WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonuniform aerospace structures

  1. Modelling non-uniform strain distributions in aerospace composites using fibre Bragg gratings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajabzadehdizaji, Aydin; Groves, R.M.; Hendriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.; Chung, Y.; Jin, W.; Lee, B.; Canning, J.; Nakamura, K.; Yuan, L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the behaviour of fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors under non-uniform strain distributions was analysed. Using the fundamental matrix approach, the length of the FBG sensor was discretised, with each segment undergoing different strain values. FBG sensors that are embedded inside

  2. Aerospace Structures Test Facility Environmental Test Chambers (ETC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The ETCs test the structural integrity of aerospace structures in representative operating temperatures and aerodynamic load distributions. The test article...

  3. A tuning method for nonuniform traveling-wave accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Cunkui; Zheng Shuxin; Shao Jiahang; Jia Xiaoyu; Chen Huaibi

    2013-01-01

    The tuning method of uniform traveling-wave structures based on non-resonant perturbation field distribution measurement has been widely used in tuning both constant-impedance and constant-gradient structures. In this paper, the method of tuning nonuniform structures is proposed on the basis of the above theory. The internal reflection coefficient of each cell is obtained from analyzing the normalized voltage distribution. A numerical simulation of tuning process according to the coupled cavity chain theory has been done and the result shows each cell is in right phase advance after tuning. The method will be used in the tuning of a disk-loaded traveling-wave structure being developed at the Accelerator Laboratory, Tsinghua University. (authors)

  4. Impact source localisation in aerospace composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Mario Emanuele; Ciampa, Francesco; Boccardi, Salvatore; Meo, Michele

    2017-12-01

    The most commonly encountered type of damage in aircraft composite structures is caused by low-velocity impacts due to foreign objects such as hail stones, tool drops and bird strikes. Often these events can cause severe internal material damage that is difficult to detect and may lead to a significant reduction of the structure’s strength and fatigue life. For this reason there is an urgent need to develop structural health monitoring systems able to localise low-velocity impacts in both metallic and composite components as they occur. This article proposes a novel monitoring system for impact localisation in aluminium and composite structures, which is able to determine the impact location in real-time without a-priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the material. This method relies on an optimal configuration of receiving sensors, which allows linearization of well-known nonlinear systems of equations for the estimation of the impact location. The proposed algorithm is based on the time of arrival identification of the elastic waves generated by the impact source using the Akaike Information Criterion. The proposed approach was demonstrated successfully on both isotropic and orthotropic materials by using a network of closely spaced surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers. The results obtained show the validity of the proposed algorithm, since the impact sources were detected with a high level of accuracy. The proposed impact detection system overcomes current limitations of other methods and can be retrofitted easily on existing aerospace structures allowing timely detection of an impact event.

  5. Information processing for aerospace structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; White, Edward V.; Baumann, Erwin W.

    1998-06-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) technology provides a means to significantly reduce life cycle of aerospace vehicles by eliminating unnecessary inspections, minimizing inspection complexity, and providing accurate diagnostics and prognostics to support vehicle life extension. In order to accomplish this, a comprehensive SHM system will need to acquire data from a wide variety of diverse sensors including strain gages, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, crack growth gages, corrosion sensors, and piezoelectric transducers. Significant amounts of computer processing will then be required to convert this raw sensor data into meaningful information which indicates both the diagnostics of the current structural integrity as well as the prognostics necessary for planning and managing the future health of the structure in a cost effective manner. This paper provides a description of the key types of information processing technologies required in an effective SHM system. These include artificial intelligence techniques such as neural networks, expert systems, and fuzzy logic for nonlinear modeling, pattern recognition, and complex decision making; signal processing techniques such as Fourier and wavelet transforms for spectral analysis and feature extraction; statistical algorithms for optimal detection, estimation, prediction, and fusion; and a wide variety of other algorithms for data analysis and visualization. The intent of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of information processing for SHM, discuss various technologies which can contribute to accomplishing this role, and present some example applications of information processing for SHM implemented at the Boeing Company.

  6. Challenges for Insertion of Structural Nanomaterials in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochi, Emilie J.

    2012-01-01

    In the two decades since Iijima's report on carbon nanotubes (CNT), there has been great interest in realizing the benefits of mechanical properties observed at the nanoscale in large-scale structures. The weight savings possible due to dramatic improvements in mechanical properties relative to state-of-the-art material systems can be game changing for applications like aerospace vehicles. While there has been significant progress in commercial production of CNTs, major aerospace applications that take advantage of properties offered by this material have yet to be realized. This paper provides a perspective on the technical challenges and barriers for insertion of CNTs as an emerging material technology in aerospace applications and proposes approaches that may reduce the typical timeframe for technology maturation and insertion into aerospace structures.

  7. Analysis of Quantum Effects in Non-Uniformly Doped MOS Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fiegna, Claudio

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents results from the self-consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations obtained in one-dimensional non-uniformly doped MOS structures suitable for the fabrication of very short transistors...

  8. Non-uniformity of phase structure in immiscible polymer blends

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fortelný, Ivan; Lapčíková, Monika; Lednický, František; Starý, Zdeněk; Kruliš, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2008), s. 564-571 ISSN 0032-3888 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/06/0729; GA ČR GA106/06/0761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer blends * melt mixing * non-uniform morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.245, year: 2008

  9. Research and Development of Rapid Design Systems for Aerospace Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Harry G.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of research activities associated with the development of rapid design systems for aerospace structures in support of the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE). The specific subsystems investigated were the interface between model assembly and analysis; and, the high performance NASA GPS equation solver software system in the Windows NT environment on low cost high-performance PCs.

  10. Stress state of thin – walled member of the structure with operation damages under nonuniform loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.В. Астанін

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  The publication is dedicated to determining of stress state in particular the stress concentration factors for thin – walled members of the structures subject to nonuniform tension. A structure member has obtained the operation damage generation by corrosion and other causes.

  11. Calculation of hybrid joints used in modern aerospace structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel STERE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The state – of - the art of aeronautical structures show that parts are manufactured and subsequently assembled with the use of fasteners and/ or bonding. Adhesive bonding is a key technology to low weight, high fatigue resistance, robustness and an attractive design for cost structures.The paper results resolve significant problems for two groups of end-users:1 for the aerospace design office: a robust procedure for the design of the hybrid joint structural components;2 for the aeronautical repair centres: a useful procedure for structural design and analysis with significant cost savings.

  12. Automated procedures for sizing aerospace vehicle structures /SAVES/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. L.; Blackburn, C. L.; Dixon, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Results from a continuing effort to develop automated methods for structural design are described. A system of computer programs presently under development called SAVES is intended to automate the preliminary structural design of a complete aerospace vehicle. Each step in the automated design process of the SAVES system of programs is discussed, with emphasis placed on use of automated routines for generation of finite-element models. The versatility of these routines is demonstrated by structural models generated for a space shuttle orbiter, an advanced technology transport,n hydrogen fueled Mach 3 transport. Illustrative numerical results are presented for the Mach 3 transport wing.

  13. Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbato, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue-induced damage is one of the most uncertain and extremely unpredictable failure mechanisms for a large variety of structural systems (e.g., aerospace, automotive, offshore, and civil structures) subjected to stochastic and cyclic loading during service life. Among these systems, composite lightweight aerospace structures -- such as fighter aircrafts and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) -- are particularly sensitive to both fatigue- induced and impact-induced damage. Within this scenari...

  14. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Redmond, James M.; Roach, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk

    2000-06-01

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto- ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  15. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  16. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  17. Investigation of non-uniform structure of sulfur doped monolayer for polystyrene hollow microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yiyang; Su Lin; Liu Meifang; Zhang Zhanwen; Li Bo; Chen Sufen

    2012-01-01

    Detailed analysis is carried out to describe the non-uniform structure of sulfur doped monolayer for polystyrene hollow microscopy. The results demonstrate that the appearance of this non-uniform comes from PSS (sodium polystyrene sulfonate, the doped sulfur agent). The film forming capability of PSS is also investigated with infrared image microscopy and polarizing microscope. PSS has a bad performance in film forming, and the ordering aggregates and crystal appear on the surfaces of the film. There is great difference in the thermal properties between the PSS film and the polystyrene film indicated by thermal treatment, and the PSS film is easy to have brittle crack and strip from the polystyrene film. Therefore, PSS is not appropriate for fabricating the hollow microspheres when the content of doped sulfur is high. (authors)

  18. Hierarchical Composites with Nanostructured Reinforcement for Multifunctional Aerospace Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced nano-engineered composites hold great potential for augmenting aerospace composites material performance by reducing spacecraft weight, increasing payload...

  19. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  20. A critical review of nanotechnologies for composite aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Masouras, Athanasios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Sotiriadis, George; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The past decade extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Integration of nano-particles into fiber composites concludes to multi-scale reinforced composites and has opened a new wide range of multi-functional materials in industry. In this direction, a variety of carbon based nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. This interest originates from several industrial applications needs that request the development of new multi-functional materials which combine enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. In this work, an attempt is performed to review the most representative processes and related performances reported in literature and the experience obtained on nano-enabling technologies of fiber composite materials. This review focuses on the two main composite manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace industry; Prepreg/Autoclave and Resin Transfer technologies. It addresses several approaches for nano-enabling of composites for these two routes and reports latest achieved results focusing on performance of nano-enabled fiber reinforced composites extracted from literature. Finally, this review work identifies the gap between available nano-technology integration routes and the established industrial composite manufacturing techniques and the challenges to increase the Technology Readiness Level to reach the demands for aerospace industry applications.

  1. Study of damping characteristics of fibre reinforced composite aerospace structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.Z.; Saleh, S.; Munir, A.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials are used in a variety of high demanding structural applications. Apart from their other preferable properties, they have high-energy dissipation characteristics, which is important aspect when we repeatedly wiggle the system back and forth. It is important to have thorough understanding of material damping behavior; in general materials damping tends to be complex nonlinear function of vibration amplitude, frequency of loading and material formulation. There are number of mathematical models available in literature to obtain hysteresis curves. One approach for identifying damping characteristics used mechanical hysteresis curves. In present work, a phenomenon was observed during testing of fibre reinforced composite beam of an aerospace structure, that for increase load in structure, the path of Force vs. Displacement curve is different than the path of unloading. A plot is generated which indicate the hysteresis loop representing the steady state dynamic behavior of material. The area enclosed by such curves is proportional to energy dissipation per cycle. However, the specific shape of the curve also has important implications for characterizing the specific functional form of the damping. Therefore, it is important to develop methods for accurately accounting for such effects. The current work explores the damping characteristics both theoretically and experimentally. (author)

  2. Multifunctional Composites for Future Energy Storage in Aerospace Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Julian Adam

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctionalization of fiber-reinforced composites, especially by adding energy storage capabilities, is a promising approach to realize lightweight structural energy storages for future transport vehicles. Compared to conventional energy storage systems, energy density can be increased by reducing parasitic masses of non-energy-storing components and by benefitting from the composite meso- and microarchitectures. In this paper, the most relevant existing approaches towards multifunctional energy storages are reviewed and subdivided into five groups by distinguishing their degree of integration and their scale of multifunctionalization. By introducing a modified range equation for battery-powered electric aircrafts, possible range extensions enabled by multifunctionalization are estimated. Furthermore, general and aerospace specific potentials of multifunctional energy storages are discussed. Representing an intermediate degree of structural integration, experimental results for a multifunctional energy-storing glass fiber-reinforced composite based on the ceramic electrolyte Li1.4Al0.4Ti1.6(PO43 are presented. Cyclic voltammetry tests are used to characterize the double-layer behavior combined with galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements for capacitance calculation. The capacitance is observed to be unchanged after 1500 charge–discharge cycles revealing a promising potential for future applications. Furthermore, the mechanical properties are assessed by means of four-point bending and tensile tests. Additionally, the influence of mechanical loads on the electrical properties is also investigated, demonstrating the storage stability of the composites.

  3. Non-uniformity of hot plastic strain of stainless steels with austenitic-ferritic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laricheva, L.P.; Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Rostovtsev, A.N.; Levius, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Non-uniformity of hot strain of stainless steels of various alloying was investigated. Steels with austenite and δ-ferrite structure of two classes were chosen for investigation: 08Kh18N10T steel of austenitic class and 08Kh21N5T steel of austenitic-ferritic class. Tests were conducted for samples subjected to preliminary thermal treatment: heating up to 1250 deg C, holding during 0.5 h, cooling in water. The heat treatment enabled to produce large grains of austenite and δ-ferrite (about 30 μm) in 08Kh21N5T steel, and sufficient amount of δ-ferrite (up to 50%) in 08Kh18N10T steel. It is shown that hot strain of austenitic-ferritic steels is non-uniform. δ-ferrite strain is more pronounced as compared to austenite. The ratio of mean δ-ferrite strain to the mean austenite strain grows with increase of the degree of general steel strain and temperature. The ratio of mean phase strains in 08Kh18N10T steel is higher as compared to 08Kh21N5T steel, general strain and temperature being equal. Temperature effect on the ratio of δ-ferrite and austenite strains is more pronounced for 08Kh18N10T steel. It is explaind by the value of ratios of phase strain resistance and temperature effect on them

  4. DESIGN & ANALYSIS TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES IN A 3D VISUAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BISCA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this project is to develop a set of tools and to integrate techniques in a software package which is build on structure analysis applications based on Romanian engineers experience in designing and analysing aerospace structures, consolidated with the most recent methods and techniques. The applications automates the structure’s design and analysis processes and facilitate the exchange of technical information between the partners involved in a complex aerospace project without limiting the domain.

  5. IPAD applications to the design, analysis, and/or machining of aerospace structures. [Integrated Program for Aerospace-vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, C. L.; Dovi, A. R.; Kurtze, W. L.; Storaasli, O. O.

    1981-01-01

    A computer software system for the processing and integration of engineering data and programs, called IPAD (Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design), is described. The ability of the system to relieve the engineer of the mundane task of input data preparation is demonstrated by the application of a prototype system to the design, analysis, and/or machining of three simple structures. Future work to further enhance the system's automated data handling and ability to handle larger and more varied design problems are also presented.

  6. Intermittent convective transport carried by propagating electromagnetic filamentary structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Naulin, Volker; Fundamenski, W.

    2010-01-01

    energy, magnetic momentum, and angular momentum. The perpendicular vortex motions and the kinetic shear Alfvén waves are coupled through the parallel current and Ampere’s law, leading to field line bending. On the timescale of interchange motion τ⊥, a thermal expansion force in the direction of curvature...... filaments in a nonuniformly and strongly magnetized plasma are revisited. We systemize the Lagrangian-invariant-based method. Six Lagrangian invariants are employed to describe structure motion and the resultant convective transport, namely, magnetic flux, background magnetic energy, specific entropy, total...... gradient is converted into the kinetic energy of convective motion and the magnetic energy of field line bending through reversible pressure-volume work as a result of the plasma compressibility in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. On the timescale of parallel acoustic response τ∥⪢τ⊥, part of the filament...

  7. Non-uniform Solar Temperature Field on Large Aperture, Fully-Steerable Telescope Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a 110-m fully steerable radio telescope was used as an analysis platform and the integral parametric finite element model of the antenna structure was built in the ANSYS thermal analysis module. The boundary conditions of periodic air temperature, solar radiation, long-wave radiation shadows of the surrounding environment, etc. were computed at 30 min intervals under a cloudless sky on a summer day, i.e., worstcase climate conditions. The transient structural temperatures were then analyzed under a period of several days of sunshine with a rational initial structural temperature distribution until the whole set of structural temperatures converged to the results obtained the day before. The non-uniform temperature field distribution of the entire structure and the main reflector surface RMS were acquired according to changes in pitch and azimuth angle over the observation period. Variations in the solar cooker effect over time and spatial distributions in the secondary reflector were observed to elucidate the mechanism of the effect. The results presented here not only provide valuable realtime data for the design, construction, sensor arrangement and thermal deformation control of actuators but also provide a troubleshooting reference for existing actuators.

  8. Photogrammetric Verification of Fiber Optic Shape Sensors on Flexible Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason P.; Rogge, Matthew D.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-core fiber (MCF) optic shape sensing offers the possibility of providing in-flight shape measurements of highly flexible aerospace structures and control surfaces for such purposes as gust load alleviation, flutter suppression, general flight control and structural health monitoring. Photogrammetric measurements of surface mounted MCF shape sensing cable can be used to quantify the MCF installation path and verify measurement methods.

  9. Optical Fiber Strain Instrumentation for High Temperature Aerospace Structural Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the program is the development and laboratory demonstration of sensors based on silica optical fibers for measurement of high temperature strain for aerospace materials evaluations. A complete fiber strain sensor system based on white-light interferometry was designed and implemented. An experiment set-up was constructed to permit testing of strain measurement up to 850 C. The strain is created by bending an alumina cantilever beam to which is the fiber sensor is attached. The strain calibration is provided by the application of known beam deflections. To ensure the high temperature operation capability of the sensor, gold-coated single-mode fiber is used. Moreover, a new method of sensor surface attachment which permits accurate sensor gage length determination is also developed. Excellent results were obtained at temperatures up to 800-850 C.

  10. A Qualitative Program Evaluation of a Structured Leadership Mentoring Program at a Large Aerospace Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Romney P.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher utilized a qualitative approach to conduct a program evaluation of the organization where he is employed. The study intended to serve as a program evaluation for the structured in-house mentoring program at a large aerospace corporation (A-Corp). This program evaluation clarified areas in which the current mentoring program is…

  11. Light beam diffraction on inhomogeneous holographic photonic PDLC structures under the influence of spatially non-uniform electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkin, A. O.; Sharangovich, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the theoretical model of two-dimensional Bragg diffraction of quasimonochromatic light beams on amplitude- and phase- inhomogeneous holographic photonic PDLC structures under the impact of spatially non-uniform electric field is proposed. The selfconsistent solutions for the light diffraction on PDLC structure with uniform amplitude and quasi-quadratic profiles are obtained for the case of influence of linearly varying electric field. The possibility to compensate the PDLC structure response inhomogeneity by the impact of non-unifrom external field is shown.

  12. Metamaterials-Inspired Aerospace Structures (MIAS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The vibroacoustic characteristics of structures are vital in determining the operational envelope and mission feasibilities. The sources of vibroacoustic excitation...

  13. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Allison, Sidney G.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in materials and structures by performing temperature measurements with fiber Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of structures with subsurface defects or thickness variations. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. The data obtained from grating sensors were further analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with those from conventional thermography techniques. Limitations of the technique were investigated using both experimental and numerical simulation techniques. Methods for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  14. Moving Aerospace Structural Design Practice to a Load and Resistance Factor Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis E.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2016-01-01

    Aerospace structures are traditionally designed using the factor of safety (FOS) approach. The limit load on the structure is determined and the structure is then designed for FOS times the limit load - the ultimate load. Probabilistic approaches utilize distributions for loads and strengths. Failures are predicted to occur in the region of intersection of the two distributions. The load and resistance factor design (LRFD) approach judiciously combines these two approaches by intensive calibration studies on loads and strength to result in structures that are efficient and reliable. This paper discusses these three approaches.

  15. Generating Autoclave-Level Mechanical Properties with Out-of-Autoclave Thermoplastic Placement of Large Composite Aerospace Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — While in the 1970's and 1980's, composites were adopted for aerospace structure for increased performance and weight savings, the 1990's and 2000's witnessed the...

  16. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  17. Analysis of fatigue, fatique-crack propagation, and fracture data. [design of metallic aerospace structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.; Davies, K. B.; Rice, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for consolidation of fatigue, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components. To evaluate these methods, a comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6A1-4V, and 300M and D6Ac steels was established. Data were obtained from both published literature and unpublished reports furnished by aerospace companies. Fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation analyses were restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Fracture toughness data were from tests of center-cracked tension panels, part-through crack specimens, and compact-tension specimens.

  18. A Conceptual Aerospace Vehicle Structural System Modeling, Analysis and Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2007-01-01

    A process for aerospace structural concept analysis and design is presented, with examples of a blended-wing-body fuselage, a multi-bubble fuselage concept, a notional crew exploration vehicle, and a high altitude long endurance aircraft. Aerospace vehicle structures must withstand all anticipated mission loads, yet must be designed to have optimal structural weight with the required safety margins. For a viable systems study of advanced concepts, these conflicting requirements must be imposed and analyzed early in the conceptual design cycle, preferably with a high degree of fidelity. In this design process, integrated multidisciplinary analysis tools are used in a collaborative engineering environment. First, parametric solid and surface models including the internal structural layout are developed for detailed finite element analyses. Multiple design scenarios are generated for analyzing several structural configurations and material alternatives. The structural stress, deflection, strain, and margins of safety distributions are visualized and the design is improved. Over several design cycles, the refined vehicle parts and assembly models are generated. The accumulated design data is used for the structural mass comparison and concept ranking. The present application focus on the blended-wing-body vehicle structure and advanced composite material are also discussed.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  20. Theory to test comparisons for selected aerospace multishell structures and their interfaces under thermomechanical loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdie, R. D.; Ligocki, J. E.; England, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Guidelines for structural shell analyses were obtained on the basis of theory-to-test comparisons made on two large-scale aerospace structures subject to thermomechanical loads. The first structural test was the cylindrical aluminum skin-stringer-ring construction of the S-IC forward skirt and S-II interstage. The second structural test included the truncated, cone-shaped, bonded honeycomb sandwich shell of the Spacecraft Lunar Module Adapter; the cylindrical bonded aluminum honeycomb sandwich construction of the Instrument Unit; and the skin-stringer construction with rings and intercostals of the S-IVB forward skirt. Analyses were made for loadings simulating the flight environment. Elementary shear lag theory was superimposed on shell analysis for interface junctions between stages to obtain favorable theory-to-test stress comparisons.

  1. Reducing Undue Conservatism in "Higher Frequency" Structural Design Loads in Aerospace Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, J. Brent

    2012-01-01

    This study is intended to investigate the frequency dependency of significant strain due to vibratory loads in aerospace vehicle components. The notion that "higher frequency" dynamic loads applied as static loads is inherently conservative is perceived as widely accepted. This effort is focused on demonstrating that principle and attempting to evolve methods to capitalize on it to mitigate undue conservatism. It has been suggested that observations of higher frequency modes that resulted in very low corresponding strain did so due to those modes not being significant. Two avionics boxes, one with its first significant mode at 341 Hz and the other at 857 Hz, were attached to a flat panel installed on a curved orthogrid panel which was driven acoustically in tests performed at NASA/MSFC. Strain and acceleration were measured at select locations on each of the boxes. When possible, strain gage rosettes and accelerometers were installed on either side of a given structural member so that measured strain and acceleration data would directly correspond to one another. Ultimately, a frequency above which vibratory loads can be disregarded for purposes of static structural analyses and sizing of typical robust aerospace components is sought.

  2. Structural assessment of aerospace components using image processing algorithms and Finite Element models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatelos, Dimtrios; Kappatos, Vassilios

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – This paper presents the development of an advanced structural assessment approach for aerospace components (metallic and composites). This work focuses on developing an automatic image processing methodology based on Non Destructive Testing (NDT) data and numerical models, for predicting...... the residual strength of these components. Design/methodology/approach – An image processing algorithm, based on the threshold method, has been developed to process and quantify the geometric characteristics of damages. Then, a parametric Finite Element (FE) model of the damaged component is developed based...... on the inputs acquired from the image processing algorithm. The analysis of the metallic structures is employing the Extended FE Method (XFEM), while for the composite structures the Cohesive Zone Model (CZM) technique with Progressive Damage Modelling (PDM) is used. Findings – The numerical analyses...

  3. Response of structural elements under non-uniformly distributed dynamic loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, T.A.T.; Huebner, M.; Ferretti, D.L.; Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van; Gebbeken, N.

    2016-01-01

    Determination of the structural response of a structural element under blast loading is of interest to vulnerability / lethality (V/L) studies of military operations in urban terrain. These studies require a quick and easy to use method to simulate the structural response of e.g. a wall under

  4. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  5. Toward smart aerospace structures: design of a piezoelectric sensor and its analog interface for flaw detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-31

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  6. Optimization of relativistic backward wave oscillator with non-uniform slow wave structure and a resonant reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    This letter optimizes synchronously 18 parameters of a relativistic backward wave oscillator with non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) and a resonant reflector by using the parallel genetic algorithms and particle-in-cell simulation. The optimization results show that the generation efficiency of microwave from the electron beam has increased 32% compared to that of the original device. After optimization, the electromagnetic mode propagating in the resonant changes from the original TM 020 mode of reflector to higher-order TM 021 mode, which has a high reflection coefficient in a broader frequency range than that of the former. The modulation of current inside the optimized device is much deeper than that in the original one. The product of the electric field and current is defined. Observing this product, it is found that the interaction of the electron beam with the electromagnetic wave in the optimized device is much stronger than that in the original device, and at the rear part of SWS of the optimized device, the electron beam dominantly gives out the energy to the electromagnetic wave, leading to the higher generation efficiency of microwave than that of the original device

  7. Analogies between solitonic bio-energy transport along polypeptide chains and nonautonomous optical solitons in structurated nonuniform fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Lara, L.; Peña-Moreno, R.; Mena-Contla, A.; Serkin, V. N.; Belyaeva, T. L.

    2015-01-01

    The interpenetration of the main ideas and methods being used in different fields of science and technology has become one of the decisive factors in the progress of science as a whole. Mathematical analogies between different physical systems can be extremely fruitful in understanding the novel physical concepts. Accordingly to the new theory of bio-energy transport along protein molecules in living systems and modified Davydov molecular soliton theory, we propose a nonautonomous model that can be considered as a candidate of the bio-energy transport mechanism in protein molecules. Based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation model with varying-intime harmonic oscillator potential, we show that conditions of its exact integrability in one-dimensional case indicate conclusively the way for solitonlike pulse generation in polypeptide molecular systems. The most important properties of this soliton transport of bio-energy are related with periodically changed energy-release conditions and the influences of structure nonuniformity in protein molecules. By analogy with the corresponding optical phenomena in inhomogeneous optical fibers with varying properties along the length, we study the main features of modified Davydov soliton on the basis of the unified nonautonomous nonlinear Schrodinger model in the parameters region of the exact integrability of the model under consideration.

  8. Nonuniform Internal Structure of Fibrin Fibers: Protein Density and Bond Density Strongly Decrease with Increasing Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The major structural component of a blood clot is a meshwork of fibrin fibers. It has long been thought that the internal structure of fibrin fibers is homogeneous; that is, the protein density and the bond density between protofibrils are uniform and do not depend on fiber diameter. We performed experiments to investigate the internal structure of fibrin fibers. We formed fibrin fibers with fluorescently labeled fibrinogen and determined the light intensity of a fiber, I, as a function of fiber diameter, D. The intensity and, thus, the total number of fibrin molecules in a cross-section scaled as D1.4. This means that the protein density (fibrin per cross-sectional area, ρp, is not homogeneous but instead strongly decreases with fiber diameter as D-0.6. Thinner fibers are denser than thicker fibers. We also determined Young’s modulus, Y, as a function of fiber diameter. Y decreased strongly with increasing D; Y scaled as D-1.5. This implies that the bond density, ρb, also scales as D-1.5. Thinner fibers are stiffer than thicker fibers. Our data suggest that fibrin fibers have a dense, well-connected core and a sparse, loosely connected periphery. In contrast, electrospun fibrinogen fibers, used as a control, have a homogeneous cross-section.

  9. Research Developments in Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring for the Sustainment of Composite Aerospace Structures at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable both the use and sustainment of composites in commercial aircraft structures. One key to the sustainment of these large composite structures is the rapid, in-situ characterization of a wide range of potential defects that may occur during the vehicle's life. Additionally, in many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over their lifetime. Quantitative characterization through Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of defects such as reduced bond strength, microcracking, and delamination damage due to impact, are of particular interest. This paper will present an overview of NASA's applications of NDE technologies being developed for the characterization and sustainment of advanced aerospace composites. The approaches presented include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods and infrared thermography techniques for NDE. Finally, the use of simulation tools for optimizing and validating these techniques will also be discussed.

  10. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Boukabache

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures’ reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure’s integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  11. X-ray simulation for structural integrity for aerospace components - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surendra; Gray, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The use of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) has rapidly evolved from an emerging technology to the industry standards in Materials, Manufacturing, Chemical, Civil, and Aerospace engineering. Despite this the recognition of the ICME merits has been somewhat lacking within NDE community. This is due in part to the makeup of NDE practitioners. They are a very diverse but regimented group. More than 80% of NDE experts are trained and certified as NDT Level 3's and auditors in order to perform their daily inspection jobs. These jobs involve detection of attribute of interest, which may be a defect or condition or both, in a material. These jobs are performed in strict compliance with procedures that have been developed over many years by trial-and-error with minimal understanding of the underlying physics and interplay between the NDE methods setup parameters. It is not in the nature of these trained Level 3's experts to look for alternate or out-of-the box, solutions. Instead, they follow the procedures for compliance as required by regulatory agencies. This approach is time-consuming, subjective, and is treated as a bottleneck in today's manufacturing environments. As such, there is a need for new NDE tools that provide rapid, high quality solutions for studying structural and dimensional integrity in parts at a reduced cost. NDE simulations offer such options by a shortening NDE technique development-time, attaining a new level in the scientific understanding of physics of interactions between interrogating energy and materials, and reducing costs. In this paper, we apply NDE simulation (XRSIM as an example) for simulating X-Ray techniques for studying aerospace components. These results show that NDE simulations help: 1) significantly shorten NDE technique development-time, 2) assist in training NDE experts, by facilitating the understanding of the underlying physics, and 3) improve both capability and reliability of NDE methods in terms of

  12. Nanosecond laser texturing of uniformly and non-uniformly wettable micro structured metal surfaces for enhanced boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zupančič, Matevž, E-mail: matevz.zupancic@fs.uni-lj.si; Može, Matic; Gregorčič, Peter; Golobič, Iztok

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Surfaces with periodically changed wettability were produced by a ns marking laser. • Heat transfer was investigated on uniformly and non-uniformly wettable surfaces. • Microporous surfaces with non-uniform wettability enhance boiling heat transfer. • The most bubble nucleations were observed in the vicinity of the microcavities. • Results agree with the predictions of the nucleation criteria. - Abstract: Microstructured uniformly and non-uniformly wettable surfaces were created on 25-μm-thin stainless steel foils by laser texturing using a marking nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) and utilizing various laser fluences and scan line separations. High-speed photography and high-speed IR thermography were used to investigate nucleate boiling heat transfer on the microstructured surfaces. The most pronounced results were obtained on a surface with non-uniform microstructure and non-uniform wettability. The obtained results show up to a 110% higher heat transfer coefficients and 20–40 times higher nucleation site densities compared to the untextured surface. We show that the number of active nucleation sites is significantly increased in the vicinity of microcavities that appeared in areas with the smallest (10 μm) scan line separation. Furthermore, this confirms the predictions of nucleation criteria and proves that straightforward, cost-effective nanosecond laser texturing allows the production of cavities with diameters of up to a few micrometers and surfaces with non-uniform wettability. Additionally, this opens up important possibilities for a more deterministic control over the complex boiling process.

  13. A stochastic global identification framework for aerospace structures operating under varying flight states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis; Nardari, Raphael; Li, Yu-Hung; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, a novel data-based stochastic "global" identification framework is introduced for aerospace structures operating under varying flight states and uncertainty. In this context, the term "global" refers to the identification of a model that is capable of representing the structure under any admissible flight state based on data recorded from a sample of these states. The proposed framework is based on stochastic time-series models for representing the structural dynamics and aeroelastic response under multiple flight states, with each state characterized by several variables, such as the airspeed, angle of attack, altitude and temperature, forming a flight state vector. The method's cornerstone lies in the new class of Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled (VFP) models which allow the explicit analytical inclusion of the flight state vector into the model parameters and, hence, system dynamics. This is achieved via the use of functional data pooling techniques for optimally treating - as a single entity - the data records corresponding to the various flight states. In this proof-of-concept study the flight state vector is defined by two variables, namely the airspeed and angle of attack of the vehicle. The experimental evaluation and assessment is based on a prototype bio-inspired self-sensing composite wing that is subjected to a series of wind tunnel experiments under multiple flight states. Distributed micro-sensors in the form of stretchable sensor networks are embedded in the composite layup of the wing in order to provide the sensing capabilities. Experimental data collected from piezoelectric sensors are employed for the identification of a stochastic global VFP model via appropriate parameter estimation and model structure selection methods. The estimated VFP model parameters constitute two-dimensional functions of the flight state vector defined by the airspeed and angle of attack. The identified model is able to successfully represent the wing

  14. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  15. Reliability-based econometrics of aerospace structural systems: Design criteria and test options. Ph.D. Thesis - Georgia Inst. of Tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. M.; Hanagud, S.

    1974-01-01

    The design criteria and test options for aerospace structural reliability were investigated. A decision methodology was developed for selecting a combination of structural tests and structural design factors. The decision method involves the use of Bayesian statistics and statistical decision theory. Procedures are discussed for obtaining and updating data-based probabilistic strength distributions for aerospace structures when test information is available and for obtaining subjective distributions when data are not available. The techniques used in developing the distributions are explained.

  16. A self-diagnostic adhesive for monitoring bonded joints in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yitao; Li, Yu-hung; Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2016-04-01

    Bondline integrity is still one of the most critical concerns in the design of aircraft structures up to date. Due to the lack of confidence on the integrity of the bondline both during fabrication and service, the industry standards and regulations still require assembling the composite using conventional fasteners. Furthermore, current state-of-the-art non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques are incapable of offering mature solutions on the issue of bondline integrity monitoring. Therefore, the objective of this work is the development of an intelligent adhesive film with integrated micro-sensors for monitoring the integrity of the bondline interface. The proposed method makes use of an electromechanical-impedance (EMI) based method, which is a rapidly evolving approach within the SHM family. Furthermore, an innovative screen-printing technique to fabricate piezoelectric ceramic sensors with minimal thickness has been developed at Stanford. The approach presented in this study is based on the use of (i) micro screen-printed piezoelectric sensors integrated into adhesive leaving a minimal footprint on the material, (ii) numerical and analytical modeling of the EMI spectrum of the adhesive bondline, (iii) novel diagnostic algorithms for monitoring the bondline integrity based on advanced signal processing techniques, and (iv) the experimental assessment via prototype adhesively bonded structures in static (varying loads) and dynamic (fatigue) environments. The proposed method will provide a huge confidence on the use of bonded joints for aerospace structures and lead to a paradigm change in their design by enabling enormous weight savings while maximizing the economic and performance efficiency.

  17. A model based bayesian solution for characterization of complex damage scenarios in aerospace composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, H; Leckey, Cara A C; Dick, A; Harvey, G; Dobson, J

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonic damage detection and characterization is commonly used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace composite components. In recent years there has been an increased development of guided wave based methods. In real materials and structures, these dispersive waves result in complicated behavior in the presence of complex damage scenarios. Model-based characterization methods utilize accurate three dimensional finite element models (FEMs) of guided wave interaction with realistic damage scenarios to aid in defect identification and classification. This work describes an inverse solution for realistic composite damage characterization by comparing the wavenumber-frequency spectra of experimental and simulated ultrasonic inspections. The composite laminate material properties are first verified through a Bayesian solution (Markov chain Monte Carlo), enabling uncertainty quantification surrounding the characterization. A study is undertaken to assess the efficacy of the proposed damage model and comparative metrics between the experimental and simulated output. The FEM is then parameterized with a damage model capable of describing the typical complex damage created by impact events in composites. The damage is characterized through a transdimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo solution, enabling a flexible damage model capable of adapting to the complex damage geometry investigated here. The posterior probability distributions of the individual delamination petals as well as the overall envelope of the damage site are determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental Modal Analysis and Dynaic Strain Fiber Bragg Gratings for Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panopoulou, A.; Fransen, S.; Gomez Molinero, V.; Kostopoulos, V.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a new structural health monitoring system for composite aerospace structures based on dynamic response strain measurements and experimental modal analysis techniques. Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) optical sensors were used for monitoring the dynamic response of the composite structure. The structural dynamic behaviour has been numerically simulated and experimentally verified by means of vibration testing. The hypothesis of all vibration tests was that actual damage in composites reduces their stiffness and produces the same result as mass increase produces. Thus, damage was simulated by slightly varying locally the mass of the structure at different zones. Experimental modal analysis based on the strain responses was conducted and the extracted strain mode shapes were the input for the damage detection expert system. A feed-forward back propagation neural network was the core of the damage detection system. The features-input to the neural network consisted of the strain mode shapes, extracted from the experimental modal analysis. Dedicated training and validation activities were carried out based on the experimental results. The system showed high reliability, confirmed by the ability of the neural network to recognize the size and the position of damage on the structure. The experiments were performed on a real structure i.e. a lightweight antenna sub- reflector, manufactured and tested at EADS CASA ESPACIO. An integrated FBG sensor network, based on the advantage of multiplexing, was mounted on the structure with optimum topology. Numerical simulation of both structures was used as a support tool at all the steps of the work. Potential applications for the proposed system are during ground qualification extensive tests of space structures and during the mission as modal analysis tool on board, being able via the FBG responses to identify a potential failure.

  19. Design and analysis of composite structures with applications to aerospace structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kassapoglou, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Design and Analysis of Composite Structures enables graduate students and engineers to generate meaningful and robust designs of complex composite structures. Combining analysis and design methods for structural components, the book begins with simple topics such as skins and stiffeners and progresses through to entire components of fuselages and wings. Starting with basic mathematical derivation followed by simplifications used in real-world design, Design and Analysis of Composite Structures presents the level of accuracy and range of applicability of each method. Examples taken from ac

  20. Organizational structure and operation of defense/aerospace information centers in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, H. E.; Lushina, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    U.S. Government aerospace and defense information centers are addressed. DTIC and NASA are described in terms of their history, operational authority, information services provided, user community, sources of information collected, efforts under way to improve services, and external agreements regarding the exchange of documents and/or data bases. Contents show how DTIC and NASA provide aerospace/defense information services in support of U.S. research and development efforts. In a general introduction, the importance of scientific and technical information and the need for information centers to acquire, handle, and disseminate it are stressed.

  1. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  2. Self-organization of large-scale ULF electromagnetic wave structures in their interaction with nonuniform zonal winds in the ionospheric E region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburjania, G. D.; Chargazia, Kh. Z.

    2011-01-01

    A study is made of the generation and subsequent linear and nonlinear evolution of ultralow-frequency planetary electromagnetic waves in the E region of a dissipative ionosphere in the presence of a nonuniform zonal wind (a sheared flow). Hall currents flowing in the E region and such permanent global factors as the spatial nonuniformity of the geomagnetic field and of the normal component of the Earth’s angular velocity give rise to fast and slow planetary-scale electromagnetic waves. The efficiency of the linear amplification of planetary electromagnetic waves in their interaction with a nonuniform zonal wind is analyzed. When there are sheared flows, the operators of linear problems are non-self-conjugate and the corresponding eigenfunctions are nonorthogonal, so the canonical modal approach is poorly suited for studying such motions and it is necessary to utilize the so-called nonmodal mathematical analysis. It is shown that, in the linear evolutionary stage, planetary electromagnetic waves efficiently extract energy from the sheared flow, thereby substantially increasing their amplitude and, accordingly, energy. The criterion for instability of a sheared flow in an ionospheric medium is derived. As the shear instability develops and the perturbation amplitude grows, a nonlinear self-localization mechanism comes into play and the process ends with the self-organization of nonlinear, highly localized, solitary vortex structures. The system thus acquires a new degree of freedom, thereby providing a new way for the perturbation to evolve in a medium with a sheared flow. Depending on the shape of the sheared flow velocity profile, nonlinear structures can be either purely monopole vortices or vortex streets against the background of the zonal wind. The accumulation of such vortices can lead to a strongly turbulent state in an ionospheric medium.

  3. Estimation of probability of failure for damage-tolerant aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Keith

    potential to improve aerospace structural safety and reduce maintenance costs by providing a more accurate assessment of the risk of failure and the likelihood of repairs throughout the life of an aircraft.

  4. New Parallel Algorithms for Structural Analysis and Design of Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc T.

    1998-01-01

    Subspace and Lanczos iterations have been developed, well documented, and widely accepted as efficient methods for obtaining p-lowest eigen-pair solutions of large-scale, practical engineering problems. The focus of this paper is to incorporate recent developments in vectorized sparse technologies in conjunction with Subspace and Lanczos iterative algorithms for computational enhancements. Numerical performance, in terms of accuracy and efficiency of the proposed sparse strategies for Subspace and Lanczos algorithm, is demonstrated by solving for the lowest frequencies and mode shapes of structural problems on the IBM-R6000/590 and SunSparc 20 workstations.

  5. Manufacturing Challenges Associated with the Use of Metal Matrix Composites in Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramic particles or fibers. These materials possess a very high strength to weight ratio, good resistance to impact and wear, and a number of other properties which make them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as NASA's Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and Space Launch System. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials, such as MMCs, which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Since Friction Stir Welding occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This chapter summarizes the challenges encountered when joining MMCs to themselves or to other materials in structures. Specific attention is paid to the influence of process variables in Friction Stir Welding on the wear process characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length

  6. Scenario-Based Specification and Evaluation of Architectures for Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ravi; Sundaram, P.

    2001-01-01

    HUMS systems have been an area of increased research in the recent times due to two main reasons: (a) increase in the occurrences of accidents in the aerospace, and (b) stricter FAA regulations on aircrafts maintenance [2]. There are several problems associated with the maintenance of aircrafts that the HUMS systems can solve through the use of several monitoring technologies.This paper documents our methodology of employing scenarios in the specification and evaluation of architecture for HUMS. Section 2 investigates related works that use scenarios in software development. Section 3 describes how we use scenarios in our work, which is followed by a demonstration of our methods in the development of KUMS in section 4. Conclusion summarizes results.

  7. Frontier Aerospace Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Discussion and suggested applications of the many ongoing technology opportunities for aerospace products and missions, resulting in often revolutionary capabilities. The, at this point largely unexamined, plethora of possibilities going forward, a subset of which is discussed, could literally reinvent aerospace but requires triage of many possibilities. Such initial upfront homework would lengthen the Research and Development (R&D) time frame but could greatly enhance the affordability and performance of the evolved products and capabilities. Structural nanotubes and exotic energetics along with some unique systems approaches are particularly compelling.

  8. Standard practice for acoustic emission examination of plate-like and flat panel composite structures used in aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers acoustic emission (AE) examination or monitoring of panel and plate-like composite structures made entirely of fiber/polymer composites. 1.2 The AE examination detects emission sources and locates the region(s) within the composite structure where the emission originated. When properly developed AE-based criteria for the composite item are in place, the AE data can be used for nondestructive examination (NDE), characterization of proof testing, documentation of quality control or for decisions relative to structural-test termination prior to completion of a planned test. Other NDE methods may be used to provide additional information about located damage regions. For additional information see Appendix X1. 1.3 This practice can be applied to aerospace composite panels and plate-like elements as a part of incoming inspection, during manufacturing, after assembly, continuously (during structural health monitoring) and at periodic intervals during the life of a structure. 1.4 This pra...

  9. Structure and corrosion properties of Cr coating deposited on aerospace bearing steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhang, Fengxiang; Zheng, Lijing; Zhang, Hu

    2017-11-01

    The corrosion protection of chromium coating deposited on aerospace bearing steels by using the Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc deposition- Metal Evaporation Vacuum Arc duplex technique (MEVVA-FCVA) had been investigated. The protection efficiency of chromium coating on different substrate materials had also been evaluated. The chromium coating was mainly composed of nanocrystallineα-Cr in a range of 50-200 nm. The orientation distributions of α-Cr film on substrates with different composition had a certain difference to each other. Electrochemical experimental results indicated that the chromium coating significantly improved the corrosion resistance of experimental bearing steels in 3.5% NaCl solution. The protective efficiency of chromium films were all over 98%. The corrosion resistance of chromium coating was influenced by the chemical composition of substrate material. The chromium coatings on higher Cr-containing substrate displayed lower corrosion current density and more positive corrosion potential. The increase of passive film thickness and the formation of a mass of chromium oxide and hydroxide on the surface are responsible for the improved corrosion properties.

  10. Aerospace dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  11. Aerospace Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  12. Influence of geometrical non-uniformities of LaNi5 metal hydride bed on its structure and heat and mass transfer at hydrogen absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, D. V.; Dunikov, D. O.; Kazakov, A. N.; Romanov, I. A.

    2017-11-01

    We perform cycling of a 500 g bed of La0.9Ce0.1Ni5 intermetallic compound in vertical and horizontal orientations with measurements of PCT isotherms, and further XRD and SEM investigation of bed structure. Significant decrease in equilibrium absorption pressure is observed in vertical orientation of the bed from 1.58 to 1.36 MPa at 333K, and from 2.68 to 2.51 MPa at 353K, accompanied by evident particle segregation by the bed height and densification at a bottom with formation of a robust agglomerate of small particles (reactor RSP-8 with 1 kg of La0.9Ce0.1Ni5 also show considerable non-uniformity of pressure inside the bed. If the reactor is charged from the top the hydrogen pressure at the bottom is lower on 0.2-0.3 MPa, which results in earlier occurrence of heat and mass transfer crisis.

  13. The use of damage as a design parameter for postbuckling composite aerospace structures

    OpenAIRE

    Orifici, Adrian; Thomson, Rodney; Degenhardt, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Advanced fibre-reinforced polymer composites have seen a rapid increase in use in aircraft structures in recent years due their high specific strength and stiffness, amongst other properties. The use of postbuckling design, where lightweight structures are designed to operate safely at loads in excess of buckling loads, has been applied to metals for decades to design highly efficient structures. However, to date, the application of postbuckling design in composite structures has been limited...

  14. Aerospace gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, A.

    1982-01-01

    The relevancy of gerontology and geriatrics to the discipline of aerospace medicine is examined. It is noted that since the shuttle program gives the facility to fly passengers, including specially qualified older persons, it is essential to examine response to acceleration, weightlessness, and re-entry over the whole adult lifespan, not only its second quartile. The physiological responses of the older person to weightlessness and the return to Earth gravity are reviewed. The importance of the use of the weightless environment to solve critical problems in the fields of fundamental gerontology and geriatrics is also stressed.

  15. Aerothermal and aeroelastic response prediction of aerospace structures in high-speed flows using direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostoich, Christopher Mark

    Future high-speed air vehicles will be lightweight, flexible, and reusable. Ve- hicles fitting this description are subject to severe thermal and fluid dynamic loading from multiple sources such as aerothermal heating, propulsion sys- tem exhaust, and high dynamic pressures. The combination of low-margin design requirements and extreme environmental conditions emphasizes the occurrence of fluid-thermal-structural coupling. Numerous attempts to field such vehicles have been unsuccessful over the past half-century due par- tially to the inability of traditional design and analysis practices to predict the structural response in this flight regime. In this thesis, a high-fidelity computational approach is used to examine the fluid-structural response of aerospace structures in high-speed flows. The method is applied to two cases: one involving a fluid-thermal interaction problem in a hypersonic flow and the other a fluid-structure interaction study involving a turbulent boundary layer and a compliant panel. The coupled fluid-thermal investigation features a nominally rigid alu- minum spherical dome fixed to a ceramic panel holder placed in a Mach 6.59 laminar boundary layer. The problem was originally studied by Glass and Hunt in a 1988 wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel and is motivated by thermally bowed body panels designed for the National Aerospace Plane. In this work, the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for a thermally perfect gas and the transient heat equation in the structure are solved simultaneously using two high-fidelity solvers coupled at the solid-fluid interface. Predicted surface heat fluxes are within 10% of the measured values in the dome interior with greater differ- ences found near the dome edges where uncertainties concerning the exper- imental model's construction likely influence the thermal dynamics. On the flat panel holder, the local surface heat fluxes approach those on the wind- ward dome face

  16. Basic Aerospace Education Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Lists the most significant resource items on aerospace education which are presently available. Includes source books, bibliographies, directories, encyclopedias, dictionaries, audiovisuals, curriculum/planning guides, aerospace statistics, aerospace education statistics and newsletters. (BR)

  17. Optimal Composite Materials using NASA Resins or POSS Nanoparticle Modifications for Low Cost Fabrication of Large Composite Aerospace Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reduced mass composite materials are crucial to the success of aerospace systems, but their adoption is inhibited because they require autoclave consolidation, a...

  18. Non-uniform tube representation of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikael Sonne

    might not correctly capture volume exclusion - of crucial importance when trying to understand a proteins $3$d-structure. We propose a new reduced model treating the protein as a non-uniform tube with a radius reflecting the positions of atoms. The tube representation is well suited considering X...

  19. Composite Elements for Biomimetic Aerospace Structures with Progressive Shape Variation Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Airoldi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some engineering solutions for the development of innovative aerodynamic surfaces with the capability of progressive shape variation. A brief introduction of the most significant issues related to the design of such morphing structures is provided. Thereafter, two types of structural solutions are presented for the design of internal compliant structures and flexible external skins. The proposed solutions exploit the properties and the manufacturing techniques of long fibre reinforced plastic in order to fulfil the severe and contradictory requirements related to the trade-off between morphing performance and load carrying capabilities.

  20. Aerospace Systems Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposal Title: Aerospace Systems Monitor PHASE 1 Technical Abstract: This Phase II STTR project will continue development and commercialization of the Aerospace...

  1. Finite element modelling of crash response of composite aerospace sub-floor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M. A.; Harte, C. G.; Wiggenraad, J. F. M.; Michielsen, A. L. P. J.; Kohlgrüber, D.; Kamoulakos, A.

    Composite energy-absorbing structures for use in aircraft are being studied within a European Commission research programme (CRASURV - Design for Crash Survivability). One of the aims of the project is to evaluate the current capabilities of crashworthiness simulation codes for composites modelling. This paper focuses on the computational analysis using explicit finite element analysis, of a number of quasi-static and dynamic tests carried out within the programme. It describes the design of the structures, the analysis techniques used, and the results of the analyses in comparison to the experimental test results. It has been found that current multi-ply shell models are capable of modelling the main energy-absorbing processes at work in such structures. However some deficiencies exist, particularly in modelling fabric composites. Developments within the finite element code are taking place as a result of this work which will enable better representation of composite fabrics.

  2. Non-uniform tube representation of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikael Sonne

    Treating the full protein structure is often neither computationally nor physically possible. Instead one is forced to consider various reduced models capturing the properties of interest. Previous work have used tubular neighborhoods of the C-alpha backbone. However, assigning a unique radius...... might not correctly capture volume exclusion - of crucial importance when trying to understand a proteins $3$d-structure. We propose a new reduced model treating the protein as a non-uniform tube with a radius reflecting the positions of atoms. The tube representation is well suited considering X......-ray crystallographic resolution ~ 3Å while a varying radius accounts for the different sizes of side chains. Such a non-uniform tube better capture the protein geometry and has numerous applications in structural/computational biology from the classification of protein structures to sequence-structure prediction....

  3. Survivability of integrated PVDF film sensors to accelerated ageing conditions in aeronautical/aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, E.; Cugnoni, J.; Gmür, T.; Bonhôte, P.; Schorderet, A.

    2013-06-01

    This work validates the use of integrated polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film sensors for dynamic testing, even after being subjected to UV-thermo-hygro-mechanical accelerated ageing conditions. The verification of PVDF sensors’ survivability in these environmental conditions, typically confronted by civil and military aircraft, is the main concern of the study. The evaluation of survivability is made by a comparison of dynamic testing results provided by the PVDF patch sensors subjected to an accelerated ageing protocol, and those provided by neutral non-aged sensors (accelerometers). The available measurements are the time-domain response signals issued from a modal analysis procedure, and the corresponding frequency response functions (FRF). These are in turn used to identify the constitutive properties of the samples by extraction of the modal parameters, in particular the natural frequencies. The composite specimens in this study undergo different accelerated ageing processes. After several weeks of experimentation, the samples exhibit a loss of stiffness, represented by a decrease in the elastic moduli down to 10%. Despite the ageing, the integrated PVDF sensors, subjected to the same ageing conditions, are still capable of providing reliable data to carry out a close followup of these changes. This survivability is a determinant asset in order to use integrated PVDF sensors to perform structural health monitoring (SHM) in the future of full-scale composite aeronautical structures.

  4. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  5. An Advanced Multi-Sensor Acousto-Ultrasonic Structural Health Monitoring System: Development and Aerospace Demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Smithard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A key longstanding objective of the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM research community is to enable the embedment of SHM systems in high value assets like aircraft to provide on-demand damage detection and evaluation. As against traditional non-destructive inspection hardware, embedded SHM systems must be compact, lightweight, low-power and sufficiently robust to survive exposure to severe in-flight operating conditions. Typical Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS systems can be bulky, costly and are often inflexible in their configuration and/or scalability, which militates against in-service deployment. Advances in electronics have resulted in ever smaller, cheaper and more reliable components that facilitate the development of compact and robust embedded SHM systems, including for Acousto-Ultrasonics (AU, a guided plate-wave inspection modality that has attracted strong interest due mainly to its capacity to furnish wide-area diagnostic coverage with a relatively low sensor density. This article provides a detailed description of the development, testing and demonstration of a new AU interrogation system called the Acousto Ultrasonic Structural health monitoring Array Module+ (AUSAM+. This system provides independent actuation and sensing on four Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensor (PWAS elements with further sensing on four Positive Intrinsic Negative (PIN photodiodes for intensity-based interrogation of Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG. The paper details the development of a novel piezoelectric excitation amplifier, which, in conjunction with flexible acquisition-system architecture, seamlessly provides electromechanical impedance spectroscopy for PWAS diagnostics over the full instrument bandwidth of 50 KHz–5 MHz. The AUSAM+ functionality is accessed via a simple hardware object providing a myriad of custom software interfaces that can be adapted to suit the specific requirements of each individual application.

  6. An Advanced Multi-Sensor Acousto-Ultrasonic Structural Health Monitoring System: Development and Aerospace Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithard, Joel; Rajic, Nik; van der Velden, Stephen; Norman, Patrick; Rosalie, Cedric; Galea, Steve; Mei, Hanfei; Lin, Bin; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2017-07-20

    A key longstanding objective of the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) research community is to enable the embedment of SHM systems in high value assets like aircraft to provide on-demand damage detection and evaluation. As against traditional non-destructive inspection hardware, embedded SHM systems must be compact, lightweight, low-power and sufficiently robust to survive exposure to severe in-flight operating conditions. Typical Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) systems can be bulky, costly and are often inflexible in their configuration and/or scalability, which militates against in-service deployment. Advances in electronics have resulted in ever smaller, cheaper and more reliable components that facilitate the development of compact and robust embedded SHM systems, including for Acousto-Ultrasonics (AU), a guided plate-wave inspection modality that has attracted strong interest due mainly to its capacity to furnish wide-area diagnostic coverage with a relatively low sensor density. This article provides a detailed description of the development, testing and demonstration of a new AU interrogation system called the Acousto Ultrasonic Structural health monitoring Array Module⁺ (AUSAM⁺). This system provides independent actuation and sensing on four Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensor (PWAS) elements with further sensing on four Positive Intrinsic Negative (PIN) photodiodes for intensity-based interrogation of Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG). The paper details the development of a novel piezoelectric excitation amplifier, which, in conjunction with flexible acquisition-system architecture, seamlessly provides electromechanical impedance spectroscopy for PWAS diagnostics over the full instrument bandwidth of 50 KHz-5 MHz. The AUSAM⁺ functionality is accessed via a simple hardware object providing a myriad of custom software interfaces that can be adapted to suit the specific requirements of each individual application.

  7. Optimization of wall thickness and lay-up for the shell-like composite structure loaded by non-uniform pressure field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The glass/carbon fiber composites are widely used in the design of various aircraft and rotorcraft components such as fairings and cowlings, which have predominantly a shell-like geometry and are made of quasi-isotropic laminates. The main requirements to such the composite parts are the specified mechanical stiffness to withstand the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflow-induced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. The main objective of present study is the optimization of wall thickness and lay-up of composite shell-like cowling. The present approach assumes conversion of the CAD model of the cowling surface to finite element (FE) representation, then its wind tunnel testing simulation at the different orientation of airflow to find the most stressed mode of flight. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. A wall thickness of the shell had to change over its surface to minimize the objective at the constrained weight. We used a parameterization of the problem that assumes an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. Curve that formed by the intersection of the shell with sphere defined boundary of area, which should be reinforced by local thickening the shell wall. To eliminate a local stress concentration this increment was defined as the smooth function defined on the shell surface. As a result of structural optimization we obtained the thickness of shell's wall distribution, which then was used to design the draping and lay-up of composite prepreg layers. The global strain energy in the optimized cowling was reduced in2

  8. Effective safety measures with tests followed by design correction for aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Taiki

    Analytical and computational prediction tools enable us to design aircraft and spacecraft components with high degree of confidence. While the accuracy of such predictions has been improved over the years, uncertainty continues to be added by new materials and new technology introduced in order to improve performance. This requires us to have reality checks, such as tests, in order to make sure that the prediction tools are reliable enough to ensure safety. While tests can reveal unsafe designs and lead to design correction, these tests are very costly. Therefore, it is important to manage such a design-test-correction cycle effectively. In this dissertation, we consider three important test stages in the lifecycle of an aviation system. First, we dealt with characterization tests that reveal failure modes of new materials or new geometrical arrangements. We investigated the challenge associated with getting the best characterization with a limited number of tests. We have found that replicating tests to attenuate the effect of noise in observation is not necessary because some surrogate models can serve as a noise filter without having replicated data. Instead, we should focus on exploring the design space with different structural configurations in order to discover unknown failure modes. Next, we examined post-design tests for design acceptance followed by possible redesign. We looked at the question of how to balance the desire for better performance achieved by redesign against the cost of redesign. We proposed a design optimization framework that provides tradeoff information between the expected performance improvement by redesign and the probability of redesign, equivalent to the cost of redesign. We also demonstrated that the proposed method can reduce the performance loss due to a conservative reliability estimate. The ultimate test, finally, is whether the structures do not fail in flight. Once an accident occurs, an accident investigation takes place

  9. Printing Outside the Box: Additive Manufacturing Processes for Fabrication of Large Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai, Majid; Peters, Warren

    2015-01-01

    To achieve NASA's mission of space exploration, innovative manufacturing processes are being applied to the fabrication of propulsion elements. Liquid rocket engines (LREs) are comprised of a thrust chamber and nozzle extension as illustrated in figure 1 for the J2X upper stage engine. Development of the J2X engine, designed for the Ares I launch vehicle, is currently being incorporated on the Space Launch System. A nozzle extension is attached to the combustion chamber to obtain the expansion ratio needed to increase specific impulse. If the nozzle extension could be printed as one piece using free-form additive manufacturing (AM) processes, rather than the current method of forming welded parts, a considerable time savings could be realized. Not only would this provide a more homogenous microstructure than a welded structure, but could also greatly shorten the overall fabrication time. The main objective of this study is to fabricate test specimens using a pulsed arc source and solid wire as shown in figure 2. The mechanical properties of these specimens will be compared with those fabricated using the powder bed, selective laser melting technology at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. As printed components become larger, maintaining a constant temperature during the build process becomes critical. This predictive capability will require modeling of the moving heat source as illustrated in figure 3. Predictive understanding of the heat profile will allow a constant temperature to be maintained as a function of height from substrate while printing complex shapes. In addition, to avoid slumping, this will also allow better control of the microstructural development and hence the properties. Figure 4 shows a preliminary comparison of the mechanical properties obtained.

  10. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  11. Linear q-nonuniform difference equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerezako, Gaspard

    2010-01-01

    We introduce basic concepts of q-nonuniform differentiation and integration and study linear q-nonuniform difference equations and systems, as well as their application in q-nonuniform difference linear control systems. (author)

  12. Non-uniform distribution of induced strain in a gate-recessed AlGaN/GaN structure evaluated by micro-PL measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulics, M; Hardtdegen, H; Trellenkamp, St; Grützmacher, D; Lüth, H; Gregušová, D; Kordoš, P; Sofer, Z; Šimek, P; Marso, M

    2012-01-01

    Micro-photoluminescence (µ-PL) studies were performed on AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) with different gate-recessing depths. It was found that µ-PL is the method of choice for detecting dry etching damage and simultaneously recording strain and stress in the HFET GaN layer. Lateral sub-µm resolved mapping shows that the strain in the GaN layer after recessing is partially relaxed and non-uniform. (paper)

  13. Development of Nonlinear Phased Array Systems for Non-Destructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acoustic imaging has played an essential role in ensuring that structures and vehicles are in sound condition both during their construction and their operation. Our...

  14. Nonuniform sampling by quantiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, D Levi; Sonstrom, Reilly E; Rovnyak, Virginia G; Rovnyak, David

    2018-02-13

    A flexible strategy for choosing samples nonuniformly from a Nyquist grid using the concept of statistical quantiles is presented for broad classes of NMR experimentation. Quantile-directed scheduling is intuitive and flexible for any weighting function, promotes reproducibility and seed independence, and is generalizable to multiple dimensions. In brief, weighting functions are divided into regions of equal probability, which define the samples to be acquired. Quantile scheduling therefore achieves close adherence to a probability distribution function, thereby minimizing gaps for any given degree of subsampling of the Nyquist grid. A characteristic of quantile scheduling is that one-dimensional, weighted NUS schedules are deterministic, however higher dimensional schedules are similar within a user-specified jittering parameter. To develop unweighted sampling, we investigated the minimum jitter needed to disrupt subharmonic tracts, and show that this criterion can be met in many cases by jittering within 25-50% of the subharmonic gap. For nD-NUS, three supplemental components to choosing samples by quantiles are proposed in this work: (i) forcing the corner samples to ensure sampling to specified maximum values in indirect evolution times, (ii) providing an option to triangular backfill sampling schedules to promote dense/uniform tracts at the beginning of signal evolution periods, and (iii) providing an option to force the edges of nD-NUS schedules to be identical to the 1D quantiles. Quantile-directed scheduling meets the diverse needs of current NUS experimentation, but can also be used for future NUS implementations such as off-grid NUS and more. A computer program implementing these principles (a.k.a. QSched) in 1D- and 2D-NUS is available under the general public license. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonuniform sampling by quantiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, D. Levi; Sonstrom, Reilly E.; Rovnyak, Virginia G.; Rovnyak, David

    2018-03-01

    A flexible strategy for choosing samples nonuniformly from a Nyquist grid using the concept of statistical quantiles is presented for broad classes of NMR experimentation. Quantile-directed scheduling is intuitive and flexible for any weighting function, promotes reproducibility and seed independence, and is generalizable to multiple dimensions. In brief, weighting functions are divided into regions of equal probability, which define the samples to be acquired. Quantile scheduling therefore achieves close adherence to a probability distribution function, thereby minimizing gaps for any given degree of subsampling of the Nyquist grid. A characteristic of quantile scheduling is that one-dimensional, weighted NUS schedules are deterministic, however higher dimensional schedules are similar within a user-specified jittering parameter. To develop unweighted sampling, we investigated the minimum jitter needed to disrupt subharmonic tracts, and show that this criterion can be met in many cases by jittering within 25-50% of the subharmonic gap. For nD-NUS, three supplemental components to choosing samples by quantiles are proposed in this work: (i) forcing the corner samples to ensure sampling to specified maximum values in indirect evolution times, (ii) providing an option to triangular backfill sampling schedules to promote dense/uniform tracts at the beginning of signal evolution periods, and (iii) providing an option to force the edges of nD-NUS schedules to be identical to the 1D quantiles. Quantile-directed scheduling meets the diverse needs of current NUS experimentation, but can also be used for future NUS implementations such as off-grid NUS and more. A computer program implementing these principles (a.k.a. QSched) in 1D- and 2D-NUS is available under the general public license.

  16. Vortices in nonuniform upper-hybrid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, T.A.; Vranjes, J.

    1992-01-01

    The equations describing the interaction of an upper-hybrid pump wave with small low-frequency density perturbations are discussed under assumption that the pump is spatially nonuniform. The conditions for the modulational instability are investigated. Instead of a dispersion relation, describing the growth of perturbations in the case of an uniform pump, in our case of nonuniform pump a differential equation is obtained and from its eigenvalues are found the instability criteria. Taking into account the slow-frequency self-interaction terms some localized solutions similar to dipole vortices are found, but described by analytic functions in all space. It is shown that their characteristic size and speed are determined by the pump intensity and its spatial structure. (au)

  17. Haldane model under nonuniform strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yen-Hung; Castro, Eduardo V.; Cazalilla, Miguel A.

    2017-10-01

    We study the Haldane model under strain using a tight-binding approach, and compare the obtained results with the continuum-limit approximation. As in graphene, nonuniform strain leads to a time-reversal preserving pseudomagnetic field that induces (pseudo-)Landau levels. Unlike a real magnetic field, strain lifts the degeneracy of the zeroth pseudo-Landau levels at different valleys. Moreover, for the zigzag edge under uniaxial strain, strain removes the degeneracy within the pseudo-Landau levels by inducing a tilt in their energy dispersion. The latter arises from next-to-leading order corrections to the continuum-limit Hamiltonian, which are absent for a real magnetic field. We show that, for the lowest pseudo-Landau levels in the Haldane model, the dominant contribution to the tilt is different from graphene. In addition, although strain does not strongly modify the dispersion of the edge states, their interplay with the pseudo-Landau levels is different for the armchair and zigzag ribbons. Finally, we study the effect of strain in the band structure of the Haldane model at the critical point of the topological transition, thus shedding light on the interplay between nontrivial topology and strain in quantum anomalous Hall systems.

  18. A non-uniform expansion mechanical safety model of the stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Huang, N; Du, Q

    2009-01-01

    Stents have a serial unstable structure that readily leads to non-uniform expansion. Non-uniform expansion in turn creates a stent safety problem. We explain how a stent may be simplified to a serial unstable structure, and present a method to calculate the non-uniform expansion of the stent on the basis of the serial unstable structure. We propose a safety criterion based on the expansion displacement instead of the strain, and explain that the parameter Rd, the ratio of the maximum displacement of the elements to normal displacement, is meaningful to assess the safety level of the stent. We also examine how laser cutting influences non-uniform expansion. The examples illustrate how to calculate the parameter Rd to assess non-uniform expansion of the stent, and demonstrate how the laser cutting offset and strengthening coefficient of the material influence the stent expansion behaviour. The methods are valuable for assessing stent safety due to non-uniform expansion.

  19. Recent advances in the development of aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Chen, Yongjun; Hu, Junling

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made on the development of aerospace materials for structural and engine applications. Alloys, such as Al-based alloys, Mg-based alloys, Ti-based alloys, and Ni-based alloys, are developed for aerospace industry with outstanding advantages. Composite materials, the innovative materials, are taking more and more important roles in aircrafts. However, recent aerospace materials still face some major challenges, such as insufficient mechanical properties, fretting wear, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion. Consequently, extensive studies have been conducted to develop the next generation aerospace materials with superior mechanical performance and corrosion resistance to achieve improvements in both performance and life cycle cost. This review focuses on the following topics: (1) materials requirements in design of aircraft structures and engines, (2) recent advances in the development of aerospace materials, (3) challenges faced by recent aerospace materials, and (4) future trends in aerospace materials.

  20. Nanotechnology in Aerospace Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyyappan, M

    2007-01-01

    The aerospace applications for nanotechnology include high strength, low weight composites, improved electronics and displays with low power consumption, variety of physical sensors, multifunctional...

  1. Damage growth in aerospace composites

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents novel methods for the simulation of damage evolution in aerospace composites that will assist in predicting damage onset and growth and thus foster less conservative designs which realize the promised economic benefits of composite materials. The presented integrated numerical/experimental methodologies are capable of taking into account the presence of damage and its evolution in composite structures from the early phases of the design (conceptual design) through to the detailed finite element method analysis and verification phase. The book is based on the GARTEUR Research Project AG-32, which ran from 2007 to 2012, and documents the main results of that project. In addition, the state of the art in European projects on damage evolution in composites is reviewed. While the high specific strength and stiffness of composite materials make them suitable for aerospace structures, their sensitivity to damage means that designing with composites is a challenging task. The new approaches describ...

  2. Aerospace Systems Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposal Title: Aerospace Systems Monitor PHASE 1 Technical Abstract: This Phase II STTR project will continue development and commercialization of the Aerospace...

  3. Magnetic Gearboxes for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Diaz, Jose Luis; Diez-Jimenez, Efren; Alvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A.; Sanchez-Garcia-Casarrubios, Juan; Cristache, Christian; Valiente-Blanco, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic gearboxes are contactless mechanisms for torque-speed conversion. They present no wear, no friction and no fatigue. They need no lubricant and can be customized for other mechanical properties as stiffness or damping. Additionally, they can protect structures and mechanisms against overloads, limitting the transmitted torque. In this work, spur, planetary and "magdrive" or "harmonic drive" configurations are compared considering their use in aerospace applications. The most recent test data are summarized to provide some useful help for the design engineer.

  4. Variational analysis and aerospace engineering mathematical challenges for the aerospace of the future

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammadi, Bijan; Pironneau, Olivier; Cipolla, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    This book presents papers surrounding the extensive discussions that took place from the ‘Variational Analysis and Aerospace Engineering’ workshop held at the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture in 2015. Contributions to this volume focus on advanced mathematical methods in aerospace engineering and industrial engineering such as computational fluid dynamics methods, optimization methods in aerodynamics, optimum controls, dynamic systems, the theory of structures, space missions, flight mechanics, control theory, algebraic geometry for CAD applications, and variational methods and applications. Advanced graduate students, researchers, and professionals in mathematics and engineering will find this volume useful as it illustrates current collaborative research projects in applied mathematics and aerospace engineering.

  5. Optimal Composite Materials using NASA Resins or POSS Nanoparticle Modifications for Low Cost Fabrication of Large Composite Aerospace Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reduced mass composite materials are crucial to the success of aerospace systems, but their adoption is inhibited because they require autoclave consolidation, a...

  6. Polymer and ceramic nanocomposites for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Vivek T.; Kumar, Jayanth S.; Jain, Anjana

    2017-11-01

    This paper reviews the potential of polymer and ceramic matrix composites for aerospace/space vehicle applications. Special, unique and multifunctional properties arising due to the dispersion of nanoparticles in ceramic and metal matrix are briefly discussed followed by a classification of resulting aerospace applications. The paper presents polymer matrix composites comprising majority of aerospace applications in structures, coating, tribology, structural health monitoring, electromagnetic shielding and shape memory applications. The capabilities of the ceramic matrix nanocomposites to providing the electromagnetic shielding for aircrafts and better tribological properties to suit space environments are discussed. Structural health monitoring capability of ceramic matrix nanocomposite is also discussed. The properties of resulting nanocomposite material with its disadvantages like cost and processing difficulties are discussed. The paper concludes after the discussion of the possible future perspectives and challenges in implementation and further development of polymer and ceramic nanocomposite materials.

  7. Aerospace Accident - Injury Autopsy Data System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Aerospace Accident Injury Autopsy Database System will provide the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) Aerospace Medical Research Team (AMRT) the ability to...

  8. Index of international publications in aerospace medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The 5th edition of the Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive : listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, : aerospace physiology, environmental medicine...

  9. Index of international publications in aerospace medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    The Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, aerospace physiology, environmental medicine/physiology, diving med...

  10. Study of Delft aerospace alumni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, G.N.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis reports on an alumni study of the Faculty Aerospace Engineering at Delft University of Technology to discover what the impact is of the degree in aerospace engineering on an alumnus' professional success and comment on what are important qualities for aerospace engineers to have in order

  11. An Aerospace Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    aerotropolis.”19 Thus, it is no surprise so many in America seek their dreams and employment outside the aerospace sector.20 Tech savvy Millennials ...While we have a model on which this was Strategic Studies Quarterly ♦ Winter 2015 John P. Geis II and Peter A. Garretson [ 8 ] done under the stress of

  12. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Microstructural evolution of AA7449 aerospace alloy refined by intensive shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghayeghi, R.; Nastac, L.

    2012-10-01

    Many aerospace alloys are sensitive to their composition thus cannot be chemically grain refined. In addition, only 1% grain refiners can act as nuclei for refining the structure. In this paper, physical refinement by intensive shearing above liquidus as an alternative technique will be investigated for AA7449 aerospace alloy. The results can open a new gateway for aerospace industry for refining their microstructure.

  13. Ultrasonic Characterization of Aerospace Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, Cara; Johnston, Patrick; Haldren, Harold; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials have seen an increased use in aerospace in recent years and it is expected that this trend will continue due to the benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and other factors. Ongoing work at NASA involves the investigation of the large-scale use of composites for spacecraft structures (SLS components, Orion Composite Crew Module, etc). NASA is also involved in work to enable the use of composites in advanced aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). In both areas (space and aeronautics) there is a need for new nondestructive evaluation and materials characterization techniques that are appropriate for characterizing composite materials. This paper will present an overview of NASA's needs for characterizing aerospace composites, including a description of planned and ongoing work under ACP for the detection of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking. The research approaches include investigation of angle array, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods. The use of ultrasonic simulation tools for optimizing and developing methods will also be discussed.

  14. Machine intelligence and autonomy for aerospace systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Ewald (Editor); Lum, Henry (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present volume discusses progress toward intelligent robot systems in aerospace applications, NASA Space Program automation and robotics efforts, the supervisory control of telerobotics in space, machine intelligence and crew/vehicle interfaces, expert-system terms and building tools, and knowledge-acquisition for autonomous systems. Also discussed are methods for validation of knowledge-based systems, a design methodology for knowledge-based management systems, knowledge-based simulation for aerospace systems, knowledge-based diagnosis, planning and scheduling methods in AI, the treatment of uncertainty in AI, vision-sensing techniques in aerospace applications, image-understanding techniques, tactile sensing for robots, distributed sensor integration, and the control of articulated and deformable space structures.

  15. Adopting exergy analysis for use in aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, David; Lone, Mudassir; Whidborne, James F.; Camberos, José; Coetzee, Etienne

    2017-08-01

    Thermodynamic analysis methods, based on an exergy metric, have been developed to improve system efficiency of traditional heat driven systems such as ground based power plants and aircraft propulsion systems. However, in more recent years interest in the topic has broadened to include applying these second law methods to the field of aerodynamics and complete aerospace vehicles. Work to date is based on highly simplified structures, but such a method could be shown to have benefit to the highly conservative and risk averse commercial aerospace sector. This review justifies how thermodynamic exergy analysis has the potential to facilitate a breakthrough in the optimization of aerospace vehicles based on a system of energy systems, through studying the exergy-based multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles.

  16. Wireless Sensing Opportunities for Aerospace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Wilson

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensors and sensor networks is an emerging technology area with many applications within the aerospace industry. Integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM of aerospace vehicles is needed to ensure the safety of the crew and the vehicle, yet often high costs, weight, size and other constraints prevent the incorporation of instrumentation onto spacecraft. This paper presents a few of the areas such as IVHM, where new wireless sensing technology is needed on both existing vehicles as well as future spacecraft. From ground tests to inflatable structures to the International Space Station, many applications could receive benefits from small, low power, wireless sensors. This paper also highlights some of the challenges that need to overcome when implementing wireless sensor networks for aerospace vehicles.

  17. Damping Effects in Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    crown and the side webs were cut away. A joint plate with two rivets in single shear restored the continuity of the crown across the cut. The beam... profonde du role a leur faire jouer dans les comnortements dynamiques d’ensesable. 11 s’agit 13 d’un point de vue qui apparaft aujourd’hui encore

  18. Quasiparticles in non-uniformly magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosenko, P.P.

    1994-01-01

    A quasiparticle concept is generalized for the case of non-uniformly magnetized plasma. Exact and reduced continuity equations for the microscopic density in the quasiparticle phase space are derived, and the nature of quasiparticles is analyzed. The theory is developed for the general case of relativistic particles in electromagnetic fields, besides non-uniform but stationary magnetic fields. Effects of non-stationary magnetic fields are briefly investigated also. 26 refs

  19. Aerospace Engineering Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDalsem, William R.; Livingston, Mary E.; Melton, John E.; Torres, Francisco J.; Stremel, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Continuous improvement of aerospace product development processes is a driving requirement across much of the aerospace community. As up to 90% of the cost of an aerospace product is committed during the first 10% of the development cycle, there is a strong emphasis on capturing, creating, and communicating better information (both requirements and performance) early in the product development process. The community has responded by pursuing the development of computer-based systems designed to enhance the decision-making capabilities of product development individuals and teams. Recently, the historical foci on sharing the geometrical representation and on configuration management are being augmented: Physics-based analysis tools for filling the design space database; Distributed computational resources to reduce response time and cost; Web-based technologies to relieve machine-dependence; and Artificial intelligence technologies to accelerate processes and reduce process variability. Activities such as the Advanced Design Technologies Testbed (ADTT) project at NASA Ames Research Center study the strengths and weaknesses of the technologies supporting each of these trends, as well as the overall impact of the combination of these trends on a product development event. Lessons learned and recommendations for future activities will be reported.

  20. Design and Fabrication of Aerospace-Grade Digital Composite Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project aims to advance design rules and fabrication approaches to create aerospace-grade structures from digital composite materials. Digital materials are...

  1. Aerogels in Aerospace: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiir Bheekhun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerogels are highly porous structures prepared via a sol-gel process and supercritical drying technology. Among the classes of aerogels, silica aerogel exhibits the most remarkable physical properties, possessing lower density, thermal conductivity, refractive index, and dielectric constant than any solids. Its acoustical property is such that it can absorb the sound waves reducing speed to 100 m/s compared to 332 m/s for air. However, when it comes to commercialization, the result is not as expected. It seems that mass production, particularly in the aerospace industry, has dawdled behind. This paper highlights the evolution of aerogels in general and discusses the functions and significances of silica aerogel in previous astronautical applications. Future outer-space applications have been proposed as per the current research trend. Finally, the implementation of conventional silica aerogel in aeronautics is argued with an alternative known as Maerogel.

  2. Nondestructive Evaluation for Aerospace Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, Cara; Cramer, Elliott; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for enabling NASA's missions in space exploration and aeronautics. The expanded and continued use of composite materials for aerospace components and vehicles leads to a need for advanced NDE techniques capable of quantitatively characterizing damage in composites. Quantitative damage detection techniques help to ensure safety, reliability and durability of space and aeronautic vehicles. This presentation will give a broad outline of NASA's range of technical work and an overview of the NDE research performed in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center. The presentation will focus on ongoing research in the development of NDE techniques for composite materials and structures, including development of automated data processing tools to turn NDE data into quantitative location and sizing results. Composites focused NDE research in the areas of ultrasonics, thermography, X-ray computed tomography, and NDE modeling will be discussed.

  3. Dynamic measurements in non-uniform flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershov, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The response of gauges registering the flow velocity and pressure in highly non-uniform media (for example, a powder under shock compression or powdered low-density explosive) is simulated. The modeling employs an acoustic approach. Against the average level of the signal, the fluctuations generated by the heterogeneity of the medium are observed which may distort the results completely. For reliable measurements, gauges larger than the characteristic scale of the medium non-uniformity are required. Under this condition, electromagnetic flow measurements and the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) produce quite similar flow velocity profiles with small level of noise.

  4. Smart antennas in aerospace applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorte, Jaco; Schippers, Harmen; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Marpaung, D.A.I.

    2010-01-01

    The interest in Smart Antennas for aerospace applications is growing. This paper describes smart antennas which can be used on aircraft. Two aerospace applications are discussed in more detail: a phased array antenna with optical beam forming and a large vibrating phased array antenna with

  5. Nonuniform grid implicit spatial finite difference method for acoustic wave modeling in tilted transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-01-01

    Discrete earth models are commonly represented by uniform structured grids. In order to ensure accurate numerical description of all wave components propagating through these uniform grids, the grid size must be determined by the slowest velocity of the entire model. Consequently, high velocity areas are always oversampled, which inevitably increases the computational cost. A practical solution to this problem is to use nonuniform grids. We propose a nonuniform grid implicit spatial finite difference method which utilizes nonuniform grids to obtain high efficiency and relies on implicit operators to achieve high accuracy. We present a simple way of deriving implicit finite difference operators of arbitrary stencil widths on general nonuniform grids for the first and second derivatives and, as a demonstration example, apply these operators to the pseudo-acoustic wave equation in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. We propose an efficient gridding algorithm that can be used to convert uniformly sampled models onto vertically nonuniform grids. We use a 2D TTI salt model to demonstrate its effectiveness and show that the nonuniform grid implicit spatial finite difference method can produce highly accurate seismic modeling results with enhanced efficiency, compared to uniform grid explicit finite difference implementations. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Stone Stability in Non-uniform Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoan, N.T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Booij, R.; Hofland, B.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on stone stability under nonuniform turbulent flow, in particular expanding flow. Detailed measurements of both flow and turbulence and the bed stability are described. Than various manners of quantifying the hydraulic loads exerted on the

  7. Stone Stability under Stationary Nonuniform Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenstra, Remco; Hofland, B.; Paarlberg, Andries; Smale, Alfons; Huthoff, Fredrik; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    A stability parameter for rock in bed protections under nonuniform stationary flow is derived. The influence of the mean flow velocity, turbulence, and mean acceleration of the flow are included explicitly in the parameter. The relatively new notion of explicitly incorporating the mean acceleration

  8. Radar Doppler Processing with Nonuniform Sampling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional signal processing to estimate radar Doppler frequency often assumes uniform pulse/sample spacing. This is for the convenience of t he processing. More recent performance enhancements in processor capability allow optimally processing nonuniform pulse/sample spacing, thereby overcoming some of the baggage that attends uniform sampling, such as Doppler ambiguity and SNR losses due to sidelobe control measures.

  9. Dynamics of aerospace vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, David K.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this research was to address the modeling, including model reduction, of flexible aerospace vehicles, with special emphasis on models used in dynamic analysis and/or guidance and control system design. In the modeling, it is critical that the key aspects of the system being modeled be captured in the model. In this work, therefore, aspects of the vehicle dynamics critical to control design were important. In this regard, fundamental contributions were made in the areas of stability robustness analysis techniques, model reduction techniques, and literal approximations for key dynamic characteristics of flexible vehicles. All these areas are related. In the development of a model, approximations are always involved, so control systems designed using these models must be robust against uncertainties in these models.

  10. Aerospace engineering training: universities experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertins Kseniya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary professional working in aerospace engineering must have a set of soft and hard skills. The experience gained in universities shows that training of a competent professional is impossible without an employer involved in this process. The paper provides an analysis of missions, tasks and experience of aerospace professionals and identifies the present and future roles, missions and required skills of a highly qualified specialist in aerospace engineering. This analysis can be used to design a master’s program aiming at providing students with the required knowledge, know-how and attitudes needed to succeed as professionals in industrial companies.

  11. Titanium production for aerospace applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius A. R. Henriques

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium parts are ideally suited for advanced aerospace systems because of their unique combination of high specific strength at both room temperature and moderately elevated temperature, in addition to excellent general corrosion resistance. The objective of this work is to present a review of titanium metallurgy focused on aerospace applications, including developments in the Brazilian production of titanium aimed at aerospace applications. The article includes an account of the evolution of titanium research in the Brazilian Institute (IAE/CTA and the current state-of-art of titanium production in Brazil.

  12. Outer region scaling using the freestream velocity for nonuniform open channel flow over gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert L.; Fox, James F.

    2017-06-01

    The theoretical basis for outer region scaling using the freestream velocity for nonuniform open channel flows over gravel is derived and tested for the first time. Owing to the gradual expansion of the flow within the nonuniform case presented, it is hypothesized that the flow can be defined as an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer using the asymptotic invariance principle. The hypothesis is supported using similarity analysis to derive a solution, followed by further testing with experimental datasets. For the latter, 38 newly collected experimental velocity profiles across three nonuniform flows over gravel in a hydraulic flume are tested as are 43 velocity profiles previously published in seven peer-reviewed journal papers that focused on fluid mechanics of nonuniform open channel over gravel. The findings support the nonuniform flows as equilibrium defined by the asymptotic invariance principle, which is reflective of the consistency of the turbulent structure's form and function within the expanding flow. However, roughness impacts the flow structure when comparing across the published experimental datasets. As a secondary objective, we show how previously published mixed scales can be used to assist with freestream velocity scaling of the velocity deficit and thus empirically account for the roughness effects that extend into the outer region of the flow. One broader finding of this study is providing the theoretical context to relax the use of the elusive friction velocity when scaling nonuniform flows in gravel bed rivers; and instead to apply the freestream velocity. A second broader finding highlighted by our results is that scaling of nonuniform flow in gravel bed rivers is still not fully resolved theoretically since mixed scaling relies to some degree on empiricism. As researchers resolve the form and function of macroturbulence in the outer region, we hope to see the closing of this research gap.

  13. Instruction sequence based non-uniform complexity classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach to non-uniform complexity in which single-pass instruction sequences play a key part, and answer various questions that arise from this approach. We introduce several kinds of non-uniform complexity classes. One kind includes a counterpart of the well-known non-uniform

  14. Aerospace Systems Monitor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I STTR project will demonstrate the Aerospace System Monitor (ASM). This technology transforms the power distribution network in a spacecraft or aircraft...

  15. Aerospace materials and material technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wanhill, R

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of chapters on materials (both established and evolving) and material technologies that are important for aerospace systems. It considers aerospace materials in three Parts. Part I covers Metallic Materials (Mg, Al, Al-Li, Ti, aero steels, Ni, intermetallics, bronzes and Nb alloys); Part II deals with Composites (GLARE, PMCs, CMCs and Carbon based CMCs); and Part III considers Special Materials. This compilation has ensured that no important aerospace material system is ignored. Emphasis is laid in each chapter on the underlying scientific principles as well as basic and fundamental mechanisms leading to processing, characterization, property evaluation and applications. A considerable amount of materials data is compiled and presented in appendices at the end of the book. This book will be useful to students, researchers and professionals working in the domain of aerospace materials.

  16. Aerospace technology and hospital systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The use of aerospace medical techniques to improve the quality of earth health care systems is discussed. Data are focused on physiological measurements and monitoring, medical information management, clean room technology, and reliability and quality assurance for hospital equipment.

  17. Investigation of Non-Uniform Rust Distribution and Its Effects on Corrosion Induced Cracking in Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutrisno Wahyuniarsih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniform corrosion still widely used by a lot of researchers and engineers to analyze the corrosion induced cracking. However, in practice, corrosion process occurred non-uniformly. The part nearest to the exposed surface is more likely to have faster corrosion initiation compared with other regions. This research is mainly focused on investigating the effect of non-uniform rust distribution to cover cracking in reinforced concrete. An experimental test performed using accelerated corrosion test by using 5% NaCl solution and applied a constant electric current to the concrete samples. The rust distribution and measurement were observed by using a digital microscope. Based on the experimental result, it was found that the rust was distributed in a non-uniform pattern. As a result, the cracks also formed non-uniformly along the perimeter of steel bar. At the last part of this paper, a simulation result of concrete cracking induced by non-uniform corrosion is presented. The result compared with a simulation using uniform corrosion assumption to investigate the damage pattern of each model. The simulation result reveals stress evolution due to rust expansion which leads to concrete cracking. Furthermore, a comparison of stresses induced by non-uniform corrosion and uniform corrosion indicates that non-uniform corrosion could lead to earlier damage to the structure which is specified by the formation and propagation of the crack.

  18. Aeromedical solutions for aerospace safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Pawan; Gaur, Deepak

    2017-10-01

    All facets of activity in the speciality of Aviation Medicine are essentially aimed at enhancing aerospace safety. This paper highlights some innovative changes brought about by Aerospace Medicine in the three major fields of the speciality namely, medical evaluation, aeromedical training and research. Based on lab and field studies, military aircrew are now permitted flying with Modifinil as 'Go' Pill and Zolpidem as 'No-Go' Pill during sustained operations. Several other drugs for disabilities like Hypertension and CAD are now permitted for aviators. Comprehensive revision of policy permitting early return to flying is an on-going process. OPRAM courses for all three streams of aircrew in IAF have contributed to reduce aircraft accident rates. Human Engineering Consultancy and expert advice is provided by specialists at IAM as well as those in the field. In future, the country needs to provide better post-service opportunities to aerospace medicine specialists. This, in turn, will attract bright young minds to the specialty. The ISRO Humanin-Space programme will be an exciting challenge for all in this unique field. Aerospace Medicine continues to provide aerospace safety solutions to the IAF and the aviation industry. The nation needs to continue to utilize and support this specialty.

  19. Challenges in aerospace medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenon, S Marlene; Saary, Joan

    2011-11-01

    Aerospace medicine training and research represents a dream for many and a challenge for most. In Canada, although some opportunities exist for the pursuit of education and research in the aerospace medicine field, they are limited despite the importance of this field for enabling safe human space exploration. In this commentary, we aim to identify some of the challenges facing individuals wishing to get involved in the field as well as the causal factors for these challenges. We also explore strategies to mitigate against these.

  20. Supporting the industrialisation of aerospace technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally, the aerospace industry is recognised as one of the most significant multipliers for economic development. Aerospace requires a technology injection to enhance industrialisation. An example is the Rooivalk development programme, which...

  1. On the Time Variation of Dust Extinction and Gas Absorption for Type Ia Supernovae Observed through a Nonuniform Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X.; Aldering, G.; Biederman, M.; Herger, B.

    2017-11-01

    For Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed through a nonuniform interstellar medium (ISM) in its host galaxy, we investigate whether the nonuniformity can cause observable time variations in dust extinction and in gas absorption due to the expansion of the SN photosphere with time. We show that, owing to the steep spectral index of the ISM density power spectrum, sizable density fluctuation amplitudes at the length scale of typical ISM structures (≳ 10 {pc}) will translate to much smaller fluctuations on the scales of an SN photosphere. Therefore, the typical amplitude of time variation due to a nonuniform ISM, of absorption equivalent widths, and of extinction, would be small. As a result, we conclude that nonuniform ISM density should not impact cosmology measurements based on SNe Ia. We apply our predictions based on the ISM density power-law power spectrum to the observations of two highly reddened SNe Ia, SN 2012cu and SN 2014J.

  2. Analysis of the Elastic Large Deflection Behavior for Metal Plates under Nonuniformly Distributed Lateral Pressure with In-Plane Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Galerkin method is applied to analyze the elastic large deflection behavior of metal plates subject to a combination of in-plane loads such as biaxial loads, edge shear and biaxial inplane bending moments, and uniformly or nonuniformly distributed lateral pressure loads. The motive of the present study was initiated by the fact that metal plates of ships and ship-shaped offshore structures at sea are often subjected to non-uniformly distributed lateral pressure loads arising from cargo or water pressure, together with inplane axial loads or inplane bending moments, but the current practice of the maritime industry usually applies some simplified design methods assuming that the non-uniform pressure distribution in the plates can be replaced by an equivalence of uniform pressure distribution. Applied examples are presented, demonstrating that the current plate design methods of the maritime industry may be inappropriate when the non-uniformity of lateral pressure loads becomes more significant.

  3. High-order nonuniformly correlated beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yangjian

    2018-02-01

    We have introduced a class of partially coherent beams with spatially varying correlations named high-order nonuniformly correlated (HNUC) beams, as an extension of conventional nonuniformly correlated (NUC) beams. Such beams bring a new parameter (mode order) which is used to tailor the spatial coherence properties. The behavior of the spectral density of the HNUC beams on propagation has been investigated through numerical examples with the help of discrete model decomposition and fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm. Our results reveal that by selecting the mode order appropriately, the more sharpened intensity maxima can be achieved at a certain propagation distance compared to that of the NUC beams, and the lateral shift of the intensity maxima on propagation is closed related to the mode order. Furthermore, analytical expressions for the r.m.s width and the propagation factor of the HNUC beams on free-space propagation are derived by means of Wigner distribution function. The influence of initial beam parameters on the evolution of the r.m.s width and the propagation factor, and the relation between the r.m.s width and the occurring of the sharpened intensity maxima on propagation have been studied and discussed in detail.

  4. The non-uniformity of fossil preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Steven M

    2016-07-19

    The fossil record provides the primary source of data for calibrating the origin of clades. Although minimum ages of clades are given by the oldest preserved fossil, these underestimate the true age, which must be bracketed by probabilistic methods based on multiple fossil occurrences. Although most of these methods assume uniform preservation rates, this assumption is unsupported over geological timescales. On geologically long timescales (more than 10 Myr), the origin and cessation of sedimentary basins, and long-term variations in tectonic subsidence, eustatic sea level and sedimentation rate control the availability of depositional facies that preserve the environments in which species lived. The loss of doomed sediments, those with a low probability of preservation, imparts a secular trend to fossil preservation. As a result, the fossil record is spatially and temporally non-uniform. Models of fossil preservation should reflect this non-uniformity by using empirical estimates of fossil preservation that are spatially and temporally partitioned, or by using indirect proxies of fossil preservation. Geologically, realistic models of preservation will provide substantially more reliable estimates of the origination of clades.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. A stability criterion for HNFDE with non-uniform delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xingwen; Zhong Shouming; Zhang Fengli

    2005-01-01

    Stability of functional differential equations (FDE) is an increasingly important problem in both science and engineering. Delays, whether uniform or non-uniform, play an important role in the dynamics of a system. Since non-uniform delay is more general and less focused than uniform delay, this paper concentrates on the stability of high-order neutral functional differential equations (HNFDE) with non-uniform delay, and proposes a sufficient condition for it. This result may be widely helpful, thanks to the frequent emergence of a HNFDE with non-uniform delay in various fields. Its effectiveness is illustrated by some examples

  6. Aerospace Training. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace is an economic powerhouse that generates jobs and fuels our economy. Washington's community and technical colleges produce the world-class employees needed to keep it that way. With about 1,250 aerospace-related firms employing more than 94,000 workers, Washington has the largest concentration of aerospace expertise in the nation. To…

  7. Graphical simulation for aerospace manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai, Majid; Bien, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Simulation software has become a key technological enabler for integrating flexible manufacturing systems and streamlining the overall aerospace manufacturing process. In particular, robot simulation and offline programming software is being credited for reducing down time and labor cost, while boosting quality and significantly increasing productivity.

  8. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  9. Strain characterization of embedded aerospace smart materials using shearography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anisimov, A.; Muller, B.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of smart materials for embedding in aerospace composites provides enhanced functionality for future aircraft structures. Critical flight conditions like icing of the leading edges can affect the aircraft functionality and controllability. Hence, anti-icing and de-icing capabilities

  10. Present-day stress fields of the Gulf of Suez (Egypt) based on exploratory well data: Non-uniform regional extension and its relation to inherited structures and local plate motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, William; Durocher, Scott

    2017-12-01

    The Gulf of Suez is the prototype model of a failed or aborted continental rift. However, the basin is seismically active and the footwalls of several major extensional faults continue to rise at the present time. Furthermore, decadal-length Global Positioning System (GPS) datasets demonstrate that the Sinai micro-plate continues to separate from Africa in a northerly direction at ∼0.15 cm/yr with a Gulf of Suez rift-normal component of ∼0.05 cm/yr. Geologic and GPS observations both indicate that the rift is now undergoing highly-oblique extension. Previous interpretations of borehole breakouts in industry exploration wells suggested that the minimum horizontal stress (Shmin) in the southern Gulf of Suez is presently aligned ∼015°. New subsurface data from the accommodation zone boundary between the Central and Darag (northern) sub-basins similarly identifies an extension direction of approximately N-S. By contrast, in the Central sub-basin itself breakout and drilling-induced fracture (DIF) data indicate NE-SW extension, or rift-normal movement that is similar to the documented older Miocene history of the entire basin. Based on these observations the present-day stress field of the Gulf of Suez is spatially non-uniform. Variations are also present in local and teleseismic datasets. The northern Gulf of Suez shows relatively less seismicity, with very few events greater than M = 3. The central sub-basin is very active, with 17 events M ≥ 3 during the past 45 years, and these suggest NE-SW extension similar to the breakout data. The southern Gulf of Suez is the most seismically active and merges with an area of significant seismicity in the northern Red Sea. In the southern Gulf of Suez the seismicity is complex but focal plane analyses of the two largest historical events indicated NNE-SSW extension, in agreement with the breakout data. Differing interpretations have been proposed for the smaller magnitude seismicity. We suggest that each of the three

  11. ScienceScope: Aerospace

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available . Light metals initia- tives focus on the reduction of aircraft structural weight and automobile weight, while increasing local content. Another priority technology flagship is advanced electronics, which includes sensor development, technology and fusion... of the Department of Science and Technology (DST), is to deve- lop advanced metals manufacturing technologies for complex, thin-walled, light-weight components using the investment casting process. Titanium casting development, in particular, is one of the main...

  12. Chemical Microsensor Development for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Lukco, Dorothy; Chen, Liangyu; Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous aerospace applications, including low-false-alarm fire detection, environmental monitoring, fuel leak detection, and engine emission monitoring, would benefit greatly from robust and low weight, cost, and power consumption chemical microsensors. NASA Glenn Research Center has been working to develop a variety of chemical microsensors with these attributes to address the aforementioned applications. Chemical microsensors using different material platforms and sensing mechanisms have been produced. Approaches using electrochemical cells, resistors, and Schottky diode platforms, combined with nano-based materials, high temperature solid electrolytes, and room temperature polymer electrolytes have been realized to enable different types of microsensors. By understanding the application needs and chemical gas species to be detected, sensing materials and unique microfabrication processes were selected and applied. The chemical microsensors were designed utilizing simple structures and the least number of microfabrication processes possible, while maintaining high yield and low cost. In this presentation, an overview of carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), and hydrogen/hydrocarbons (H2/CxHy) microsensors and their fabrication, testing results, and applications will be described. Particular challenges associated with improving the H2/CxHy microsensor contact wire-bonding pad will be discussed. These microsensors represent our research approach and serve as major tools as we expand our sensor development toolbox. Our ultimate goal is to develop robust chemical microsensor systems for aerospace and commercial applications.

  13. Pathways and Challenges to Innovation in Aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrile, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores impediments to innovation in aerospace and suggests how successful pathways from other industries can be adopted to facilitate greater innovation. Because of its nature, space exploration would seem to be a ripe field of technical innovation. However, engineering can also be a frustratingly conservative endeavor when the realities of cost and risk are included. Impediments like the "find the fault" engineering culture, the treatment of technical risk as almost always evaluated in terms of negative impact, the difficult to account for expansive Moore's Law growth when making predictions, and the stove-piped structural organization of most large aerospace companies and federally funded research laboratories tend to inhibit cross-cutting technical innovation. One successful example of a multi-use cross cutting application that can scale with Moore's Law is the Evolutionary Computational Methods (ECM) technique developed at the Jet Propulsion Lab for automated spectral retrieval. Future innovations like computational engineering and automated design optimization can potentially redefine space exploration, but will require learning lessons from successful innovators.

  14. Influence of the Surface and Cloud Nonuniformities in the Solar Energy Fluxes in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowska, A.; Cahalan, R. F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Solar energy fluxes reaching the surface and absorbed by it are basic components of the energy balance of the Arctic. They depend mainly on the solar zenith angle, a state of the atmosphere, especially the cloudiness, and the surface albedo. However, they can also be modified by variabilities in the surface albedo and cloud optical thickness. The surface of the Arctic can be highly nonuniform. The surface of the Arctic Ocean, which covers the huge part of the Arctic can be view as a mosaic of sea water, sea ice, snow and, in the melting period, melting ponds. In our paper, results are presented of Monte Carlo simulations of the expected influence of nonuniform cloud structure and nonuniform surface albedo on radiative fluxes at the Arctic surface. In particular, the plane parallel biases in the surface absorptance and atmospheric transmittance are studied. The bias is defined as the difference between the real absorptance or transmittance (i.e. nonuniform conditions) averaged over a given area, and the uniform or plane parallel case with the same mean cloud optical thickness and the same mean surface albedo. The dependence of the biases is analysed with respect to the following: domain averaged values of the cloud optical thickness and surface albedo, scales of their spatial variabilities, correlation between cloud optical thickness and cloud albedo variabilities, cloud height, and the solar zenith angle. Ranges of means and standard deviations of the input parameters typical of Arctic conditions are obtained from the SHEBA experiment.

  15. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  16. Intersubjective management in aerospace engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpentieva Mariam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a postnonclassical approach to create the science of management processes organization in a developing society, the focus of which is “the man of culture”, i.e. the man, not just adhering to cultural norms, but also creating new concepts and products of culture. This science is proposed to be called Evergetics. The purpose of the study is the analysis science of management processes organization in a developing aerospace engineering and other industrial areas of society. The authors describe the main aspects and procedures evergetics management in aerospace engineering. They uses the comparison method, compares classical and modern approaches and technologies of management. In evergetics management model each member of society or organization is interested in augmenting his cultural heritage he is producing, which entails a raise of stability in process of engineering actions and a raise cultural potential of the society as a whole and, as a consequence, an increase in the proportion of moral and ethical managerial decisions and corresponding to them benevolent actions in organizational life. Summarize the article’s main findings, authors may in some main conclusions about necessity evergetics model and intersubjective technologies in the creation and development of aerospace engineering.

  17. Development of aero-space structural Ni3Al-based alloys for service at temperature above 1000 oC in air without protection coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kablov, E.N.; Buntushkin, V.P.; Povarova, K.B.; Kasanskaya, N.K.

    2001-01-01

    The principles of alloying are developed for alloys based on the γ' phase Ni 3 Al and realized for the design of a high-temperature alloy VKNA-1V destined for a wide range of 'hot' GTE articles (e.g., flaps, nozzle vanes, turbine rotor blades, elements of flame tubes, and other complex thin-wall articles) produced by vacuum investment casting. Owing to a fortunate combination of the selected boron-free alloying system (Ni-AI-Cr-W-Mo-Zr-C), the presence of a ductile structure constituent such as nickel-based γ solid solution (∼10 wt%) and directed columnar or single crystal structure the alloy is characterized by high ductility at room (El=14-35 %), middle and high temperatures (El=18-31 % at 673-1473 K), by a melting temperature (solidus) as high as T m = 1613 K, a density of at most 7930 kg /m 3 , high short term and long term strength at temperatures 1273-1573 K (σ 100 =110 MPa at 1373 K). Alloy has a high oxidation resistance at temperatures up to 1573 K and is resistant to stress corrosion and general atmospheric corrosion. New VKNA-1V Ni 3 Al-based alloy with equiaxed grained, directional solidification (DS), or single crystal structures can be produced by conventional cast processes used for investment casting of nickel superalloys, including the process of high-gradient DS. Compared to nickel analogs, the alloy is relatively cheap and do not need in protective coating up to 1573 K in air. (author)

  18. Study of the Micro-Nonuniformity of the Plastic Deformation of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechulin, B. B.

    1957-01-01

    The plastic flow during deformation of real polycrystalline metals has specific characteristics which distinguish the plastic deformation of metals from the deformation of ordinary isotropic bodies. One of these characteristics is the marked micro-nonuniformity of the plastic deformation of metals. P.O. Pashkov demonstrated the presence of a considerable micro-nonuniformity of the plastic deformation of coarse-grained steel wit medium or low carbon content. Analogous results in the case of tension of coarse-grained aluminum were obtained by W. Boas, who paid particular attention to the role of the grain boundaries in plastic flow. The nonuniformit of the plastic deformation in microvolumes was also recorded by T.N. Gudkova and others, on the alloy KhN80T. N.F. Lashko pointed out the nonuniformity of the plastic deformation for a series of pure polycrystalline metals and one-phase alloys. In his later reports, P.O. Pashkov arrives at he conclusion that the nonuniformity of the distribution of the deformation along the individual grains has a significant effect on the strength and plastic characteristics of polycrystalline metals in the process of plastic flow. However, until now there has not existed any systematic investigation of the general rules of the microscopic nonuniformit of plastic deformation even though the real polycrystalline metals are extremely simple with regard to structure. In the present report, an attempt is made to study the micrononuniformity of the flow of polycrystalline metals by the method of statistical analysis of the variation of the frequency diagrams of the nonuniformity of the grains in the process of plastic deformation.

  19. Flexural Free Vibrations of Multistep Nonuniform Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojin Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an exact approach to investigate the flexural free vibrations of multistep nonuniform beams. Firstly, one-step beam with moment of inertia and mass per unit length varying as I(x=α11+βxr+4 and m(x=α21+βxr was studied. By using appropriate transformations, the differential equation for flexural free vibration of one-step beam with variable cross section is reduced to a four-order differential equation with constant coefficients. According to different types of roots for the characteristic equation of four-order differential equation with constant coefficients, two kinds of modal shape functions are obtained, and the general solutions for flexural free vibration of one-step beam with variable cross section are presented. An exact approach to solve the natural frequencies and modal shapes of multistep beam with variable cross section is presented by using transfer matrix method, the exact general solutions of one-step beam, and iterative method. Numerical examples reveal that the calculated frequencies and modal shapes are in good agreement with the finite element method (FEM, which demonstrates the solutions of present method are exact ones.

  20. Long GRBs sources population non-uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene

    Long GRBs observed in the very wide energy band. It is possible to separate two subsets of GRBs with high energy component (E > 500 MeV) presence. First type events energy spectra in low and high energy intervals are similar (as for GRB 021008) and described by Band, power law or broken power law models look like to usual bursts without emission in tens MeV region. For example, Band spectrum of GRB080916C covering 6 orders of magnitude. Second ones contain new additional high energy spectral component (for example, GRB 050525B and GRB 090902B). Both types of GRBs observed since CGRO mission beginning. The low energy precursors existence are typical for all types bursts. Both types of bursts temporal profiles can be similar in the various energy regions during some events or different in other cases. The absence of hard to soft evolution in low energy band and (or) presence of high energy precursors for some events are the special features of second class of GRBs by the results of preliminary data analysis and this facts gives opportunities to suppose differences between these two GRBs subsets sources. Also the results of long GRB redshifts distribution analysis have shown its shape contradiction to uniform population objects one for our Metagalaxy to both total and various redshifts definition methods GRBs sources samples. These evidences allow making preliminary conclusion about non-uniformity of long GRBs sources population.

  1. Vortex convection in nonuniform compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumowski, A. P.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1988-03-01

    Vortex convection in longitudinally nonuniform transonic flow fields was studied. Vortices moving in moderately accelerated flow are distinct in the subsonic and supersonic range. Due to the acceleration, the vortices of the Karman street separate continuously one from another. They form a series of periodically shedding individual vortices. The density distribution of the accelerated vortices stays circular. Vortices in subsonic stream (behind the shock wave in the divergent part of the Laval nozzle) impinging on an obstacle (in this case on the regulating valve) cause shock fronts which move upstream. In a subsonic stream flowing out from the convergent nozzle, the primary vortices inside the stream significantly perturb its boundaries and induce secondary vortices (at the boundaries). Flow patterns in a duct with a sudden enlargement of cross section are influenced by the vortices convected in the flow too. However, the observed perturbations of these patterns are relatively weak. The unsteady behaviour of the free stream is not only the effect of the vortex convection but also of the unsteady interactions with the boundaries, i.e., the adjusting valve and the test-section walls. However, the effect of the vortex convection is the stronger.

  2. Minimum nonuniform graph partitioning with unrelated weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarychev, K. S.; Makarychev, Yu S.

    2017-12-01

    We give a bi-criteria approximation algorithm for the Minimum Nonuniform Graph Partitioning problem, recently introduced by Krauthgamer, Naor, Schwartz and Talwar. In this problem, we are given a graph G=(V,E) and k numbers ρ_1,\\dots, ρ_k. The goal is to partition V into k disjoint sets (bins) P_1,\\dots, P_k satisfying \\vert P_i\\vert≤ ρi \\vert V\\vert for all i, so as to minimize the number of edges cut by the partition. Our bi-criteria algorithm gives an O(\\sqrt{log \\vert V\\vert log k}) approximation for the objective function in general graphs and an O(1) approximation in graphs excluding a fixed minor. The approximate solution satisfies the relaxed capacity constraints \\vert P_i\\vert ≤ (5+ \\varepsilon)ρi \\vert V\\vert. This algorithm is an improvement upon the O(log \\vert V\\vert)-approximation algorithm by Krauthgamer, Naor, Schwartz and Talwar. We extend our results to the case of 'unrelated weights' and to the case of 'unrelated d-dimensional weights'. A preliminary version of this work was presented at the 41st International Colloquium on Automata, Languages and Programming (ICALP 2014). Bibliography: 7 titles.

  3. Compton imaging tomography for nondestructive evaluation of large multilayer aircraft components and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Volodymyr; Grubsky, Victor; Zahiri, Feraidoon

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel NDT/NDE tool for non-contact, single-sided 3D inspection of aerospace components, based on Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) technique, which is applicable to large, non-uniform, and/or multilayer structures made of composites or lightweight metals. CIT is based on the registration of Compton-scattered X-rays, and permits the reconstruction of the full 3D (tomographic) image of the inspected objects. Unlike conventional computerized tomography (CT), CIT requires only single-sided access to objects, and therefore can be applied to large structures without their disassembly. The developed tool provides accurate detection, identification, and precise 3D localizations and measurements of any possible internal and surface defects (corrosions, cracks, voids, delaminations, porosity, and inclusions), and also disbonds, core and skin defects, and intrusion of foreign fluids (e.g., fresh and salt water, oil) inside of honeycomb sandwich structures. The NDE capabilities of the system were successfully demonstrated on various aerospace structure samples provided by several major aerospace companies. Such a CIT-based tool can detect and localize individual internal defects with dimensions about 1-2 mm3, and honeycomb disbond defects less than 6 mm by 6 mm area with the variations in the thickness of the adhesive by 100 m. Current maximum scanning speed of aircraft/spacecraft structures is about 5-8 min/ft2 (50-80 min/m2).

  4. Precise pattern replication of polymer blends into nonuniform geometries via reducing interfacial tension between two polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liang; Wei, Ming; Shang, Yingrui; Kazmer, David; Barry, Carol; Mead, Joey

    2012-07-10

    Patterned polymer structures with different functionalities have many potential applications. Directed assembly of polymer blends using chemically functionalized patterns during spin-coating has been used to fabricate the patterned polymer structures. For bridging the gap between laboratorial experiments and manufacturing of nanodevices, the polymer blends structures are required to be precisely patterned into nonuniform geometries in a high-rate process, which still is a challenge. In this Article, we demonstrated for the first time that by decreasing the interfacial tension between two polymers polystyrene and poly(acrylic acid) via adding a compatibilizer (polystyrene-b-poly(acrylic acid) ), a polystyrene/poly(acrylic acid) blend was precisely patterned into nonuniform geometries in a high-rate fashion. The patterned nonuniform geometries included angled lines with angles varied from 30° to 150°, T-junctions, square arrays, circle arrays, and arbitrary letter-shaped geometries. The reduction in the interfacial tension improved the line edge roughness and the patterning efficiency of the patterned polymer blends. In addition, the commensurability between characteristic length and pattern periodicity for well-ordered morphologies was also expanded with decreasing interfacial tension. This approach can be easily extended to other functional polymers in a blend and facilitate the applications of patterned polymer structures in biosensors, organic thin-film electronics, and polymer solar cells.

  5. Effects of non-uniform embedments on earthquake responses of nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Y.; Okamoto, S.; Yoshida, K.; Inove, H.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear reactor buildings have the portion embedded in soil. In the seismic design of such structures, it is essential to consider the effects of the embedment on the earthquake response. Most studies on these effects, however, assume the uniform embedment, i.e. the depth of the embedment is constant, which is convenient for the design and analysis. The behavior of the earthquake response considering the three-dimensional aspects of non-uniform embedment has not been made clear yet. In this paper, the authors evaluate the effects of the non-uniform embedment in an inclined ground surface on the earthquake response of a nuclear reactor building as illustrated. A typical PWR type reactor building is chosen as an analysis structure model. Four different types of embedment are set up for the comparison study. The three-dimensional analysis is carried out considering the geometry of embedment

  6. Preliminary experimental study on the electrical impedance analysis for in-situ monitoring of the curing of carbon/epoxy composite material for aeronautical and aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerès, Philippe; Camps, Thierry; Viargues, Mathieu; Olivier, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    This paper concerns the electrical characterization of T700/M21 unidirectional composite materials using sensors developed specifically for this study. It proposes a reliable and reproducible protocol for the characterization of the material during curing. Prior to the characterization, an analysis was carried out to assess the impact of parasitic access elements (resistance of the electrode/fibre interface or of the feed wire), which was reduced to a minimum by appropriate dimensioning of the electrodes. A study of the electrical conduction in relation to the direction of the fibres made it possible to establish a suitable approach to homogenized measurement of the material. Thermo-electric coupling by self-heating was also evaluated, with a view to obtaining measurements that were not influenced by this phenomenon. Finally, the use of electrical impedance spectral analysis allowed in-situ monitoring of the curing process. The results obtained are compared with those of a rheological analysis of the same material. These results highlight the value of the proposed protocol and demonstrate that, with the aid of these sensors, complete automation of the manufacturing process of composite structures is feasible (optimization of the cure cycle by real-time automatic control).

  7. Aerospace Medical Support in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleberry, Tara; Chamberlin, Blake; Cole, Richard; Dowell, Gene; Savage, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the role of the flight surgeon in support of aerospace medical support operations at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), also known as Star City, in Russia. The flight surgeon in this role is the medical advocate for non-russian astronauts, and also provides medical care for illness and injury for astronauts, family members, and guests as well as civil servants and contractors. The flight surgeon also provides support for hazardous training. There are various photos of the area, and the office, and some of the equipment that is used.

  8. Cybersecurity for aerospace autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    High profile breaches have occurred across numerous information systems. One area where attacks are particularly problematic is autonomous control systems. This paper considers the aerospace information system, focusing on elements that interact with autonomous control systems (e.g., onboard UAVs). It discusses the trust placed in the autonomous systems and supporting systems (e.g., navigational aids) and how this trust can be validated. Approaches to remotely detect the UAV compromise, without relying on the onboard software (on a potentially compromised system) as part of the process are discussed. How different levels of autonomy (task-based, goal-based, mission-based) impact this remote characterization is considered.

  9. Non-uniform sampling of NMR relaxation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz-Linnet, Troels; Teilum, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-uniform sampling of NMR spectra may give significant reductions in the data acquisition time. For quantitative experiments such as the measurement of spin relaxation rates, non-uniform sampling is however not widely used as inaccuracies in peak intensities may lead to errors...... of the multi-dimensional decomposition and iterative re-weighted least-squares algorithms in reconstructing spectra with accurate peak intensities. As long as a single fully sampled spectrum is included in a series of otherwise non-uniform sampled two-dimensional spectra, multi-dimensional decomposition...... in the extracted dynamic parameters. By systematic reducing the coverage of the Nyquist grid of (15)N Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion datasets for four different proteins and performing a full data analysis of the resulting non-uniform sampled datasets, we have compared the performance...

  10. Formation of vortex chains in a nonuniform magnetized electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Srinivas, J.; Murtaza, G.; Saleem, H.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that the equations governing the dynamics of weakly interacting medium-frequency electrostatic waves in a nonuniform magnetoplasma with a fixed ion background can have localized vortex chain solutions

  11. Pattern of diffusion-limited aggregation on nonuniform substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyang Wen Ze; Zou Xian Wu; Jin Zhun Zhi

    2003-01-01

    Pattern of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on nonuniform substrate was investigated by computer simulations. The nonuniform substrates are represented by Leath percolations with the probability p. p stands for the degree of nonuniformity and takes values in the range p sub c<=p<=1, where p sub c is the threshold of percolation. The DLA cluster grows up on the Leath percolation substrate. The patterns of the DLA clusters appear asymmetrical and nonuniform, and the branches are relative few for the case p is close to p sub c. In addition, the pattern depends on the shape of substrate. As p increases from p sub c to 1, cluster changes to pure DLA gradually. Correspondingly, the fractal dimension increases from 1.46 to 1.68. Also, the random walks on Leath percolations through the range p sub c<=p<=1 were examined. Our simulations show the Honda-Toyoki-Matsushita relation is still reasonable for fractional dimensional systems.

  12. Dielectrophoresis device and method having nonuniform arrays for manipulating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Eric B.; Fintschenko, Yolanda; Simmons, Blake A.

    2012-09-04

    Microfluidic devices according to embodiments of the present invention include an inlet port, an outlet port, and a channel or chamber having a non-uniform array of insulating features on one or more surfaces. Electrodes are provided for generation of a spatially non-uniform electric field across the array. A voltage source, which may be an A.C. and/or a D.C. voltage source may be coupled to the electrodes for the generation of the electric field.

  13. Compensation for nonuniform attenuation in SPECT brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glick, S.J.; King, M.A.; Pan, T.S.; Soares, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate compensation for photon attenuation is needed to perform quantitative brain single-photon-emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging. Bellini's attenuation-compensation method has been used with a nonuniform attenuation map to account for the nonuniform attenuation properties of the head. Simulation studies using a three-dimensional (3-D) digitized anthropomorphic brain phantom were conducted to compare quantitative accuracy of reconstructions obtained with the nonuniform Bellini method to that obtained with the Chang method and to iterative reconstruction using maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM). Using the Chang method and assuming the head to be a uniform attenuator gave reconstructions with an average bias of approximately 6-8%, whereas using the Bellini or the iterative ML-EM method with a nonuniform attenuation map gave an average bias of approximately 1%. The computation time required to implement nonuniform attenuation compensation with the Bellini algorithm is approximately equivalent to the time required to perform one iteration of ML-EM. Thus, using the Bellini method with a nonuniform attenuation map provides accurate compensation for photon attenuation within the head, and the method can be implemented in computation times suitable for routine clinical use

  14. 78 FR 72554 - Airworthiness Directives; Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... Aerospace Corporation Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation Model... General Electric (GE) Aviation service information identified in this AD, contact Gulfstream Aerospace...

  15. Communication for performance in aerospace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian Virgil BALUTA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines rules for employees in the aerospace field about general procedures, accounting, budgets, employees involvement in the companies goals as a team or as a group. The quality of all communications activities is presented in correlation with performance. For us, performance means economic and social references, stability and credibility of the business and, not least, a good communication within the existing groups or teams. We take in account long-term, medium and short performance for a new and modern field such as the aerospace industry. The paper highlights the group communication aspects, the process needed to optimize communication within a group, the team characteristics and mission, the team involvement versus group involvement, organization of the work team and defining/definition of roles in a team according to individual skills and some technics; to apply the Belbin test for determining the role of individuals within the team, for identifying the types of communication in order to get the information transmitted to the different types of individuals such as “analytical type”, “director type”, “friendly type”, “expressive type”, the needs and interest of these individuals, assessing how the information was received and the impact of the feedback.

  16. Integrated Manufacturing of Aerospace Components by Superplastic Forming Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Min Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace vehicle requires lightweight structures to obtain weight saving and fuel efficiency. It is known that superplastic characteristics of some materials provide significant opportunity for forming complicated, lightweight components of aerospace structure. One of the most important advantages of using superplastic forming process is its simplicity to form integral parts and economy in tooling[1]. For instance, it can be applied to blow-forming, in which a metal sheet is deformed due to the pressure difference of hydrostatic gas on both sides of the sheet. Since the loading medium is gas pressure difference, this forming is different from conventional sheet metal forming technique in that this is stress-controlled rather than strain and strain rate controlled. This method is especially advantageous when several sheet metals are formed into complex shapes. In this study, it is demonstrated that superplastic forming process with titanium and steel alloy can be applied to manufacturing lightweight integral structures of aerospace structural parts and rocket propulsion components. The result shows that the technology to design and develop the forming process of superplastic forming can be applied for near net shape forming of a complex contour of a thrust chamber and a toroidal fuel tank.

  17. The 42nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor); Hakun, Claef (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development, and flight certification of new mechanisms.

  18. Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Aerospace Medicine technical reports are available in full-text from the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute’s publications Web site: www.faa.gov/library...System in Space and Other Extreme Conditions. England – USA: Harwood Academic Publishers, 1991. Konstantinova IV, Petrov RV. Sistema Immuniteta v

  19. High Flight. Aerospace Activities, K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Following discussions of Oklahoma aerospace history and the history of flight, interdisciplinary aerospace activities are presented. Each activity includes title, concept fostered, purpose, list of materials needed, and procedure(s). Topics include planets, the solar system, rockets, airplanes, air travel, space exploration, principles of flight,…

  20. iSTEM: The Aerospace Engineering Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Lyn D.; King, Donna T.; Hudson, Peter; Dawes, Les

    2014-01-01

    The authors developed The Paper Plane Challenge as one of a three-part response to The Aerospace Engineering Challenge. The Aerospace Engineering Challenge was the second of three multi-part activities that they had developed with the teachers during the year. Their aim was to introduce students to the exciting world of engineering, where they…

  1. Wind Turbine Aerodynamics from an Aerospace Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Garrel, Arne; ten Pas, Sebastiaan; Venner, Cornelis H.; van Muijden, Jaap

    2018-01-01

    The current challenges in wind turbine aerodynamics simulations share a number of similarities with the challenges that the aerospace industry has faced in the past. Some of the current challenges in the aerospace aerodynamics community are also relevant for today’s wind turbine aerodynamics

  2. Nanocomposites as Advanced Materials for Aerospace Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George PELIN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymer nanocomposites, consisting of nanoparticles dispersed in polymer matrix, have gained interest due to the attractive properties of nanostructured fillers, as carbon nanotubes and layered silicates. Low volume additions (1- 5% of nanoparticles provide properties enhancements comparable to those achieved by conventional loadings (15- 40% of traditional fillers.Structural nanocomposites represent reinforcement structures based on carbon or glass fibers embedded into polymeric matrix modified with nanofillers.Structural composites are the most important application of nanaocomposites, in aerospace field, as, laminates and sandwich structures. Also, they can by used as anti-lightning, anti-radar protectors and paints. The paper presents the effects of sonic dispersion of carbon nanotubes and montmorrilonite on the mechanical, electrical, rheological and trybological properties of epoxy polymers and laminated composites, with carbon or glass fiber reinforcement, with nanoadditivated epoxy matrix. One significant observation is that nanoclay contents higher than 2% wt generate an increase of the resin viscosity, from 1500 to 50000- 100000 cP, making the matrix impossible to use in high performance composites.Also, carbon nanotubes provide the resin important electrical properties, passing from dielectric to semi- conductive class. These effects have also been observed for fiber reinforced composites.Contrarily to some opinions in literature, the results of carbon nanotubes or nanoclays addition on the mechanical characteristics of glass or carbon fiber composites seem to be rather low.

  3. High performance sealing - meeting nuclear and aerospace requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wensel, R.; Metcalfe, R.

    1994-11-01

    Although high performance sealing is required in many places, two industries lead all others in terms of their demand-nuclear and aerospace. The factors that govern the high reliability and integrity of seals, particularly elastomer seals, for both industries are discussed. Aerospace requirements include low structural weight and a broad range of conditions, from the cold vacuum of space to the hot, high pressures of rocket motors. It is shown, by example, how a seal can be made an integral part of a structure in order to improve performance, rather than using a conventional handbook design. Typical processes are then described for selection, specification and procurement of suitable elastomers, functional and accelerated performance testing, database development and service-life prediction. Methods for quality assurance of elastomer seals are summarized. Potentially catastrophic internal dejects are a particular problem for conventional non-destructive inspection techniques. A new method of elastodynamic testing for these is described. (author)

  4. Unified analytical threshold voltage model for non-uniformly doped dual metal gate fully depleted silicon-on-insulator MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rathnamala; Katti, Guruprasad; Havaldar, Dnyanesh S.; DasGupta, Nandita; DasGupta, Amitava

    2009-03-01

    The paper describes the unified analytical threshold voltage model for non-uniformly doped, dual metal gate (DMG) fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FDSOI) MOSFETs based on the solution of 2D Poisson's equation. 2D Poisson's equation is solved analytically for appropriate boundary conditions using separation of variables technique. The solution is then extended to obtain the threshold voltage of the FDSOI MOSFET. The model is able to handle any kind of non-uniform doping, viz. vertical, lateral as well as laterally asymetric channel (LAC) profile in the SOI film in addition to the DMG structure. The analytical results are validated with the numerical simulations using the device simulator MEDICI.

  5. Characterization of nonuniform chaos in area-preserving nonlinear maps through a continuous archetype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerbelli, S.; Giona, M.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical investigations conducted over a wealth of nonlinear area-preserving smooth maps (e.g. the Standard Map) showed that these systems possess physically relevant features that are not captured by any continuous archetype of two-dimensional conservative dynamics. Among these properties are the dispersive behavior of stretch factor statistics, the multifractal character of the measure associated with invariant foliations, the sign-alternating property, accounting for the nestedly bent structure of invariant foliations, and the strict inequality between the topological entropy, h top , and the Lyapunov exponent, Λ. We refer to systems possessing all of these properties as nonuniformly chaotic. In this article, we present a globally continuous, piecewise-smooth area-preserving transformation, the toral homeomorphism H, as an archetype of nonuniformly chaotic behavior. The relatively simple structure of point set dynamics and the closed-form knowledge of the pointwise expanding and contracting invariant directions associated with H, permits to derive either analytically, or with arbitrary numerical precision, the standard chaotic properties as well as the dynamics of the physically relevant properties that define nonuniform chaos. Potentialities and limitations of the model proposed in representing geometric and statistical properties of physically relevant smooth systems are discussed in detail

  6. Correcting circular non-uniform illumination of Sundanese lontar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, S.; Suryani, M.; Paulus, E.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the method for enhancing quality of degraded images which is essential for information automatic extraction from the digitized ancient manuscript known as lontar. The degraded lontar images have circular non-uniform illumination characteristics that are represented by more brightness on inner center of images and darker in the outer ellipse-like area of the images. The purpose of enhanced image processing is to leveling the distribution of pixels so the images have similar characteristics. The proposed method is developed based on DEWA Framework, a novel and optimized method for object detection, combined with background subtraction technique, which is implemented in several color spaces. Background images are estimated using morphological mathematics with specific type and size of structuring element. This estimation process has to be done due to the unavailability of exact background image captured during image acquisition step. Theoretical foundations of the proposed method along with experimental results are reported in this paper. The proposed method has been tested on 12 Sundanese lontar images which shows this approach is different and unique from most of the existing methods in this field of study. Experiment demonstrated the successful results of the method which is represented by displaying profile characteristics of each images on row 128.

  7. Non-uniform dose distributions in cranial radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Edward T.

    Radiation treatments are often delivered to patients with brain metastases. For those patients who receive radiation to the entire brain, there is a risk of long-term neuro-cognitive side effects, which may be due to damage to the hippocampus. In clinical MRI and CT scans it can be difficult to identify the hippocampus, but once identified it can be partially spared from radiation dose. Using deformable image registration we demonstrate a semi-automatic technique for obtaining an estimated location of this structure in a clinical MRI or CT scan. Deformable image registration is a useful tool in other areas such as adaptive radiotherapy, where the radiation oncology team monitors patients during the course of treatment and adjusts the radiation treatments if necessary when the patient anatomy changes. Deformable image registration is used in this setting, but there is a considerable level of uncertainty. This work represents one of many possible approaches at investigating the nature of these uncertainties utilizing consistency metrics. We will show that metrics such as the inverse consistency error correlate with actual registration uncertainties. Specifically relating to brain metastases, this work investigates where in the brain metastases are likely to form, and how the primary cancer site is related. We will show that the cerebellum is at high risk for metastases and that non-uniform dose distributions may be advantageous when delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small cell lung cancer in complete remission.

  8. Powered Flight The Engineering of Aerospace Propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Greatrix, David R

    2012-01-01

    Whilst most contemporary books in the aerospace propulsion field are dedicated primarily to gas turbine engines, there is often little or no coverage of other propulsion systems and devices such as propeller and helicopter rotors or detailed attention to rocket engines. By taking a wider viewpoint, Powered Flight - The Engineering of Aerospace Propulsion aims to provide a broader context, allowing observations and comparisons to be made across systems that are overlooked by focusing on a single aspect alone. The physics and history of aerospace propulsion are built on step-by-step, coupled with the development of an appreciation for the mathematics involved in the science and engineering of propulsion. Combining the author’s experience as a researcher, an industry professional and a lecturer in graduate and undergraduate aerospace engineering, Powered Flight - The Engineering of Aerospace Propulsion covers its subject matter both theoretically and with an awareness of the practicalities of the industry. To ...

  9. Magnesium MMC for Aerospace Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA will return to the IIS by 2014 and the moon by 2020. To accomplish these missions, NASA will exploit to the maximum degree possible the Apollo architecture and...

  10. Engineering Data on New Aerospace Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    TEMPERATURE Spec linen Energy, Number ft-lbs Lonp-itud inal 1OL-1 40 1OL-2 38 1OL-3 37 1OL-4 40 lOL-5 37 1OL-6 39 Average 38.5 Transverse 1OT-1 33 10T-2...electrically insulated from the fixture by means of glass or sapphire rods. Deflection for a given maximum fiber stress was calculated by the following...expression: y c (3 P’ ’-4a a Y -12 dE, where I y (deflection I c maximum fiber stress Sdistance between outer load points a distance between outer and

  11. Research on the operational reliability system control methodology and its application for aerospace mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Gao; Haoxin Wu; Mingtao Du; Gang Chen; Hanxu Sun; Qingxuan Jia; Yifan Wang

    2016-01-01

    According to the characteristics of space missions and space environment, to slow performance deterioration and possible reliability attenuation for aerospace mechanisms, an operational reliability system control methodology is proposed in this article. A space manipulator – a kind of typical complicated aerospace mechanism – is chosen as the research object. First, considering relevant materials and structure mechanism of joint and link parts, the influence factors of operational reliability...

  12. Energy Storage for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Hoberecht, Mark A.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Kohout, Lisa L.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has long been a major contributor to the development and application of energy storage technologies for NASAs missions and programs. NASA GRC has supported technology efforts for the advancement of batteries and fuel cells. The Electrochemistry Branch at NASA GRC continues to play a critical role in the development and application of energy storage technologies, in collaboration with other NASA centers, government agencies, industry and academia. This paper describes the work in batteries and fuel cell technologies at the NASA Glenn Research Center. It covers a number of systems required to ensure that NASAs needs for a wide variety of systems are met. Some of the topics covered are lithium-based batteries, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and nanotechnology activities. With the advances of the past years, we begin the 21st century with new technical challenges and opportunities as we develop enabling technologies for batteries and fuel cells for aerospace applications.

  13. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. On the Time Variation of Dust Extinction and Gas Absorption for Type Ia Supernovae Observed Through Non-uniform Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaosheng; Aldering, Gregory; Biederman, Moriah; Herger, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    For Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed through a non-uniform interstellar medium (ISM) in its host galaxy, we investigate whether the non-uniformity can cause observable time variations in dust extinction and in gas absorption due to the expansion of the SN photosphere with time. We show that, owing to the steep spectral index of the ISM density power spectrum, sizable density fluctuation amplitudes at the length scale of typical ISM structures (>~ 10 pc) will translate to much smaller fluctuations on the scales of a SN photosphere. Therefore the typical amplitude of time variation due to non-uniform ISM, of absorption equivalent widths and of extinction, would be small. As a result, we conclude that non-uniform ISM density should not impact cosmology measurements based on SNe Ia. We apply our predictions based on the ISM density power law power spectrum to the observations of two highly reddened SNe Ia, SN 2012cu and SN 2014J.

  15. Bridge density functional approximation for non-uniform hard core repulsive Yukawa fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shiqi

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a bridge density functional approximation (BDFA) (J. Chem. Phys. 112, 8079 (2000)) for a non-uniform hard-sphere fluid is extended to a non-uniform hard-core repulsive Yukawa (HCRY) fluid. It is found that the choice of a bulk bridge functional approximation is crucial for both a uniform HCRY fluid and a non-uniform HCRY fluid. A new bridge functional approximation is proposed, which can accurately predict the radial distribution function of the bulk HCRY fluid. With the new bridge functional approximation and its associated bulk second order direct correlation function as input, the BDFA can be used to well calculate the density profile of the HCRY fluid subjected to the influence of varying external fields, and the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the corresponding simulation data. The calculated results indicate that the present BDFA captures quantitatively the phenomena such as the coexistence of solid-like high density phase and low density gas phase, and the adsorption properties of the HCRY fluid, which qualitatively differ from those of the fluids combining both hard-core repulsion and an attractive tail. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  16. Characterization and Processing of Non-Uniformities in Back-Illuminated CCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemm, Alia D.; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Maddocks, Sally

    2018-01-01

    In astronomical photometry, Charged Coupled Device (CCD) detectors are used to achieve high precision photometry and must be properly calibrated to correct for noise and pixel non-uniformities. Uncalibrated images may contain bias offset, dark current, bias structure and uneven illumination. In addition, standard data reduction is often not sufficient to “normalize” imagery to single-digit millimagnitude (mmag) precision. We are investigating an apparent non-uniformity, or interference pattern, in a back-illuminated sensor, the Alta U-47, attached to a DFM Engineering 41-cm Ritchey-Chrétien f/8 telescope. Based on the amplitude of this effect, we estimate that instrument magnitude peak-to-valley deviations of 50 mmag or more may result. Our initial testing strongly suggests that reflected skylight from high pressure sodium city lights may be the cause of this interference pattern. Our research goals are twofold: to fully characterize this non-uniformity and to determine the best method to remove this interference pattern from our reduced CCD images.

  17. Enceladus's crust as a non-uniform thin shell: I tidal deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuthe, Mikael

    2018-03-01

    The geologic activity at Enceladus's south pole remains unexplained, though tidal deformations are probably the ultimate cause. Recent gravity and libration data indicate that Enceladus's icy crust floats on a global ocean, is rather thin, and has a strongly non-uniform thickness. Tidal effects are enhanced by crustal thinning at the south pole, so that realistic models of tidal tectonics and dissipation should take into account the lateral variations of shell structure. I construct here the theory of non-uniform viscoelastic thin shells, allowing for depth-dependent rheology and large lateral variations of shell thickness and rheology. Coupling to tides yields two 2D linear partial differential equations of the fourth order on the sphere which take into account self-gravity, density stratification below the shell, and core viscoelasticity. If the shell is laterally uniform, the solution agrees with analytical formulas for tidal Love numbers; errors on displacements and stresses are less than 5% and 15%, respectively, if the thickness is less than 10% of the radius. If the shell is non-uniform, the tidal thin shell equations are solved as a system of coupled linear equations in a spherical harmonic basis. Compared to finite element models, thin shell predictions are similar for the deformations due to Enceladus's pressurized ocean, but differ for the tides of Ganymede. If Enceladus's shell is conductive with isostatic thickness variations, surface stresses are approximately inversely proportional to the local shell thickness. The radial tide is only moderately enhanced at the south pole. The combination of crustal thinning and convection below the poles can amplify south polar stresses by a factor of 10, but it cannot explain the apparent time lag between the maximum plume brightness and the opening of tiger stripes. In a second paper, I will study the impact of a non-uniform crust on tidal dissipation.

  18. Graphene-magnesium nanocomposite: An advanced material for aerospace application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D. K.; Sarkar, Jit

    2018-02-01

    This work focuses on the analytical study of mechanical and thermal properties of a nanocomposite that can be obtained by reinforcing graphene in magnesium. The estimated mechanical and thermal properties of graphene-magnesium nanocomposite are much higher than magnesium and other existing alloys used in aerospace materials. We also altered the weight percentage of graphene in the composite and observed mechanical and thermal properties of the composite increase with increase in concentration of graphene reinforcement. The Young’s modulus and thermal conductivity of graphene-magnesium nanocomposite are found to be ≥165 GPa and ≥175 W/mK, respectively. Nanocomposite material with desired properties for targeted applications can also be designed by our analytical modeling technique. This graphene-magnesium nanocomposite can be used for designing improved aerospace structure systems with enhanced properties.

  19. PREFACE: Trends in Aerospace Manufacturing 2009 International Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Keith; Gault, Rosemary; Allen, Adrian

    2011-12-01

    The aerospace industry is rapidly changing. New aircraft structures are being developed and aero-engines are becoming lighter and more environmentally friendly. In both areas, innovative materials and manufacturing methods are used in an attempt to get maximum performance for minimum cost. At the same time, the structure of the industry has changed and there has been a move from large companies designing, manufacturing components and assembling aircraft to one of large global supply chains headed by large system integrators. All these changes have forced engineers and managers to bring in innovations in design, materials, manufacturing technologies and supply chain management. In September 2009, the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) at the University of Sheffield held the inaugural Trends in Aerospace Manufacturing conference (TRAM09). This brought together 28 speakers over two days, who presented in sessions on advanced manufacturing trends for the aerospace sector. Areas covered included new materials, including composites, advanced machining, state of the art additive manufacturing techniques, assembly and supply chain issues.

  20. Titanium alloys Russian aircraft and aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseyev, Valentin N

    2005-01-01

    This text offers previously elusive information on state-of-the-art Russian metallurgic technology of titanium alloys. It details their physical, mechanical, and technological properties, as well as treatments and applications in various branches of modern industry, particularly aircraft and aerospace construction. Titanium Alloys: Russian Aircraft and Aerospace Applications addresses all facets of titanium alloys in aerospace and aviation technology, including specific applications, fundamentals, composition, and properties of commercial alloys. It is useful for all students and researchers interested in the investigation and applications of titanium.

  1. The reliability of multistory buildings with the effect of non-uniform settlements of foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'Malul, Rafik; Gadzhuntsev, Michail

    2018-03-01

    The issue is the evaluation of reliability of construction considering the influence of the variation of the support settlement, which is changing during the lifetime of constructions due to the consolidation process of the ground. Recently, the specialists give special emphasis to the necessity to develop the methods for the estimation of reliability and durability of structures. The problem, the article considers, is the determination of the reliability of multistory buildings with non-uniform changing-in-time sediments caused by the consolidation process in soils. Failure of structures may occur before the draft reaches it`s stabilizing value, because of the violations of the conditions of normal use.

  2. Resonant-state expansion of light propagation in nonuniform waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, S. V.; Zoriniants, G.; Langbein, W.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    A rigorous approach for precise and efficient calculation of light propagation along nonuniform waveguides is presented. Resonant states of a uniform waveguide, which satisfy outgoing-wave boundary conditions, form a natural basis for expansion of the local electromagnetic field. Using such an expansion at fixed frequency, we convert the wave equation for light propagation in a nonuniform waveguide into an ordinary second-order matrix differential equation for the expansion coefficients depending on the coordinate along the waveguide. We illustrate the method on several examples of nonuniform planar waveguides and evaluate its efficiency compared to the aperiodic Fourier modal method and the finite element method, showing improvements of one to four orders of magnitude. A similar improvement can be expected also for applications in other fields of physics showing wave phenomena, such as acoustics and quantum mechanics.

  3. Iterative and noniterative nonuniform quantisation techniques in digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, Alison E.; Naughton, Thomas J.; Javidi, Bahram

    2006-04-01

    Compression is essential for efficient storage and transmission of three-dimensional (3D) digital holograms. The inherent speckle content in holographic data causes lossless compression techniques, such as Huffman and Burrows-Wheeler (BW), to perform poorly. Therefore, the combination of lossy quantisation followed by lossless compression is essential for effective compression of digital holograms. Our complex-valued digital holograms of 3D real-world objects were captured using phase-shift interferometry (PSI). Quantisation reduces the number of different real and imaginary values required to describe each hologram. Traditional data compression techniques can then be applied to the hologram to actually reduce its size. Since our data has a nonuniform distribution, the uniform quantisation technique does not perform optimally. We require nonuniform quantisation, since in a histogram representation our data is denser around the origin (low amplitudes), thus requiring more cluster centres, and sparser away from the origin (high amplitudes). By nonuniformly positioning the cluster centres to match the fact that there is a higher probability that the pixel will have a low amplitude value, the cluster centres can be used more efficiently. Nonuniform quantisation results in cluster centres that are adapted to the exact statistics of the input data. We analyse a number of iterative (k-means clustering, Kohonen competitive neural network, SOM, and annealed Hopfield neural network), and non-iterative (companding, histogram, and optimal) nonuniform quantisation techniques. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each technique and highlight important factors that must be considered when choosing between iterative and non-iterative nonuniform quantisation. We measure the degradation due to lossy quantisation in the reconstruction domain, using the normalised rms (NRMS) metric.

  4. Microwave interaction with nonuniform hydrogen gas in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei, S.; Babaei, Sh.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the reflection, absorption, and transmission of microwave from nonuniform hydrogen gas in carbon nanotubes, grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure carbon monoxide disproportionate (HiPco) process. A discussion on the effect of various hydrogen gas parameters on the reflected power, absorbed power, and transmitted power is presented. The nonuniform hydrogen gas slab is modeled by a series of subslabs. The overall number density profile across the whole slab follows a parabolic function. The total reflected, absorbed, and transmitted powers are then deduced and their functional dependence on the number density, collision frequency, and angle of propagation is studied

  5. Unification: An international aerospace information opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.; Carroll, Bonnie C.

    1992-01-01

    Science and technology projects are becoming more and more international and interdisciplinary. Other parts of the world, notably Europe, are increasingly powerful players in the aerospace industry. This change has led to the development of various aerospace information initiatives in other countries. With scarce resources in all areas of government and industry, the NASA STI Program is reviewing its current acquisition and exchange practices and policies to factor in the changing requirements and new opportunities within the international community. Current NASA goals and activities are reviewed with a new view toward developing a scenario for establishing an international aerospace database, maintaining compatibility among national aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

  6. Unification - An international aerospace information opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Science and technology projects are becoming more and more international and interdisciplinary. Other parts of the world, notably Europe, are increasingly powerful players in the aerospace industry. This change has led to the development of various aerospace information initiatives in other countries. With scarce resources in all areas of government and industry, the NASA STI Program is reviewing its current acquisition and exchange practices and policies to factor in the changing requirements and new opportunities within the international community. Current NASA goals and activities are reviewed with a new view toward developing a scenario for establishing an international aerospace database, maintaining compatibility among national aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

  7. Aerospace Grade Carbon Felt Preform, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fiber Materials, Inc. (FMI) will develop an aerospace-grade carbon felt preform by employing application specific materials with effective processes and fabrication...

  8. Nanomaterials: Opportunities and Challenges for Aerospace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obieta, Isabel; Marcos, J

    2005-01-01

    Nanomaterials are regarded world-wide as key materials of the 21st Century. Also, in aerospace a high potential for nanomaterials applications is postulated and technological breakthroughs are expected in this area...

  9. Unification: An international aerospace information issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.

    1991-01-01

    Science and technology projects are becoming more and more international and interdisciplinary. Other parts of the world, notably Europe, are increasingly powerful players in the aerospace business. This change has led to the development of various aerospace information initiatives in other countries. With scarce resources in all areas of government and industry, the NASA STI Program is reviewing its current acquisition and exchange practices and policies to factor in the changing requirements and new opportunities within the international community. Current NASA goals and activities are reviewed with a view toward developing a scenario for establishing an international aerospace data base, maintaining compatibility among national aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

  10. 2011 aerospace medical certification statistical handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The annual Aerospace Medical Certification Statistical Handbook reports descriptive characteristics of all active U.S. civil aviation airmen and the aviation medical examiners (AMEs) that perform the required medical examinations. The 2011 annual han...

  11. 2012 aerospace medical certification statistical handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The annual Aerospace Medical Certification Statistical Handbook reports descriptive : characteristics of all active U.S. civil aviation airmen and the aviation medical examiners (AMEs) that : perform the required medical examinations. The 2012 annual...

  12. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  13. Crew factors in the aerospace workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Foushee, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of technological change in the aerospace workplace on pilot performance are discussed. Attention is given to individual and physiological problems, crew and interpersonal problems, environmental and task problems, organization and management problems, training and intervention problems. A philosophy and conceptual framework for conducting research on these problems are presented and two aerospace studies are examined which investigated: (1) the effect of leader personality on crew effectiveness and (2) the working undersea habitat known as Aquarius.

  14. Novel Wiring Technologies for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    Because wire failure in aerospace vehicles could be catastrophic, smart wiring capabilities have been critical for NASA. Through the years, researchers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have developed technologies, expertise, and research facilities to meet this need. In addition to aerospace applications, NASA has applied its knowledge of smart wiring, including self-healing materials, to serve the aviation industry. This webinar will discuss the development efforts of several wiring technologies at KSC and provide insight into both current and future research objectives.

  15. Intelligent Systems Applied to the Aerospace Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sary, Charisse; Werking, Roger

    1997-01-01

    For years, the aerospace industry has relied on people and their knowledge to make critical decisions. This method of decision-making has become very expensive and unreliable, particularly when used to monitor increasingly complex systems. Intelligent systems and tools are now available that can be used to reduce costs and improve operations. Much work has been done in the area of intelligent systems to support aerospace-related activities. Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) has conducted st...

  16. Protons, Aerospace, and Electronics: A National Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Turflinger, Thomas L.

    2018-01-01

    The aerospace and semiconductor industries lost approximately 2000 hours annually of research access when IUCF closed. An ad hoc team between the U.S. government and industry was formed to evaluate other facility options. In this presentation, we will discuss: 1) Why aerospace, semiconductor manufacturers, and others are interested in proton facility access, as well as, 2) Some of the basics of a typical tests for electronics, and 3) We'll conclude with the brief current status on progress.

  17. Operational Software Maturity: An Aerospace Industry Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl González Muñoz; Essam Shehab; Martin Weinitzke; Chris Fowler; Paul Baguley

    2017-01-01

    Software applications have become crucial to the aerospace industry, providing a wide range of functionalities and capabilities used during the design, manufacturing and support of aircraft. However, as this criticality increases, so too does the risk for business operations when facing a software failure. Hence, there is a need for new methodologies to be developed to support aerospace companies in effectively managing their software portfolios, avoiding the hazards of business disruption an...

  18. Optimal control with aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    Longuski, James M; Prussing, John E

    2014-01-01

    Want to know not just what makes rockets go up but how to do it optimally? Optimal control theory has become such an important field in aerospace engineering that no graduate student or practicing engineer can afford to be without a working knowledge of it. This is the first book that begins from scratch to teach the reader the basic principles of the calculus of variations, develop the necessary conditions step-by-step, and introduce the elementary computational techniques of optimal control. This book, with problems and an online solution manual, provides the graduate-level reader with enough introductory knowledge so that he or she can not only read the literature and study the next level textbook but can also apply the theory to find optimal solutions in practice. No more is needed than the usual background of an undergraduate engineering, science, or mathematics program: namely calculus, differential equations, and numerical integration. Although finding optimal solutions for these problems is a...

  19. Aerospace Technology Innovation. Volume 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Janelle (Editor); Cousins, Liz (Editor); Bennett, Evonne (Editor); Vendette, Joel (Editor); West, Kenyon (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    Whether finding new applications for existing NASA technologies or developing unique marketing strategies to demonstrate them, NASA's offices are committed to identifying unique partnering opportunities. Through their efforts NASA leverages resources through joint research and development, and gains new insight into the core areas relevant to all NASA field centers. One of the most satisfying aspects of my job comes when I learn of a mission-driven technology that can be spun-off to touch the lives of everyday people. NASA's New Partnerships in Medical Diagnostic Imaging is one such initiative. Not only does it promise to provide greater dividends for the country's investment in aerospace research, but also to enhance the American quality of life. This issue of Innovation highlights the new NASA-sponsored initiative in medical imaging. Early in 2001, NASA announced the launch of the New Partnerships in Medical Diagnostic Imaging initiative to promote the partnership and commercialization of NASA technologies in the medical imaging industry. NASA and the medical imaging industry share a number of crosscutting technologies in areas such as high-performance detectors and image-processing tools. Many of the opportunities for joint development and technology transfer to the medical imaging market also hold the promise for future spin back to NASA.

  20. Resource Management and Contingencies in Aerospace Concurrent Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpati, Gabe; Hyde, Tupper; Peabody, Hume; Garrison, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    significant concern in designing complex systems implementing new technologies is that while knowledge about the system is acquired incrementally, substantial financial commitments, even make-or-break decisions, must be made upfront, essentially in the unknown. One practice that helps in dealing with this dichotomy is the smart embedding of contingencies and margins in the design to serve as buffers against surprises. This issue presents itself in full force in the aerospace industry, where unprecedented systems are formulated and committed to as a matter of routine. As more and more aerospace mission concepts are generated by concurrent design laboratories, it is imperative that such laboratories apply well thought-out contingency and margin structures to their designs. The first part of this publication provides an overview of resource management techniques and standards used in the aerospace industry. That is followed by a thought provoking treatise on margin policies. The expose presents the actual flight telemetry data recorded by the thermal discipline during several recent NASA Goddard Space Flight Center missions. The margins actually achieved in flight are compared against pre-flight predictions, and the appropriateness and the ramifications of having designed with rigid margins to bounding stacked worst case conditions are assessed. The second half of the paper examines the particular issues associated with the application of contingencies and margins in the concurrent engineering environment. In closure, a discipline-by-discipline disclosure of the contingency and margin policies in use at the Integrated Design Center at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center is made.

  1. Shape Preserving Interpolatory Subdivision Schemes for Nonuniform Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijt, F.; van Damme, Rudolf M.J.

    2002-01-01

    This article is concerned with a class of shape preserving four-point subdivision schemes which are stationary and which interpolate nonuniform univariate data {(xi, fi)}. These data are functional data, i.e., xi≠xj if i≠j. Subdivision for the strictly monotone x-values is performed by a subdivision

  2. Capacitated Vehicle Routing with Non-Uniform Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li; Molinaro, Marco; Nagarajan, Viswanath

    2011-01-01

    The capacitated vehicle routing problem (CVRP) [21] involves distributing (identical) items from a depot to a set of demand locations in the shortest possible time, using a single capacitated vehicle. We study a generalization of this problem to the setting of multiple vehicles having non-uniform...

  3. Field nonuniformity correction for quantitative analysis of digitized mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2001-01-01

    Several factors, including the heel effect, variation in distance from the x-ray source to points in the image and path obliquity contribute to the signal nonuniformity of mammograms. To best use digitized mammograms for quantitative image analysis, these field non-uniformities must be corrected. An empirically based correction method, which uses a bowl-shaped calibration phantom, has been developed. Due to the annular spherical shape of the phantom, its attenuation is constant over the entire image. Remaining nonuniformities are due only to the heel and inverse square effects as well as the variable path through the beam filter, compression plate and image receptor. In logarithmic space, a normalized image of the phantom can be added to mammograms to correct for these effects. Then, an analytical correction for path obliquity in the breast can be applied to the images. It was found that the correction causes the errors associated with field nonuniformity to be reduced from 14% to 2% for a 4 cm block of material corresponding to a combination of 50% fibroglandular and 50% fatty breast tissue. A repeatability study has been conducted to show that in regions as far as 20 cm away from the chest wall, variations due to imaging conditions and phantom alignment contribute to <2% of overall corrected signal

  4. Josephson flux-flow oscillators in nonuniform microwave fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salerno, Mario; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    2000-01-01

    We present a simple theory for Josephson flux-flow oscillators in the presence of nonuniform microwave fields. In particular we derive an analytical expression for the I-V characteristic of the oscillator from which we show that satellite steps are spaced around the main flux-flow resonance by only...

  5. Prediction of bed level variations in nonuniform sediment bed channel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B R Andharia

    2018-04-12

    Apr 12, 2018 ... have been undertaken for measurements of bed and water levels in an aggrading channel due to overloading of nonuniform sediments ..... 2.4 Thickness of active bed layer. The mixing zone of sediment remaining in contact with the flow is referred as active layer (ABL). The thickness and particle size ...

  6. Absolute parametric instability in a nonuniform plane plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The paper reports an analysis of the effect of spatial plasma nonuniformity on absolute parametric instability (API) of electrostatic waves in magnetized plane waveguides subjected to an intense high-frequency (HF) electric field using the separation method. In this case the effect of strong static magnetic field is considered.

  7. Absolute parametric instability in a nonuniform plane plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The paper reports an analysis of the effect of spatial plasma nonuniformity on absolute parametric instability (API) of electrostatic waves in magnetized plane waveguides subjected to an intense high-frequency (HF) electric field using the separation method. In this case the effect of strong static magnetic field is ...

  8. Instruction sequences and non-uniform complexity theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    We develop theory concerning non-uniform complexity in a setting in which the notion of single-pass instruction sequence considered in program algebra is the central notion. We define counterparts of the complexity classes P/poly and NP/poly and formulate a counterpart of the complexity theoretic

  9. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 35: The use of computer networks in aerospace engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Ann P.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    This research used survey research to explore and describe the use of computer networks by aerospace engineers. The study population included 2000 randomly selected U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who subscribed to Aerospace Engineering. A total of 950 usable questionnaires were received by the cutoff date of July 1994. Study results contribute to existing knowledge about both computer network use and the nature of engineering work and communication. We found that 74 percent of mail survey respondents personally used computer networks. Electronic mail, file transfer, and remote login were the most widely used applications. Networks were used less often than face-to-face interactions in performing work tasks, but about equally with reading and telephone conversations, and more often than mail or fax. Network use was associated with a range of technical, organizational, and personal factors: lack of compatibility across systems, cost, inadequate access and training, and unwillingness to embrace new technologies and modes of work appear to discourage network use. The greatest positive impacts from networking appear to be increases in the amount of accurate and timely information available, better exchange of ideas across organizational boundaries, and enhanced work flexibility, efficiency, and quality. Involvement with classified or proprietary data and type of organizational structure did not distinguish network users from nonusers. The findings can be used by people involved in the design and implementation of networks in engineering communities to inform the development of more effective networking systems, services, and policies.

  10. Mobile Computing for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alena, Richard; Swietek, Gregory E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The use of commercial computer technology in specific aerospace mission applications can reduce the cost and project cycle time required for the development of special-purpose computer systems. Additionally, the pace of technological innovation in the commercial market has made new computer capabilities available for demonstrations and flight tests. Three areas of research and development being explored by the Portable Computer Technology Project at NASA Ames Research Center are the application of commercial client/server network computing solutions to crew support and payload operations, the analysis of requirements for portable computing devices, and testing of wireless data communication links as extensions to the wired network. This paper will present computer architectural solutions to portable workstation design including the use of standard interfaces, advanced flat-panel displays and network configurations incorporating both wired and wireless transmission media. It will describe the design tradeoffs used in selecting high-performance processors and memories, interfaces for communication and peripheral control, and high resolution displays. The packaging issues for safe and reliable operation aboard spacecraft and aircraft are presented. The current status of wireless data links for portable computers is discussed from a system design perspective. An end-to-end data flow model for payload science operations from the experiment flight rack to the principal investigator is analyzed using capabilities provided by the new generation of computer products. A future flight experiment on-board the Russian MIR space station will be described in detail including system configuration and function, the characteristics of the spacecraft operating environment, the flight qualification measures needed for safety review, and the specifications of the computing devices to be used in the experiment. The software architecture chosen shall be presented. An analysis of the

  11. Non-uniform dispersion of toughening agents and its influence on the mechanical properties of polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Fu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To achieve excellent properties of polymer blends and composites, good dispersion and uniform distribution of second component or filler in the matrix are often required. However, more and more evidences reveal that uniform distribution is not always the best. To further prove this idea, in this work, we purposely designed and prepared different samples of isotactic polypropylene (iPP/elastomer or iPP/β-nucleating agent with uniform and non-uniform distribution of the modifiers via stacking the blending sheets in different sequence. It was found that for a given amount of toughening agent, the impact strength of polymer blends with non-uniform distribution of elastomer or β-nucleating agent could be much higher than its uniformly dispersed counterpart, while the tensile strength and tensile modulus remain relatively constant. The instrumented impact test confirmed that among the samples with different layered structures, the absorbed energy during crack initiation differs little from each other. Whereas absorbed energy during crack propagation process shows the same trend as final impact strength, making it the controlling parameter during the impact process. When cracks are initiated at higher toughening agents content side, the relatively smooth fracture surfaces near the crack edge area proved that they absorb small energy and the adjacent inner part showed obviously plastic deformation, corresponding to higher energy absorption. Our work demonstrates again that design and control of the hierarchical structure of polymer articles is vital for high performance properties and non-uniform distribution of filler could be much better than the uniform distribution.

  12. 19 January 2011 - British University of Manchester, Vice-President and Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences Professor of Structural Engineering School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering C. Bailey in CERN Control Centre with Department Head P. Collier; at LHCb with R. Lindner and ATLAS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton, througout accompanied by . Collier with R. Appleby and F. Loebinger

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    19 January 2011 - British University of Manchester, Vice-President and Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences Professor of Structural Engineering School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering C. Bailey in CERN Control Centre with Department Head P. Collier; at LHCb with R. Lindner and ATLAS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton, througout accompanied by . Collier with R. Appleby and F. Loebinger

  13. Recent developments in graphite. [Use in HTGR and aerospace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications.

  14. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  15. NSWC Crane Aerospace Cell Test History Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Harry; Moore, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    The Aerospace Cell Test History Database was developed to provide project engineers and scientists ready access to the data obtained from testing of aerospace cell designs at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division. The database is intended for use by all aerospace engineers and scientists involved in the design of power systems for satellites. Specifically, the database will provide a tool for project engineers to review the progress of their test at Crane and to have ready access to data for evaluation. Additionally, the database will provide a history of test results that designers can draw upon to answer questions about cell performance under certain test conditions and aid in selection of a cell for a satellite battery. Viewgraphs are included.

  16. The comprehensive aerospace index (CASI): Tracking the economic performance of the aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattedi, Adriana Prest; Mantegna, Rosario Nunzio; Ramos, Fernando Manuel; Rosa, Reinaldo Roberto

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we described the Comprehensive AeroSpace Index (CASI), a financial index aimed at representing the economic performance of the aerospace industry. CASI is build upon a data set of approximately 20 years of daily close prices set, from January 1987 to June 2007, from a comprehensive sample of leading aerospace-related companies with stocks negotiated on the New York Exchange (NYSE) and on the over-the-counter (OTC) markets. We also introduced the sub-indices CASI-AERO, for aeronautical segment, and CASI-SAT, for satellite segment, and considered the relation between them. These three indices are compared to others aerospace indices and to more traditional general financial indices like DJIA, S&P500 and Nasdaq. Our results have shown that the CASI is an index that describes very well the aerospace sector behavior, since it is able to reflect the aeronautical segment comportment as well as the satellite one. Therefore, in this sense, it can be considered as a representative index of the aerospace sector. Moreover, the creation of two sub-indices, the CASI-AERO and the CASI-SAT, allows to elucidate capital movements within the aerospace sector, particularly those of speculative nature, like the dot.com bubble and crash of 1998-2001.

  17. Dual-electrode CMUT with non-uniform membranes for high electromechanical coupling coefficient and high bandwidth operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldiken, Rasim O; Zahorian, Jaime; Yamaner, F Y; Degertekin, F Levent

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we report measurement results on dual-electrode CMUT demonstrating electromechanical coupling coefficient (k(2)) of 0.82 at 90% of collapse voltage as well as 136% 3 dB one-way fractional bandwidth at the transducer surface around the design frequency of 8 MHz. These results are within 5% of the predictions of the finite element simulations. The large bandwidth is achieved mainly by utilizing a non-uniform membrane, introducing center mass to the design, whereas the dual-electrode structure provides high coupling coefficient in a large dc bias range without collapsing the membrane. In addition, the non-uniform membrane structure improves the transmit sensitivity of the dual-electrode CMUT by about 2dB as compared with a dual electrode CMUT with uniform membrane.

  18. Parametric instability of a nonuniform plasma near a linear focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipenko, V.I.; Budnikov, V.N.; Gusakov, E.Z.; Romanchuk, I.A.; Simonchik, L.V.

    1985-02-01

    Parametric instability l ..-->.. l'+s resulting in anomalous reflection of oblique Langmuir waves in a two-dimensionally nonuniform plasma is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experimental results confirm the theoretical prediction that for low input powers, the instability consists in the spatial amplification of ion-sound noise. The scattered signal is found to rise abruptly for spatial gains s> or approx. =10/sup 4/ because the threshold for absolute instability l ..-->.. l'+s is approached. The absolute instability saturates due to depletion of the pump wave, which is almost completely reflected. A mechanism for the generation of cascade parametric turbulence spectra is identified which is specific to nonuniform plasmas.

  19. Magnetostatic interactions in cylindrical nanostructures with non-uniform magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, O.J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Perez, L.M. [Departamento de Fisica y Matematica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona (Spain); Laroze, D., E-mail: david.laroze@gmail.com [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D 55021 Mainz (Germany); Instituto de Alta Investigacion, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile); Altbir, D. [Departamento de Fisica and Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-15

    Cylindrical magnetic nanostructures, like nanowires or nanotubes, should be used for the new generation of magnetic devices. Therefore, the investigation of inter-element interaction is an intense area of research. In this paper we investigated cylindrical nanostructures with non-uniform magnetization field. We focus on particles with a periodic magnetization function and using Fourier series we reduced the problem to a single integral expression. Analytical expressions for both, the self and the interaction magnetostatic energy, are given. These expressions are used to analyze multisegmented tubes, as a function of the number of segments and the distance between particles. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic cylindrical nanoparticles like nanowires or nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetostatic interaction between particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-uniform magnetization states.

  20. Measurement of reactivity effect caused by nonuniform fuel distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Yasushi; Yasui, Hazime; Nishina, Kojiro; Shiroya, Seiji

    1991-01-01

    A reactivity effect due to a spatial variation of nuclear fuel concentration is an important problem in a reprocessing plant. To estimate this reactivity effect theoretically, the ''Goertzel's necessary condition, and th Fuel Importance'' theory have been proposed. In order to verify these theories, we have performed systematic measurements of reactivity effect due to the nonuniformity in the fuel distribution within the Kyoto University Critical Assembly. Neutron flux distribution and Fuel Importance distribution were also determined. A nonuniform assembly whose fuel concentration in the center region was 40% higher than the uniform one was found to have an excess reactivity of 0.3%Δk/k, with the same total uranium mass for which the uniform assembly was just critical. Moreover, its spatial distribution of thermal neutron flux and of Fuel Importance were more flat than those of the uniform assembly, as expected by the Goertzel's condition and the Fuel Importance theory. (Author)

  1. Object tracking under nonuniform illumination with adaptive correlation filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picos, Kenia; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.; Kober, Vitaly

    2013-09-01

    A real-time system for illumination-invariant object tracking is proposed. The system is able to estimate at high-rate the position of a moving target in an input scene when is corrupted by the presence of a high cluttering background and nonuniform illumination. The position of the target is estimated with the help of a filter bank of space-variant correlation filters. The filters in the bank, adapt their parameters according to the local statistical parameters of the observed scene in a small region centered at coordinates of a predicted position for the target in each frame. The prediction is carried out by exploiting information of present and past frames, and by using a dynamic motion model of the target in a two-dimensional plane. Computer simulation results obtained with the proposed system are presented and discussed in terms of tracking accuracy, computational complexity, and tolerance to nonuniform illumination.

  2. Review: laser ignition for aerospace propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. O’Briant

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to provide the reader an overview of advanced ignition methods, with an emphasis on laser ignition and its applications to aerospace propulsion. A comprehensive review of advanced ignition systems in aerospace applications is performed. This includes studies on gas turbine applications, ramjet and scramjet systems, and space and rocket applications. A brief overview of ignition and laser ignition phenomena is also provided in earlier sections of the report. Throughout the reading, research papers, which were presented at the 2nd Laser Ignition Conference in April 2014, are mentioned to indicate the vast array of projects that are currently being pursued.

  3. MEMS for automotive and aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, Michael

    2013-01-01

    MEMS for automotive and aerospace applications reviews the use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) in developing solutions to the unique challenges presented by the automotive and aerospace industries.Part one explores MEMS for a variety of automotive applications. The role of MEMS in passenger safety and comfort, sensors for automotive vehicle stability control applications and automotive tire pressure monitoring systems are considered, along with pressure and flow sensors for engine management, and RF MEMS for automotive radar sensors. Part two then goes on to explore MEMS for

  4. Fast Scene Based Nonuniformity Correction with Minimal Temporal Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    period of time. For example, the “Zenith camera” referenced in Elkins et al. can process 16 frames at a speed of 100 million frames per second (Mfps...derived to use whole shifts in - 42 - order to optimize for speed . The error introduced by uncertainty in the shifts is highly dependant on the...Sons, Inc. 1985. 3. Hayat, Majeed M; Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo , J. Scott; Agi, Kamil. “Generalized Algebraic Scene-based Nonuniformity Correction

  5. Using Nonuniform Fiber to Generate Slow Light via SBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhai Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The data pulse delay based on slow light induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS in a nonuniform dispersion decreasing fiber (DDF is demonstrated experimentally, and the distortions of data pulses at different beat frequencies are studied. We found that a delay exceeding a pulse width can be achieved at particular beat frequency, and the DDF has larger delay versus gain slope coefficient with much better output pulse quality than single-mode fiber.

  6. The gauge theory of dislocations: A nonuniformly moving screw dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazar, Markus, E-mail: lazar@fkp.tu-darmstadt.d [Emmy Noether Research Group, Department of Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Hochschulstr. 6, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-07-05

    We investigate the nonuniform motion of a straight screw dislocation in infinite media in the framework of the translational gauge theory of dislocations. The equations of motion are derived for an arbitrarily moving screw dislocation. The fields of the elastic velocity, elastic distortion, dislocation density and dislocation current surrounding the arbitrarily moving screw dislocation are derived explicitly in the form of integral representations. We calculate the radiation fields and the fields depending on the dislocation velocities.

  7. Linear-array systems for aerospace NDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert A.; Willsher, Stephen J.; Bending, Jamie M.

    1999-01-01

    Rapid large-area inspection of composite structures for impact damage and multi-layered aluminum skins for corrosion has been a recognized priority for several years in both military and civil aerospace applications. Approaches to this requirement have followed two clearly different routes: the development of novel large-area inspection systems, and the enhancement of current ultrasonic or eddy-current methods to reduce inspection times. Ultrasonic inspection is possible with standard flaw detection equipment but the addition of a linear ultrasonic array could reduce inspection times considerably. In order to investigate their potential, 9-element and 17-element linear ultrasonic arrays for composites, and 64-element arrays for aluminum skins, have been developed to DERA specifications for use with the ANDSCAN area scanning system. A 5 m 2 composite wing surface has been scanned with a scan resolution of approximately 3 mm in 6 hours. With subsequent software and hardware improvements all four composite wing surfaces (top/bottom, left/right) of a military fighter aircraft can potentially be inspected in less than a day. Array technology has been very widely used in the medical ultrasound field although rarely above 10 MHz, whereas lap-joint inspection requires a pulse center-frequency of 12 to 20 MHz in order to resolve the separate interfaces in the lap joint. A 128 mm-long multi-element array of 5 mmx2 mm ultrasonic elements for use with the ANDSCAN scanning software was produced to a DERA specification by an NDT manufacturer with experience in the medical imaging field. This paper analyses the performance of the transducers that have been produced and evaluates their use in scanning systems of different configurations

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of stress corrosion cracking on smooth surface under non-uniform stress condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Tohgo, Keiichiro; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Guen; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation model for the process of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in structural metal materials under non-uniform stress condition has been proposed. The possible number of crack initiations is set for given space and initiation times for all cracks are assigned random numbers based on exponential distributions depending on stress level. Sites and lengths of the cracks are assigned by random numbers based on uniform distribution and normal distribution, respectively. Coalescence of cracks and subcritical crack growth are determined based on the fracture mechanics concept. Through the SCC process in the model, the influence of semi-elliptical surface cracks is taken into consideration. SCC simulations were carried out on a smooth surface under two kinds of non-uniform stress conditions such as residual stress distribution around a weld line. Multiple parallel cracks and multiple cracks along narrow high stress region were obtained depending on the stress distributions, respectively. Simulation results exhibit the applicability of the model to describe the SCC behavior observed in real structures. (author)

  9. A Grobman-Hartman theorem for nonuniformly hyperbolic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Luis; Valls, Claudia

    We establish a version of the Grobman-Hartman theorem in Banach spaces for nonuniformly hyperbolic dynamics. We also consider the case of sequences of maps, which corresponds to a nonautonomous dynamics with discrete time. More precisely, we consider sequences of Lipschitz maps A+f such that the linear parts A admit a nonuniform exponential dichotomy, and we establish the existence of a unique sequence of topological conjugacies between the maps A+f and A. Furthermore, we show that the conjugacies are Hölder continuous, with Hölder exponent determined by the ratios of Lyapunov exponents with the same sign. To the best of our knowledge this statement appeared nowhere before in the published literature, even in the particular case of uniform exponential dichotomies, although some experts claim that it is well known in this case. We are also interested in the dependence of the conjugacies on the perturbations f: we show that it is Hölder continuous, with the same Hölder exponent as the one for the conjugacies. We emphasize that the additional work required to consider the case of nonuniform exponential dichotomies is substantial. In particular, we need to consider several additional Lyapunov norms.

  10. 75 FR 6407 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... Flight Center Industrial Safety, New Initiatives, Proactive Approaches, Specific Safety Issues... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10- 020)] Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel... Aeronautics and Space Administration announce a forthcoming meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel...

  11. CSIR in aerospace: An engine for future industrial growth

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Kavendra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available in aerospace: An engine for future industrial growth Dr Kavendra Naidoo CSIR aeronautic systems manager 2 Overview • A brief summary of past and current activities in South African aerospace • Overview of CSIR capabilities in aerospace • Opportunities... for industry impact 3 A brief summary of previous and current activities in SA aerospace Argos-II Airborne Observation System SumbandilaSat Satellite 4 RAVIN Light Aircraft JS1 Championship Glider Sling Light Sport Aircraft AIRBUS SUPPLIER...

  12. Strain distributions in nano-onions with uniform and non-uniform compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, H L; Karihaloo, B L; Wang, J; Yi, X

    2006-01-01

    Nano-onions are ellipsoidal or spherical particles consisting of a core surrounded by concentric shells of nanometre size. Nano-onions produced by self-assembly and colloidal techniques have different structures and compositions, and thus differ in the state of strains. The mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficients and lattice constants between neighbouring shells induces stress/strain fields in the core and shells, which in turn affect their physical/mechanical properties and/or the properties of the composites containing them. In this paper, the strains in embedded and free-standing nano-onions with uniform and non-uniform compositions are studied in detail. It is found that the strains in the nano-onions can be modified by adjusting their compositions and structures. The results are useful for the band structure engineering of semiconductor nano-onions

  13. Prevention of Bridge Scour with Non-uniform Circular Piers Plane under Steady Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsing-Ting; Wang, Chuan-Yi

    2017-04-01

    foundation (Y=+0.2D*) under any steady flows. Opposite results are found for the exposed (Y=-0.2D*) bridge foundation. For the condition non-uniform pier diameter ratio (D/D*=0.3 0.8) scours, when D/D* is equal to 0.4, because pier oncoming flow area is the smallest one so that down flow intensity is less; as non-uniform area is bigger and decrease more down flow energy so that bring smaller scour depth and effect area. Therefore, local scour depth for pier diameter ratio of 0.4 is less than other type of pier. Considering the safety of bridge structure, a non-uniform circular pier with D/D* which equals to 0.4 and initial bed level relative to Y=+0.2D* is the most ideal pier allocations.

  14. 76 FR 58776 - U.S. Aerospace Supplier & Investment Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Aerospace Supplier & Investment... organizing a U.S. Aerospace Supplier & Investment Mission to Montreal, Canada, May 6-9, 2012. This aerospace... anticipated trend will bode well for Canada and for U.S. companies exporting to this market. Quebec and...

  15. 78 FR 30243 - Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... all Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Model EA500 airplanes equipped with Avio, Avio with ETT, or Avio NG 1.0... identified in this proposed AD, contact Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. 26 East Palatine Road, Wheeling, Illinois...

  16. 76 FR 55614 - Airworthiness Directives; Pacific Aerospace Limited Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pacific Aerospace... (AD) for Pacific Aerospace Limited Models FU24-954 and FU24A-954 airplanes modified with an unapproved... INFORMATION CONTACT: Karl Schletzbaum, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room...

  17. 78 FR 56941 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, October 11, 2013, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Harmony Myers, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Executive Director...

  18. 76 FR 70042 - Airworthiness Directives; Pacific Aerospace Limited Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ...-030-AD; Amendment 39-16862; AD 2011-23-11] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pacific Aerospace...). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Pacific Aerospace...., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karl Schletzbaum, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small...

  19. 78 FR 15976 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Wednesday April 3, 2013, 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m..., Greenbelt, MD 20771-0001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Harmony Myers, Aerospace Safety Advisory...

  20. 78 FR 36793 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP). DATES: Friday, July 12, 2013, 09:00-10:00 a.m.... Harmony Myers, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Executive Director, National Aeronautics and Space...

  1. 78 FR 9781 - Airworthiness Directives; Pacific Aerospace Limited Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ...-044-AD; Amendment 39-17335; AD 2013-03-01] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pacific Aerospace... Aerospace Limited Models FU24-954 and FU24A-954 airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing.... For service information identified in this AD, contact Pacific Aerospace Limited, Hamilton Airport...

  2. 76 FR 36937 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, July 15, 2011, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. ADDRESSES... INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Kathy Dakon, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Executive Director, National Aeronautics...

  3. 78 FR 49908 - Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ...-007-AD; Amendment 39-17542; AD 2013-16-04] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eclipse Aerospace... adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. Model EA500 airplanes equipped... service information identified in this AD, contact Eclipse Aerospace, Inc., 26 East Palatine Road...

  4. 76 FR 62455 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, October 21, 2011, 12:30 to 2 p.m. Central.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Susan Burch, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Administrative...

  5. 75 FR 61219 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, October 22, 2010, 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m... 77058. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Kathy Dakon, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Executive...

  6. 77 FR 25502 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, May 25, 2012, 10:00-11:00 a.m. CST... Visitor Control Center to gain access.) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Harmony Myers, Aerospace...

  7. 77 FR 71357 - Airworthiness Directives; Pacific Aerospace Limited Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... Directives; Pacific Aerospace Limited Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... airworthiness directive (AD) for all Pacific Aerospace Limited Models FU24-954 and FU24A-954 airplanes that... INFORMATION CONTACT: Karl Schletzbaum, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room...

  8. 77 FR 58413 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, October 12, 2012, 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Harmony Myers, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Executive Director...

  9. 77 FR 1955 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, January 27, 2012, Time 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m... CONTACT: Ms. Susan Burch, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Administrative Officer, National Aeronautics and...

  10. 76 FR 2923 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, February 4, 2011, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m... CONTACT: Ms. Kathy Dakon, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Executive Director, National Aeronautics and...

  11. 77 FR 38090 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... meeting of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. DATES: Friday, July 20, 2012, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. EDT... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Harmony Myers, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Executive Director...

  12. 32 CFR 705.30 - Aerospace Education Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aerospace Education Workshop. 705.30 Section 705... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.30 Aerospace Education Workshop. (a) This... of Naval Operations has cognizance of all assistance provided by the Navy to all Aerospace Education...

  13. 78 FR 57903 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Charter Renewal AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of renewal and amendment of the charter of the Aerospace... the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel is in the public interest in connection with the performance of...

  14. 78 FR 77618 - Airworthiness Directives; M7 Aerospace LLC Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; M7 Aerospace LLC...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all M7 Aerospace LLC Models SA226-AT... bulkhead. This proposed AD also requires reporting certain inspection results to M7 Aerospace LLC. We are...

  15. 77 FR 75908 - Airworthiness Directives; Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... Aerospace Corporation AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Aerospace Corporation Model GV and GV-SP airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of two failures... in this proposed AD, contact Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Technical Publications Dept., P.O. Box...

  16. 77 FR 54787 - Airworthiness Directives; M7 Aerospace LLC Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ...-17177; AD 2012-18-01] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; M7 Aerospace LLC Airplanes AGENCY: Federal... new airworthiness directive (AD) for all M7 Aerospace LLC Models SA226-AT, SA226-T, SA226-T(B), SA226... information identified in this AD, contact M7 Aerospace LP, 10823 NE Entrance Road, San Antonio, Texas 78216...

  17. Aerospace Technologies and Applications for Dual Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

     the Planet safety and security. In this frame, the concept of dual use - the set of technologies and applications that can be exploied for both civil and military purposes - becomes a key-topic. In addition, the aerospace is a strategic building block in the deployment of a network centric environment...

  18. Occupant modeling in the aerospace environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaklin, P.; Lim, T.; Marshall, R.

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic testing and occupant protection standards are a reality in the aerospace industry. Methods to model these situations are evolving. A method of modeling an occupant on a crew seat, in a drop test is presented. This method combines a rigid body occupant model with a finite element model of the

  19. Aerospace Concepts at the Elementary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Presents materials compiled to assist the elementary teacher in preparing teaching units in aerospace education. Suggests specific and general objectives and lists important concepts and questions pertaining to areas such as: history of flight, weather and flying, airplanes, jets, rockets, space travel, and the solar system. (MLH)

  20. Analysis of impact of non-uniformities on thin-film solar cells and modules with two-dimesional simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koishiyev, Galymzhan T.

    Clean and environmentally friendly photovoltaic (PV) technologies are now generally recognized as an alternative solution to many global-scale problems such as energy demand, pollution, and environment safety. The cost ($/kWh) is the primary challenge for all PV technologies. In that respect, thin-film polycrystalline PV technology (CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se2, etc), due to its fast production line, large area panels and low material usage, is one of the most promising low-cost technologies. Due to their granular structure, thin-film solar cells are inherently non-uniform. Also, inevitable fluctuations during the multistep deposition process of large area thin-film solar panels and specific manufacturing procedures such as scribing result in non-uniformities. Furthermore, non-uniformities can occur, become more severe, or increase in size during the solar-panel's life cycle due to various environmental conditions (i.e. temperature variation, shading, hail impact, etc). Non-uniformities generally reduce the overall efficiency of solar cells and modules, and their effects therefore need to be well understood. This thesis focuses on the analysis of the effect of non-uniformities on small size solar cells and modules with the help of numerical simulations. Even though the 2-D model developed here can analyze the effect of non-uniformities of any nature, only two specific types of microscopic non-uniformities were addressed here: shunts and weak-diodes. One type of macroscopic non-uniformity, partial shading, was also addressed. The circuit model developed here is a network of diodes, current-sources, and transparent-conductive-oxide (TCO) resistors. An analytic relation between the TCO-resistor, which is the primary model parameter, and TCO sheet resistance rhoS, which is the corresponding physical parameter, was derived. Based on the model several useful general results regarding a uniform cell were deduced. In particular, a global parameter delta, which determines the

  1. Aerospace Meteorology Lessons Learned Relative to Aerospace Vehicle Design and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, William W.; Anderson, B. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Aerospace Meteorology came into being in the 1950s as the development of rockets for military and civilian usage grew in the United States. The term was coined to identify those involved in the development of natural environment models, design/operational requirements, and environment measurement systems to support the needs of aerospace vehicles, both launch vehicles and spacecraft. It encompassed the atmospheric environment of the Earth, including Earth orbit environments. Several groups within the United States were active in this area, including the Department of Defense, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and a few of the aerospace industry groups. Some aerospace meteorology efforts were similar to those being undertaken relative to aviation interests. As part of the aerospace meteorology activities a number of lessons learned resulted that produced follow on efforts which benefited from these experiences, thus leading to the rather efficient and technologically current descriptions of terrestrial environment design requirements, prelaunch monitoring systems, and forecast capabilities available to support the development and operations of aerospace vehicles.

  2. The study and design of a national supply chain for the aerospace titanium components manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene van der Merwe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium’s strength-to-density ratio, corrosion resistance and high thermal compatibility makes it the perfect metal for aerospace. Titanium is for instance used for the structural airframe, seat tracks, engine components and landing gear of aircraft. The Boeing 787 that had its test flight in 2009 is one of the latest aircraft designs that incorporates a substantially higher percentage of parts manufactured from titanium due to the weight benefit. Titanium’s extensive use in aerospace applications ensures that the aerospace market is the main driver of titanium metal demand. South Africa is the second largest titanium producer in the world after Australia. The abundance of titanium in South Africa together with the growing demand has led it to be identified as a beneficiation priority in a collaborative government initiative, called Titanium Beneficiation Initiative (TBI. The purpose of this paper is to develop a supply chain model for the anticipated South African titanium component manufacturing industry.

  3. Non-Uniform Laser Surface Texturing of an Un-Tapered Square Pad for Tribological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ancona

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser surface micro-texturing has emerged as a promising technology to enhance the tribological properties of different kinds of electromechanical devices. In this research paper, we have exploited the intrinsic flexibility and micrometric accuracy of femtosecond laser ablation to realize complex micro-structural modifications on the surface of a laboratory prototype of a steel thrust bearing (un-tapered pad. The Bruggeman Texture Hydrodynamics theory (BTH is employed for the design of the anisotropic and non-uniform texture maximizing the thrust load of the pad prototype. The preliminary experimental results, reported in this work, show that the non-uniform micro-texture largely affects the friction characteristics of the contact. In particular, in agreement with the BTH predictions, the tribo-system shows friction properties that are strongly sensitive to the direction of the sliding speed, as a consequence of the micro-fluid dynamics which are designed to occur only in a specific sliding direction. We suggest that the joint action of virtual prototyping (BTH lubrication theory and ultrafast laser micro-prototyping can lead to unconventional and impressive results in terms of enhanced or tailored contact mechanics properties of the generic lubricated tribopair.

  4. AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development) Highlights 89/1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    low speed subsonic wind tunnels. In one of them the ESTRUCTURAS Y STRUCTURES AND aerodynamic coefficients of the latest Spanish MATERIALES MATERIALS I...RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE SPANISH AEROSPACE INDUSTRY Javier Alvarez Vara President of Construcciones Aeronauticas S.A. (CASA) INTRODUCTION The...CRAY supercomputer. CONSTRUCCIONES AERONAUTICAS 0 Technology laboratories. 25 e Test and prototypes laboratories. - The accomplishment (in close

  5. Advances in control system technology for aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to Control System Technology applied to aerospace and covers the four disciplines Cognitive Engineering, Computer Science, Operations Research, and Servo-Mechanisms. This edited book follows a workshop held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2012, where the today's most important aerospace challenges, including aerospace autonomy, safety-critical embedded software engineering, and modern air transportation were discussed over the course of two days of intense interactions among leading aerospace engineers and scientists. Its content provide a snapshot of today's aerospace control research and its future, including Autonomy in space applications, Control in space applications, Autonomy in aeronautical applications, Air transportation, and Safety-critical software engineering.

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 40: Technical communications in aerospace education: A study of AIAA student members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John M.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary analysis of a survey of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) student members. In the paper we examine (1) the demographic characteristics of the students, (2) factors that affected their career decisions, (3) their career goals and aspirations, and (4) their training in technical communication and techniques for finding and using aerospace scientific and technical information (STI). We determine that aerospace engineering students receive training in technical communication skills and the use of STI. While those in the aerospace industry think that more training is needed, we believe the students receive the appropriate amount of training. We think that the differences between the amount of training students receive and the perception of training needs is related partially to the characteristics of the students and partially to the structure of the aerospace STI dissemination system. Overall, we conclude that the students' technical communication training and knowledge of STI, while limited by external forces, makes it difficult for students to achieve their career goals.

  7. The importance of channel non-uniformity in riverine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternack, G. B.

    2007-12-01

    A key aspect of the hierarchical controls on riverine ecosystems that has been undervalued in both river science and restoration is the role of channel non-uniformity. As the water depth to bed grain size ratio decreases, channel non-uniformity takes over as a dominant control on hydraulic, geomorphic, and ecologic processes in rivers. As a case in point, the degree of channel degradation and habitat loss that ensues after dams are built may be directly related to maintenance of channel non-uniformity. The study reported here evaluated channel change at different spatial (submeter to km) and temporal (seasonal to interdecadal) scales in a regulated, but still dynamic, gravel-cobble river. The objectives were to (1) determine the cause of the persistence of riffles and pools even as the channel incised more than 10 m over 70 years and (2) evaluate the linkage between channel change and anadromous fish habitat in such a dynamic setting. The study area was the top 10.5 km of the Yuba River below Englebright Dam. Although this dam has blocked bedload transport into the reach for 65 years causing significant channel incision, a residual of 17.7 million m3 of sediment remains in the study reach due to historical hydraulic mining for gold. The approach used was to combine the knowledge gained at multiple scales using different methods, including historical aerial photo analysis, channel DEM analysis and differencing, 2D hydrodynamic modeling, hydraulic geometry analysis, fish observations, process-based hydrogeomorphic monitoring, and sediment transport experiments. These diverse methods revealed an array of mechanisms contributing to channel change and habitat rejuvenation, most notable including flow-convergence routing responsible for maintaining riffles and pools over a range of flows. Anadromous fish were observed to shift their pattern of habitat utilization in response to channel change in predictable ways. The primary lesson for river management is that more

  8. Characteristics of radiation syndromes caused by nonuniform irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avetisov, G.M.; Darenskaya, N.G.; Zajtseva, R.N.

    1975-01-01

    The quantitative characteristics of the development of hemopoietic, intestinal and oral syndromes were studied on male rats subjected to uniform, general non-uniform and partial (head, adbomen, anterior and posterior abdomen sections, and hind part of body) X-raying (180-250 kV, 60-200 R/min). The hemopoietic syndrome resulted in death at uniform irradiation intensities of 400-700R; with screening of the abdominal cavity, irradiation was increased to 850 R. The dosages for intestinal and oral syndromes at partial irradiation of the abdominal cavity and head were equal to 1,150-1,500 and 1,400-1,800 R, respectively

  9. Non-Uniform Compressive Strength of Debonded Sandwich Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøkkentved, Alexandros; Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Berggreen, Carl Christian

    2005-01-01

    debonds show a considerable strength reduction with increasing debond diameter, with failure mechanisms varying between fast debond propagation and wrinkling-introduced face compression failure for large and small debonds, respectively. Residual strength predictions are based on intact panel testing...... of applying a controlled non-uniform compressive load to the test panels requires a strong focus on the development of a suitable testrig. This is done by the extensive use of product development methods. The experimental results based on full-scale testing of 10 GFRP/foam core panels with prefabricated...

  10. Potential aerospace applications of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Raouf

    1994-12-01

    The recent discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) with superconducting transition temperature, T(sub c), above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen has opened the door for using these materials in new and practical applications. These materials have zero resistance to electric current, have the capability of carrying large currents and as such have the potential to be used in high magnetic field applications. One of the space applications that can use superconductors is electromagnetic launch of payloads to low-earth-orbit. An electromagnetic gun-type launcher can be used in small payload systems that are launched at very high velocity, while sled-type magnetically levitated launcher can be used to launch larger payloads at smaller velocities. Both types of launchers are being studied by NASA and the aerospace industry. The use of superconductors will be essential in any of these types of launchers in order to produce the large magnetic fields required to obtain large thrust forces. Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) technology is mature enough and can be easily integrated in such systems. As for the HTS, many leading companies are currently producing HTS coils and magnets that potentially can be mass-produced for these launchers. It seems that designing and building a small-scale electromagnetic launcher is the next logical step toward seriously considering this method for launching payloads into low-earth-orbit. A second potential application is the use of HTS to build sensitive portable devices for the use in Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) are the most sensitive instruments for measuring changes in magnetic flux. By using HTS in SQUID's, one will be able to design a portable unit that uses liquid nitrogen or a cryocooler pump to explore the use of gradiometers or magnetometers to detect deep cracks or corrosion in structures. A third use is the replacement of Infra-Red (IR) sensor leads on

  11. CSIR ScienceScope: Aerospace

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available , magne- sium and aluminium. Light metals initia- tives focus on the reduction of aircraft structural weight and automobile weight, while increasing local content. Another priority technology flagship is advanced electronics, which includes sensor... by the CSIR on behalf of the Department of Science and Technology (DST), is to deve- lop advanced metals manufacturing technologies for complex, thin-walled, light-weight components using the investment casting process. Titanium casting development...

  12. IT Data Mining Tool Uses in Aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Gilena A.; Freeman, Kenneth; Jones, Kevin L.

    2012-01-01

    Data mining has a broad spectrum of uses throughout the realms of aerospace and information technology. Each of these areas has useful methods for processing, distributing, and storing its corresponding data. This paper focuses on ways to leverage the data mining tools and resources used in NASA's information technology area to meet the similar data mining needs of aviation and aerospace domains. This paper details the searching, alerting, reporting, and application functionalities of the Splunk system, used by NASA's Security Operations Center (SOC), and their potential shared solutions to address aircraft and spacecraft flight and ground systems data mining requirements. This paper also touches on capacity and security requirements when addressing sizeable amounts of data across a large data infrastructure.

  13. Relationship between local molecular field theory and density functional theory for non-uniform liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, A J; Evans, R

    2013-01-07

    The local molecular field theory (LMF) developed by Weeks and co-workers has proved successful for treating the structure and thermodynamics of a variety of non-uniform liquids. By reformulating LMF in terms of one-body direct correlation functions we recast the theory in the framework of classical density functional theory (DFT). We show that the general LMF equation for the effective reference potential φ(R)(r) follows directly from the standard mean-field DFT treatment of attractive interatomic forces. Using an accurate (fundamental measures) DFT for the non-uniform hard-sphere reference fluid we determine φ(R)(r) for a hard-core Yukawa liquid adsorbed at a planar hard wall. In the approach to bulk liquid-gas coexistence we find the effective potentials exhibit rich structure that can include damped oscillations at large distances from the wall as well as the repulsive hump near the wall required to generate the low density "gas" layer characteristic of complete drying. We argue that it would be difficult to obtain the same level of detail from other (non-DFT based) implementations of LMF. LMF emphasizes the importance of making an intelligent division of the interatomic pair potential of the full system into a reference part and a remainder that can be treated in mean-field approximation. We investigate different divisions for an exactly solvable one-dimensional model where the pair potential has a hard-core plus a linear attractive tail. Results for the structure factor and the equation of state of the uniform fluid show that including a significant portion of the attraction in the reference system can be much more accurate than treating the full attractive tail in mean-field approximation. We discuss further aspects of the relationship between LMF and DFT.

  14. Laterally excited flexible tanks with nonuniform density liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu

    1996-01-01

    A study of the dynamic responses of flexible tanks containing nonuniform liquid under horizontal base excitations is presented. The system considered is an upright, circular cylindrical tank filled with an incompressible and inviscid liquid in which the density increases with the liquid depth. Only the impulsive components of response are considered in this study since the convective components can be computed by considering the tank to be rigid. It is shown in this study that for tanks with height-to-radius ratios between 0.3 and 1.2, the response quantities may be estimated utilizing the rigid tank solutions. Also, it is found that the pressure distribution along the tank wall is not sensitive to the detailed distribution function of the liquid density, and that the base shear and moments for the tank with nonuniform liquid can be estimated conservatively by assuming that the tank is filled with an equivalent uniform liquid density that preserves the total liquid weight. Finally, a simple equation for evaluating the fundamental natural frequency of the system is proposed

  15. Electrostatic adhesion of multiple non-uniformly charged dielectric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, B. A.; Whitney, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle adhesion measurements can be as much as one order of magnitude higher than theoretical calculations. This discrepancy has ignited a debate as to the nature of the physics occurring with microscopic particle adhesion. Attempts to bring calculations closer to measured results have produced models that include multiple particle interactions, dielectric polarization, and non-uniform charge. Individually, each of these models can only produce a 2× to 5× enhancement in predicted adhesion force over simple Coulombic attraction. In this correspondence, an analytical model of electrostatic particle forces is developed, which allows for independent assignment of dielectric constant and non-uniform surface charge distribution to an arbitrary number of particles. Because the model can include an image plane, it is ideal for electrostatic adhesion calculations. Application to a monolayer of printed toner particles predicts nearly an order of magnitude increase in adhesion force over Coulombic attraction. These results are the first analytical results to place predictions of charged particle adhesion on the same order of magnitude with measurements.

  16. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in a nonuniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, S.L.; D'Angelo, N.; Merlino, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves excited in a single-ended cesium Q machine with a nonuniform magnetic field are described. The electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves are generated in the usual manner by drawing an electron current to a small exciter disk immersed in the plasma column. The parallel and perpendicular (to B) wavelengths and phase velocities are determined by mapping out two-dimensional wave phase contours. The wave frequency f depends on the location of the exciter disk in the nonuniform magnetic field, and propagating waves are only observed in the region where f> or approx. =f/sub c/i, where f/sub c/i is the local ion-cyclotron frequency. The parallel phase velocity is in the direction of the electron drift. From measurements of the plasma properties along the axis, it is inferred that the electron drift velocity is not uniform along the entire current channel. The evidence suggests that the waves begin being excited at that axial position where the critical drift velocity is first exceeded, consistent with a current-driven excitation mechanism

  17. Adaptive enhancement for nonuniform illumination images via nonlinear mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfang; Huang, Qian; Hu, Jing

    2017-09-01

    Nonuniform illumination images suffer from degenerated details because of underexposure, overexposure, or a combination of both. To improve the visual quality of color images, underexposure regions should be lightened, whereas overexposure areas need to be dimmed properly. However, discriminating between underexposure and overexposure is troublesome. Compared with traditional methods that produce a fixed demarcation value throughout an image, the proposed demarcation changes as local luminance varies, thus is suitable for manipulating complicated illumination. Based on this locally adaptive demarcation, a nonlinear modification is applied to image luminance. Further, with the modified luminance, we propose a nonlinear process to reconstruct a luminance-enhanced color image. For every pixel, this nonlinear process takes the luminance change and the original chromaticity into account, thus trying to avoid exaggerated colors at dark areas and depressed colors at highly bright regions. Finally, to improve image contrast, a local and image-dependent exponential technique is designed and applied to the RGB channels of the obtained color image. Experimental results demonstrate that our method produces good contrast and vivid color for both nonuniform illumination images and images with normal illumination.

  18. A novel boundary element method for nonuniform neutron diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi; Nisiyama, Shusuke; Tomioka, Satoshi; Enoto, Takeaki

    1999-01-01

    An advanced boundary element formulation has been proposed to solve the neutron diffusion equation (NDE) for a 'nonuniform' system. The continuous spatial distribution of a nuclear constant is assumed to be described using a polynomial function. Part of the constant term in the polynomial is left on the left-hand-side of the NDE, while the reminding is added to the fission source term on the right-hand-side to create a fictitious source. When the neutron flux is also expanded using a polynomial, the boundary integral equation corresponding to the NDE contains a domain integral related to the polynomial source. This domain integral is transformed into an infinite series of boundary integrals, by repeated application of the particular solution for a Poisson-type equation with the polynomial source. In two-dimensional, one-group test calculations for rectangular domains, the orthogonality of Legendre polynomials was used to determine the polynomial expansion coefficients. The results show good agreement with those obtained from finite difference computations in which the nonuniformity was approximated by a large number of material regions. (author)

  19. Towards a new titanium sector: Aerospace

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sector: Aerospace 4th Biennial Conference Presented by: Dr Willie du Preez Director: Titanium Centre of Competence Date: 9 October 2012 Outline ? Why Titanium? ? The Opportunity for South Africa ? The SA Titanium Industry Strategy ? Primary...747 B777 A380 A350 B787 Materials used in Modern Aircraft: Composites vs Titanium ? CSIR 2012 Slide 6 Source: Engineering News Online, American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics Aluminium Composite Steel Titanium Others Titanium...

  20. CORPORATE MULTICULTURALISM IN THE GLOBAL AEROSPACE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Kaskel, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    International aerospace corporations have recently witnessed a rapid growth in the pace of globalization. Increasing global sales, international acquisitions, and production outsourcing to other countries are activities that highlight the critical necessity of effectively conducting business between culturally diverse stakeholders. An awareness of the ways in which culture defines who we are and how that affects interaction with others is crucial to international business success. Geert Hofs...

  1. Big Data in the Aerospace Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Emmanuell BADEA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the approaches related to the need for large volume data analysis, Big Data, and also the information that the beneficiaries of this analysis can interpret. Aerospace companies understand better the challenges of Big Data than the rest of the industries. Also, in this paper we describe a novel analytical system that enables query processing and predictive analytics over streams of large aviation data.

  2. THE UNSAAC ACTIVITIES IN AEROSPACE DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Roman-Gonzalez, Avid

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Aerospace technology is a field of great importance for an institution, for a community, for a region, and in general for a country. It is true, the development of space technology started during the Cold War and with the aim of exploring the universe, but currently, some of these developed technology is applied in our daily life. Due to the technological advancement, miniaturization of components, and cost reduction; currently there are many universities and colleges ...

  3. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 18:] Scientific and Technical Information (STI) policy and the competitive position of the US aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernon, Peter; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    With its contribution to trade, its coupling with national security, and its symbolism of U.S. technological strength, the U.S. aerospace industry holds a unique position in the Nation's industrial structure. Federal science and technology policy and Federal scientific and technical information (STI) policy loom important as strategic contributions to the U.S. aerospace industry's leading competitive position. However, three fundamental policy problems exist. First, the United States lacks a coherent STI policy and a unified approach to the development of such a policy. Second, policymakers fail to understand the relationship of STI to science and technology policy. Third, STI is treated as a part of general information policy, without any recognition of its uniqueness. This paper provides an overview of the Federal information policy structure as it relates to STI and frames the policy issues that require resolution.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 18: Scientific and Technical Information (STI) policy and the competitive position of the US aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernon, Peter; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    With its contribution to trade, its coupling with national security, and its symbolism of U.S. technological strength, the U.S. aerospace industry holds a unique position in the Nation's industrial structure. Federal science and technology policy and Federal scientific and technical information (STI) policy loom important as strategic contributions to the U.S. aerospace industry's leading competitive position. However, three fundamental policy problems exist. First, the United States lacks a coherent STI policy and a unified approach to the development of such a policy. Second, policymakers fail to understand the relationship of STI to science and technology policy. Third, STI is treated as a part of general information policy, without any recognition of its uniqueness. This paper provides an overview of the Federal information policy structure as it relates to STI and frames the policy issues that require resolution.

  5. Probing Photocurrent Nonuniformities in the Subcells of Monolithic Perovskite/Silicon Tandem Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Zhaoning

    2016-11-23

    Perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells with high power conversion efficiencies have the potential to become a commercially viable photovoltaic option in the near future. However, device design and optimization is challenging because conventional characterization methods do not give clear feedback on the localized chemical and physical factors that limit performance within individual subcells, especially when stability and degradation is a concern. In this study, we use light beam induced current (LBIC) to probe photocurrent collection nonuniformities in the individual subcells of perovskite/silicon tandems. The choices of lasers and light biasing conditions allow efficiency-limiting effects relating to processing defects, optical interference within the individual cells, and the evolution of water-induced device degradation to be spatially resolved. The results reveal several types of microscopic defects and demonstrate that eliminating these and managing the optical properties within the multilayer structures will be important for future optimization of perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells.

  6. Graph analysis of non-uniform rational B-spline-based metamodels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuben, John C.; Turner, Cameron J.

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade metamodels, also known as surrogate models, based on non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBs) have been developed. These metamodels exhibit unique properties that enable a wide range of computationally efficient analyses. Thus far, the analysis of these metamodels has been of a geometric nature, but in this article an approach based on graph theory is used. The properties of NURBs enable the interpretation of NURBs-based metamodels as graphs, and enable the demonstration of several analyses based on this structure. The general case of an analytically defined continuous-variable problem is given in the first example. A specific application in the field of robotic path planning constitutes the second example. Finally, an observation on the current state of this research, its merits and drawbacks, and an outline of future efforts that may increase its utility is provided.

  7. Efficient design of multiplier-less digital channelizers using recombination non-uniform filter banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaeen Kalathil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for the efficient realization of digital channelizers in software defined radios using recombination filter banks is proposed in this paper. Digital channelizer is the core of software defined radio. Computationally efficient design supporting multiple channels with different bandwidths and low complexity are inevitable requirements for the digital channelizers. Recombination filter banks method is used to obtain non-uniform filter banks with rational sampling factors, using a two stage structure. It consists of a uniform filter bank and trans-multiplexer. In this work, the uniform filter bank and trans-multiplexer are designed using cosine modulated filter banks. The prototype filter design is made simple, efficient and fast, using window method. The multiplier-less realization of recombination filter banks in the canonic signed digit space using nature inspired optimization algorithms, results in reduced implementation complexity.

  8. Sparse-View Ultrasound Diffraction Tomography Using Compressed Sensing with Nonuniform FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoyan Hua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate reconstruction of the object from sparse-view sampling data is an appealing issue for ultrasound diffraction tomography (UDT. In this paper, we present a reconstruction method based on compressed sensing framework for sparse-view UDT. Due to the piecewise uniform characteristics of anatomy structures, the total variation is introduced into the cost function to find a more faithful sparse representation of the object. The inverse problem of UDT is iteratively resolved by conjugate gradient with nonuniform fast Fourier transform. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method that the main characteristics of the object can be properly presented with only 16 views. Compared to interpolation and multiband method, the proposed method can provide higher resolution and lower artifacts with the same view number. The robustness to noise and the computation complexity are also discussed.

  9. Barely visible impact damage detection for composite sandwich structures by optical-fiber-based distributed strain measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakuchi, S; Mizutani, T; Okabe, Y; Takeda, N

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed an impact damage-detection system for large-scale composite sandwich structures using an optical fiber network running throughout the structure. A Brillouin-based sensing system with high spatial resolution (pre-pump pulse Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (PPP-BOTDA)) was utilized for distributed strain measurement. The PPP-BOTDA sensing system can measure axial strain along the optical fiber by employing stimulated Brillouin scattering. The system realizes a spatial resolution of 10 cm, a sampling interval of 5 cm, and a sensing range of more than 1 km. Our previous study revealed that a non-uniform axial strain within centimeter spatial resolution broadens the width of the Brillouin gain spectrum, which is the output of the PPP-BOTDA. The specific response of the PPP-BOTDA was employed to detect non-uniform strain distribution along a residual facesheet dent in a damaged area. First, the response of the optical fiber sensor network, formed in the adhesive layer, was simulated to clarify the effectiveness and limitations of the proposed damage-detection technique. The system was then validated by an experiment. As the damage became larger, the width of the Brillouin gain spectra became broader. Consequently, the location and size of barely visible damage could be estimated. The system developed is quite useful for a first inspection of large-scale sandwich structures in aerospace and marine applications

  10. Capital raising of aerospace companies: equities or debts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui-Shan, L.; Taw-Onn, Y.; Wai-Mun, H.

    2016-10-01

    Aerospace products enhance national and economic activities, thus maintaining the sustainability of aerospace industry is crucial. One of the perspectives in ensuring sustainability of aerospace companies is expansion of firms by raising funds for research and development in order to provide a reasonable profitability to the firms. This study comprises a sample of 47 aerospace companies from 2009 to 2015 to analyze the impact of raising fund by equities or debts to the profitability of the firms. The result indicates that capital raising through equities is preferable than debts. Moreover, the study also identifies that the profit of aerospace industry is volatile and there is cyclical reduction of the net income in the first quarter of the year. The management needs to make wise decisions in raising fund to ensure a healthy growth of the aerospace company.

  11. Interrupted innovation: Innovation system dynamics in latecomer aerospace industries

    OpenAIRE

    Vertesy, Daniel; Szirmai, Adam

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the role of sectoral innovation systems in the emergence and catch-up of aerospace industries in latecomer economies. We argue that the aerospace sector is characterized by a process of interrupted innovation. Competitive pressures and the cyclical nature of the industry not only require shifts in the direction of innovation and changes in the production system, but also periodical restructuring of the whole sectoral system of innovation. Aerospace manufacturing requi...

  12. Non-uniform plastic deformation of micron scale objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    Significant increases in apparent flow strength are observed when non-uniform plastic deformation of metals occurs at the scale ranging from roughly one to ten microns. Several basic plane strain problems are analyzed numerically in this paper based on a new formulation of strain gradient...... that are not captured by conventional plasticity theory. These include the role of material length parameters in establishing the size dependence of strength and the elevation of resistance to plastic flow resulting from constraint on plastic flow at boundaries. Details of the finite element method employed...... in the numerical analysis of the higher order gradient theory will be discussed and related to prior formulations having some of the same features....

  13. Non-uniform plastic deformation of micron scale objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    Significant increases in apparent flow strength are observed when non-uniform plastic deformation of metals occurs at the scale ranging from roughly one to ten microns. Several basic plane strain problems are analyzed numerically in this paper based on a new formulation of strain gradient...... plasticity. The problems are the tangential and normal loading of a finite rectangular block of material bonded to rigid platens and having traction-free ends, and the normal loading of a half-space by a flat, rigid punch. The solutions illustrate fundamental features of plasticity at the micron scale...... that are not captured by conventional plasticity theory. These include the role of material length parameters in establishing the size dependence of strength and the elevation of resistance to plastic flow resulting from constraint on plastic flow at boundaries. Details of the finite element method employed...

  14. Vibration and Dynamic Response Control of Nonuniform Composite Rotating Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the free vibration, dynamic response, and the active control of composite rotating pretwisted blades modeled as nonuniform thin-walled beams, fixed at the hub at a setting angle, and incorporating piezoelectrically induced damping capabilities. In this sense, a distributed piezoelectric actuator system activated through the application of an out-of-phase electrical current is used to suppress the dynamic response of the rotating beam subjected to a Heaviside pulse. The blade model incorporates nonclassical effects such as transverse shear, secondary warping, and rotary inertias, and includes the centrifugal and Coriolis force fields. A velocity feedback control law relating the piezoelectrically induced bending moment at the beam tip with appropriately selected kinematical response quantities is used, and the beneficial effects of its implementation upon the closed loop eigenvibration and dynamic characteristics of the blade are highlighted.

  15. Vacuum polarisation in some static nonuniform magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calucci, G.

    1995-11-01

    Vacuum polarisation in QED in presence of some configurations of external magnetic fields is investigated. The configuration considered correspond to fields is investigated. The configuration considered correspond to fields lying in a plane and without sources. The motion of a Dirac electron in this field configuration is studied and arguments are found to conclude that the lowest level gives the most important contribution. The result is that the main effect is not very different from the uniform case, the possibilities of calculating the corrections due to the uniformity is explicitly shown. A typical effect of nonuniformity of the field shows out in the refractivity of the field shows out in the refractivity of the vacuum

  16. Non-Uniform Heat Transfer in Thermal Regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Buch

    , a numerical model, which simulates a single-blow operation in a parallel-plate regenerator, was developed and used to model the heat transfer under various conditions. In addition to the modeling of the heat transfer, a series of experiments on passive regenerators with non-uniform, but precisely controlled......, geometries was performed. The objective of performing these experiments was in part to eval- uate the direct applicability of the model, which only simulates one half of the regenerator cycle, to a practical situation where the regenerator is running con- tinuously by comparing the results gained......, and decreasing the plate spacing beoynd a certain point can even hurt the performance. Inter-channel heat transfer effects - or thermal cross-talk - have also been in- vestigated and the results show that not only the size of the plate spacings, but also their mutual order, can affect the heat transfer...

  17. Leveraging Non-Uniform Resources for Parallel Query Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayr, Tobias; Bonnet, Philippe; Gehrke, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    Modular clusters are now composed of non- uniform nodes with different CPUs, disks or network cards so that customers can adapt the cluster configuration to the changing technologies and to their changing needs. This challenges dataflow parallelism as the primary load balancing technique...... of existing parallel database systems. We show in this paper that dataflow parallelism alone is ill suited for modular clusters because running the same operation on different subsets of the data can not fully utilize non-uniform hardware resources. We propose and evaluate new load balancing techniques...... that confirms the feasibility and effectiveness of the new techniques in a parallel execution engine prototype based on the open-source DBMS Predator....

  18. An operating system for future aerospace vehicle computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foudriat, E. C.; Berman, W. J.; Will, R. W.; Bynum, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements for future aerospace vehicle computer operating systems are examined in this paper. The computer architecture is assumed to be distributed with a local area network connecting the nodes. Each node is assumed to provide a specific functionality. The network provides for communication so that the overall tasks of the vehicle are accomplished. The O/S structure is based upon the concept of objects. The mechanisms for integrating node unique objects with node common objects in order to implement both the autonomy and the cooperation between nodes is developed. The requirements for time critical performance and reliability and recovery are discussed. Time critical performance impacts all parts of the distributed operating system; e.g., its structure, the functional design of its objects, the language structure, etc. Throughout the paper the tradeoffs - concurrency, language structure, object recovery, binding, file structure, communication protocol, programmer freedom, etc. - are considered to arrive at a feasible, maximum performance design. Reliability of the network system is considered. A parallel multipath bus structure is proposed for the control of delivery time for time critical messages. The architecture also supports immediate recovery for the time critical message system after a communication failure.

  19. Restoration of non-uniform exposure motion blurred image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuanhong; Xu, Tingfa; Wang, Ningming; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Restoring motion-blurred image is the key technologies in the opto-electronic detection system. The imaging sensors such as CCD and infrared imaging sensor, which are mounted on the motion platforms, quickly move together with the platforms of high speed. As a result, the images become blur. The image degradation will cause great trouble for the succeeding jobs such as objects detection, target recognition and tracking. So the motion-blurred images must be restoration before detecting motion targets in the subsequent images. On the demand of the real weapon task, in order to deal with targets in the complex background, this dissertation uses the new theories in the field of image processing and computer vision to research the new technology of motion deblurring and motion detection. The principle content is as follows: 1) When the prior knowledge about degradation function is unknown, the uniform motion blurred images are restored. At first, the blur parameters, including the motion blur extent and direction of PSF(point spread function), are estimated individually in domain of logarithmic frequency. The direction of PSF is calculated by extracting the central light line of the spectrum, and the extent is computed by minimizing the correction between the fourier spectrum of the blurred image and a detecting function. Moreover, in order to remove the strip in the deblurred image, windows technique is employed in the algorithm, which makes the deblurred image clear. 2) According to the principle of infrared image non-uniform exposure, a new restoration model for infrared blurred images is developed. The fitting of infrared image non-uniform exposure curve is performed by experiment data. The blurred images are restored by the fitting curve.

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF NONUNIFORM CLOUD COVER ON TRANSIT TRANSMISSION SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Line, Michael R. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Parmentier, Vivien, E-mail: mrline@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California–Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    We model the impact of nonuniform cloud cover on transit transmission spectra. Patchy clouds exist in nearly every solar system atmosphere, brown dwarfs, and transiting exoplanets. Our major findings suggest that fractional cloud coverage can exactly mimic high mean molecular weight atmospheres and vice versa over certain wavelength regions, in particular, over the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) bandpass (1.1–1.7 μm). We also find that patchy cloud coverage exhibits a signature that is different from uniform global clouds. Furthermore, we explain analytically why the “patchy cloud-high mean molecular weight” degeneracy exists. We also explore the degeneracy of nonuniform cloud coverage in atmospheric retrievals on both synthetic and real planets. We find from retrievals on a synthetic solar composition hot Jupiter with patchy clouds and a cloud-free high mean molecular weight warm Neptune that both cloud-free high mean molecular weight atmospheres and partially cloudy atmospheres can explain the data equally well. Another key finding is that the HST WFC3 transit transmission spectra of two well-observed objects, the hot Jupiter HD 189733b and the warm Neptune HAT-P-11b, can be explained well by solar composition atmospheres with patchy clouds without the need to invoke high mean molecular weight or global clouds. The degeneracy between high molecular weight and solar composition partially cloudy atmospheres can be broken by observing the molecular Rayleigh scattering differences between the two. Furthermore, the signature of partially cloudy limbs also appears as a ∼100 ppm residual in the ingress and egress of the transit light curves, provided that the transit timing is known to seconds.

  1. Analyte preconcentration in nanofluidic channels with nonuniform zeta potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, A.; McCallum, C.; Storey, B. D.; Pennathur, S.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that charged analytes in the presence of nonuniform electric fields concentrate at locations where the relevant driving forces balance, and a wide range of ionic stacking and focusing methods are commonly employed to leverage these physical mechanisms in order to improve signal levels in biosensing applications. In particular, nanofluidic channels with spatially varying conductivity distributions have been shown to provide increased preconcentration of charged analytes due to the existence of a finite electric double layer (EDL), in which electrostatic attraction and repulsion from charged surfaces produce nonuniform transverse ion distributions. In this work, we use numerical simulations to show that one can achieve greater levels of sample accumulation by using field-effect control via wall-embedded electrodes to tailor the surface potential heterogeneity in a nanochannel with overlapped EDLs. In addition to previously demonstrated stacking and focusing mechanisms, we find that the coupling between two-dimensional ion distributions and the axial electric field under overlapped EDL conditions can generate an ion concentration polarization interface in the middle of the channel. Under an applied electric field, this interface can be used to concentrate sample ions between two stationary regions of different surface potential and charge density. Our numerical model uses the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system of equations coupled with the Stokes equation to demonstrate the phenomenon, and we discuss in detail the driving forces behind the predicted sample enhancement. The numerical velocity and salt concentration profiles exhibit good agreement with analytical results from a simplified one-dimensional area-averaged model for several limiting cases, and we show predicted amplification ratios of up to 105.

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF NONUNIFORM CLOUD COVER ON TRANSIT TRANSMISSION SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line, Michael R.; Parmentier, Vivien

    2016-01-01

    We model the impact of nonuniform cloud cover on transit transmission spectra. Patchy clouds exist in nearly every solar system atmosphere, brown dwarfs, and transiting exoplanets. Our major findings suggest that fractional cloud coverage can exactly mimic high mean molecular weight atmospheres and vice versa over certain wavelength regions, in particular, over the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) bandpass (1.1–1.7 μm). We also find that patchy cloud coverage exhibits a signature that is different from uniform global clouds. Furthermore, we explain analytically why the “patchy cloud-high mean molecular weight” degeneracy exists. We also explore the degeneracy of nonuniform cloud coverage in atmospheric retrievals on both synthetic and real planets. We find from retrievals on a synthetic solar composition hot Jupiter with patchy clouds and a cloud-free high mean molecular weight warm Neptune that both cloud-free high mean molecular weight atmospheres and partially cloudy atmospheres can explain the data equally well. Another key finding is that the HST WFC3 transit transmission spectra of two well-observed objects, the hot Jupiter HD 189733b and the warm Neptune HAT-P-11b, can be explained well by solar composition atmospheres with patchy clouds without the need to invoke high mean molecular weight or global clouds. The degeneracy between high molecular weight and solar composition partially cloudy atmospheres can be broken by observing the molecular Rayleigh scattering differences between the two. Furthermore, the signature of partially cloudy limbs also appears as a ∼100 ppm residual in the ingress and egress of the transit light curves, provided that the transit timing is known to seconds

  3. Commercialization of terrestrial applications of aerospace power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberg, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    The potential for commercialization of terrestrial energy systems based upon aerospace power technology's explored. Threats to the aerospace power technology industry, caused by the end of the cold war and weak world economy are described. There are also new opportunities caused by increasing terrestrial energy needs and world-wide concern for the environment. In this paper, the strengths and weaknesses of the aerospace power industry in commercializing terrestrial energy technologies are reviewed. Finally, actions which will enable the aerospace power technology industry to commercialize products into terrestrial energy markets are described

  4. High-Fidelity Simulation in Biomedical and Aerospace Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Introduction / Background. Modeling and Simulation Challenges in Aerospace Engineering. Modeling and Simulation Challenges in Biomedical Engineering. Digital Astronaut. Project Columbia. Summary and Discussion.

  5. 78 FR 77501 - NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: 13-153] NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Meeting...

  6. Computational Modeling of Flow Control Systems for Aerospace Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. proposes to develop computational methods for designing active flow control systems on aerospace vehicles with the primary objective of...

  7. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 39: The role of computer networks in aerospace engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Ann P.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aerospace engineering. Such networks allow aerospace engineers to communicate with people and access remote resources through electronic mail, file transfer, and remote log-in. The study drew its subjects from private sector, government and academic organizations in the U.S. aerospace industry. Data presented here were gathered in a mail survey, conducted in Spring 1993, that was distributed to aerospace engineers performing a wide variety of jobs. Results from the mail survey provide a snapshot of the current use of computer networks in the aerospace industry, suggest factors associated with the use of networks, and identify perceived impacts of networks on aerospace engineering work and communication.

  8. Design and cold flow test of a scramjet nozzle with nonuniform inflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianwei; Xu, Jinglei; Quan, Zhibin; Yu, Kaikai; Lv, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Dramatic differences in lift and pitching moment of a scramjet nozzle are inevitably produced when its inlet is nonuniform. A rotational method of characteristics computer program which takes into account the non-uniform inflow effects has been developed for designing asymmetric scramjet nozzles. Typical design cases with a given non-uniform Mach number profile and the corresponding mass-weighted average uniform Mach number profile were developed. Then, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analyses and cold flow experimental measurements were conducted to quantify performance improvement of the nozzle with the non-uniform design. Both the computation and experiment results indicate that the nozzle design with the non-uniform Mach number profile always exhibit better performance than the design with the uniform Mach number profile, particularly for lift and pitching moment. Compared with the nozzle design with uniform inflow, the improvement of axial thrust coefficient in the nozzle design with non-uniform inflow is approximately 1.75% at the design point, with a nozzle pressure ratio of 35. Moreover, the benefits on lift and pitching moment coefficients of the nozzle design with non-uniform inflow are approximately 6.51% and 6.35% at the design point, respectively. These results confirm that considering non-uniform distribution of the entrance flow parameters of a scramjet nozzle is necessary.

  9. Radio-frequency properties of stacked long Josephson junctions with nonuniform bias current distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filatrella, G; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1999-01-01

    We have numerically investigated the behavior of stacks of long Josephson junctions considering a nonuniform bias profile. In the presence of a microwave field the nonuniform bias, which favors the formation of fluxons, can give rise to a change of the sequence of radio-frequency induced steps...

  10. Parallel processing and non-uniform grids in global air quality modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Bochev, Mikhail A.

    2002-01-01

    A large-scale global air quality model, running efficiently on a single vector processor, is enhanced to make more realistic and more long-term simulations feasible. Two strategies are combined: non-uniform grids and parallel processing. The communication through the hierarchy of non-uniform grids

  11. Stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse with non-uniform correlation distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Chaoliang; Cai, Yangjian; Zhang, Yongtao; Wang, Haixia; Zhao, Zhiguo; Pan, Liuzhan

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave (SEPW) pulse with non-uniform correlation distribution is introduced. The realizability condition for such pulse is derived. It is found that the evolution properties of the intensity and the degree of polarization of an SEPW pulse with non-uniform correlation distribution in dispersive media are much different from those of an SEPW pulse with uniform correlation distribution.

  12. Recent Advances in Active Infrared Thermography for Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Pooya; Pinto, Fulvio; Meo, Michele

    2018-01-01

    Active infrared thermography is a fast and accurate non-destructive evaluation technique that is of particular relevance to the aerospace industry for the inspection of aircraft and helicopters’ primary and secondary structures, aero-engine parts, spacecraft components and its subsystems. This review provides an exhaustive summary of most recent active thermographic methods used for aerospace applications according to their physical principle and thermal excitation sources. Besides traditional optically stimulated thermography, which uses external optical radiation such as flashes, heaters and laser systems, novel hybrid thermographic techniques are also investigated. These include ultrasonic stimulated thermography, which uses ultrasonic waves and the local damage resonance effect to enhance the reliability and sensitivity to micro-cracks, eddy current stimulated thermography, which uses cost-effective eddy current excitation to generate induction heating, and microwave thermography, which uses electromagnetic radiation at the microwave frequency bands to provide rapid detection of cracks and delamination. All these techniques are here analysed and numerous examples are provided for different damage scenarios and aerospace components in order to identify the strength and limitations of each thermographic technique. Moreover, alternative strategies to current external thermal excitation sources, here named as material-based thermography methods, are examined in this paper. These novel thermographic techniques rely on thermoresistive internal heating and offer a fast, low power, accurate and reliable assessment of damage in aerospace composites. PMID:29462953

  13. Recent Advances in Active Infrared Thermography for Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ciampa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Active infrared thermography is a fast and accurate non-destructive evaluation technique that is of particular relevance to the aerospace industry for the inspection of aircraft and helicopters’ primary and secondary structures, aero-engine parts, spacecraft components and its subsystems. This review provides an exhaustive summary of most recent active thermographic methods used for aerospace applications according to their physical principle and thermal excitation sources. Besides traditional optically stimulated thermography, which uses external optical radiation such as flashes, heaters and laser systems, novel hybrid thermographic techniques are also investigated. These include ultrasonic stimulated thermography, which uses ultrasonic waves and the local damage resonance effect to enhance the reliability and sensitivity to micro-cracks, eddy current stimulated thermography, which uses cost-effective eddy current excitation to generate induction heating, and microwave thermography, which uses electromagnetic radiation at the microwave frequency bands to provide rapid detection of cracks and delamination. All these techniques are here analysed and numerous examples are provided for different damage scenarios and aerospace components in order to identify the strength and limitations of each thermographic technique. Moreover, alternative strategies to current external thermal excitation sources, here named as material-based thermography methods, are examined in this paper. These novel thermographic techniques rely on thermoresistive internal heating and offer a fast, low power, accurate and reliable assessment of damage in aerospace composites.

  14. Recent Advances in Active Infrared Thermography for Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Mahmoodi, Pooya; Pinto, Fulvio; Meo, Michele

    2018-02-16

    Active infrared thermography is a fast and accurate non-destructive evaluation technique that is of particular relevance to the aerospace industry for the inspection of aircraft and helicopters' primary and secondary structures, aero-engine parts, spacecraft components and its subsystems. This review provides an exhaustive summary of most recent active thermographic methods used for aerospace applications according to their physical principle and thermal excitation sources. Besides traditional optically stimulated thermography, which uses external optical radiation such as flashes, heaters and laser systems, novel hybrid thermographic techniques are also investigated. These include ultrasonic stimulated thermography, which uses ultrasonic waves and the local damage resonance effect to enhance the reliability and sensitivity to micro-cracks, eddy current stimulated thermography, which uses cost-effective eddy current excitation to generate induction heating, and microwave thermography, which uses electromagnetic radiation at the microwave frequency bands to provide rapid detection of cracks and delamination. All these techniques are here analysed and numerous examples are provided for different damage scenarios and aerospace components in order to identify the strength and limitations of each thermographic technique. Moreover, alternative strategies to current external thermal excitation sources, here named as material-based thermography methods, are examined in this paper. These novel thermographic techniques rely on thermoresistive internal heating and offer a fast, low power, accurate and reliable assessment of damage in aerospace composites.

  15. Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erin M.

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding…

  16. Automating System Assembly of Aerospace Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolios, Panagiotis

    2008-01-01

    One of the major challenges in modern aerospace designs is the integration and assembly of independently developed components. We have formalized this as the system assembly problem: from a sea of available components, which should be selected and how should they be connected, integrated, and assembled so that the overall system requirements are satisfied in a certifiable way? We present a powerful framework for automatically solving the system assembly problem directly from system requirements by using formal verification technology. We also present a case study where we applied our work to large-scale industrial examples from the Boeing Dreamliner.

  17. National aero-space plane: Flight mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mciver, Duncan E.; Morrell, Frederick R.

    1990-01-01

    The current status and plans of the U.S. National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program are reviewed. The goal of the program is to develop technology for single stage, hypersonic vehicles which use airbreathing propulsion to fly directly to orbit. The program features an X-30 flight research vehicle to explore altitude-speed regimes not amenable to ground testing. The decision to build the X-30 is now scheduled for 1993, with the first flight in the late 1990's. The flight mechanics, controls, flight management, and flight test considerations for the X-30 are discussed.

  18. In Vivo Sarcomere Lengths Become More Non-uniform upon Activation in Intact Whole Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng Kuan Moo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The sarcomere force-length relationship has been extensively used to predict muscle force potential. The common practice is to measure the mean sarcomere length (SL in a relaxed muscle at a single location and at a given length, and this mean SL is assumed to represent the SLs at other locations across the muscle. However, in a previous study, we found that SLs are highly non-uniform across an intact passive muscle. Moreover, SL non-uniformity increases during activation in single myofibril experiments. Myofibrils lack some structural proteins that comprise an intact muscle, and therefore, the increased SL dispersion upon activation seen in myofibrils may not occur in intact whole muscle. The objectives of the current study were (i to measure the distribution of SLs in an activated intact muscle; and (ii to assess the feasibility of using the mean SL measured at a specific location of the muscle to predict muscle force. Using state-of-the-art multi-photon microscopy and a miniature tendon force transducer, in vivo sarcomeres in the mouse tibialis anterior were imaged simultaneously with muscle force during isometric tetanic contractions. We found that in vivo SL dispersion increased substantially during activation and reached average differences of ~1.0 μm. These differences in SL are associated with theoretical force differences of 70–100% of the maximal isometric force. Furthermore, SLs measured at a single location in the passive muscle were poor predictors of active force potential. Although mean SLs in the activated muscle were better predictors of force potential, predicted forces still differed by as much as 35% from the experimentally measured maximal isometric forces.

  19. Wastewater diffusive dilution and sedimentation of the fine contaminated particles for nonuniform flow in open channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapin Anton

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of non-uniformity on mass transfer processes in open channels have been investigated under the action of urbanization factors. The study is related to the urgent problem of environmental degradation of water objects in urbanized areas. It is known that the water quality in the water objects depends on the manner in which the contaminants spread how they mix with the river water and diluted by it. The main results of the study consist of recommendations to incorporate non-uniformity factor to the calculation of diffusion dilution of wastewater and prediction of river processes. So the effect of the flow non-uniformity on the diffusion model of pollutants dilution and diffusion coefficient have been investigated. Formulas for the concentration profiles calculating and the average concentration of fine particulate matter in nonuniform gradually varied flow were presented. The deposition length of suspended contaminants were received, based on the hydraulic resistance laws of nonuniform gradually varied flow.

  20. Non-uniformity calibration for MWIR polarization imagery obtained with integrated microgrid polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Zheng; Shi, Ze-Lin; Feng, Bin; Hui, Bin; Zhao, Yao-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Integrating microgrid polarimeters on focal plane array (FPA) of an infrared detector causes non-uniformity of polarization response. In order to reduce the effect of polarization non-uniformity, this paper constructs an experimental setup for capturing raw flat-field images and proposes a procedure for acquiring non-uniform calibration (NUC) matrix and calibrating raw polarization images. The proposed procedure takes the incident radiation as a polarization vector and offers a calibration matrix for each pixel. Both our matrix calibration and two-point calibration are applied to our mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) polarization imaging system with integrated microgrid polarimeters. Compared with two point calibration, our matrix calibration reduces non-uniformity by 30 40% under condition of flat-field data test with polarization. The ourdoor scene observation experiment indicates that our calibration can effectively reduce polarization non-uniformity and improve the image quality of our MWIR polarization imaging system.

  1. Puncture Self-Healing Polymers for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L.; Penner, Ronald K.; Bogert, Phil B.; Yost, W. T.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2011-01-01

    Space exploration launch costs on the order of $10K per pound provide ample incentive to seek innovative, cost-effective ways to reduce structural mass without sacrificing safety and reliability. Damage-tolerant structural systems can provide a route to avoiding weight penalty while enhancing vehicle safety and reliability. Self-healing polymers capable of spontaneous puncture repair show great promise to mitigate potentially catastrophic damage from events such as micrometeoroid penetration. Effective self-repair requires these materials to heal instantaneously following projectile penetration while retaining structural integrity. Poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) (EMMA), also known as Surlyn is an ionomer-based copolymer that undergoes puncture reversal (self-healing) following high impact puncture at high velocities. However EMMA is not a structural engineering polymer, and will not meet the demands of aerospace applications requiring self-healing engineering materials. Current efforts to identify candidate self-healing polymer materials for structural engineering systems are reported. Rheology, high speed thermography, and high speed video for self-healing semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers will be reported.

  2. The effects of relativistic and non-local non-linearities on modulational instabilities in non-uniform plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, B.F.; El-Shorbagy, Kh.H.

    2000-01-01

    A general detailed analysis for the nonlinear generation of localized fields due to the existence of a strong pump field inside the non-uniform plasma has been considered. We have taken into account the effects of relativistic and non-local nonlinearities on the structure of plasma resonance region. The nonlinear Schrodinger equation described the localized fields are investigated. Besides, the generalized dispersion relation is obtained to study the modulational instabilities in different cases. Keywords: Wave-plasma interaction, Nonlinear effects, Modulation instabilities

  3. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of Selected Aerospace Education Workshops in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Pauline Hicks

    1976-01-01

    Data from questionnaires indicated that the Tennessee Aerospace Education Workshops were successful in reaching their stated goals, which included developing a greater awareness of aerospace education and helping teachers incorporate more aerospace education in classroom activities. (MLH)

  4. Managing human fallibility in critical aerospace situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Larry

    2014-11-01

    Human fallibility is pervasive in the aerospace industry with over 50% of errors attributed to human error. Consider the benefits to any organization if those errors were significantly reduced. Aerospace manufacturing involves high value, high profile systems with significant complexity and often repetitive build, assembly, and test operations. In spite of extensive analysis, planning, training, and detailed procedures, human factors can cause unexpected errors. Handling such errors involves extensive cause and corrective action analysis and invariably schedule slips and cost growth. We will discuss success stories, including those associated with electro-optical systems, where very significant reductions in human fallibility errors were achieved after receiving adapted and specialized training. In the eyes of company and customer leadership, the steps used to achieve these results lead to in a major culture change in both the workforce and the supporting management organization. This approach has proven effective in other industries like medicine, firefighting, law enforcement, and aviation. The roadmap to success and the steps to minimize human error are known. They can be used by any organization willing to accept human fallibility and take a proactive approach to incorporate the steps needed to manage and minimize error.

  5. Hybrid techniques for complex aerospace electromagnetics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Important aerospace electromagnetics problems include the evaluation of antenna performance on aircraft and the prediction and control of the aircraft's electromagnetic signature. Due to the ever increasing complexity and expense of aircraft design, aerospace engineers have become increasingly dependent on computer solutions. Traditionally, computational electromagnetics (CEM) has relied primarily on four disparate techniques: the method of moments (MoM), the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, the finite element method (FEM), and high frequency asymptotic techniques (HFAT) such as ray tracing. Each of these techniques has distinct advantages and disadvantages, and no single technique is capable of accurately solving all problems of interest on computers that are available now or will be available in the foreseeable future. As a result, new approaches that overcome the deficiencies of traditional techniques are beginning to attract a great deal of interest in the CEM community. Among these new approaches are hybrid methods which combine two or more of these techniques into a coherent model. During the ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program a hybrid FEM/MoM computer code was developed and applied to a geometry containing features found on many modern aircraft.

  6. Leak Detection and Location Technology Assessment for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Coffey, Neil C.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Micro Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) and other impacts can cause leaks in the International Space Station and other aerospace vehicles. The early detection and location of leaks is paramount to astronaut safety. Therefore this document surveys the state of the art in leak detection and location technology for aerospace vehicles.

  7. 77 FR 41891 - Airworthiness Directives; Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael Cann, Senior Aerospace Engineer, Airframe Branch, ACE-117A, FAA, Atlanta Aircraft...: michael.cann@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We received reports of failure to inspect or... Information For more information about this AD, contact Michael Cann, Senior Aerospace Engineer, Airframe...

  8. Development and application of high-end aerospace MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weizheng

    2017-12-01

    This paper introduces the design and manufacturing technology of aerospace microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) characterized by high performance, multi-variety, and small batch. Moreover, several kinds of special MEMS devices with high precision, high reliability, and environmental adaptability, as well as their typical applications in the fields of aeronautics and aerospace, are presented.

  9. The Relationship of Skilled Aerospace Manufacturing Workforce Performance to Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malsberry, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    A major economic driver, the aerospace industry contributes to exports and higher wage jobs, which the United States requires to maintain robust economic health. Despite the investment in vocational educational training programs, insufficient workers have been available to aerospace companies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the…

  10. Aerospace Technology Curriculum Guide. Invest in Success. Vo. Ed. #260.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document contains standards for an articulated secondary and postsecondary curriculum in aerospace technology. The curriculum standards can be used to ensure that vocational programs meet the needs of local business and industry. The first part of the document contains a task list and student performance standards for the aerospace technology…

  11. The Relationship between Organizational Culture Types and Innovation in Aerospace Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Adaora N.

    Innovation in the aerospace industry has proven to be an effective strategy for competitiveness and sustainability. The organizational culture of the firm must be conducive to innovation. The problem was that although innovation is needed for aerospace companies to be competitive and sustainable, certain organizational culture issues might hinder leaders from successfully innovating (Emery, 2010; Ramanigopal, 2012). The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of hierarchical, clan, adhocracy and market organizational types and innovation in aerospace companies within the U.S while controlling for company size and length of time in business. The non-experimental quantitative study included a random sample of 136 aerospace leaders in the U.S. There was a significant relationship between market organizational culture and innovation, F(1,132) = 4.559, p = .035. No significant relationships were found between hierarchical organizational culture and innovation and between clan culture and innovation. The relationship between adhocracy culture and innovation was not significant, possible due to inadequate sample size. Company size was shown to be a justifiable covariate in the study, due to a significant relationship with innovative (F(1, 130) = 4.66, p market organizational cultures are more likely to result in innovative outcomes in the aerospace industry. Organizational leaders are encouraged to adopt a market culture and adopt smaller organizational structures. Recommendations for further research include investigating the relationship between adhocracy culture and innovation using an adequate sample size. Research is needed to determine other variables that predict innovation. This study should be repeated at periodic intervals and across other industrial sectors and countries.

  12. Processing and properties of pressable ceramic with non-uniform reinforcement for selective-toughening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Wei; Hu, Xiaozhi; Ichim, Paul; Sun, Xudong

    2012-01-01

    Brittle low-strength and low-toughness pressable dental ceramic can be reinforced by ductile elongated gold-particles (GP). A customized crown structure can be adequately strengthened by distributing GP only in critical sections of the crown, where high tensile stresses are experienced. In the present study, a non-uniformly structured ceramic–matrix composite with excellent interfacial bonding, twofold fracture toughness and strength at desired locations, is fabricated using pressable dental ceramic and GP. The layout pattern and sequence of different GP/ceramic powder mixtures, high-temperature flow properties of these mixtures during hot-pressing and the sample mold geometry are used to control the distribution and locations of GP for selective toughening and strengthening. Nano-crystalline structures of the pressable ceramic–matrix and the nano-scaled interfacial region around GP have been revealed by high-magnification field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Toughening and strengthening mechanisms of the elongated GP including residual stresses from composite processing and ductile fracture of GP are discussed together with SEM observations. Bulk flexural strength and local micro-indentation fracture and deformation characteristics of the selective-toughened ceramic/metal composite have been compared to those of the monolithic pressable ceramic to validate the toughening and strengthening mechanisms.

  13. Processing and properties of pressable ceramic with non-uniform reinforcement for selective-toughening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Wei [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Xiaozhi, E-mail: xiao.zhi.hu@uwa.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Ichim, Paul [School of Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Sun, Xudong [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Brittle low-strength and low-toughness pressable dental ceramic can be reinforced by ductile elongated gold-particles (GP). A customized crown structure can be adequately strengthened by distributing GP only in critical sections of the crown, where high tensile stresses are experienced. In the present study, a non-uniformly structured ceramic-matrix composite with excellent interfacial bonding, twofold fracture toughness and strength at desired locations, is fabricated using pressable dental ceramic and GP. The layout pattern and sequence of different GP/ceramic powder mixtures, high-temperature flow properties of these mixtures during hot-pressing and the sample mold geometry are used to control the distribution and locations of GP for selective toughening and strengthening. Nano-crystalline structures of the pressable ceramic-matrix and the nano-scaled interfacial region around GP have been revealed by high-magnification field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Toughening and strengthening mechanisms of the elongated GP including residual stresses from composite processing and ductile fracture of GP are discussed together with SEM observations. Bulk flexural strength and local micro-indentation fracture and deformation characteristics of the selective-toughened ceramic/metal composite have been compared to those of the monolithic pressable ceramic to validate the toughening and strengthening mechanisms.

  14. SUPPLY CHAIN FEATURES OF THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY PARTICULAR CASE AIRBUS AND BOEING

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela MOCENCO

    2015-01-01

    Aerospace sector is one of the most globalized industries in terms of market structure and production system. Through aircraft development programs aviation industry has introduced new solutions to develop its products. The role of the partners involved in the development programs for the new generation aircraft is becoming increasingly important. Supply chain management has become a key factor for major manufacturers in the industry. The new strategies introduced by the aircraft manufacturer...

  15. Skill gap analysis and training needs in Indian aerospace industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premkumar Balaraman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of the paper is on assessing the global aerospace industry as well as Indian scenario, and attempts to assess the skill gaps and training needs of Indian aerospace industry.  Design/methodology/approach: The study is qualitative in nature, and employs wide array of qualitative tools which includes desktop study, focus group interviews and secondary sources of information. Around 10 focus groups were used in the study, with each focus group having a minimum of 6 members of experts in the aerospace and allied industries. The study evolved into a 2 staged one, with the first study elucidating the growing importance and potential of aerospace industry, justifying the significance to take forward the second part of the study. And the second study specifically focuses on skill gaps and training needs. Findings and Originality/value: The Study yields varied results on existing generic expectations of aerospace industry, specific needs of aerospace industry, identification of aerospace job categories unique to aerospace industry, key issues of training in Indian scenario and recommendations. The paper in summary reflects the current scenario of aerospace industry potentials for India and its likely impact on skills gap and training needs. Practical implications: Skills gap is a significant gap between an organization’s current capabilities and the skills it needs to achieve its goals. As a number of Global forecasts project, India as an emerging aviation market, the skill gaps in this sector is predicted to be huge and necessitates the study on assessing the skill gaps and its allied training needs. Originality/value: The Study is highly original and first one of its kind in reflecting the current situation of the skills gap and training needs in Indian Aerospace industry. The focus group interviews were conducted with the experts at various levels in the industyr without any bias yielding valid and realtime data for the

  16. SU-F-E-03: PET/CT Guided Dose Boost to Hypoxic Sub-Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinomas Using Self-Optimizing Non-Uniform VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, J; Zheng, X; Liu, H; Chen, B; Zhuo, W [FuDan University HuaDong Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to evaluate the feasibility of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to hypoxic subvolume (HTV) in nasopharyngeal carcinomas under the guidance of 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET/CT using a novel non-uniform volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)technique. Methods: Eight nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with conventional uniform VMAT were retrospectively analyzed. For each treatment, actual conventional uniform VMAT plan with two or more arcs (2–2.5 arcs, totally rotating angle < 1000o) was designed with dose boost to hopxic subvolume (total dose, 84Gy) in the gross tumor volme (GTV) under the guidance of 18F- FMISO PET/CT. Based on the same dataset, experimental single arc non-uniform VAMT plans were generated with the same dose prescription using customized software tools. Dosimetric parameters, quality assurance and the efficiency of the treatment delivery were compared between the uniform and non-uniform VMAT plans. Results: To develop the non-uniform VMAT technique, a specific optimization model was successfully established. Both techniques generate high-quality plans with pass rate (>98%) with the 3mm, 3% criterion. HTV received dose of 84.1±0.75Gy and 84.1±1.2Gy from uniform and non-uniform VMAT plans, respectively. In terms of target coverage and dose homogeneity, there was no significant statistical difference between actual and experimental plans for each case. However, for critical organs at risk (OAR), including the parotids, oral cavity and larynx, dosimetric difference was significant with better dose sparing form experimental plans. Regarding plan implementation efficiency, the average machine time was 3.5 minutes for the actual VMAT plans and 3.7 minutes for the experimental nonuniform VMAT plans (p>0.050). Conclusion: Compared to conventional VMAT technique, the proposed non-uniform VMAT technique has the potential to produce efficient and safe treatment plans, especially in cases with complicated anatomical

  17. Evaluation of nonuniform field exposures with coupling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Onishi, Teruo

    2015-10-21

    In this study, the safety compliance for nonuniform field exposures is discussed using coupling factor concepts. The coupling factor, which is defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission 62311 standard, is extended to consider the effects of harmonics and also to apply to the specific absorption rate (for frequencies up to 30 MHz). The proposed compliance procedure is applied to and demonstrated for a prototype wireless power transfer (WPT) system with induction coupling operating at the fundamental frequency in 140 kHz band. First, measurements confirm that the perturbation of the external magnetic field strength and S11 parameter of a one-loop antenna by a human-equivalent phantom are sufficiently small, suggesting the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to frequencies up to 30 MHz. Then, the frequency characteristics of the coupling factor are derived for the WPT system. For the prototype system that is not optimized for commercial usage, the maximum allowable transmitting power is relaxed by a factor of 23 with the proposed procedure. The contribution of the harmonics decreased the allowable transmitting power by 39%, indicating their importance for safety compliance.

  18. The Influence of nonuniform activity distribution on cellular dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naling, Song; Yuan, Tian; Liangan, Zhang; Guangfu, Dai

    2008-01-01

    S value is an important parameter in determination of absorbed dose in nuclear medicine and radiobiology. The distribution of radioactivity shows significant influence on the S value especially in microdosimetry. In present work, a semi Monte Carlo Model is developed to calculate the microdosimetric cellular S value for different micro-distributions of radioactivity, i.e. uniform, linear increase, linear decrease, exponential increase, exponential decrease and centroid distribution. Emission of alpha particles is simulated by Monte Carlo model and the energy imparted to the target volume is calculated by the analytical Continuous Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA) model and the spline interpolation of range-energy relationship. We calculate tables of S values for 213 Po and 210 Po with various dimensions and most important with various possible micro-distributions of radioactivity, such as linear increase, linear decrease, exponential increase and exponential decrease. Then we compare the S values from cell to cell of uniform distribution with the Hamacher's results to test the feasibility of our model. S values of some nonuniform micro-distributions are compared to the corresponding data of the uniform distribution. The possible sources of these differences are theoretical analyzed. (author)

  19. Vertex function representation in non-uniform frequency grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Ka-Ming; Yang, Shuxiang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2014-03-01

    The proper computer representation of many-body vertex functions is a central issue in computational many body methods such as the parquet formalism, a self-consistent two-particle field theory. Despite the great effort over the past two decades, its application is very limited. This is predominately due to two crucial factors - the stability of the iteration and the size of the memory allocation for the vertices. We previously demonstrated that the stability problem can be alleviated by explicitly restoring the crossing symmetry, making simulations beyond weak coupling for the Hubbard model feasible. The next step for the practical applications of the parquet formalism is to compress the memory required to represent the vertex. In this talk, we first demonstrate the problem of perturbation theory off the Matsubara frequency grids. This problem is avoided by working on the so-called decimation grids, which are non-uniform grids on Matsubara frequency. We then use this scheme in the parquet method, for solving an Anderson impurity problem. The results show substantial improvement compared to using the same number of uniform frequency grids. This may represent a crucial step towards practical applications of the parquet formalism for large clusters.

  20. Fluting Modes in Transversely Nonuniform Solar Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic waves of different types are frequently observed in magnetic flux tubes of the solar atmosphere and are often modeled using simple models. In the standard flux tube model made of a straight uniform tube with an abrupt boundary, transverse wave modes are classified according to their azimuthal wavenumber, m. Sausage (m = 0) and kink (m = 1) modes produce pulsations of the cross section and transverse oscillations of tube axis, respectively. Both sausage and kink modes have been observed in the solar atmosphere. Fluting (m≥slant 2) modes produce perturbations that are essentially confined around the boundary of the tube, I.e., they have a strong surface-like character. Unlike sausage and kink modes, the detection of fluting modes remains elusive. Here we show that the inclusion of transverse inhomogeneity in the flux tube model dramatically affects the properties of fluting modes. Even in a thin tube, kink and fluting modes are no longer degenerate in frequency when the tube has a smooth boundary. In addition, fluting modes become heavily damped by resonant absorption in a timescale shorter than the oscillation period. The perturbations loose their global shape and their distinctive surface-like appearance. As a consequence of that, we argue that nonuniform flux tubes with smooth boundaries may not be able to support fluting-like perturbations as coherent, global modes.

  1. Coronal heating by Alfven waves dissipation in compressible nonuniform media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malara, Francesco; Primavera, Leonardo; Veltri, Pierluigi

    1996-01-01

    The possibility to produce small scales and then to efficiently dissipate energy has been studied by Malara et al. [1992b] in the case of MHD disturbances propagating in an weakly dissipative incompressible and inhomogeneous medium, for a strictly 2D geometry. We extend this work to include both compressibility and the third component for vector quantities. Numerical simulations show that, when an Alfven wave propagates in a compressible nonuniform medium, the two dynamical effects responsible for the small scales formation in the incompressible case are still at work: energy pinching and phase-mixing. These effects give rise to the formation of compressible perturbations (fast and slow waves or a static entropy wave). Some of these compressive fluctuations are subject to the steepening of the wave front and become shock waves, which are extremely efficient in dissipating their energy, their dissipation being independent of the Reynolds number. Rough estimates of the typical times the various dynamical processes take to produce small scales show that these times are consistent with those required to dissipate inside the solar corona the energy of Alfven waves of photospheric origin

  2. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 19: Computer and information technology and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Bishop, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    To remain a world leader in aerospace, the US must improve and maintain the professional competency of its engineers and scientists, increase the research and development (R&D) knowledge base, improve productivity, and maximize the integration of recent technological developments into the R&D process. How well these objectives are met, and at what cost, depends on a variety of factors, but largely on the ability of US aerospace engineers and scientists to acquire and process the results of federally funded R&D. The Federal Government's commitment to high speed computing and networking systems presupposes that computer and information technology will play a major role in the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. However, we know little about information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The use of computer and information technology by US aerospace engineers and scientists in academia, government, and industry is reported.

  3. Technical communications in aerospace - An analysis of the practices reported by U.S. and European aerospace engineers and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

    1990-01-01

    The flow of scientific and technical information (STI) at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels is studied. The responses of U.S and European aerospace engineers and scientists to questionnaires concerning technical communications in aerospace are examined. Particular attention is given to the means used to communicate information and the social system of the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. Demographic data about the survey respondents are provided. The methods used to communicate technical data and the sources utilized to solve technical problems are described. The importance of technical writing skills and the use of computer technology in the aerospace field are discussed. The derived data are useful for R&D and information managers in order to improve access to and utilization of aerospace STI.

  4. Alternative methods for evaluation of non-uniformity in nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasaneh, S.; Rajabi, H.; Hajizadeh, E.

    2005-01-01

    Non-uniformity test is the most essential in daily quality control procedures of nuclear medicine equipment's. However, the calculation of non-uniformity is hindered due to high level of noise in nuclear medicine data. Non-uniformity may be considered as a type of systematic error while noise is certainly a random error. The present methods of uniformity evaluation are not able to distinguish between systematic and random error and therefore produce incorrect results when noise is significant. In the present study, two hypothetical methods have been tested for evaluation of non-uniformity in nuclear medicine images. Materials and Methods: Using the Monte Carlo method, uniform and non-uniform flood images of different matrix sizes and different counts were generated. The uniformity of the images was calculated using the conventional method and proposed methods. The results were compared with the known non-uniformity data of simulated images. Results: It was observed that the value of integral uniformity never went below the recommended values except in small matrix size of high counts (more than 80 millions counts). The differential uniformity was quite insensitive to the degree of non-uniformity in large matrix size. Matrix size of 64*64 was only found to be suitable for the calculation of differential uniformity. It was observed that in uniform images, a small amount of non-uniformity changes the p-value of Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and noise amplitude of fast fourier transformation test significantly while the conventional methods failed to detect the nonuniformity. Conclusion: The conventional methods do not distinguish noise, which is always present in the data and occasional non-uniformity at low count density. In a uniform intact flood image, the difference between maximum and minimum pixel count (the value of integral uniformity) is much more than the recommended values for non-uniformity. After filtration of image, this difference decreases, but remains high

  5. Advanced Virtual Reality Simulations in Aerospace Education and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, L.; Trivailo, P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent research developments at Aerospace Engineering, RMIT University have demonstrated great potential for using Virtual Reality simulations as a very effective tool in advanced structures and dynamics applications. They have also been extremely successful in teaching of various undergraduate and postgraduate courses for presenting complex concepts in structural and dynamics designs. Characteristic examples are related to the classical orbital mechanics, spacecraft attitude and structural dynamics. Advanced simulations, reflecting current research by the authors, are mainly related to the implementation of various non-linear dynamic techniques, including using Kane's equations to study dynamics of space tethered satellite systems and the Co-rotational Finite Element method to study reconfigurable robotic systems undergoing large rotations and large translations. The current article will describe the numerical implementation of the modern methods of dynamics, and will concentrate on the post-processing stage of the dynamic simulations. Numerous examples of building Virtual Reality stand-alone animations, designed by the authors, will be discussed in detail. These virtual reality examples will include: The striking feature of the developed technology is the use of the standard mathematical packages, like MATLAB, as a post-processing tool to generate Virtual Reality Modelling Language files with brilliant interactive, graphics and audio effects. These stand-alone demonstration files can be run under Netscape or Microsoft Explorer and do not require MATLAB. Use of this technology enables scientists to easily share their results with colleagues using the Internet, contributing to the flexible learning development at schools and Universities.

  6. Loft: An Automated Mesh Generator for Stiffened Shell Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2011-01-01

    Loft is an automated mesh generation code that is designed for aerospace vehicle structures. From user input, Loft generates meshes for wings, noses, tanks, fuselage sections, thrust structures, and so on. As a mesh is generated, each element is assigned properties to mark the part of the vehicle with which it is associated. This property assignment is an extremely powerful feature that enables detailed analysis tasks, such as load application and structural sizing. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is an overview of the code and its applications. The modeling approach that was used to create the finite element meshes is described. Several applications of the code are demonstrated, including a Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) wing-sizing study, a lunar lander stage study, a launch vehicle shroud shape study, and a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) orbiter. Part two of the report is the program user manual. The manual includes in-depth tutorials and a complete command reference.

  7. Weakly ionized plasmas in aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V E; Bondarenko, V G; Gildenburg, V B; Gubchenko, V M; Smirnov, A I

    2002-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the activity and state-of-the-art in the field of plasma aerospace applications. Both experimental results and theoretical ideas are analysed. Principal attention is focused on understanding the physical mechanisms of the plasma effect on hypersonic aerodynamics. In particular, it is shown that drag reduction can be achieved using a proper distribution of heat sources around a flying body. Estimates of the energetic efficiency of the thermal mechanism of aerodynamic drag reduction are presented. The non-thermal effect caused by the interaction of a plasma flow with a magnetic field is also analysed. Specifically, it is shown that appropriate spatial distribution of volumetric forces around a hypersonic body allows for complete elimination of shock wave generation. It should be noted that in an ideal case, shock waves could be eliminated without energy consumption

  8. Avoiding symmetry-breaking spatial non-uniformity in deformable image registration via a quasi-volume-preserving constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganj, Iman; Reuter, Martin; Sabuncu, Mert R; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    The choice of a reference image typically influences the results of deformable image registration, thereby making it asymmetric. This is a consequence of a spatially non-uniform weighting in the cost function integral that leads to general registration inaccuracy. The inhomogeneous integral measure--which is the local volume change in the transformation, thus varying through the course of the registration--causes image regions to contribute differently to the objective function. More importantly, the optimization algorithm is allowed to minimize the cost function by manipulating the volume change, instead of aligning the images. The approaches that restore symmetry to deformable registration successfully achieve inverse-consistency, but do not eliminate the regional bias that is the source of the error. In this work, we address the root of the problem: the non-uniformity of the cost function integral. We introduce a new quasi-volume-preserving constraint that allows for volume change only in areas with well-matching image intensities, and show that such a constraint puts a bound on the error arising from spatial non-uniformity. We demonstrate the advantages of adding the proposed constraint to standard (asymmetric and symmetrized) demons and diffeomorphic demons algorithms through experiments on synthetic images, and real X-ray and 2D/3D brain MRI data. Specifically, the results show that our approach leads to image alignment with more accurate matching of manually defined neuroanatomical structures, better tradeoff between image intensity matching and registration-induced distortion, improved native symmetry, and lower susceptibility to local optima. In summary, the inclusion of this space- and time-varying constraint leads to better image registration along every dimension that we have measured it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Liquid jets injected into non-uniform crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Samir

    An experimental study has been conducted with liquid jets injected transversely into a crossflow to study the effect of non-uniformities in the crossflow velocity distribution to the jet behavior. Two different non-uniform crossflows were created during this work, a shear-laden crossflow and a swirling crossflow. The shear-laden crossflow was generated by merging two independent, co-directional, parallel airstreams creating a shear mixing layer at the interface between them. The crossflow exhibited a quasi-linear velocity gradient across the height of the test chamber. By varying the velocities of the two airstreams, the sense and the slope of the crossflow velocity gradient could be changed. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) studies were conducted to characterize the crossflow. The parameter, UR, is defined as the ratio of the velocities of the two streams and governs the velocity gradient. A positive velocity gradient was observed for UR > 1 and a negative velocity gradient for UR atomization of 0.5 mm diameter water jets injected into this crossflow. The crossflow velocity gradient was observed to have a significant effect on jet penetration as well as the post breakup spray. For high UR (> 1), jet penetration increased and the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) distribution became more uniform. For low UR (atomization were observed. The second crossflow tested was a swirling flow generated using in-house designed axial swirlers. Three swirlers were used, with vane exit angles of 30°, 45° and 60°. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was used to study the crossflow velocities. The axial (Ux) and the tangential (Utheta) components of the crossflow velocity were observed to decrease with increasing radial distance away from the centerbody. The flow angle of the crossflow was smaller than the vane exit angle, with the difference increasing with the vane exit angle. Water jets were injected from a 0.5 mm diameter orifice located on a cylindrical centerbody. Multi-plane PIV

  10. Test of critical heat flux with non-uniform axial power shapes in rectangle narrow channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Wanyu; Wang Fei; Xiao Zejun; Lu Donghua

    2007-01-01

    Critical heat flux for axial non-uniform heat flux distribution in rectangle narrow channel was studied in this report. During the test, electric heating were adopted, and the axial direction power loaded were truncation cosine distribution. The de-ionized water was heated. The test result indicated that CHF with non-uniform axial heat flux distribution was lower than CHF with uniform axial heat flux distribution. A correction factor was used to analyze the test data. The semi-empirical relation of correction factor of CHF with axial non-uniform heat flux distribution had been obtained. Comparing to the existing correction factor models, it revealed that the proposed semi-empirical relation predictive CHF with axial non-uniform heat flux distribution in rectangle narrow channel was most accurate. (authors)

  11. Isospectrals of non-uniform Rayleigh beams with respect to their uniform counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat K, Srivatsa; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we look for non-uniform Rayleigh beams isospectral to a given uniform Rayleigh beam. Isospectral systems are those that have the same spectral properties, i.e. the same free vibration natural frequencies for a given boundary condition. A transformation is proposed that converts the fourth-order governing differential equation of non-uniform Rayleigh beam into a uniform Rayleigh beam. If the coefficients of the transformed equation match with those of the uniform beam equation, then the non-uniform beam is isospectral to the given uniform beam. The boundary-condition configuration should be preserved under this transformation. We present the constraints under which the boundary configurations will remain unchanged. Frequency equivalence of the non-uniform beams and the uniform beam is confirmed by the finite-element method. For the considered cases, examples of beams having a rectangular cross section are presented to show the application of our analysis.

  12. The magnetostriction in a superconductor-magnet system under non-uniform magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xueyi; Jiang, Lang; Wu, Hao [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Disaster and Environment in Western China attached to the Ministry of Education of China, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Gao, Zhiwen, E-mail: gaozhw@lzu.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • We studied firstly magnetostriction in HTS under non-uniform magnetic field. • The superconductors may be homogeneous and nonhomogeneous. • The magnetostrictions response of the HTS is sensitive to the critical current density and amplitude of the applied magnetic field. • The magnetostriction of nonhomogeneous HTS is larger than that of homogeneous HTS. - Abstract: This paper describes a numerical model to examine the magnetostriction of bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) under non-uniform magnetic field in conjunction with finite element analysis. Through this model, the magnetostriction of homogeneous and nonhomogeneous HTS can be implemented under non-uniform magnetic field. Further, the effects of critical current density, applied field frequency and amplitude are also considered. The computational study can provide a fundamental mechanistic understanding the effects of non-uniform magnetic field on magnetostriction of HTS.

  13. Influence of adhesive non-uniformity on zero offset of micro accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Li, Fei; Yu, Huijun; Qu, Hao; Hao, Rui; Wang, Dong; Sun, Sheng; Peng, Bei

    2017-12-01

    Adhesive attaching is a common method used in the packaging of high accurate MEMS devices. A full understanding of the effects of adhesive on device performance, therefore, plays a significant role in MEMS design because the thermal stress formed in packaging process highly depends on the shape, size, amount, properties and layout of the die attach adhesive. This paper investigates intensively the influence of adhesive nonuniformity in the sensitive direction of microaccelerometers on the distribution of thermal stress during the variation of environment temperature. The thermal stress will induce a movement of anchors and lead to nonzero voltage output of microaccelerometer. The influence of the adhesive with different levels of nonuniformity k on zero voltage output is investigated and the results show that the adhesive nonuniformity significantly influences the zero offset of the sensors, and the maximum one can reach 8.6 mV when nonuniformity factor is 0.975.

  14. Local full-wave energy in nonuniform plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithe, D.N.

    1988-10-01

    The subject of local wave energy in plasmas is treated via quasilinear theory from the dual perspectives of the action-angle formalism and gyrokinetics analysis. This work presents an extension to all orders in the gyroradius of the self-consistent wave-propagation/quasilinear-absorption problem using gyrokinetics. Questions of when and under what conditions local energy should be of definite sign are best answered using the action-angle formalism. An important result is that the ''dielectric operators'' of the linearized wave equation and of the local energy are not the same, a fact which is obscured when the eikonal or WKB assumption is invoked. Even though the two dielectrics are very different in character (one operates linearly on electric field for the plasma current, the other operates quadratically for the energy), it is demonstrated that they are nevertheless related by a simple mathematical statement. This study was originally motivated by concern and lively discussion over the questions of local energy for rf-heating of plasmas, where in certain instances, full-wave effects such as refraction, strong absorption, and mode conversion are of primary importance. Fundamentally, the rf-absorption must equate with the energy moment of the quasilinear term to achieve a correct energy balance. This fact governs the derivation (as opposed to postulation) of the local absorption. The troublesome ''kinetic flux'' may then be chosen (it is not unique) to satisfy a wave-energy balance relation with the Poynting flux and local absorption. It is shown that at least one such choice reduces asymptotically to the Stix form away from nonuniformities, thereby demonstrating energy conservation to all orders in Larmor radius. 25 refs

  15. 12th International School of Mathematics "G Stampacchia" : Applied Mathematics in the Aerospace Field "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, Attilio; Applied Mathematics in Aerospace Science and Engineering

    1994-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings ofthe meeting on "Applied Mathematics in the Aerospace Field," held in Erice, Sicily, Italy from September 3 to September 10, 1991. The occasion of the meeting was the 12th Course of the School of Mathematics "Guido Stampacchia," directed by Professor Franco Giannessi of the University of Pisa. The school is affiliated with the International Center for Scientific Culture "Ettore Majorana," which is directed by Professor Antonino Zichichi of the University of Bologna. The objective of the course was to give a perspective on the state-of­ the-art and research trends concerning the application of mathematics to aerospace science and engineering. The course was structured with invited lectures and seminars concerning fundamental aspects of differential equa­ tions, mathematical programming, optimal control, numerical methods, per­ turbation methods, and variational methods occurring in flight mechanics, astrodynamics, guidance, control, aircraft design, fluid mechanic...

  16. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC TRACKING OF AERODYNAMIC SURFACES AND AEROSPACE MODELS AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Shortis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace engineers require measurements of the shape of aerodynamic surfaces and the six degree of freedom (6DoF position and orientation of aerospace models to analyse structural dynamics and aerodynamic forces. The measurement technique must be non-contact, accurate, reliable, have a high sample rate and preferably be non-intrusive. Close range photogrammetry based on multiple, synchronised, commercial-off-the-shelf digital cameras can supply surface shape and 6DoF data at 5-15Hz with customisable accuracies. This paper describes data acquisition systems designed and implemented at NASA Langley Research Center to capture surface shapes and 6DoF data. System calibration and data processing techniques are discussed. Examples of experiments and data outputs are described.

  17. Effect of fuel-air-ratio nonuniformity on emissions of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, V. J.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet fuel-air ratio nonuniformity is studied to deterine how nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions are affected. An increase in NOx emissions with increased fuel-air ratio nonuniformity for average equivalence ratios less than 0.7 and a decrease in NOx emissions for average equivalence ratios near stoichiometric is predicted. The degree of uniformityy of fuel-air ratio profiles that is necessary to achieve NOx emissions goals for actual engines that use lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion systems is determined.

  18. Electron Beam Irradiated Intercalated CNT Yarns For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Deborah L.; Gaier, James R.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Lopez Calero, Johnny E.; Ramirez, Christopher; Meador, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-walled CNT yarns have been experimentally and commercially created to yield lightweight, high conductivity fibers with good tensile properties for application as electrical wiring and multifunctional tendons. Multifunctional tendons are needed as the cable structures in tensegrity robots for use in planetary exploration. These lightweight robust tendons can provide mechanical strength for movement of the robot in addition to power distribution and data transmission. In aerospace vehicles, such as Orion, electrical wiring and harnessing mass can approach half of the avionics mass. Use of CNT yarns as electrical power and data cables could reduce mass of the wiring by thirty to seventy percent. These fibers have been intercalated with mixed halogens to increase their specific electrical conductivity to that near copper. This conductivity, combined with the superior strength and fatigue resistance makes it an attractive alternative to copper for wiring and multifunctional tendon applications. Electron beam irradiation has been shown to increase mechanical strength in pristine CNT fibers through increased cross-linking. Both pristine and intercalated CNT yarns have been irradiated using a 5-megavolt electron beam for various durations and the conductivities and tensile properties will be discussed. Structural information obtained using a field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy will correlate microstructural details with bulk properties.

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 12: The diffusion of federally funded aerospace research and development (R/D) and the information seeking behavior of US aerospace engineers and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D is explored from the perspective of the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The following three assumptions frame this exploration: (1) knowledge production, transfer, and utilization are equally important components of the aerospace R&D process; (2) the diffusion of knowledge resulting from federally funded aerospace R&D is indispensable for the U.S. to remain a world leader in aerospace; and (3) U.S. government technical reports, produced by NASA and DOD, play an important, but as yet undefined, role in the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D. A conceptual model for federally funded aerospace knowledge diffusion, one that emphasizes U.S. goverment technical reports, is presented. Data regarding three research questions concerning the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists are also presented.

  20. Exploring Stakeholder Definitions within the Aerospace Industry: A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Jonathan R.

    A best practice in the discipline of project management is to identify all key project stakeholders prior to the execution of a project. When stakeholders are properly identified, they can be consulted to provide expert advice on project activities so that the project manager can ensure the project stays within the budget and schedule constraints. The problem addressed by this study is that managers fail to properly identify key project stakeholders when using stakeholder theory because there are multiple conflicting definitions for the term stakeholder. Poor stakeholder identification has been linked to multiple negative project outcomes such as budget and schedules overruns, and this problem is heightened in certain industries such as aerospace. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore project managers' and project stakeholders' perceptions of how they define and use the term stakeholder within the aerospace industry. This qualitative exploratory single-case study had two embedded units of analysis: project managers and project stakeholders. Six aerospace project managers and five aerospace project stakeholders were purposively selected for this study. Data were collected through individual semi-structured interviews with both project managers and project stakeholders. All data were analyzed using Yin's (2011) five-phased cycle approach for qualitative research. The results indicated that the aerospace project managers and project stakeholder define the term stakeholder as "those who do the work of a company." The participants build upon this well-known concept by adding that, "a company should list specific job titles" that correspond to their company specific-stakeholder definition. Results also indicated that the definition of the term stakeholder is used when management is assigning human resources to a project to mitigate or control project risk. Results showed that project managers tended to include the customer in their stakeholder definitions

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 47: The value of computer networks in aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Ann Peterson; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents data on the value of computer networks that were obtained from a national survey of 2000 aerospace engineers that was conducted in 1993. Survey respondents reported the extent to which they used computer networks in their work and communication and offered their assessments of the value of various network types and applications. They also provided information about the positive impacts of networks on their work, which presents another perspective on value. Finally, aerospace engineers' recommendations on network implementation present suggestions for increasing the value of computer networks within aerospace organizations.

  2. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  3. Global Optimization using Interval Analysis : Interval Optimization for Aerospace Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kampen, E.

    2010-01-01

    Optimization is an important element in aerospace related research. It is encountered for example in trajectory optimization problems, such as: satellite formation flying, spacecraft re-entry optimization and airport approach and departure optimization; in control optimization, for example in

  4. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  5. 75 FR 19662 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... Updates; Commercial Space; Mishap Investigation Process and Metrics; Industrial Safety Metrics. The... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-043)] Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY...

  6. Liquid crystalline thermosetting polymers as protective coatings for aerospace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerriero, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental regulations are driving the development of new aerospace coating systems, mainly to eliminate chromates and reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Among the various potential options for new coating materials, liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) are attractive due to their

  7. Aviation/Aerospace Teacher Education Workshops: Program Development and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Aviation/Aerospace Teacher Education Workshops have been recommended by the Illinois Task force for Aviation/Space Education (1988) as a way of encouraging aeronautical education. The workshop will be offered to elementary school teachers. During...

  8. 76 FR 23339 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ..., 2011. SUMMARY: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration published a document in the Federal... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-043)] Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of meeting...

  9. 76 FR 26316 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Aeronautics and Space Administration published a notice in the Federal Register of April 26, 2011, announcing... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 11- 044] Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of meeting...

  10. Sealed metal-hydride batteries for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, R. D.

    Nickel and silver-metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications by Eagle-Picher. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems. Nickel-metal hydride batteries have twice the gravimetric energy density of nickel-cadmium batteries and twice the volumetric energy density of nickel-hydrogen batteries. Silver-metal hydride batteries have the potential of three times the energy density of nickel-metal hydride. Aerospace metal hydride batteries are hermetically sealed, operate at low pressure and are prismatic in geometry. They exhibit excellent overcharge and overdischarge capability. The objective of current programs at Eagle-Picher is to develop high energy density, long cycle life metal-hydride batteries for the aerospace market and to establish a testing database to support future applications.

  11. Nonuniform Effect of Carrier Separation Efficiency and Light Absorption in Type-II Perovskite Nanowire Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiping; He, Jialun; Cao, Yiyan; Kong, Lijing; Zheng, Xuanli; Wu, Yaping; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Shuping; Wu, Zhiming; Kang, Junyong

    2017-12-01

    Coaxial structures exhibit great potential for the application of high-efficiency solar cells due to the novel mechanism of radial charge separation. Here, we intensively investigate the nonuniform effect of carrier separation efficiency (CSE) and light absorption in perovskite-based type-II coaxial nanowire solar cells (ZnO/CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 ). Results show that the CSE rapidly decreases along the radial direction in the shell, and the value at the outer side becomes extremely low for the thick shell. Besides, the position of the main light absorption gradually moves to the outer side with the increase of the shell thickness. As a result, the external quantum efficiency shows a positional dependence with a maximal value close to the border of the nanowire. Eventually, in our case, it is found that the maximal power conversion efficiency of the solar cells reduces from 19.5 to 17.9% under the effect of the nonuniformity of CSE and light absorption. This work provides a basis for the design of high-efficiency solar cells, especially type-II nanowire solar cells.

  12. Blind restoration for nonuniform aerial images using nonlocal Retinex model and shearlet-based higher-order regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Jia, Huizhu; Xie, Xiaodong; Gao, Wen

    2017-05-01

    Aerial images are often degraded by space-varying motion blurs and simultaneous uneven illumination. To recover a high-quality aerial image from its nonuniform version, we propose a patchwise restoration approach based on a key observation that the degree of blurring is inevitably affected by the illumination conditions. A nonlocal Retinex model is developed to accurately estimate the reflectance component from the degraded aerial image. Thereafter, the uneven illumination is corrected well. Then nonuniform coupled blurring in the enhanced reflectance image is alleviated and transformed toward uniform distribution, which will facilitate the subsequent deblurring. For constructing the multiscale sparsified regularization, the discrete shearlet transform is improved to better represent anisotropic image features in terms of directional sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, a new adaptive variant of total generalized variation is proposed to act as the structure-preserving regularizer. These complementary regularizers are elegantly integrated into an objective function. The final deblurred image with uniform illumination can be obtained by applying a fast alternating direction scheme to solve the derived function. The experimental results demonstrate that our algorithm can not only effectively remove both the space-varying illumination and motion blurs in aerial images, but also recover the abundant details of aerial scenes with top-level objective and subjective quality, and outperforms other state-of-the-art restoration methods.

  13. Nonuniform Effect of Carrier Separation Efficiency and Light Absorption in Type-II Perovskite Nanowire Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiping; He, Jialun; Cao, Yiyan; Kong, Lijing; Zheng, Xuanli; Wu, Yaping; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Shuping; Wu, Zhiming; Kang, Junyong

    2017-03-01

    Coaxial structures exhibit great potential for the application of high-efficiency solar cells due to the novel mechanism of radial charge separation. Here, we intensively investigate the nonuniform effect of carrier separation efficiency (CSE) and light absorption in perovskite-based type-II coaxial nanowire solar cells (ZnO/CH3NH3PbI3). Results show that the CSE rapidly decreases along the radial direction in the shell, and the value at the outer side becomes extremely low for the thick shell. Besides, the position of the main light absorption gradually moves to the outer side with the increase of the shell thickness. As a result, the external quantum efficiency shows a positional dependence with a maximal value close to the border of the nanowire. Eventually, in our case, it is found that the maximal power conversion efficiency of the solar cells reduces from 19.5 to 17.9% under the effect of the nonuniformity of CSE and light absorption. This work provides a basis for the design of high-efficiency solar cells, especially type-II nanowire solar cells.

  14. Amplitude variations of ELF radio waves in the Earth-ionosphere cavity with the day-night non-uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuk, Yu P.; Nickolaenko, A. P.; Hayakawa, M.

    2018-04-01

    The real structure of lower ionosphere should be taken into account when modeling the sub-ionospheric radio propagation in the extremely low frequency (ELF) band and studying the global electromagnetic (Schumann) resonance of the Earth-ionosphere cavity. In the present work we use the 2D (two dimensional) telegraph equations (2DTE) for evaluating the effect of the ionosphere day-night non-uniformity on the electromagnetic field amplitude at the Schumann resonance and higher frequencies. Properties of the cavity upper boundary were taken into account by the full wave solution technique for realistic vertical profiles of atmosphere conductivity in the ambient day and ambient night conditions. We solved the electromagnetic problem in a cavity with the day-night non-uniformity by using the 2DTE technique. Initially, the testing of the 2DTE solution was performed in the model of the sharp day-night interface. The further computations were carried out in the model of the smooth day-night transition. The major attention was directed to the effects at propagation paths "perpendicular" or "parallel" to the solar terminator line. Data were computed for a series of frequencies, the comparison of the results was made and interpretation was given to the observed effects.

  15. Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    Commission Vice-Chairman Partner, Williams & Connolly LLP Dr. Buzz Aldrin President Starcraft Enterprises Sharespace Starbooster & Starcycler Mr. Edward M...proved illusory.” Commissioner Buzz Aldrin 3 - 4 FINAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSION ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNITED STATES AEROSPACE INDUSTRY Aerospace...building market share, largely at the expense of U.S. companies. Former Apollo astronaut and Commissioner Buzz Aldrin signs Yuri Gagarin’s Tribute Book at

  16. Solar and Thermal Energy Harvesting Textile Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Harvesting Textile Composites 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-06-1-0399 for Aerospace Applications” 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Max...Harvesting Textile Composites for Aerospace Applications” Project number FA9550-06-1-0399 Max Shtein, 1 Kevin Pipe, 1 Peter Peumans 2 1...ceramic that is typically used as a transparent electrode in or- ganic solar cells. This achievement is important for integration of PV functionality in

  17. Applications of aerospace technology to petroleum extraction and reservoir engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Back, L. H.; Berdahl, C. M.; Collins, E. E., Jr.; Gordon, P. G.; Houseman, J.; Humphrey, M. F.; Hsu, G. C.; Ham, J. D.; Marte, J. E.; hide

    1977-01-01

    Through contacts with the petroleum industry, the petroleum service industry, universities and government agencies, important petroleum extraction problems were identified. For each problem, areas of aerospace technology that might aid in its solution were also identified, where possible. Some of the problems were selected for further consideration. Work on these problems led to the formulation of specific concepts as candidate for development. Each concept is addressed to the solution of specific extraction problems and makes use of specific areas of aerospace technology.

  18. Research on non-uniform strain profile reconstruction along fiber Bragg grating via genetic programming algorithm and interrelated experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shijie; Zhang, Nan; Xia, Yanjun; Wang, Hongtao

    2014-03-01

    A new heuristic strategy for the non-uniform strain profile reconstruction along Fiber Bragg Gratings is proposed in this paper, which is based on the modified transfer matrix and Genetic Programming(GP) algorithm. The present method uses Genetic Programming to determine the applied strain field as a function of position along the fiber length. The structures that undergo adaptation in genetic programming are hierarchical structures which are different from that of conventional genetic algorithm operating on strings. GP regress the strain profile function which matches the 'measured' spectrum best and makes space resolution of strain reconstruction arbitrarily high, or even infinite. This paper also presents an experimental verification of the reconstruction of non-homogeneous strain fields using GP. The results are compared with numerical calculations of finite element method. Both the simulation examples and experimental results demonstrate that Genetic Programming can effectively reconstruct continuous profile expression along the whole FBG, and greatly improves its computational efficiency and accuracy.

  19. Robust and Adaptive Control With Aerospace Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lavretsky, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Robust and Adaptive Control shows the reader how to produce consistent and accurate controllers that operate in the presence of uncertainties and unforeseen events. Driven by aerospace applications the focus of the book is primarily on continuous-dynamical systems.  The text is a three-part treatment, beginning with robust and optimal linear control methods and moving on to a self-contained presentation of the design and analysis of model reference adaptive control (MRAC) for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. Recent extensions and modifications to MRAC design are included, as are guidelines for combining robust optimal and MRAC controllers. Features of the text include: ·         case studies that demonstrate the benefits of robust and adaptive control for piloted, autonomous and experimental aerial platforms; ·         detailed background material for each chapter to motivate theoretical developments; ·         realistic examples and simulation data illustrating key features ...

  20. Biomimetic optical sensor for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Gorospe, George E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a fiber optic sensor based on the physiological aspects of the eye and vision-related neural layers of the common housefly (Musca domestica) that has been developed and built for aerospace applications. The intent of the research is to reproduce select features from the fly's vision system that are desirable in image processing, including high functionality in low-light and low-contrast environments, sensitivity to motion, compact size, lightweight, and low power and computation requirements. The fly uses a combination of overlapping photoreceptor responses that are well approximated by Gaussian distributions and neural superposition to detect image features, such as object motion, to a much higher degree than just the photoreceptor density would imply. The Gaussian overlap in the biomimetic sensor comes from the front-end optical design, and the neural superposition is accomplished by subsequently combining the signals using analog electronics. The fly eye sensor is being developed to perform real-time tracking of a target on a flexible aircraft wing experiencing bending and torsion loads during flight. We report on results of laboratory experiments using the fly eye sensor to sense a target moving across its field of view.

  1. Aerospace Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma/non-thermal plasma/cold plasmas are being used in a wide range of new applications in aeronautics, active flow control, heat transfer reduction, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, noise suppression, and power generation. Industrial applications may be found in pollution control, materials surface treatment, and water purification. In order for these plasma processes to become practical, efficient means of ionization are necessary. A primary challenge for these applications is to create a desired non-equilibrium plasma in air by preventing the discharge from transitioning into an arc. Of particular interest is the impact on simulations and experimental data with and without detailed consideration of non-equilibrium effects, and the consequences of neglecting non-equilibrium. This presentation will provide an assessment of the presence and influence of non-equilibrium phenomena for various aerospace needs and applications. Specific examples to be considered will include the forward energy deposition of laser-induced non-equilibrium plasmoids for sonic boom mitigation, weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges for an annular Hall type MHD generator duct for turbojet energy bypass, and fundamental mechanisms affecting the design and operation of novel plasma-assisted reactive systems in dielectric liquids (water purification, in-pipe modification of fuels, etc.).

  2. A brief history of aerospace dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, D Keith

    2002-07-01

    In April 2000, the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine (NAS/IOM) Committee on Space Medicine held a workshop under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to explore "innovative terrestrial medical care." There was also a NAS/IOM panel held on "Space Dentistry: Maintaining Astronauts' Oral Health on Long Missions." Air Force Dental Officer Col. Shannon E. Mills chaired the dental committee. Many questions were raised but few answers were available. Prevention was emphasized with the hope that within twenty to thirty years there may be a number of astronaut candidates with no existing dental restorations and with optimum oral health. However, there remains the concern that trauma to teeth could occur within the confines of a zero gravity space capsule as crew members carry out their daily responsibilities. The possibility is evident considering the duration of a space flight to Mars and back could require up to three years. The dental concerns of a space mission are only a small part of a much larger team effort, however, it is one not to be overlooked. An historical review of dentistry's involvement with America's flight and space programs of the 20th Century would be prudent. Many of same questions asked today were addressed in the early days of aviation dentistry as it transitioned into aerospace dentistry. Any past research and experiences would help serve as a foundation to build upon.

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 26: The relationship between technology policy and scientific and technical information within the US and Japanese aerospace industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Government technology policy has nurtured the growth of the aerospace industry which is vital to both the U.S. and Japanese economies. Japanese technology policy differs significantly from U.S. technology policy, however, particularly with respect to the production, transfer, and use of scientific and technical information (STI). In this paper, we discuss the unique position of the aerospace industry in the U.S. and Japan, U.S. and Japanese aerospace policy, and the role of STI in the process of aerospace innovation. The information-seeking behaviors of U.S. and Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists are compared. The authors advocate the development of innovation-adoption technology and STI policy goals for U.S. aerospace and the inclusion of an aerospace knowledge diffusion transfer system with an 'active' component for scanning and acquiring foreign aerospace technology and STI.

  4. Simulations and Experiments on Vibration Control of Aerospace Thin-Walled Parts via Preload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin-walled parts primarily comprise the entire piece of rough machining, and the material removal rate can surpass 95%. Numerous components with thin-walled structures are preferred in the aerospace industry for their light weight, high strength, and other advantages. In aerospace thin-walled workpiece machining processes and practical applications, they are excited by the vibration. The preload changing the modal stiffness of the part is found and this change causes continuous changes in the natural frequency. Researching on the influence of pretightening force on dynamic characteristics of thin-walled components is highly significant for controlling vibration. In this study, the typical aviation thin-walled part is the research object. Finite element numerical simulation and experimental verification are employed to analyze the dynamic characteristics of 7075 aluminum alloy thin-walled plates under different preloads for exploring the relationship between natural frequency and preload. The relationship is validated by comparative results. Both the simulation and experimental results show that the natural frequencies of plates increase following the augmentation of the preload. Thus, this research introduces the method where vibration of aerospace thin-walled parts is reduced by preload. For practical engineering application, a program showing the relationship between natural frequency and preload is written using Visual Basic language.

  5. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 30: The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a major role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  6. A Methodology for Engineering Competencies Definition in the Aerospace Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fortunato

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The need to cut off lead times, to increase the products innovation, to respond to changing customer requirements and to integrate new technologies into business process pushes companies to increase the collaboration. In particular, collaboration, knowledge sharing and information exchange in the Aerospace Value Network, need to a clear definition and identification of competencies of several actors. Main contractors, stakeholders, customers, suppliers, partners, have different expertise and backgrounds and in this collaborative working environment are called to work together in projects, programs and process. To improve collaboration and support the knowledge sharing, a competencies definition methodology and the related dictionary result useful tools among actors within an extended supply chain. They can use the same terminology and be informed on the competencies available. It becomes easy to specify who knows to do required activities stimulating collaboration and improving communication. Based on an action research developed in the context of the iDesign Foundation project, the paper outlines a competency definition methodology and it presents examples from the implementation in Alenia Aeronautica company. A new definition of competency is suggested supporting by a new method to specify the structural relationship between competencies and activities of aeronautical processes.

  7. Adaptive materials and aerostructures: revolutionizing uninhabited aerospace systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ron

    2009-07-01

    This paper is intended to introduce the international adaptive aerostructures community to the tremendous opportunities these structures can bring to uninhabited aerospace systems. The paper starts with an overview of the most critical classes of adaptive aerostructures for uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) and the materials which are used to drive them. The paper describes several classes of UAVs that take advantage of the various kinds of these technologies. Adaptive aerostructures are shown to be integrated into hovering, high speed, low speed and ultra-high performance UAVs. These ultra-high performance UAVs are shown to significantly benefit from newly invented Post-Buckled Precompressed (PBP) piezoelectric actuators. These UAVs are capable of hovering for extended periods of time as a helicopter in gusty, windy, dusty environments, then pop up, converting and dashing out like a missile at several hundred km/hr. The paper shows photos of ultra-high performance UAV launches from armored vehicles, a battle-damage assessment exercise and a live fire sequence with 40mm munitions. The paper concludes with a description of the Visual Signature Suppression (VSS) system which was employed on a 2m UAV operating at several hundred meters above ground level. The VSS system was shown to reduce the visual cross section to below 1.8cm2 which is the threshold for human aircraft observation. Accordingly, the VSS equipped aircraft is said to "disappear" in mid flight.

  8. Electronic Noses for Composites Surface Contamination Detection in Aerospace Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vito, Saverio De; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Formisano, Fabrizio; Polichetti, Tiziana; Salvato, Maria; Alfano, Brigida; Esposito, Elena; Francia, Girolamo Di

    2017-04-02

    The full exploitation of Composite Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in so-called green aircrafts design is still limited by the lack of adequate quality assurance procedures for checking the adhesive bonding assembly, especially in load-critical primary structures. In this respect, contamination of the CFRP panel surface is of significant concern since it may severely affect the bonding and the mechanical properties of the joint. During the last years, the authors have developed and tested an electronic nose as a non-destructive tool for pre-bonding surface inspection for contaminants detection, identification and quantification. Several sensors and sampling architectures have been screened in view of the high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scenarios requirements. Ad-hoc pattern recognition systems have also been devised to ensure a fast and reliable assessment of the contamination status, by combining real time classifiers and the implementation of a suitable rejection option. Results show that e-noses could be used as first line low cost Non Destructive Test (NDT) tool in aerospace CFRP assembly and maintenance scenarios.

  9. Challenges and Opportunities for Nanotechnology in Multi-Functional Composite Structures (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baur, Jeff; Silverman, Edward

    2006-01-01

    .... Of the wide variety of structural applications, fiber-reinforced composites for aerospace structures have some of the most demanding applications with extreme requirements in physical, chemical...

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 69: Writing for the Aerospace Industry. Chapter 3; The Practice of Technical and Scientific Communication: Writing in Professional Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The large and complex aerospace industry, which employed approximately 850,000 people in 1994 (Aerospace Facts, 1994-95, p. 11), plays a vital role in the nation's economy. Although only a small percentage of those employed in aerospace are technical communicators, they perform a wide variety of communication duties in government and the private sector.

  11. Soft Soil Impact Testing and Simulation of Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    In June 2007, a 38-ft/s vertical drop test of a 5-ft-diameter, 5-ft-long composite fuselage section that was retrofitted with a novel composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) was conducted onto unpacked sand. This test was one of a series of tests to evaluate the multi-terrain capabilities of the DEA and to generate test data for model validation. During the test, the DEA crushed approximately 6-in. and left craters in the sand of depths ranging from 7.5- to 9-in. A finite element model of the fuselage section with DEA was developed for execution in LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic code. Pre-test predictions were generated in which the sand was represented initially as a crushable foam material MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63). Following the drop test, a series of hemispherical penetrometer tests were conducted to assist in soil characterization. The penetrometer weighed 20-lb and was instrumented with a tri-axial accelerometer. Drop tests were performed at 16-ft/s and crater depths were measured. The penetrometer drop tests were simulated as a means for developing a more representative soil model based on a soil and foam material definition MAT_SOIL_AND FOAM (Mat 5) in LS-DYNA. The model of the fuselage with DEA was reexecuted using the updated soil model and test-analysis correlations are presented.

  12. Net Shape Technology in Aerospace Structures. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    inx, cs Art Metal Conpan In Japan, %% hich is making fibr- r c n t’rccd a lu m in u n pistons for diesel engines for Toyota . The pro,:css is ,qucclc...5-,,.t,,.. ’ ’.,-.𔃽 , ’- ’Z ’- ,-% ,% , , ’’e $. , $’I ,, ,-r N ". . .,%! -, , ;’,! ----------- 23. Stout , R. J. Thermoplastic Composite...McDonnell Aircraft Company Thomas E. Steelman, Rockwell International Robert J. Stout , General Dynamics Corporation ’.’ Allan T. Taylor, Boeing Commercial

  13. Predictive Modeling of Structural Sensing for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-03

    concrete reinforcing bars, tendons, track rails , one-dimensional (1D) stiffeners, and so on (Bartoli et al., 2005; Loveday, 2008; Marzani et al., 2008...for boundaries of guidedwaves problems, AIP Conf. Proc. 820 (2006) 126–133. [20] Z. Fan, M. Lowe, Interaction of weld -guided waves with defects, NDT...transdu- cers, or EMAT [14], where SH waves were used for detection of weld defects. SH waves excited by EMAT have shown superiority over conventional

  14. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  15. Bio-based structural composite materials for aerospace applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available . Figure 2: Composite Panel 4.3 Cone calorimeter testing Flammability behaviour of the composite panel was tested using a Fire Testing Technology dual cone calorimeter. A constant incident heat flux of 35 kW/m² was used and an electronic ignition... of combustion5,6. The results are given in Table 1. Plots of HRR and smoke production rate (SPR) are given in Figures 3 and 4 and Figure 5 shows the composite panel after cone calorimeter testing. 3 2nd SAIAS Symposium, 14-16 September 2008...

  16. Hybrid Nanocomposites for Efficient Aerospace Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles program seeks to improve safety and efficiency through exploration of the value of hybrid composites, guiding utilization of the...

  17. Hybrid Nanocomposites for Efficient Aerospace Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA seeks to address the primary goals of the Advanced Air Vehicles program, improving safety and efficiency, through exploration of the value for hybrid composites...

  18. Statistical Control Paradigm for Aerospace Structures Under Impulsive Disturbances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pham, Khanh D; Robertson, Lawrence M

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the newly developed statistical control theory is revisited to autonomously control the satellite attitude as well as to provide a means of actively attenuating impulsive disturbances...

  19. Evaluation of Air Coupled Ultrasound for Composite Aerospace Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tat, H.; Georgeson, G.; Bossi, R.

    2009-03-01

    Non-contact air coupled ultrasound suffers from the high acoustic impedance mismatch characteristics of air to solid interfaces. Advances in transducer technology, particularly MEMS, have improved the acoustic impedance match at the transmission stage and the signal to noise at the reception stage. Comparisons of through transmission (TTU) scanning of laminate and honeycomb test samples using conventional piezoelectric air coupled transducers, new MEMS air coupled transducers, and standard water coupled inspections have been performed to assess the capability. An additional issue for air coupled UT inspection is the need for a lean implementation for both manufacturing and in-service operations. Concepts and applications utilizing magnetic coupling of transducers have been developed that allows air coupled inspection operations in compact low cost configurations.

  20. Self-Healing Structural Materials for Damage Tolerant Aerospace Vehicles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed  effort describes how to develop novel lightweight, self-healing systems where self-repair is induced by the forces imparted by the damage event itself....

  1. Improved calibration-based non-uniformity correction method for uncooled infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengwei; Sui, Xiubao

    2017-08-01

    With the latest improvements of microbolometer focal plane arrays (FPA), uncooled infrared (IR) cameras are becoming the most widely used devices in thermography, especially in handheld devices. However the influences derived from changing ambient condition and the non-uniform response of the sensors make it more difficult to correct the nonuniformity of uncooled infrared camera. In this paper, based on the infrared radiation characteristic in the TEC-less uncooled infrared camera, a novel model was proposed for calibration-based non-uniformity correction (NUC). In this model, we introduce the FPA temperature, together with the responses of microbolometer under different ambient temperature to calculate the correction parameters. Based on the proposed model, we can work out the correction parameters with the calibration measurements under controlled ambient condition and uniform blackbody. All correction parameters can be determined after the calibration process and then be used to correct the non-uniformity of the infrared camera in real time. This paper presents the detail of the compensation procedure and the performance of the proposed calibration-based non-uniformity correction method. And our method was evaluated on realistic IR images obtained by a 384x288 pixels uncooled long wave infrared (LWIR) camera operated under changed ambient condition. The results show that our method can exclude the influence caused by the changed ambient condition, and ensure that the infrared camera has a stable performance.

  2. On natural frequencies of non-uniform beams modulated by finite periodic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yanlong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Wang, Wei; Wang, Longqi; Peng, Fujun; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that an infinite periodic beam can support flexural wave band gaps. However, in real applications, the number of the periodic cells is always limited. If a uniform beam is replaced by a non-uniform beam with finite periodicity, the vibration changes are vital by mysterious. This paper employs the transfer matrix method (TMM) to study the natural frequencies of the non-uniform beams with modulation by finite periodic cells. The effects of the amounts, cross section ratios, and arrangement forms of the periodic cells on the natural frequencies are explored. The relationship between the natural frequencies of the non-uniform beams with finite periodicity and the band gap boundaries of the corresponding infinite periodic beam is also investigated. Numerical results and conclusions obtained here are favorable for designing beams with good vibration control ability. - Highlights: • The transfer matrix method to study the natural frequencies of the finite periodic non-uniform beams is derived. • The transfer matrix method to study the band gaps of the infinite periodic non-uniform beams is derived. • The effects of the periodic cells on the natural frequencies are explored. • The relationships of the natural frequencies and band gap boundaries are investigated.

  3. Effects of Nonuniform Incident Illumination on the Thermal Performance of a Concentrating Triple Junction Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Al-Amri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical heat transfer model was developed to investigate the temperature of a triple junction solar cell and the thermal characteristics of the airflow in a channel behind the solar cell assembly using nonuniform incident illumination. The effects of nonuniformity parameters, emissivity of the two channel walls, and Reynolds number were studied. The maximum solar cell temperature sharply increased in the presence of nonuniform light profiles, causing a drastic reduction in overall efficiency. This resulted in two possible solutions for solar cells to operate in optimum efficiency level: (i adding new receiver plate with higher surface area or (ii using forced cooling techniques to reduce the solar cell temperature. Thus, surface radiation exchanges inside the duct and Re significantly reduced the maximum solar cell temperature, but a conventional plain channel cooling system was inefficient for cooling the solar cell at medium concentrations when the system was subjected to a nonuniform light distribution. Nonuniformity of the incident light and surface radiation in the duct had negligible effects on the collected thermal energy.

  4. Technology Applications Team: Applications of aerospace technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Highlights of the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Applications Team activities over the past quarter are presented in Section 1.0. The Team's progress in fulfilling the requirements of the contract is summarized in Section 2.0. In addition to our market-driven approach to applications project development, RTI has placed increased effort on activities to commercialize technologies developed at NASA Centers. These Technology Commercialization efforts are summarized in Section 3.0. New problem statements prepared by the Team in the reporting period are presented in Section 4.0. The Team's transfer activities for ongoing projects with the NASA Centers are presented in Section 5.0. Section 6.0 summarizes the status of four add-on tasks. Travel for the reporting period is described in Section 7.0. The RTI Team staff and consultants and their project responsibilities are listed in Appendix A. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of many individuals to the RTI Technology Applications Team program. The time and effort contributed by managers, engineers, and scientists throughout NASA were essential to program success. Most important to the program has been a productive working relationship with the NASA Field Center Technology Utilization (TU) Offices. The RTI Team continues to strive for improved effectiveness as a resource to these offices. Industry managers, technical staff, medical researchers, and clinicians have been cooperative and open in their participation. The RTI Team looks forward to continuing expansion of its interaction with U.S. industry to facilitate the transfer of aerospace technology to the private sector.

  5. Ethernet for Aerospace Applications - Ethernet Heads for the Skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the goals of aerospace applications is to reduce the cost and complexity of avionic systems. Ethernet is a highly scalable, flexible, and popular protocol. The aerospace market is large, with a forecasted production of over 50,000 turbine-powered aircraft valued at $1.7 trillion between 2012 and 2022. Boeing estimates demand for commercial aircraft by 2033 to total over 36,000 with a value of over $5 trillion. In 2014 US airlines served over 750 million passengers and this is growing over 2% yearly. Electronic fly-by-wire is now used for all airliners and high performance aircraft. Although Ethernet has been widely used for four decades, its use in aerospace applications is just beginning to become common. Ethernet is the universal solution in commercial networks because of its high bandwidths, lower cost, openness, reliability, maintainability, flexibility, and interoperability. However, when Ethernet was designed applications with time-critical, safety relevant and deterministic requirements were not given much consideration. Many aerospace applications use a variety of communication architectures that add cost and complexity. Some of them are SpaceWire, MIL-STD-1553, Avionics Full Duplex Switched Ethernet (AFDX), and Time-Triggered Ethernet (TTE). Aerospace network designers desire to decrease the number of networks to reduce cost and effort while improving scalability, flexibility, openness, maintainability, and reliability. AFDX and TTE are being considered more for critical aerospace systems because they provide redundancy, failover protection, guaranteed timing, and frame priority and are based on Ethernet IEEE 802.3. This paper explores the use of AFDX and TTE for aerospace applications.

  6. Electroluminescence from InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-wells nanorods light-emitting diodes positioned by non-uniform electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunik; Kim, Byung-Jae; Kim, Jihyun

    2012-11-05

    We report that the nanorod light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-wells (MQWs) emitted bright electroluminescence (EL) after they were positioned and aligned by non-uniform electric fields. Firstly, thin film LED structures with MQWs on sapphire substrate were coated with SiO(2) nanospheres, followed by inductively-coupled plasma etch to create nanorod-shapes with MQWs, which were transferred to the pre-patterned SiO(2)/Si wafer. This method allowed us to obtain nanorod LEDs with uniform length, diameter and qualities. Dielectrophoretic force created by non-uniform electric field was very effective at positioning the processed nanorods on the pre-patterned contacts. After aligned by non-uniform electric field, we observed bright EL from many nanorods, which had both cases (p-GaN/MQWs/n-GaN or n-GaN/MQWs/p-GaN). Therefore, bright ELs at different locations were observed under the various bias conditions.

  7. Non-uniform chromatin condensation on chromosomes: Comparison of different loci by two-color FISH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tihy, F.; Fetni, r.; Lemieux, N. [Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Models for higher-order folding of the chromatin fiber have been proposed. To date, however, many questions are still unanswered concerning the specificity of chromatin condensation along the entire genome. With the most advanced molecular cytogenetic techniques, we could gather data to help elucidate some aspects of the structural organization of chromosomes by analyzing the resolution limit of adjacent probes at different loci. To study this limit of resolution, we have used two-color FISH to determine the minimal distance at which two probes are individualized. We used probes of known molecular distances on the following loci: the dystrophin gene on Xp21, the HLA locus on 6p21, the RB1 on 13q14 and the HSTF1 and INT2 genes on 11q13. For the dystrophin gene, the limit of resolution was found to be 250 kb, for the HLA locus, 150 kb, for HSTF1 and INT2 on 11q13, 40 kb, and for RB1, 30 kb. There was a large difference in resolution between the loci studied. These results show that condensation does not affect chromatin equally in every loci. The non-uniform compaction of chromatin within loci on chromosomes could be related to the different activities of those loci. The smallest limits of resolution that we observed were 30 kb for the RB1 gene and 40 kb for the HSTF1 and INT2 genes. These distances are much smaller than expected, suggesting that these genes have a particularly decondensed structure. Since these genes are known to be very active, these results can also be interpreted to show the relationship between greater activity and smaller condensation.

  8. Nonuniformity correction for an infrared focal plane array based on diamond search block matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng-Hui, Rong; Hui-Xin, Zhou; Han-Lin, Qin; Rui, Lai; Kun, Qian

    2016-05-01

    In scene-based nonuniformity correction algorithms, artificial ghosting and image blurring degrade the correction quality severely. In this paper, an improved algorithm based on the diamond search block matching algorithm and the adaptive learning rate is proposed. First, accurate transform pairs between two adjacent frames are estimated by the diamond search block matching algorithm. Then, based on the error between the corresponding transform pairs, the gradient descent algorithm is applied to update correction parameters. During the process of gradient descent, the local standard deviation and a threshold are utilized to control the learning rate to avoid the accumulation of matching error. Finally, the nonuniformity correction would be realized by a linear model with updated correction parameters. The performance of the proposed algorithm is thoroughly studied with four real infrared image sequences. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can reduce the nonuniformity with less ghosting artifacts in moving areas and can also overcome the problem of image blurring in static areas.

  9. Effect of nonuniformity on the energy resolution of EM sampling calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, J.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Glagolev, V.; Pantea, A.; Pantea, D.; Tokar, S.

    1995-01-01

    The response of a sampling tile electromagnetic calorimeter was simulated for incident electrons in the 10-500 GeV energy range. The influence of tile to tile nonuniformity on the a and b coefficients of the calorimeter energy resolution parametrisation formula was investigated in detail. An energy resolution deterioration due to nonuniformity was observed, but it was shown that by calibrating the towers individually one can reduce this undesirable effect to reasonable limits. An explicit a and b coefficients dependence on σ non , the tile response nonuniformity standard deviation, was found. Our previous results on this dependence obtained by analytical methods using the electromagnetic shower mean profile universal parametrisation and the present results obtained by Monte Carlo simulation are compared and found to be in good agreement. (orig.)

  10. Joint de-blurring and nonuniformity correction method for infrared microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Anselmo; Torres, Sergio; Machuca, Guillermo; Ramírez, Wagner; Gutiérrez, Pablo A.; Viafora, Laura A.; Godoy, Sebastián E.; Vera, Esteban

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we present a new technique to simultaneously reduce two major degradation artifacts found in mid-wavelength infrared microscopy imagery, namely the inherent focal-plane array nonuniformity noise and the scene defocus presented due to the point spread function of the infrared microscope. We correct both nuisances using a novel, recursive method that combines the constant range nonuniformity correction algorithm with a frame-by-frame deconvolution approach. The ability of the method to jointly compensate for both nonuniformity noise and blur is demonstrated using two different real mid-wavelength infrared microscopic video sequences, which were captured from two microscopic living organisms using a Janos-Sofradir mid-wavelength infrared microscopy setup. The performance of the proposed method is assessed on real and simulated infrared data by computing the root mean-square error and the roughness-laplacian pattern index, which was specifically developed for the present work.

  11. Highlighting non-uniform temperatures close to liquid/solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirez, L.; Baroni, P.; Bardeau, J. F.

    2017-05-01

    The present experimental measurements reveal that similar to external fields such as electric, magnetic, or flow fields, the vicinity of a solid surface can preclude the liquid molecules from relaxing to equilibrium, generating located non-uniform temperatures. The non-uniform temperature zone extends up to several millimeters within the liquid with a lower temperature near the solid wall (reaching ΔT = -0.15 °C ± 0.02 °C in the case of liquid water) counterbalanced at larger distances by a temperature rise. These effects highlighted by two independent methods (thermistor measurement and infra-red emissivity) are particularly pronounced for highly wetting surfaces. The scale over which non-uniform temperatures are extended indicates that the effect is assisted by intermolecular interactions, in agreement with recent developments showing that liquids possess finite shear elasticity and theoretical approaches integrating long range correlations.

  12. Vibration of nonuniform carbon nanotube with attached mass via nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Hai Li; Shen, Zhi Bin; Li, Dao Kui

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the vibrational behavior of nonuniform single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) carrying a nanoparticle. A nonuniform cantilever beam with a concentrated mass at the free end is analyzed according to the nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory. A governing equation of a nonuniform SWCNT with attached mass is established. The transfer function method incorporating with the perturbation method is utilized to obtain the resonant frequencies of a vibrating nonlocal cantilever-mass system. The effects of the nonlocal parameter, taper ratio and attached mass on the natural frequencies and frequency shifts are discussed. Obtained results indicate that the sensitivity of the frequency shifts on the attached mass increases when the length-to-diameter ratio decreases. Tapered SWCNT possesses higher fundamental frequencies if the taper ratio becomes larger.

  13. Circumferential nonuniformity of cladding radiation swelling of fast reactor peripheral fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutov, V.F.; Farkhutdinov, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of the investigation into the perimeter radiation swelling of Kh18N10T stainless steel cladding in different cross sections of a peripheral fuel element of the BR-5 reactor. The fluence on the cladding is 1.8-2.9 x 10 22 fast neutr/cm 2 , the operating temperatures in different parts of the fuel element being 430 deg to 585 deg C. There has been observed circumferential non-uniformity of the distribution, concentration, and of the total volume of radiation cavities, which is due to temperature non-uniformity along the cladding perimeter. It is shown that such non-uniformity of radiation swelling of the cladding material may result in bending of the peripheral fuel element with regard to the fuel assembly sheath walls

  14. Nonuniform transformation field analysis of multiphase elasto viscoplastic materials: application to MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussette, S.

    2005-05-01

    The description of the overall behavior of nonlinear materials with nonlinear dissipative phases requires an infinity of internal variables. An approximate model involving only a finite number of internal variables, Nonuniform Transformation Field Analysis, is obtained by considering a decomposition of these variables on a finite set of nonuniform transformation fields, called plastic modes. The method is initially developed for incompressible elasto viscoplastic materials. Karhunen-Loeve expansion is proposed to optimize the plastic modes. Then the method is extended to porous elasto viscoplastic materials. Finally the transformation field analysis, developed by Dvorak, is applied to nuclear fuels MOX. This method enables to make sensitivity studies to determine the role of some microstructural parameters on the fuel behaviour. Moreover the adequacy of the nonuniform method for fuels MOX is shown, the final objective being to be able to apply the model to the MOX in 3D. (author)

  15. U. S. aerospace: the keystone to fusion development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbertson, J.

    1977-03-01

    From 1968 to 1974 employment in the aerospace industry dropped by 35 percent, with even greater reductions since. Aerospace and related sectors are now estimated to be operating at 60 percent of total capacity or less. What is being destroyed is an industry whose R and D budget still makes up a whopping 50 percent of all U.S. industrial R and D. The author feels this R and D capability, and the quality of technology and manpower that accompany the industry, pinpoint aerospace as the keystone of the development effort necessary to bring a fusion economy into being, solving the scientific problems that still stand in the way of constructing working fusion reactors and providing the level of productive capacity necessary to produce such reactors to power the world. He suggests that a program for fusion development would catapult aerospace out of its present collapse into growth. Employment in aerospace and the related electronics industry would increase by at least a half million workers, scientists, engineers, and technicians. During the same time other parts of the industry will be deployed to vital projects in transportation development, space exploration, communications, and certain consumer goods, creating additional hundreds of thousands of jobs. The step from experimental reactors to full fusion power plants generating electricity and, further down the line, providing energy for techniques such as the fusion torch, is a giant one, involving the solution of both the most fundamental problems of physics theory and many formidable engineering problems.

  16. International conference on Recent Advances in Aerospace Engineering (ICRAAE-2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Introduction The First International conference on Recent Advances in Aerospace Engineering (ICRAAE-2017) will be conducted by the Department of Aerospace Engineering at Karunya University, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, India, on 3rd and 4th March, 2017. The conference aims to bring together students, academicians, leading scientists, researchers and industrialists working in diverse fields of Aerospace Engineering. This conference provides an inter-disciplinary platform for the educators, researchers and practitioners to present, share and discuss the recent trends, innovations, concerns and solutions in the cutting edge technologies of Aerospace Engineering for mutual benefit and the growth of the nation. Objectives The conference is devoted to benefit the participants who will have the opportunity to gain insight into state-of-the-art technologies in the field of Aerospace Engineering by the expert lectures of scientists and pioneering researchers from India and abroad. In addition, the two-day conference will enable knowledge sharing by personnel involved in active research working on the recent developments in this diverse field. List of International Deep Drawing Research Group, Conference Topics, Facts and Statistics, Achknowledgement, Keynote Speakers, Scientific Committee, Editors all are available in this PDF.

  17. Factors Influencing Advancement of Women Senior Leaders in Aerospace Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett-Howard, Camille Elaine

    The problem researched in this study was the limited number of women in senior leadership positions in the aerospace industry. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological research study was to interview women senior leaders in the aerospace industry to explore the factors they perceived as beneficial to their advancement to senior leadership positions in the aerospace industry. The research study was guided by a central research question relating to what professional and personal factors might have led to promotional opportunities into senior leadership roles. Transformational leadership was the conceptual framework used to inform the study. The qualitative, phenomenological approach was selected to gain insights of the lived experiences and perceptions relating to career advancement of women to senior leadership positions in the aerospace industry. Data were collected using a modified Van Kaam method, coded, and analyzed to discern themes or patterns. Findings were that the attributes participants contributed to their success, included a focus on leadership, personal development, and the importance of mentoring relationships. This study presented a positive direction in addressing the gaps in the body of knowledge related to women and leadership development by exploring the experiences of women in senior leadership positions in the aerospace industry. Implications for social change include informing organizations and women about specific leadership development practices as one way to promote more women into leadership positions thus reducing the gap between the number of men and women leaders.

  18. Multiwavelength Pyrometer Developed for Use at Elevated Temperatures in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel L.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a unique multiwavelength pyrometer for aerospace applications. It has been shown to be a useful and versatile instrument for measuring the surface temperatures of ceramic zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and alumina, even when their emissivity is unknown. The introduction of fiber optics into the pyrometer has greatly increased the ease of using this instrument. Direct comparison of measurements obtained using the pyrometer and thin film thermocouples on a sample provided independent verification of pyrometry temperature measurement. Application of the pyrometer has also included simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurement in a transparent material, the measurement of combustion gas temperatures in the flames of an atmospheric burner, the measurement of the temperature distribution appearing on a large surface from the recording of just a single radiation spectrum emitted from this nonuniform temperature surface, and the measurement of some optical properties for special aeronautical materials-such as nanostructured layers. The multiwavelength pyrometer temperature is obtained from a radiation spectrum recorded over a broad wavelength region by transforming it into a straight line segment(s) in part or all of the spectral region. The intercept of the line segment(s) with the vertical axis at zero wavelength gives the inverse of the temperature. In a two-color pyrometer, the two data points are also amenable to this analysis to determine the unknown temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength-independent emissivity. Its two (and minimum) pieces of data are sufficient to determine this straight line. However, a multiwavelength pyrometer not only has improved accuracy but also confirms that the wavelength-independent emissivity assumption is valid when a multitude of data points are shown to lie on a simple straight line.

  19. Simulations of beam emittance growth from the collectiverelaxation of space-charge nonuniformities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Steven M.; Grote, David P.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-05-01

    Beams injected into a linear focusing channel typically have some degree of space-charge nonuniformity. For unbunched beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in linear focusing channels, Debye screening of self-field interactions tends to make the transverse density profile flat. An injected particle distribution with a large systematic charge nonuniformity will generally be far from an equilibrium of the focusing channel and the initial condition will launch a broad spectrum of collective modes. These modes can phase-mix and experience nonlinear interactions which result in an effective relaxation to a more thermal-equilibrium-like distribution characterized by a uniform density profile. This relaxation transfers self-field energy from the initial space-charge nonuniformity to the local particle temperature, thereby increasing beam phase space area (emittance growth). Here they employ two-dimensional electrostatic particle in cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the effects of initial transverse space-charge nonuniformities on the equality of beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in a continuous focusing channel. Results are compared to theoretical bounds of emittance growth developed in previous studies. Consistent with earlier theory, it is found that a high degree of initial distribution nonuniformity can be tolerated with only modest emittance growth and that beam control can be maintained. The simulations also provide information on the rate of relaxation and characteristic levels of fluctuations in the relaxed states. This research suggests that a surprising degree of initial space-charge nonuniformity can be tolerated in practical intense beam experiments.

  20. The Pierce diode with an external circuit: II, Non-uniform equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    The non-uniform (non-linear) equilibria of the classical (short circuit) Pierce diode and the extended (series RLC external circuit) Pierce diode are described theoretically, and explored via computer simulation. It is found that most equilibria are correctly predicted by theory, but that the continuous set of equilibria of the classical Pierce diode at α = 2π are not observed. The stability characteristics of the non-uniform equilibria are also worked out, and are consistent with the simulations. 8 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Fluxon dynamics in long Josephson junctions in the presence of a temperature gradient or spatial nonuniformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krasnov, V.M.; Oboznov, V.A.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1997-01-01

    self-energy (from the cold to the hot end of the junction). A phenomenon, the ''zero crossing flux flow step'' (ZCFFS) with a nonzero voltage at a zero applied current, was observed in nonuniform long Josephson junctions. The phenomenon is due to the existence of a preferential direction...... for the Josephson vortex motion. ZCFFS's were observed at certain magnetic fields when the critical current in one direction but not the other becomes zero. Possible applications of nonuniform Josephson junctions in flux flow oscillators and as a superconducting diode are discussed....

  2. Photocathode non-uniformity contribution to the energy resolution of scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghian, M.; Koohi-Fayegh, R.; Ghal-Eh, N.; Etaati, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the basics of the light transport simulation in scintillators and the wavelength-dependencies in the process. The non-uniformity measurement of the photocathode surface is undertaken, showing that for the photocathode used in this study the quantum efficiency falls to about 4% of its maximum value, especially in areas far from the centre. The wavelength-and position-dependent quantum efficiency is implemented in the Monte Carlo light transport code, showing that, the contribution of the photocathode non-uniformity to the energy resolution is estimated to be around 18%, when all position-and wavelength-dependencies are included. (authors)

  3. Additive non-uniform random sampling in superimposed fiber Bragg grating strain gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Y C; Liu, H Y; Yan, S B; Li, J M; Tang, J; Yang, Y H; Yang, M W

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an additive non-uniform random sampling and interrogation method for dynamic and/or static strain gauge using a reflection spectrum from two superimposed fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The superimposed FBGs are designed to generate non-equidistant space of a sensing pulse train in the time domain during dynamic strain gauge. By combining centroid finding with smooth filtering methods, both the interrogation speed and accuracy are improved. A 1.9 kHz dynamic strain is measured by generating an additive non-uniform randomly distributed 2 kHz optical sensing pulse train from a mean 500 Hz triangular periodically changing scanning frequency. (paper)

  4. Additive non-uniform random sampling in superimposed fiber Bragg grating strain gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y. C.; Liu, H. Y.; Yan, S. B.; Yang, Y. H.; Yang, M. W.; Li, J. M.; Tang, J.

    2013-05-01

    This paper demonstrates an additive non-uniform random sampling and interrogation method for dynamic and/or static strain gauge using a reflection spectrum from two superimposed fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The superimposed FBGs are designed to generate non-equidistant space of a sensing pulse train in the time domain during dynamic strain gauge. By combining centroid finding with smooth filtering methods, both the interrogation speed and accuracy are improved. A 1.9 kHz dynamic strain is measured by generating an additive non-uniform randomly distributed 2 kHz optical sensing pulse train from a mean 500 Hz triangular periodically changing scanning frequency.

  5. Modeling of pancake frying with non-uniform heating source applied to domestic cookers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz-Serrano, F.; Sagues, C.; Feyissa, Aberham Hailu

    2016-01-01

    . In this work we propose a model of contact frying of pancakes in domestic cookers, particularly in induction hobs and radiant cookers, in which the heating of the cooking vessels can be non-uniform. This non-uniformity is unavoidable in practice, but it can be reduced by optimizing the design of the cooker....... The proposed model combines heat and mass transfer phenomena, and also includes the correlation between the browning development and the temperature distribution, the local water content and the cooking time. The model has been also validated through experiments using a commercial induction hob and a radiation...

  6. Green Aerospace Fuels from Nonpetroleum Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Kulis, Michael J.; DeLaRee, Ana B.; Zubrin, Robert; Berggren, Mark; Hensel, Joseph D.; Kimble, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to produce green aerospace propellants from nonpetroleum sources are outlined. The paper begins with an overview of feedstock processing and relevant small molecule or C1 chemistry. Gas-to-liquid technologies, notably Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processing of synthesis gas (CO and H2), are being optimized to enhance the fraction of product stream relevant to aviation (and other transportation) fuels at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Efforts to produce optimized catalysts are described. Given the high cost of space launch, the recycling of human metabolic and plastic wastes to reduce the need to transport consumables to orbit to support the crew of a space station has long been recognized as a high priority. If the much larger costs of transporting consumables to the Moon or beyond are taken into account, the importance of developing waste recycling systems becomes still more imperative. One promising way to transform organic waste products into useful gases is steam reformation; this well-known technology is currently being optimized by a Colorado company for exploration and planetary surface operations. Reduction of terrestrial waste streams while producing energy and/or valuable raw materials is an opportunity being realized by a new generation of visionary entrepreneurs. A technology that has successfully demonstrated production of fuels and related chemicals from waste plastics developed in Northeast Ohio is described. Technologies being developed by a Massachusetts company to remove sulfur impurities are highlighted. Common issues and concerns for nonpetroleum fuel production are emphasized. Energy utilization is a concern for production of fuels whether a terrestrial operation or on the lunar (or Martian) surface; the term green relates to not only mitigating excess carbon release but also to the efficiency of grid-energy usage. For space exploration, energy efficiency can be an essential concern. Other issues of great concern include minimizing

  7. Environmentally friendly power sources for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeña-Rey, Nieves; Mosquera, Jonay; Bataller, Elena; Ortí, Fortunato; Dudfield, Christopher; Orsillo, Alessandro

    between the two power sources [N. Lapeña-Rey, J. Mosquera, E. Bataller, F. Ortí, SAE 2007 Aerotech Congress & Exhibition, 2007 (Publication number: 2007-01-3906)]. The demonstrator airplane constitutes an example of the successful implementation of novel clean power sources in aviation. The detailed description of the airplane and its subsystems is given elsewhere [N. Lapeña-Rey, J. Mosquera, E. Bataller, F. Ortí, SAE 2007 Aerotech Congress & Exhibition, 2007 (Publication number: 2007-01-3906)]. This paper focuses specially on the power sources design and pre-flight tests giving special attention to those requirements derived from aerospace applications.

  8. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  9. Aerospace Patented High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Used in Commercial Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA structural materials engineer, Jonathan Lee, displays blocks and pistons as examples of some of the uses for NASA's patented high-strength aluminum alloy originally developed at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. NASA desired an alloy for aerospace applications with higher strength and wear-resistance at elevated temperatures. The alloy is a solution to reduce costs of aluminum engine pistons and lower engine emissions for the automobile industry. The Boats and Outboard Engines Division at Bombardier Recreational Products of Sturtevant, Wisconsin is using the alloy for pistons in its Evinrude E-Tec outboard engine line.

  10. Numerical assessment of non-uniform corrosion scenarios of rebar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. S Muthulingam1 B N Rao2. Department of Civil Engineering, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603 110, India; Structural Engineering Division, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, India ...

  11. PARTIAL ERUPTION OF A FILAMENT WITH TWISTING NON-UNIFORM FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Xiang, Yongyuan; Cai, Yunfang; Liu, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The eruption of a filament in a kinklike fashion is often regarded as a signature of kink instability. However, the kink instability threshold for the filament’s magnetic structure is not widely understood. Using Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope, we present a partial eruptive filament. During the eruption, the filament thread appeared to split from its middle and to break out in a kinklike fashion. In this period, the remaining filament material stayed below and erupted without the kinking motion later on. The coronal magnetic field lines associated with the filament are obtained from nonlinear force-free field extrapolations using the twelve-minute-cadence vector magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We studied the extrapolated field lines passing through the magnetic dips which are in good agreement with the observed filament. The field lines are non-uniformly twisted and appear to be composed of two twisted flux ropes winding around each other. One of them has a higher twist than the other, and the flux rope with the higher twist has its dips aligned with the kinking eruptive thread at the beginning of its eruption. Before the eruption, moreover, the flux rope with the higher twist was found to expand with an approximately constant field twist. In addition, the helicity flux maps deduced from the HMI magnetograms show that some helicity is injected into the overlying magnetic arcade, but no significant helicity is injected into the flux ropes. Accordingly, we suggest that the highly twisted flux rope became kink unstable when the instability threshold declined with the expansion of the flux rope

  12. Aerospace toxicology overview: aerial application and cabin air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    Aerospace toxicology is a rather recent development and is closely related to aerospace medicine. Aerospace toxicology can be defined as a field of study designed to address the adverse effects of medications, chemicals, and contaminants on humans who fly within or outside the atmosphere in aviation or on space flights. The environment extending above and beyond the surface of the Earth is referred to as aerospace. The term aviation is frequently used interchangeably with aerospace. The focus of the literature review performed to prepare this paper was on aerospace toxicology-related subject matters, aerial application and aircraft cabin air quality. Among the important topics addressed are the following: · Aerial applications of agricultural chemicals, pesticidal toxicity, and exposures to aerially applied mixtures of chemicals and their associated formulating solvents/surfactants The safety of aerially encountered chemicals and the bioanalytical methods used to monitor exposures to some of them · The presence of fumes and smoke, as well as other contaminants that may generally be present in aircraft/space vehicle cabin air · And importantly, the toxic effects of aerially encountered contaminants, with emphasis on the degradation products of oils, fluids, and lubricants used in aircraft, and finally · Analytical methods used for monitoring human exposure to CO and HCN are addressed in the review, as are the signs and symptoms associated with exposures to these combustion gases. Although many agricultural chemical monitoring studies have been published, few have dealt with the occurrence of such chemicals in aircraft cabin air. However, agricultural chemicals do appear in cabin air; indeed, attempts have been made to establish maximum allowable concentrations for several of the more potentially toxic ones that are found in aircraft cabin air. In this article, I emphasize the need for precautionary measures to be taken to minimize exposures to aerially

  13. Development and integration of modern laboratories in aerospace education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desautel, D.; Hunter, N.; Mourtos, N.; Pernicka, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and integration of a suite of laboratories in an aerospace engineering program. The program's approach to undergraduate education is described as the source for the development of the supporting laboratories. Nine laboratories supporting instruction were developed and installed. The nine laboratories include most major flight-vehicle disciplines. The purpose and major equipments/experiments of each laboratory are briefly described, as is the integration of the laboratory with coursework. The laboratory education provided by this program successfully achieves its purpose of producing competitive aerospace engineering graduates and advancing the level of undergraduate education.

  14. Optical Characterization of Window Materials for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Clark, Natalie; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    An optical metrology laboratory has been developed to characterize the optical properties of optical window materials to be used for aerospace applications. Several optical measurement systems have been selected and developed to measure spectral transmittance, haze, clarity, birefringence, striae, wavefront quality, and wedge. In addition to silica based glasses, several optical lightweight polymer materials and transparent ceramics have been investigated in the laboratory. The measurement systems and selected empirical results for non-silica materials are described. These measurements will be used to form the basis of acceptance criteria for selection of window materials for future aerospace vehicle and habitat designs.

  15. Software for aerospace education: A bibliography, 2nd edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Roth, Susan Kies; Phelps, Malcom V.

    1990-01-01

    This is the second aerospace education software bibliography to be published by the NASA Educational Technology Branch in Washington, DC. Unlike many software bibliographies, this bibliography does not evaluate and grade software according to its quality and value to the classroom, nor does it make any endorsements or warrant scientific accuracy. Rather, it describes software, its subject, approach, and technical details. This bibliography is intended as a convenience to educators. The specific software included represents replies to more than 300 queries to software producers for aerospace education programs.

  16. When Failure Means Success: Accepting Risk in Aerospace Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Singer, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last three decades, NASA has been diligent in qualifying systems for human space flight. As the Agency transitions from operating the Space Shuttle, its employees must learn to accept higher risk levels to generate the data needed to certify its next human space flight system. The Marshall Center s Engineering workforce is developing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and designing the Ares V cargo launch vehicle for safety, reliability, and cost-effective operations. This presentation will provide a risk retrospective, using first-hand examples from the Delta Clipper-Experimental Advanced (DC-XA) and the X-33 single-stage-to-orbit flight demonstrators, while looking ahead to the upcoming Ares I-X uncrewed test flight. The DC-XA was successfully flown twice in 26 hours, setting a new turnaround-time record. Later, one of its 3 landing gears did not deploy, it tipped over, and was destroyed. During structural testing, the X-33 s advanced composite tanks were unable to withstand the forces to which it was subjected and the project was later cancelled. These are examples of successful failures, as the data generated are captured in databases used by vehicle designers today. More recently, the Ares I-X flight readiness review process was streamlined in keeping with the mission's objectives, since human lives are not at stake, which reflects the beginning of a cultural change. Failures are acceptable during testing, as they provide the lessons that actually lead to mission success. These and other examples will stimulate the discussion of when to accept risk in aerospace projects.

  17. Magneto-acoustic resonance in a non-uniform current carrying plasma column

    OpenAIRE

    Vaclavik, J.

    2017-01-01

    The forced radial magneto-acoustic oscillations in a plasma column with nonuniform mass density and temperature are investigated. It turns out that the oscillations have a resonant character similar to that of the magneto-acoustic oscillations in a uniform plasma column. The properties of the axial and azimuthal components of the oscillating magnetic field are discussed in detail

  18. Analysis of the origins of content non-uniformity in high-shear wet granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Sarang; Smrčka, David; Kataria, Anjali; Emady, Heather; Muzzio, Fernando; Štěpánek, František; Ramachandran, Rohit

    2017-08-07

    In this study, the origins of granule content non-uniformity in the high-shear wet granulation of a model two-component pharmaceutical blend were investigated. Using acetaminophen as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and microcrystalline cellulose as the excipient, the distribution of the API across the granule size classes was measured for a range of conditions that differed in the duration of the initial dry mixing stage, the overall composition of the blend and the wet massing time. The coarse granule fractions were found to be systematically sub-potent, while the fines were enriched in the API. The extent of content non-uniformity was found to be dependent on two factors - powder segregation during dry mixing and redistribution of the API between the granule size fractions during the wet massing phase. The latter was demonstrated in an experiment where the excipient was pre-granulated, the API was added later and wet massed. The content non-uniformity in this case was comparable to that obtained when both components were present in the granulator from the beginning. With increasing wet massing time, the extent of content non-uniformity decreased, indicating that longer wet massing times might be a solution for systems with a natural tendency for component segregation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-uniform approximations for sums of discrete m-dependent random variables

    OpenAIRE

    Vellaisamy, P.; Cekanavicius, V.

    2013-01-01

    Non-uniform estimates are obtained for Poisson, compound Poisson, translated Poisson, negative binomial and binomial approximations to sums of of m-dependent integer-valued random variables. Estimates for Wasserstein metric also follow easily from our results. The results are then exemplified by the approximation of Poisson binomial distribution, 2-runs and $m$-dependent $(k_1,k_2)$-events.

  20. Physical correction model for automatic correction of intensity non-uniformity in magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Leger

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: The proposed PCM algorithm led to a significantly improved image quality compared to the originally acquired images, suggesting that it is applicable to the correction of MRI data. Thus it may help to reduce intensity non-uniformity which is an important step for advanced image analysis.

  1. 28 CFR 51.15 - Enabling legislation and contingent or nonuniform requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enabling legislation and contingent or... Provisions § 51.15 Enabling legislation and contingent or nonuniform requirements. (a) With respect to legislation (1) that enables or permits the State or its political subunits to institute a voting change or (2...

  2. Effects of transverse temperature field nonuniformity on stress in silicon sheet growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataga, P. A.; Hutchinson, J. W.; Chalmers, B.; Bell, R. O.; Kalejs, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    Stress and strain rate distributions are calculated using finite element analysis for steady-state growth of thin silicon sheet temperature nonuniformities imposed in the transverse (sheet width) dimension. Significant reductions in residual stress are predicted to occur for the case where the sheet edge is cooled relative to its center provided plastic deformation with high creep rates is present.

  3. Pondermotive absorption of a short intense laser pulse in a non-uniform plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, A.A.; Platonov, K.Yu. [Inst. for Laser Physics, SC `Vavilov State Optical Inst.` 12, Birzhevaya line, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.A.

    1998-03-01

    An analytical description of the pondermotive absorption mechanism at a short high intense laser pulse interaction with a strong inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The optimal conditions for the maximum of resonance absorption of laser pulse interaction with non-uniform plasma at normal incidence are founded. (author)

  4. Deep convolutional neural networks for dense non-uniform motion deblurring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cronje, J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The work in this paper address the problem of removing non-uniform motion blur from a single image. The motion vector for an image patch is estimated by using a convolutional neural network (CNN). All the predicted motion vectors are combined...

  5. Low-frequency electrostatic dust-modes in a non-uniform

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A self-consistent and general description of obliquely propagating low-frequency electrostatic dust-modes in a non-uniform magnetized dusty plasma system has been presented. A number of different situations, which correspond to different low-frequency electrostatic dust-modes, namely, dust-acoustic mode, dust-drift ...

  6. Maximum Likelihood DOA Estimation of Multiple Wideband Sources in the Presence of Nonuniform Sensor Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yao

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the maximum likelihood (ML direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation of multiple wideband sources in the presence of unknown nonuniform sensor noise. New closed-form expression for the direction estimation Cramér-Rao-Bound (CRB has been derived. The performance of the conventional wideband uniform ML estimator under nonuniform noise has been studied. In order to mitigate the performance degradation caused by the nonuniformity of the noise, a new deterministic wideband nonuniform ML DOA estimator is derived and two associated processing algorithms are proposed. The first algorithm is based on an iterative procedure which stepwise concentrates the log-likelihood function with respect to the DOAs and the noise nuisance parameters, while the second is a noniterative algorithm that maximizes the derived approximately concentrated log-likelihood function. The performance of the proposed algorithms is tested through extensive computer simulations. Simulation results show the stepwise-concentrated ML algorithm (SC-ML requires only a few iterations to converge and both the SC-ML and the approximately-concentrated ML algorithm (AC-ML attain a solution close to the derived CRB at high signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Roughness of (ℤ+, ℤ-)-nonuniform exponential dichotomy for difference equations in Banach spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupa, Nicolae

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the roughness of (ℤ+, ℤ-)-nonuniform exponential dichotomy for nonautonomous difference equations in the general context of infinite-dimensional spaces. An explicit form is given for each of the dichotomy constants of the perturbed equation in terms of the original ones. We emphasize that we do not assume any boundedness condition on the coefficients.

  8. Roughness of (ℤ +, ℤ −)-Nonuniform Exponential Dichotomy for Difference Equations in Banach Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the roughness of (ℤ +, ℤ −)-nonuniform exponential dichotomy for nonautonomous difference equations in the general context of infinite-dimensional spaces. An explicit form is given for each of the dichotomy constants of the perturbed equation in terms of the original ones. We emphasize that we do not assume any boundedness condition on the coefficients. PMID:24592188

  9. Synchronization in an homogeneous, time-varying network with nonuniform time-varying communication delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Saberi, Ali; Zhang, Meirong

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies synchronization among identical agents that are coupled through a time-varying network with nonuniform time-varying communication delay. Given an arbitrary upper bound for the delays, a controller design methodology without exact knowledge of the network topology is proposed so

  10. Synchronization for a network of identical discrete-time agents with unknown, nonuniform constant input delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Meirong; Saberi, Ali; Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the synchronization problem for a network of identical discrete-time agents with unknown, nonuniform constant input delays. The agents are at most critically stable and non-introspective (i.e. the agents have no access to their own states or outputs). There exists full state

  11. Nonuniform Illumination Correction Algorithm for Underwater Images Using Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Sachin Sankpal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scattering and absorption of light is main reason for limited visibility in water. The suspended particles and dissolved chemical compounds in water are also responsible for scattering and absorption of light in water. The limited visibility in water results in degradation of underwater images. The visibility can be increased by using artificial light source in underwater imaging system. But the artificial light illuminates the scene in a nonuniform fashion. It produces bright spot at the center with the dark region at surroundings. In some cases imaging system itself creates dark region in the image by producing shadow on the objects. The problem of nonuniform illumination is neglected by the researchers in most of the image enhancement techniques of underwater images. Also very few methods are discussed showing the results on color images. This paper suggests a method for nonuniform illumination correction for underwater images. The method assumes that natural underwater images are Rayleigh distributed. This paper used maximum likelihood estimation of scale parameter to map distribution of image to Rayleigh distribution. The method is compared with traditional methods for nonuniform illumination correction using no-reference image quality metrics like average luminance, average information entropy, normalized neighborhood function, average contrast, and comprehensive assessment function.

  12. Dynamic behaviour of non-uniform Bernoulli-Euler beams subjected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the dynamics behaviour of non-uniform Bernoulli-Euler beams subjected to concentrated loads ravelling at variable velocities. The solution technique is based on the Generalized Galerkin Method and the use of the generating function of the Bessel function type. The results show that, for all the ...

  13. On The Dynamic Analysis of Non-Uniform Beams Under Uniformly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the non-uniform continuous beam was replaced by a non-continuous (discrete) system made up of beam elements. The modified elemental and overall stiffness, and mass matrices, the elemental and overall centripetal acceleration matrices as well as the load vector were derived. Next, the Newmark's direct integration ...

  14. Numerical analysis of blood flow in realistic arteries subjected to strong non-uniform magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports on a comprehensive mathematical model for simulations of blood flow under the presence of strong non-uniform magnetic fields. The model consists of a set of Navier–Stokes equations accounting for the Lorentz and magnetisation forces, and a simplified set of Maxwell’s equations

  15. An improved non-uniformity correction algorithm and its GPU parallel implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuanhong; Zhou, Huixin; Qin, Hanlin; Zhao, Dong; Qian, Kun; Rong, Shenghui

    2018-05-01

    The performance of SLP-THP based non-uniformity correction algorithm is seriously affected by the result of SLP filter, which always leads to image blurring and ghosting artifacts. To address this problem, an improved SLP-THP based non-uniformity correction method with curvature constraint was proposed. Here we put forward a new way to estimate spatial low frequency component. First, the details and contours of input image were obtained respectively by minimizing local Gaussian curvature and mean curvature of image surface. Then, the guided filter was utilized to combine these two parts together to get the estimate of spatial low frequency component. Finally, we brought this SLP component into SLP-THP method to achieve non-uniformity correction. The performance of proposed algorithm was verified by several real and simulated infrared image sequences. The experimental results indicated that the proposed algorithm can reduce the non-uniformity without detail losing. After that, a GPU based parallel implementation that runs 150 times faster than CPU was presented, which showed the proposed algorithm has great potential for real time application.

  16. Sharp lower bounds on the extractable randomness from non-uniform sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Škorić, Boris; Obi, Chibuzo; Verbitskiy, Evgeny; Schoenmakers, Berry

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of uniform randomness from (noisy) non-uniform sources is an important primitive in many security applications, e.g. (pseudo-)random number generators, privacy-preserving biometrics, and key storage based on Physical Unclonable Functions. Generic extraction methods exist, using universal

  17. Computational Complexity Reduction in Nonuniform Compressed Sensing by Multi-Coset Emulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigoryan, Ruben; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Single-channel Nonuniform Sampling (SNS) is a Compressed Sensing (CS) approach that allows sub-Nyquist sampling of frequency sparse signals. The relatively simple architecture, comprising one wide-band sampling channel, makes it an attractive solution for applications such as signal anal...

  18. Effects of non-uniform interfacial tension in small Reynolds number ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 493–507. Effects of non-uniform interfacial tension in small Reynolds number flow past a spherical liquid drop. D P MASON1,∗ and G M MOREMEDI2. 1Centre for Differential Equations, Continuum Mechanics and Applications,. School of Computational and Applied Mathematics, University of the Witwatersrand, ...

  19. Effect of non-uniform mean flow field on acoustic propagation problems in computational aeroacoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Si, Haiqing; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in the presence of a non-uniform mean flow is studied numerically by using two different acoustic propagating models, which solve linearized Euler equations (LEE) and acoustic perturbation equations (APE). As noise induced by turbulent flows often propagates from near field t...

  20. Modeling of parallel-plate regenerators with non-uniform plate distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Buch; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite element model describing the performance of parallel-plate regenerators with arbitrary channel width distributions has been developed in order to investigate the effect of non-uniform plate spacing on the performance of regenerators. Results for a series of hypothetical...

  1. Ultralight Core Shell Architectures for Aerospace Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding the impact of integrating nanomaterials into current technology is of great importance to design composite structures to meet our application needs....

  2. Non-uniform Solar Temperature Field on Large Aperture, Fully ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, a 110-m fully steerable radio telescope was used as an analysis platform and the integral parametric finite element model of the antenna structure was built in the ANSYS thermal analysis module. The boundary conditions of periodic air temperature, solar radiation, long-wave radiation shadows of the ...

  3. Numerical assessment of non-uniform corrosion scenarios of rebar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the dependence of chloride diffusion coefficient on the material parameters of concrete, internal relative humidity and ... Corrosion propagation phase refers to the mechanical degradation process of RC structures under corrosion ..... Perform iterative procedure to obtain the actual profile of h by using the profile of h obtained ...

  4. Numerical assessment of non-uniform corrosion scenarios of rebar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corrosion of embedded rebars is a classical deterioration mechanism that remains as one of the most significant problems limiting the service life of concrete structures exposed to chloride-laden environments. The primary objective of this study is to propose and verify a numerical framework that can efficiently quantify ...

  5. Non-uniform Solar Temperature Field on Large Aperture, Fully ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. The solar cooker effect distribution in the time-history and rotation operation ranges represents a valuable reference for the design of the secondary reflector. In order to avoid loss of effectiveness or burn-out at extremely high temperatures and to ensure optimal structure performance, it is necessary to adopt materials that.

  6. 48 CFR 1852.244-70 - Geographic participation in the aerospace program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the aerospace program. 1852.244-70 Section 1852.244-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.244-70 Geographic participation in the aerospace program. As prescribed in 1844.204-70, insert the following clause: Geographic Participation in the Aerospace Program (APR 1985) (a...

  7. 75 FR 12468 - Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... airworthiness directive (AD) for all Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E airplanes. This proposed AD would... 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. is in...

  8. 76 FR 51350 - Aerospace Executive Service Trade Mission (AESTM) to Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... International Trade Administration Aerospace Executive Service Trade Mission (AESTM) to Seoul, Korea AGENCY.... Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration (ITA), Aerospace & Defense Technologies Team and the U.S. Commercial Service in Seoul (CS Korea) are organizing an Aerospace Executive Service Trade...

  9. 75 FR 30282 - Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E airplanes. This AD requires you to clean and lubricate the... publications listed in this AD. ADDRESSES: Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. is in liquidation. For service/or...

  10. A possible new mechanism involved in non-uniform field breakdown in gaseous dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1994-01-01

    The electrical breakdown of gases under uniform field conditions is fairly well understood in terms of the Townsend's breakdown theory. In most cases involving uniform fields, the breakdown voltage can be estimated via this theory using basic electron impact parameters for molecules in their ground electronic states. In contrast, a consistent model of gaseous breakdown under nonuniform fields is not available at present although substantial progress has been made recently. We point out the possibility that electron impact processes involving high-lying electronically-excited states may play a significant role under non-uniform field conditions. Thus, such processes may need to be included in order to obtain a better understanding of non-uniform field breakdown phenomena. The general, breakdown characteristics of highly non-uniform field gaps can be illustrated by that for a point-plane geometry. It has been found that the breakdown voltage for such a gap can be calculated by a simple streamer criterion if the pressure P, is above a critical value, P c ; for P c , the estimated breakdown voltage is found to coincide with the corona inception voltage, with the actual breakdown occurring at a higher voltage, corona discharges occur only for P c . In other words, the presence of corona in the pressure region below P c seems to prevent the breakdown from occurring at the predicted value. This has led to the term ''corona stabilization'' to describe the enhancement in the breakdown voltage for pressures below P c . Non-uniform field breakdown measurements in gases will be discussed. We will discuss the possibility that the ''corona stabilization'' is due to the prevention of avalanche progression by attachment of free electrons to molecules in their high-lying electronically-excited states. Information on electron attachment to electronically-excited states of molecules was not available up until the late 1980's

  11. Six Aerospace design projects to learn how to engineer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, A.

    2013-01-01

    Tomorrow’s engineers are required to have a good balance of deep working knowledge of engineering sciences and engineering skills. In the Bachelor in Aerospace Engineering at TU Delft, students are educated to master these competences so that they are ready to engineer when they graduate. The

  12. Aerospace medicine and biology. A continuing bibliography with indexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This bibliography lists 244 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in February 1981. Aerospace medicine and aerobiology topics are included. Listings for physiological factors, astronaut performance, control theory, artificial intelligence, and cybernetics are included

  13. 76 FR 19147 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Overview; Updates on Safety Mission Assurance; Safety Metrics and Commercial Space. The meeting will be... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-030)] Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY...

  14. 75 FR 36697 - Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel meeting at the LaRC must provide their full name, company affiliation (if.... All non-U.S. citizens must submit their name; current address; citizenship; company affiliation (if... information to include type, number, and expiration date; U.S. Social Security Number (if applicable...

  15. Personality and organizational influences on aerospace human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Individual and organizational influences on performance in aerospace environments are discussed. A model of personality with demonstrated validity is described along with reasons why personality's effects on performance have been underestimated. Organizational forces including intergroup conflict and coercive pressures are also described. It is suggested that basic and applied research in analog situations is needed to provide necessary guidance for planning future space missions.

  16. Aerospace Medicine and Biology. A continuing bibliography with indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 244 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in February 1981. Aerospace medicine and aerobiology topics are included. Listings for physiological factors, astronaut performance, control theory, artificial intelligence, and cybernetics are included.

  17. Technology transfer between the government and the aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackheim, Robert; Dunbar, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    The object of this working group panel was to review questions and issues pertaining to technology transfer between the government and the aerospace industry for use on both government and commercial space customer applications. The results of this review are presented in vugraph form.

  18. Human Requirements of Flight. Aviation and Spaceflight. Aerospace Education III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coard, E. A.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education III, deals with the general nature of human physiology during space flights. Chapter 1 begins with a brief discussion of the nature of the atmosphere. Other topics examined in this chapter include respiration and circulation, principles and problems of vision, noise and vibration, and…

  19. Cryogenic rocket engine development at Delft aerospace rocket engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J; Hermsen, R.; Huijsman, R; Akkermans, C.; Denies, L.; Barreiro, F.; Schutte, A.; Cervone, A.; Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the current developments regarding cryogenic rocket engine technology at Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering (DARE). DARE is a student society based at Delft University of Technology with the goal of being the first student group in the world to launch a rocket into space. After

  20. Donor impurity states in a non-uniform quantum strip: Geometrical and electro-magnetic field effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaza, Y. A.; Fonnegra-García, D.; Fulla, M. R.; Salazar-Santa, J. D.; Marín, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    The neutral donor energy structure in non-uniform height quantum strip under the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is studied. The quantum strip height has been modeled by including a phenomenological two-parametric function. The first of these parameters is related to the number of structural hills present on the nano-strip, while the second one allows us to control the hills height. We solve the Schrödinger equation by considering specific quantum strips whose height-to-base aspect ratio is very small, which makes possible to calculate numerically the energy structure trough the adiabatic approximation and the exact diagonalization method. In limit cases, our results are in good agreement with those ones previously reported. Periodic oscillations of the ground state energy with magnetic field strength can be tuned by applied electric field which also yields an anti-crossing of the energy levels in a quantum strip with two hills. The energy level structure are strongly sensitive to changes of nano-strip geometrical factors.