and extracellular levels reach equilibrium. Astrocytes have much faster lactate uptake than neurons and shuttle more lactate among gap junction-coupled astrocytes than to nearby neurons. Lactate diffusion within syncytia can provide precursors for oxidative metabolism and glutamate synthesis and facilitate its release from endfeet to perivascular space to stimulate blood flow. Lactate efflux from brain during activation underlies the large underestimation of CMRglc with labeled glucose and fall in CMRO2/CMRglc ratio. Receptor-mediated effects of lactate on locus coeruleus neurons include noradrenaline release in cerebral cortex and c-AMP-mediated stimulation of astrocytic gap junctional coupling, thereby enhancing its dispersal and release from brain. Lactate transport is essential for its multifunctional roles.

  5. Strong activation of vascular prejunctional beta 2-adrenoceptors in freely moving rats by adrenaline released as a co-transmitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COPPES, RP; SMIT, J; KHALI, NN; Brouwer, F.; ZAAGSMA, J

    1993-01-01

    The effect of adrenaline on the electrically evoked noradrenaline overflow in the portal vein of adrenal demedullated freely moving rats was studied. Adrenaline (100 ng/min) was infused for 2 h into the portal vein. After a 1-h interval when plasma adrenaline had returned to pre-infusion undetectabl

  6. International Evoked Potentials Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The past decade has seen great progress in the measurement of evoked potentials in man; a steady increase in our understanding of their charac­ teristics, their origins and their usefulness; and a growing application in the field of clinical diagnosis. The topic is a truly multidisciplinary one. Important research contributions have been made by workers of many different backgrounds and clinical applications span the specialities. This book represents a revised and updated version of the work originally presented at the international evoked potential symposium held in Nottingham 4-6 1978. The Nottingham Symposium provided a forum for a state-of-the-art discussion amongst workers from many different disciplines and from many different countries. For each major topic in the field an expert review set the scene for discussion of current research presentations. This format is retained in the book: the chapters in Part A provide the context in which the research presented in Part B is set. The task of selecting m...

  7. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...... reveals presence of a true emission from all ears tested. It is concluded that the cochlear echo can be recorded in normal-hearing newborns with an extremely low rate of type I errors.......Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar...

  8. (/sup 3/H)desipramine binding to rat brain tissue: binding to both noradrenaline uptake sites and sites not related to noradrenaline neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, I.T.Ro.; Ross, S.B.; Marcusson, J.O.

    1989-04-01

    The pharmacological and biochemical characteristics of (3H)desipramine binding to rat brain tissue were investigated. Competition studies with noradrenaline, nisoxetine, nortriptyline, and desipramine suggested the presence of more than one (3H)desipramine binding site. Most of the noradrenaline-sensitive binding represented a high-affinity site, and this site appeared to be the same as the high-affinity site of nisoxetine-sensitive binding. The (3H)desipramine binding sites were abolished by protease treatment, a result suggesting that the binding sites are protein in nature. When specific binding was defined by 0.1 microM nisoxetine, the binding was saturable and fitted a single-site binding model with a binding affinity of approximately 1 nM. This binding fraction was abolished by lesioning of the noradrenaline neurons with the noradrenaline neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4). In contrast, when 10 microM nisoxetine was used to define the specific binding, the binding was not saturable over the nanomolar range, but the binding fitted a two-site binding model with KD values of 0.5 and greater than 100 nM for the high- and low-affinity components, respectively. The high-affinity site was abolished after DSP4 lesioning, whereas the low-affinity site remained. The binding capacity (Bmax) for binding defined by 0.1 microM nisoxetine varied between brain regions, with very low density in the striatum (Bmax not possible to determine), 60-90 fmol/mg of protein in cortical areas and cerebellum, and 120 fmol/mg of protein in the hypothalamus. The binding capacities of these high-affinity sites correlated significantly with the regional distribution of (3H)noradrenaline uptake but not with 5-(3H)hydroxytryptamine uptake.

  9. Evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, George H

    2013-11-01

    Before the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evoked potentials (EPs)-visual evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brain stem auditory evoked responses-were commonly used to determine a second site of disease in patients being evaluated for possible multiple sclerosis (MS). The identification of an area of the central nervous system showing abnormal conduction was used to supplement the abnormal signs identified on the physical examination-thus identifying the "multiple" in MS. This article is a brief overview of additional ways in which central nervous system (CNS) physiology-as measured by EPs-can still contribute value in the management of MS in the era of MRIs.

  10. Parasympathetic inhibition of pineal indole metabolism by prejunctional modulation of noradrenaline release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, WJ; Grol, CJ; Westerink, BHC

    1996-01-01

    The role of the parasympathetic nervous system in rat pineal indole metabolism was investigated by transpineal in vivo microdialysis. On-line coupling to a high performance liquid chromatography system with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) allowed simultaneous analysis of three major indolic compoun

  11. Volume Transmission in Central Dopamine and Noradrenaline Neurons and Its Astroglial Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Agnati, Luigi F; Marcoli, Manuela; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2015-12-01

    Already in the 1960s the architecture and pharmacology of the brainstem dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) neurons with formation of vast numbers of DA and NA terminal plexa of the central nervous system (CNS) indicated that they may not only communicate via synaptic transmission. In the 1980s the theory of volume transmission (VT) was introduced as a major communication together with synaptic transmission in the CNS. VT is an extracellular and cerebrospinal fluid transmission of chemical signals like transmitters, modulators etc. moving along energy gradients making diffusion and flow of VT signals possible. VT interacts with synaptic transmission mainly through direct receptor-receptor interactions in synaptic and extrasynaptic heteroreceptor complexes and their signaling cascades. The DA and NA neurons are specialized for extrasynaptic VT at the soma-dendrtitic and terminal level. The catecholamines released target multiple DA and adrenergic subtypes on nerve cells, astroglia and microglia which are the major cell components of the trophic units building up the neural-glial networks of the CNS. DA and NA VT can modulate not only the strength of synaptic transmission but also the VT signaling of the astroglia and microglia of high relevance for neuron-glia interactions. The catecholamine VT targeting astroglia can modulate the fundamental functions of astroglia observed in neuroenergetics, in the Glymphatic system, in the central renin-angiotensin system and in the production of long-distance calcium waves. Also the astrocytic and microglial DA and adrenergic receptor subtypes mediating DA and NA VT can be significant drug targets in neurological and psychiatric disease.

  12. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces.

  13. Adjective metaphors evoke negative meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Maki; Utsumi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Previous metaphor studies have paid much attention to nominal metaphors and predicative metaphors, but little attention has been given to adjective metaphors. Although some studies have focused on adjective metaphors, they only examined differences in the acceptability of various types of adjective metaphors. This paper explores the cognitive effects evoked by adjective metaphors. Three psychological experiments revealed that (1) adjective metaphors, especially those modified by color adjectives, tend to evoke negative effect; (2) although the meanings of metaphors are basically affected by the meanings of their vehicles, when a vehicle has a neutral meaning, negative meanings are evoked most frequently for adjective metaphors compared to nominal and predicative metaphors; (3) negative meanings evoked by adjective metaphors are related to poeticness, and poetic metaphors evoke negative meanings more easily than less poetic metaphors. Our research sheds new light on studies of the use of metaphor, which is one of the most basic human cognitive abilities.

  14. Achieving Presence through Evoked Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh S. ePillai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sense of ‘Presence’ (evolving from ‘telepresence’ has always been associated with virtual reality research and is still an exceptionally mystifying constituent. Now the study of presence clearly spans over various disciplines associated with cognition. This paper attempts to put forth a concept that argues that it’s an experience of an 'Evoked Reality’ (illusion of reality that triggers an ‘Evoked Presence’ (sense of presence in our minds. A Three Pole Reality Model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. The poles range from Dream Reality to Simulated Reality with Primary (Physical Reality at the center. To demonstrate the relationship between Evoked Reality and Evoked Presence, a Reality-Presence Map is developed. We believe that this concept of Evoked Reality and the proposed model may have significant applications in the study of presence, and in exploring the possibilities of not just virtual reality but also what we call ‘reality’.

  15. Response Surface Modelling of Noradrenaline Production in Hairy Root Culture of Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghorbani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Common purslane (Portulaca oleracea L. is an annual plant as one of the natural sources for noradrenaline hormone. In this research, hairy root culture of purslane was established by using Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC 15834. In the following, Box-Behnken model of response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize B5 medium for the growth of P. oleracea L. hairy root line. According to the results, modelling and optimization conditions, including sucrose, CaCl2.H2O, H2PO4 and NO3-/NH4+ concentrations on maximum dry weight (0.155 g and noradrenaline content (0.36 mg.g-1 DW was predicted. These optimal conditions predicted by RSM were confirmed the enhancement of noradrenaline production as an application potential for production by hairy root cultures.

  16. Soy peptide ingestion augments the synthesis and metabolism of noradrenaline in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Haruka; Moriyasu, Kazuki; Nakahata, Akane; Maebuchi, Motohiro; Ichinose, Takashi; Furuya, Shigeki

    2017-05-01

    To examine whether edible peptide intake affects neurotransmitter metabolism in the brain, we evaluated the effect of peptides derived from soy proteins or fish collagen on free amino acids and monoamines in the mouse brain. Ingestion of soy peptides led to markedly higher levels of tyrosine, a catecholamine precursor, in the serum, and cerebral cortex compared to those following ingestion of vehicle alone or collagen peptides. Soy peptide ingestion also effectively increased 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol and normetanephrine, the principal metabolites of noradrenaline, in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem, whereas collagen peptides did not exert such effects. Further, soy peptide ingestion led to a significant increase in noradrenaline itself in the brainstem, where noradrenergic neurons are present. Noradrenergic turnover was also markedly stimulated in these regions after soy peptide ingestion. These in vivo observations suggest that soy peptide ingestion can maintain and promote the synthesis and metabolism of noradrenaline in the brain.

  17. Intrathecal DSP4 selectively depletes spinal noradrenaline and attenuates morphine analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, F X; Ji, X Q; Tsou, K

    1985-10-22

    The noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP4 was injected intrathecally into the lumbar spinal subarachnoid space of the rat. After 10 days, dose-response curves for tail-flick inhibition were determined for both intraperitoneal and intraventricular injections of morphine. In rats pretreated with DSP4, the analgesic effect of morphine given either intraventricularly or intraperitoneally was significantly attenuated. The noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine contents in the brain-stem and the spinal cord were also measured. Intrathecal DSP4 depleted noradrenaline in the spinal cord but not in the brain-stem. Neither brain-stem or spinal cord 5-hydroxytryptamine was affected by DSP4.

  18. Chronic noradrenaline increases renal expression of NHE-3, NBC-1, BSC-1 and aquaporin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonalker, Prajakta A; Tofovic, Stevan P; Bastacky, Sheldon I; Jackson, Edwin K

    2008-05-01

    1. Because chronic activation of the renal sympathetic nervous system promotes sodium and water retention, it is conceivable that long-term exposure of the kidney to the sympathetic neurotransmitter noradrenaline upregulates the expression of key renal epithelial transport systems. 2. To test this hypothesis, we used immunoblotting of renal cortical and medullary tissue to investigate the abundance of major transport systems expressed along the renal tubule in response to long-term (15 days) infusions of noradrenaline (600 ng/min) in rats. 3. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were significantly elevated in rats receiving chronic infusions of noradrenaline (128 +/- 10 mmHg and 492 +/- 16 b.p.m., respectively) compared with animals treated with saline only (89 +/- 3 mmHg and 376 +/- 14 b.p.m., respectively). 4. Chronic infusions of noradrenaline also increased the protein abundance of the cortical Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE-3; 2.5-fold; P = 0.0142), the cortical sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBC-1 (2.5-fold; P = 0.0067), the bumetanide-sensitive sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter BSC-1/NKCC2 in the inner stripe of outer medulla (threefold; P = 0.0020) and aquaporin-2 in the inner medulla (twofold; P = 0.0039). 5. In contrast, noradrenaline did not significantly affect expression of the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter in the cortex, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-alpha(1) in the cortex and inner stripe of the outer or inner medulla, the inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (ROMK-1) in the inner stripe of the outer medulla or aquaporin-1 in the cortex or inner medulla. Noradrenaline did significantly, but modestly (less than twofold), increase aquaporin-1 in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. 6. We conclude that noradrenaline-induced increases in the expression of NHE-3, NBC-1, BSC-1 and aquaporin-2 are likely to play an important role in the regulation of salt and water transport by noradrenaline in the kidney and may explain, at least in

  19. Neurochemical evidence that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) 55-102 peptide modulates the dopaminergic reward system by decreasing the dopamine release in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovska, Angelina; Baranyi, Maria; Windisch, Katalin; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Gagov, Hristo; Kalfin, Reni

    2017-08-09

    CART (Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript) peptide is a neurotransmitter naturally occurring in the CNS and found mostly in nucleus accumbens, ventrotegmental area, ventral pallidum, amygdalae and striatum, brain regions associated with drug addiction. In the nucleus accumbens, known for its significant role in motivation, pleasure, reward and reinforcement learning, CART peptide inhibits cocaine and amphetamine-induced dopamine-mediated increases in locomotor activity and behavior, suggesting a CART peptide interaction with the dopaminergic system. Thus in the present study, we examined the effect of CART (55-102) peptide on the basal, electrical field stimulation-evoked (EFS-evoked) (30V, 2Hz, 120 shocks) and returning basal dopamine (DA) release and on the release of the DA metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetaldehyde (DOPAL), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) as well as on norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine-o-quinone (Daq) in isolated mouse nucleus accumbens, in a preparation, in which any CART peptide effects on the dendrites or soma of ventral tegmental projection neurons have been excluded. We further extended our study to assess the effect of CART (55-102) peptide on basal cocaine-induced release of dopamine and its metabolites DOPAL, DOPAC, HVA, DOPET and 3-MT as well as on NE and Daq. To analyze the amount of [(3)H]dopamine, dopamine metabolites, Daq and NE in the nucleus accumbens superfusate, a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with electrochemical, UV and radiochemical detections was used. CART (55-102) peptide, 0.1μM, added alone, exerted: (i) a significant decrease in the basal and EFS-evoked levels of extracellular dopamine (ii) a significant increase in the EFS-evoked and returning basal levels of the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA, major products of dopamine degradation and (iii) a significant decrease in the returning basal

  20. The role of stress and noradrenaline in prepulse inhibition, a rodent study : implications for schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontag, Thomas Alexander

    2003-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of stress and noradrenaline in schizophrenia. Among others schizophrenic patients display reductions in prepulse inhibition. Since this behavioural response can be measured in both humans and animals it opens the possibility to use rats in schizophrenia researc

  1. Whole body and regional clearances of noradrenaline and adrenaline in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N J; Galbo, H; Gjerris, Anne Cathrine Roslev;

    1984-01-01

    The whole body clearance of noradrenaline (NA) was measured in seven patients pre- and postoperatively. L-3H-NA was infused intravenously for 90 min and steady-state concentrations of L-3H-NA were measured in both arterial and peripheral venous blood. Preoperatively, in the resting supine position...

  2. The Dynamic cerebral autoregulatory adaptive response to noradrenaline is attenuated during systemic inflammation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Bailey, Damian M;

    2015-01-01

    CA following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion, a human-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during early sepsis. The dCA in eight healthy males was examined prior to and during an intended noradrenaline-induced MAP increase of approximately 30 mmHg. This was performed at baseline...... neuroprotective effect by enhancing dCA in patients with early sepsis....

  3. Whole body and regional clearances of noradrenaline and adrenaline in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N J; Galbo, H; Gjerris, Anne Cathrine Roslev

    1984-01-01

    The whole body clearance of noradrenaline (NA) was measured in seven patients pre- and postoperatively. L-3H-NA was infused intravenously for 90 min and steady-state concentrations of L-3H-NA were measured in both arterial and peripheral venous blood. Preoperatively, in the resting supine position...

  4. ATTENUATION OF HALOPERIDOL-INDUCED CATALEPSY BY NORADRENALINE AND L-THREO-DOPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERHAGENKAMERBEEK, WDJ; HAZEMEIJER, [No Value; KORF, J; LAKKE, JPWF

    1993-01-01

    In addition to impaired dopaminergic neurotransmission a dysfunctional noradrenergic system has been demonstrated in Parkinson's disease. L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), a synthetic precursor of noradrenaline (NA), appears to be effective in the treatment of some akinetic symptoms in parki

  5. Evoked Cultural Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    of precautionary psychology? For example, does Theory of Mind development play a role in sensitivity to inferred predation or social status threats...student is in the process of analyzing the economic game theory protocol data collected there. 8 Distribution A: Approved for public release... McClelland , J., et al. (2001). Compulsive Checking Behavior of Quinpirole-Sensitized Rats as an Animal Model of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD

  6. Role of alpha adrenoceptors in the nucleus accumbens in the control of accumbal noradrenaline efflux: a microdialysis study with freely moving rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aono, Y.; Saigusa, T.; Watanabe, S.; Iwakami, T.; Mizoguchi, N.; Ikeda, H.; Ishige, K.; Tomiyama, K.; Oi, Y.; Ueda, K.; Rausch, W.D.; Waddington, J.L.; Ito, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Microdialysis technique was used to study the effects of the locally applied alpha adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine and antagonist phentolamine on the basal noradrenaline efflux as well as on the noradrenaline uptake inhibitor desipramine-elicited noradrenaline efflux in the nucleus accumbens (NAc

  7. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Gutjar, Swetlana; Ter Horst, Gert J; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  8. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle R Dalenberg

    Full Text Available In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively. After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  9. GABAA receptors modulate cannabinoid-evoked hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, S M; Tallarida, R J; Kon, D A; Geller, E B; Adler, Martin W

    2004-05-01

    Cannabinoids evoke hypothermia by stimulating central CB(1) receptors. GABA induces hypothermia via GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptor activation. CB(1) receptor activation increases GABA release in the hypothalamus, a central locus for thermoregulation, suggesting that cannabinoid and GABA systems may be functionally linked in body temperature regulation. We investigated whether GABA receptors modulate the hypothermic actions of [4,5-dihydro-2-methyl-4(4-morpholinylmethyl)-1-(1-naphthalenyl-carbonyl)-6H-pyrrolo[3,2,1ij]quinolin-6-one] (WIN 55212-2), a selective cannabinoid agonist, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. WIN 55212-2 (2.5 mg/kg im) produced a rapid hypothermia that peaked 45-90 min postinjection. The hypothermia was attenuated by bicuculline (2 mg/kg ip), a GABA(A) antagonist. However, SCH 50911 (1-10 mg/kg ip), a GABA(B) blocker, did not antagonize the hypothermia. Neither bicuculline (2 mg/kg) nor SCH 50911 (10 mg/kg) by itself altered body temperature. We also investigated a possible role for CB(1) receptors in GABA-generated hypothermia. Muscimol (2.5 mg/kg ip), a GABA(A) agonist, or baclofen (5 mg/kg ip), a GABA(B) agonist, evoked a significant hypothermia. Blockade of CB(1) receptors with SR141716A (2.5 mg/kg im) did not antagonize muscimol- or baclofen-induced hypothermia, indicating that GABA-evoked hypothermia does not contain a CB(1)-sensitive component. Our results implicate GABA(A) receptors in the hypothermic actions of cannabinoids and provide further evidence of a functional link between cannabinoid and GABA systems.

  10. [Evoked potentials and inhalation anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, A; Russ, W; Hempelmann, G

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of evoked potentials can be affected by various factors including volatile anaesthetics. These effects have to be considered in order to give correct interpretations of the obtained data. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) and auditory evoked potentials (AEP) will show strong alterations under general anaesthesia whereas brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) are slightly affected. The effects of nitrous oxide, halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane on somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) after median nerve stimulation were studied in 35 healthy adult patients. pCO2 and tympanic membrane temperature were held constant. Simultaneous cervical and cortical SEP recording was performed using surface electrodes. After induction of anaesthesia SEP were recorded during normoventilation with 100% oxygen and after inhalation of 66.6% nitrous oxide. 10 patients received halothane at inspired concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0%. After nitrous oxide had been replaced by oxygen, halothane was reduced in steps of 0.5%. SEP were recorded at the end of each period (15 min). Equipotent doses of enflurane or isoflurane were administered to 15 and 10 patients, respectively. Nitrous oxide depressed early cortical SEP amplitude. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane caused dose dependent increases of latencies. Reduction of amplitude was most pronounced with isoflurane. Using high doses of enflurane in oxygen cortical SEP showed unusual high amplitudes associated with marked increases of latencies. Even under high concentrations of volatile anaesthetics cervical SEP were minimally affected. The effects of anaesthetic gases have to be considered when SEP are recorded intraoperatively.

  11. A parametric study of the effects of the noradrenaline neurotoxin DSP4 on avoidance acquisition and noradrenaline neurones in the CNS of the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, T.; G Jonsson; Ross, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various doses of DSP4 on two-way active avoidance acquisition in rats and on central noradrenaline neurones were compared. Doses of DSP4 from 3 mg kg-1 i.p. and upwards injected one week before the onset of the avoidance trials significantly impaired two-way avoidance learning. The learning impairment caused by DSP4 (50 mg kg-1 i.p.) lasted for at least 10 weeks. Desipramine (20 mg kg-1) injected either 30 or 60 min before DSP4 (50 mg kg-1) antagonized the active avoidance impa...

  12. Noradrenaline as a putative neurotransmitter mediating hypotension—induced FOs—like immunoreactivity in the supraoptic nucleus of the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENEH; XIASUN

    1995-01-01

    Hemorrhage or hypotension induces extensive Fos-like immunoreactivity in the magnocellular neurosecretory cells in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus in rat,especially in the vasopressin neurons.The present study was to explore the neurotransmitter mediating this effect,Microinfusion of the alpha-adrenergic blocker into the supraoptic nucleus reduced the hypotension-induced FOs.whereas beta-antagonist did not affect it significantly.Alaha1-and alpha2-antagonist,prazosin and yohimbine,both reduced the Fos-Positive cell counts.However,the effective dosage of yohimbine was much larger,Alpha1-agonist,methoxamine,induced abundant Fos-like immunoreactivity in the vasopressin cells in this nucleus,while beta-and alpha2-agonist did not elicit such effect.Administration of the noradrenergic re-uptake inhibitor desipramine,to this nucleus to locally accumulate the spontaneously released noradrenaline from the nerve terminals also induced Fos expression,mostly in the vasopressin cells.

  13. Cardiovascular, metabolic, and hormonal responses to noradrenaline in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Andersen, P; Hvidberg, A

    1996-01-01

    Denervation hypersensitivity is a well-known phenomenon in patients with autonomic failure. In diabetic autonomic neuropathy hypersensitivity to beta-adrenergic stimulation has been demonstrated. We infused noradrenaline, mainly an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, in three escalating doses (0.5, 2.......5, and 5 micrograms min-1) in three age and sex matched groups of eight subjects: healthy volunteers, diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy. During steady state in each infusion period we measured heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, hepato-splanchnic blood flow, vascular...... resistance, glucose kinetics, metabolites (beta-hydroxybuturate, glycerol, and lactate), and glucoregulatory hormones (noradrenaline, adrenaline, growth hormone, pancreatic polypeptide, cortisol, and insulin). Systolic and mean blood pressure increased in all groups but diabetic patients with autonomic...

  14. Delphinidin immobilized on silver nanoparticles for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, noradrenalin, uric acid, and tryptophan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nasirizadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the fabrication of a new modified electrode for electrocatalytic oxidation of noradrenalin, based on the delphinidin immobilized on silver nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the redox properties of this modified electrode. The surface charge transfer rate constant (ks and the charge transfer coefficient (α for the electron transfer between the glassy carbon electrode and the immobilized delphinidin were calculated. The differential pulse voltammetry exhibited two linear dynamic ranges and a detection limit of 0.40μM for noradrenalin determination. Moreover, the present electrode could separate the oxidation peak potentials of ascorbic acid, noradrenalin, uric acid, and tryptophan in a mixture. The usefulness of this nanosensor was also investigated for the determination of ascorbic acid, noradrenalin, and uric acid in pharmaceutical and biological fluid samples with satisfactory results.

  15. Impaired noradrenaline homeostasis in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy as a target of duloxetine analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Jun; Takahashi, Yukari; Watabe, Ayako M.; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Kato, Fusao

    2013-01-01

    Background Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that affects a large number of patients in many countries. The molecular mechanisms underlying the exaggerated nociception in PDN have not been established. Recently, duloxetine (DLX), a serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor, has been recommended as one of the first-line treatments of PDN in the United States Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicines Agency and the Japanese Guideli...

  16. Cholinergic basal forebrain structures are involved in the mediation of the arousal effect of noradrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelkes, Zoltán; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Stenberg, Dag

    2013-12-01

    Cholinergic basal forebrain structures are implicated in cortical arousal and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Cholinergic neurones are innervated by noradrenergic terminals, noradrenaline excites them via alpha-1 receptors and microinjection of noradrenaline into the basal forebrain enhances wakefulness. However, it is not known to what extent the cholinergic versus non-cholinergic basal forebrain projection neurones contribute to the arousing effects of noradrenaline. To elucidate the roles of cholinergic basal forebrain structures we administered methoxamine, an alpha-1-adrenergic agonist into the basal forebrain, in intact animals and again after selective destruction of the basal forebrain cholinergic cells by 192 IgG-saporin. In eight male Han-Wistar rats implanted with electroencephalogram/electromyogram electrodes, a microdialysis probe targeted into the basal forebrain was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 6 h on a baseline day, and with cerebrospinal fluid in the first and with methoxamine in the second 3-h period of the subsequent day. The sleep-wake activity was recorded for 24 h on both days. Saporin was then injected into the basal forebrain and 2 weeks later the same experimental schedule (with cerebrospinal fluid and methoxamine) was repeated. In the intact animals, methoxamine exhibited a robust arousing effect and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and REM sleep was suppressed. Lesioning of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurones abolished almost completely the NREM sleep-suppressing effect of methoxamine, whereas the REM sleep-suppressing effect remained intact. Thus, the basal forebrain cholinergic neurones mediate, at least in part, cortical arousal and non-REM sleep-suppression, but they are not involved in the REM sleep-suppressing effects of noradrenaline. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  17. Regional haemodynamic effects of noradrenaline injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats: possible mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Harland, D; Gardiner, S M; Kemp, P A; Bennett, T

    1992-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of noradrenaline bilaterally injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei were investigated in conscious, unrestrained Long-Evans rats and homozygous, vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats, chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler probes for measurement of regional haemodynamics. In Long-Evans rats, incremental doses of noradrenaline (0.01-10 nmol) caused dose-related increases in blood pressure and a substantial, dose-related, superior mesenteric vasoconstriction. These changes were accompanied by bradycardia and reductions in renal and hind-quarter vascular conductances. In Brattleboro rats, noradrenaline (10 nmol) had no effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or renal or superior mesenteric vascular conductances. However, there was a slight vasodilatation in the vascular bed of the hindquarters. In Long-Evans rats, intravenous pretreatment with phentolamine had no effect on the bradycardia but partly inhibited the pressor response to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei. These effects were associated with a smaller superior mesenteric vasoconstriction and an abolition of the vasoconstriction in the hindquarters. Combined intravenous pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol had no effect on the heart rate or pressor responses to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei, but reduced the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction, potentiated the vasoconstriction in the hindquarters and eliminated the renal vasoconstriction. These results suggest that, in untreated Long-Evans rats, alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated constriction in the mesenteric vascular bed and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated dilatation in the vascular bed of the hindquarters have important influences on the pressor response to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei. In the presence of the vasopressin V1-receptor antagonist, d(CH2)5[Tyr(Et)]DAVP, the pressor and heart rate responses to noradrenaline injected into the

  18. Dopamine and noradrenaline are unrelated to renalase, heart rate, and blood pressure in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, G; Przybyłowski, P; Janik, L; Nowak, E; Sadowski, J; Małyszko, J

    2014-10-01

    Renalase may degrade catecholamines and regulate sympathetic tone and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to assess dopamine, norepinephrine, and renalase in 80 heart transplant recipients and 22 healthy volunteers and their correlations with heart rate, blood pressure control, type of hypotensive therapy, and renal function. Renalase, dopamine, and norepinephrine were studied by using commercially available assays. Renalase levels were higher in heart transplant recipients compared with healthy volunteers, and noradrenaline levels were lower in the studied cohort patients than in the healthy volunteers. Noradrenaline was correlated with white blood cell count (r = -0.21, P blood cell count (r = -0.22, P heart rate, blood pressure, kidney function, or New York Heart Association class. Noradrenaline was significantly higher in patients with elevated diastolic blood pressure (>90 mm Hg) compared with those with normal diastolic blood pressure (P heart transplant patients were related to kidney function but not linked to the sympathetic nervous system activity in this study population. In heart transplant recipients, these findings might suggest that sympathetic denervation and the modulation of β-receptors persist.

  19. Paring down on Descartes: a review of brain noradrenaline and sympathetic nervous function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, G W

    2001-12-01

    1. The conceptual framework of mind-body interaction can be traced back to the seminal observations of the French philosopher and mathematician René Descartes (1596-1650). Descartes succeeded in eliminating the soul's apparent physiological role and established the brain as the body's control centre. 2. While the pivotal role played by the central nervous system (CNS) in the maintenance of physiological and psychological health has long been recognized, the development of methods designed for the direct examination of human CNS processes has only recently come to fruition. 3. There exists a substantial body of evidence derived from clinical and experimental studies indicating that CNS monoaminergic cell groups, in particular those using noradrenaline as their neurotransmitter, participate in the excitatory regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and the development and maintenance of the hypertensive state. 4. In essential hypertension, particularly in younger patients, there occurs an activation of sympathetic nervous outflows to the kidneys, heart and skeletal muscle. The existence of a correlation between subcortical brain noradrenaline turnover and total body noradrenaline spillover to plasma, resting blood pressure and heart rate provides further support for the observation that elevated subcortical noradrenergic activity subserves a sympathoexcitatory role in the regulation of sympathetic preganglionic neurons of the thorocolumbar cord.

  20. Role of noradrenaline in wake promotion effect of orexin-A on alcohol coma in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-hao WANG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study whether or not noradrenaline system participates in the process of orexin-A wake-promoting from alcohol coma. Methods  Twenty-four adult female SPF SD rats were divided into four groups, 6 each, and the model of alcohol coma was reproduced. Experimental rats were then divided randomly into rats receiving injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF, control group, orexin-A (orexin-A group, noradrenaline α1 receptor antagonists--prazosin (prazosin group, or prazosin + orexin-A (prazosin-orexin-A group into the lateral ventricle. The depth of coma was evaluated by the duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR and δ wave in electrocorticogram (ECoG. Results  The duration of LORR was significantly longer and the ratio of δ wave higher in the prazosin-treated rats than those in control group (P0.05. But the values were significantly different from those in the orexin-A group (P<0.01. Conclusion  Noradrenaline system may participate in the wake-promoting process of alcohol coma by orexin-A.

  1. Evoked Potentials and Human Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, John P.; Schafer, Edward W. P.

    Evidence of a relationship between the electrical responses of the human brain and psychometric measure of intelligence is presented. These involuntary cortical responses, known as average evoked potentials are considered to be the electrical signs of information processing by the brain. The time delays of these responses from presentation of a…

  2. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments.

  3. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, J.R.; Gutjar, S.; Horst, ter G.J.; Graaf, de C.; Renken, R.; Jager, G.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Th

  4. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebatch, J G; Rosengren, S M; Welgampola, M S

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a short-latency potential evoked through activation of vestibular receptors using sound or vibration. It is generated by modulated electromyographic signals either from the sternocleidomastoid muscle for the cervical VEMP (cVEMP) or the inferior oblique muscle for the ocular VEMP (oVEMP). These reflexes appear to originate from the otolith organs and thus complement existing methods of vestibular assessment, which are mainly based upon canal function. This review considers the basis, methodology, and current applications of the cVEMP and oVEMP in the assessment and diagnosis of vestibular disorders, both peripheral and central. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Achieving Presence through Evoked Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Jayesh S; Schmidt, Colin; Richir, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The sense of "Presence" (evolving from "telepresence") has always been associated with virtual reality research and is still an exceptionally mystifying constituent. Now the study of presence clearly spans over various disciplines associated with cognition. This paper attempts to put forth a concept that argues that it's an experience of an "Evoked Reality (ER)" (illusion of reality) that triggers an "Evoked Presence (EP)" (sense of presence) in our minds. A Three Pole Reality Model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. The poles range from Dream Reality to Simulated Reality with Primary (Physical) Reality at the center. To demonstrate the relationship between ER and EP, a Reality-Presence Map is developed. We believe that this concept of ER and the proposed model may have significant applications in the study of presence, and in exploring the possibilities of not just virtual reality but also what we call "reality."

  6. Time Perception and Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    ARI Research Note 88-69 0 MitnS.Ktohe U.0 ... Ann-r (. Time Perception and Evoked Potentials Paul FraisseDT ( Lfniversit6 Rene Descartes E LECTE...JOHNSON 00L, [N Technical Dicctojr Cmad Research accomplished under contract for the Department of the Army C. Universite Rene Descartes , Paris )r...ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Labrato-ire de Psychologie Experimental AREA• WORK UNIT NUMBERS Universite Rene Descartes

  7. Adrenomedullin receptor is found exclusively in noradrenaline-secreting cells of the rat adrenal medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, D; Thomson, L M; Michael, G J; Carroll, M; Kapas, S; Hinson, J P

    2000-04-01

    Adrenomedullin, originally identified in the adrenal medulla, has binding sites in the adrenal gland; however, its role in the adrenal medulla is unclear. This study was designed to characterise adrenomedullin binding sites in the rat adrenal medulla, using ligand binding studies, immunocytochemistry, and mRNA analysis. A single population of specific adrenomedullin receptors was identified in adrenal medullary homogenates. 125I-Adrenomedullin was displaced only by adrenomedullin1-50 and not by calcitonin gene-related peptide or amylin at concentrations up to 100 nmol/L. The receptor K(D) was 3.64 nmol/L with a receptor density of 570 fmol/mg of protein. Analysis of mRNA revealed that the genes encoding both the putative adrenomedullin receptors, termed calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and L1, were expressed in the rat adrenal medulla. Dual-colour indirect-labelled immunofluorescence was used to localise phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) and the adrenomedullin receptor in the same section. PNMT is the enzyme that converts noradrenaline to adrenaline and is not expressed in noradrenaline-secreting cells. These studies revealed that both CRLR and L1 were expressed only in cells that did not express PNMT, suggesting that adrenomedullin receptors are only found in noradrenaline-secreting cells. Further evidence to support this conclusion was provided by the demonstration of colocalisation of adrenomedullin receptors with dopamine beta-hydroxylase, confirming the presence of the receptors in medullary chromaffin cells. Taken together, these data suggest that adrenomedullin acts through a specific adrenomedullin receptor in the rat adrenal medulla. RT-PCR and northern blot analysis revealed greater abundance of mRNA for L1 than for CRLR, possibly suggesting that L1 may be the major adrenomedullin receptor expressed in this tissue. As it has been reported that adrenomedullin is synthesised predominantly by adrenaline-secreting cells, it appears likely

  8. Spontaneous and electrically-evoked catecholamine secretion from long-term cultures of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, Brian R; Pinzon, Alberto

    2013-09-05

    Catecholamine release was measured from bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cell (CC) cultures maintained over a period of three months. Cells were plated over simple biocompatible cell platforms with electrical stimulation capability and at specified times transferred to an acrylic superfusion chamber designed to allow controlled flow of superfusate over the culture. Catecholamine release was measured from the superfusates using fast cyclic voltammetry before, during and after electrical stimulation of the cells. Immunocytochemical staining of CC cultures revealed that they were composed of epinephrine (EP) and/or norepinephrine (NE) type cells. Both spontaneous and evoked-release of catecholamines from CCs were observed throughout the testing period. EP predominated during spontaneous release, whereas NE was more prevalent during electrically-evoked release. Electrical stimulation for 20 s, increased total catecholamine release by 60-130% (measured over a period of 500 s) compared to that observed for an equivalent 20 s period of spontaneous release. Stimulus intensity was correlated with the amount of evoked release, up to a plateau which was observed near the highest intensities. Shorter intervals between stimulation trials did not significantly affect the initial amount of release, and the amount of evoked release was relatively stable over time and did not decrease significantly with age of the culture. The present study demonstrates long-term survival of CC cultures in vitro and describes a technique useful for rapid assessment of cell functionality and release properties of cultured monoaminergic cell types that later can be transplanted for neurotransmitter replacement following injury or disease.

  9. Barrier and uptake mechanisms in the cerebrovascular response to noradrenaline. [/sup 133/Xe tracer technique, baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCalden, T.A.; Eidelman, B.H.; Mendelow, A.D.

    1977-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in 20 baboons by the intra-arterial xenon-133 injection method. The CBF responses to intra-arterial infusions of noradrenaline (NA) were determined. These responses were normally found to be vasodilator and mediated by beta adrenoreceptors. After infusion of substances blocking extraneuronal uptake of NA or opening of the blood-brain barrier, this vasodilation was either abolished or converted to an alpha-receptor mediated vasoconstriction. This suggests that normally the cerebral circulation is protected against noradrenergic vasoconstriction by mechanisms reducing the concentration of NA in the tunica media to below threshold for alpha-adrenoreceptor stimulation.

  10. Functional adaptation of the human β-cells after frequent exposure to noradrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    KEY POINTS: Trained people produce less insulin than untrained; there is an adaptation of the insulin-producing cells to the trained state. The mechanism behind this adaptation is not known, but some sort of memory must be introduced into the insulin-producing cells. Here it is shown...... in noradrenaline is most likely the stimulus that introduces a memory in the insulin-producing cells. ABSTRACT: Physical training decreases glucose- and arginine-stimulated insulin secretion. The mechanism by which the pancreatic β-cells adapt to the training status of the individual is not known. We hypothesized...... the adaptation of the β-cells seen in trained people....

  11. [Noradrenaline and plasticity of the visual cortex of the kitten: a reexamination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrien, J; Buisseret, P; Fregnac, Y; Gary-Bobo, E; Imbert, M; Tassin, J P; Trotter, Y

    1982-12-06

    We have undertaken a study of the role of the noradrenergic system in the functional modifications, observed in the primary visual cortex of the Kitten, following monocular deprivation. The lids of one eye were sutured in 5 week old Kittens for a period of 1 or 2 weeks. Noradrenergic depletion was obtained by 6-OHDA injection, either intraventricular or localized in the coeruleus complex. Our results indicate that disappearance of noradrenaline in area 17 does not prevent the loss of binocularity of cortical cells, but appears to limit ocular dominance shifts at a stage equivalent to that observed in the intact Kitten after 6 days of monocular deprivation.

  12. Psychoneuromedulator role of corticotrophin releasing hormone in PCOS

    OpenAIRE

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh; Mohammad Mehdi Naghizadeh; Masoumeh Masoumi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common complex condition in women associated with reproductive and metabolic systems and also psychological disorders. There is considerable evidence to suggest that the sympathetic nervous system is involved in PCO and metabolic syndromes. Noradrenalin (NA), corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are the strong stimulants for two axes: hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) ...

  13. [Simultaneous determination of adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisone and cortisol in plasma with HPLC/MS/MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Li; Wang, Yu; Zou, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Lan; Xie, Hui-Ru; Li, Long-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    To develop a method for simultaneous determination of adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisone and cortisol in plasma using HPLC/MS/MS. Sample proteins were precipitated with acetonitrile and the sample solution was injected into HPLC/MS/MS after centrifugation at 15,000 r/min for 5 min. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and the positive ion detection were applied with a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode for quantitative analyses. Under the optimal conditions, good linearity (r > 0.999) was observed in the range of 0.02-200.00 ng/mL of target compounds. The detection limit reached 4.13 pg/mL, 4.64 pg/mL, 4.29 pg/mL and 4.52 pg/mL for adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisone and cortisol respectively. The inter-day and intra-day precisions ranged from 1.19%-5.42% and 2.16%-6.04% respectively. Satisfied results were achieved using human plasma samples, with a spiked recovery in the range of 80.0%-109.0% and a relative standard deviation of 3.93%-7.57%. The proposed method is quick, sensitive and suitable for batch analyses of plasma samples.

  14. GPR40/FFAR1 deficient mice increase noradrenaline levels in the brain and exhibit abnormal behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuka Aizawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFAR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor, which is activated by long chain fatty acids. We have previously demonstrated that activation of brain GPR40/FFAR1 exerts an antinociceptive effect that is mediated by the modulation of the descending pain control system. However, it is unclear whether brain GPR40/FFAR1 contributes to emotional function. In this study, we investigated the involvement of GPR40/FFAR1 in emotional behavior using GPR40/FFAR1 deficient (knockout, KO mice. The emotional behavior in wild and KO male mice was evaluated at 9–10 weeks of age by the elevated plus-maze test, open field test, social interaction test, and sucrose preference test. Brain monoamines levels were measured using LC–MS/MS. The elevated plus-maze test and open field tests revealed that the KO mice reduced anxiety-like behavior. There were no differences in locomotor activity or social behavior between the wild and KO mice. In the sucrose preference test, the KO mice showed reduction in sucrose preference and intake. The level of noradrenaline was higher in the hippocampus, medulla oblongata, hypothalamus and midbrain of KO mice. Therefore, these results suggest that brain GPR40/FFAR1 is associated with anxiety- and depression-related behavior regulated by the increment of noradrenaline in the brain.

  15. Stress Alone or associated with Ethanol Induces Prostanoid Release in Rat Aorta via α2-Adrenoceptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Taipeiro, Elane de Fátima [Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa [Departamento de Análise Clínica - Toxicológica e Ciência de Alimentos - Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas - USP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chies, Agnaldo Bruno [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Cordellini, Sandra, E-mail: cordelli@ibb.unesp.br [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Stress and ethanol are both, independently, important cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the cardiovascular risk of ethanol consumption and stress exposure, isolated and in association, in male adult rats. Rats were separated into 4 groups: Control, ethanol (20% in drinking water for 6 weeks), stress (immobilization 1h day/5 days a week for 6 weeks) and stress/ethanol. Concentration-responses curves to noradrenaline - in the absence and presence of yohimbine, L-NAME or indomethacin - or to phenylephrine were determined in thoracic aortas with and without endothelium. EC50 and maximum response (n=8-12) were compared using two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni method. Either stress or stress in association with ethanol consumption increased the noradrenaline maximum responses in intact aortas. This hyper-reactivity was eliminated by endothelium removal or by the presence of either indomethacin or yohimbine, but was not altered by the presence of L-NAME. Meanwhile, ethanol consumption did not alter the reactivity to noradrenaline. The phenylephrine responses in aortas both with and without endothelium also remained unaffected regardless of protocol. Chronic stress increased rat aortic responses to noradrenaline. This effect is dependent upon the vascular endothelium and involves the release of vasoconstrictor prostanoids via stimulation of endothelial alpha-2 adrenoceptors. Moreover, chronic ethanol consumption appeared to neither influence noradrenaline responses in rat thoracic aorta, nor did it modify the increase of such responses observed as a consequence of stress exposure.

  16. Stress Alone or associated with Ethanol Induces Prostanoid Release in Rat Aorta via α2-Adrenoceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira; Taipeiro, Elane de Fátima; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Chies, Agnaldo Bruno; Cordellini, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress and ethanol are both, independently, important cardiovascular risk factors. Objective To evaluate the cardiovascular risk of ethanol consumption and stress exposure, isolated and in association, in male adult rats. Methods Rats were separated into 4 groups: Control, ethanol (20% in drinking water for 6 weeks), stress (immobilization 1h day/5 days a week for 6 weeks) and stress/ethanol. Concentration-responses curves to noradrenaline - in the absence and presence of yohimbine, L-NAME or indomethacin - or to phenylephrine were determined in thoracic aortas with and without endothelium. EC50 and maximum response (n=8-12) were compared using two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni method. Results Either stress or stress in association with ethanol consumption increased the noradrenaline maximum responses in intact aortas. This hyper-reactivity was eliminated by endothelium removal or by the presence of either indomethacin or yohimbine, but was not altered by the presence of L-NAME. Meanwhile, ethanol consumption did not alter the reactivity to noradrenaline. The phenylephrine responses in aortas both with and without endothelium also remained unaffected regardless of protocol. Conclusion Chronic stress increased rat aortic responses to noradrenaline. This effect is dependent upon the vascular endothelium and involves the release of vasoconstrictor prostanoids via stimulation of endothelial alpha-2 adrenoceptors. Moreover, chronic ethanol consumption appeared to neither influence noradrenaline responses in rat thoracic aorta, nor did it modify the increase of such responses observed as a consequence of stress exposure. PMID:24676223

  17. The dopamine beta-hydroxylase inhibitor nepicastat increases dopamine release and potentiates psychostimulant-induced dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, Paola; Flore, Giovanna; Saba, Pierluigi; Bini, Valentina; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2014-07-01

    The dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor nepicastat has been shown to reproduce disulfiram ability to suppress the reinstatement of cocaine seeking after extinction in rats. To clarify its mechanism of action, we examined the effect of nepicastat, given alone or in association with cocaine or amphetamine, on catecholamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, two key regions involved in the reinforcing and motivational effects of cocaine and in the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Nepicastat effect on catecholamines was evaluated by microdialysis in freely moving rats. Nepicastat reduced noradrenaline release both in the medial prefrontal cortex and in the nucleus accumbens, and increased dopamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex but not in the nucleus accumbens. Moreover, nepicastat markedly potentiated cocaine- and amphetamine-induced extracellular dopamine accumulation in the medial prefrontal cortex but not in the nucleus accumbens. Extracellular dopamine accumulation produced by nepicastat alone or by its combination with cocaine or amphetamine was suppressed by the α2 -adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. It is suggested that nepicastat, by suppressing noradrenaline synthesis and release, eliminated the α2 -adrenoceptor mediated inhibitory mechanism that constrains dopamine release and cocaine- and amphetamine-induced dopamine release from noradrenaline or dopamine terminals in the medial prefrontal cortex.

  18. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D.; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F.; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Ray, Chester A.; Buckey, Jay C Jr; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Gaffney, F. Andrew; Costa, Fernando; Holt, Carol; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Baisch, Friedhelm J.; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio-acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre-flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to -30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 +/- 4 to 72 +/- 4 beats min(-1)) than pre-flight (from 56 +/- 4 at rest to 62 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P < 0.05). Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre-flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post-flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P < 0.05). In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33 %) in the same three subjects in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre-flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre-flight vs. 40 bursts min(-1) in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately and sympathetic

  19. Recovery of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline from different metabolic compartments of rat brain with respect to the role of catechol-O-methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koester, G.; Goede, E.; Breuer, H.

    1984-03-01

    Rats were treated with reserpine, desmethyl-imipramine, or carrier, either alone or in combination with tropolone. Either 10 min (t1) or 1 h (t2) after intraventricular injection of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline, they were decapitated. The total /sup 3/H activity and the recovery of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline were determined in tissue extracts from various brain regions. Maximum total /sup 3/H activity was measured at t1 in all tropolone-treated rats; the mean sum of these results served as an estimate of the initial tissue concentration of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline. At t1, 40-50% of the sum of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline and its metabolites was recovered unchanged in normal rats; reserpine and DMI reduced the recovery to 18-27%. In all groups, the decline of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline was retarded after t1. Inhibition of catechol-O-methyltransferase by tropolone caused consistently elevated (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline levels, but did not affect the metabolic rate after t1 when compared with similarly pretreated, but tropolone-free rats. Thus, if catechol-O-methyltransferase was inhibited during the injection of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline, a higher percentage of the amine had been taken up into spaces with a slow noradrenaline turnover. The maximum increase was seen when the neuronal uptake1 was inhibited by desmethylimipramine. This supported the hypothesis that an additional extraneuronal space exists, in addition to the known intraneuronal and extraneuronal compartments, which has a slow noradrenaline turnover. The tropolone effect on the noradrenaline recovery possibly shows that there might be a saturable ''methylating system,'' similar to that described for the periphery, in which catechol-O-methyltransferase is linked to the extraneuronal uptake.

  20. Adrenaline but not noradrenaline is a determinant of exercise-induced lipid mobilization in human subcutaneous adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glisezinski, I. de; Larrouy, D.; Bajzova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The relative contribution of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) and adrenaline (epinephrine) in the control of lipid mobilization in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) during exercise was evaluated in men treated with a somatostatin analogue, octreotide. Eight lean and eight obese young men matched...... specifically to SCAT and exercise only or if conclusions could be extended to all forms of lipolysis in humans Udgivelsesdato: 2009/7/1...

  1. Autoradiographic localization of 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline in the central nervous system of Lithobius forficatus L. (Myriapoda; Chilopoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Descamps, Michel; Joly, Robert; Jamault-Navarro, Catherine

    1985-01-01

    Using the ability of selective uptake by the neurons of their own secreted amines, two 3H labeled neurotransmitters were used: 5-hydroxytryptamine (5 HT, serotonin) and noradrenaline (NA). Autoradiographic study was conducted on semithin and on ultrathin sections. In the brain, 3H-5 HT labeling is o

  2. Circadian rhythm in plasma noradrenaline of healthy sleep-deprived subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candito, M; Pringuey, D; Jacomet, Y; Souêtre, E; Salvati, E; Ardisson, J L; Chambon, P; Darcourt, G

    1992-12-01

    Under normal sleep-wake conditions, noradrenaline (NA) secretions in supine subjects exhibit a weak circadian variation with a peak that occurs around noon; the sleep span is characterized by reduced NA secretion. Some investigators have reported that the circadian NA rhythm is completely obliterated during sleep deprivation. In our laboratory, plasma NA was assayed every hour for 24 h in nine healthy men 20-23 years of age. All men were deprived of sleep and were required to eat and walk around every hour to prevent sleep. However, subjects remained supine for 20 min before blood samples were collected to eliminate the effect of activity. Persistence of a slight decrease in the night concentration in several subjects, despite sleep deprivation, suggests that NA secretion may be influenced by a biological clock whose activity becomes visible when the influence of posture is removed.

  3. Noradrenaline spillover during exercise in active versus resting skeletal muscle in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G; Strange, S; Kiens, Bente

    1987-01-01

    Increases in plasma noradrenaline (NA) concentration occur during moderate to heavy exercise in man. This study was undertaken to examine the spillover of NA from both resting and contracting skeletal muscle during exercise. Six male subjects performed one-legged knee-extension so that all...... in the exercising leg than in the resting leg both during 50% and 100% leg exercise. These results suggest that contracting skeletal muscle may contribute to a larger extent than resting skeletal muscle to increasing the level of plasma NA during exercise. Contractile activity may influence the NA spillover from...... measurements could be made both in the exercising and in the resting leg. Subjects exercised for 10 min at each of 50% and 100% of the peak performance capacity of the leg. Leg blood flow was measured by thermodilution and blood samples were drawn for the determination of plasma NA and adrenaline, first...

  4. Nocturnal secretion of growth hormone, noradrenaline, cortisol and insulin in cluster headache remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E L; Marcus, C; Waldenlind, E

    2007-08-01

    We have previously shown decreased, nocturnal lipolysis in both phases of cluster headache (CH). Lipolysis is stimulated by noradrenaline (NA), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol, and inhibited by insulin, hormones which are directly or indirectly regulated by the hypothalamus. Our aim was to investigate the nocturnal secretion of NA, GH, cortisol and insulin in nine CH patients in remission and 10 healthy controls. Nocturnal venous blood samples were collected in hourly intervals for analysis of NA, cortisol and insulin and in 30-min intervals for GH. We found a reduced increase in GH between 24.00 h and 01.00 h (anova, P insulin did not differ significantly between the groups. The altered nocturnal GH pattern that was seen in CH patients in remission might in part explain the altered nocturnal lipolysis previously found and further indicate a permanent hypothalamic disturbance in CH.

  5. Atropine-sensitive, tetrodotoxin-resistant contraction induced by noradrenaline in isolated cat rectum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neya,Toshiaki

    1985-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of noradrenaline (NA on the isolated rectal circular muscle of the cats were studied in comparison with the effects on the internal anal sphincter (IAS. NA (10(-8-10(-7 g/ml caused tonic contraction in four of 15 strips of the rectum taken from 15 animals, and in all 15 strips of the IAS. Phenylephrine also induced rectal and IAS contraction. Rectal contraction induced by NA was resistant to phentolamine, yohimbine, propranolol, hexamethonium and tetrodotoxin, but blocked by atropine. IAS contraction induced by NA was resistant to propranolol, atropine, hexamethonium and tetrodotoxin, but blocked by phentolamine and yohimbine. It is suggested that an atropine-sensitive excitatory adrenergic mechanism other than the excitatory alpha-adrenergic mechanism exists in the rectal circular muscle.

  6. ATP and noradrenaline activate CREB in astrocytes via noncanonical Ca(2+) and cyclic AMP independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriba, Paulina; Pardo, Luis; Parra-Damas, Arnaldo; Lichtenstein, Mathieu P; Saura, Carlos A; Pujol, Aurora; Masgrau, Roser; Galea, Elena

    2012-09-01

    In neurons, it is well established that CREB contributes to learning and memory by orchestrating the translation of experience into the activity-dependent (i.e., driven by neurotransmitters) transcription of plasticity-related genes. The activity-dependent CREB-triggered transcription requires the concerted action of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A and Ca(2+) /calcineurin via the CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC). It is not known, however, whether a comparable molecular sequence occurs in astrocytes, despite the unquestionable contribution of these cells to brain plasticity. Here we sought to determine whether and how ATP and noradrenaline cause CREB-dependent transcription in rat cortical astrocyte cultures. Both transmitters induced CREB phosphorylation (Western Blots), CREB-dependent transcription (CRE-luciferase reporter assays), and the transcription of Bdnf, a canonical regulator of synaptic plasticity (quantitative RT-PCR). We indentified a Ca(2+) and diacylglycerol-independent protein kinase C at the uppermost position of the cascade leading to CREB-dependent transcription. Notably, CREB-dependent transcription was partially dependent on ERK1/2 and CRTC, but independent of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A or Ca(2+) /calcineurin. We conclude that ATP and noradrenaline activate CREB-dependent transcription in cortical astrocytes via an atypical protein kinase C. It is of relevance that the signaling involved be starkly different to the one described in neurons since there is no convergence of Ca(2+) and cyclic AMP-dependent pathways on CRTC, which, moreover, exerts a modulatory rather than a central role. Our data thus point to the existence of an alternative, non-neuronal, glia-based role of CREB in plasticity.

  7. Chicks incubated in hypomagnetic field need more exogenous noradrenaline for memory consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Wang, Qian; Xu, Mu-Ling; Jiang, Jin-Chang; Li, Bing

    2009-07-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) is one of the essential characteristics of the terrestrial environment but does not apply in outer space. The elimination of GMF may interfere with the normal activities of life in many aspects. Previous behavioral experiments have found that long-term memory is impaired in chicks incubated in a near-zero magnetic environment (i.e. hypomagnetic field or HMF). The present study was designed to evaluate the possible involvement of noradrenergic change in the functional abnormality observed before. A HMF space was produced by nullifying the natural GMF with three pairs of Helmholtz coils. The one-trial passive avoidance learning paradigm was performed on day-old chicks incubated in either the HMF space or the natural GMF. Exogenous noradrenaline was administered by intracerebral injections and the effect on memory consolidation was compared between the two categories of subjects. In the behavioral paradigm, the HMF chicks had a higher elimination rate than the GMF chicks and displayed a significant reduction in overall responsiveness. The administration of moderate doses (0.1-0.5 nmol/hemisphere) of noradrenaline led to fairly good memory retention in GMF chicks but had little effect on HMF chicks. However, long-term memory of HMF chicks could be elevated to the normal level by much higher doses (1.0-1.75 nmol/hem) of the drug. These results suggest that prolonged exposure to HMF may induce disorders in the noradrenergic system in the brain and indicate a potentiality of counteracting the ill-effect of GMF deprivation with appropriate pharmacological manipulation.

  8. Caffeine and central noradrenaline: effects on mood, cognitive performance, eye movements and cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Brice, Carolyn; Nash, Jon; Rich, Neil; Nutt, David J

    2003-09-01

    There have been numerous studies on the effects of caffeine on behaviour and cardiovascular function. It is now important to clarify the mechanisms that underlie such effects, and the main objective of the present study was to investigate whether changes in central noradrenaline underlie some of the behavioural and cardiovascular effects of caffeine. This was examined using a clonidine challenge paradigm. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were assigned to one of four conditions: (i) clonidine/caffeine; (ii) clonidine/placebo; (iii) placebo/caffeine: (iv) placebo/placebo. Baseline measurements of mood, cognitive performance, saccadic eye movements and cardiovascular function were recorded. Subsequently, volunteers were given either clonidine (200 microg) or placebo and consumed coffee containing caffeine (1.5 mg/kg) or placebo. The test battery was then repeated 30 min, 150 min and 270 min later. A second cup of coffee (with the same amount of caffeine as the first) was consumed 120 min after the first cup. The results showed that clonidine reduced alertness, impaired many aspects of performance and slowed saccadic eye movements; caffeine removed many of these impairments. Both clonidine and caffeine influenced blood pressure (clonidine reduced it, caffeine raised it) but the effects appeared to be independent, suggesting that separate mechanisms were involved. In addition, there were some behavioural effects of caffeine that were independent of the clonidine effect (e.g. effects on speed of encoding of new information) and these may reflect other neurotransmitter systems (e.g cholinergic effects). Overall, the results suggest that caffeine counteracts reductions in the turnover of central noradrenaline. This mechanism may underlie the beneficial effects of caffeine seen in low alertness states.

  9. EVOKED CAVERNOUS ACTIVITY: NEUROANATOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Vicars, Brenda; Yang, Claire C.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the autonomic innervation of the penis by using evoked cavernous activity (ECA). We recruited 7 males with thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) and sexual dysfunction and 6 males who were scheduled to have pelvic surgery (PS), specifically non-nerve-sparing radical cystoprostatectomy. In the PS subjects, ECA was performed both pre- and postoperatively. The left median nerve was electrically stimulated and ECA was recorded with two concentric electromyography needles placed into the right and left cavernous bodies. We simultaneously recorded hand and foot sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) as controls. In the SCI group, all but one subject had reproducible hand SSRs. None of these subjects had ECA or foot SSRs. All the PS subjects had reproducible ECA and SSRs, both preoperatively and postoperatively. There was no difference in the latency and amplitude measurements of ECA and SSRs in the postoperative compared to the preoperative period (p>0.05). In conclusion, ECA is absent in men with SCI above the sympathetic outflow to the genitalia. In men following radical pelvic surgery, ECA is preserved, indicating the preservation of sympathetic fibers. PMID:19609298

  10. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  11. [Intraoperative Visual Evoked Potential Monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hironobu; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) is recorded from the back of the head, which is elicited by retinal stimulation transmitted through optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract lateral geniculate body, optic radiation and finally cortical visual area. VEP monitoring did not prevail since 1990s because marked intra-individual difference and instability of VEP recording limited the clinical usefulness under inhalation anesthetic management and techniques of VEP monitoring at the time. However, recent advances in techniques including a new light-stimulating device consisting of high-luminosity LEDs and induction of electroretinography to ascertain the arrival of the stimulus at the retina provided better conditions for stable VEP recording under general anesthesia. In addition, the introduction of total intravenous anesthesia using propofol is important for the successful VEP recordings because inhaled anesthetics have suppressive effect on VEP waveform. Intraoperative VEP has been considered to monitor the functional integrity of visual function during neurosurgical procedures, in which the optic pathway is at a risk of injury. Intraoperative VEP monitoring may allow us to detect reversible damage to the visual pathway intraoperatively and enable us to prevent permanent impairment.

  12. Evoked potentials in neuroinfections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Komantsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the neurophysiological study in which 95 children with viral encephalitis and 30 children with meningitis (age from 2 up to 17 years undergo evoked potentials investigation. Some specific features of evoked potentials in neuroinfections have been shown to correlate with the course of disease and the age of the patients. We give a description of a logistic model of predicting outcomes in such patients by complex diagnostic method. We have found that evoked potentials may be successfully implemented in correcting the therapeutic strategies. Study of evoked potentials in neuroinfections in children can define the severity and extent of lesions and help to identify subclinical dysfunction and monitor the recovery processes under the therapy.

  13. Visual Evoked Potentials in Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Boston Children's Hospital recorded pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice and in 34 girls with Rett syndrome (RTT.

  14. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Theresia Weber-Glass; Elisabeth eLingg; Eva eHeuberger

    2014-01-01

    Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman’s (Ekman et al., 1983) basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive respons...

  15. Optical dynamic imaging of the regional blood flow in the rat mesentery under the effect of noradrenalin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The regional blood flow in the rat mesentery under the effect of noradrenalin is monitored using the laser speckle imaging method. The results show that at the third minute of application of noradrenalin, the blood flow begins to decrease, and the venule blood flow decreases more rapidly than that in the arteriole. Five minutes later blood flow in part of blood vessels begins to resume and the blood flow in the arteriole recovers more quickly than that in the venule. These suggest that laser speckle imaging can obtain the temporal-spatial characteristic of blood flow in mesentery without the need of scanning. It provides a new approach for investigating the change of regional blood flow in the mesentery in microcirculation studies.

  16. Prenatal malnutrition-induced functional alterations in callosal connections and in interhemispheric asymmetry in rats are prevented by reduction of noradrenaline synthesis during gestation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soto-Moyano, R; Alarcon, S; Hernández, A; Pérez, H; Ruiz, S; Carreño, P; Kusch, C; Belmar, J

    1998-01-01

    ... and synaptic elimination. This suggests that some of the functional disturbances in brain induced by prenatal malnutrition could be due at least in part to increased noradrenaline activity that may enhance regressive events...

  17. The effects of cocaine and diphenhydramine upon the reactivity of rat vas deferens to supramaximal doses of noradrenaline and of other agonists: the mode of action of cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennefather, J N

    1976-02-01

    The effects of cocaine on responses to supramaximal concentrations of agonists have been studied in preparations of rat vas deferens. Cocaine 10 muM decreased the mean time to peak and increased the mean magnitude of responses to noradrenaline but not to supramaximal field stimulation of sympathetic fibres, to high potassium or to methoxamine. Diphenydramine 10 muM affected responses to noradrenaline similarly. It is proposed that the prejunctional action of cocaine and of diphenhydramine to reduce the rate of neuronal uptake of noradrenaline may provide a sufficient explanation for the enhanced reactivity of the vas deferens to noradrenaline, as this would allow an increased rate of rise of amine concentration at the receptors. Cocaine also enhanced the reactivity of the vas deferens to acetylcholine. The basis of this enhancement by cocaine of the reactivity of the vas deferens to acetylcholine remains to be established, but clearly is not mediated postjunctionally since responses to carbachol were not similarly affected.

  18. Effects of noradrenaline on the cell-surface glucose transporters in cultured brown adipocytes: novel mechanism for selective activation of GLUT1 glucose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Satoh, S; Yano, H; Minokoshi, Y; Cushman, S W; Shimazu, T

    1998-01-01

    Glucose transport into rat brown adipocytes has been shown to be stimulated directly by the sympathetic neurotransmitter, noradrenaline, without a significant increase in the protein content of either GLUT1 or GLUT4 glucose transporter in the plasma membrane [Shimizu, Kielar, Minokoshi and Shimazu (1996) Biochem. J. 314, 485-490]. In the present study, we labelled the exofacial glucose-binding sites of GLUT1 and GLUT4 with a membrane-impermeant photoaffinity reagent, 2-N-[4-(1-azitrifluoroethyl)benzoyl]-[2-3H]1,3-bis- (D-mannos-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-[3H]BMPA), to determine which isoform is responsible for the noradrenaline-induced increase in glucose transport into intact brown adipocytes in culture. Insulin stimulated the rate of hexose transport by increasing ATB-[3H]BMPA-labelled cell-surface GLUT4. In contrast, the noradrenaline-induced increase in glucose transport was not accompanied by an increased ATB-[3H]BMPA labelling of GLUT4, nor with an increased amount of GLUT4 in the plasma membrane fraction as assessed by Western blotting, indicating that noradrenaline does not promote the translocation of GLUT4. However, noradrenaline induced an increase in photoaffinity labelling of cell-surface GLUT1 without an apparent increase in the immunoreactive GLUT1 protein in the plasma membrane. This is suggestive of an increased affinity of GLUT1 for the ligand. In fact, the Ki value of non-radioactive ATB-BMPA for 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake was significantly decreased after treatment of the cells with noradrenaline. The increased photoaffinity labelling of GLUT1 and increased glucose transport caused by noradrenaline were inhibited by a cAMP antagonist, cAMP-S Rp-isomer. These results demonstrate that noradrenaline stimulates glucose transport in brown adipocytes by enhancing the functional activity of GLUT1 through a cAMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:9461536

  19. Noradrenaline-induced increases in calcium and tension in skeletal muscle conductance and resistance arteries from rats with post-infarction heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautner, Simon; Amtorp, Ole; Boesgaard, Soren; Andersen, Claus B; Galbo, Henrik; Haunsoe, Stig; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2006-05-10

    We tested the hypothesis that arterial reactivity to noradrenaline is augmented in congestive heart failure (CHF), which could contribute to the deleterious changes in peripheral vascular resistance and compliance in this condition. From male Wistar rats with post-infarction CHF and sham-operated rats, skeletal muscle conductance and resistance arteries (mean lumen diameters: 514 and 186 microm) were isolated and mounted on wire myographs, and wall tension was recorded in response to cumulative application of acetylcholine and noradrenaline to the vessel segments. In a subset of experiments, wall tension and cytosolic free calcium ion concentration [Ca(2+)](i) were recorded simultaneously during noradrenaline application, using wire myography and the FURA-2 technique. No significant differences were found in the arterial baseline levels of [Ca(2+)](i) or tension between CHF and sham rats. In the resistance arteries of CHF rats, the noradrenaline-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) were significantly enhanced (P=0.003). Despite the augmented [Ca(2+)](i) levels, the tension responses to noradrenaline were unaltered in these arteries. In the conductance arteries, there were no significant differences in noradrenaline-induced [Ca(2+)](i) or tension responses between CHF and control rats. CHF did not alter vascular morphology or change vascular relaxations to acetylcholine in either type of artery. In conclusion, these results do not support the contention that arterial reactivity to noradrenaline is augmented in the skeletal muscle vascular bed in CHF. On the contrary, the unchanged contractile responsiveness in the resistance arteries despite the enhanced levels of [Ca(2+)](i) during noradrenaline application suggests that the contractile function of these vessels is compromised in CHF. Neither vascular remodeling, endothelial dysfunction nor changes in baseline vascular tone could be demonstrated in the skeletal muscle vascular bed of this animal model of heart failure.

  20. Central noradrenaline transporter availability in highly obese, non-depressed individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Medical Centre, Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Becker, Georg-Alexander; Bresch, Anke; Luthardt, Julia; Patt, Marianne; Meyer, Philipp M. [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Rullmann, Michael [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Medical Centre, Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Hankir, Mohammed K.; Zientek, Franziska; Reissig, Georg; Fenske, Wiebke K. [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Arelin, Katrin [Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); University of Leipzig, Day Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Lobsien, Donald [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuroradiology, Leipzig (Germany); Mueller, Ulrich [University of Cambridge, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Baldofski, S.; Hilbert, Anja [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); University of Leipzig, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Leipzig (Germany); Blueher, Matthias [University of Leipzig, Department of Internal Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Fasshauer, Mathias; Stumvoll, Michael [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); University of Leipzig, Department of Internal Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Ding, Yu-Shin [New York University School of Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The brain noradrenaline (NA) system plays an important role in the central nervous control of energy balance and is thus implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity. The specific processes modulated by this neurotransmitter which lead to obesity and overeating are still a matter of debate. We tested the hypothesis that in vivo NA transporter (NAT) availability is changed in obesity by using positron emission tomography (PET) and S,S-[{sup 11}C]O-methylreboxetine (MRB) in twenty subjects comprising ten highly obese (body mass index BMI > 35 kg/m{sup 2}), metabolically healthy, non-depressed individuals and ten non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m{sup 2}) healthy controls. Overall, we found no significant differences in binding potential (BP{sub ND}) values between obese and non-obese individuals in the investigated brain regions, including the NAT-rich thalamus (0.40 ± 0.14 vs. 0.41 ± 0.18; p = 0.84) though additional discriminant analysis correctly identified individual group affiliation based on regional BP{sub ND} in all but one (control) case. Furthermore, inter-regional correlation analyses indicated different BP{sub ND} patterns between both groups but this did not survive testing for multiple comparions. Our data do not find an overall involvement of NAT changes in human obesity. However, preliminary secondary findings of distinct regional and associative patterns warrant further investigation. (orig.)

  1. Uptake of [3H]-nicotine and [3H]-noradrenaline by cultured chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceña, V.; García, A. G.; Montiel, C.; Sánchez-García, P.

    1984-01-01

    Three day-old cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells incubated at room temperature with Krebs-HEPES solution containing different concentrations of [3H]-nicotine, took up and retained increasing amounts of the drug by a mechanism that did not saturate. Concentrations of cold nicotine as high as 100 microM did not alter the amount of [3H]-nicotine retained by cells. Imipramine, cocaine, tetracaine or mecamylamine, at concentrations (10 microM) that blocked the catecholamine secretory effects of nicotine completely, did not modify the uptake of [3H]-nicotine. Both imipramine and cocaine drastically inhibited [3H]-noradrenaline uptake by cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50S of 0.08 and 1 microM, respectively). These data indicate that the secretory effects of nicotine are not coupled to its previous uptake into cells, and are evidence in favour of a site of action for nicotine located in or at the surface of the chromaffin cell membrane. PMID:6704577

  2. Genesis and Maintenance of Attentional Biases: The Role of the Locus Coeruleus-Noradrenaline System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mana R. Ehlers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotionally arousing events are typically better remembered than mundane ones, in part because emotionally relevant aspects of our environment are prioritized in attention. Such biased attentional tuning is itself the result of associative processes through which we learn affective and motivational relevance of cues. We propose that the locus coeruleus-noradrenaline (LC-NA system plays an important role in the genesis of attentional biases through associative learning processes as well as their maintenance. We further propose that individual differences in and disruptions of the LC-NA system underlie the development of maladaptive biases linked to psychopathology. We provide support for the proposed role of the LC-NA system by first reviewing work on attentional biases in development and its link to psychopathology in relation to alterations and individual differences in NA availability. We focus on pharmacological manipulations to demonstrate the effect of a disrupted system as well as the ADRA2b polymorphism as a tool to investigate naturally occurring differences in NA availability. We next review associative learning processes that—modulated by the LC-NA system—result in such implicit attentional biases. Further, we demonstrate how NA may influence aversive and appetitive conditioning linked to anxiety disorders as well as addiction and depression.

  3. Noradrenaline acting on alpha1-adrenoceptor mediates REM sleep deprivation-induced increased membrane potential in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gitanjali; Mallick, Birendra Nath

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that one of the functions of REM sleep is to maintain brain excitability and therefore, REM sleep deprivation is likely to modulate neuronal transmembrane potential; however, so far there was no direct evidence to support the claim. In this study a cationic dye, 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide was used to estimate the potential in synaptosomal samples prepared from control and REM sleep deprived rat brains. The activity of Na-K-ATPase that maintains the transmembrane potential was also estimated in the same sample. Further, the roles of noradrenaline and alpha1-adrenoceptor in mediating the responses were studied both in vivo as well as in vitro. Rats were REM sleep deprived for 4 days by the classical flower-pot method; large platform and recovery controls were carried out in addition to free-moving control. The fluorescence intensity increased in samples prepared from REM sleep deprived rat brain as compared to control, which reflected synaptosomal depolarization after deprivation. The Na-K-ATPase activity also increased in the same deprived sample. Furthermore, both the effects were mediated by noradrenaline acting on alpha1-adrenoceptors in the brain. This is the first direct evidence showing that REM sleep deprivation indeed increased neuronal depolarization, which is the likely cause for increased brain excitability, thus supporting our hypothesis and the effect was mediated by noradrenaline acting through the alpha1-adrenoceptor.

  4. Raised Intracellular Calcium Contributes to Ischemia-Induced Depression of Evoked Synaptic Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Jalini

    Full Text Available Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD leads to depression of evoked synaptic transmission, for which the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that increased presynaptic [Ca2+]i during transient OGD contributes to the depression of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs. Additionally, we hypothesized that increased buffering of intracellular calcium would shorten electrophysiological recovery after transient ischemia. Mouse hippocampal slices were exposed to 2 to 8 min of OGD. fEPSPs evoked by Schaffer collateral stimulation were recorded in the stratum radiatum, and whole cell current or voltage clamp recordings were performed in CA1 neurons. Transient ischemia led to increased presynaptic [Ca2+]i, (shown by calcium imaging, increased spontaneous miniature EPSP/Cs, and depressed evoked fEPSPs, partially mediated by adenosine. Buffering of intracellular Ca2+ during OGD by membrane-permeant chelators (BAPTA-AM or EGTA-AM partially prevented fEPSP depression and promoted faster electrophysiological recovery when the OGD challenge was stopped. The blocker of BK channels, charybdotoxin (ChTX, also prevented fEPSP depression, but did not accelerate post-ischemic recovery. These results suggest that OGD leads to elevated presynaptic [Ca2+]i, which reduces evoked transmitter release; this effect can be reversed by increased intracellular Ca2+ buffering which also speeds recovery.

  5. Characterization of music-evoked autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, Petr; Tomic, Stefan T; Rakowski, Sonja K

    2007-11-01

    Despite music's prominence in Western society and its importance to individuals in their daily lives, very little is known about the memories and emotions that are often evoked when hearing a piece of music from one's past. We examined the content of music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) using a novel approach for selecting stimuli from a large corpus of popular music, in both laboratory and online settings. A set of questionnaires probed the cognitive and affective properties of the evoked memories. On average, 30% of the song presentations evoked autobiographical memories, and the majority of songs also evoked various emotions, primarily positive, that were felt strongly. The third most common emotion was nostalgia. Analyses of written memory reports found both general and specific levels of autobiographical knowledge to be represented, and several social and situational contexts for memory formation were common across many memories. The findings indicate that excerpts of popular music serve as potent stimuli for studying the structure of autobiographical memories.

  6. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in Spinal Dorsal Horn Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Patrick M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removing and sequestering synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space is carried out by specific plasma membrane transporters that are primarily located in astrocytes. Glial glutamate transporter function can be monitored by recording the currents that are produced by co-transportation of Na+ ions with the uptake of glutamate. The goal of this study was to characterize glutamate transporter function in astrocytes of the spinal cord dorsal horn in real time by recording synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents. Results Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from astrocytes in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG area in spinal slices of young adult rats. Glutamate transporter currents were evoked in these cells by electrical stimulation at the spinal dorsal root entry zone in the presence of bicuculline, strychnine, DNQX and D-AP5. Transporter currents were abolished when synaptic transmission was blocked by TTX or Cd2+. Pharmacological studies identified two subtypes of glutamate transporters in spinal astrocytes, GLAST and GLT-1. Glutamate transporter currents were graded with stimulus intensity, reaching peak responses at 4 to 5 times activation threshold, but were reduced following low-frequency (0.1 – 1 Hz repetitive stimulation. Conclusion These results suggest that glutamate transporters of spinal astrocytes could be activated by synaptic activation, and recording glutamate transporter currents may provide a means of examining the real time physiological responses of glial cells in spinal sensory processing, sensitization, hyperalgesia and chronic pain.

  7. Effects of Noradrenaline and Potassium Chloride on peripheral vessels in one experimental model of heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Naghadeh M

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated contraction to noradrenaline (NA and KC1 and sensitivity of NA at the level of larger vessels (thoracic aorta and vena cava; left renal artery and left renal vein; lateral saphenous artery and lateral saphenous vein and finally central ear artery and marginal ear vein in a model devised to mimic heart failure. The model presented here is the rabbit coronary ligation model in which myocardial infarction was produced ligation model in which myocardial infarction was produced in male New Zeeland white myocardial infarction was produced in male New Zeeland white rabbits (2.6 kg-3.0 Kg by ligation of the marginal branch of the left descending coronary artery. The development of chronic heart failure was allowed to proceed over eight weeks. Animals were killed by overdose with pentobarbitone sodium (IV injection. Arteries and veins were carefully removed with as little connective tissue as possible and placed in cold physiological salt solution (PSS. The arterial and venous rings were mounted in 10 ml isolated organ baths, bathed in Kerbs maintained at 37 °c with 95% O2 plus 5% CO2. The rings were then placed under different resting tensions. After initial application of tension, tissues were left to equilibrate for a 60 min period. Then all tissues were exposed to cumulative concentration of NA (1nM-300µM. Following complete washout, the preparations were left for 45 minutes to re-equilibrate. Then all preparations were contracted with KCl (Krebs solution, sodium free and high KCl, 125 mM and allowed to contract for 5-10 min. Following complete washout with normal Krebs an additional 30 minutes equilibration period was allowed. Then cumulative concentration-response curves (CCRS to NA obtained by increasing the concentration-response curves (CCRC to NA obtained by increasing the concentration of the agonist in half-log increments. In contraction responses to NA aorta, ear artery and ear vein were the most sensitive preparations (pD2

  8. Learning-induced reversal of the effect of noradrenalin on the postburst AHP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosh, Inbar; Rosenblum, Kobi; Barkai, Edi

    2006-10-01

    Pyramidal neurons in the piriform cortex from olfactory-discrimination-trained rats have reduced postburst afterhyperpolarization (AHP), for 3 days after learning, and are thus more excitable during this period. Such AHP reduction is caused by decreased conductance of one or more of the calcium-dependent potassium currents, I(AHP) and sI(AHP), that mediate the medium and slow AHPs. In this study, we examined which potassium current is reduced by learning and how the effect of noradrenalin (NE) on neuronal excitability is modified by such reduction. The small conductance (SK) channels inhibitor, apamin, that selectively blocks I(A)(HP), reduced the AHP in neurons from trained, naïve, and pseudotrained rats to a similar extent, thus maintaining the difference in AHP amplitude between neurons from trained rats and controls. In addition, the protein expression level of the SK1, SK2, and SK3 channels was also similar in all groups. NE, which was shown to enhance I(AHP) while suppressing (S)I(AHP), reduced the AHP in neurons from controls but enhanced the AHP in neurons from trained rats. Our data show that learning-induced enhancement of neuronal excitability is not the result of reduction in the I(AHP) current. Thus it is probably mediated by reduction in conductance of the other calcium-dependent potassium current, sI(AHP). Consequently, the effect of NE on neuronal excitability is reversed. We propose that the change in the effect of NE after learning may act to counterbalance learning-induced hyperexcitability and preserve the piriform cortex ability to subserve olfactory learning.

  9. Quantified distribution of the noradrenaline innervation in the hippocampus of adult rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleskevich, S.; Descarries, L.; Lacaille, J.C. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1989-11-01

    A recently developed radioautographic technique, based on the uptake labeling of monoamine terminals in vitro, was used to quantify the noradrenaline (NA) innervation in adult rat hippocampus. After incubation of brain slices with 1 microM 3H-NA, the NA varicosities were visualized as small aggregates of silver grains, in light microscope radioautographs prepared at 3 equidistant horizontal levels across the ventral 2/3 of the hippocampus. Using a computer-assisted image analyzer, counts were obtained from the subiculum (SUB), 3 sectors of Ammon's horn (CA1, CA3-a, CA3-b) and 3 sectors of the dentate gyrus (DG-medial blade, crest, and lateral blade), every lamina being sampled in each region. After a double correction for duration of radioautographic exposure and section thickness, and following measurement of varicosity diameter in electron microscope radioautographs, it was possible to express these results in number of terminals per volumetric unit of tissue. It was thus found that the overall density of hippocampal NA innervation averages 2.1 million varicosities/mm3 of tissue, a value almost twice as high as that in cerebral cortex. This innervation is 20% denser ventrally than dorsally and is heterogeneous both in terms of regional and laminar distribution. SUB and DG are more strongly innervated than Ammon's horn, wherein CA1 has the lowest overall density. In SUB and CA1, there is a clear predilection of NA varicosities for the stratum moleculare. In CA3, there is a narrow band of even stronger innervation in the stratum radiatum, near the apical border of the stratum pyramidale, contrasting with a 3 times lower density in this cell layer and the stratum oriens. In DG, the NA innervation is again the weakest in the cell body layer and exhibits an almost 3-fold greater density in the polymorph layer, the highest of all hippocampus.

  10. Effects of acetylcholine and noradrenalin on action potentials of isolated rabbit sinoatrial and atrial myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie O. Verkerk

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system controls heart rate and contractility through sympathetic and parasympathetic inputs to the cardiac tissue, with acetylcholine (ACh and noradrenalin (NA as the chemical transmitters. In recent years, it has become clear that specific Regulators of G protein Signalling proteins (RGS proteins suppress muscarinic sensitivity and parasympathetic tone, identifying RGS proteins as intriguing potential therapeutic targets. In the present study, we have identified the effects of 1 µM ACh and 1 µM NA on the intrinsic action potentials of sinotrial (SA nodal and atrial myocytes. Single cells were enzymatically isolated from the SA node or from the left atrium of rabbit hearts. Action potentials were recorded using the amphotericin-perforated patch-clamp technique in the absence and presence of ACh, NA or a combination of both. In SA nodal myocytes, ACh increased cycle length and decreased diastolic depolarization rate, whereas NA decreased cycle length and increased diastolic depolarization rate. Both ACh and NA increased maximum upstroke velocity. Furthermore, ACh hyperpolarized the maximum diastolic potential. In atrial myocytes stimulated at 2 Hz, both ACh and NA hyperpolarized the maximum diastolic potential, increased the action potential amplitude, and increased the maximum upstroke velocity. Action potential duration at 50 and 90% repolarization was decreased by ACh, but increased by NA. The effects of both ACh and NA on action potential duration showed a dose dependence in the range of 1–1,000 nM, while a clear-cut frequency dependence in the range of 1–4 Hz was absent. Intermediate results were obtained in the combined presence of ACh and NA in both SA nodal and atrial myocytes. Our data uncover the extent to which SA nodal and atrial action potentials are intrinsically dependent on ACh, NA or a combination of both and may thus guide further experiments with RGS proteins.

  11. Noradrenaline-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) and tension in mesenteric arteries from diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, W L; Zhang, L; MacLeod, K M

    2001-09-01

    1. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether enhanced contractile responses to noradrenaline (NA) of mesenteric arteries from rats with chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetes are associated with increases in mean cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i. 2. [Ca(2+)]i was measured with fura 2-AM, and was monitored simultaneously with tension in perfused endothelium-denuded mesenteric arterial rings from 12 - 14 week diabetic rats and age- and gender-matched control rats. 3. Basal [Ca(2+)]i (expressed as R(n), the normalized fura 2 ratio) was not significantly different in arteries from control and diabetic rats. Similarly, no differences between control and diabetic arteries in the tension or [Ca(2+)]i responses to 80 mM KCl in the presence of phentolamine were detected. 4. The rate of tension development, peak tension and integrated tension in response to 30 microM NA were all significantly greater in diabetic than control arteries. However, this was not associated with enhancement of the corresponding [Ca(2+)]i responses in the diabetic arteries. 5. Peak contractile responses to perfusion with both 0.3 and 3 microM NA, but peak [Ca(2+)]i only in response to 0.3 microM NA, were significantly greater in diabetic than control arteries. 6. NA (30 microM) produced a greater increase in both peak tension and [Ca(2+)]i in diabetic than control arteries perfused with Ca(2+)-free solution containing 1 mM EGTA. Neither the rate nor the magnitude of NA-induced Ca(2+) influx appeared to be altered in the diabetic arteries. 7. The enhanced sustained contractile response of diabetic arteries to NA appears to be dissociated from increases in [Ca(2+)]i, and may be due to other factors, such as an increase in the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile proteins.

  12. Daily variations in the influence of noradrenaline on preferred ambient temperature of the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefimow, Małgorzata; Wojciechowski, Michał; Tegowska, Eugenia

    2003-04-01

    Daily variations in sensitivity to noradrenaline (NA) and the activation of nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) are important for survival under a potentially wide range of environmental conditions. However, little is known regarding the ability of the Siberian hamster and other species to activate NST in the day and night when they may be subjected to marked variations in environmental temperature. In this study, the effects of acclimation temperature and time of day on the behavioral thermoregulatory response to NA injections in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) was investigated. Hamsters were acclimated for 4 weeks to 23 degrees C and a L:D 12:12 h photoperiod. After acclimation, preferred ambient temperatures (PT(a)) in saline- and NA-injected animals were measured continuously in the temperature gradient system. NA (0.6 mg/kg; s.c.) was given every 4 h while PT(a) was monitored. After NA injections there was a rapid drop in PT(a), decreasing to approximately 15 degrees C within 10-20 min after each NA injection. Following 4 weeks of acclimation to 10 degrees C and a L:D 8:16 h photoperiod, the same hamsters were re-tested in the temperature gradient system. Cold acclimation led to an accentuation in the behavioral response with a decrease in PT(a) of approximately 10 degrees C. The maximal decrease in preferred ambient temperatures was recorded during the light phase of the day and during the second part of the night. Lowering of PT(a) after NA allows for rapid dissipation of the heat from NST. Overall, the behavioral response reflects the daily changes in brown adipose tissue sensitivity to NA and thus capacity for NST.

  13. Viral-genetic tracing of the input-output organization of a central noradrenaline circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Lindsay A; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Gao, Xiaojing J; Beier, Kevin T; Weissbourd, Brandon; DeLoach, Katherine E; Ren, Jing; Ibanes, Sandy; Malenka, Robert C; Kremer, Eric J; Luo, Liqun

    2015-08-01

    Deciphering how neural circuits are anatomically organized with regard to input and output is instrumental in understanding how the brain processes information. For example, locus coeruleus noradrenaline (also known as norepinephrine) (LC-NE) neurons receive input from and send output to broad regions of the brain and spinal cord, and regulate diverse functions including arousal, attention, mood and sensory gating. However, it is unclear how LC-NE neurons divide up their brain-wide projection patterns and whether different LC-NE neurons receive differential input. Here we developed a set of viral-genetic tools to quantitatively analyse the input-output relationship of neural circuits, and applied these tools to dissect the LC-NE circuit in mice. Rabies-virus-based input mapping indicated that LC-NE neurons receive convergent synaptic input from many regions previously identified as sending axons to the locus coeruleus, as well as from newly identified presynaptic partners, including cerebellar Purkinje cells. The 'tracing the relationship between input and output' method (or TRIO method) enables trans-synaptic input tracing from specific subsets of neurons based on their projection and cell type. We found that LC-NE neurons projecting to diverse output regions receive mostly similar input. Projection-based viral labelling revealed that LC-NE neurons projecting to one output region also project to all brain regions we examined. Thus, the LC-NE circuit overall integrates information from, and broadcasts to, many brain regions, consistent with its primary role in regulating brain states. At the same time, we uncovered several levels of specificity in certain LC-NE sub-circuits. These tools for mapping output architecture and input-output relationship are applicable to other neuronal circuits and organisms. More broadly, our viral-genetic approaches provide an efficient intersectional means to target neuronal populations based on cell type and projection pattern.

  14. Brain correlates of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies, partly owing to its power to evoke strong emotions and influence moods. During the past decade, the investigation of the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions has been invaluable for the understanding of human emotion. Functional neuroimaging studies on music and emotion show that music can modulate activity in brain structures that are known to be crucially involved in emotion, such as the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, insula, cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. The potential of music to modulate activity in these structures has important implications for the use of music in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  15. Evoking prescribed spike times in stochastic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Jens; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Single cell stimulation in vivo is a powerful tool to investigate the properties of single neurons and their functionality in neural networks. We present a method to determine a cell-specific stimulus that reliably evokes a prescribed spike train with high temporal precision of action potentials. We test the performance of this stimulus in simulations for two different stochastic neuron models. For a broad range of parameters and a neuron firing with intermediate firing rates (20-40 Hz) the reliability in evoking the prescribed spike train is close to its theoretical maximum that is mainly determined by the level of intrinsic noise.

  16. Formalin evokes calcium transients from the endoplasmatic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J M Fischer

    Full Text Available The formalin test is the most widely used behavioral screening test for analgesic compounds. The cellular mechanism of action of formaldehyde, inducing a typically biphasic pain-related behavior in rodents is addressed in this study. The chemoreceptor channel TRPA1 was suggested as primary transducer, but the high concentrations used in the formalin test elicit a similar response in TRPA1 wildtype and knockout animals. Here we show that formaldehyde evokes a dose-dependent calcium release from intracellular stores in mouse sensory neurons and primary keratinocytes as well as in non-neuronal cell lines, and independent of TRPA1. The source of calcium is the endoplasmatic reticulum and inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase has a major contribution. This TRPA1-independent mechanism may underlie formaldehyde-induced pan-neuronal excitation and subsequent inflammation.

  17. The importance of the time of digitalization for the incidence of spasms evoked by ouabain in strips of human saphenous vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkowski, H R; Wagner, J

    1982-10-01

    The extent of contracture induced by ouabain on preparations of the greater saphenous vein obtained from patients undergoing elective coronary bypass surgery was investigated. The medical pretreatment of the various donor patients was similar but differed with regard to the duration of preoperative digitalization ranging from several days to months. Whereas the maximal contraction induced by noradrenaline was not influenced by prior digitalization, the contracture evoked by ouabain showed a strong dependency on the duration of preoperative digitalization. In patients without or with only short-term preoperative digitalization the spasm exerted by ouabain amounted to 48.8% and 49.2%, respectively, of the maximal contraction induced by noradrenaline, and decreased to zero in patients with long-term digitalization. From this result it is concluded that, in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting who did not receive cardiac glycosides for long-term treatment, the acute administration of glycosides may be a mechanism responsible for the early occlusion of saphenous vein bypass grafts.

  18. Localization of the sensory neurons and mechanoreceptors required for stretch-evoked colonic migrating motor complexes in mouse colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir P Zagorodnyuk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The pacemaker and pattern generator that underlies the cyclical generation of spontaneous colonic migrating motor complexes (CMMCs has recently been identified to lie within the myenteric plexus and/or muscularis externa. Neither the mucosa, nor the release of substances from the mucosa were found to be required for the spontaneous generation of CMMCs. However, it is known that stretch applied to the colonic wall can also evoke CMMCs and since stretch of the gut wall is known to stimulate the mucosa, it is not clear whether release of substances from the mucosa and/or submucosal plexus are required for stretch-evoked CMMCs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether circumferential stretch-evoked CMMCs require the presence of the mucosa and/or submucosal plexus in isolated mouse colon. Spontaneous CMMCs were recorded from full length sheet preparations of colon in vitro. Graded circumferential stretch (at a rate of 100μm/s applied to a 15mm segment of mid-distal colon reliably evoked a CMMC, which propagated to the oral recording site. Sharp dissection to remove the mucosa and submucosal plexus from the entire colon did not prevent spontaneous CMMCs and circumferential stretch-evoked CMMCs were still reliably evoked by circumferential stretch even at lower thresholds. In contrast, in intact preparations, direct stimulation of the mucosa (without accompanying stretch proved highly inconsistent and rarely evoked a CMMC. These observations lead to the inescapable conclusion that the sensory neurons activated by colonic stretch to initiate CMMCs lie in the myenteric plexus, while the mechanoreceptors activated by stretch, lie in the myenteric ganglia and/or muscularis externa. Stretch activation of these mechanoreceptors does not require release of any substance(s from the mucosa, or neural inputs arising from submucosal ganglia.

  19. Splanchnic and renal elimination and release of catecholamines in cirrhosis. Evidence of enhanced sympathetic nervous activity in patients with decompensated cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring-Larsen, H; Kanstrup, I L; Christensen, N J

    1984-01-01

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA) and adrenaline (A) concentrations were determined in different vascular areas in 32 patients with cirrhosis and in nine controls during a right sided heart, liver, and renal vein catheterisation. The patients were divided into four groups: (I) Compensated (without ascites......, respectively, the three last mentioned values being significantly raised (p less than 0.01). Median arterial adrenaline concentrations were not significantly increased. In patients arterial-hepatic venous extraction ratios of noradrenaline and adrenaline were on the average 25% (p less than 0.01) and 20% (p...... differences were significantly increased in groups II, III and IV (0.47, 0.53 and 0.68 nmol/l, p less than 0.01), indicating a significant net release of noradrenaline from the kidneys in recompensated and decompensated patients. Renal extraction of adrenaline was normal. In conclusion, increased arterial...

  20. [Effect of sleep deprivation on visual evoked potentials and brain stem auditory evoked potentials in epileptics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urumova, L T; Kovalenko, G A; Tsunikov, A I; Sumskiĭ, L I

    1984-01-01

    The article reports on the first study of the evoked activity of the brain in epileptic patients (n = 20) following sleep deprivation. An analysis of the data obtained has revealed a tendency to the shortening of the peak latent intervals of visual evoked potentials in the range of 100-200 mu sec and the V component and the interpeak interval III-V of evoked auditory trunk potentials in patients with temporal epilepsy. The phenomenon may indicate the elimination of stabilizing control involving the specific conductive pathways and, possibly, an accelerated conduction of a specific sensor signal.

  1. Color Evoked Potentials in Adults and Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carroll T.; And Others

    This paper discusses recent studies of the adult visual evoked potential (VEP) which have indicated that specific components of the complex waveform obtained are related to the three basic color processes, and that these components interact in ways that seem to agree with opponent-colors phenomena. The components identified as being related to the…

  2. Methylglyoxal evokes pain by stimulating TRPA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Andersson

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is a severe complication of long-standing diabetes and one of the major etiologies of neuropathic pain. Diabetes is associated with an increased formation of reactive oxygen species and the electrophilic dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MG. Here we show that MG stimulates heterologously expressed TRPA1 in CHO cells and natively expressed TRPA1 in MDCK cells and DRG neurons. MG evokes [Ca(2+]i-responses in TRPA1 expressing DRG neurons but is without effect in neurons cultured from Trpa1(-/- mice. Consistent with a direct, intracellular action, we show that methylglyoxal is significantly more potent as a TRPA1 agonist when applied to the intracellular face of excised membrane patches than to intact cells. Local intraplantar administration of MG evokes a pain response in Trpa1(+/+ but not in Trpa1(-/- mice. Furthermore, persistently increased MG levels achieved by two weeks pharmacological inhibition of glyoxalase-1 (GLO-1, the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for detoxification of MG, evokes a progressive and marked thermal (cold and heat and mechanical hypersensitivity in wildtype but not in Trpa1(-/- mice. Our results thus demonstrate that TRPA1 is required both for the acute pain response evoked by topical MG and for the long-lasting pronociceptive effects associated with elevated MG in vivo. In contrast to our observations in DRG neurons, MG evokes indistinguishable [Ca(2+]i-responses in pancreatic β-cells cultured from Trpa1(+/+ and Trpa1(-/- mice. In vivo, the TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 impairs glucose clearance in the glucose tolerance test both in Trpa1(+/+ and Trpa1(-/- mice, indicating a non-TRPA1 mediated effect and suggesting that results obtained with this compound should be interpreted with caution. Our results show that TRPA1 is the principal target for MG in sensory neurons but not in pancreatic β-cells and that activation of TRPA1 by MG produces a painful neuropathy with the behavioral hallmarks of diabetic

  3. Effects of denervation on the sensitizing effect to noradrenaline induced by morphine in the vas deferens of mice treated chronically with morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L; Gaete, S; Juica, S

    1982-08-01

    The acute administration of morphine to the isolated vas deferens from mice chronically exposed to this analgesic, induced a facilitatory effect on the responses of the muscle to exogenous noradrenaline. It has been suggested that this sensitizing property of morphine might reflect a dependence-like state of the vas deferens. In the present paper, the capability of met- and leu-enkephalin to substitute for morphine was studied, as well as the influence of innervation on the apparent dependence state. The contractile responses to noradrenaline and to acetylcholine were increased after the administration of morphine to the bath containing a denervated vas deferences, prepared from chronically morphinized mice. Morphine administration facilitated noradrenaline- but not acetylcholine-induced contractile effects in vas deferens isolated from mice which had been chronically treated with either morphine or morphine plus guanethidine. The presence of met- or leu-enkephalin in the isolated vas deferens from chronically morphinized mice (either intact, denervated or treated with guanethidine) failed to sensitize contractile responses to noradrenaline or acetylcholine. It is concluded that (a) the sensitizing effect induced by morphine in the vas deferens from mice chronically treated with morphine is specific for the adrenergic neurotransmitter; (b) the effect of morphine is not mimicked by opiate peptides; and (c) denervation of the vas deferens of mice treated chronically with morphine does not suppress the noradrenaline-sensitizing property of morphine.

  4. Influence of dopamine as noradrenaline precursor on the secretory function of the bovine corpus luteum in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Kotwica, J.; Skarzynski, D.; Bogacki, M.; Miszkiel, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Dopamine is assumed to affect the ovary function after its conversion into noradrenaline (NA). 2. To study this bovine luteal slices from 11-14 days of the oestrous cycle were preincubated for 24 h to recover beta-receptors and next they were incubated for 1, 2 or 4 h with (a) different doses of dopamine; (b) dopamine together with a beta-antagonist (propranolol) or with a dopamine receptor blocker (droperidol); (c) dopamine with a dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor. 3. Dopamine stimulate...

  5. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Fawley, Jessica A; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 μM QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1- ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1- inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents.

  6. Sympathetic activity in the rat: effects of anaesthesia on noradrenaline kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignan, E; Dong, W X; Legrand, M; Safar, M; Cuche, J L

    2000-04-12

    Noradrenaline (NA) kinetics represent an effective tool for evaluating the activity of the sympathetic system: thus plasma NA concentration, spillover rate (SOR) and metabolic clearance rate (MC) were measured in the rat. The dilution technique was adapted and validated: pithing that caused mechanical destruction of the spinal cord was shown to reduce drastically NA-SOR and plasma NA concentration with no effect on NA-MC. NA-SOR and plasma NA concentration were restored within their normal limits when 2.5 Hz electrical stimulation of the sympathetic roots was superimposed. Normal values of NA kinetics in non-anaesthetised normotensive 12-week-old rats are reported: NA-SOR=196.1+/-26.4 ng/kg/min, NA-MC=413.9+/-38.8 ml/kg/min and plasma NA=486+/-52 pg/ml. NA kinetic was investigated in response to anaesthesia, known to depress excitable tissues of the central nervous system and expected to depress the activity of the sympathetic system. When NA-SOR was significantly reduced during anaesthesia with either sodium pentobarbital or chloralose, plasma NA concentration was not changed because NA-MC was also reduced. Thus, plasma NA concentration can be a misleading marker of the sympathetic activity. The response of the sympathetic activity to four different anaesthetic agents is shown to be heterogeneous, ranging from inhibition to stimulation. Sodium pentobarbital anaesthesia was associated with a statistically significant reduction of both NA-SOR (105.6+/-14.1 ng/kg/min, P<0. 01) and NA-MC (239.3+/-18.7 ml/kg/min, P<0.001) while plasma NA was not changed (438+/-47 pg/ml). Chloralose reduced NA-SOR (101.6+/-20. 1 ng/kg/min, P<0.05) while ketamine did not (150.6+/-35.5 ng/kg/min, n.s.): both compounds reduced NA-MC (257.9+/-27.8 ml/kg/min, P<0.01 and 265.8+/-34.3 ml/kg/min, P<0.05, respectively). Diethyl ether was shown to increase both NA-SOR (472.2+/-111 ng/kg/min, P<0.05) and plasma NA concentration (1589+/-436 pg/ml, P<0.01), while NA-MC remained unchanged. Thus, any

  7. Noradrenaline-induced increases in calcium and tension in skeletal muscle conductance and resistance arteries from rats with post-infarction heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trautner, Simon; Amtorp, Ole; Boesgaard, Soren

    2006-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that arterial reactivity to noradrenaline is augmented in congestive heart failure (CHF), which could contribute to the deleterious changes in peripheral vascular resistance and compliance in this condition. From male Wistar rats with post-infarction CHF and sham-operated......, endothelial dysfunction nor changes in baseline vascular tone could be demonstrated in the skeletal muscle vascular bed of this animal model of heart failure.......We tested the hypothesis that arterial reactivity to noradrenaline is augmented in congestive heart failure (CHF), which could contribute to the deleterious changes in peripheral vascular resistance and compliance in this condition. From male Wistar rats with post-infarction CHF and sham......-operated rats, skeletal muscle conductance and resistance arteries (mean lumen diameters: 514 and 186 microm) were isolated and mounted on wire myographs, and wall tension was recorded in response to cumulative application of acetylcholine and noradrenaline to the vessel segments. In a subset of experiments...

  8. The influence of steroids on noradrenaline-mediated contractile reactivity of the superficial nasal and facial veins in cycling gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorzewski, W J; Muszak, J; Wasowska, B; Jan, B; Stefańczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2012-01-01

    The nasal venous blood may be directed through the facial vein into the systemic circulation or through the frontal vein into the venous cavernous sinus of the perihypophyseal vascular complex, where hormones and pheromones permeate from the venous blood into the arterial blood supplying the brain and hypophysis. The present study was designed to determine the effect of noradrenaline (NA) on the tension of the nasal, frontal and facial veins of cycling gilts, and influence of ovarian steroid hormones on NA-mediated contractile reactivity. Additionally, the enzyme dopamine-beta-hydroxylase catalysing the conversion of dopamine to noradrenaline (DbetaH) was immunolocalized in these vessels. Among three studied veins, the frontal proximal vein, that fulfill a key role in the supply of the nasal venous blood into the venous cavernous sinus, reacted to NA most strongly (P tension of the frontal proximal vein during the periestrous period (P superficial nasal and facial veins of gilts in both studied stages of the estrous cycle. We suggest that the reactivity of the superficial veins of the nose and face to NA combined with the previously demonstrated reactivity of these veins to steroid ovarian hormones and male steroid pheromones may regulate the access of priming pheromone androstenol (resorebed in the nasal cavity) to the brain of gilts during periestrous period via humoral local destination transfer.

  9. μ-Opioid receptor activation and noradrenaline transport inhibition by tapentadol in rat single locus coeruleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mahsa; Tzschentke, Thomas M; Christie, MacDonald J

    2015-01-01

    Tapentadol is a novel analgesic that combines moderate μ-opioid receptor agonism and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in a single molecule. Both mechanisms of action are involved in producing analgesia; however, the potency and efficacy of tapentadol in individual neurons has not been characterized. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) (KIR 3.x) currents were made from rat locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices to investigate the potency and relative efficacy of tapentadol and compare its intrinsic activity with other clinically used opioids. Tapentadol showed agonist activity at μ receptors and was approximately six times less potent than morphine with respect to KIR 3.x current modulation. The intrinsic activity of tapentadol was lower than [Met]enkephalin, morphine and oxycodone, but higher than buprenorphine and pentazocine. Tapentadol inhibited the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) with potency similar to that at μ receptors. The interaction between these two mechanisms of action was additive in individual LC neurons. Tapentadol displays similar potency for both µ receptor activation and NAT inhibition in functioning neurons. The intrinsic activity of tapentadol at the μ receptor lies between that of buprenorphine and oxycodone, potentially explaining the favourable profile of side effects, related to μ receptors. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Sympathetic control of skeletal muscle function: possible co-operation between noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y in rabbit jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, C; Deriu, F; Roatta, S; Santarelli, R; Azzena, G B; Passatore, M

    1996-07-19

    Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve at 10/s increases by 12.9 +/- 0.7% peak tension of maximal twitches in the directly stimulated jaw muscles and markedly depresses (41.6 +/- 1.3%) the tonic vibration reflex (TVR) elicited in the same muscles by vibration of the mandible. Both effects are not significantly influenced by administration of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. When both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors are blocked, sympathetic stimulation induces a very small increase in twitch tension (3.8 +/- 0.7%), while no detectable change in the TVR is observed. Close arterial injection of alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine mimics the effects induced by sympathetic stimulation on twitch tension and TVR, dose-dependently. The noradrenaline co-transmitter neuropeptide Y also produces a long-lasting, dose-dependent increase in the twitch tension which is unaffected by blockade of adrenergic receptors as well as of the neuromuscular junctions. Contribution of neuropeptide Y to the sympathetically-induced reduction of the stretch reflex is not clearly demonstrated. These data suggest that co-operation between noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y may be effective in determining sympathetic modulation of skeletal muscle function.

  11. Influence of dopamine as noradrenaline precursor on the secretory function of the bovine corpus luteum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwica, J.; Skarzynski, D.; Bogacki, M.; Miszkiel, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Dopamine is assumed to affect the ovary function after its conversion into noradrenaline (NA). 2. To study this bovine luteal slices from 11-14 days of the oestrous cycle were preincubated for 24 h to recover beta-receptors and next they were incubated for 1, 2 or 4 h with (a) different doses of dopamine; (b) dopamine together with a beta-antagonist (propranolol) or with a dopamine receptor blocker (droperidol); (c) dopamine with a dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor. 3. Dopamine stimulated the luteal content of oxytocin (OT) and progesterone. This effect was inhibited by propanolol but not by droperidol. 4. Dopamine added to the medium was followed by an increase of noradrenaline there. This rise was dose and time-dependent. 5. The dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor, inhibited the stimulating effect of dopamine on luteal progesterone and OT content. 6. Bovine corpus luteum can synthesize de novo NA from dopamine as a precursor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8842430

  12. Noradrenaline increases intracellular glutathione in human astrocytoma U-251 MG cells by inducing glutamate-cysteine ligase protein via β3-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Kadoi, Hisatsugu; Yamamuro, Akiko; Ishimaru, Yuki; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2016-02-05

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a critical role in protecting cells from oxidative damage. Since neurons rely on the supply of GSH from astrocytes to maintain optimal intracellular GSH concentrations, the GSH concentration of astrocytes is important for the survival of neighboring neurons against oxidative stress. The neurotransmitter noradrenaline is known to modulate the functions of astrocytes and has been suggested to have neuroprotective properties in neurodegenerative diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective properties of noradrenaline, in this study, we investigated the effect of noradrenaline on the concentrations of intracellular GSH in human U-251 malignant glioma (MG; astrocytoma) cells. Treatment of the cells with noradrenaline for 24h concentration-dependently increased their intracellular GSH concentration. This increase was inhibited by a non-selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol and by a selective β3-adrenoceptor antagonist SR59230A, but not by a non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine, or by a selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol or by a selective β2-adrenoceptor antagonist butoxamine. In addition, the selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL316243 increased the intracellular GSH in U-251 MG cells. Treatment of the cells with noradrenaline (10μM) for 24h increased the protein level of the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLc), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis; and this increase was inhibited by SR59230A. These results thus suggest that noradrenaline increased the GSH concentration in astrocytes by inducing GCLc protein in them via β3-adrenoceptor stimulation.

  13. Mechanism of action of magnesium on acetylcholine-evoked secretory responses in isolated rat pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, L P; Lennard, R; Singh, J

    1990-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of magnesium (Mg2+) on acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked secretory responses and calcium (Ca2+) mobilization in the isolated rat pancreas. ACh induced marked dose-dependent increases in total protein output and amylase release from superfused pancreatic segments in zero, normal (1 x 1 mM) and elevated (10 mM) extracellular Mg2+. Elevated Mg2+ attenuated the ACh-evoked secretory responses compared to zero and normal Mg2+. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, but presence of 1 mM-EGTA (ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N''-tetraacetic acid), ACh elicited a small transient release of protein from pancreatic segments compared to a larger and more sustained secretion in the absence of both Ca2+ and Mg2+. Incubation of pancreatic segments with 45Ca2+ resulted in time-dependent uptake with maximum influx of 45Ca2+ occurring after 20 min of incubation period. ACh stimulated markedly the 45Ca2+ uptake compared to control tissues. In elevated extracellular Mg2+ the ACh-induced 45Ca2+ influx was significantly (P less than 0.001) reduced compared to zero and normal Mg2+. ACh also evoked dose-dependent increases in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in pancreatic acinar cells loaded with the fluorescent dye Fura-2 AM. In elevated Mg2+ the ACh-induced cytosolic [Ca2+]i was significantly (P less than 0.001) reduced compared to zero and normal Mg2+. These results indicate that Mg2+ can influence ACh-evoked secretory responses possibly by controlling both Ca2+ influx and release in pancreatic acinar cells.

  14. Early visual evoked potentials in callosal agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Melodie S; Hamm, Jeff P; Kirk, Ian J; Corballis, Michael C

    2005-11-01

    Three participants with callosal agenesis and 12 neurologically normal participants were tested on a simple reaction time task, with visual evoked potentials collected using a high-density 128-channel system. Independent-components analyses were performed on the averaged visual evoked potentials to isolate the components of interest. Contrary to previous research with acallosals, evidence of ipsilateral activation was present in all 3 participants. Although ipsilateral visual components were present in all 4 unilateral conditions in the 2 related acallosal participants, in the 3rd, these were present only in the crossed visual field-hand conditions and not in the uncrossed conditions. Suggestions are made as to why these results differ from earlier findings and as to the neural mechanisms facilitating this ipsilateral activation.

  15. Changes of brainstem auditory and somatosensory evoked

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the characteristics and clinical value of evoked potentials in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy. Methods: Brainstem auditory, and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 6 patients, and compared with the results of CT scan. Results: All of the 6 patients had abnormal results of BAEP and MNSEP. The main abnormal parameters in BAEP were latency prolongation in wave I, inter-peak latency prolongation in Ⅰ-Ⅲ and Ⅰ-Ⅴ. The abnormal features of MNSEP were low amplitude and absence of wave N9, inter-Peak latency prolongation in Ng-N13 and N13-N20, but no significant change of N20 amplitude. The results also revealed that abnormal changes in BAEP and MNSEP were earlier than that in CT. Conclusion: The detection of BAEP and MNSEP in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy might early reveal the abnormality of conductive function in nervous system and might be a useful method in diagnosis.

  16. Modeling auditory evoked potentials to complex stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch

    The auditory evoked potential (AEP) is an electrical signal that can be recorded from electrodes attached to the scalp of a human subject when a sound is presented. The signal is considered to reflect neural activity in response to the acoustic stimulation and is a well established clinical...... clinically and in research towards using realistic and complex stimuli, such as speech, to electrophysiologically assess the human hearing. However, to interpret the AEP generation to complex sounds, the potential patterns in response to simple stimuli needs to be understood. Therefore, the model was used...... to simulate auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) evoked by classic stimuli like clicks, tone bursts and chirps. The ABRs to these simple stimuli were compared to literature data and the model was shown to predict the frequency dependence of tone-burst ABR wave-V latency and the level-dependence of ABR wave...

  17. Thought-evoking approaches in engineering problems

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In creating the value-added product in not distant future, it is necessary and inevitable to establish a holistic and though-evoking approach to the engineering problem, which should be at least associated with the inter-disciplinary knowledge and thought processes across the whole engineering spheres. It is furthermore desirable to integrate it with trans-disciplinary aspects ranging from manufacturing culture, through liberal-arts engineering, and industrial sociology.   The thought-evoking approach can be exemplified and typified by representative engineering problems: unveiling essential features in ‘Tangential Force Ratio and Interface Pressure’, prototype development for ‘Bio-mimetic Needle’ and application of ‘Water-jet Machining to Artificial Hip Joint’, product innovation in ‘Heat Sink for Computer’, application of ‘Graph Theory’ to similarity evaluation of production systems, leverage among reciprocity attributes in ‘Industrial and Engineering Designs for Machine Enclosure’,...

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-1 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassano, Sara; Wang, Guo-Du; Mulè, Flavia; Wood, Jackie D

    2012-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts at the G protein-coupled receptor, GLP-1R, to stimulate secretion of insulin and to inhibit secretion of glucagon and gastric acid. Involvement in mucosal secretory physiology has received negligible attention. We aimed to study involvement of GLP-1 in mucosal chloride secretion in the small intestine. Ussing chamber methods, in concert with transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS), were used to study actions on neurogenic chloride secretion. ELISA was used to study GLP-1R effects on neural release of acetylcholine (ACh). Intramural localization of GLP-1R was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Application of GLP-1 to serosal or mucosal sides of flat-sheet preparations in Ussing chambers did not change baseline short-circuit current (I(sc)), which served as a marker for chloride secretion. Transmural EFS evoked neurally mediated biphasic increases in I(sc) that had an initial spike-like rising phase followed by a sustained plateau-like phase. Blockade of the EFS-evoked responses by tetrodotoxin indicated that the responses were neurally mediated. Application of GLP-1 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) suppressed this action of GLP-1. The GLP-1 inhibitory action on EFS-evoked responses persisted in the presence of nicotinic or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor antagonists but not in the presence of a muscarinic receptor antagonist. GLP-1 significantly reduced EFS-evoked ACh release. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-1R immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. Our results suggest that GLP-1R is expressed in guinea pig submucosal neurons and that its activation leads to a decrease in neurally evoked chloride secretion by suppressing release of ACh at neuroepithelial junctions in the enteric neural networks

  19. Auditory evoked potentials and multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Gentile Matas; Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas; Caroline Rondina Salzano de Oliveira; Isabela Crivellaro Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease that can affect several areas of the central nervous system. Damage along the auditory pathway can alter its integrity significantly. Therefore, it is important to investigate the auditory pathway, from the brainstem to the cortex, in individuals with MS. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize auditory evoked potentials in adults with MS of the remittent-recurrent type. METHOD: The study comprised 25 individuals w...

  20. Brain stem evoked response audiometry A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Brain stem evoked response audiometry (BERA) is a useful objective assessement of hearing. Major advantage of this procedure is its ability to test even infants in whom conventional audiometry may not be useful. This investigation can be used as a screening test for deafness in high risk infants. Early diagnosis and rehabilitation will reduce disability in these children. This article attempts to review the published literature on this subject. Methadology: Internet search using goog...

  1. Evoked Effective Connectivity of the Human Neocortex

    OpenAIRE

    Entz, László; Tóth, Emília; Keller, Corey J.; Bickel, Stephan; Groppe, David M.; Fabó, Dániel; Kozák, Lajos R.; Eroőss, Loránd; Ulbert, István; Mehta, Ashesh D.

    2014-01-01

    The role of cortical connectivity in brain function and pathology is increasingly being recognized. While in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies have provided important insights into anatomical and functional connectivity, these methodologies are limited in their ability to detect electrophysiological activity and the causal relationships that underlie effective connectivity. Here, we describe results of cortico-cortical evoked potential (CCEP) mapping using single pulse electrical stimul...

  2. Evoked Brain Activity and Personnel Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Eysenck and Barrett (1985) reviewed at considerable length this error rate theory , as well as other proposed interactions of psychophysiology and...Include Security CItuification) EVOKED BRAIN ACTIVITY AND PERSONNEL PERFORMANCE 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lewis, G. W., and Sorenson, R. C. 13a. TYPE...aptitude tests and the MM PI and other personality tests were developed along with tests designed for military purposes. The latter include the Armed

  3. Brainstem auditory evoked response: application in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available The tecnique that we use for eliciting brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs is described. BAERs are a non-invasive and reliable clinical test when carefully performed. This test is indicated in the evaluation of disorders which may potentially involve the brainstem such as coma, multiple sclerosis posterior fossa tumors and others. Unsuspected lesions with normal radiologic studies (including CT-scan can be revealed by the BAER.

  4. [Noradrenaline and the enzymes of its synthesis and breakdown in the rat hypothalamus after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torda, T; Kvetnansky, R; Tigranian, R A; Chulman, J; Genin, A M

    1981-01-01

    In the hypothalamus of the weightless and centrifuged rats flown for 18.5 days on board the biosatellite Cosmos-936 the noradrenaline concentration and activity of the enzymes involved in the catecholamine synthesis and degradation were measured. It was found that under the space flight influence the noradrenaline concentration and tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and monoamine oxidase activities remained unaltered. These findings indicate that a prolonged exposure to weightlessness was not a stressogenic agent that could activate the adrenergic system in the rat hypothalamus.

  5. Somatosensory evoked potentials predict neurolysis outcome in meralgia paraesthetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Timothy L T; Chandran, K Nadana

    2004-01-01

    The role of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) in predicting the outcome of nerve entrapment syndrome following surgical release has not been fully verified. All patients included in our study had preoperative SEP recordings and had undergone neurolysis for treatment of meralgia paraesthetica by our senior author (KNC) between 1996 and 2000. The outcome of surgery was assessed 6 weeks after the procedure; follow up was continued at 3 month intervals if symptoms persisted. Telephone interviews were conducted to assess long-term results. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to establish the predictive value of side-to-side N1 and P1 latency differences in obtaining complete relief of symptoms following surgery. Twenty-four patients who had preoperative SEP recordings and had undergone neurolysis for meralgia paraesthetica were followed for 4.0 +/- 1.5 (SD) years. A prolonged side-to-side N1 latency difference (DeltaN1) was found to be significantly associated with complete relief of symptoms at about 6 weeks postoperatively, after adjustment for age, sex and duration of symptoms (OR, 1.75; CI, 1.03-2.96). Logistic regression identified a critical cut-off value of 8 ms (OR, 27.2; CI, 1.4-547.0). This association disappeared with longer follow up. Somatosensory evoked potentials provide significant data for prediction of good surgical outcome for meralgia paraesthetica. Re-evaluation of the diagnosis, adequate trial of conservative treatments and special attention to anomalous branches are recommended for patients with low preoperative DeltaN1 values.

  6. The celiac ganglion modulates LH-induced inhibition of androstenedione release in late pregnant rat ovaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastrilla Ana M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the control of ovarian production of steroid hormones is mainly of endocrine nature, there is increasing evidence that the nervous system also influences ovarian steroidogenic output. The purpose of this work was to study whether the celiac ganglion modulates, via the superior ovarian nerve, the anti-steroidogenic effect of LH in the rat ovary. Using mid- and late-pregnant rats, we set up to study: 1 the influence of the noradrenergic stimulation of the celiac ganglion on the ovarian production of the luteotropic hormone androstenedione; 2 the modulatory effect of noradrenaline at the celiac ganglion on the anti-steroidogenic effect of LH in the ovary; and 3 the involvement of catecholaminergic neurotransmitters released in the ovary upon the combination of noradrenergic stimulation of the celiac ganglion and LH treatment of the ovary. Methods The ex vivo celiac ganglion-superior ovarian nerve-ovary integrated system was used. This model allows studying in vitro how direct neural connections from the celiac ganglion regulate ovarian steroidogenic output. The system was incubated in buffer solution with the ganglion and the ovary located in different compartments and linked by the superior ovarian nerve. Three experiments were designed with the addition of: 1 noradrenaline in the ganglion compartment; 2 LH in the ovarian compartment; and 3 noradrenaline and LH in the ganglion and ovarian compartments, respectively. Rats of 15, 19, 20 and 21 days of pregnancy were used, and, as an end point, the concentration of the luteotropic hormone androstenedione was measured in the ovarian compartment by RIA at various times of incubation. For some of the experimental paradigms the concentration of various catecholamines (dihydroxyphenylalanine, dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline was also measured in the ovarian compartment by HPLC. Results The most relevant result concerning the action of noradrenaline in the celiac ganglion

  7. Effects of AT1 receptor antagonism on kainate-induced seizures and concomitant changes in hippocampal extracellular noradrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine levels in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Loyens, Ellen; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-05-01

    In the management of epilepsy, AT1 receptor antagonists have been suggested as an additional treatment strategy. A hyperactive brain angiotensin (Ang) II system and upregulated AT1 receptors are implicated in the cerebrovascular alterations in a genetic form of hypertension. Uncontrolled hypertension could also, in turn, be a risk factor for a seizure threshold decrease and development of epileptogenesis. The present study aimed to assess the effects of the selective AT1 receptor antagonist ZD7155 on kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) development and accompanying changes in the hippocampal extracellular (EC) neurotransmitter levels of noradrenaline (NAD), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and their parent strain Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, since monoamines are well-known neurotransmitters involved in mechanisms of both epilepsy and hypertension. Status epilepticus was evoked in freely moving rats by a repetitive intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of KA in subconvulsant doses. In the treatment group, ZD7155 (5mg/kg i.p.) was coadministered with the first KA injection. Spontaneously hypertensive rats exhibited higher susceptibility to SE than WKY rats, but the AT1 receptor antagonist did not alter the development of SE in SHRs or in WKY rats. In vivo microdialysis demonstrated significant KA-induced increases of the hippocampal NAD and DA levels in SHRs and of NAD, 5-HT, and DA in WKY rats. Although SHRs developed more severe seizures while receiving a lower dose of KA compared to WKY rats, AT1 receptor antagonism completely prevented all KA-induced increases of hippocampal monoamine levels in both rat strains without affecting seizure development per se. These results suggest a lack of direct relationship between KA-induced seizure susceptibility and adaptive changes of hippocampal NAD, 5-HT, and DA levels in the effects of ZD7155 in WKY rats and SHRs.

  8. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Vincis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independent of neurotransmitter release and neurovascular coupling. Furthermore, our results suggest that odor-evoked parenchymal IOSs originate from changes in light scattering of olfactory sensory neuron axons, mostly due to water movement following action potential propagation. Our study sheds light on a direct correlate of neuronal activity, which may be used for large-scale functional brain imaging.

  9. Plasma cortisol and noradrenalin concentrations in pigs: automated sampling of freely moving pigs housed in PigTurn versus manually sampled and restrained pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minimizing the effects of restraint and human interaction on the endocrine physiology of animals is essential for collection of accurate physiological measurements. Our objective was to compare stress-induced cortisol (CORT) and noradrenalin (NorA) responses in automated versus manual blood sampling...

  10. Responses to noradrenaline of tail arteries in hypertensive, hypotensive and normotensive rats under different regimens of perfusion: role of the myogenic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Vlasova, Maria A; Tarasova, Olga S;

    1998-01-01

    The vasoconstrictor effects of noradrenaline were studied in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) compared with Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), and in Wistar rats with regional hypotension (WH) compared to control Wistar rats (WC). The abdominal aorta was ligated in WH distal to the renal arteries...... thickness causing different degrees of activation of the myogenic response to distension....

  11. Noradrenaline represses PPAR (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor) gamma2 gene expression in brown adipocytes: intracellular signalling and effects on PPARgamma2 and PPARgamma1 protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Eva M; Nielsen, Ronni; Petrovic, Natasa

    2004-01-01

    PPAR (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor) gamma is expressed in brown and white adipose tissues and is involved in the control of differentiation and proliferation. Noradrenaline stimulates brown pre-adipocyte proliferation and brown adipocyte differentiation. The aim of the present study...

  12. Ca(2+) sensitisation of force production by noradrenaline in femoral conductance and resistance arteries from rats with postinfarction congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trautner, Simon; Amtorp, Ole; Boesgaard, Soren

    2006-01-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that arterial myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity and/or the Ca(2+) sensitising effect of noradrenaline (NA) is enhanced in post-infarction congestive heart failure (CHF), which could contribute to the high peripheral vascular resistance in this condition. Femora...

  13. Metabolism of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline in different compartments of rat brain with respect to the role of catechol-O-methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koester, G.; Goede, E.; Breuer, H.

    1984-03-01

    Rats were pretreated with either reserpine or desmethylimipramine, either alone or in combination with tropolone. At either 10 min or 1 h after the intraventricular injection of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline, in several brain regions the complete metabolic patterns were determined: normetanephrine; the glycol metabolites (methylated and nonmethylated) and their sulfate conjugates; and the acidic metabolites (methylated and non-methylated). A reserpine-induced increase in the turnover of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline caused a transient increase of the catechol glycol followed by elevated levels of the two glycol sulfates. The stimulated (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline turnover if achieved by desmethylimipramine caused a transient increase of normetanephrine and initially lowered values of catechol glycols (both free and sulfated), which were followed by elevated levels. Drug-pretreated rats compensated for the inhibition of catechol-O-methyl-transferase by tropolone in different ways: Reserpine caused an early increase of the catechol glycol beyond the measurements in other treatment groups, whereas desmethylimipramine increased the nonmethylated carboxylic acid and glycol sulfates rather slowly to levels beyond those of other groups. The results support the existence of two compartments with a fast metabolism (an intraneuronal monoamine oxidase compartment and an extraneuronal catechol-O-methyltransferase compartment). In addition, there seems to exist another extra-neuronal space with a slow, monoamine oxidase-dependent noradrenaline turnover.

  14. Histaminergic H1 and H2 Receptors Mediate the Effects of Propofol on the Noradrenalin-Inhibited Neurons in Rat Ventrolateral Preoptic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Tian

    2017-02-09

    The ventrolateral preoptic nucleus is a sleep-promoting nucleus located in the basal forebrain. A commonly used intravenous anesthetic, propofol, had been reported to induce sleep spindles and augment the firing rate of neurons in ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, but the underlining mechanism is yet to be known. By using patch clamp recording on neuron in acute brain slice, present study tested if histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors play a role in the effect of propofol on the noradrenalin-inhibited neurons in ventrolateral preoptic nucleus. We found that the firing rate of noradrenalin-inhibited neurons were significantly augmented by propofol; the frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents of noradrenalin-inhibited neuron were evidently attenuated by propofol; such inhibition effect was suppressed by histamine; and both triprolidine (antagonist for H1 histamine receptor) and ranitidine (antagonist for H2 histamine receptor) were able to increase the inhibition rate of propofol in presence of histamine. Present study demonstrated that propofol-induced inhibition of inhibitory postsynaptic currents on noradrenalin-inhibited neurons were mediated by histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors.

  15. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Sandra T; Lingg, Elisabeth; Heuberger, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman's (Ekman et al., 1983) basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness, and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles/bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate, and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response (SCR) varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the SCR and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles/bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics.

  16. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Theresia Weber-Glass

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman’s (Ekman et al., 1983 basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles / bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the skin conductance response and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles / bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics.

  17. Somatosensory evoked response: application in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available One technique used for short-latency somatosensory evoked response (SER is described. SER following nerve stimulation is a unique non-invasive, clinical test used to evaluate the somatosensory pathways. It tests the physiological function of the median nerve, the brachial plexus, the C6-7 cervical roots, cervical spinal cord, the cuneate nuclei, the medial lemniscus, the thalamus, and the contralateral sensory cortex. It has been shown to be a reliable and useful clinical test partiicularly in multiple sclerosis and comatose patients. The promising technique of SER following peroneal nerve stimulation is mentioned.

  18. Increased Contractile Response to Noradrenaline Induced By Factors Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome in Cultured Small Mesenteric Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blædel, Martin; Sams, Anette; Boonen, Harrie C M

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: This study investigated the effect of the metabolic syndrome associated risk factors hyperglycemia (glucose [Glc]), hyperinsulinemia (insulin [Ins]) and low-grade inflammation (tumor necrosis factor α [TNFα]) on the vasomotor responses of resistance arteries. Isolated small mesenteric...... arteries from 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were suspended for 21-23 h in tissue cultures containing either elevated Glc (30 mmol/l), Ins (100 nmol/l), TNFα (100 ng/ml) or combinations thereof. After incubation, the vascular response to noradrenaline (NA), phenylephrine, isoprenaline and NA...... in the presence of propranolol (10 µmol/l) was measured by wire myography. RESULTS: Arteries exposed only to combinations of the risk factors showed a significant 1.6-fold increase in the contractile NA sensitivity, which suggests that complex combinations of metabolic risk factors might lead to changes...

  19. Quantitative gene expression of somatostatin receptors and noradrenaline transporter underlying scintigraphic results in patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich; Mellon Mogensen, Anne

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To measure, by a quantitative approach, the gene expression underlying the results of somatostatin receptor (sst) scintigraphy ((111)In-DTPA-octreotide) and noradrenaline transporter (NAT) scintigraphy ((123)I-MIBG) in patients with neuroendocrine (NE) tumors. METHODS: The gene expression...... of somatostatin receptors 1-5 (sst) and NAT was measured quantitatively by real-time PCR in a group of patients with NE tumors (n = 14) and compared to a group of patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas (n = 15). If available, scintigraphic results were compared with gene expression results (9 octreotide and 3...... in gene expression of sst(2) corresponded with scintigraphic results. Our data support that sst(2) is the best target for visualization of NE tumors, whereas NAT is only a useful target in a subpopulation of NE tumors. Comparison of scintigraphic results with quantitative gene expression may be used...

  20. Complexes of osmium, uranium, molybdenum, and tungsten with the catechol amines adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, dopa, and isoproterenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Hendawy, A.M.; Griffith, W.P.; Pumphrey, C.A.

    1988-07-01

    New complexes of the form trans-(OsO/sub 2/L/sub 2/)/sup 2-/ and UO/sub 2/Lcenter dotnH/sub 2/O (H/sub 2/L = adrenaline (H/sub 2/ad), noradrenaline (H/sub 2/nad), dopamine (H/sub 2/dpm), dopa (H/sub 2/dp), and isoproterenol (H/sub 2/prot)) are reported, as are cis(MO/sub 2/L/sub 2/)/sup 2-/(L = nad, dp, prot for M = Mo or W, and ad for M = W), (MO/sub 2/(Hdpm)/sub 2/) (M = Mo or W), and (Mo/sub 2/O/sub 5/(Had)/sub 2/). The structures of these species are discussed on the basis of their Raman, infrared, /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C n.m.r. spectra.

  1. Acetylcholine is released from taste cells, enhancing taste signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), a candidate neurotransmitter that has been implicated in taste buds, elicits calcium mobilization in Receptor (Type II) taste cells. Using RT-PCR analysis and pharmacological interventions, we demonstrate that the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 mediates these actions. Applying ACh enhanced both taste-evoked Ca2+ responses and taste-evoked afferent neurotransmitter (ATP) secretion from taste Receptor cells. Blocking muscarinic receptors depressed taste-evoked responses in Receptor cells, suggesting that ACh is normally released from taste cells during taste stimulation. ACh biosensors confirmed that, indeed, taste Receptor cells secrete acetylcholine during gustatory stimulation. Genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors resulted in significantly diminished ATP secretion from taste buds. The data demonstrate a new role for acetylcholine as a taste bud transmitter. Our results imply specifically that ACh is an autocrine transmitter secreted by taste Receptor cells during gustatory stimulation, enhancing taste-evoked responses and afferent transmitter secretion.

  2. Chronic sleep restriction induces long-lasting changes in adenosine and noradrenaline receptor density in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEISSHAUPT, ANGELA; WEDEKIND, FRANZISKA; KROLL, TINA; MCCARLEY, ROBERT W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Although chronic sleep restriction frequently produces long-lasting behavioural and physiological impairments in humans, the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here we used a rat model of chronic sleep restriction to investigate the role of brain adenosine and noradrenaline systems, known to regulate sleep and wakefulness, respectively. The density of adenosine A1 and A2a receptors and β-adrenergic receptors before, during and following 5 days of sleep restriction was assessed with autoradiography. Rats (n = 48) were sleep-deprived for 18 h day–1 for 5 consecutive days (SR1–SR5), followed by 3 unrestricted recovery sleep days (R1–R3). Brains were collected at the beginning of the light period, which was immediately after the end of sleep deprivation on sleep restriction days. Chronic sleep restriction increased adenosine A1 receptor density significantly in nine of the 13 brain areas analysed with elevations also observed on R3 (+18 to +32%). In contrast, chronic sleep restriction reduced adenosine A2a receptor density significantly in one of the three brain areas analysed (olfactory tubercle which declined 26–31% from SR1 to R1). A decrease in b-adrenergic receptors density was seen in substantia innominata and ventral pallidum which remained reduced on R3, but no changes were found in the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction can induce long-term changes in the brain adenosine and noradrenaline receptors, which may underlie the long-lasting neurocognitive impairments observed in chronic sleep restriction. PMID:25900125

  3. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of VAsopressin versus Noradrenaline as Initial therapy in Septic sHock (VANISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Anthony C; Mason, Alexina J; Perkins, Gavin D; Ashby, Deborah; Brett, Stephen J

    2014-07-03

    Vasopressin is an alternative vasopressor in the management of septic shock. It spares catecholamine use but whether it improves outcome remains uncertain. Current evidence suggests that it may be most effective if used early and possibly in conjunction with corticosteroids. This trial will compare vasopressin to noradrenaline as initial vasopressor in the management of adult septic shock and investigate whether there is an interaction of vasopressin with corticosteroids. This is a multicentre, factorial (2×2), randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 412 patients will be recruited from multiple UK intensive care units and randomised to receive vasopressin (0-0.06 U/min) or noradrenaline (0-12 µg/min) as a continuous intravenous infusion as initial vasopressor therapy. If maximum infusion rates of this first study drug are reached, the patient will be treated with either hydrocortisone (initially 50 mg intravenous bolus six-hourly) or placebo, before additional open-label catecholamine vasopressors are prescribed. The primary outcome of the trial will be the difference in renal failure-free days between treatment groups. Secondary outcomes include need for renal replacement therapy, survival rates, other organ failures and resource utilisation. The trial protocol and information sheets have received a favourable opinion from the Oxford A Research Ethics Committee (12/SC/0014). There is an independent Data Monitoring and Ethics Committee and independent membership of the Trial Steering Committee including patient and public involvement. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international scientific meetings. ISRCTN 20769191 and EudraCT 2011-005363-24. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Effects of chronic and acute oestrogen treatment on the developing noradrenaline-containing nerves of the rat uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, M M; Corbacho, A M; Burnstock, G

    1995-12-01

    The developing noradrenaline-containing (NA-C) sympathetic nerves of the rat uterus were analyzed following acute and chronic treatment with oestrogen. Histochemical methods were used in association with nerve density measurements and biochemical assays. For comparative purposes, noradrenaline (NA) levels were measured in the urinary bladder and right auricle following chronic oestrogen treatment. Acute treatment was performed by s.c. administration of a single dose of 40 micrograms oestradiol cypionate on the 25th day of age. Chronic treatment consisted of four doses of 10 micrograms oestradiol on days 10, 15, 20 and 25 of postnatal development. Both acute- and chronic-treated animals were killed at 28 days of age. The main biochemical findings were the following: (a) both acute and chronic oestrogen treatment increased the weight of the uterine horn, parametrial tissue and uterine cervix; (b) in the uterine horn, the total content of NA was reduced following both oestrogen treatments. However, the degree of reduction was greater after chronic treatment; (c) in the parametrial tissue, the NA levels were reduced only after chronic treatment; (d) in the cervix, the NA total content was increased after both treatments; (e) in the urinary bladder, there was a parallel increase between organ growth and NA content following chronic oestrogen treatment; (e) in the auricle neither the tissue weight nor the total content of NA were changed by chronic estrogen treatment. Histochemical studies showed that: (a) acute treatment with one single dose of oestradiol, provoked a marked reduction in the density of NA-C nerves associated with the myometrial and parametrial smooth muscle, without affecting the innervation of blood vessels; (b) following chronic treatment, the only fibers we were able to recognize were those associated with blood vessels. These fibers were thinner and less intensely fluorescent than in controls. Results are interpreted considering the differential

  5. The effects of compound stimulus extinction and inhibition of noradrenaline reuptake on the renewal of alcohol seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, T M; Pan, M J; Corbit, L H

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-related stimuli can trigger relapse of alcohol-seeking behaviors even after extended periods of abstinence. Extinction of such stimuli can reduce their impact on relapse; however, the expression of extinction can be disrupted when testing occurs outside the context where extinction learning took place, an effect termed renewal. Behavioral and pharmacological methods have recently been shown to augment extinction learning; yet, it is not known whether the improved expression of extinction following these treatments remains context-dependent. Here we examined whether two methods, compound–stimulus extinction and treatment with the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine, would reduce the vulnerability of extinction to a change in context. Following alcohol self-administration, responding was extinguished in a distinct context. After initial extinction, further extinction was given to a target stimulus presented in compound with another alcohol-predictive stimulus intended to augment prediction error (Experiment 1) or after a systemic injection of atomoxetine (1.0 mg kg−1; Experiment 2). A stimulus extinguished as part of a compound elicited less responding than a stimulus receiving equal extinction alone regardless of whether animals were tested in the training or extinction context; however, reliable renewal was not observed in this paradigm. Importantly, atomoxetine enhanced extinction relative to controls even in the presence of a reliable renewal effect. Thus, extinction of alcohol-seeking behavior can be improved by extinguishing multiple alcohol-predictive stimuli or enhancing noradrenaline neurotransmission during extinction training. Importantly, both methods improve extinction even when the context is changed between extinction training and test, and thus could be utilized to enhance the outcome of extinction-based treatments for alcohol-use disorders. PMID:26327688

  6. Evoked potentials in pediatric cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Bhanushali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cortical evoked potentials (EP provide localized data regarding brain function and may offer prognostic information and insights into the pathologic mechanisms of malariamediated cerebral injury. As part of a prospective cohort study, we obtained somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs and brainstem auditory EPs (AEPs within 24 hours of admission on 27 consecutive children admitted with cerebral malaria (CM. Children underwent follow-up for 12 months to determine if they had any long term neurologic sequelae. EPs were obtained in 27 pediatric CM admissions. Two children died. Among survivors followed an average of 514 days, 7/25 (28.0% had at least one adverse neurologic outcome. Only a single subject had absent cortical EPs on admission and this child had a good neurologic outcome. Among pediatric CM survivors, cortical EPs are generally intact and do not predict adverse neurologic outcomes. Further study is needed to determine if alterations in cortical EPs can be used to predict a fatal outcome in CM.

  7. Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials during Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Shirley; Deepeshwar, Singh; Naveen, Kalkuni Visweswaraiah; Pailoor, Subramanya

    2015-10-01

    The auditory sensory pathway has been studied in meditators, using midlatency and short latency auditory evoked potentials. The present study evaluated long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEPs) during meditation. Sixty male participants, aged between 18 and 31 years (group mean±SD, 20.5±3.8 years), were assessed in 4 mental states based on descriptions in the traditional texts. They were (a) random thinking, (b) nonmeditative focusing, (c) meditative focusing, and (d) meditation. The order of the sessions was randomly assigned. The LLAEP components studied were P1 (40-60 ms), N1 (75-115 ms), P2 (120-180 ms), and N2 (180-280 ms). For each component, the peak amplitude and peak latency were measured from the prestimulus baseline. There was significant decrease in the peak latency of the P2 component during and after meditation (Pmeditation facilitates the processing of information in the auditory association cortex, whereas the number of neurons recruited was smaller in random thinking and non-meditative focused thinking, at the level of the secondary auditory cortex, auditory association cortex and anterior cingulate cortex.

  8. New perspectives on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Sally M; Kingma, Herman

    2013-02-01

    Although the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) measured from the cervical muscles (cVEMP, cervical VEMP) is well described and has documented clinical utility, its analogue recorded from the extraocular muscles (oVEMP, ocular VEMP) has been described only recently and is currently emerging as an additional test of otolith function. This review will, therefore, summarize recent developments in VEMP research with a focus on the oVEMP. Recent studies suggest that the oVEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior vestibular nerve division, whereas the cVEMP evoked by sound is thought to be an inferior vestibular nerve reflex. Correspondingly, the oVEMP correlates better with caloric and subjective visual vertical tests than sound-cVEMPs. cVEMPs are more complicated than often thought, as shown by the presence of crossed responses and conflicting results of recent vibration studies. Altered inner ear mechanics produced by the vestibular diseases superior semicircular canal dehiscence and Ménière's disease lead to changes in the preferred frequency of the oVEMP and cVEMP. The oVEMP provides complementary diagnostic information to the cVEMP and is likely to be a useful addition to the diagnostic test battery in neuro-otology.

  9. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

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    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  10. Auditory evoked potentials in postconcussive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M E; Weate, S J; Newell, S A

    1996-12-01

    The neuropsychiatric sequelae of minor head trauma have been the source of controversy. Most clinical and imaging studies have shown no alteration after concussion, but neuropsychological and neuropathological abnormalities have been reported. Some changes in neurophysiologic diagnostic tests have been described in postconcussive syndrome. We recorded middle latency auditory evoked potentials (MLR) and slow vertex responses (SVR) in 20 individuals with prolonged cognitive difficulties, behavior changes, dizziness, and headache after concussion. MLR is utilized alternating polarity clicks presented monaurally at 70 dB SL at 4 per second, with 40 dB contralateral masking. Five hundred responses were recorded and replicated from Cz-A1 and Cz-A2, with 50 ms. analysis time and 20-1000 Hz filter band pass. SVRs were recorded with the same montage, but used rarefaction clicks, 0.5 Hz stimulus rate, 500 ms. analysis time, and 1-50 Hz filter band pass. Na and Pa MLR components were reduced in amplitude in postconcussion patients. Pa latency was significantly longer in patients than in controls. SVR amplitudes were longer in concussed individuals, but differences in latency and amplitude were not significant. These changes may reflect posttraumatic disturbance in presumed subcortical MLR generators, or in frontal or temporal cortical structures that modulate them. Middle and long-latency auditory evoked potentials may be helpful in the evaluation of postconcussive neuropsychiatric symptoms.

  11. Interaural difference values of vestibular evoked myogenic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Moallemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a neurologic disease, which often is associated with a unilateral headache. Vestibular abnormalities are common in migraine. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs assess otolith function in particular functional integrity of the saccule and the inferior vestibular nerve. We used VEMP to evaluate if the migraine headache can affect VEMP asymmetry parameters. A total of 25 patients with migraine (22 females and 3 males who were diagnosed according to the criteria of IHS-1988 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Control group consisted of 26 healthy participants (18 female and 8 male, without neurotological symptoms and history of migraine. The short tone burst (95 dB nHL, 500 Hz was presented to ears. VEMP was recorded with surface electromyography over the contracted ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid (SCM muscle. Although current results showed that the amplitude ratio is greater in migraine patients than normal group, there was no statistical difference between two groups in mean asymmetry parameters of VEMP. Asymmetry measurements in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials probably are not indicators of unilateral deficient in saccular pathways of migraine patients.

  12. Inhibitory Effects of Ginsenoside-Rb2 on Nicotinic Stimulation-Evoked Catecholamine Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, Hyun-Young

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ginsenoside-Rb2 (Rb2) can affect the secretion of catecholamines (CA) in the perfused model of the rat adrenal medulla. Rb2 (3~30 µM), perfused into an adrenal vein for 90 min, inhibited ACh (5.32 mM)-evoked CA secretory response in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Rb2 (10 µM) also time-dependently inhibited the CA secretion evoked by DMPP (100 µM, a selective neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist) and high K+ (56 mM, a direct membrane depolarizer). Rb2 itself did not affect basal CA secretion (data not shown). Also, in the presence of Rb2 (50 µg/mL), the secretory responses of CA evoked by veratridine (a selective Na+ channel activator (50 µM), Bay-K-8644 (an L-type dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel activator, 10 µM), and cyclopiazonic acid (a cytoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor, 10 µM) were significantly reduced, respectively. Interestingly, in the simultaneous presence of Rb2 (10 µM) and L-NAME (an inhibitor of NO synthase, 30 µM), the inhibitory responses of Rb2 on ACh-evoked CA secretory response was considerably recovered to the extent of the corresponding control secretion compared with the inhibitory effect of Rb2-treatment alone. Practically, the level of NO released from adrenal medulla after the treatment of Rb2 (10 µM) was greatly elevated compared to the corresponding basal released level. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Rb2 inhibits the CA secretory responses evoked by nicotinic stimulation as well as by direct membrane-depolarization from the isolated perfused rat adrenal medulla. It seems that this inhibitory effect of Rb2 is mediated by inhibiting both the influx of Ca2+ and Na+ into the adrenomedullary chromaffin cells and also by suppressing the release of Ca2+ from the cytoplasmic calcium store, at least partly through the increased NO production due to the activation of nitric oxide synthase, which is relevant to neuronal nicotinic receptor blockade. PMID:25352764

  13. Rapid eye movement sleep loss induces neuronal apoptosis in the rat brain by noradrenaline acting on alpha 1-adrenoceptor and by triggering mitochondrial intrinsic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu I Somarajan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative disorders are associated with rapid eye movement sleep (REMS-loss, however the mechanism was unknown. As REMS-loss elevates noradrenaline (NA level in the brain as well as induces neuronal apoptosis and degeneration, in this study we have delineated the intracellular molecular pathway involved in REMS deprivation (REMSD associated NA-induced neuronal apoptosis. Rats were REMS deprived for 6 days by the classical flower-pot method, suitable controls were conducted and the effects on apoptosis markers evaluated. Further, the role of NA was studied by one, intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of NA-ergic alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (PRZ and two, by down-regulation of NA synthesis in locus coeruleus (LC neurons by local microinjection of tyrosine hydroxylase siRNA (TH-siRNA. Immunoblot estimates showed that the expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins viz. Bcl2-associated death promoter (BAD protein, apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1, cytochrome c, caspase9, caspase3 were elevated in the REMS-deprived rat brains, while caspase8 level remained unaffected; PRZ treatment did not allow elevation of these pro-apoptotic factors. Further, REMSD increased cytochrome c expression, which was prevented if the NA synthesis from the LC neurons was blocked by microinjection of TH-siRNA in vivo into the LC during REMSD in freely moving normal rats. Mitochondrial damage was re-confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, which showed distinctly swollen mitochondria with disintegrated cristae, chromosomal condensation and clumping along the nuclear membrane and all these changes were prevented in PRZ treated rats. Combining findings of this study along with earlier reports we propose that upon REMSD NA level increases in the brain as the LC NA-ergic REM-OFF neurons do not cease firing and TH is up-regulated in those neurons. This elevated NA acting on alpha1-adrenoceptors damages mitochondria causing release of

  14. Morphine enhances the release of /sup 3/H-purines from rat brain cerebral cortical prisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.H.; Phillis, J.W.; Yuen, H.

    1982-10-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that /sup 3/H-purines can be released from /sup 3/H-adenosine preloaded rat brain cortical prisms by a KCl-evoked depolarization. The KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines is dependent on the concentration of KCl present in the superfusate. At concentrations of 10(-7) approximately 10(-5)M morphine did not influence the basal release of /sup 3/H-purines from the prisms, although it enhanced the KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines. The enhancement of KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by morphine was concentration-dependent and was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting the involvement of opiate receptors. Uptake studies with rat brain cerebral cortical synaptosomes show that morphine is a very weak inhibitor of adenosine uptake. Comparisons with dipyridamole, a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake, suggest that this low level of inhibition of the uptake did not contribute significantly to the release of /sup 3/H-purine by morphine seen in our experiments. It is therefore suggested that morphine enhances KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by an interaction with opiate receptors and that the resultant increase in extracellular purine (adenosine) levels may account for some of the actions of morphine.

  15. Visual evoked potentials in rubber factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, O P; Kumar, V

    1997-01-01

    Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (pVEP) were studied in 39 male rubber factory workers in the age range of 18-55 years and 20 control subjects (aged 18-46 years) not exposed to the rubber factory environment. Results revealed that 20 (51%) rubber factory workers had abnormal latencies of wave P1 (dominant component of pVEP) as per accepted criteria of 99% tolerance limit set for the control group (i.e. any value above mean +3 SD of control was considered abnormal). The section-wise per cent distribution of abnormalities was vulcanization (83%), tubing (75%), calendering (60%), loading (38%) and mixing (14%). This study provides electrophysiological evidence that rubber factory environments affect the conduction processes in optical pathways from their origin in the retina to striate cortex. However, this study has its limitations in not identifying the specific chemical(s) causing these changes in VEP.

  16. Music evokes vicarious emotions in listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Why do we listen to sad music? We seek to answer this question using a psychological approach. It is possible to distinguish perceived emotions from those that are experienced. Therefore, we hypothesized that, although sad music is perceived as sad, listeners actually feel (experience) pleasant emotions concurrent with sadness. This hypothesis was supported, which led us to question whether sadness in the context of art is truly an unpleasant emotion. While experiencing sadness may be unpleasant, it may also be somewhat pleasant when experienced in the context of art, for example, when listening to sad music. We consider musically evoked emotion vicarious, as we are not threatened when we experience it, in the way that we can be during the course of experiencing emotion in daily life. When we listen to sad music, we experience vicarious sadness. In this review, we propose two sides to sadness by suggesting vicarious emotion.

  17. Bayesian analysis of MEG visual evoked responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-04-01

    The authors developed a method for analyzing neural electromagnetic data that allows probabilistic inferences to be drawn about regions of activation. The method involves the generation of a large number of possible solutions which both fir the data and prior expectations about the nature of probable solutions made explicit by a Bayesian formalism. In addition, they have introduced a model for the current distributions that produce MEG and (EEG) data that allows extended regions of activity, and can easily incorporate prior information such as anatomical constraints from MRI. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of the Bayesian approach with actual data, they analyzed MEG data from a visual evoked response experiment. They compared Bayesian analyses of MEG responses to visual stimuli in the left and right visual fields, in order to examine the sensitivity of the method to detect known features of human visual cortex organization. They also examined the changing pattern of cortical activation as a function of time.

  18. Resting Heart Rate and Auditory Evoked Potential

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    Simone Fiuza Regaçone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between rest heart rate (HR and the components of the auditory evoked-related potentials (ERPs at rest in women. We investigated 21 healthy female university students between 18 and 24 years old. We performed complete audiological evaluation and measurement of heart rate for 10 minutes at rest (heart rate monitor Polar RS800CX and performed ERPs analysis (discrepancy in frequency and duration. There was a moderate negative correlation of the N1 and P3a with rest HR and a strong positive correlation of the P2 and N2 components with rest HR. Larger components of the ERP are associated with higher rest HR.

  19. RECORDING OF VESTIBULAR EVOKED MYOGENIC POTENTIALS

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    A. A. Sazgar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that loud clicks evoke myogenic potentials in the tonically contracting sternocleidomastoid muscles. Studies have suggested that these potentials are of vestibular origin, especially of the saccule and inferior vestibular nerve. A pilot study was undertaken in our hospital to record vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP for the first time in Iran. Eighteen healthy volunteers (32 ears without history of otologic or vestibular disorders were subjected to the VEMP test. Twenty-one patients (26 ears with unilateral (6 patients and bilateral (5 patients high frequency sensorineural hearing loss with unknown etiology, acoustic neuroma (1 patient, Meniere’s disease (4 patients and unilateral low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint (5 patients were also enrolled in this study. VEMP response to clicks was obtained from 84.4% of ears of healthy subjects. These subjects demonstrated short latency waves to click stimuli during tonic neck flexor activation. Mean latencies of first positive (p13 and first negative (n23 potentials in healthy subjects were 12.45 ± 1.9 ms and 20.8 ± 3.5 ms, respectively. Median latencies of these two potentials were 12.1 and 19.3 ms, respectively. We could record VEMP in 5 patients with unilateral and all patients with high and low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint. In the patient with acoustic neuroma VEMP was absent on the affected side. This technique may offer a new method to evaluate otolith and sacculocollic pathways in human.

  20. Mind games : the effects of diazepam on Evoked Potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Marie-Louise Albertien

    2000-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) represents the electrical activity of the brain. Evoked Potentials (EPs) are small voltage fluctuations in the EEG resulting from sensory, cognitive or motor evoked neural activity. Variations in the EP waveform may be caused by several factors. 1. By employing differe

  1. 21 CFR 882.1870 - Evoked response electrical stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evoked response electrical stimulator. 882.1870... electrical stimulator. (a) Identification. An evoked response electrical stimulator is a device used to apply an electrical stimulus to a patient by means of skin electrodes for the purpose of measuring...

  2. Effect of Propofol on Glutamate and γ-aminobutyric Acid Release from Rat Hippocampal Synaptosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG You; YAO Shanglong; ZENG Yinming; LIU Hongliang; CAO Junli

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of propofol on the release of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from rat hippocampal synatosomes, synaptosomes was made from hippocampus and incubated with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). With the experiment of Ca2+-dependent release of glutamate and GABA, dihydrokainic acid (DHK) and nipectic acid were added into aCSF. For the observation of Ca2+-independent release of glutamate and GABA, no DHK, nipectic acid and Ca2+were added from aCSF. The release of glutamate and GABA were evoked by 20μmol/L veratridine or 30 mmol/L KCl. The concentration of glutamate and GABA in aCSF was measured by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 30, 100 and 300 μmol/L propofol significantly inhibited veratridine-evoked Ca2+-dependent release of glutamate and GABA (P<0.01 or P<0.05). However, propofol showed no effect on elevated KCl-evoked Ca2+-dependent release of glutamate and GABA (P>0.05). Veratridine or elevated KCl evoked Ca2+ -independent release of glutamate and GABA was not affected significantly by propofol (P>0.05). Propofol could inhibit Ca2+-dependent release of glutamate and GABA. However, it has no effect on the Ca2+-independent release ofglutamate and GABA.

  3. Noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations in various vascular beds in patients with cirrhosis. Relation to haemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christensen, N J; Ring-Larsen, H

    1981-01-01

    into the systemic circulation. Renal venous plasma NA exceeded arterial concentration by 38% (P less than 0.02). NA concentrations in femoral vein and ascitic fluid were not different from that of arterial plasma. Plasma NA was positively correlated to wedged hepatic vein pressure (r = 0.86, P less than 0.......001) and to heart rate (r = 0.61, P less than 0.02), but inversely correlated to plasma volume (r = 0.83, P less than 0.01) in cirrhotic patients. Arterial blood pressure was reduced in these patients compared to controls (P less than 0.02), but not significantly correlated to plasma NA. The increased plasma NA...... indicates that sympathetic nervous activity is enhanced in patients with cirrhosis. Based on the above positive correlation between NA and heart rate and the significant release of NA from the kidney, it may be hypothesized that the increased sympathetic nervous activity especially involves heart and kidney...

  4. Auditory evoked potentials in peripheral vestibular disorder individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matas, Carla Gentile

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The auditory and vestibular systems are located in the same peripheral receptor, however they enter the CNS and go through different ways, thus creating a number of connections and reaching a wide area of the encephalon. Despite going through different ways, some changes can impair both systems. Such tests as Auditory Evoked Potentials can help find a diagnosis when vestibular alterations are seen. Objective: describe the Auditory Evoked Potential results in individuals complaining about dizziness or vertigo with Peripheral Vestibular Disorders and in normal individuals having the same complaint. Methods: Short, middle and long latency Auditory Evoked Potentials were performed as a transversal prospective study. Conclusion: individuals complaining about dizziness or vertigo can show some changes in BAEP (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential, MLAEP (Medium Latency Auditory Evoked Potential and P300.

  5. Multimodal evoked potential abnormalities in patients with Wilson's disease

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    Ilić Tihomir V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the following functional systems: somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP, visual evoked potentials (VEP, and event related potentials (ERP, in twenty patients with Wilson's disease (WD. VEP and SSEP abnormalities were discovered in S patients respectively (40%, whereas ERP were either absent or, in the case of 10 patients (50%, had significantly prolonged P-300 latencies. Taken together, at least one evoked potential abnormality was discovered in 17 patients (85%]. Only in 3 patients (15%, involving either the isolated hepatic type of disease or short illness duration of the neurological type, were normal evoked potential findings observed. Our findings suggest the usefulness of multimodal evoked potential abnormalities in the evaluation of subclinical manifestations in patients with WD.

  6. Effect of Thiopental Sodium on the Release of Glutamate and γ-aminobutyric Acid from Rats Prefrontal Cortical Synaptosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红亮; 姚尚龙

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of thiopental sodium on the release of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from synaptosomes in the prefrontal cortex, synaptosomes were made, the spontaneous release and the evoked release by 30 mmol/L KCl or 20 μmol/L veratridine of glutamate and GABA were performed under various concentrations of thiopental sodium (10-300μmol/L), glutamate and GABA concentrations were determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Our results showed that spontaneous release and evoked release of glutamate were significantly inhibited by 30μmol/L, 100 μmol/L and 300 μmol/L thiopental sodium, IC50 of thiopental sodium was 25.8±2.3 μmol/L for the spontaneous release, 23.4±2.4 μmol/L for KClevoked release, and 24.3±1.8 μmol/L for veratridine-evoked release. But GABA spontaneous release and evoked release were unaffected. The study showed that thiopental sodium with clinically related concentrations could inhibit the release of glutamate, but had no effect on the release of GABA from rats prefrontal cortical synaptosomes.

  7. Chirp-modulated visual evoked potential as a generalization of steady state visual evoked potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Tao; Xin, Yi; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2012-02-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) are of great concern in cognitive and clinical neuroscience as well as in the recent research field of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In this study, a chirp-modulated stimulation was employed to serve as a novel type of visual stimulus. Based on our empirical study, the chirp stimuli visual evoked potential (Chirp-VEP) preserved frequency features of the chirp stimulus analogous to the steady state evoked potential (SSVEP), and therefore it can be regarded as a generalization of SSVEP. Specifically, we first investigated the characteristics of the Chirp-VEP in the time-frequency domain and the fractional domain via fractional Fourier transform. We also proposed a group delay technique to derive the apparent latency from Chirp-VEP. Results on EEG data showed that our approach outperformed the traditional SSVEP-based method in efficiency and ease of apparent latency estimation. For the recruited six subjects, the average apparent latencies ranged from 100 to 130 ms. Finally, we implemented a BCI system with six targets to validate the feasibility of Chirp-VEP as a potential candidate in the field of BCIs.

  8. Stimulation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes counteracting effects on hindlimb vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Joseph M; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2005-12-01

    Our previous studies concluded that stimulation of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) A2a receptors evokes preferential hindlimb vasodilation mainly via inducing increases in preganglionic sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) directed to the adrenal medulla. This increase in pre-ASNA causes the release of epinephrine and subsequent activation of beta-adrenergic receptors that are preferentially located in the skeletal muscle vasculature. Selective activation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes variable, mostly pressor effects and increases pre-ASNA, as well as lumbar sympathetic activity, which is directed to the hindlimb. These counteracting factors may have opposite effects on the hindlimb vasculature resulting in mixed vascular responses. Therefore, in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized rats, we evaluated the contribution of vasodilator versus vasoconstrictor effects of stimulation of NTS A1 receptors on the hindlimb vasculature. We compared the changes in iliac vascular conductance evoked by microinejctions into the NTS of the selective A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (330 pmol in 50 nl volume) in intact animals with the responses evoked after beta-adrenergic blockade, bilateral adrenalectomy, bilateral lumbar sympathectomy, and combined adrenalectomy + lumbar sympathectomy. In intact animals, stimulation of NTS A1 receptors evoked variable effects: increases and decreases in mean arterial pressure and iliac conductance with prevailing pressor and vasoconstrictor effects. Peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor blockade and bilateral adrenalectomy eliminated the depressor component of the responses, markedly potentiated iliac vasoconstriction, and tended to increase the pressor responses. Lumbar sympathectomy tended to decrease the pressor and vasoconstrictor responses. After bilateral adrenalectomy plus lumbar sympathectomy, a marked vasoconstriction in iliac vascular bed still persisted, suggesting that the vasoconstrictor component of the

  9. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats" NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo." The pattern evok...

  10. Effects of inorganic cations on K+-, 5-hydroxytryptamine- and noradrenaline-induced contractions of the isolated rat jugular vein and aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, M.A.M.; Wilffert, B.; Van Zwieten, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of 1 mM of the inorganic cations, La3+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Ni2+and Co2+on contractions induced by K+(100 mM) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10-5M) in the isolated rat jugular vein and on contractions induced by K+(100 mM), 5-HT (10-5) and noradrenaline (NA, 10-5M) in

  11. Analysis of microdialysate monoamines, including noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin, using capillary ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Barbara; Gifu, Elena-Patricia; Sandu, Ioana; Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical methods are very often used to detect catecholamine and indolamine neurotransmitters separated by conventional reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present paper presents the development of a chromatographic method to detect monoamines present in low-volume brain dialysis samples using a capillary column filled with sub-2μm particles. Several parameters (repeatability, linearity, accuracy, limit of detection) for this new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method with electrochemical detection were examined after optimization of the analytical conditions. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine were separated in 1μL of injected sample volume; they were detected above concentrations of 0.5-1nmol/L, with 2.1-9.5% accuracy and intra-assay repeatability equal to or less than 6%. The final method was applied to very low volume dialysates from rat brain containing monoamine traces. The study demonstrates that capillary UHPLC with electrochemical detection is suitable for monitoring dialysate monoamines collected at high sampling rate.

  12. Tetrahydro-beta-carbolines and corresponding tryptamines: In vitro inhibition of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline uptake in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komulainen, H; Tuomisto, J; Airaksinen, M M; Kari, I; Peura, P; Pollari, L

    1980-04-01

    The structure activity relationships of tryptolines and some other beta-carbolines and tryptamines as inhibitors of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) uptake were studied in rat brain synaptosomes. All beta-carbolines inhibited to higher degree the uptake of 5-HT than that of DA or NA(IC50's 5-100 times lower). The most potent tryptoline derivative was 6-hydroxy-tetrahydro-beta-carboline (5-hydroxytryptoline, 6-OH-THBC) with an IC50 of 5.0 x 10(-7) M at a 5-HT concentration of 10(-7) M. 6-Methoxy-tetrahydro-beta-carboline (5-methoxytryptoline) was slightly weaker; the inhibition of 5-HT uptake and DA uptake being competitive. Also tetrahydro-beta-carboline (tryptoline) was more potent than its 1-methylderivative, tetrahydroharmane (methtryptoline) or norharmane (beta-carboline). All of them were, however, weaker inhibitors of 5-HT uptake than the freely rotating indoleamines N-methyl-tryptamine (N-Me-T) or 5-HT itself. N-Me-T and 5-HT were also more potent inhibitors of DA and NA uptake than most of the beta-carbolines, DA uptake, however, was inhibited better by 6-OH-THBC than by 5-HT or N-ME-T. Tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may inhibit 5-HT uptake also in vivo but is unlikely that catecholamine uptake is affected.

  13. Simultaneous Determination of Epinephrine, Noradrenaline and Dopamine in Human Serum Samples by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Chemiluminescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN, Fu-Nan; ZHANG, Ying-Xue; ZHANG, Zhu-Jun

    2007-01-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique coupled with chemiluminescence (CL) detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of epinephrine (E),noradrenaline (NA) and dopamine (DA). It was based on the analyte enhancement effect on the CL reaction between luminol and potassium ferricyanide. The effects of various parameters, such as potassium ferricyanide concentration, luminol concentration, pH value and component of the mobile phase on chromatographic behaviors of the analytes (E, NA and DA) were investigated. The separation was carried out on C18 column using the mobile tions, E, NA and DA showed good linear relationships in the range of 1×10-8-5×10-6, 5.0×10-9-1.0× 10-6 and 5.0×10-9-1.0×10-6 g/mL respectively. The detection limits for E, NA and DA were 4.0×10-9, 1.0×10-9 and 8.0×10-10 g/mL. The proposed method has been applied successfully to the analysis of E, NA and DA in human serum samples.

  14. Pupillometric evidence for the locus coeruleus-noradrenaline system facilitating attentional processing of action-triggered visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Ken; Takeuchi, Tatsuto; Yoshimoto, Sanae; Kondo, Hirohito M; Kawahara, Jun I

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that attentional processing of visual stimuli is facilitated by a voluntary action that triggers the stimulus onset. However, the relationship between action-induced facilitation of attention and the neural substrates has not been well established. The present study investigated whether the locus coeruleus-noradrenaline (LC-NA) system is involved in this facilitation effect. A rapid serial visual presentation paradigm was used to assess the dynamics of transient attention in humans. Participants were instructed to change a digit stream to a letter stream by pressing a button and specifying successive targets of four letters. Pupil dilation was measured as an index of LC-NA function. Accuracy of target identification was better when the temporal delay between participants' key press and target onset was 800 ms than when targets appeared just after the key press or when targets appeared without key press. Accuracy of target identification was positively correlated with both the peak amplitude of pupil dilation and the pupil size at the time of the key press. These results indicate that target identification in the visual task is closely linked to pupil dilation. We conclude that the LC-NA system plays an important role in the facilitation of transient attention driven by voluntary action.

  15. Voltametric Behavior of Noradrenaline at 2-Mercaptoethanol Self-Assembled Monolayer Modified Gold Electrode and its Analytical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShengFu Wang

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available 2-Mercaptoethanol self-assembled monolayer (ME/Au SAMs was prepared on a gold electrode. The ME/Au SAMs was characterized by using ATR-FTIR and dynamic contact angle measurements. The electrochemical behaviors of noradrenaline (NE on the ME/Au SAMs were studied in BR buffer solution. The modified electrode accelerated electron transfer rate of the redox of NE and showed an excellent eletrocatalytic activity. The diffusion coefficient (D of NE was obtained to be 4.3×10-8 cm2 s-1. The catalytic current increased linearly with the concentration of NE in the range of 2.0×10-6 -1.0×10-3 M by square wave voltammetry response. The modified electrode could eliminate the interference of ascorbic acid (AA at 40-fold concentration of NE and could be satisfactorily used for the determination of NE in the drug injection.

  16. Pupillometric evidence for the locus coeruleus-noradrenaline system facilitating attentional processing of action-triggered visual stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eKihara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that attentional processing of visual stimuli is facilitated by a voluntary action that triggers the stimulus onset. However, the relationship between action-induced facilitation of attention and the neural substrates has not been well established. The present study investigated whether the locus coeruleus-noradrenaline (LC-NA system is involved in this facilitation effect. A rapid serial visual presentation paradigm was used to assess the dynamics of transient attention in humans. Participants were instructed to change a digit stream to a letter stream by pressing a button and specifying successive targets of four letters. Pupil dilation was measured as an index of LC-NA function. Accuracy of target identification was better when the temporal delay between participants' key press and target onset was 800 ms than when targets appeared just after the key press or when targets appeared without key press. Accuracy of target identification was positively correlated with both the peak amplitude of pupil dilation and the pupil size at the time of the key press. These results indicate that target identification in the visual task is closely linked to pupil dilation. We conclude that the LC-NA system plays an important role in the facilitation of transient attention driven by voluntary action.

  17. Cerebral hemorrhage increases plasma concentrations of noradrenalin and creatine kinase MB fraction with induction of cardiomyocyte damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Min; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Juan; Jiang, Xiao-Jiang; Xu, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of cardiac damage is high during acute cerebral hemorrhage. The animal data on the relationship between cerebral apoplexy and cardiac damage are lacking. Thus, the aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of cerebral hemorrhage on plasma concentrations of monoamine transmitter noradrenalin (NA), creatine kinase muscle and brain (CK-MB) isoenzyme fraction, and cardiomyocyte changes in the rat model. In this study, 140 Wistar rats were randomly and equally divided into experimental and control groups, and collagenase was injected into the right caudate nucleus to induce cerebral hemorrhage in the experimental group. Plasma NA was analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection and serum CK-MB was measured by enzyme reaction rate method. We found that both NA and CK-MB were elevated (p MB concentrations reached peak levels at 24 h which were found to be 3.52 ± 0.06 μg/L and 5.47 ± 0.49 μkat/L, respectively. Thereafter, NA and CK-MB concentrations decreased gradually. Plasma NA declined to the preoperative level (1.66 ± 0.03 μg/L) at 72 h, while CK-MB level (2.71 ± 0.17 μkat/L) was found to be still higher than its preoperative level. It was, therefore, concluded that plasma NA might be involved in the induction and development of cardiomyocytes damage during cerebral hemorrhage.

  18. Effects of calcium and nifedipine on noradrenaline- and PGF-2 alpha-induced activity of the ampullary-isthmic junction of the human oviduct in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, A; Andersson, K E; Ulmsten, U

    1983-03-01

    From 22 women undergoing hysterectomy at various stages of the menstrual cycle, strip preparations were dissected from the outer, longitudinal and the inner, circular smooth muscle layers of the ampullary-isthmic junction (AIJ). The strips were mounted in organ baths, and isometric tension was recorded. Spontaneous contractions were recorded mainly in circular muscle strips. Contractions were elicited by 127 mM-K+, 10(-6) M-noradrenaline and 10(-6) M-PGF-2 alpha. Potassium induced biphasic responses that were slightly different in the two tissues. In circular muscle strips, noradrenaline and PGF-2 alpha induced phasic contractions superimposed on a rise in tone. In longitudinal muscle specimens, the two compounds produced tonic responses. All types of mechanical activity were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium. K+-induced responses and phasic contractions produced by noradrenaline and PGF-2 alpha could be abolished by 10(-6) M-nifedipine whereas the tonic contractions in the circular and longitudinal muscle were more resistant to the calcium antagonist. The results suggest that K+-induced responses in circular and longitudinal muscle of the human AIJ, and the phasic contractions in circular muscle, depend on calcium influx via potential-sensitive membrane channels. Receptor-operated calcium channels seem to be involved in the tonic contractions observed mainly in the longitudinal smooth muscle.

  19. Noradrenaline-induced enhancement of oscillatory local field potentials in the mouse accessory olfactory bulb does not depend on disinhibition of mitral cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszkowicz, Emilia; Khan, Selina; Ng, Stephanie; Ved, Nikita; Swallow, Daniel L; Brennan, Peter A

    2012-05-01

    The olfactory bulb differs from other brain regions by its use of bidirectional synaptic transmission at dendrodendritic reciprocal synapses. These reciprocal synapses provide tight coupling of inhibitory feedback from granule cell interneurons to mitral cell projection neurons in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), at the first stage of vomeronasal processing. It has been proposed that both the mGluR2 agonist DCG-IV and noradrenaline promote mate recognition memory formation by reducing GABAergic feedback on mitral cells. The resultant mitral cell disinhibition is thought to induce a long-lasting enhancement in the gain of inhibitory feedback from granule to mitral cells, which selectively gates the transmission of the learned chemosensory information. However, we found that local infusions of both noradrenaline and DCG-IV failed to disinhibit AOB neural activity in urethane-anaesthetised mice. DCG-IV infusion had similar effects to the GABA(A) agonist isoguvacine, suggesting that it increased GABAergic inhibition in the AOB rather than reducing it. Noradrenaline infusion into the AOB also failed to disinhibit mitral cells in awake mice despite inducing long-term increases in power of AOB local field potentials, similar to those observed following memory formation. These results suggest that mitral cell disinhibition is not essential for the neural changes in the AOB that underlie mate recognition memory formation in mice.

  20. [Noradrenaline and glycogen content and the activity of several enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in normal, embryonic, and partly denervated livers and in hepatomas of the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iljin, S V; Shanigina, K I; Sydow, G; Parfhenova, N S

    1977-01-01

    The noradrenaline and glycogen contents as well as hexokinase, glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase activities were determined in normal, embryonic and partially denervated (bilateral dissection of the Nervus splanchnicus or Nervus vagus) rat liver and in two transplantable hepatomas. In embryonic liver and hepatomas a strong decrease or complete loss of noradrenaline and glycogen levels and glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase activities is demonstrable as compared to the livers of adult animals, while the hexokinase activity is enhanced. Following bilateral splanchnicotomy the glycogen content and hexokinase activity are enhanced; the glucose-6-phosphatase activity is reduced, and the liver does not contain any noradrenaline. Bilateral vagotomy causes decrease of the glycogen content, of the hexokinase and glucokinase activities and an enhancement of glucose-6-phosphatase activity. The results lend support to the idea of antagonistic action of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems upon several partial reactions of carbohydrate metabolism of liver. In addition, it can be assumed that the alterations of the carbohydrate metabolism demonstrable in hepatomas as compared to normal liver are not solely attributable to disturbance or breakdown of the nervous regulation.

  1. Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potentials in Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Sari; Lenko, Hanna L; Oja, Sakari; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Pietilä, Timo; Mäkipernaa, Anne

    2016-07-01

    This population-based cross-sectional study evaluates the clinical value of electroretinography and visual evoked potentials in childhood brain tumor survivors. A flash electroretinography and a checkerboard reversal pattern visual evoked potential (or alternatively a flash visual evoked potential) were done for 51 survivors (age 3.8-28.7 years) after a mean follow-up time of 7.6 (1.5-15.1) years. Abnormal electroretinography was obtained in 1 case, bilaterally delayed abnormal visual evoked potentials in 22/51 (43%) cases. Nine of 25 patients with infratentorial tumor location, and altogether 12 out of 31 (39%) patients who did not have tumors involving the visual pathways, had abnormal visual evoked potentials. Abnormal electroretinographies are rarely observed, but abnormal visual evoked potentials are common even without evident anatomic lesions in the visual pathway. Bilateral changes suggest a general and possibly multifactorial toxic/adverse effect on the visual pathway. Electroretinography and visual evoked potential may have clinical and scientific value while evaluating long-term effects of childhood brain tumors and tumor treatment.

  2. Cortical evoked potentials recorded from the guinea pig without averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walloch, R A

    1975-01-01

    Potentials evoked by tonal pulses and recorded with a monopolar electrode on the pial surface over the auditory cortex of the guinea pig are presented. These potentials are compared with average potentials recorded in previous studies with an electrode on the dura. The potentials recorded by these two techniques have similar waveforms, peak latencies and thresholds. They appear to be generated within the same region of the cerebral cortex. As can be expected, the amplitude of the evoked potentials recorded from the pial surface is larger than that recorded from the dura. Consequently, averaging is not needed to extract the evoked potential once the dura is removed. The thresholds for the evoked cortical potential are similar to behavioral thresholds for the guinea pig at high frequencies; however, evoked potential thresholds are eleveate over behavioral thresholds at low frequencies. The removal of the dura and the direct recording of the evoked potential appears most appropriate for acute experiments. The recording of an evoked potential with dura electrodes empploying averaging procedures appears most appropriate for chronic studies.

  3. Mechanical Stimulation by Postnasal Drip Evokes Cough.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Iwata

    Full Text Available Cough affects all individuals at different times, and its economic burden is substantial. Despite these widespread adverse effects, cough research relies on animal models, which hampers our understanding of the fundamental cause of cough. Postnasal drip is speculated to be one of the most frequent causes of chronic cough; however, this is a matter of debate. Here we show that mechanical stimuli by postnasal drip cause chronic cough. We distinguished human cough from sneezes and expiration reflexes by airflow patterns. Cough and sneeze exhibited one-peak and two-peak patterns, respectively, in expiratory airflow, which were also confirmed by animal models of cough and sneeze. Transgenic mice with ciliary dyskinesia coughed substantially and showed postnasal drip in the pharynx; furthermore, their cough was completely inhibited by nasal airway blockade of postnasal drip. We successfully reproduced cough observed in these mice by injecting artificial postnasal drip in wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that mechanical stimulation by postnasal drip evoked cough. The findings of our study can therefore be used to develop new antitussive drugs that prevent the root cause of cough.

  4. Mechanical Stimulation by Postnasal Drip Evokes Cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Toshiyuki; Ito, Isao; Niimi, Akio; Ikegami, Koji; Marumo, Satoshi; Tanabe, Naoya; Nakaji, Hitoshi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hisako; Kamei, Junzo; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Cough affects all individuals at different times, and its economic burden is substantial. Despite these widespread adverse effects, cough research relies on animal models, which hampers our understanding of the fundamental cause of cough. Postnasal drip is speculated to be one of the most frequent causes of chronic cough; however, this is a matter of debate. Here we show that mechanical stimuli by postnasal drip cause chronic cough. We distinguished human cough from sneezes and expiration reflexes by airflow patterns. Cough and sneeze exhibited one-peak and two-peak patterns, respectively, in expiratory airflow, which were also confirmed by animal models of cough and sneeze. Transgenic mice with ciliary dyskinesia coughed substantially and showed postnasal drip in the pharynx; furthermore, their cough was completely inhibited by nasal airway blockade of postnasal drip. We successfully reproduced cough observed in these mice by injecting artificial postnasal drip in wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that mechanical stimulation by postnasal drip evoked cough. The findings of our study can therefore be used to develop new antitussive drugs that prevent the root cause of cough.

  5. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in rock musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høydal, Erik Harry; Lein Størmer, Carl Christian; Laukli, Einar; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2017-09-01

    Our focus in this study was the assessment of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in a large group of rock musicians. A further objective was to analyse tinnitus among rock musicians as related to TEOAEs. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random. A control group was included at random for comparison. We recruited 111 musicians and a control group of 40 non-musicians. Testing was conducted by using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, TEOAEs and a questionnaire. TEOAE SNR in the half-octave frequency band centred on 4 kHz was significantly lower bilaterally in musicians than controls. This effect was strongly predicted by age and pure-tone hearing threshold levels in the 3-6 kHz range. Bilateral hearing thresholds were significantly higher at 6 kHz in musicians. Twenty percent of the musicians had permanent tinnitus. There was no association between the TEOAE parameters and permanent tinnitus. Our results suggest an incipient hearing loss at 6 kHz in rock musicians. Loss of TEOAE SNR in the 4 kHz half-octave frequency band was observed, but it was related to higher mean 3-6 kHz hearing thresholds and age. A large proportion of rock musicians have permanent tinnitus.

  6. [Intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakuma, Jun; Suzuki, Kyouichi; Matsumoto, Masato; Itakura, Takeshi; Kodama, Namio; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    Our success rate of intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potential (VEP) had been approximately 30% in the past. In order to improve recording rate of intraoperative VEP, we developed a new stimulating device using high power light emitting diodes. Electroretinogram was simultaneously recorded to understand whether flash stimulation reached the retina. In addition, total venous anesthesia with propofol was used to avoid the adverse effect of inhalation anesthesia. We report the results after introduction of these improvements. Intraoperative monitoring of VEP was attempted in 35 cases. We evaluated success rate of VEP recording, correlation between VEP findings and postoperative visual function, and reasons why recording was not successful. Stable and reproducible waveforms were obtained in 59 sides (84%). Two cases, whose VEP deteriorated intraoperatively, developed postoperative visual disturbance: In 11 sides (16%), stable waveforms were not obtained. There were two main causes. In 8 sides out of 11, the cause was attributed to pre-existing severe visual disturbance. In these 8 sides, VEP in the awake state was not recordable or was recordable, but with very low amplitudes under 1 microV. In the other 3 sides, the cause was attributed to movement of a stimulating device by reflecting the fronto-temporal scalp flap. In conclusion, the successful recording rate was increased to 84% from approximately 30%, after introduction of various trials. We need further improvement in recording intraoperative VEP to establish a reliable intraoperative monitoring method for VEP.

  7. Elderly trauma patients have high circulating noradrenaline levels but attenuated release of adrenaline, platelets, and leukocytes in response to increasing injury severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Sørensen, Anne Marie; Perner, Anders

    2012-01-01

    : High patient age is a strong predictor of poor outcome in trauma patients. The present study investigated the effect of age on mortality and biomarkers of sympathoadrenal activation, tissue, endothelial, and glycocalyx damage, coagulation activation/inhibition, fibrinolysis, and inflammation in...

  8. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of hippocampal acetylcholine release is preserved in aged mice

    OpenAIRE

    Redmer, Agnes; Kathmann, Markus; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2003-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist SR 141716 increases acetylcholine release in rodent hippocampus and improves memory in some experimental paradigms. Since drugs like SR 141716 may represent a novel class of cognition-enhancing drugs, we wanted to check whether the function of the CB1 receptor is preserved during ageing.Hippocampal and striatal slices from 2- to 3- and 24- to 28-month-old C57BL/6J mice were preincubated with [3H]-choline or [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA) a...

  9. [Brainstem auditory evoked potentials and somatosensory evoked potentials in Chiari malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncho, Dulce; Poca, María A; Minoves, Teresa; Ferré, Alejandro; Rahnama, Kimia; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2013-06-16

    Introduccion. La malformacion de Chiari (MC) incluye una serie de anomalias congenitas que tienen como comun denominador la ectopia de las amigdalas del cerebelo por debajo del foramen magno, lo que puede condicionar fenomenos compresivos del troncoencefalo, la medula espinal alta y los nervios craneales, alterando las respuestas de los potenciales evocados auditivos del tronco cerebral (PEATC) y de los potenciales evocados somatosensoriales (PESS). Sin embargo, las indicaciones de ambas exploraciones en las MC han sido motivo de estudio en un numero limitado de publicaciones, centradas en series cortas y heterogeneas de pacientes. Objetivo. Revisar los hallazgos de los PEATC y los PESS en los estudios publicados en pacientes con MC tipo 1 (MC-1) o tipo 2 (MC-2), y su indicacion en el diagnostico, tratamiento y seguimiento, especialmente en la MC-1. Desarrollo. Es un estudio de revision realizado mediante analisis de los estudios publicados en Medline desde 1966, localizados mediante PubMed, utilizando combinaciones de las palabras clave 'Chiari malformation', 'Arnold-Chiari malformation', 'Chiari type 1 malformation', 'Arnold-Chiari type 1 malformation', 'evoked potentials', 'brainstem auditory evoked potentials' y 'somatosensory evoked potentials', asi como informacion de pacientes con MC-1 valorados en los servicios de neurocirugia y neurofisiologia clinica del Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron. Conclusiones. Los hallazgos mas comunes de los PESS son la reduccion en la amplitud cortical para el nervio tibial posterior, la reduccion o ausencia del potencial cervical del nervio mediano y el aumento del intervalo N13-N20. En el caso de los PEATC, los hallazgos mas frecuentes descritos son el aumento del intervalo I-V y la alteracion periferica o coclear.

  10. Evoked potentials and head injury. 1. Rating of evoked potential abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, M; Hall, K; Hopkins, H K; Belleza, T

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes a method for rating the degree of abnormality of auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potential patterns in head injury (HI) patients. Criteria for judging degree of EP abnormality are presented that allow assessment of the extent and severity of subcortical and cortical dysfunction associated with traumatic brain damage. Interrater reliability data based upon blind ratings of normal and HI patients are presented and shown to be highly significant. Tables of normative values of peak latencies and amplitudes are given and illustrations of EP patterns of different degrees of abnormality are presented.

  11. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of serotonin release in the rat brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Betz, R; Göthert, M

    1988-05-01

    Rat brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-serotonin were superfused with physiological salt solution (containing citalopram, an inhibitor of serotonin uptake) and the effect of histamine on the electrically (3 Hz) evoked 3H overflow was studied. Histamine decreased the evoked overflow in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of histamine was antagonized by impromidine and burimamide, but was not affected by pheniramine, ranitidine, metitepine and phentolamine. Given alone, impromidine facilitated the evoked overflow, whereas burimamide, pheniramine and ranitidine had no effect. The results suggest that histamine inhibits serotonin release in the rat brain cortex via histamine H3 receptors, which may be located presynaptically.

  12. Renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located......, salt, and volume overload. In contrast, the events controlling the function of renin-secreting cells at the organ and cellular level are markedly less clear and remain mysterious in certain aspects. The unravelling of these mysteries has led to new and interesting insights into the process of renin...

  13. Multimodality evoked responses in the neurological assessment of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, E; von Siebenthal, K; Daniëls, H; Guzzetta, F; Casaer, P

    1994-09-01

    In recent years increased attention has been devoted to evoked potentials (EP) in newborns. This paper reviews the literature and data from our research group in an attempt to assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of evoked responses in the first weeks of life and their use in different age-specific clinical conditions. The results show that EP are a very sensitive measure of the integrity of the sensory pathways. They make it possible to follow normal physiological maturation and the abnormalities of development resulting from neurological lesions. Repeated measurements of visual evoked potentials and somatosensorial evoked potential are prognostically useful in term infants, but seem much more limited in preterm newborns in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  14. Towards a neural basis of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Music is capable of evoking exceptionally strong emotions and of reliably affecting the mood of individuals. Functional neuroimaging and lesion studies show that music-evoked emotions can modulate activity in virtually all limbic and paralimbic brain structures. These structures are crucially involved in the initiation, generation, detection, maintenance, regulation and termination of emotions that have survival value for the individual and the species. Therefore, at least some music-evoked emotions involve the very core of evolutionarily adaptive neuroaffective mechanisms. Because dysfunctions in these structures are related to emotional disorders, a better understanding of music-evoked emotions and their neural correlates can lead to a more systematic and effective use of music in therapy.

  15. Laser evoked potentials in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Libro, Giuseppe; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Sardaro, Michele; Serpino, Claudia; Calabrese, Rita; Vecchio, Eleonora; Livrea, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of Adelta fibers at the hand level in patients with clinical symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) using CO(2) laser evoked potentials (LEPs), in light of the intensity and distribution of sensory symptoms and pain. Thirty-four CTS outpatients (62 hands) were compared to 23 sex- and age-matched control subjects (46 hands). The periungueal skin of the first, second, third and fifth fingers, and the dorsum of the hands were stimulated in random order. The latency and amplitude of the N2, P2 and N1 components were evaluated with respect to the Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) data, clinical scales, pain intensity and glove-like symptoms distribution. The amplitude of the N2-P2 complex was significantly reduced in CTS hands compared to normal hands after stimulation of the second and third fingers, even in patients with mild nerve conduction impairment. No significant fifth finger LEP abnormalities were found in patients with glove-like distribution symptoms. The N2-P2 amplitude at the second and third fingers was positively correlated with the severity of sensory symptoms. The involvement of median nerve Adelta fibers in CTS seems to be an early phenomenon, which concurs with the impairment of large motor and sensory afferents and is linked to the severity of the disease. The finding of reduced sensory symptoms in patients with severe thin afferents damage, may suggest a slight expression of central sensitisation phenomena in the advanced stage of CTS syndrome.

  16. Pudendal somatosensory evoked potentials in normal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A. Cavalcanti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP is an electrophysiological test used to evaluate sensory innervations in peripheral and central neuropathies. Pudendal SSEP has been studied in dysfunctions related to the lower urinary tract and pelvic floor. Although some authors have already described technical details pertaining to the method, the standardization and the influence of physiological variables in normative values have not yet been established, especially for women. The aim of the study was to describe normal values of the pudendal SSEP and to compare technical details with those described by other authors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The clitoral sensory threshold and pudendal SSEP latency was accomplished in 38 normal volunteers. The results obtained from stimulation performed on each side of the clitoris were compared to ages, body mass index (BMI and number of pregnancies. RESULTS: The values of clitoral sensory threshold and P1 latency with clitoral left stimulation were respectively, 3.64 ± 1.01 mA and 37.68 ± 2.60 ms. Results obtained with clitoral right stimulation were 3.84 ± 1.53 mA and 37.42 ± 3.12 ms, respectively. There were no correlations between clitoral sensory threshold and P1 latency with age, BMI or height of the volunteers. A significant difference was found in P1 latency between nulliparous women and volunteers who had been previously submitted to cesarean section. CONCLUSIONS: The SSEP latency represents an accessible and reproducible method to investigate the afferent pathways from the genitourinary tract. These results could be used as normative values in studies involving genitourinary neuropathies in order to better clarify voiding and sexual dysfunctions in females.

  17. Brain-immune interaction accompanying odor-evoked autobiographic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Bai, Yu; Yamakawa, Kaori; Toyama, Asako; Kashiwagi, Mitsuyoshi; Fukuda, Kazuyuki; Oshida, Akiko; Sanada, Kazue; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon in which a certain smell evokes a specific memory is known as the Proust phenomenon. Odor-evoked autobiographic memories are more emotional than those elicited by other sensory stimuli. The results of our previous study indicated that odor-evoked autobiographic memory accompanied by positive emotions has remarkable effects on various psychological and physiological activities, including the secretion of cytokines, which are immune-signaling molecules that modulate systemic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to clarify the neural substrates associated with the interaction between odor-evoked autobiographic memory and peripheral circulating cytokines. We recruited healthy male and female volunteers and investigated the association between brain responses and the concentration of several cytokines in the plasma by using positron emission tomography (PET) recordings when an autographic memory was evoked in participants by asking them to smell an odor that was nostalgic to them. Participants experienced positive emotions and autobiographic memories when nostalgic odors were presented to them. The levels of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), were significantly reduced after experiencing odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Subtraction analysis of PET images indicated that the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) were significantly activated during experiences of odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Furthermore, a correlation analysis indicated that activities of the mOFC and precuneus/PCC were negatively correlated with IFN-γ concentration. These results indicate that the neural networks including the precuneus/PCC and mOFC might regulate the secretion of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines during the experience of odor-evoked autobiographic memories accompanied with positive emotions.

  18. Multiple Color Stimulus Induced Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    evoked potentials, multiple color, FFT, bispectrum I. INTRODUCTION Visual evoked potential ( VEP ) is the electrical response of...brain under visual stimulation, which can be recorded from the scalp over the visual cortex of the brain. A distinction is made between transient VEP ...and steady-state VEP (SSVEP) based on the stimulation frequencies. The former arises when the stimulation frequencies are less than 2 Hz. However

  19. Investigating the periodicity of transient-evoked otoacoustic emission envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhulst, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the cochlear origin of the multiple temporal lobes that are often observed in the transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) envelope. This "waxing and waning" of the OAE amplitude can be observed in tone-burst (TB) OAEs and sometimes also in click-evoked (CE) OAEs. TBOAE...... and the middle-ear boundary may contribute to the TBOAE envelope periodicity, but were not the main modulation component in waxing and waning of the investigated TBOAEs....

  20. Auditory evoked potentials and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in evaluation of brainstem lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Anita; Nesek Mađarić, Vesna; Starčević, Katarina; Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Gabelić, Tereza; Adamec, Ivan; Habek, Mario

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the roles of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) in the evaluation of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS). Altogether 32 patients with the diagnosis of MS participated in the study. The following data was collected from all patients: age, gender, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, brainstem functional system score (BSFS) (part of the EDSS evaluating brainstem symptomatology), and involvement of the brainstem on the brain MRI. AEP and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) were studied in all patients. BSFS, MRI, AEP, oVEMP and cVEMP involvement of the brainstem was evident in 9 (28.1%), 14 (43.8%), 7 (21.9%), 12 (37.5%) and 10 (31.0%) patients, respectively. None of the tests used showed statistically significant advantage in the detection of brainstem lesions. When combining oVEMP and cVEMP 18 (56.3%) patients showed brainstem involvement. This combination showed brainstem involvement in greater percentage than BSFS or AEP, with statistical significance (p=0.035 and p=0.007, respectively). VEMP is a reliable method in detection of brainstem involvement in MS. It is comparable with MRI, but superior to clinical examination or AEP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantified regional and laminar distribution of the noradrenaline innervation in the anterior half of the adult rat cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audet, M.A.; Doucet, G.; Oleskevich, S.; Descarries, L.

    1988-08-15

    The regional and laminar distribution of the noradrenaline (NA) innervation in the adult rat cerebral cortex was quantified in radioautographs of semithin sections from whole hemisphere slices incubated with tritiated catecholamines and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. Uptake-labeled axonal varicosities (aggregates of silver grains) were counted with the help of a computerized image analyzer in seven cytoarchitectonic areas of the rostral half of the cortex: Cg3, rostral AID, Cg2, Fr1, Par1, caudal AID, and Pir (prepiriform) according to Zilles's nomenclature. Both dopamine (DA) and NA terminals were detected after incubation with (3H)DA and citalopram or with (3H)NA alone. In the presence of desipramine (DMI), DA terminals alone were demonstrated; the number of NA terminals was then obtained by subtraction from counts in adjacent slices incubated with or without DMI. These counts suggested that DA and NA varicosities were fully visualized only after labeling with their respective tritiated amine. Similar numbers of labeled NA varicosities as inferred after (3H)NA incubation with or without DMI were observed after (3H)NA incubation in the presence of benztropine (BZ). This indicated that NA terminals were then maximally detected to the exclusion of the DA ones, and the latter approach was adopted for the acquisition of normative data. Since the average diameter of the labeled NA varicosities was known from earlier measurements in electron microscope radioautographs, the initial counts of labeled sites/mm2 of histological section could be expressed as numbers of varicosities/mm3 of tissue following a double correction for incomplete detection at the chosen duration of radioautographic exposure and section thickness.

  2. Modulation of neurotransmitter release via histamine H3 heteroreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Malinowska, B; Kathmann, M; Göthert, M

    1994-01-01

    Presynaptic H3 receptors occur on histaminergic neurones of the CNS (autoreceptors) and on non-histaminergic neurones of the central and autonomic nervous system (heteroreceptors). H3 heteroreceptors, most probably located on the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibres innervating the resistance vessels and the heart, have been identified in the model of the pithed rat. Furthermore, we could show in superfusion experiments that H3 heteroreceptors also occur on the sympathetic neurones supplying the human saphenous vein and the vasculature of the pig retina and on the serotoninergic, dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurones in the brain of various mammalian species, including man. The effects of three recently described H3 receptor ligands were studied in superfused mouse brain cortex slices. The potency of the novel H3 receptor agonist imetit exceeded that of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (the reference H3 receptor agonist) by one log unit and that of histamine by almost two log units. Clobenpropit was shown to be a competitive H3 receptor antagonist, exhibiting a pA2 as high as 9.6 (exceeding the pA2 of the reference H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide by one log unit). The irreversible antagonism of N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) was also studied. Interactions of the H3 heteroreceptor with the dopamine autoreceptor in mouse striatal slices and the alpha 2-autoreceptor in mouse brain cortex slices could be demonstrated. Activation of alpha 2-autoreceptors decreases the H3 receptor-mediated effect. Blockade of alpha 2-autoreceptors increases the H3 receptor-mediated effect only if the alpha 2-autoreceptors are simultaneously activated by endogenous noradrenaline. The H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in mouse brain cortex slices was attenuated by the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium but this attenuation was abolished by reduction of the Ca2+ concentration in the medium (to compensate for the facilitatory effect of

  3. Evoked Culture and Evoked Nature: The Promise of Gene-Culture Co-Evolution Theory for Sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Anthony; Yun, Ilhong

    2016-01-01

    The traditional sociological view of culture has been almost exclusively that of transmitted culture decoupled from biology. The concept of evoked culture brings biology “back in” since it identifies ecological challenges that evoked certain practices based on evolutionary imperatives. The practices are then passed on to subsequent generations as normative, and individuals best suited to these normative practices will enjoy greater fitness benefits than those less suited. In other words, prac...

  4. Somatosensory Evoked Potential Findings in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidem, Muharrem; Sahin, Zerrin; Aydin, Teoman; Aysal, Fikret

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) abnormalities were reported in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study aimed to investigate SSEP abnormalities and its relation with clinical findings in AS patients. Materials and Methods: The study included 26 patients with AS and 17 age-matched health volunteers (Control for SSEP). Median nerve SSEP findings were normal in all AS cases. Results: However, delayed latency and/or very low amplitude of tibial nerve SSEP was found in 20 (76.9%) AS patients. There were significant correlations between tibial SSEP latency and disease duration (R=0.433 to 0.635). There was also an inverse correlation between tibial SSEP amplitude and disease duration (R=−0.429, p=0.047). Serum estradiol level, hip total bone mineral density, The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) score and Beck depression score were significantly lower in AS patients with SSEP abnormalities (37.3±10.8 pg/mL, 0.916±0.123 g/cm2, 35.0±27.9, 12.8±8.4, respectively) than in AS patients without SSEP abnormalities (53.7±12.3 pg/mL, 1.103±0.197 g/cm2, 64.8±15.5, 24.8±10.1, respectively). Conclusion: Significant inverse correlations between SSEP latencies and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) levels were found (R=−0.400 to −0.713). There were also significant inverse correlation between SSEP latencies and DHEAS/oestrogen index (R=−0.596 to −0.868), and between SSEP latencies and DHEAS/Progesterone index (R=−0.467 to −0.685). As a conclusion, this study indicates that tibial nerve SSEP abnormalities are common in patients with AS and there are significant correlations between clinical findings of AS and SSEP abnormalities. PMID:25610293

  5. Rab3A deletion selectively reduces spontaneous neurotransmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sons, Michèle S; Plomp, Jaap J

    2006-05-17

    Rab3A is a synaptic vesicle-associated GTP-binding protein thought to be involved in modulation of presynaptic transmitter release through regulation of vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. Electrophysiological studies at central nervous system synapses of Rab3A null-mutant mice have indicated that nerve stimulation-evoked transmitter release and its short- and long-term modulation are partly dependent on Rab3A, whereas spontaneous uniquantal release is completely independent of it. Here, we studied the acetylcholine (ACh) release at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of diaphragm and soleus muscles from Rab3A-deficient mice with intracellular microelectrode methods. Surprisingly, we found 20-40% reduction of spontaneous ACh release but completely intact nerve action potential-evoked release at both high- and low-rate stimulation and during recovery from intense release. The ACh release induced by hypertonic medium was also unchanged, indicating that the pool of vesicles for immediate release is unaltered at the Rab3A-deficient NMJ. These results indicate a selective role of Rab3A in spontaneous transmitter release at the NMJ which cannot or only partly be taken over by the closely related Rab3B, Rab3C, or Rab3D isoforms when Rab3A is deleted. It has been hypothesized that Rab3A mutation underlies human presynaptic myasthenic syndromes, in which severely reduced nerve action potential-evoked ACh release at the NMJ causes paralysis. Our observation that Rab3A deletion does not reduce evoked ACh release at any stimulation rate at the mouse NMJ, argues against this hypothesis.

  6. The timing of phasic transmitter release is Ca2+-dependent and lacks a direct influence of presynaptic membrane potential

    OpenAIRE

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and the resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, triggers transmitter release in nerve terminals. However, it is controversial whether in addition to the opening of Ca2+ channels, membrane potential directly affects transmitter release. Here, we assayed the influence of membrane potential on transmitter release at the calyx of Held nerve terminals. Transmitter release was evoked by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging, or by presyn...

  7. Peptide-evoked release of amylase from isolated acini of the rat parotid gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goll, R; Poulsen, J H; Schmidt, P

    1994-01-01

    in extracts of the gland. The immunoreactivity of these peptides could be located to varicose nerve fibers in the gland. Binding of labeled SP to the isolated acini exhibited the characteristics of a genuine agonist/receptor interaction, and the rank order of displacement potencies indicated the presence...

  8. Membrane permeable C-terminal dopamine transporter peptides attenuate amphetamine-evoked dopamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Owens, WA; Winkler, Marie-Therese

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is responsible for sequestration of extracellular dopamine (DA). The psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH) is a DAT substrate, which is actively transported into the nerve terminal, eliciting vesicular depletion and reversal of DA transport via DAT. Here, we investigate...

  9. The paradox of music-evoked sadness: an online survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liila Taruffi

    Full Text Available This study explores listeners' experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772. The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no "real-life" implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life.

  10. The paradox of music-evoked sadness: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores listeners' experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772). The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no "real-life" implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life.

  11. The Paradox of Music-Evoked Sadness: An Online Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores listeners’ experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772). The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no “real-life” implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life. PMID:25330315

  12. Cortical evoked potentials to an auditory illusion: binaural beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Hillel; Starr, Arnold; Michalewski, Henry J; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Nomi

    2009-08-01

    To define brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of 3 and 6Hz binaural beats in 250Hz or 1000Hz base frequencies, and compare it to the sound onset response. Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded in response to unmodulated tones of 250 or 1000Hz to one ear and 3 or 6Hz higher to the other, creating an illusion of amplitude modulations (beats) of 3Hz and 6Hz, in base frequencies of 250Hz and 1000Hz. Tones were 2000ms in duration and presented with approximately 1s intervals. Latency, amplitude and source current density estimates of ERP components to tone onset and subsequent beats-evoked oscillations were determined and compared across beat frequencies with both base frequencies. All stimuli evoked tone-onset P(50), N(100) and P(200) components followed by oscillations corresponding to the beat frequency, and a subsequent tone-offset complex. Beats-evoked oscillations were higher in amplitude with the low base frequency and to the low beat frequency. Sources of the beats-evoked oscillations across all stimulus conditions located mostly to left lateral and inferior temporal lobe areas in all stimulus conditions. Onset-evoked components were not different across stimulus conditions; P(50) had significantly different sources than the beats-evoked oscillations; and N(100) and P(200) sources located to the same temporal lobe regions as beats-evoked oscillations, but were bilateral and also included frontal and parietal contributions. Neural activity with slightly different volley frequencies from left and right ear converges and interacts in the central auditory brainstem pathways to generate beats of neural activity to modulate activities in the left temporal lobe, giving rise to the illusion of binaural beats. Cortical potentials recorded to binaural beats are distinct from onset responses. Brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of low frequency beats can be recorded from the scalp.

  13. Conditioning effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation evoking motor-evoked potential on V-wave response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosprêtre, Sidney; Martin, Alain

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the collision responsible for the volitional V-wave evoked by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the motor nerve during voluntary contraction. V-wave was conditioned by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex at several inter-stimuli intervals (ISI) during weak voluntary plantar flexions (n = 10) and at rest for flexor carpi radialis muscle (FCR; n = 6). Conditioning stimulations were induced by TMS with intensity eliciting maximal motor-evoked potential (MEPmax). ISIs used were ranging from -20 to +20 msec depending on muscles tested. The results showed that, for triceps surae muscles, conditioning TMS increased the V-wave amplitude (~ +250%) and the associated mechanical response (~ +30%) during weak voluntary plantar flexion (10% of the maximal voluntary contraction -MVC) for ISIs ranging from +6 to +18 msec. Similar effect was observed at rest for the FCR with ISI ranging from +6 to +12 msec. When the level of force was increased from 10 to 50% MVC or the conditioning TMS intensity was reduced to elicit responses of 50% of MEPmax, a significant decrease in the conditioned V-wave amplitude was observed for the triceps surae muscles, linearly correlated to the changes in MEP amplitude. The slope of this correlation, as well as the electro-mechanical efficiency, was closed to the identity line, indicating that V-wave impact at muscle level seems to be similar to the impact of cortical stimulation. All these results suggest that change in V-wave amplitude is a great index to reflect changes in cortical neural drive addressed to spinal motoneurons.

  14. A facile self-assembled film assisted preparation of CuGaS{sub 2} ultrathin films and their high sensitivity to L-noradrenaline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qin; Kang, Shi-Zhao, E-mail: kangsz@sit.edu.cn; Li, Xiangqing; Qin, Lixia; Mu, Jin, E-mail: mujin@sit.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A dense CuGaS{sub 2} ultrathin film was prepared in an improved layer-by-layer self-assembled process following heat treatment. And, the as-prepared CuGaS{sub 2} ultrathin film possesses high sensitivity to L-noradrenaline. - Highlights: • Tetragonal CuGaS{sub 2} film was prepared in a simple process. • CuGaS{sub 2} film exhibits a narrow emission. • High sensitivity to LNE with a detection limit of 2.83 ng cm{sup −2}. - Abstract: A dense CuGaS{sub 2} ultrathin film was prepared in an improved layer-by-layer self-assembled process followed by heat treatment and characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Meanwhile, the application of the as-prepared CuGaS{sub 2} ultrathin film in the trace detection of L-noradrenaline was explored as a photoluminescent probe. The results show that the tetragonal phase CuGaS{sub 2} film fabricated on the glass substrate is smooth and dense. And this CuGaS{sub 2} ultrathin film can exhibit a strong emission at 829 nm with full width at half maximum of approximate 12 nm. Furthermore, the as-prepared CuGaS{sub 2} ultrathin film possesses high sensitivity to L-noradrenaline with a detectable concentration of 2.83 ng cm{sup −2} when it is used as a photoluminescent probe, implying that it is a promising candidate in the field of biological and chemical sensing in future.

  15. The Increase in Signaling by Kisspeptin Neurons in the Preoptic Area and Associated Changes in Clock Gene Expression That Trigger the LH Surge in Female Rats Are Dependent on the Facilitatory Action of a Noradrenaline Input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Bruna; Ribeiro, Aline B; Leite, Cristiane M; Uchôa, Ernane T; Carolino, Ruither O; Cardoso, Thais S R; Elias, Lucila L K; Rodrigues, José A; Plant, Tony M; Poletini, Maristela O; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, kisspeptin neurons in the rostral periventricular area of the third ventricle (RP3V) of the preoptic area are considered to provide a major stimulatory input to the GnRH neuronal network that is responsible for triggering the preovulatory LH surge. Noradrenaline (NA) is one of the main modulators of GnRH release, and NA fibers are found in close apposition to kisspeptin neurons in the RP3V. Our objective was to interrogate the role of NA signaling in the kisspeptin control of GnRH secretion during the estradiol induced LH surge in ovariectomized rats, using prazosin, an α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist. In control rats, the estradiol-induced LH surge at 17 hours was associated with a significant increase in GnRH and kisspeptin content in the median eminence with the increase in kisspeptin preceding that of GnRH and LH. Prazosin, administered 5 and 3 hours prior to the predicted time of the LH surge truncated the LH surge and abolished the rise in GnRH and kisspeptin in the median eminence. In the preoptic area, prazosin blocked the increases in Kiss1 gene expression and kisspeptin content in association with a disruption in the expression of the clock genes, Per1 and Bmal1. Together these findings demonstrate for the first time that NA modulates kisspeptin synthesis in the RP3V through the activation of α1-adrenergic receptors prior to the initiation of the LH surge and indicate a potential role of α1-adrenergic signaling in the circadian-controlled pathway timing of the preovulatory LH surge.

  16. Plasma volume substitution does not inhibit plasma noradrenaline and muscle nerve sympathetic responses to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Berne, C; Fagius, J;

    1989-01-01

    underly the sympathetic activation. To study the effect of prevention of plasma volume reduction during hypoglycaemia, saline containing albumin was infused intravenously in healthy adult volunteers during hypoglycaemia. Hypoglycaemia was induced by an intravenous injection of soluble insulin in a dose...... of 0.15 IU/kg body weight. Peripheral venous plasma noradrenaline concentrations were identical in experiments without and with plasma volume substitution. Muscle nerve sympathetic activity increased to the same extent during hypoglycaemia with and without plasma volume substitution. It is concluded...

  17. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin.

  18. A Comprehensive Review on Methodologies Employed for Visual Evoked Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Ruchi; Bokariya, Pradeep; Singh, Smita; Singh, Ramji

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is fundamental to how we appreciate our environment and interact with others. The visual evoked potential (VEP) is among those evoked potentials that are the bioelectric signals generated in the striate and extrastriate cortex when the retina is stimulated with light which can be recorded from the scalp electrodes. In the current paper, we provide an overview of the various modalities, techniques, and methodologies which have been employed for visual evoked potentials over the years. In the first part of the paper, we cast a cursory glance on the historical aspect of evoked potentials. Then the growing clinical significance and advantages of VEPs in clinical disorders have been briefly described, followed by the discussion on the earlier and currently available methods for VEPs based on the studies in the past and recent times. Next, we mention the standards and protocols laid down by the authorized agencies. We then summarize the recently developed techniques for VEP. In the concluding section, we lay down prospective research directives related to fundamental and applied aspects of VEPs as well as offering perspectives for further research to stimulate inquiry into the role of visual evoked potentials in visual processing impairment related disorders.

  19. Linear superposition of sensory-evoked and ongoing cortical hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Saka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern non-invasive brain imaging techniques utilise changes in cerebral blood flow, volume and oxygenation that accompany brain activation. However, stimulus-evoked hemodynamic responses display considerable inter-trial variability even when identical stimuli are presented and the sources of this variability are poorly understood. One of the sources of this response variation could be ongoing spontaneous hemodynamic fluctuations. To investigate this issue, 2-dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy was used to measure cortical hemodynamics in response to sensory stimuli in anaesthetised rodents Pre-stimulus cortical hemodynamics displayed spontaneous periodic fluctuations and as such, data from individual stimulus presentation trials were assigned to one of four groups depending on the phase angle of pre-stimulus hemodynamic fluctuations and averaged. This analysis revealed that sensory evoked cortical hemodynamics displayed distinctive response characteristics and magnitudes depending on the phase angle of ongoing fluctuations at stimulus onset. To investigate the origin of this phenomenon, ‘null-trails’ were collected without stimulus presentation. Subtraction of phase averaged ‘null trials’ from their phase averaged stimulus-evoked counterparts resulted in four similar time series that resembled the mean stimulus-evoked response. These analyses suggest that linear superposition of evoked and ongoing cortical hemodynamic changes may be a property of the structure of inter-trial variability.

  20. The interleukin-6 and noradrenaline mediated inflammation-stress feedback mechanism is dysregulated in metabolic syndrome: Effect of exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega Eduardo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MS is a metabolic disorder associated with obesity, type-II diabetes, and "low grade inflammation", with the concomitant increased risk of cardiovascular events. Removal of the inflammatory mediator signals is a promising strategy to protect against insulin resistance, obesity, and other problems associated with MS such as cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the "inflammatory and stress status" in an experimental model of MS, and to evaluate the effect of a program of habitual exercise and the resulting training-induced adaptation to the effects of a single bout of acute exercise. Methods Obese Zucker rats (fa/fa were used as the experimental model of MS, and lean Zucker rats (Fa/fa were used for reference values. The habitual exercise (performed by the obese rats consisted of treadmill running: 5 days/week for 14 weeks, at 35 cm/s for 35 min in the last month. The acute exercise consisted of a single session of 25-35 min at 35 cm/s. Circulating concentrations of IL-6 (a cytokine that regulates the inflammatory and metabolic responses, CRP (a systemic inflammatory marker, and corticosterone (CTC (the main glucocorticoid in rats were determined by ELISA, and that of noradrenaline (NA was determined by HPLC. Glucose was determined by standard methods. Results The genetically obese animals showed higher circulating levels of glucose, IL-6, PCR, and NA compared with the control lean animals. The habitual exercise program increased the concentration of IL-6, PCR, NA, and glucose, but decreased that of CTC. Acute exercise increased IL-6, CRP, and NA in the sedentary obese animals, but not in the trained obese animals. CTC was increased after the acute exercise in the trained animals only. Conclusion Animals with MS present a dysregulation in the feedback mechanism between IL-6 and NA which can contribute to the systemic low-grade inflammation and/or hyperglycaemia of MS

  1. Presynaptic action of neurotensin on dopamine release through inhibition of D2 receptor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudeau Louis-Eric

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotensin (NT is known to act on dopamine (DA neurons at the somatodendritic level to regulate cell firing and secondarily enhance DA release. In addition, anatomical and indirect physiological data suggest the presence of NT receptors at the terminal level. However, a clear demonstration of the mechanism of action of NT on dopaminergic axon terminals is lacking. We hypothesize that NT acts to increase DA release by inhibiting the function of terminal D2 autoreceptors. To test this hypothesis, we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FCV to monitor in real time the axonal release of DA in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc. Results DA release was evoked by single electrical pulses and pulse trains (10 Hz, 30 pulses. Under these two stimulation conditions, we evaluated the characteristics of DA D2 autoreceptors and the presynaptic action of NT in the NAcc shell and shell/core border region. The selective agonist of D2 autoreceptors, quinpirole (1 μM, inhibited DA overflow evoked by both single and train pulses. In sharp contrast, the selective D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride (5 μM, strongly enhanced DA release triggered by pulse trains, without any effect on DA release elicited by single pulses, thus confirming previous observations. We then determined the effect of NT (8–13 (100 nM and found that although it failed to increase DA release evoked by single pulses, it strongly enhanced DA release evoked by pulse trains that lead to prolonged DA release and engage D2 autoreceptors. In addition, initial blockade of D2 autoreceptors by sulpiride considerably inhibited further facilitation of DA release generated by NT (8–13. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that NT enhances DA release principally by inhibiting the function of terminal D2 autoreceptors and not by more direct mechanisms such as facilitation of terminal calcium influx.

  2. Temporal resolution in the hearing system and auditory evoked potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Lee; Beedholm, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    3pAB5. Temporal resolution in the hearing system and auditory evoked potentials. Kristian Beedholm Institute of Biology,University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark, beedholm@mail.dk, Lee A. Miller Institute of Biology,University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230...... Odense M, Denmark, lee@biology.sdu.dkA popular type of investigation with auditory evoked potentials AEP consists of mapping the dependency of the envelope followingresponse to the AM frequency. This results in what is called the modulation rate transfer function MRTF. The physiologicalinterpretation...... of the MRTF is not straight forward, but is often used as a measure of the ability of the auditory system to encodetemporal changes. It is, however, shown here that the MRTF must depend on the waveform of the click-evoked AEP ceAEP, whichdoes not relate directly to temporal resolution. The theoretical...

  3. Stimulator with arbitrary waveform for auditory evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, H R; Romao, M; Placido, D; Provenzano, F; Tierra-Criollo, C J [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Engenharia Eletrica (DEE), Nucleo de Estudos e Pesquisa em Engenharia Biomedica NEPEB, Av. Ant. Carlos, 6627, sala 2206, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31.270-901 (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    The technological improvement helps many medical areas. The audiometric exams involving the auditory evoked potentials can make better diagnoses of auditory disorders. This paper proposes the development of a stimulator based on Digital Signal Processor. This stimulator is the first step of an auditory evoked potential system based on the ADSP-BF533 EZ KIT LITE (Analog Devices Company - USA). The stimulator can generate arbitrary waveform like Sine Waves, Modulated Amplitude, Pulses, Bursts and Pips. The waveforms are generated through a graphical interface programmed in C++ in which the user can define the parameters of the waveform. Furthermore, the user can set the exam parameters as number of stimuli, time with stimulation (Time ON) and time without stimulus (Time OFF). In future works will be implemented another parts of the system that includes the acquirement of electroencephalogram and signal processing to estimate and analyze the evoked potential.

  4. Neuronal Rac1 is required for learning-evoked neurogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haditsch, Ursula; Anderson, Matthew P; Freewoman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    neurons for normal synaptic plasticity in vivo, and here we show that selective loss of neuronal Rac1 also impairs the learning-evoked increase in neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus. Earlier work has indicated that experience elevates the abundance of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus...... primarily by enhancing the survival of neurons produced just before the learning event. Loss of Rac1 in mature projection neurons did reduce learning-evoked neurogenesis but, contrary to our expectations, these effects were not mediated by altering the survival of young neurons in the hippocampus. Instead......, loss of neuronal Rac1 activation selectively impaired a learning-evoked increase in the proliferation and accumulation of neural precursors generated during the learning event itself. This indicates that experience-induced alterations in neurogenesis can be mechanistically resolved into two effects: (1...

  5. The effects of curiosity-evoking events on activity enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikman, Elif; MacInnis, Deborah J; Ülkümen, Gülden; Cavanaugh, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Whereas prior literature has studied the positive effects of curiosity-evoking events that are integral to focal activities, we explore whether and how a curiosity-evoking event that is incidental to a focal activity induces negative outcomes for enjoyment. Four experiments and 1 field study demonstrate that curiosity about an event that is incidental to an activity in which individuals are engaged, significantly affects enjoyment of a concurrent activity. The reason why is that curiosity diverts attention away from the concurrent activity and focuses attention on the curiosity-evoking event. Thus, curiosity regarding an incidental event decreases enjoyment of a positive focal activity but increases enjoyment of a negative focal activity.

  6. [Speech evoked auditory brainstem response and cognitive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M; Wang, N Y

    2016-12-07

    Speech evoked auditory brainstem response(s-ABR)is evoked by compound syllable, and those stimulus are similar to the daily language which convey both semantic information and non-semantic information. Speech coding program can take place at brainstem. As a new method, s-ABR may reveal the mystery of speech coding program. Many tests have proved that s-ABR is somehow related to cognitive ability. We mainly illustrated the possibility of grading the cognitive ability using s-ABR, the abnormal test result from those cognitive disorders, and the family factors that contribute to cognitive disorder.

  7. [Evoked potentials in intracranial operations: current status and our experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, H E; Hess, W; Pohlen, G; Marggraf, G; Rimpel, J

    1987-03-01

    Intraoperative neuromonitoring, especially evoked potential monitoring, has gained interest in recent years for both the anesthesiologist evaluating cerebral function and the neurosurgeon wishing to avoid neuronal lesions during intracranial operations. Before evoked potential monitoring can be introduced as a routine method of intraoperative management, experience with this method particularly in intensive care units, is imperative. We recorded evoked potentials with the Compact Four (Nicolet) and Basis 8000 (Schwarzer Picker International) computer systems. Preoperative derivations should be done with the same apparatus used intraoperatively and parameters of peri- and intraoperative derivations should not be changed. The patient's head must be fixed in a Mayfield clamp in order to avoid artefacts during trepanation. The possible artefacts due to apparatus, patient, or anesthesia are summarized in the tables. The derivations of evoked potentials should be supervised by a person who is not involved in the anesthesia or the surgical procedure; this condition may change in the future with full automatization of the recording technique and alarms. Good communication between surgeon, anesthesiologist, and neurophysiological assistant is a prerequisite. The modality is chosen in accordance with the affected neuronal system: visual-evoked potential (VEP) monitoring in the management of processes affecting the visual pathway, brain stem auditory-(BAER) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring in lesions affecting these pathways, in particular space-occupying lesions of the posterior fossa. VEP monitoring may be useful, but we observed alterations of the responses without changes in the level of anesthesia or manipulation of the visual pathways. In space-occupying processes of the cerebellopontine angle, BAER could not be developed in nearly all cases because the large underlying tumor had caused the disappearance of waves II-V. In these cases SSEP monitoring

  8. Habituation of evoked responses is greater in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine than in controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Bolla, M; Magis, D

    2011-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare, dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with transient hemiplegia during the aura phase. Mutations in at least three different genes can produce the FHM phenotype. The mutated FHM genes code for ion transport proteins that animal and cellular studies...... have associated with disturbed ion homeostasis, altered cellular excitability, neurotransmitter release, and decreased threshold for cortical spreading depression. The common forms of migraine are characterized interictally by a habituation deficit of cortical and subcortical evoked responses that has...... been attributed to neuronal dysexcitability. FHM and the common forms of migraine are thought to belong to a spectrum of migraine phenotypes with similar pathophysiology, and we therefore examined whether an abnormal habituation pattern would also be found in FHM patients....

  9. Accumulation of radioactivity after repeated infusion of 3H-adrenaline and 3H-noradrenaline in the rat as a model animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepschy, M; Filip, T; Palme, R G

    2014-10-01

    Besides enzymatic inactivation, catecholamines bind non-enzymatically and irreversible to proteins. The physiological impact of these catecholamine adducts is still unclear. We therefore collected basic data about the distribution of catecholamine adducts in the rat after repeated intravenous administration of (3)H-adrenaline and (3)H-noradrenaline. In all animals radioactivity in blood increased until the last injection on Day 7 and decreased then slowly close to background values (plasma) or remained higher (erythrocytes). In all sampled tissues radioactivity could be found, but only in hair high amounts remained present even after 3 weeks. Half-life of rat serum albumin loaded with (3)H-adrenaline or (3)H-noradrenaline was not altered. This study provides basic knowledge about the distribution of catecholamines or their adducts, but physiological effects could not be demonstrated. However, for the first time deposition and accumulation of catecholamines (adducts) in the hair could be proven, suggesting that hair might be used for evaluating long term stress.

  10. Mouse strain differences in immobility and sensitivity to fluvoxamine and desipramine in the forced swimming test: analysis of serotonin and noradrenaline transporter binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Kajiwara, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Kazufumi; Yamada, Shizuo; Tagawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Jun

    2008-09-11

    Strain differences in immobility time in the forced swimming test were investigated in five strains of mice, namely, ICR, ddY, C57BL/6, DBA/2 and BALB/c mice. There were significant strain differences. The immobility times of ICR, ddY and C57BL/6 mice were longer than those of DBA/2 and BALB/c mice. Immobility times were not significantly related to locomotor activity in these strains. There were also differences in sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine. In ICR, ddY and C57BL/6 mice, fluvoxamine did not affect immobility time, while it reduced the immobility time of DBA/2 and BALB/c mice dose-dependently. The noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine decreased immobility time in all strains of mice. Serotonin (5-HT) transporter binding in the brains of all five strains of mice was also investigated. Analysis of 5-HT transporter binding revealed significant strain differences, being lower in DBA/2 and BALB/c mice than in other strains of mice. The amount of 5-HT transporter binding was correlated to baseline immobility time. However, there was no significant relation between noradrenaline transporter binding and immobility time. These results suggest that the duration of baseline immobility depends on the levels of 5-HT transporter binding, leading to apparent strain differences in immobility time in the forced swimming test. Furthermore, differences in 5-HT transporter binding may cause variations in responses to fluvoxamine.

  11. The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the intrathecal noradrenaline-induced facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakitama, K

    1993-11-01

    The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers (group II flexor reflex) in anesthetized intact rats and on the intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex in anesthetized spinal rats were investigated. In anesthetized intact rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen inhibited the group II flexor reflex dose-dependently, whereas the inhibitory effect of tizanidine-HCl was bell-shaped. The effect of diazepam tended to be saturated. In anesthetized spinal rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl, diazepam and baclofen also depressed the group II flexor reflex, but tizanidine-HCl slightly increased it. The intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex was not affected by mephenesin or diazepam, but was inhibited by tizanidine-HCl, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen. These results suggest that compounds with centrally acting muscle relaxant activity depress the group II flexor reflex in different manners, and the inhibition of descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord participates in the depressant action of the group II flexor reflex produced by tolperisone-HCl, tizanidine-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen.

  12. Noradrenaline depletion in patients with coronary artery disease before and after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty with iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine and single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guertner, C. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)); Klepzig, H. Jr. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Cardiology, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)); Maul, F.D. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)); Hartmann, A. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Cardiology, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)); Leibach, S. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)); Hellmann, A. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)); Hoer, G. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany))

    1993-09-01

    Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a noradrenaline analogue which can be used as a tracer to investigate the cardiac sympathetic nervous system. Regional ischaemia leads to noradrenaline depletion with functional denervation which can be demonstrated by reduced MIGB uptake. In order to evaluate the reversibility of ischaemia-associated damage to the sympathetic nervous system, neuronal scintigraphy with [sup 123]I-MIBG and myocardial rest and stress perfusion scintigraphy with technetium-99m sestamibi was performed in 16 patients with coronary artery disease before and 3-4 months after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Partial re-innervation ocurred in five patients, the degree of stenosis of reamining lesions being estimated by repeat angiography to be below 40%. Unchanged MIBG defects cold be confirmed in four patients with residual lesions of between 40% and 50%. Increased MIBG defects were shown in three patients with significant restenoses of more than 70%. In all patients the neuronal defects exceeded the ischaemia-induced or scar-associated perfursion defects. Three patients dropped out of this study: One for technical reasons, one due to emergency aortocoronary bypass surgery and one due to diabetic polyneuropathy. This investigation shows that the sympathetic nevous system is highly sensitive to ischaemia. Further studies need to be done to assess the conditions allowing re-innervation after PTCA. (orig.)

  13. Xanthohumol-induced presynaptic reduction of glutamate release in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Ying Chou; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether xanthohumol, a hop-derived prenylated flavonoid present in beer, affects glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In the rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), xanthohumol inhibited the release of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked glutamate and the elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, whereas it had no effect on 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of xanthohumol on the evoked glutamate release was prevented by removing extracellular Ca(2+), using the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-CgTX MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, and the protein kinase A inhibitor H89; however, no such effect was observed when the G-protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide was used. In addition, immunocytochemical data demonstrated that GABAA receptors are present in the hippocampal synaptosomes and that the xanthohumol effect on evoked glutamate release was antagonized by the GABAA receptor antagonist SR95531. Furthermore, in slice preparations, xanthohumol reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude. We conclude that xanthohumol acts at GABAA receptors present in the hippocampal nerve terminals to decrease the Ca(2+) influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, which subsequently suppresses the Ca(2+)-calmodulin/PKA cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release.

  14. Recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 at 9.4T static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrubla, Jorge; Neuner, Irene; Hahn, David; Boers, Frank; Shah, N Jon

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4 T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4 T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4 T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP). Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4 T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4 T were not different from those recorded at 0 T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4 T when compared to recordings at 0 T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses.

  15. Recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 at 9.4T static magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Arrubla

    Full Text Available Simultaneous recording of electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has shown a number of advantages that make this multimodal technique superior to fMRI alone. The feasibility of recording EEG at ultra-high static magnetic field up to 9.4 T was recently demonstrated and promises to be implemented soon in fMRI studies at ultra high magnetic fields. Recording visual evoked potentials are expected to be amongst the most simple for simultaneous EEG/fMRI at ultra-high magnetic field due to the easy assessment of the visual cortex. Auditory evoked P300 measurements are of interest since it is believed that they represent the earliest stage of cognitive processing. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of recording visual evoked potentials and auditory evoked P300 in a 9.4 T static magnetic field. For this purpose, EEG data were recorded from 26 healthy volunteers inside a 9.4 T MR scanner using a 32-channel MR compatible EEG system. Visual stimulation and auditory oddball paradigm were presented in order to elicit evoked related potentials (ERP. Recordings made outside the scanner were performed using the same stimuli and EEG system for comparison purposes. We were able to retrieve visual P100 and auditory P300 evoked potentials at 9.4 T static magnetic field after correction of the ballistocardiogram artefact using independent component analysis. The latencies of the ERPs recorded at 9.4 T were not different from those recorded at 0 T. The amplitudes of ERPs were higher at 9.4 T when compared to recordings at 0 T. Nevertheless, it seems that the increased amplitudes of the ERPs are due to the effect of the ultra-high field on the EEG recording system rather than alteration in the intrinsic processes that generate the electrophysiological responses.

  16. Value of transcranial motor evoked potentials during spinal operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: We read the interesting recent article by Ding et al1 concerning the value of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in the diagnosis and prognosis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, as well as the usefulness of monitoring intraoperative potentials in terms of safety and predictive factors.

  17. Evaluation of Evoked Potentials to Dyadic Tones after Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Pascale; Eichele, Tom; Buechler, Michael; Debener, Stefan; Jancke, Lutz; Dillier, Norbert; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Meyer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Auditory evoked potentials are tools widely used to assess auditory cortex functions in clinical context. However, in cochlear implant users, electrophysiological measures are challenging due to implant-created artefacts in the EEG. Here, we used independent component analysis to reduce cochlear implant-related artefacts in event-related EEGs of…

  18. Recording and assessment of evoked potentials with electrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljković, N; Malešević, N; Kojić, V; Bijelić, G; Keller, T; Popović, D B

    2015-09-01

    In order to optimize procedure for the assessment of evoked potentials and to provide visualization of the flow of action potentials along the motor systems, we introduced array electrodes for stimulation and recording and developed software for the analysis of the recordings. The system uses a stimulator connected to an electrode array for the generation of evoked potentials, an electrode array connected to the amplifier, A/D converter and computer for the recording of evoked potentials, and a dedicated software application. The method has been tested for the assessment of the H-reflex on the triceps surae muscle in six healthy humans. The electrode array with 16 pads was positioned over the posterior aspect of the thigh, while the recording electrode array with 16 pads was positioned over the triceps surae muscle. The stimulator activated all the pads of the stimulation electrode array asynchronously, while the signals were recorded continuously at all the recording sites. The results are topography maps (spatial distribution of evoked potentials) and matrices (spatial visualization of nerve excitability). The software allows the automatic selection of the lowest stimulation intensity to achieve maximal H-reflex amplitude and selection of the recording/stimulation pads according to predefined criteria. The analysis of results shows that the method provides rich information compared with the conventional recording of the H-reflex with regard the spatial distribution.

  19. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Unsuccessful Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munivrana, Boska; Mildner, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    In some cochlear implant users, success is not achieved in spite of optimal clinical factors (including age at implantation, duration of rehabilitation and post-implant hearing level), which may be attributed to disorders at higher levels of the auditory pathway. We used cortical auditory evoked potentials to investigate the ability to perceive…

  20. SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED-POTENTIALS IN CEREBRAL ANEURYSM SURGERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUCHTHAL, A; BELOPAVLOVIC, M

    1992-01-01

    Monitoring of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) during surgery for a basilar artery aneurysm under moderate hypothermia revealed an unexpected loss of the first cortical peak. This was due to compression of the middle cerebral artery under the retractor during the surgical approach

  1. Cortical Variability in the Sensory-Evoked Response in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Sarah M.; Heeger, David J.; Dinstein, Ilan; Minshew, Nancy; Behrmann, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Previous findings have shown that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) evince greater intra-individual variability (IIV) in their sensory-evoked fMRI responses compared to typical control participants. We explore the robustness of this finding with a new sample of high-functioning adults with autism. Participants were presented with…

  2. Asymmetric vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in unilateral Meniere patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, C. M.; Wit, H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were measured in 22 unilateral MeniSre patients with monaural and binaural stimulation with 250 and 500 Hz tone bursts. For all measurement situations significantly lower VEMP amplitudes were on average measured at the affected side compared to the unaff

  3. Analysis and Treatment of Problem Behavior Evoked by Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Scott D.; Newchok, Debra K.

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of differential negative reinforcement of other behavior (DNRO) on problem behavior evoked by music in a 7-year-old child with pervasive developmental disorder. Following an auditory stimulus assessment, DNRO was used to reduce problem behavior to near-zero levels. Results are discussed in terms of…

  4. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Unsuccessful Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munivrana, Boska; Mildner, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    In some cochlear implant users, success is not achieved in spite of optimal clinical factors (including age at implantation, duration of rehabilitation and post-implant hearing level), which may be attributed to disorders at higher levels of the auditory pathway. We used cortical auditory evoked potentials to investigate the ability to perceive…

  5. Thermal grill conditioning: Effect on contact heat evoked potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzeler, Catherine R.; Warner, Freda M.; Wanek, Johann; Curt, Armin; Kramer, John L. K.

    2017-01-01

    The ‘thermal grill illusion’ (TGI) is a unique cutaneous sensation of unpleasantness, induced through the application of interlacing warm and cool stimuli. While previous studies have investigated optimal parameters and subject characteristics to evoke the illusion, our aim was to examine the modulating effect as a conditioning stimulus. A total of 28 healthy control individuals underwent three testing sessions on separate days. Briefly, 15 contact heat stimuli were delivered to the right hand dorsum, while the left palmar side of the hand was being conditioned with either neutral (32 °C), cool (20 °C), warm (40 °C), or TGI (20/40 °C). Rating of perception (numeric rating scale: 0–10) and evoked potentials (i.e., N1 and N2P2 potentials) to noxious contact heat stimuli were assessed. While cool and warm conditioning decreased cortical responses to noxious heat, TGI conditioning increased evoked potential amplitude (N1 and N2P2). In line with other modalities of unpleasant conditioning (e.g., sound, visual, and olfactory stimulation), cortical and possibly sub-cortical modulation may underlie the facilitation of contact heat evoked potentials. PMID:28079118

  6. The computation of evoked heart rate and blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koers, G.; Mulder, L.J.M.; van der Veen, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    For many years psychophysiologists have been interested in stimulus related changes in heart rate and blood pressure. To represent these evoked heart rate and blood pressure patterns, heart rate and blood pressure data have to be transformed into equidistant time series. This paper presents an

  7. Multichannel recording of tibial-nerve somatosensory evoked potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wassenberg, W. J. G. van; Kruizinga, W. J.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Leenders, K. L.; Maurits, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Study aims. -The topography of the peaks of tibial.-nerve somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) varies among healthy subjects, most likely because of differences in position and orientation of their cortical generator(s). Therefore, amplitude estimation with a standard one- or two-channel derivation

  8. Visual evoked potentials in patients after methanol poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Urban

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We report the results of the visual evoked potentials (VEP examination in patients after severe poisoning by methanol. Material and Methods: The group of 47 patients (38 males and 9 females was assembled out of persons who survived an outbreak of poisoning by the methanol adulterated alcohol beverages, which happened in the Czech Republic in 2012–2013. The visual evoked potentials examination was performed using monocular checkerboard pattern-reversal stimulation. Two criteria of abnormality were chosen: missing evoked response, and wave P1 latency > 117 ms. Non-parametric statistical methods (median, range, and the median test were used to analyze factors influencing the VEP abnormality. Results: The visual evoked potential was abnormal in 20 patients (43%, 5 of them had normal visual acuity on the Snellen chart. The VEP abnormality did not correlate significantly with initial serum concentrations of methanol, formic acid or lactate; however, it showed statistically significant inverse relation to the initial serum pH: the subgroup with the abnormal VEP had significantly lower median pH in comparison with the subgroup with the normal VEP (7.16 vs. 7.34, p = 0.04. The abnormality was not related to chronic alcohol abuse. Conclusions: The visual evoked potentials examination appeared sensitive enough to detected even subclinical impairment of the optic system. Metabolic acidosis is likely to be the key factor related to the development of visual damage induced by methanol. The examination performed with a delay of 1–9 months after the poisoning documented the situation relatively early after the event. It is considered as a baseline for the planned long-term follow-up of the patients, which will make it possible to assess the dynamics of the observed changes, their reversibility, and the occurrence of potential late sequelae.

  9. Characterization of electrically evoked field potentials in the medial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex of the rat: modulation by monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Joanne; Jackson, Rosanna K; Shotton, Tanya L; Munjal, Ishaana; McQuade, Richard; Gartside, Sarah E

    2014-02-01

    Medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) play critical roles in cognition and behavioural control. Glutamatergic, GABAergic, and monoaminergic dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex has been hypothesised to underlie symptoms in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we characterised electrically-evoked field potentials in the mPFC and OFC. Electrical stimulation evoked field potentials in layer V/VI of the mPFC and layer V of the OFC. The earliest component (approximately 2 ms latency) was insensitive to glutamate receptor blockade and was presumed to be presynaptic. Later components were blocked by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX (20 µM)) and were assumed to reflect monosynaptic (latency 4-6 ms) and polysynaptic activity (latency 6-40 ms) mediated by glutamate via AMPA/kainate receptor. In the mPFC, but not the OFC, the monosynaptic component was also partly blocked by 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5 (50-100µM)) indicating the involvement of NMDA receptors. Bicuculline (3-10 µM) enhanced the monosynaptic component suggesting electrically-evoked and/or glutamate induced GABA release inhibits the monosynaptic component via GABAA receptor activation. There were complex effects of bicuculline on polysynaptic components. In the mPFC both the mono- and polysynaptic components were attenuated by 5-HT (10-100 µM) and NA (30 and 60 µM) and the monosynaptic component was attenuated by DA (100 µM). In the OFC the mono- and polysynaptic components were also attenuated by 5-HT (100 µM), NA (10-100 µM) but DA (10-100 µM) had no effect. We propose that these pharmacologically characterised electrically-evoked field potentials in the mPFC and OFC are useful models for the study of prefrontal cortical physiology and pathophysiology.

  10. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  11. Facilitating neuronal connectivity analysis of evoked responses by exposing local activity with principal component analysis preprocessing: simulation of evoked MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Zhang, Tongsheng; Wang, Jue; Stephen, Julia

    2013-04-01

    When connectivity analysis is carried out for event related EEG and MEG, the presence of strong spatial correlations from spontaneous activity in background may mask the local neuronal evoked activity and lead to spurious connections. In this paper, we hypothesized PCA decomposition could be used to diminish the background activity and further improve the performance of connectivity analysis in event related experiments. The idea was tested using simulation, where we found that for the 306-channel Elekta Neuromag system, the first 4 PCs represent the dominant background activity, and the source connectivity pattern after preprocessing is consistent with the true connectivity pattern designed in the simulation. Improving signal to noise of the evoked responses by discarding the first few PCs demonstrates increased coherences at major physiological frequency bands when removing the first few PCs. Furthermore, the evoked information was maintained after PCA preprocessing. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that the first few PCs represent background activity, and PCA decomposition can be employed to remove it to expose the evoked activity for the channels under investigation. Therefore, PCA can be applied as a preprocessing approach to improve neuronal connectivity analysis for event related data.

  12. Real-time monitoring of electrically evoked catecholamine signals in the songbird striatum using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda R; Garris, Paul A; Casto, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry is a powerful technique for monitoring rapid changes in extracellular neurotransmitter levels in the brain. In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry has been used extensively in mammalian models to characterize dopamine signals in both anesthetized and awake preparations, but has yet to be applied to a non-mammalian vertebrate. The goal of this study was to establish in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a songbird, the European starling, to facilitate real-time measurements of extracellular catecholamine levels in the avian striatum. In urethane-anesthetized starlings, changes in catecholamine levels were evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and measured at carbon-fiber microelectrodes positioned in the medial and lateral striata. Catecholamines were elicited by different stimulations, including trains related to phasic dopamine signaling in the rat, and were analyzed to quantify presynaptic mechanisms governing exocytotic release and neuronal uptake. Evoked extracellular catecholamine dynamics, maximal amplitude of the evoked catecholamine signal, and parameters for catecholamine release and uptake did not differ between striatal regions and were similar to those determined for dopamine in the rat dorsomedial striatum under similar conditions. Chemical identification of measured catecholamine by its voltammogram was consistent with the presence of both dopamine and norepinephrine in striatal tissue content. However, the high ratio of dopamine to norepinephrine in tissue content and the greater sensitivity of the carbon-fiber microelectrode to dopamine compared to norepinephrine favored the measurement of dopamine. Thus, converging evidence suggests that dopamine was the predominate analyte of the electrically evoked catecholamine signal measured in the striatum by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Overall, comparisons between the characteristics of these evoked signals suggested a similar presynaptic regulation of

  13. Light-controlled relaxation of the rat penile corpus cavernosum using NOBL-1, a novel nitric oxide releaser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Hotta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate whether relaxation of the rat penile corpus cavernosum could be controlled with NOBL-1, a novel, lightcontrollable nitric oxide (NO releaser. Materials and Methods: Fifteen-week-old male Wistar-ST rats were used. The penile corpus cavernosum was prepared and used in an isometric tension study. After noradrenaline (10−5 M achieved precontraction, the penile corpus cavernosum was irradiated by light (470–500 nm with and without NOBL-1 (10−6 M. In addition, we noted rats’ responses to light with vardenafil (10−6 M, a phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5 inhibitor. Next, responses to light in the presence of a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10−5 M, were measured. All measurements were performed in pretreated L-NAME (10−4 M conditions to inhibit endogenous NO production. Results: Corpus cavernosal smooth muscle, precontracted with noradrenaline, was unchanged by light irradiation in the absence of NOBL-1. However, in the presence of NOBL-1, corpus cavernosal smooth muscle, precontracted with noradrenaline, relaxed in response to light irradiation. After blue light irradiation ceased, tension returned. In addition, the light response was obviously enhanced in the presence of a PDE-5 inhibitor. Conclusions: This study showed that rat corpus cavernosal smooth muscle relaxation can be light-controlled using NOBL-1, a novel, light sensitive NO releaser. Though further in vivo studies are needed to investigate possible usefulness, NOBL-1 may be prove to be a useful tool for erectile dysfunction therapy, specifically in the field of penile rehabilitation.

  14. Arecoline inhibits catecholamine release from perfused rat adrenal gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-yoon LIM; Il-sik KIM

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of arecoline, an alkaloid isolated from Areca catechu, on the secretion of catecholamines (CA) evoked by cholinergic agonists and the membrane depolarizer from isolated perfused rat adrenal gland. Methods: Adrenal glands were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The adrenal glands were perfused with Krebs bicarbonate solution by means of a peristaltic pump. The CA content of the perfusate was measured directly using the fluorometric method.Results: Arecoline (0.1-1.0 mmol/L) perfused into an adrenal vein for 60 min produced dose- and time-dependent inhibition in CA secretory responses evoked by acetylcholine (ACh) (5.32 mmol/L), 1.1-dimethyl-4-phenyl piperazinium iodide (DMPP) (100 μmol/L for 2 min) and 3-(m-choloro-phenyl-carbamoyl-oxy)-2-butynyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (McN-A-343) (100 μmol/L for 2 min). However, lower doses of arecoline did not affect CA secretion of high K+ (56 mmol/L); higher doses greatly reduced CA secretion of high K+. Arecoline also failed to affect basal catecholamine output. Furthermore, in adrenal glands loaded with arecoline (0.3 mmol/L), CA secretory response evoked by Bay-K-8644 (10 μmol/L), an activator of L-type Ca2+ channels, was markedly inhibited, whereas CA secretion by cyclopiazonic acid (10 μmol/L), an inhibitor of cytoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase, was not affected. Nicotine (30 μmol/L), which was peffused into the adrenal gland for 60min, however, initially enhanced ACh-evoked CA secretory responses. As time elapsed, these responses became more inhibited, whereas the initially enhanced high K+-evoked CA release diminished. CA secretion evoked by DMPP and McNA-343 was significantly depressed in the presence of nicotine. Conclusion:Arecoline dose-dependently inhibits CA secretion from isolated perfused rat adrenal gland evoked by activation of cholinergic receptors. At lower doses arecoline does not inhibit CA secretion through membrane depolarization, but at larger doses it does. This inhibitory

  15. Interaction between protein kinase C and protein kinase A can modulate transmitter release at the rat neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafé, M M; Garcia, N; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, M; Tomàs, J

    2009-02-15

    We used intracellular recording to investigate the functional interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction cascades in the control of transmitter release in the neuromuscular synapses from adult rats. Our results indicate that: 1) PKA and PKC are independently involved in asynchronous release. 2) Evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release is enhanced with the PKA agonist Sp-8-BrcAMP and the PKC agonist phorbol ester (PMA). 3) PKA has a constitutive role in promoting a component of normal evoked transmitter release because, when the kinase is inhibited with H-89, the release diminishes. However, the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (CaC) does not affect ACh release. 4) PKA regulates neurotransmission without PKC involvement because, after PMA or CaC modulation of the PKC activity, coupling to the ACh release of PKA can normally be stimulated with Sp-8-BrcAMP or inhibited with H-89. 5) After PKA inhibition with H-89, PKC stimulation with PMA (or inhibition with CaC) does not lead to any change in evoked ACh release. However, in PKA-stimulated preparations with Sp-8-BrcAMP, PKC becomes tonically active, thus potentiating a component of release that can now be blocked with CaC. In normal conditions, therefore, PKA was able to modulate ACh release independently of PKC activity, whereas PKA stimulation caused the PKC coupling to evoked release. In contrast, PKA inhibition prevent PKC stimulation (with the phorbol ester) and coupling to ACh output. There was therefore some dependence of PKC on PKA activity in the fine control of the neuromuscular synaptic functionalism and ACh release.

  16. An inventory and update of jealousy-evoking partner behaviours in modern society.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.; Groothof, Hinke A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to identify the most important jealousy-evoking partner behaviours and to examine the extent to which these behaviours evoke jealousy. Based on the literature, a questionnaire was constructed containing 42 jealousy-evoking partner behaviours, including a partner's e

  17. Purines released from astrocytes inhibit excitatory synaptic transmission in the ventral horn of the spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Eva Maria Meier; Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie

    2014-01-01

    by releasing gliotransmitters, which in turn modulate synaptic transmission. Here we investigated if astrocytes present in the ventral horn of the spinal cord modulate synaptic transmission. We evoked synaptic inputs in ventral horn neurons recorded in a slice preparation from the spinal cord of neonatal mice...

  18. Mechanism of noradrenaline-induced stimulation of Na-K ATPase activity in the rat brain: implications on REM sleep deprivation-induced increase in brain excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Birendra Nath; Singh, Sudhuman; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-03-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a unique phenomenon expressed in all higher forms of animals. Its quantity varies in different species and with ageing; it is also affected in several psycho-somatic disorders. Several lines of studies showed that after REM sleep loss, the levels of noradrenaline (NA) increase in the brain. The NA in the brain modulates neuronal Na-K ATPase activity, which helps maintaining the brain excitability status. The detailed mechanism of increase in NA level after REM sleep loss and the effect of NA on stimulation of Na-K ATPase in the neurons have been discussed. The findings have been reviewed and discussed with an aim to understand the role of REM sleep in maintaining brain excitability status.

  19. Toxicity of noradrenaline, a novel anti-biofouling component, to two non-target zooplankton species, Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overturf, C L; Wormington, A M; Blythe, K N; Gohad, N V; Mount, A S; Roberts, A P

    2015-05-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) is the active component of novel antifouling agents and acts by preventing attachment of fouling organisms. The goal of this study was to examine the toxicity of NA to the non-target zooplankton D. magna and C. dubia. Neonates were exposed to one of five concentrations of NA and effects on survival, reproduction and molting were determined. Calculated LC50 values were determined to be 46 and 38 μM in C. dubia and D. magna, respectively. A 10-day C. dubia study found that reproduction metrics were significantly impacted at non-lethal concentrations. In D. magna, concentrations greater than 40 μM significantly impacted molting. A toxicity test was conducted with D. magna using oxidized NA, which yielded similar results. These data indicate that both NA and oxidized NA are toxic to non-target zooplankton. Results obtained from this study can be used to guide future ecological risk assessments of catecholamine-based antifouling agents.

  20. Modulation by K+ channels of action potential-evoked intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises in rat cerebellar basket cell axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y P; Llano, I

    1999-10-01

    1. Action potential-evoked [Ca2+]i rises in basket cell axons of rat cerebellar slices were studied using two-photon laser scanning microscopy and whole-cell recording, to identify the K+ channels controlling the shape of the axonal action potential. 2. Whole-cell recordings of Purkinje cell IPSCs were used to screen K+ channel subtypes which could contribute to axonal repolarization. alpha-Dendrotoxin, 4-aminopyridine, charybdotoxin and tetraethylammonium chloride increased IPSC rate and/or amplitude, whereas iberiotoxin and apamin failed to affect the IPSCs. 3. The effects of those K+ channel blockers that enhanced transmitter release on the [Ca2+]i rises elicited in basket cell axons by action potentials fell into three groups: 4-aminopyridine strongly increased action potential-evoked [Ca2+]i; tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin were ineffective alone but augmented the effects of 4-aminopyridine; alpha-dendrotoxin had no effect. 4. We conclude that cerebellar basket cells contain at least three pharmacologically distinct K+ channels, which regulate transmitter release through different mechanisms. 4-Aminopyridine-sensitive, alpha-dendrotoxin-insensitive K+ channels are mainly responsible for repolarization in basket cell presynaptic terminals. K+ channels blocked by charybdotoxin and tetraethylammonium have a minor role in repolarization. alpha-Dendrotoxin-sensitive channels are not involved in shaping the axonal action potential waveform. The two last types of channels must therefore exert control of synaptic activity through a pathway unrelated to axonal action potential broadening.

  1. REM sleep deprivation-induced noradrenaline stimulates neuronal and inhibits glial Na-K ATPase in rat brain: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskey, Ganesh; Singh, Abhishek; Sharma, Rakhi; Mallick, Birendra Nath

    2009-01-01

    Increased noradrenaline, induced by rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation, stimulates Na-K ATPase activity in the rat brain. The brain contains neurons as well as glia and both possess Na-K ATPase, however, it was not known if REM sleep deprivation affects the enzyme in both types of cells identically. Rats were REM sleep deprived by the flowerpot method and free moving, large platform and recovery controls were carried out. Na-K ATPase activity was measured in membranes prepared from whole brain as well as from neuronal and glial fractions separated from REM sleep-deprived and control rats. The effects of noradrenaline (NA) in different fractions were studied with or without in vivo i.p. treatment of prazosin, an alpha1-adrenpceptor antagonist, as well as in vitro membranes prepared from neurons and glia separated from normal rat brain. Further, to confirm the findings, membranes were prepared from neuro2a and C6 cell lines treated with NA in the presence and absence of prazosin and Na-K ATPase activity was estimated. The results showed that neuron and neuro2a as well as glia and C6 possess comparable Na-K ATPase activity. After REM sleep deprivation the neuronal Na-K ATPase activity increased, while the glial enzyme activity decreased and these changes were mediated by NA acting on alpha1-adrenoceptor; comparable results were obtained by treating the neuro2a and C6 cell lines with NA. The opposite actions of NA on neuronal and glial Na-K ATPase activity probably help maintain neuronal homeostasis.

  2. Orexin A promotes histamine, but not norepinephrine or serotonin, release in frontal cortex of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-yuan HONG; Zhi-li HUANG; Wei-min QU; Naomi EGUCHI

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of orexin A on release of histamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin in the frontal cortex of mice. Methods: Samples for measuring histamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin contents were collected by in vivo microdialysis of the frontal cortex of anesthetized mice. The histamine,noradrenaline, and serotonin content in dialysates were measured by HPLC techniques. Results: Intracrebroventricular injection of orexin A at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 pmol per mouse promoted histamine release from the frontal cortex in a dose-dependent manner. At the highest dose given, 200 pmol, orexin A significantly induced histamine release, with the maximal magnitude being 230% over the mean basal release. The enhanced histamine release was sustained for 140 min, and then gradually returned to the basal level. However, no change in nore pinephrine or serotonin release was observed under application of the same dose of orexin A. Conclusion: These results suggest that the arousal effect of orexin A is mainly mediated by histamine, not by norepinephrine or serotonin.

  3. NEUROSECRETION OF CRUSTACEAN HYPERGLYCEMIC HORMONE EVOKED BY AXONAL STIMULATION OR ELEVATION OF SALINE K+ CONCENTRATION QUANTIFIED BY A SENSITIVE IMMUNOASSAY METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller; Haylett; Cooke

    1994-03-01

    A sandwich-type enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was utilized to quantify crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (as Carcinus maenas equivalents) released by single X-organ­sinus gland systems of the crab Cardisoma carnifex during continuous perifusion. Basal rates of secretion (20­60 pg min-1) were stable for at least 4 h. Electrical stimulation (600 stimuli in 5 min) of the axon tract increased secretion two- to threefold, but only if it resulted in neural activity that was propagated to the terminals of the sinus gland. No difference was observable when stimuli were given repetitively or as a series of trains. Perifusion with saline having ten times the normal K+ concentration augmented secretion by as much as fivefold. Augmented secretion of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone evoked by either electrical or K+ stimulation appeared abruptly but declined slowly (over tens of minutes) after stimulation was stopped. K+-evoked secretion of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone was maintained without decrement for at least 1 h. Basal secretion increased in saline from which Ca2+ had been omitted, but decreased in saline containing Mn2+. Neither electrical stimulation nor high [K+] augmented secretion in Ca2+-deficient saline or if Mn2+ was present. Introduction of Mn2+ during K+-evoked secretion immediately reduced release to unstimulated levels; secretion resumed promptly upon removal of Mn2+. Tetrodotoxin reversibly blocked both electrical and secretory responses to axonal stimulation, but it did not block basal or K+-evoked secretion. Release of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone by isolated axon terminals was augmented two- to threefold by perifusion with saline having ten times the normal K+ concentration. The responses were similar to those of the intact systems, having a rapid onset, well-maintained secretion and a long 'tail' of secretion after removal of the K+ stimulus.

  4. Ritual relieved axial dystonia triggered by gaze-evoked amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacome, D E

    1997-11-01

    A woman with chronic posttraumatic axial lateropulsion cervical dystonia ("belly dancer's head") found relief of her spontaneous dystonic spasms by the sequential performance of an elaborate motor ritual. During an episode of left optic papillitis caused by central retinal vein occlusion, gaze-evoked amaurosis of the left eye developed, preceded by achromatopsia, during left lateral gaze. Gaze-evoked amaurosis triggered axial dystonia, which was followed by her unique, stereotyped, dystonia-relieving ritual that simulated a slow dance. Visual symptoms improved progressively in 1 year. Eventually, she was unable to trigger her dystonia by eye movements. Spontaneous dystonia remained otherwise unchanged from before the episode of papillitis and was still relieved by her unique ritual.

  5. Evoked potentials and head injury. 2. Clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, M; Hopkins, H K; Hall, K; Belleza, T

    1981-10-01

    The method of rating abnormality of evoked brain potential patterns and assessing the extent and severity of cortical and subcortical brain dysfunction in head injury patients described in Part I is applied in a clinical context. Evoked potential abnormality (EPA) scores are found to be significantly correlated both with admission and outcome disability approximately one year after head injury. Correlations increase with the increase in the number of sensory modalities tested. Correlations between EPA scores and clinical disability (measured by the Disability Rating Scale) decrease with time after injury. Significant correlations, however, persist for about 60 days after onset of injury. It was found that EP pattern abnormalities can reflect specific sensory (and at times motor) deficits in noncommunicative patients and thereby contribute significantly to early treatment and rehabilitation planning.

  6. Evoked response audiometry used in testing auditory organs of miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, T.; Klepacki, J.; Wagstyl, R.

    1980-01-01

    The evoked response audiometry method of testing hearing loss is presented and the results of comparative studies using subjective tonal audiometry and evoked response audiometry in tests of 56 healthy men with good hearing are discussed. The men were divided into three groups according to age and place of work: work place without increased noise; work place with noise and vibrations (at drilling machines); work place with noise and shocks (work at excavators in surface coal mines). The ERA-MKII audiometer produced by the Medelec-Amplaid firm was used. Audiometric threshhold curves for the three groups of tested men are given. At frequencies of 500, 1000 and 4000 Hz mean objective auditory threshhold was shifted by 4-9.5 dB in comparison to the subjective auditory threshold. (21 refs.) (In Polish)

  7. Modeling auditory evoked brainstem responses to transient stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative model is presented that describes the formation of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to tone pulses, clicks and rising chirps as a function of stimulation level. The model computes the convolution of the instantaneous discharge rates using the “humanized” nonlinear auditory...... of tone-pulse evoked wave-V latency with frequency but underestimates the level dependency of the tone-pulse as well as click-evoked latency values. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the nonlinear wave-V amplitude behavior in response to the chirp stimulation both as a function of chirp sweeping...... rate and level. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that the pattern of ABR generation is strongly affected by the nonlinear and dispersive processes in the cochlea....

  8. Temporal resolution in the hearing system and auditory evoked potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Lee; Beedholm, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    3pAB5. Temporal resolution in the hearing system and auditory evoked potentials. Kristian Beedholm Institute of Biology,University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark, beedholm@mail.dk, Lee A. Miller Institute of Biology,University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230...... of the MRTF is not straight forward, but is often used as a measure of the ability of the auditory system to encodetemporal changes. It is, however, shown here that the MRTF must depend on the waveform of the click-evoked AEP ceAEP, whichdoes not relate directly to temporal resolution. The theoretical...... of 0.5 ms Hann weighted130 kHz tone pips presented at an increasing rate chirped over a time span of 32 ms. The results reveal that the system's responsivenessdeclines roughly exponentially as a function of click rate with a rate constant of about -0.7 kHz and appears more rate limited thanimplied...

  9. Abdominal acupuncture reduces laser-evoked potentials in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzaglia, C.; Liguori, S.; Minciotti, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Acupuncture is known to reduce clinical pain, although the exact mechanism is unknown. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of acupuncture on laser-evoked potential amplitudes and laser pain perception. Methods: In order to evaluate whether abdominal acupuncture...... is able to modify pain perception, 10 healthy subjects underwent a protocol in which laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and laser pain perception were collected before the test (baseline), during abdominal acupuncture, and 15. min after needle removal. The same subjects also underwent a similar protocol...... in which, however, sham acupuncture without any needle penetration was used. Results: During real acupuncture, both N1 and N2/P2 amplitudes were reduced, as compared to baseline (p . < 0.01). The reduction lasted up to 15. min after needle removal. Furthermore, laser pain perception was reduced during...

  10. [Long-latency auditory evoked potentials in cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, J J; Jiménez, J M; Pérez, J; Postigo, A; Roldán, B

    1999-01-01

    Cortical evoked potentials were evaluated in patients with cochlear implants. In a group of 8 adults of different ages, the lingual state before implantation and during rehabilitation were evaluated. Using cortical evoked potentials, the results of the P300 wave in response to two tones, one frequent (1,000 Hz) and the other infrequent (2,000 Hz), presented at 70 and 80 dB HL were studied. Results were analyzed and compared in relation to locutive state, rehabilitation stage, and intensity of stimulus. Absolute latencies did not differ significantly. However, latency values in relation to reaction time were significantly longer in prelingual than in postlingual patients (p test). The results confirmed the normality of central cognitive processes in patients with cochlear implants in objective assessment of P300 latency. The results suggest differences between prelingual and postlingual patients in relation to central signal processing.

  11. The transfer of avoidance evoking functions through stimulus equivalence classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustson, E M; Dougher, M J

    1997-09-01

    Recent research in the area of stimulus equivalence suggests that transfer of function via members of stimulus equivalence classes may have relevance to human emotional responding and the development and generalization of certain psychological disorders. This study investigated the transfer of avoidance evoking functions through equivalence classes. Eight subjects were trained in the necessary relations for two-four member stimulus equivalence classes to emerge. Next, using an on-baseline classical conditioning procedure, one member of one class was paired with shock while one member of the other class was presented without shock. Then, while subjects engaged a key-press task, a differential, signalled avoidance task was introduced wherein shock was avoided if a response occurred to the stimulus previously associated with shock. The remaining stimuli from both classes were then presented. The behavior of all eight subjects showed the differential transfer of the avoidance evoking function. The clinical and theoretical implications of the results are discussed.

  12. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  13. Visual evoked potentials in a patient with prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, M

    1988-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded from a 53-year-old man with prosopagnosia during presentation of slides of known and unknown faces and under two control conditions. ANOVA comparisons with a normal male group showed no differences in P100 amplitude, P300 amplitude or P300 latency. There were no significant evoked potential differences between the patient and controls specifically related to the face conditions. There was, however, a significant delay in the latency of P100 from both hemispheres during all types of stimuli. This prolonged latency was asymmetrical, showing a right sided emphasis with the control conditions: pattern reversal and slides of geometric designs. This finding, of a dissociation in the interhemispheric delay, provides physiological evidence of stimulus-specific organisation at an early, sensory level. The fact that the P100 component showed a marked delay, yet P300 fell within normal limits for amplitude and latency, suggests that this patient's problem lies at a perceptual level.

  14. Application of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions to pediatric populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S J

    1993-02-01

    Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) occur after presentation of brief acoustic stimuli such as clicks and tone pips. They represent physiological activity from within the cochlea, specifically from normal functioning outer hair cells. TEOAEs are frequency specific in that their spectra are determined by the spectra of the evoking stimulus and the audiometric configuration. TEOAEs are sensitive to mild to moderate degrees of cochlear hearing loss up to about 40 to 50 dB HL. They can be measured rapidly and noninvasively in infants and children. Among the potential applications in pediatric audiology are screening for hearing impairment in neonates, separating peripheral hearing loss and central auditory dysfunction, and monitoring cochlear status in children receiving ototoxic drugs.

  15. Properties and glial origin of osmotic-dependent release of taurine from the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, C; Duvoid, A; Hussy, N

    1998-03-01

    1. Taurine, prominently concentrated in glial cells in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), is probably involved in the inhibition of SON vasopressin neurones by peripheral hypotonic stimulus, via activation of neuronal glycine receptors. We report here the properties and origin of the osmolarity-dependent release of preloaded [3H]taurine from isolated whole SO nuclei. 2. Hyposmotic medium induced a rapid, reversible and dose-dependent increase in taurine release. Release showed a high sensitivity to osmotic change, with a significant enhancement with less than a 5% decrease in osmolarity. Hyperosmotic stimulus decreased basal release. 3. Evoked release was independent of extracellular Ca2+ and Na+, and was blocked by the Cl- channel blockers DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) and DPC (N-phenylanthranilic acid), suggesting a diffusion process through volume-sensitive Cl- channels. 4. Evoked release was transient for large osmotic reductions (> or = 15%), probably reflecting regulatory volume decrease (RVD). However, it was sustained for smaller changes, suggesting that taurine release induced by physiological variations in osmolarity is not linked to RVD. 5. Basal and evoked release were strongly inhibited by an incubation of the tissue with the glia-specific toxin fluorocitrate, but were unaffected by a neurotoxic-treatment with NMDA, demonstrating the glial origin of the release of taurine in the SON. 6. The high osmosensitivity of taurine release suggests an important role in the osmoregulation of the SON function. These results strengthen the notion of an implication of taurine and glial cells in the regulation of the whole-body fluid balance through the modulation of vasopressin release.

  16. Computer Processing of Visual Evoked Potentials Utilizing Digital Filtering Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Vigorito, A.; Stephens, G.; Louis, H; Cinotti, A.; Michelson, L.; E. Stephens

    1981-01-01

    Recording of the VER (Visual Evoked Response) and the ERG (ElectroRetinoGram) in our laboratory is done with stimulation, using a fixed checkerboard pattern or a reversible checkerboard pattern. Questionable data frames are eliminated from the signal averaging process by means of a semiautomatic electronic analyzer or by means of a computer program. This special computer software, with flexible format constraints, is utilized on an off-line basis to remove residual artifacts and noise from av...

  17. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in chronic alcoholics.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Y W; McLeod, J G; Tuck, R R; Feary, P A

    1985-01-01

    Brain stem auditory evoked responses (BAERs) were performed on 25 alcoholic patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, 56 alcoholic patients without Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, 24 of whom had cerebellar ataxia, and 37 control subjects. Abnormal BAERs were found in 48% of patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, in 25% of alcoholic patients without Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome but with cerebellar ataxia, and in 13% of alcoholic patients without Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome or ataxia. The mean...

  18. Cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during evoked neural activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto L Vazquez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases in neural activity evoke increases in the delivery and consumption of oxygen. Beyond observations of cerebral tissue and blood oxygen, the role and properties of cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during changes in brain function are not well understood. This work overviews the current knowledge of functional oxygen delivery and consumption and introduces recent and preliminary findings to explore the mechanisms by which oxygen is delivered to tissue as well as the temporal dynamics of oxygen metabolism. Vascular oxygen tension measurements have shown that a relatively large amount of oxygen exits pial arterioles prior to capillaries. Additionally, increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF induced by evoked neural activation are accompanied by arterial vasodilation and also by increases in arteriolar oxygenation. This increase contributes not only to the down-stream delivery of oxygen to tissue, but also to delivery of additional oxygen to extra-vascular spaces surrounding the arterioles. On the other hand, the changes in tissue oxygen tension due to functional increases in oxygen consumption have been investigated using a method to suppress the evoked CBF response. The functional decreases in tissue oxygen tension induced by increases in oxygen consumption are slow to evoked changes in CBF under control conditions. Preliminary findings obtained using flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging suggest cellular oxidative metabolism changes at a faster rate than the average changes in tissue oxygen. These issues are important in the determination of the dynamic changes in tissue oxygen metabolism from hemoglobin-based imaging techniques such as blood oxygenation-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.

  19. Temporal suppression and augmentation of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhulst, Sarah; Harte, James; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates and models temporal suppression of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs). This suppression-effect is created when a suppressor-click is presented close in time to a test-click. The analysis was carried out for short time-frames of short- and long-latency CEOAEs. The ...... phenomenologically using compression or expansion of the system output. This was obtained by shifting the operating-point on the input-output-characteristic in relation to the ICI....

  20. [Visual evoked potentials (VEP) in anesthesia and intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, W; Krumholz, W; Hempelmann, G

    1984-03-01

    Methodological considerations and different stimulation techniques of visual evoked potentials (VEP) are described. VEP can provide information about neurological function during anaesthesia, surgery and in the unconscious patient after head injury. The feasibility of the method for intraoperative monitoring in neuro- and cardiac surgery and the influence of general anaesthetics and other contributing factors such as temperature, paCO2, pO2, part are discussed.

  1. Pattern shift visual evoked response: application in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available The technique that we use for pattern shift visual evoked response (PSVER is described. PSVER is a non-invasive, practical and reliable clinical test in detecting anterior visual pathways lesions even when asymptomatic. The ability to find unsuspected lesions in multiple sclerosis, making possible an early diagnosis, is underscored. We also discuss some pathophysiologic aspects and the findings of the PSVER in some neurologic disorders with visual system involvement.

  2. Amino acid neurotransmitter release and learning: a study of visual imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, R M; McCabe, B J; Kendrick, K M; Horn, G

    2004-01-01

    The intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) is an area of the domestic chick forebrain that stores information acquired through the learning process of imprinting. The effects of visual imprinting on the release of the amino acids aspartate, arginine, citrulline, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, glycine and taurine from the left and right IMHVs in vitro were measured at 3.5, 10 and 24 h after training. Chicks were exposed to an imprinting stimulus for 1 h, their preferences measured 10 min afterward and a preference score calculated as a measure of the strength of learning. Potassium stimulation was used to evoke amino acid release from the IMHVs of trained and untrained chicks in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+. Ca2+-dependent, K+-evoked release of glutamate was significantly (34.4%) higher in trained than in untrained chicks. This effect was not influenced by time after training or by side (left or right IMHV). Training influenced the evoked release of GABA and taurine from the left IMHV at both 3.5 and 10 h. The training effects at the two times were statistically homogeneous so data (imprinting stimulus glutamatergic excitatory transmission in IMHV is enhanced, and remains enhanced for at least 24 h. In contrast, the learning-related elevations in taurine and GABA release are not sustained over this period. The change in GABA release may reflect a transient increase in inhibitory transmission in the left IMHV. Copyright 2004 IBRO

  3. Inhibition of serotonin release by bombesin-like peptides in rat hypothalamus in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saporito, M.S.; Warwick, R.O. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the activity of bombesin (BN), neuromedin-C (NM-C) and neuromedin-B (NM-B) on serotonin (5-HT) release and reuptake in rat hypothalamus (HYP) in vitro. BN and NM-C but not NM-B decreased K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release from superfused HYP slices by 25%. Bacitracin, a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, reversed the inhibitory effect of BN on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Phosphoramidon (PAN, 10 /mu/M) an endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor, abolished the inhibitory effect of BN, but not NM-C, on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. The peptidyl dipeptidase A inhibitor enalaprilat (ENP, 10 /mu/M), enhanced both BN and NM-C inhibition of /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Bestatin (BST, 10 /mu/M) had no effect on BN or NM-C inhibitory activity on /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Neither BN, NM-C nor NM-B affected reuptake of /sup 3/H-5-HT into HYP synaptosomes alone or in combination with any of the peptidase inhibitors, nor did these peptides alter the ability of fluoxetine to inhibit /sup 3/H-5-HT uptake.

  4. Sleep-wake sensitive mechanisms of adenosine release in the basal forebrain of rodents: an in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Edward Sims

    Full Text Available Adenosine acting in the basal forebrain is a key mediator of sleep homeostasis. Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase during wakefulness, especially during prolonged wakefulness and lead to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. The release of endogenous adenosine during the sleep-wake cycle has mainly been studied in vivo with microdialysis techniques. The biochemical changes that accompany sleep-wake status may be preserved in vitro. We have therefore used adenosine-sensitive biosensors in slices of the basal forebrain (BFB to study both depolarization-evoked adenosine release and the steady state adenosine tone in rats, mice and hamsters. Adenosine release was evoked by high K(+, AMPA, NMDA and mGlu receptor agonists, but not by other transmitters associated with wakefulness such as orexin, histamine or neurotensin. Evoked and basal adenosine release in the BFB in vitro exhibited three key features: the magnitude of each varied systematically with the diurnal time at which the animal was sacrificed; sleep deprivation prior to sacrifice greatly increased both evoked adenosine release and the basal tone; and the enhancement of evoked adenosine release and basal tone resulting from sleep deprivation was reversed by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. These data indicate that characteristics of adenosine release recorded in the BFB in vitro reflect those that have been linked in vivo to the homeostatic control of sleep. Our results provide methodologically independent support for a key role for induction of iNOS as a trigger for enhanced adenosine release following sleep deprivation and suggest that this induction may constitute a biochemical memory of this state.

  5. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in miniature pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Shi; Yan Zhang; Ya Li; Shiwei Qiu; Shili Zhang; Yaohan Li; Na Yuan; Yuehua Qiao; Shiming Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To report detection of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in the miniature pig. Methods:Potentials evoked by 1000 Hz tone bursts were recorded from neck extensor muscles and the masseter muscles in normal adult Bama miniature pigs anesthetized with 3%pentobarbital sodium and Carbachol II. Results:The latency of the first positive wave P from neck extensor muscles was 7.65 ± 0.64 ms, with an amplitude of 1.66 ± 0.34 uv and a rate of successful induction of 75%at 80 dB SPL. The latency of potentials evoked from the masseter muscles was 7.60 ± 0.78 ms, with an amplitude of 1.31 ± 0.28 uv and a rate successful induction of 66%at 80 dB SPL. Conclusion:The latencies and thresholds of VEMPs recorded from the neck extensor muscle and the masseter muscle appear to be comparable in normal adult Bama miniature pigs, although the amplitude recorded from the neck extensor muscle seems to be higher than that from the masseter muscle. However, because of their usually relatively superficial and easily accessible location, as well as their large volume and strong contractions, masseter muscles may be better target muscles for recording myogenic potentials.

  6. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with lead exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia de Freitas Alvarenga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earlier studies have demonstrated an auditory effect of lead exposure in children, but information on the effects of low chronic exposures needs to be further elucidated. Objective: To investigate the effect of low chronic exposures of the auditory system in children with a history of low blood lead levels, using an auditory electrophysiological test. Methods: Contemporary cross-sectional cohort. Study participants underwent tympanometry, pure tone and speech audiometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with blood lead monitoring over a period of 35.5 months. The study included 130 children, with ages ranging from 18 months to 14 years, 5 months (mean age 6 years, 8 months ± 3 years, 2 months. Results: The mean time-integrated cumulative blood lead index was 12 µg/dL (SD ± 5.7, range:2.433. All participants had hearing thresholds equal to or below 20 dBHL and normal amplitudes of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. No association was found between the absolute latencies of waves I, III, and V, the interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, and I-V, and the cumulative lead values. Conclusion: No evidence of toxic effects from chronic low lead exposures was observed on the auditory function of children living in a lead contaminated area.

  7. Submillisecond unmasked subliminal visual stimuli evoke electrical brain responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperdin, Holger F; Spierer, Lucas; Becker, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Landis, Theodor

    2015-04-01

    Subliminal perception is strongly associated to the processing of meaningful or emotional information and has mostly been studied using visual masking. In this study, we used high density 256-channel EEG coupled with an liquid crystal display (LCD) tachistoscope to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of the brain response to visual checkerboard stimuli (Experiment 1) or blank stimuli (Experiment 2) presented without a mask for 1 ms (visible), 500 µs (partially visible), and 250 µs (subliminal) by applying time-wise, assumption-free nonparametric randomization statistics on the strength and on the topography of high-density scalp-recorded electric field. Stimulus visibility was assessed in a third separate behavioral experiment. Results revealed that unmasked checkerboards presented subliminally for 250 µs evoked weak but detectable visual evoked potential (VEP) responses. When the checkerboards were replaced by blank stimuli, there was no evidence for the presence of an evoked response anymore. Furthermore, the checkerboard VEPs were modulated topographically between 243 and 296 ms post-stimulus onset as a function of stimulus duration, indicative of the engagement of distinct configuration of active brain networks. A distributed electrical source analysis localized this modulation within the right superior parietal lobule near the precuneus. These results show the presence of a brain response to submillisecond unmasked subliminal visual stimuli independently of their emotional saliency or meaningfulness and opens an avenue for new investigations of subliminal stimulation without using visual masking. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Evoked otoacoustic emissions in workers exposed to noise: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcarás, Patrícia Arruda de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The otoacoustic emissions test is an essential tool in the evaluation of auditory function, since it allows the early detection of cochlear damage of occupational origin. Objective: To present a review of the literature and analyze the effectiveness of the clinical application of the otoacoustic emissions test in workers exposed to noise. Methods: A bibliographical search covering a period of 10 years was performed in the Virtual Health Library including published articles in national and international journals indexed in the internationally recognized databases for the health sciences, LILACS, SCIELO, and MEDLINE, using the terms "otoacoustic emissions" and "occupational exposure." The type of published article (national/international, the type and intensity of the stimulus most commonly used for the evoked otoacoustic emissions, the gender and age of the subjects, and the conclusions from the retrospective studies were all taken into consideration. Results and Conclusions: A total of 19 articles were analyzed, 7 national and 12 international, covering subjects from 17 to 77 years of age, mostly men. The type of stimulus most commonly used for the evoked otoacoustic emissions was the distortion method (12. Through this review, we have concluded that testing of evoked otoacoustic emissions in workers exposed to noise is an important tool in the early diagnosis of noise-induced cochlear hearing disorders.

  9. Perceptual learning of acoustic noise generates memory-evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrillon, Thomas; Kouider, Sid; Agus, Trevor; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Experience continuously imprints on the brain at all stages of life. The traces it leaves behind can produce perceptual learning [1], which drives adaptive behavior to previously encountered stimuli. Recently, it has been shown that even random noise, a type of sound devoid of acoustic structure, can trigger fast and robust perceptual learning after repeated exposure [2]. Here, by combining psychophysics, electroencephalography (EEG), and modeling, we show that the perceptual learning of noise is associated with evoked potentials, without any salient physical discontinuity or obvious acoustic landmark in the sound. Rather, the potentials appeared whenever a memory trace was observed behaviorally. Such memory-evoked potentials were characterized by early latencies and auditory topographies, consistent with a sensory origin. Furthermore, they were generated even on conditions of diverted attention. The EEG waveforms could be modeled as standard evoked responses to auditory events (N1-P2) [3], triggered by idiosyncratic perceptual features acquired through learning. Thus, we argue that the learning of noise is accompanied by the rapid formation of sharp neural selectivity to arbitrary and complex acoustic patterns, within sensory regions. Such a mechanism bridges the gap between the short-term and longer-term plasticity observed in the learning of noise [2, 4-6]. It could also be key to the processing of natural sounds within auditory cortices [7], suggesting that the neural code for sound source identification will be shaped by experience as well as by acoustics.

  10. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Ali; Doğan, Murat; Koç, Ali; Kalkan, Mehmet; Akçadağ, Alper; Özcan, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    To investigate vestibular evoked myogenic potentials combined with audiologic status in Behcet's disease (BD) and to compare the results with normal healthy subjects. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) test, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) test, Dix-Hallpike test, conventional pure tone audiometry (cPTA) and high frequency audiometry (HFA), and 226 and 1000Hz tympanometry were performed to each subject of the study. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast enhancement was also performed to evaluate the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with BD. VEMP parameters including the mean peak latencies of p13-n23 and n10-p15, AR values and thresholds were not statistically different both in cVEMP and oVEMP between the BD and control groups. Except for 250Hz, mean audiological thresholds were significantly higher in the BD group. Five of the 20 patients had pathological cranial MRI findings that may be compatible with central nervous system involvement. To our knowledge, the present study is the first report investigating oVEMP and cVEMP responses combined with MRI findings in patients with BD. The presence of high frequency hearing loss is a common finding in BD and HFA may help early detection of hearing loss in patients with BD when combined with cPTA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Somatosensory evoked magnetic fields in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclin, E L; Rose, D F; Knight, J E; Orrison, W W; Davis, L E

    1994-12-01

    We used magnetoencephalography to evaluate areas of sensory cortex in patients with ischemic strokes involving the somatomotor system. We measured somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using a 7-channel neuromagnetometer and estimated the location of cortical responses to median nerve stimulation in 5 patients with cortical or subcortical strokes involving the somatomotor system. All patients underwent quantitative neurological examinations and a high resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. The estimated current dipoles were localized onto the patient's own MRI scan in all patients with measurable responses. The location of the estimated dipole was always in non-infarcted tissue in the anatomical region of the somatosensory cortex. In 1 patient the somatosensory dipole localized to a peninsula of cortex flanked by infarcted tissue. Single photon emission computed tomography found the localized area of cortex to have significant blood flow. The estimated current dipole strengths of somatosensory evoked fields from median nerve stimulation correlated significantly (r = 0.95, P graphesthesia). The combination of evoked magnetic field recording and magnetic resonance imaging is a promising non-invasive technology for studying brain function in patients with cerebrovascular disease.

  12. Baroreceptor activation attenuates attentional effects on pain-evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Marcus A; Minati, Ludovico; Paoletti, Giulia; Critchley, Hugo D

    2010-12-01

    Focused attention typically enhances neural nociceptive responses, reflected electroencephalographically as increased amplitude of pain-evoked event-related potentials (ERPs). Additionally, pain-evoked ERPs are attenuated by hypertension and baroreceptor activity, through as yet unclear mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these two effects may interact, suggesting that baroreceptor-related modulation of nociception is more than a low-level gating phenomenon. To address this hypothesis, we explored in a group of healthy participants the combined effects of cue-induced expectancy and baroreceptor activity on the amplitude of pain-evoked ERPs. Brief nociceptive skin stimuli were delivered during a simple visual task; half were preceded by a visual forewarning cue, and half were unpredictable. Nociceptive stimuli were timed to coincide either with systole (maximum activation of cardiac baroreceptors) or with diastole (minimum baroreceptor activation). We observed a strong interaction between expectancy and cardiac timing for the amplitude of the P2 ERP component; no effects were observed for the N2 component. Cued stimuli were associated with larger P2 amplitude, but this effect was abolished for stimuli presented during baroreceptor activation. No cardiac timing effect was observed for un-cued stimuli. Taken together, these findings suggest a close integration of cognitive-affective aspects of expectancy and baroreceptor influences on pain, and as such may cast further light on mechanisms underlying mental and physiological contributions to clinical pain.

  13. Brainstem auditory evoked potential abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharat Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus represents a syndrome complex in which multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system, are affected. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the changes in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 126 diabetic males, aged 35-50 years, and 106 age-matched, healthy male volunteers. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were recorded and the results were analyzed statistically using student′s unpaired t-test. The data consisted of wave latencies I, II, III, IV, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V, separately for both ears. Results: The latency of wave IV was significantly delayed only in the right ear, while the latency of waves III, V and interpeak latencies III-V, I-V showed a significant delay bilaterally in diabetic males. However, no significant difference was found between diabetic and control subjects as regards to the latency of wave IV unilaterally in the left ear and the latencies of waves I, II and interpeak latency I-III bilaterally. Conclusion: Diabetes patients have an early involvement of central auditory pathway, which can be detected with fair accuracy with auditory evoked potential studies.

  14. STUDY ON EVOKED POTENTIALS IN TYPE 2 DIABETIC PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈薇; 陈慎仁; 陈璇; 吴静珊; 刘兴材

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the changes of visual evoked potentiaK VEP), brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP), Somatosensory e-voked potential (SEP), event-related potential(ERP) of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus(DM).Methods VEP, BAEP, SEP, ERP were measured in 30 cases with type 2 DM (DM group) and in 30 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (Control group) by using Nicolet Viking Ⅳ EMG/EP instrument. The numerical values of VEP, BAEP, SEP and ERP were recorded and analyzed by SPSS.Results Abnormalities were found as follows: VEP in 20(66.7%), BAEP in 18(60%), MNSEP in 20(66.7%),PTNSEP in 22(73.3%), and ERP in 11 (36.67%) diabetic patients, including the disappearance of wave, prolonged wave latency and decreased wave amplitude. Compared with control group, the P100 latency of VEP, the latencies of wave Ⅰ and Ⅴ, amplitude of wave Ⅴ, the interpeak latencies (IPL) of each wave in BAEP, the latencies and wave amplitudes in N9 to P20 of MNSEP and in N9 to P38 of PTNSEP, as well a

  15. Cell-attached recordings of responses evoked by photorelease of GABA in the immature cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat eMinlebaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel non-invasive technique to measure the polarity of GABAergic responses based on cell-attached recordings of currents activated by laser-uncaging of GABA. For these recordings, a patch pipette was filled with a solution containing RuBi-GABA, and GABA was released from this complex by a laser beam conducted to the tip of the patch pipette via an optic fiber. In cell-attached recordings from neocortical and hippocampal neurons in postnatal days P2-5 rat brain slices in vitro, we found that laser-uncaging of GABA activates integral cell-attached currents mediated by tens of GABA(A channels. The initial response was inwardly directed, indicating a depolarizing response to GABA. The direction of the initial response was dependent on the pipette potential and analysis of its slope-voltage relationships revealed a depolarizing driving force of +11 mV for the currents through GABA channels. Initial depolarizing responses to GABA uncaging were inverted to hyperpolarizing in the presence of the NKCC1 blocker bumetanide. Current-voltage relationships of the currents evoked by Rubi-GABA uncaging using voltage-ramps at the peak of responses not only revealed a bumetanide-sensitive depolarizing reversal potential of the GABA(A receptor mediated responses, but also showed a strong voltage-dependent hysteresis. Upon desensitization of the uncaged-GABA response, current-voltage relationships of the currents through single GABA(A channels revealed depolarizing responses with the driving force values similar to those obtained for the initial response. Thus, cell-attached recordings of the responses evoked by local intrapipette GABA uncaging are suitable to assess the polarity of the GABA(A-Rs mediated signals in small cell compartments.

  16. Prognosis in prolonged coma patients with diffuse axonal injury assessed by somatosensory evoked potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiujue Zheng; Mantao Chen; Jingqi Li; Fei Cao

    2013-01-01

    A total of 43 prolonged coma patients with diffuse axonal injury received the somatosensory evoked potential examination one month after injury in the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University in China. Somatosensory evoked potentials were graded as normal, abnormal or absent (grades I–III) according to N20 amplitude and central conduction time. The outcome in patients with grade III somatosensory evoked potential was in each case unfavorable. The prognostic accuracy of grade III somatosensory evoked potential for unfavorable and non-awakening outcome was 100% and 80%, respectively. The prognostic accuracy of grade I somatosensory evoked potential for favorable and wakening outcome was 86% and 100%, respectively. These results suggest that somatosensory evoked potential grade is closely correlated with coma severity and degree of recovery. Somatosensory evoked potential is a valuable diagnostic tool to assess prognosis in prolonged coma patients with diffuse axonal injury.

  17. A joint sparse representation-based method for double-trial evoked potentials estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nannan; Liu, Haikuan; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Hanbing

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to solving an evoked potentials estimating problem. Generally, the evoked potentials in two consecutive trials obtained by repeated identical stimuli of the nerves are extremely similar. In order to trace evoked potentials, we propose a joint sparse representation-based double-trial evoked potentials estimation method, taking full advantage of this similarity. The estimation process is performed in three stages: first, according to the similarity of evoked potentials and the randomness of a spontaneous electroencephalogram, the two consecutive observations of evoked potentials are considered as superpositions of the common component and the unique components; second, making use of their characteristics, the two sparse dictionaries are constructed; and finally, we apply the joint sparse representation method in order to extract the common component of double-trial observations, instead of the evoked potential in each trial. A series of experiments carried out on simulated and human test responses confirmed the superior performance of our method.

  18. Impaired acetylcholine release from the myenteric plexus of Trichinella-infected rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, S.M.; Blennerhassett, P.A.; Blennerhassett, M.G.; Vermillion, D.L. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-12-01

    We examined the release of acetylcholine (ACh) from jejunal longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations in noninfected control rats and in rats infected 6, 23, or 40 days previously with Trichinella spiralis. ACh release was assessed by preincubating the tissue with ({sup 3}H)choline and measuring the evoked release of tritium. The uptake of {sup 3}H was significantly less in tissue from T. spiralis-infected rats compared with control. In tissues from either infected or control animals, electrical field stimulation (30 V, 0.5 ms, 10 Hz for 1 min), or veratridine (6-30 microM) induced {sup 3}H release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive. Depolarization by KCl (25-75 mM) also caused {sup 3}H release, but this was only partially reduced by tetrodotoxin. Radiochromatographic analysis indicated evoked release of {sup 3}H to be almost entirely ({sup 3}H)ACh. In rats infected 6 days previously with T. spiralis, ({sup 3}H)ACh release induced by KCl, veratridine, and field stimulation were decreased at least 80%. The suppression of ({sup 3}H)ACh release induced by veratridine or KCl was fully reversible after 40 days postinfection, but field-stimulated responses remained approximately 50% of control values. These results indicate that T. spiralis infection in the rat is accompanied by a reversible suppression of ACh release from the longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the jejunum.

  19. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide provokes acetylcholine release from the myenteric plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, M.; Tsai, L.H.; Taniyama, K.; Tanaka, C.

    1986-07-01

    Effects of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on the release of acetylcholine (ACh) from longitudinal muscle strips with myenteric plexus (LM) preparations were examined in the guinea pig small intestine. VIP (10 to 10 W M) induced a concentration-dependent contraction of LM preparation. The VIP-induced contractions seem to be related to three components, the scopolamine-sensitive, the scopolamine-insensitive, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive, and the tetrodotoxin-insensitive contractions. VIP (10 to 10 W M) induced a concentration-dependent increase in the release of (TH)ACh from LM preparations preloaded with (TH)choline. The VIP-evoked (TH)ACh release was inhibited by removal of CaS from the perfusion medium and by treatment with tetrodotoxin but not by scopolamine and hexamethonium. The spontaneous and VIP-evoked (TH)ACh release was not affected by phentolamine, propranolol, methysergide, diphenhydramine, cimetidine, bicuculline, or (D-ProS, D-Trp/sup 7,9/)substance P. The result demonstrates that VIP induces contractions of longitudinal smooth muscle directly and indirectly by the stimulation of both cholinergic neurons and noncholinergic excitatory neurons.

  20. Optogenetic control of serotonin and dopamine release in Drosophila larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ning; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2014-08-20

    Optogenetic control of neurotransmitter release is an elegant method to investigate neurobiological mechanisms with millisecond precision and cell type-specific resolution. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) can be expressed in specific neurons, and blue light used to activate those neurons. Previously, in Drosophila, neurotransmitter release and uptake have been studied after continuous optical illumination. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulsed optical stimulation trains on serotonin or dopamine release in larval ventral nerve cords. In larvae with ChR2 expressed in serotonergic neurons, low-frequency stimulations produced a distinct, steady-state response while high-frequency patterns were peak shaped. Evoked serotonin release increased with increasing stimulation frequency and then plateaued. The steady-state response and the frequency dependence disappeared after administering the uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, indicating that uptake plays a significant role in regulating the extracellular serotonin concentration. Pulsed stimulations were also used to evoke dopamine release in flies expressing ChR2 in dopaminergic neurons and similar frequency dependence was observed. Release due to pulsed optical stimulations was modeled to determine the uptake kinetics. For serotonin, Vmax was 0.54 ± 0.07 μM/s and Km was 0.61 ± 0.04 μM; and for dopamine, Vmax was 0.12 ± 0.03 μM/s and Km was 0.45 ± 0.13 μM. The amount of serotonin released per stimulation pulse was 4.4 ± 1.0 nM, and the amount of dopamine was 1.6 ± 0.3 nM. Thus, pulsed optical stimulations can be used to mimic neuronal firing patterns and will allow Drosophila to be used as a model system for studying mechanisms underlying neurotransmission.

  1. Transient early neurotrophin release and delayed inflammatory cytokine release by microglia in response to PAR-2 stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Ouyang, Qing; Sun, Ji-Hu; Liu, Fang-Ting; Song, Dian-Wen; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2012-06-25

    Activated microglia exerts both beneficial and deleterious effects on neurons, but the signaling mechanism controlling these distinct responses remain unclear. We demonstrated that treatment of microglial cultures with the PAR-2 agonist, 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, evoked early transient release of BDNF, while sustained PAR-2 stimulation evoked the delayed release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) and nitric oxide. Culture medium harvested during the early phase (at 1 h) of microglial activation induced by 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 (microglial conditioned medium, MCM) had no deleterious effects on cultured neurons, while MCM harvested during the late phase (at 72 h) promoted DNA fragmentation and apoptosis as indicated by TUNEL and annexin/PI staining. Blockade of PAR-1 during the early phase of PAR-2 stimulation enhanced BDNF release (by 11%, small but significant) while a PAR-1 agonist added during the late phase (24 h after 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 addition) suppressed the release of cytokines and NO. The neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of activated microglial exhibit distinct temporal profiles that are regulated by PAR-1 and PAR-2 stimulation. It may be possible to facilitate neuronal recovery and repair by appropriately timed stimulation and inhibition of microglial PAR-1 and PAR-2 receptors.

  2. Interactions Between SNAP-25 and Synaptotagmin-1 Are Involved in Vesicle Priming, Clamping Spontaneous and Stimulating Evoked Neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schupp, Melanie; Malsam, Jörg; Ruiter, Marvin;

    2016-01-01

    . Mutation in region II (D51/E52/E55A) also unclamped release, but this effect could be overcome by synaptotagmin overexpression, arguing against an obligatory role in clamping. We conclude that three synaptic release functions of syt-1, vesicle priming, spontaneous release clamping, and evoked release...... within region II of the primary interface (Zhou et al., 2015); two mutations targeted region I (D166A and D166/E170A) and one mutation targeted both (D51/E52/E55/D166A). The final mutation (D186/D193A) targeted C-terminal residues not expected to interact with syt-1. An in vitro assay showed...... that the region I, region II, and region I+II (D51/E52/E55/D166A) mutants markedly reduced the attachment between syt-1 and t-SNARE-carrying vesicles in the absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. In the presence of PI(4,5)P2, vesicle attachment was unaffected by mutation. When expressed...

  3. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  4. Regulation of (/sup 3/H)GABA release from strips of guinea pig urinary bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakawa, J.; Taniyama, K.; Iwai, S.; Tanaka, C.

    1988-12-01

    The presence of receptors that regulate the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was studied in strips of the guinea pig urinary bladder. GABA (10(-8)-10(-5) M) and muscimol (10(-8)-10(-5) M), but not baclofen (10(-5) M), reduced the Ca2+-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant release of (/sup 3/H)GABA evoked by high K+ from the urinary bladder strips preloaded with (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of muscimol was antagonized by bicuculline and potentiated by diazepam, clonazepam, and pentobarbital sodium. The potentiating effect of clonazepam was antagonized by Ro 15-1788. Acetylcholine (ACh) inhibited the high K+-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of ACh was antagonized by atropine sulfate and pirenzepine but not by hexamethonium. Norepinephrine (NE) inhibited the evoked release of (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of NE was mimicked by clonidine, but not by phenylephrine, and was antagonized by yohimbine but not by prazosin. These results provide evidence that the release of GABA from strips of guinea pig urinary bladder is regulated via the bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptor, M1-muscarinic, and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors.

  5. Apigenin, a natural flavonoid, inhibits glutamate release in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Ying; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Chia Chuan; Wang, Ying Chou; Chou, Shang Shing Peter; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-09-05

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect and mechanism of apigenin, a natural flavonoid, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), apigenin inhibited glutamate release and the elevation of the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration evoked by 4-aminopyridine, whereas it had no effect on 4-aminopyridine-mediated depolarization and Na(+) influx. The apigenin-mediated inhibition of evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca(2+) ions and blocking Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel activity. Furthermore, we determined that gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors are present in the hippocampal nerve terminals because they are colocalized with the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. However, the effect of apigenin on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was unaffected by the GABAA receptor antagonists SR95531 and bicuculline. Furthermore, in slice preparations, whole-cell patch-clamp experiments showed that apigenin reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. On the basis of these results, we suggested that apigenin exerts its presynaptic inhibition probably by reducing Ca(2+) entry mediated by the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, thereby inhibiting glutamate release from the rat hippocampal nerve terminals.

  6. Cortical modulation of short-latency TMS-evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica eVeniero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation - electroencephalogram (TMS-EEG co-registration offers the opportunity to test reactivity of brain areas across distinct conditions through TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs. Several TEPs have been described, their functional meaning being largely unknown. In particular, short-latency potentials peaking at 5 (P5 and 8 (N8 ms after the TMS pulse have been recently described, but because of their huge amplitude, the problem of whether their origin is cortical or not has been opened. To gain information about these components, we employed a protocol that modulates primary motor cortex excitability (MI through an exclusively cortical phenomena: low frequency stimulation of premotor area (PMC. TMS was applied simultaneously with EEG recording from 70 electrodes. Amplitude of TEPs evoked by 200 single-pulses TMS delivered over MI at 110% of resting motor threshold was measured before and after applying 900 TMS conditioning stimuli to left premotor cortex with 1 Hz repetition rate. Single subject analyses showed reduction in TEPs amplitude after PMC conditioning in a sample of participants and increase in TEPs amplitude in two subjects. No effects were found on corticospinal excitability as recorded by motor evoked potentials (MEPs. Furthermore, correlation analysis showed an inverse relation between the effects of the conditioning protocol on P5-N8 complex amplitude and MEPs amplitude. Because the effects of the used protocol have been ascribed to a cortical interaction between premotor area and MI, we suggest that despite the sign of P5-N8 amplitude modulation is not consistent across participant, this modulation could indicate, at least in part, their cortical origin. We conclude that with an accurate experimental procedure early-latency components can be used to evaluate the reactivity of the stimulated cortex.

  7. Localizing evoked and induced responses to faces using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Gavin; Singh, Krish D

    2014-05-01

    A rich pattern of responses in frequency, time and space are known to be generated in the visual cortex in response to faces. Recently, a number of studies have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to try to record these responses non-invasively - in many cases using source analysis techniques based on the beamforming method. Here we sought both to characterize best practice for measuring face-specific responses using MEG beamforming, and to determine whether the results produced by the beamformer match evidence from other modalities. We measured activity to visual presentation of face stimuli and phase-scrambled control stimuli, and performed source analyses of both induced and evoked responses using Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry. We localized the gamma-band response to bilateral lateral occipital cortex, and both the gamma-band response and the M170-evoked response to the right fusiform gyrus. Differences in the gamma-band response between faces and scrambled stimuli were confined to the frequency range 50-90 Hz; gamma-band activity at higher frequencies did not differ between the two stimulus categories. We additionally identified a component of the M220-evoked response - localized to the parieto-occipital sulcus - which was enhanced for scrambled vs. unscrambled faces. These findings help to establish that MEG beamforming can localize face-specific responses in time, frequency and space with good accuracy (when validated against established findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging and intracranial recordings), as well as contributing to the establishment of best methodological practice for the use of the beamformer method to measure face-specific responses.

  8. Visual evoked potentials in children prenatally exposed to methylmercury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Bjerve, Kristian S

    2013-01-01

    the effect of prenatal methylmercury exposure on visual evoked potential (VEP) latencies in Faroese children with elevated prenatal methylmercury exposure. A cohort of 182 singleton term births was assembled in the Faroe Islands during 1994-1995. At age 7 years, VEP tracings were obtained from 139 cohort...... subjects after exclusion of subjects with abnormal vision conditions. We used multiple regression analysis to evaluate the association of mercury concentrations in cord blood and maternal hair at parturition with VEP latencies after adjustment for potential confounders that included the cord...

  9. Intraoperative Monitoring: Recent Advances in Motor Evoked Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koht, Antoun; Sloan, Tod B

    2016-09-01

    Advances in electrophysiological monitoring have improved the ability of surgeons to make decisions and minimize the risks of complications during surgery and interventional procedures when the central nervous system (CNS) is at risk. Individual techniques have become important for identifying or mapping the location and pathway of critical neural structures. These techniques are also used to monitor the progress of procedures to augment surgical and physiologic management so as to reduce the risk of CNS injury. Advances in motor evoked potentials have facilitated mapping and monitoring of the motor tracts in newer, more complex procedures.

  10. [Effects of nicotine on visually evoked EEG potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, P P; Bättig, K; Rosecrans, J A

    1982-10-01

    The effects of nicotine were measured on the averaged visual evoked response (AVER) through the use of two types of experimental cigarettes which differed only in nicotine content (i.e., 0.14 vs. 1.34 mg/cig.). The results indicate that the restorative and/or enhancing effects of cigarette smoking on peak amplitudes are due predominantly to nicotine's psychopharmacologic effects, and support past research indicating that nicotine may enhance visual attentional processes in the quiescent smoker. This contrasts with other reports indicating nicotine to have a depressant effect on auditory processes.

  11. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in normal-hearing adults

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Kamali; Homa Zarinkoub; Akram Pourbakht; Abdoreza Sheibanizade; Maryam Ramezani; Seyede Nazanin Hajari

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) is a novel vestibular function test. This short-latency response can be recorded through contracting extraocular muscles by high-intensity acoustic stimulation and can be used to evaluate contralateral ocular-vestibular reflex. The aim of this study was to record and compare the amplitude, latency, asymmetry ratio and occurrence percentage of oVEMP (n10) and cervical VEMP (p13) responses in a group of normal adult subject...

  12. Clinical application of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murofushi, Toshihisa

    2016-08-01

    The author reviewed clinical aspects of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). Now two types of VEMPs are available. The first one is cervical VEMP, which is recorded in the sternocleidomastoid muscle and predominantly reflects sacculo-collic reflex. The other is ocular VEMP, which is usually recorded below the lower eye lid and predominantly reflects utriculo-ocular reflex. VEMPs play important roles not only for assessment of common vestibular diseases but also for establishment of new clinical entities. Clinical application in Meniere's disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular migraine, idiopathic otolithic vertigo, and central vertigo/dizziness was reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Band limited chirp stimulation in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Leif Erik; Cebulla, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Air conducted vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) can be elicited by various low frequency and intense sound stimuli, mainly clicks or short tone bursts (STB). Chirp stimuli are increasingly used in diagnostic audiological evaluations as an effective means to obtain acoustically evoked responses in narrowed or extended frequency ranges. We hypothesized in this study that band limited chirp stimulation, which covers the main sensitivity range of sound sensitive otolithic afferents (around 500 Hz), might be useful for application in cervical and ocular VEMP to air conduction. For this purpose we designed a chirp stimulus ranging 250-1000 Hz (up chirp). The chirp stimulus was delivered with a stimulus intensity of 100 dB nHL in normal subjects (n = 10) and patients with otolith involvement (vestibular neuritis) (n = 6). Amplitudes of the designed chirp ("CW-VEMP-chirp, 250-1000 Hz") were compared with amplitudes of VEMPs evoked by click stimuli (0.1 ms) and a short tone burst (STB, 1-2-1, 8 ms, 500 Hz). CVEMPs and oVEMPs were detectable in 9 of 10 normal individuals. Statistical evaluation in healthy patients revealed significantly larger cVEMP and oVEMP amplitudes for CW-VEMP-chirp (250-1000 Hz) stimuli. CVEMP amplitudes evoked by CW-VEMP-chirp (250-1000 Hz) showed a high stability in comparison with click and STB stimulation. CW-VEMP-chirp (250-1000 Hz) showed abnormal cVEMP and oVEMP amplitudes in patients with vestibular neuritis, with the same properties as click and STB stimulated VEMPs. We conclude that the designed CW-VEMP-chirp (250-1000 Hz) is an effective stimulus which can be further used in VEMP diagnostic. Since a chirp stimulus can be easily varied in its properties, in particular with regard to frequency, this might be a promising tool for further investigations.

  14. Sense Estimation and Instrumental Evaluation of Fabric-Evoked Prickle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    敖利民; 郁崇文

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the mechanism of fabric-evoked prickle is discussed, which indicates that the mechanical stimuli aroused by the fiber ends on the fabric surface to the skin-sensory receptors are responsible for prickle. The factors influencing the intensity of prickle are specialized and anatomized. Several means of sense estimate, including the corresponding statistical measures, are described. A few groping objective methods of evaluating prickle are analyzed, including the testing principles, the advantages and the disadvantages. At last, a new concept is proposed on the objective evaluation of prickle.

  15. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  16. The noradrenaline metabolite MHPG is a candidate biomarker between the depressive, remission, and manic states in bipolar disorder I: two long-term naturalistic case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurita M

    2015-02-01

    that peripheral MHPG levels (which is related to noradrenaline levels in the brain could be used as a biomarker of mood states in BDI. The noradrenaline level in the brain is likely to reflect the clinical characteristics of the switch process in BDI, and has prognostic significance for the treatment of both manic and depressive states.Keywords: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, monoamine, dopamine, homovanilic acid (HVA, depression, pathophysiology, mood disorder

  17. Mechanisms, pools, and sites of spontaneous vesicle release at synapses of rod and cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cork, Karlene M; Van Hook, Matthew J; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2016-08-01

    Photoreceptors have depolarized resting potentials that stimulate calcium-dependent release continuously from a large vesicle pool but neurons can also release vesicles without stimulation. We characterized the Ca(2+) dependence, vesicle pools, and release sites involved in spontaneous release at photoreceptor ribbon synapses. In whole-cell recordings from light-adapted horizontal cells (HCs) of tiger salamander retina, we detected miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) when no stimulation was applied to promote exocytosis. Blocking Ca(2+) influx by lowering extracellular Ca(2+) , by application of Cd(2+) and other agents reduced the frequency of mEPSCs but did not eliminate them, indicating that mEPSCs can occur independently of Ca(2+) . We also measured release presynaptically from rods and cones by examining quantal glutamate transporter anion currents. Presynaptic quantal event frequency was reduced by Cd(2+) or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) buffering in rods, but not in cones, that were voltage clamped at -70 mV. By inhibiting the vesicle cycle with bafilomycin, we found the frequency of mEPSCs declined more rapidly than the amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) suggesting a possible separation between vesicle pools in evoked and spontaneous exocytosis. We mapped sites of Ca(2+) -independent release using total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualize fusion of individual vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pHrodo. Spontaneous release in rods occurred more frequently at non-ribbon sites than evoked release events. The function of Ca(2+) -independent spontaneous release at continuously active photoreceptor synapses remains unclear, but the low frequency of spontaneous quanta limits their impact on noise.

  18. Activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors inhibits regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2012-09-01

    Previously we have shown that adenosine operating via the A(1) receptor subtype may inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the baroreflex arc within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and differentially increase renal (RSNA), preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity (ASNA>RSNA≥LSNA). Since the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex and the arterial baroreflex are mediated via similar medullary pathways, and glutamate is a primary transmitter in both pathways, it is likely that adenosine operating via A(1) receptors in the NTS may differentially inhibit regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreceptors. Therefore, in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 37) we compared regional sympathoinhibition evoked by the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (activated with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT(3) receptor agonist phenylbiguanide, PBG, 1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors [microinjections of N(6)-cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), 0.033-330 pmol/50 nl]. Activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreceptors evoked differential, dose-dependent sympathoinhibition (RSNA>ASNA>LSNA), and decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. These differential sympathetic responses were uniformly attenuated in dose-dependent manner by microinjections of CPA into the NTS. Volume control (n = 11) and blockade of adenosine receptor subtypes in the NTS via 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (8-SPT, 1 nmol in 100 nl) (n = 9) did not affect the reflex responses. We conclude that activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors uniformly inhibits neural and cardiovascular cardiopulmonary chemoreflex responses. A(1) adenosine receptors have no tonic modulatory effect on this reflex under normal conditions. However, when adenosine is released into the NTS (i.e., during stress or severe hypotension/ischemia), it may serve as negative feedback regulator for depressor and sympathoinhibitory reflexes

  19. Ischemia Induces Release of Endogenous Amino Acids from the Cerebral Cortex and Cerebellum of Developing and Adult Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo S. Oja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia enhanced release of endogenous neuroactive amino acids from cerebellar and cerebral cortical slices. More glutamate was released in adult than developing mice. Taurine release enhanced by K+ stimulation and ischemia was more than one magnitude greater than that of GABA or glutamate in the developing cerebral cortex and cerebellum, while in adults the releases were almost comparable. Aspartate release was prominently enhanced by both ischemia and K+ stimulation in the adult cerebral cortex. In the cerebellum K+ stimulation and ischemia evoked almost 10-fold greater GABA release in 3-month olds than in 7-day olds. The release of taurine increased severalfold in the cerebellum of 7-day-old mice in high-K+ media, whereas the K+-evoked effect was rather small in adults. In 3-month-old mice no effects of K+ stimulation or ischemia were seen in the release of aspartate, glycine, glutamine, alanine, serine, or threonine. The releases from the cerebral cortex and cerebellum were markedly different and also differed between developing and adult mice. In developing mice only the release of inhibitory taurine may be large enough to counteract the harmful effects of excitatory amino acids in ischemia in both cerebral cortex and cerebellum, in particular since at that age the release of glutamate and aspartate cannot be described as massive.

  20. Kainate-enhanced release of D-(3H)aspartate from cerebral cortex and striatum: reversal by baclofen and pentobarbital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potashner, S.J.; Gerard, D.

    1983-06-01

    A study was made of the actions of the excitant neurotoxin, kainic acid, on the uptake and the release of D-(2,3-3H)aspartate (D-ASP) in slices of guinea pig cerebral neocortex and striatum. The slices took up D-ASP, reaching concentrations of the amino acid in the tissue which were 14-23 times that in the medium. Subsequently, electrical stimulation of the slices evoked a Ca2+-dependent release of a portion of the D-ASP. Kainic acid (10(-5)-10(-3) M) produced a dose-dependent inhibition of D-ASP uptake. The electrically evoked release of D-ASP was increased 1.6-2.0 fold by 10(-5) and 10(-4)M kainic acid. The kainate-enlarged release was Ca2+-dependent. Dihydrokainic acid, an analogue of kainic acid with little excitatory or toxic action, did not increase D-ASP release but depressed D-ASP uptake. Attempts were made to block the action of kainic acid with baclofen and pentobarbital, compounds which depress the electrically evoked release of L-glutamate (L-GLU) and L-aspartate (L-ASP). Baclofen (4 X 10(-6)M), an antispastic drug, and pentobarbital (10(-4)M), an anesthetic agent, each inhibited the electrically evoked release of D-ASP and prevented the enhancement of the release above control levels usually produced by 10(-4)M kainic acid. It is proposed that 10(-5) and 10(-4)M kainic acid may enhance the synaptic release of L-GLU and L-ASP from neurons which use these amino acids as transmitters. This action is prevented by baclofen and pentobarbital. In view of the possibility that cell death in Huntington's disease could involve excessive depolarization of striatal and other cells by glutamate, baclofen might be effective in delaying the loss of neurons associated with this condition.

  1. BRAIN DYSFUNCTION OF PATIENTS WITH QIGONG INDUCED MENTAL DISORDER REVEALED BY EVOKED POTENTIALS RECORDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yingzhi; ZONG Wenbin; CHEN Xingshi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In order to investigate the brain function of patients with Qigong induced mental disorder (QIMD), this study was carried out. Methods: Four kinds of evoked potentials, including contingent negative variation (CNV), auditory evoked potentials (AEP), visual evoked potentials (VEP), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), were recorded from 12 patients with Qigong induced mental disorder.Comparison of their evoked potentials with the data from some normal controls was made. Results: The results revealed that there were 3 kinds of abnormal changes in evoked potentials of patients with QIMD that is latency prolongation, amplitude increase and amplitude decrease, as compared with normal controls. Conclusion: Brain dysfunction of patients with QIMD was confirmed. Its biological mechanism needs further studying.

  2. Comparison Acoustically Evoked Short Latency Negative Response with Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential in Adults with Profound Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ramezani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: A negative deflection with a 3-4 ms latency period has been reported to exist within the auditory brainstem response of some patients with profound hearing loss following a strong acoustic stimulus. This deflection, namingly the n3 or the acoustically evoked short latency negative response is assumed to be a vestibular-evoked potential, especially of saccular origin. Since the myogenic potential is also saccular in origin, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between these two tests in adults with profound hearing loss.Methods: The present cross sectional study was performed on 20 profoundly deaf volunteers(39 ears who aged between 18-40 years old, randomly selected from available deaf adults in Tehran. The auditory brainstem response of all subjects was recorded following a 1000 Hz tone burst in 70-100dB nHL. Subjects were also tested for vestibular evoked myogenic potential.Results: Only 34 of 39 ears recorded myogenic potential that negative response was recorded in 27 of 34 ears with normal p13 and n23. In seven ears with normal p13 and n23, the negative response was absent. In 3 ears with no p13 and n23, the negative response was observed, and two none.Conclusion: In view of the high prevalance of the negative response in profoundly deaf ears with normal p13 and n23, it could be concluded that the negative response can be used when for any reason, it is not possible to record myogenic potential and be considered as a new test in vestibular test battery.

  3. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  4. [Exploration of the optic and somatosensory pathways with cerebral evoked potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, A; Zibetti, A

    1981-06-16

    Visual and somatosensorial evoked potentials are the electrical response, recorded on the scalp, that follows the presentation of visual and sensorial stimuli. After briefly mentioning the technical premises enabling evoked responses to be obtained from EEC activity, some cases are reported (demyelining, degenerative, compressive, ischaemic, anoxic pathology) where visual or sensory evoked potentials presented changes, proof of the usefulness of these techniques for the purposes of clinical documentation or for diagnosis in different fields of DNS pathology.

  5. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in multiple sclerosis participants

    OpenAIRE

    Parsa, Maryam Sadat; Mohammadkhani, Ghassem; Hajabolhassani, Fahimeh; Jalaee, Shohreh; Zakeri, Hassanali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disease that affects brain and spinal cord. The infratentorial region contains the cerebellum and brainstem. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) are short-latency myogenic responses. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) is a manifestation of vestibulocolic reflex and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) contributes to the linear vestibular?ocular reflex. The aim of this study was to evaluat...

  6. Evoked brain potentials and disability in brain-damaged patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, M; Hall, K; Hopkins, K; Belleza, T; Berrol, S; Reynolds, G

    1977-08-01

    Various measures of evoked brain potential abnormality (EPA) were correlated with disability ratings (DR) for 35 brain-damaged patients. EPA data consisted of judgements of abnormality of ipsilateral, contralateral and bilateral responses to auditory and visual stimuli reflecting activity in the brain stem, subcortex and cortex. DR data were obtained from a scale developed for this study to quantize and categorize patients with a wide range of disabilities from coma to normal functioning. EPA scores based on visual and auditory cortical responses showed significantly positive correlations with degree of disability. Visual response correlation was .49, auditory .38 and combined visual and auditory .51. It was concluded that EPA measures can reflect disability independently of clinical information. They are useful in assessing brain function in general and, specifically, in assessing impairment of sensory function. The evoked potential technique was particularly useful in patients who were not able to participate fully in their own examination. There were indications that the technique may also be valuable in monitoring progress and in predicting clinical outcome in brain-damaged patients.

  7. Subcortical evoked activity and motor enhancement in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzak, Anam; Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Khan, Sadaquate; Javed, Shazia; Gill, Steven S.; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Akram, Harith; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Enhancements in motor performance have been demonstrated in response to intense stimuli both in healthy subjects and in the form of ‘paradoxical kinesis’ in patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we identify a mid-latency evoked potential in local field potential recordings from the region of the subthalamic nucleus, which scales in amplitude with both the intensity of the stimulus delivered and corresponding enhancements in biomechanical measures of maximal handgrips, independent of the dopaminergic state of our subjects with Parkinson's disease. Recordings of a similar evoked potential in the related pedunculopontine nucleus – a key component of the reticular activating system – provide support for this neural signature in the subthalmic nucleus being a novel correlate of ascending arousal, propagated from the reticular activating system to exert an ‘energizing’ influence on motor circuitry. Future manipulation of this system linking arousal and motor performance may provide a novel approach for the non-dopaminergic enhancement of motor performance in patients with hypokinetic disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:26687971

  8. Contrast independence of dynamic random dot correlogram evoked VEP amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markó, Katalin; Kiss, Huba J M; Mikó-Baráth, Eszter; Bártfai, Orsolya; Török, Béla; Kovács, Ilona; Jandó, Gábor

    2009-04-06

    Dynamic random dot correlograms (DRDCs) are binocular stimuli that evoke a percept and a visual evoked potential (VEP) only in case of a mature and functional binocular system. DRDC-VEP is a method extensively used to study cortical binocularity in human infants and nonverbal children. Although the DRDC-VEP was invented 3 decades ago, neither the fundamental parameters, including contrast, of the stimulation nor the cerebral processing mechanisms have been clarified. The objective of the present study was to investigate the variability and detectability of adults' VEPs to DRDC under different stimulus contrast conditions. DRDCs were presented on the red and green channels of a computer monitor and were viewed with red-green goggles. The steady state DRDC-VEPs were recorded in healthy adult volunteers, and response reliability was assessed by the T(circ)(2) statistic. DRDC-VEP amplitude was independent of contrast, while VEP phases showed a weak correlation with contrast. Contrast invariance of DRDC-VEP amplitude suggests a very high contrast gain and dominant magnocellular input to the binocular correlation processing system.

  9. Visual evoked potentials, reaction times and eye dominance in cricketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N G; Harden, L M; Rogers, G G

    2005-09-01

    Few studies have examined the physiology of cricket, including the difference in ability between batsmen to make controlled contact with a ball bowled at high speed. We therefore measured visual evoked potentials and choice reaction times with dominant eyes, non-dominant eyes, and both eyes together, in 15 elite batsmen and 10 elite bowlers (aged 20.9 SD 1.9 years) and 9 control subjects (aged 20.2 SD 1.5 years). The latency and amplitude of waves N70, P100 and N145 were determined for each visual evoked potential (VEP). In addition interpeak latencies and peak to peak amplitudes were measured. The subjects also completed a choice reaction test to a visual stimulus. We found that cricketers were not more likely to have crossed dominance (dominant eye contralateral to dominant hand) than controls. Cricketers had a faster latency for VEP wave N70 than controls (p=0.03). However reaction time was not different between cricketers and the control group. Across all subjects, in comparison to monocular testing, binocular testing led to a faster choice reaction time (p=0.02) and larger amplitudes of VEP wave N70 (p=0.01). Visual processing during the first 100(-1)50 ms of the balls flight together with binocular vision facilitates retinal activation in talented cricketers.

  10. NGF-evoked sensitization of muscle fascia nociceptors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deising, Saskia; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Blunk, James; Obreja, Otilia; Schmelz, Martin; Rukwied, Roman

    2012-08-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces local hyperalgesia for a few days after intramuscular injection, but longer-lasting muscle pain upon systemic administration. As the muscle fascia is densely innervated by free nerve endings, we hypothesized a lasting sensitization of fascia nociceptors by NGF. We administered 1 μg NGF (dissolved in 100 μL saline) ultrasound-guided to the fascia of the Musculus erector spinae muscle at the lumbar level of 14 male volunteers and assessed hypersensitivity after 6 hours, and 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 days. Pain upon mechanical stimuli (constant pressure and dynamic impact), upon exercise and electrically induced M. erector spinae contraction, and upon injection of 100 μL phosphate buffer pH4 (at day 7 and 14 only) to the fascia of both NGF- and saline-treated muscles, was investigated. Injections into the muscle fascia did not cause acute pain. Local heat pain thresholds were unchanged following NGF and saline (control) administration. NGF evoked a lasting (days 1-7) and significant reduction of pressure pain, pressure thresholds, exercise-evoked muscle pain, and hyperalgesia to impact stimuli (12 m/s). Pain upon injected protons was significantly elevated (Pfascia to mechanical and chemical stimuli lasting for up to 2 weeks. As nociceptors in the fascia appear to be particularly prone to sensitization, they may contribute to acute or chronic muscle pain. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging and analysis of evoked excitatory-postsynaptic-calcium-transients by individual presynaptic-boutons of cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkinson, Guy; Spira, Micha E

    2010-04-01

    The use of the sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapse of the Aplysia gill withdrawal reflex has contributed immensely to the understanding of synaptic transmission, learning and memory acquisition processes. Whereas the majority of the studies focused on analysis of the presynaptic mechanisms, recent studies indicated that as in mammalian synapses, long term potentiation (LTP) formed by Aplysia SN-MN synapse depends on elevation of the postsynaptic free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+](i)). Consistently, injection of the fast calcium chelator BAPTA to the MN prevents the formation of serotonin-induced LTP. Nevertheless, currently there are no published reports that directly examine and document whether evoked synaptic transmission is associated with transient increase in the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i). In the present study we imaged, for the first time, alterations in the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i) in response to presynaptic stimulation and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Using live imaging of the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i) while monitoring the EPSP, we found that evoked transmitter release generates excitatory postsynaptic calcium concentration transients (EPSCaTs) by two mechanisms: (a) activation of DNQX-sensitive postsynaptic receptors-gated calcium influx and (b) calcium influx through nitrendipine-sensitive voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Concomitant confocal imaging of presynaptic boutons and EPSCaTs revealed that approximately 86% of the presynaptic boutons are associated with functional synapses.

  12. Exploring the Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Using Somatosensory and Laser Evoked Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew D; Taylor, Janet L; Booth, John; Barry, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is well described, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials, laser evoked potentials, pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds. These were recorded before and after 3-min of isometric elbow flexion exercise at 40% of the participant's maximal voluntary force, or an equivalent period of rest. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia was confirmed in two experiments (Experiment 1-SEPs; Experiment 2-LEPs) by increased pressure pain thresholds at biceps brachii (24.3 and 20.6% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.84 and p 0.57 and p evoked potentials (14.6% decrease, d = -0.42, p = 0.004) and somatosensory evoked potentials (10.9% increase, d = -0.02, p = 1) were also observed, while an equivalent period of rest showed similar habituation (laser evoked potential: 7.3% decrease, d = -0.25, p = 0.14; somatosensory evoked potential: 20.7% decrease, d = -0.32, p = 0.006). The differential response of pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds to exercise is consistent with relative insensitivity of thermal nociception to the acute hypoalgesic effects of exercise. Conflicting effects of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials and laser evoked potentials were observed. This may reflect non-nociceptive contributions to the somatosensory evoked potential, but could also indicate that peripheral nociceptors contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia.

  13. Usage of Multimodal Evoked Potentials in Diagnosis of Changes in Central Nervous System in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Özbek

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evoked potentials are used in the functional assessment of sensory and motor pathways. Conflicting results have been reported in different studies about the value of evoked potentials in demyelinating diseases. Over 80% of patients with multiple sclerosis present with a relapsing–remitting form of the disease. In this study we aimed to examine the value of each evoked potential to demonstrate the demyelinating lesions in a homogenous group of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. We also aimed to examine the correlation between clinical status and evoked potential abnormalities. METHODS: Twenty patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis and ten healthy volunteers were included in the study to evaluate the value of evoked potentials in a homogenous group. Visual, somatosensory and motor evoked potentials were measured and EDSS scores of the patients were calculated. RESULTS: Of 20 patients, 15 patients(75% had VEP abnormality, 14 patients (70% had MEP abnormality and 12 patients (60% had tibial SEP abnormality. All patients had at least one abnormal evoked potential measurement. The abnormality of evoked potentials also had a correlation with high EDSS scores. CONCLUSION: We concluded that evoked potentials, especially used in combination, are good markers to show the nervous damage in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  14. Cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12, depresses glutamate release through inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kun-Long; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Huang, Chia-Yu; Wang, Su-Jane

    2009-01-14

    The effect of cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12, on glutamate release in isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) prepared from rat prefrontal cortex was examined. Cyanocobalamin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of cyanocobalamin was blocked by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, not by the glutamate transporter inhibitor L-transpyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid or the nontransportable glutamate inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate, indicating that this release inhibition results from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis and not from an inhibition of Ca(2+)-independent efflux via glutamate transporter. Examination of the effect of cyanocobalamin on cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration revealed that the inhibition of glutamate release could be attributed to a reduction in voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx. Consistent with this, the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker omega-conotoxin MVIIC, largely attenuated the inhibitory effect of cyanocobalamin on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release, but the Ca(2+) release inhibitor dantrolene had no effect. Cyanocobalamin did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-aminopyridine-mediated depolarization; thus, the inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release produced by cyanocobalamin was not due to its decreasing synaptosomal excitability. In addition, cyanocobalamin-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release was significantly attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitors GF109203X and Ro318220. Furthermore, 4-aminopyridine-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C was significantly reduced by cyanocobalamin. These results suggest that cyanocobalamin effects a decrease in protein kinase C activation, which subsequently reduces the Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels to cause a decrease in evoked glutamate

  15. ALTERATION IN CONTRACTILE RESPONSE TO NORADRENALINE,5-HYDROXYTRYPTAMINE,SARAFOTOXIN 6c,AND ANGIOTENSINⅡIN RAT MESENTERIC ARTERY DURING ORGAN CULTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Yongxiao(曹永孝); He Langchong(贺浪冲); Xu Cangbao(徐仓宝); EDVINSSON Lars

    2004-01-01

    Objective To compare the vasoconstrictive effects of 9 mediators on fresh and incubated mesenteric arteries of rats. Methods The superior mesenteric artery of rat was removed and the endothelium was denuded. The vessels were cut into 1 mm long cylindrical segments and subjected to organ culture for 24 hours. Fresh or incubated segments were immersed into tissue baths and the concentration-response curves were obtained by cumulative administration of the vasoconstrictors. Results In fresh mesenteric artery, endothelin-1 (ET-1), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), noradrenaline (NA), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), and angiotensinⅡ (AngⅡ) induced potent and sustained constrictions in a concentration-dependent manner. The contraction induced by sarafotoxin 6c (S6c) was weak, while bradykinin (BK), des-Arg-bradykinin (DA-BK), and human urotensinⅡ (hUT-II) showed no detectable contraction. The concentraion-response curves in order of slopes was ET-1, NA, 5-HT, 5-CT, and AngⅡ. The order of the maximum contractions was ET-1>NA=5-HT=5-CT>AngⅡ>S6c. After organ culture, the concentration-response curves induced by S6c, NA, and 5-HT were significantly increased, while that induced by AngⅡ was decreased as comparing to fresh arteries. BK contracted the artery only weakly. Conclusion Organ culture changed the phenotypes towards an increased efficacy of NA, 5-HT, S6c, and a reduced efficacy of AngⅡ, which is in accordance with the results of pharmacological characterization in some human vascular disease.

  16. Mechanisms Underlying Enhanced Noradrenaline-Induced Femoral Arterial Contractions of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Involvement of Endothelium-Derived Factors and Cyclooxygenase-Derived Prostanoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takayuki; Watanabe, Shun; Iguchi, Maika; Ando, Makoto; Oda, Mirai; Nagata, Mako; Yamada, Kosuke; Taguchi, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between noradrenaline (NAd)-induced contractions, endothelial function, and hypertension in femoral arteries isolated from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the femoral arteries of SHR, vs. age-matched control Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, contractions induced by NAd were increased. These effects were enhanced by endothelial denudation, which abolished the differences between the two groups. NAd-induced contractions were enhanced by nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition, and further increased by the blockade of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Conversely, NAd-induced contractions were inhibited by cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. In addition, in SHR arteries, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was reduced, and components of endothelium-derived factors were altered, such as increased COX-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids, reduced EDHF, and preserved NO-m