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Sample records for nontuberculous mycobacteria zambia

  1. Misdiagnosis of tuberculosis and the clinical relevance of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in Zambia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia CAM Buijtels; Michael D Iseman; Shelagh Parkinson; Cas S de Graaff; Henri A Verbrugh; Pieter LC Petit; Dick van Soolingen

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To determine the accuracy of TB diagnosis of TB in Zambia in the era of increasing HIV prevalence. Methods: Sputum of the clinically diagnosed TB cases was additionally subjected to liquid culture and molecular identification. This study distinguished between TB cases confirmed by positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) cultures and mycobacterial disease caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Results: Only 49%of the 173 presumptively diagnosed TB cases was M. tuberculosis cultured, while in 13%(22) cases, a combination of M. tuberculosis and NTM was found. In 18%of the patients only NTM were cultured. In 28%, no mycobacteria was cultivable. HIV positive status was correlated with the isolation of NTM (P<0.05). Conclusions:The diagnosis of tuberculosis based on symptoms, sputum smear and/or chest X-ray leads to significant numbers of false-positive TB cases in Zambia, most likely due to the increased prevalence of HIV. The role of NTM in tuberculosis-like disease also seems relevant to the false diagnosis of TB in Zambia.

  2. Drug susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Kuijper, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria are emerging in many settings. With an increased number of patients needing treatment, the role of drug susceptibility testing is again in the spotlight. This articles covers the history and methodology of drug susceptibility tests for nontuberculous

  3. EXAMINATION OF BOTTLED WATER FOR NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine bottled water for the presence of nontuberculous mycobacteria as a potential source of infection in AIDS patients. Twenty brands of bottled water commonly used in the Los Angeles area were tested for the presence of nontuberculous mycoba...

  4. Sinusitis from Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Tap Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-12-21

    Dr. Wellington S. Tichenor. Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College and in private practice in Manhattan, New York, discusses his investigation of sinusitis from nontuberculous mycobacteria in tap water.  Created: 12/21/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/31/2012.

  5. Environmental Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in the Hawaiian Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Honda, Jennifer R.; Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Williams, Myra D.; Epperson, L. Elaine; Reynolds, Paul R.; Smith, Terry; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Bankowski, Matthew J.; Wallace, Richard J.; Chan, Edward D.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Lung disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Epidemiologic studies have shown the Hawaiian Islands have the highest prevalence of NTM lung infections in the United States. However, potential environmental reservoirs and species diversity have not been characterized. In this cross-sectional study, we describe molecular and phylogenetic comparisons of NTM isolated from 172 household plumbing biofilms and soil samples from 62 ...

  6. Isolation and characterization of non tuberculous mycobacteria from humans and animals in Namwala District of Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Malama, Sydney; Munyeme, Musso; Mwanza, Sydney; Muma, John Bwalya

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Mycobacterium contains more than 100 species, most of which are classified as non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). In Zambia, the NTM are slowly becoming recognized as pathogens of major public health significance with the advent of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed at reporting the isolated NTM and ascertains their zoonotic potential and diagnostic significance in Zambia. Method A total of 100 sputum samples...

  7. Environmental Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in the Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Jennifer R; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Davidson, Rebecca M; Williams, Myra D; Epperson, L Elaine; Reynolds, Paul R; Smith, Terry; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Bankowski, Matthew J; Wallace, Richard J; Chan, Edward D; Falkinham, Joseph O; Strong, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Lung disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Epidemiologic studies have shown the Hawaiian Islands have the highest prevalence of NTM lung infections in the United States. However, potential environmental reservoirs and species diversity have not been characterized. In this cross-sectional study, we describe molecular and phylogenetic comparisons of NTM isolated from 172 household plumbing biofilms and soil samples from 62 non-patient households and 15 respiratory specimens. Although non-uniform geographic sampling and availability of patient information were limitations, Mycobacterium chimaera was found to be the dominant species in both environmental and respiratory specimens. In contrast to previous studies from the continental U.S., no Mycobacterium avium was identified. Mycobacterium intracellulare was found only in respiratory specimens and a soil sample. We conclude that Hawai'i's household water sources contain a unique composition of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), increasing our appreciation of NTM organisms of pulmonary importance in tropical environments.

  8. Epidemiology of infection by nontuberculous Mycobacteria. III. Isolation of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria from aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, S L; George, K L; Parker, B C; Gruft, H; Falkinham, J O

    1980-08-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (21 isolates), biochemically similar to those that are recovered from humans, were recovered from rainwater and from natural river waters and their aerosols in the area of Richmond, Virginia. Field experiments have confirmed the existence of a natural mechanism for the transfer of significant numbers of mycobacteria from water to air. These findings support the hypothesis that aerosolization of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria from waters of the southeastern United States may be a major pathway for human infection.

  9. Resistance mechanisms and drug susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van; Mouton, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized as causative agents of opportunistic infections in humans. For most NTM infections the therapy of choice is drug treatment, but treatment regimens differ by species, in particular between slow (e.g. Mycobacterium avium complex,

  10. Resistance mechanisms and drug susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van; Mouton, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized as causative agents of opportunistic infections in humans. For most NTM infections the therapy of choice is drug treatment, but treatment regimens differ by species, in particular between slow (e.g. Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacter

  11. Shifting paradigms of nontuberculous mycobacteria in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Pressler, Tania; Høiby, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Important paradigms of pulmonary disease with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are currently shifting based on an increasing attention within the field of cystic fibrosis (CF). These shifts are likely to benefit the management of all patients with pulmonary NTM, regardless of underlying pathology...

  12. Environmental sources of rapid growing nontuberculous mycobacteria causing disease in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Boeree, M.J.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Soolingen, D. van

    2009-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are environmental, opportunistic pathogens whose role in human disease is increasingly recognized, especially regarding the rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM). RGM are recovered from various environmental sources, both natural and man-made. In water systems, RGM can survive

  13. Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM in Iranian Clinical Specimens: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Khaledi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:    Although, nontuberculous mycobacteria can cause disease in different organisms, they usually are not reported in most countries because scientists in general consider them as non-pathogens. But, increasing nontuberculous mycobacteria diseases occurrence has changed this belief. Nevertheless, there is no meta-analysis review about prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria in Iran. Methods:   Any data about prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria in clinical specimens in Iran were retrieved by searching data bases such as Pub Med, MEDLINE, and Iranian data bases. Then the meta-analysis was performed by comprehensive meta-analysis software (CMA. Results:    The meta-analysis showed that the prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria in the clinical specimens in Iran was 1.3%. In the studies that had sample size less than 300, and in studies conducted after 2004, the prevalence was higher. Also, the prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria was higher in the West of Iran. In this study, the most prevalent rapid-growing mycobacterium was Mycobacterium. fortuitum and  most prevalent slow-growing mycobacterium was M. simiae with the prevalence 44.2% and 14.3%, respectively.Conclusion:   M. simiae is the most prevalent nontuberculous mycobacteria in the clinical specimens in Iran. As this species of nontuberculous mycobacteria has similar clinical and radiological manifestations with tuberculosis, it is often treated as tuberculosis. Unfortunately, M. simiae is resistant against first-line anti-TB drugs resulting in treatment failure after using routine anti-TB medication. Therefore, there is an urgent need for application of new diagnostic strategy for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria species.

  14. Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems Jill Hoelle, Michael Coughlin, Elizabeth Sotkiewicz, Jingrang Lu, Stacy Pfaller, Mark Rodgers, and Hodon Ryu U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati...

  15. Natural disasters and nontuberculous mycobacteria: a recipe for increased disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Jennifer R; Bernhard, Jon N; Chan, Edward D

    2015-02-01

    Infectious diseases acquired by survivors of large-scale natural disasters complicate the recovery process. During events such as tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornados and well into the recovery period, victims often are exposed to water-soil mixtures that have relocated with indigenous microbes. Because nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in water and soil, there is potential for increased exposure to these organisms during natural disasters. In this hypothesis-driven commentary, we discuss the rise in NTM lung disease and natural disasters and examine the geographic overlap of NTM infections and disaster frequencies in the United States. Moreover, we show an increased number of positive NTM cultures from Louisiana residents in the years following three of the relatively recent epic hurricanes and posit that such natural disasters may help to drive the increased number of NTM infections. Finally, we advocate for increased environmental studies and surveillance of NTM infections before and after natural disasters.

  16. Specific Proteins in Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: New Potential Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Orduña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM have been isolated from water, soil, air, food, protozoa, plants, animals, and humans. Although most NTM are saprophytes, approximately one-third of NTM have been associated with human diseases. In this study, we did a comparative proteomic analysis among five NTM strains isolated from several sources. There were different numbers of protein spots from M. gordonae (1,264, M. nonchromogenicum type I (894, M. nonchromogenicum type II (935, M. peregrinum (806, and M. scrofulaceum/Mycobacterium mantenii (1,486 strains, respectively. We identified 141 proteins common to all strains and specific proteins to each NTM strain. A total of 23 proteins were selected for its identification. Two of the common proteins identified (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SDR and diguanylate cyclase did not align with M. tuberculosis complex protein sequences, which suggest that these proteins are found only in the NTM strains. Some of the proteins identified as common to all strains can be used as markers of NTM exposure and for the development of new diagnostic tools. Additionally, the specific proteins to NTM strains identified may represent potential candidates for the diagnosis of diseases caused by these mycobacteria.

  17. Specific Proteins in Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: New Potential Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduña, Patricia; Castillo-Rodal, Antonia I.; Mercado, Martha E.; Ponce de León, Samuel; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been isolated from water, soil, air, food, protozoa, plants, animals, and humans. Although most NTM are saprophytes, approximately one-third of NTM have been associated with human diseases. In this study, we did a comparative proteomic analysis among five NTM strains isolated from several sources. There were different numbers of protein spots from M. gordonae (1,264), M. nonchromogenicum type I (894), M. nonchromogenicum type II (935), M. peregrinum (806), and M. scrofulaceum/Mycobacterium mantenii (1,486) strains, respectively. We identified 141 proteins common to all strains and specific proteins to each NTM strain. A total of 23 proteins were selected for its identification. Two of the common proteins identified (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SDR and diguanylate cyclase) did not align with M. tuberculosis complex protein sequences, which suggest that these proteins are found only in the NTM strains. Some of the proteins identified as common to all strains can be used as markers of NTM exposure and for the development of new diagnostic tools. Additionally, the specific proteins to NTM strains identified may represent potential candidates for the diagnosis of diseases caused by these mycobacteria. PMID:26106621

  18. Mycobacteria mobility shift assay: a method for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Muraro Wildner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of mycobacteria is essential because tuberculosis (TB and mycobacteriosis are clinically indistinguishable and require different therapeutic regimens. The traditional phenotypic method is time consuming and may last up to 60 days. Indeed, rapid, affordable, specific and easy-to-perform identification methods are needed. We have previously described a polymerase chain reaction-based method called a mycobacteria mobility shift assay (MMSA that was designed for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM species identification. The aim of this study was to assess the MMSA for the identification of MTC and NTM clinical isolates and to compare its performance with that of the PRA-hsp65 method. A total of 204 clinical isolates (102 NTM and 102 MTC were identified by the MMSA and PRA-hsp65. For isolates for which these methods gave discordant results, definitive species identification was obtained by sequencing fragments of the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. Both methods correctly identified all MTC isolates. Among the NTM isolates, the MMSA alone assigned 94 (92.2% to a complex or species, whereas the PRA-hsp65 method assigned 100% to a species. A 91.5% agreement was observed for the 94 NTM isolates identified by both methods. The MMSA provided correct identification for 96.8% of the NTM isolates compared with 94.7% for PRA-hsp65. The MMSA is a suitable auxiliary method for routine use for the rapid identification of mycobacteria.

  19. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: incidence in Southwest Ireland from 1987 to 2000.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, M P

    2012-02-03

    SETTING: The Southwest of Ireland (Counties Cork and Kerry) 1987-2000, average population 549,500. OBJECTIVE: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause significant morbidity worldwide and the study of epidemiology and characteristics helps in their prevention and treatment. This study was performed to determine the incidence of NTM disease in comparison to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in Southwest Ireland, over the above time period. DESIGN: A retrospective study was carried out in all human isolates of NTM, M. tuberculosis and M. bovis between 1987 and 2000, in the Southwest Region of Ireland. RESULTS: The mean incidence of NTM (0.4\\/100,000 population) has risen since 1995, principally of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex (MAC). The annual incidence of M. tuberculosis in humans over 14 years in the same region was 971\\/100,000 population with a significant reduction since 1994 and M. bovis remained constant at 0.5\\/100,000 population. CONCLUSION: The increasing incidence of disease causing NTM noted in Southwest Ireland reflects global data and is surmised to be due to an ageing population, increased incidence related to chronic fibrotic lung disease, and environmental mycobacterial factors.

  20. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Tuberculosis Suspects in Ibadan, Nigeria

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    Simeon Idowu Cadmus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, one of the highest tuberculosis (TB burdened nations, sputum smear microscopy is routinely employed for TB diagnosis at Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS Centers. This diagnostic algorithm does not differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM. Between December 2008 and January 2009, consecutive patients diagnosed with TB were screened for inclusion at 10 DOTS centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. To verify Mycobacterium species in patients diagnosed, we cultured and identified mycobacterial isolates using PCR, line probe assay, and spoligotyping techniques. From 48 patients screened, 23 met the inclusion criteria for the study. All the 23 study patients had a positive culture. Overall, we identified 11/23 patients (48% with MTC only, 9/23 (39% with NTM only, and 3/23 (13% with evidence of both MTC and NTM. Strains of MTC identified were Latin American Mediterranean (LAM genotype (n=12, M. africanum (n=1, and the genotype family T (n=1. Four M. avium-intracellulare-M. scrofulaceum complexes, one M. chelonae complex, one M. abscessus, and one M. intracellulare were identified. Our findings underscore the need to incorporate molecular techniques for more precise diagnosis of TB at DOTS centers to improve clinical outcomes and safe guard public health, particularly in TB endemic countries.

  1. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Tuberculosis Suspects in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmus, Simeon Idowu; Diarra, Bassirou; Traore, Brehima; Maiga, Mamoudou; Siddiqui, Sophia; Tounkara, Anatole; Falodun, Olutayo; Lawal, Wole; Adewole, Isaac Folurunso; Murphy, Rob; van Soolingen, Dick; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2016-01-01

    In Nigeria, one of the highest tuberculosis (TB) burdened nations, sputum smear microscopy is routinely employed for TB diagnosis at Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) Centers. This diagnostic algorithm does not differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Between December 2008 and January 2009, consecutive patients diagnosed with TB were screened for inclusion at 10 DOTS centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. To verify Mycobacterium species in patients diagnosed, we cultured and identified mycobacterial isolates using PCR, line probe assay, and spoligotyping techniques. From 48 patients screened, 23 met the inclusion criteria for the study. All the 23 study patients had a positive culture. Overall, we identified 11/23 patients (48%) with MTC only, 9/23 (39%) with NTM only, and 3/23 (13%) with evidence of both MTC and NTM. Strains of MTC identified were Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) genotype (n = 12), M. africanum (n = 1), and the genotype family T (n = 1). Four M. avium-intracellulare-M. scrofulaceum complexes, one M. chelonae complex, one M. abscessus, and one M. intracellulare were identified. Our findings underscore the need to incorporate molecular techniques for more precise diagnosis of TB at DOTS centers to improve clinical outcomes and safe guard public health, particularly in TB endemic countries. PMID:27099795

  2. Epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria among patients with cystic fibrosis in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Gilljam, Marita; Jönsson, Bodil;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an emerging threat to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients but their epidemiology is not well described. METHODS: In this retrospective observational study we identified all Scandinavian CF patients with a positive NTM culture from airway secretions from...

  3. Tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria among HIV-infected individuals in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrrum, Stephanie; Oliver-Commey, Joseph; Kenu, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence and clinical importance of previously unrecognised tuberculosis (TB) and isolation of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) among HIV-infected individuals in a teaching hospital in Ghana. METHODS: Intensified mycobacterial case finding was conducted among HIV...

  4. Rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria cultured from home tap and shower water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Blaak, H.; Beer, J. de; Roda Husman, A.M. de; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    Tap and shower water at two locations in the Netherlands was examined for the presence of rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria. Cultures yielded Mycobacterium peregrinum, M. salmoniphilum, M. llatzerense, M. septicum, and three potentially novel species, a distribution different from that in

  5. The geographic diversity of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from pulmonary samples: an NTM-NET collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefsloot, W.; Ingen, J. van; Andrejak, C.; Angeby, K.; Bauriaud, R.; Bemer, P.; Beylis, N.; Boeree, M.J.; Cacho, J.; Chihota, V.; Chimara, E.; Churchyard, G.; Cias, R.; Daza, R.; Daley, C.L.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Domingo, D.; Drobniewski, F.; Esteban, J. De; Fauville-Dufaux, M.; Folkvardsen, D.B.; Gibbons, N.; Gomez-Mampaso, E.; Gonzalez, R.; Hoffmann, H.; Hsueh, P.R.; Indra, A.; Jagielski, T.; Jamieson, F.; Jankovic, M.; Jong, Eefje de; Keane, J.; Koh, W.J.; Lange, B. de; Leao, S.; Macedo, R.; Mannsaker, T.; Marras, T.K.; Maugein, J.; Milburn, H.J.; Mlinko, T.; Morcillo, N.; Morimoto, K.; Papaventsis, D.; Palenque, E.; Paez-Pena, M.; Piersimoni, C.; Polanova, M.; Rastogi, N.; Richter, E.; Ruiz-Serrano, M.J.; Silva, A.; Silva, M.P. da; Simsek, H.; Soolingen, D. van; Szabo, N.; Thomson, R.; Fernandez, T. Tortola; Tortoli, E.; Totten, S.E.; Tyrrell, G.; Vasankari, T.; Villar, M.; Walkiewicz, R.; Winthrop, K.L.; Wagner, D.; Trials, G. Nontuberculous

    2013-01-01

    A significant knowledge gap exists concerning the geographical distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolation worldwide. To provide a snapshot of NTM species distribution, global partners in the NTM-Network European Trials Group (NET) framework (www.ntm-net.org), a branch of the Tubercu

  6. The geographic diversity of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from pulmonary samples: an NTM-NET collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefsloot, W.; Ingen, J. van; Andrejak, C.; Angeby, K.; Bauriaud, R.; Bemer, P.; Beylis, N.; Boeree, M.J.; Cacho, J.; Chihota, V.; Chimara, E.; Churchyard, G.; Cias, R.; Daza, R.; Daley, C.L.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Domingo, D.; Drobniewski, F.; Esteban, J. De; Fauville-Dufaux, M.; Folkvardsen, D.B.; Gibbons, N.; Gomez-Mampaso, E.; Gonzalez, R.; Hoffmann, H.; Hsueh, P.R.; Indra, A.; Jagielski, T.; Jamieson, F.; Jankovic, M.; Jong, Eefje de; Keane, J.; Koh, W.J.; Lange, B. de; Leao, S.; Macedo, R.; Mannsaker, T.; Marras, T.K.; Maugein, J.; Milburn, H.J.; Mlinko, T.; Morcillo, N.; Morimoto, K.; Papaventsis, D.; Palenque, E.; Paez-Pena, M.; Piersimoni, C.; Polanova, M.; Rastogi, N.; Richter, E.; Ruiz-Serrano, M.J.; Silva, A.; Silva, M.P. da; Simsek, H.; Soolingen, D. van; Szabo, N.; Thomson, R.; Fernandez, T. Tortola; Tortoli, E.; Totten, S.E.; Tyrrell, G.; Vasankari, T.; Villar, M.; Walkiewicz, R.; Winthrop, K.L.; Wagner, D.; Trials, G. Nontuberculous

    2013-01-01

    A significant knowledge gap exists concerning the geographical distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolation worldwide. To provide a snapshot of NTM species distribution, global partners in the NTM-Network European Trials Group (NET) framework (www.ntm-net.org), a branch of the

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of standard strains of nontuberculous mycobacteria by microplate Alamar Blue assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilian Li

    Full Text Available In this study, 24 standard nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM species strains including 12 slowly growing mycobacteria strains and 12 rapidly growing mycobacteria strains were subjected to drug susceptibility testing using microplate Alamar Blue assay-based 7H9 broth. The most active antimicrobial agents against the 24 NTM strains were streptomycin, amikacin, the fluoroquinolones, and the tetracyclines. Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium bolletii, and Mycobacterium simiae are resistant to most antimicrobial agents. The susceptibility results of this study from 24 NTM standard strains can be referenced by clinicians before susceptibility testing for clinical isolates is performed or when conditions do not allow for susceptibility testing. The application of broth-based methods is recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the documentation of the susceptibility patterns of standard strains of mycobacteria can improve the international standardization of susceptibility testing methods.

  8. Acidochromogenicity is a common characteristic in nontuberculous mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felton Jeffrey

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An acidic environment is something likely encountered by mycobacteria in the environment or in a human host. Previously mycobacterial species had been known to produce carotenoid pigments in response to light or constitutively. Results We have tested the ability of various mycobacteria to grow on solid agar plates of differing acidity, and have shown that many species of mycobacteria previously thought to not produce pigment are pigmented when exposed to acidic stress. The Mycobacterium smegmatis promoter region upstream of the genes homologous to those of other mycobacterial species known to code for proteins involved in carotenoid biosynthesis was found to be upregulated under acidic stress. Conclusions Mycobacterial species can produce pigment in response to conditions not previously known to induce chromogenicity in mycobacteria. In addition many mycobacterial species previously thought to not produce pigment are actually chromogenic under acidic conditions.

  9. Prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients with bronchiectasis: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chu,Haiqing; Zhao, Lan; Xiao, Heping; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhang, Jinbo; Gui, Tao; Gong, Sugang; Xu, Liyun; Sun, Xiwen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have emerged as critical opportunistic pathogens of lung diseases recently. Patients with preexisting bronchiectasis are susceptible to NTM. Nevertheless, patients with preexisting bronchiectasis are susceptible to NTM but the prevalence of NTM pulmonary infection in different species and geographical areas is still not fully understood. Material and methods The relevant data of the prevalence of NTM in patients with bronchiectasis were retrieved...

  10. Ocular infections due to Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria

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    Lalitha P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the types and causes of non-tuberculous ocular infections and study their response to topical antibiotic therapy. METHOD: A single center, retrospective review of 18 patients with non-tuberculous mycobacterial ocular infections, seen over a 3 year period was done. Laboratory diagnosis was established by growth on blood agar, LJ medium and Ziehl-Nielsen acid fast stain. RESULTS: Out of 18 patients, six had post corneal graft infection, six had corneal ulcers, three had endogenous endophthalmitis, one had post operative endophthalmitis and two cases were of post surgical wound infection. History of trauma was reported in two cases and surgery in nine cases. M.chelonae was grown in blood agar for all patients. For corneal infections fortified genatmicin and fortified amikacin topical eye drops were given while the cases of endophthalmitis received intravitreal amikacin. Response to treatment was poor in 16 cases (88.9%. Only two cases of corneal ulcer improved after prolonged treatment. There was a misdiagnosis of Corynebacterium spp. on Gram stain in the initial cases. Majority of the isolates were sensitive to gentamicin (72.2% followed by amikacin (44.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Early clinical recognition and prompt laboratory diagnosis together with aggressive topical antibiotic therapy may shorten morbidity and improve the clinical outcome of non-tuberculous mycobacterial ocular infection.

  11. Transcriptional Response of Respiratory Epithelium to Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Masashi; Martins, Andrew J; Shallom, Shamira; Kamenyeva, Olena; Kashyap, Anuj; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Kabat, Juraj; Olivier, Kenneth N; Zelazny, Adrian M; Tsang, John S; Holland, Steven M

    2017-09-15

    The incidence of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease is increasing, but host responses in respiratory epithelium infected with NTM are not fully understood. We aimed to identify infection-relevant gene expression signatures of NTM infection of the respiratory epithelium. We infected air-liquid interface (ALI) primary respiratory epithelial cell cultures with Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAC) or Mycobacterium abscessuss subsp. abscessuss (MAB). We used cells from 4 different donors to obtain generalizable data. The differentiated respiratory epithelial cells at ALI were infected with MAC or MAB at MOI of 100:1 or 1000:1, and RNA-seq was performed at days 1 and 3 after infection. In response to infection we found downregulation of ciliary genes but upregulation of genes associated with cytokine/chemokine, such as IL-32, and cholesterol biosynthesis. Inflammatory response genes tended to be more upregulated by MAB than MAC infection. Primary respiratory epithelial cell infection with NTM at ALI identified ciliary function, cholesterol biosynthesis, and cytokine/chemokine production as major host responses to infection. Some of these pathways may be amenable to therapeutic manipulation.

  12. Increasing reports of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, 1995-2006

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    Drobniewski Francis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-tuberculous mycobacteria have long been identified as capable of causing human disease and the number at risk, due to immune-suppression, is rising. Several reports have suggested incidence to be increasing, yet routine surveillance-based evidence is lacking. We investigated recent trends in, and the epidemiology of, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, 1995-2006. Methods Hospital laboratories voluntarily report non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections to the Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections. Details reported include age and sex of the patient, species, specimen type and source laboratory. All reports were analysed. Results The rate of non-tuberculous mycobacteria reports rose from 0.9 per 100,000 population in 1995 to 2.9 per 100,000 in 2006 (1608 reports. Increases were mainly in pulmonary specimens and people aged 60+ years. The most commonly reported species was Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (43%; M. malmoense and M. kansasii were also commonly reported. M. gordonae showed the biggest increase over the study period rising from one report in 1995 to 153 in 2006. Clinical information was rarely reported. Conclusions The number and rate of reports increased considerably between 1995 and 2006, primarily in older age groups and pulmonary specimens. Increases in some species are likely to be artefacts but real changes in more pathogenic species, some of which will require clinical care, should not be excluded. Enhanced surveillance is needed to understand the true epidemiology of these infections and their impact on human health.

  13. Frequency of tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in HIV infected patients from Bogota, Colombia

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    León Clara I

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species in the HIV-infected patient population in Colombia was uncertain despite some pilot studies. We determined the frequency of isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and of non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species in diverse body fluids of HIV-infected patients in Bogota, Colombia. Methods Patients who attended the three major HIV/AIDS healthcare centres in Bogota were prospectively studied over a six month period. A total of 286 patients were enrolled, 20% of them were hospitalized at some point during the study. Sixty four percent (64% were classified as stage C, 25% as stage B, and 11% as stage A (CDC staging system, 1993. A total of 1,622 clinical samples (mostly paired samples of blood, sputum, stool, and urine were processed for acid-fast bacilli (AFB stain and culture. Results Overall 43 of 1,622 cultures (2.6% were positive for mycobacteria. Twenty-two sputum samples were positive. Four patients were diagnosed with M. tuberculosis (1.4%. All isolates of M. tuberculosis were sensitive to common anti-tuberculous drugs. M. avium was isolated in thirteen patients (4.5%, but only in three of them the cultures originated from blood. The other isolates were obtained from stool, urine or sputum samples. In three cases, direct AFB smears of blood were positive. Two patients presented simultaneously with M. tuberculosis and M. avium. Conclusions Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium infections are frequent in HIV infected patients in Bogota. The diagnostic sensitivity for infection with tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria can be increased when diverse body fluids are processed from each patient.

  14. Frequency of tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in HIV infected patients from Bogota, Colombia.

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    Murcia-Aranguren, M I; Gómez-Marin, J E; Alvarado, F S; Bustillo, J G; de Mendivelson, E; Gómez, B; León, C I; Triana, W A; Vargas, E A; Rodríguez, E

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species in the HIV-infected patient population in Colombia was uncertain despite some pilot studies. We determined the frequency of isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and of non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species in diverse body fluids of HIV-infected patients in Bogota, Colombia. Patients who attended the three major HIV/AIDS health care centres in Bogota were prospectively studied over a six month period. A total of 286 patients were enrolled, 20% of them were hospitalized at some point during the study. Sixty four percent (64%) were classified as stage C, 25% as stage B, and 11% as stage A (CDC staging system, 1993). A total of 1,622 clinical samples (mostly paired samples of blood, sputum, stool, and urine) were processed for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) stain and culture. Overall 43 of 1,622 cultures (2.6%) were positive for mycobacteria. Twenty-two sputum samples were positive. Four patients were diagnosed with M. tuberculosis (1.4%). All isolates of M. tuberculosis were sensitive to common anti-tuberculous drugs. M. avium was isolated in thirteen patients (4.5%), but only in three of them the cultures originated from blood. The other isolates were obtained from stool, urine or sputum samples. In three cases, direct AFB smears of blood were positive. Two patients presented simultaneously with M. tuberculosis and M. avium. Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium infections are frequent in HIV infected patients in Bogota. The diagnostic sensitivity for infection with tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria can be increased when diverse body fluids are processed from each patient.

  15. Baby bottle steam sterilizers for disinfecting home nebulizers inoculated with non-tuberculous mycobacteria.

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    Towle, D; Callan, D A; Lamprea, C; Murray, T S

    2016-03-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTMb), present in environmental water sources, can contribute to respiratory infection in patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Contaminated nebulizers are a potential source of respiratory infection. Treatment with baby bottle steam sterilizers disinfects home nebulizers inoculated with bacterial pathogens but whether this method works for disinfection of NTMb is unclear. Baby bottle steam sterilization was compared with vigorous water washing for disinfecting home nebulizers inoculated with NTMb mixed with cystic fibrosis sputum. No NTMb was recovered from any nebulizers after steam treatment whereas viable NTMb grew after water washing, demonstrating that steam sterilization effectively disinfects NTMb-inoculated nebulizers.

  16. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria and microbial populations in drinking water distribution systems

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    Rossella Briancesco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the occurrence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM, in parallel with those obtained for bacterial indicators and amoebae, are presented with the aim to collect information on the spread of NTM in drinking water distribution systems in Italy. Samples were collected from taps of hospitals and households in Central and Southern Italy. The concentration values obtained for the more traditional microbial parameters complied with the mandatory requirements for drinking water. Conversely, moderate-to-high microbial loads (till 300 CFU/L were observed for the NTM. Positive samples were obtained from 62% of the investigated water samples. Analogous results were observed for amoebae showing a higher percentage of positive samples (76%. In terms of public health, the presence of mycobacteria in water distribution systems may represent a potential risk especially for vulnerable people such as children, the elderly or immunocompromised individuals.

  17. Isolation of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) from Household Water and Shower Aerosols in Patients with Pulmonary Disease Caused by NTM

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    Thomson, Rachel; Tolson, Carla; Carter, Robyn; Coulter, Chris; Huygens, Flavia; Hargreaves, Megan

    2013-01-01

    It has been postulated that susceptible individuals may acquire infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from water and aerosol exposure. This study examined household water and shower aerosols of patients with NTM pulmonary disease. The mycobacteria isolated from clinical samples from 20 patients included M. avium (5 patients), M. intracellulare (12 patients), M. abscessus (7 patients), M. gordonae (1 patient), M. lentiflavum (1 patient), M. fortuitum (1 patient), M. peregrinum (1 pa...

  18. THE PERSISTENCE OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA INI A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AFTER THE ADDITION OF FILTRATION TREATMENT

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    There is evidence that drinking water may be a source of pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections in humans. One method by which NTM are believed to enter drinking water distribution systems is by their intracellular colonization of protozoa. Our goal was to determ...

  19. Application of a dual target PCR-high resolution melting (HRM) method for rapid nontuberculous mycobacteria identification.

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    Chen, Jonathan Hk; Cheng, Vincent Cc; She, Kevin Kk; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-01-01

    Species differentiation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has long been a difficult task in clinical laboratories. This study demonstrated and evaluated a simple and cost-effective method using the real-time PCR with high-resolution melting (PCR-HRM) analysis technique, which could differentiate at least 14 different medically related NTM.

  20. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation from Clinical and Environmental Samples in Iran: Twenty Years of Surveillance

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    Ali Akbar Velayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are opportunistic pathogens that are widely distributed in the environment. There is a lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Iran. This study consists of a review of NTM articles published in Iran between the years 1992 and 2014. In this review, 20 articles and 14 case reports were identified. Among the 20 articles, 13 (65% studies focused on NTM isolates from clinical specimens, 6 (30% studies examined NTM isolates from environmental samples, and one (5% article included both clinical and environmental isolates. M. fortuitum (229/997; 23% was recorded as the most prevalent and rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM species in both clinical (28% and environmental (19% isolated samples (P < 0.05. Among slow growing mycobacteria (SGM, M. simiae (103/494; 21% demonstrated a higher frequency in clinical samples whereas in environmental samples it was M. flavescens (44/503; 9%. These data represent information from 14 provinces out of 31 provinces of Iran. No information is available in current published data on clinical or environmental NTM from the remaining 17 provinces in Iran. These results emphasize the potential importance of NTM as well as the underestimation of NTM frequency in Iran. NTM is an important clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. Continued research is needed from both clinical and environmental sources to help clinicians and researchers better understand and address NTM treatment and prevention.

  1. Verification of Frequency in Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Kermanshah Drinking Water Supplies Using the PCR-Sequencing Method.

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    Mohajeri, Parviz; Yazdani, Laya; Shahraki, Abdolrazagh Hashemi; Alvandi, Amirhoshang; Atashi, Sara; Farahani, Abbas; Almasi, Ali; Rezaei, Mansour

    2017-04-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are habitants of environment, especially in aquatic systems. Some of them cause problems in immunodeficient patients. Over the last decade, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was established in 45 novel species of nontuberculous mycobacteria. Experiences revealed that this method underestimates the diversity, but does not distinguish between some of mycobacterium subsp. To recognize emerging rapidly growing mycobacteria and identify their subsp, rpoB gene sequencing has been developed. To better understand the transmission of nontuberculous mycobacterial species from drinking water and preventing the spread of illness with these bacteria, the aim of this study was to detect the presence of bacteria by PCR-sequencing techniques. Drinking water samples were collected from different areas of Kermanshah city in west of IRAN. After decontamination with cetylpyridinium chloride, samples were filtered with 0.45-micron filters, the filter transferred directly on growth medium waiting to appear in colonies, then DNA extraction and PCR were performed, and products were sent to sequencing. We found 35/110 (32%) nontuberculous mycobacterial species in drinking water samples, isolates included Mycobacterium goodii, Mycobacterium aurum, and Mycobacterium gastri with the most abundance (11.5%), followed by Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium porcinum, Mycobacterium peregrinum, Mycobacterium mucogenicum, and Mycobacterium chelonae (8%). In this study, we recognized the evidence of contamination by nontuberculous mycobacteria in corroded water pipes. As a result of the high prevalence of these bacteria in drinking water in Kermanshah, this is important evidence of transmission through drinking water. This finding can also help public health policy makers control these isolates in drinking water supplies in Kermanshah.

  2. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis due to Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria: A Case Report

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    Yi, Tae-Im; Choe, Yeo-Reum; Kim, Joo-Sup; Kwon, Kye-Won

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs. Gram-positive cocci are the most common etiological organisms of calcaneal osteomyelitis; whereas, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely documented. We reported a case of NTM calcaneal osteomyelitis in a 51-year-old female patient. She had been previously treated in many local clinics with multiple local steroid injection over 50 times and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy over 20 times with the impression of plantar fasciitis for 3 years prior. Diagnostic workup revealed a calcaneal osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction assay on bone aspirate specimens confirmed the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The patient had a partial calcanectomy with antitubercular therapy. Six months after surgery, a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed localized chronic osteomyelitis with abscess formation. We continued anti-tubercular therapy without operation. At 18-month follow-up after surgery and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy, she was ambulating normally and able to carry out her daily activities without any discomfort. PMID:26949685

  3. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from slaughter pigs in Mubende district, Uganda

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    Muwonge Adrian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of infections caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM in animals and humans has gained considerable recognition during the past few years. In the developed world, where pig production is extensively practiced, studies on mycobacterial infections and related control strategies have received increasing attention. The infections are reported to be caused by a wide spectrum of NTM. Unfortunately, these infections have been less recognized in sub-Saharan Africa owing to lack of awareness and systematic studies. In this study we aimed at isolating and identifying species of mycobacteria involved in causing infections in slaughter pigs in Mubende district of Uganda. Furthermore we wanted to identify factors associated with infection prevalence in the study area. Methods A total of 363 lymph nodes were collected and cultured for the presence of mycobacteria. Isolates were identified by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. A questionnaire survey was administered to identify production related factors associated with infection prevalence. Data were assembled and analysed using descriptive statistics and mixed effects logistic regression analysis. Results Mycobacteria were detected in 39 % (143/363 of the examined lymph nodes, 63 % (59/93 of lymph nodes with gross lesions typical of mycobacteriosis and 31% (84/270 of lymph nodes with no visible lesions. Nineteen per cent of the isolated mycobacteria were identified as Mycobacterium (M avium, of these 78% and 22% were M. avium sub sp. Hominissuis and avium respectively. Other mycobacterial species included M. senuense (16%, M. terrae (7% and M. asiaticum (6%. This study found free range systems (OR = 3.0; P = 0.034 and use of water from valley dams (OR = 2.0; P = 0.049 as factors associated with high prevalence of mycobacteria in slaughter pigs. Conclusions This study demonstrated a high prevalence of NTM infections among slaughter pigs in Mubende district of

  4. The geographic diversity of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from pulmonary samples: an NTM-NET collaborative study.

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    Hoefsloot, Wouter; van Ingen, Jakko; Andrejak, Claire; Angeby, Kristian; Bauriaud, Rosine; Bemer, Pascale; Beylis, Natalie; Boeree, Martin J; Cacho, Juana; Chihota, Violet; Chimara, Erica; Churchyard, Gavin; Cias, Raquel; Daza, Rosa; Daley, Charles L; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Domingo, Diego; Drobniewski, Francis; Esteban, Jaime; Fauville-Dufaux, Maryse; Folkvardsen, Dorte Bek; Gibbons, Noel; Gómez-Mampaso, Enrique; Gonzalez, Rosa; Hoffmann, Harald; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Indra, Alexander; Jagielski, Tomasz; Jamieson, Frances; Jankovic, Mateja; Jong, Eefje; Keane, Joseph; Koh, Wo-Jung; Lange, Berit; Leao, Sylvia; Macedo, Rita; Mannsåker, Turid; Marras, Theodore K; Maugein, Jeannette; Milburn, Heather J; Mlinkó, Tamas; Morcillo, Nora; Morimoto, Kozo; Papaventsis, Dimitrios; Palenque, Elia; Paez-Peña, Mar; Piersimoni, Claudio; Polanová, Monika; Rastogi, Nalin; Richter, Elvira; Ruiz-Serrano, Maria Jesus; Silva, Anabela; da Silva, M Pedro; Simsek, Hulya; van Soolingen, Dick; Szabó, Nora; Thomson, Rachel; Tórtola Fernandez, Teresa; Tortoli, Enrico; Totten, Sarah E; Tyrrell, Greg; Vasankari, Tuula; Villar, Miguel; Walkiewicz, Renata; Winthrop, Kevin L; Wagner, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    A significant knowledge gap exists concerning the geographical distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolation worldwide. To provide a snapshot of NTM species distribution, global partners in the NTM-Network European Trials Group (NET) framework (www.ntm-net.org), a branch of the Tuberculosis Network European Trials Group (TB-NET), provided identification results of the total number of patients in 2008 in whom NTM were isolated from pulmonary samples. From these data, we visualised the relative distribution of the different NTM found per continent and per country. We received species identification data for 20 182 patients, from 62 laboratories in 30 countries across six continents. 91 different NTM species were isolated. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) bacteria predominated in most countries, followed by M. gordonae and M. xenopi. Important differences in geographical distribution of MAC species as well as M. xenopi, M. kansasii and rapid-growing mycobacteria were observed. This snapshot demonstrates that the species distribution among NTM isolates from pulmonary specimens in the year 2008 differed by continent and differed by country within these continents. These differences in species distribution may partly determine the frequency and manifestations of pulmonary NTM disease in each geographical location.

  5. Prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from environmental samples in Iran: A meta-analysis

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    Khaledi, Azad; Bahador, Abbas; Esmaeili, Davood; Tafazoli, Alireza; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Mansury, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: While the most nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs) species are considered as opportunistic pathogens, some of them are related to several human infections. It is believed that environment is the main source for these infections. Distribution and scattering pattern of NTMs has not been well studied in Iran and a few studies about this subject have been done, so the aim of this study was to determine prevalence of NTMs in environmental samples from Iran. Materials and Methods: Data about prevalence of NTMs in environmental samples from Iran were obtained by searching databases. The studies presenting cross-sectional or cohort and the papers with sample size ≥30 were included. Then, the meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software and Cochran's Q and I2 tests. The strategy search was based PRISMA protocol is available online (PRISMA, http://www.prisma-statement.org). Results: The results of this meta-analysis showed that overall combined prevalence of NTMs in environmental samples from Iran was 38.3%. The frequency of NTM was higher in the north of Iran (73.2%). The most prevalent rapid-growing mycobacterium was Mycobacterium fortuitum (19.8%), and the most dominant slow-growing mycobacterium was Mycobacterium flavescens (16.8%). Conclusion: In regard to increasing incidence of disease in immunocompromised patients and existence of different types of mycobacteria species in environmental samples, efforts should be focused on measures that will specifically remove NTMs from habitats where susceptible individuals are exposed. PMID:27904603

  6. Prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria in hospital waters of major cities of Khuzestan province, Iran

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    Azar Dokht eKhosravi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are among the emerging pathogens in immunocompromised individuals including hospitalized patients. So, it is important to consider hospitals water supplies as a source for infection. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of NTM in the hospital aquatic systems of Khuzestan, South west of Iran. In total, 258 hospital water samples were collected and examined. After initial sample processing, sediment of each sample were inoculated into two Lowenstein-Jensen medium. The positive cultures were studied with phenotypic tests including growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation, with subsequent PCR- restriction enzyme analysis (PRA and rpoB gene sequence analysis. Mycobacterial strains were isolated from 77 samples (29.8%, comprising 52 (70.1% rapid growing, and 25 (32.4% slow growing mycobacteria. Based on the overall results, M. fortuitum (44.1% was the most common mycobacterial species in hospital water samples, followed by M. gordonae (n=13,16.8% and M. senegalense (n=5, 7.7%. In conclusion, current study demonstrated the NTM strains as one of the major parts of hospital water supplies with probable potential source for nosocomial infections. This finding also help to shed light on to the dynamics of the distribution and diversity of NTM in the water system of hospitals in the region of study.

  7. Isolation of non-tuberculous mycobacteria from pastoral ecosystems of Uganda: Public Health significance

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    Opuda-Asibo John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM infections in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa at the human-environment-livestock-wildlife interface has recently received increased attention. NTM are environmental opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals. Recent studies in pastoral ecosystems of Uganda detected NTM in humans with cervical lymphadenitis and cattle with lesions compatible with bovine tuberculosis. However, little is known about the source of these mycobacteria in Uganda. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify NTM in the environment of pastoral communities in Uganda, as well as assess the potential risk factors and the public health significance of NTM in these ecosystems. Method A total of 310 samples (soil, water and faecal from cattle and pigs were examined for mycobacteria. Isolates were identified by the INNO-Lipa test and by 16S rDNA sequencing. Additionally, a questionnaire survey involving 231 pastoralists was conducted during sample collection. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics followed by a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Forty-eight isolates of NTM were detected; 25.3% of soil samples, 11.8% of water and 9.1% from animal faecal samples contained mycobacteria. Soils around water sources were the most contaminated with NTM (29.8%. Of these samples, M. fortuitum-peregrinum complex, M. avium complex, M. gordonae, and M. nonchromogenicum were the most frequently detected mycobacteria. Drinking untreated compared to treated water (OR = 33, use of valley dam versus stream water for drinking and other domestic use (OR = 20, sharing of water sources with wild primates compared to antelopes (OR = 4.6, sharing of water sources with domestic animals (OR = 5.3, and close contact with cattle or other domestic animals (OR = 13.8 were the most plausible risk factors for humans to come in contact with NTM in the environment. Conclusions The study detected a

  8. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: susceptibility pattern and prevalence rate in Shanghai from 2005 to 2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-xiu; YUE Jun; HAN Min; YANG Jing-hui; GAO Rong-liang; JING Ling-jie; YANG Shu-sheng; ZHAO Yan-lin

    2010-01-01

    Background An increasing incidence of disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is being reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the isolation rates of NTM from various clinical specimens, and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, over a 4-year period in Shanghai. Methods All NTM isolated between 2005 and 2008 at Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, a key laboratory of mycobacteria tuberculosis in Shanghai, China, were identified with conventional biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Antimicrobial susceptibility for all NTM was determined using the BACTEC MGIT 960 system. Results A total of 21 221 specimens were cultured, of which 4868 (22.94%) grew acid fast bacilli (AFB), and 248 (5.09%) of the AFB were NTM. The prevalence rate of NTM was determined as 4.26%, 4.70%, 4.96% and 6.38% among mycobacteria culture positive samples in years 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 respectively. These data indicated that the prevalence rate has continuously increased. Sixteen different species of NTM were identified, the most commonly encountered NTM in Shanghai were M. chelonae (26.7%), followed by M. fortuitum (15.4%), M. kansasii (14.2%), M. avium-intracellulare complex (13.1%) and M. terrae (6.9%). The rare species identified were M. marinum, M. gastri, M. triviale, M. ulcerans, M. smegmatis, M. phlci, M. gordonae, M. szulgai, M. simiae, M. scrofulaceum and M. xenopi. The five most commonly identified NTM species showed high drug resistance to general anti-tuberculosis drugs, particularly, M. chelonae and M. fortuitum appear to be multi-drug resistance.Conclusions The prevalence of NTM in Shanghai showed a tendency to increase over the course of the study. The five most commonly isolated NTM species showed high drug resistance to first line anti-tuberculosis drugs.

  9. Identification and characterization of non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from tuberculosis suspects in Southern-central China.

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    Yu, Xiao-li; Lu, Lian; Chen, Gao-zhan; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Lei, Hang; Song, Yan-zheng; Zhang, Shu-lin

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)-related death has increased globally recently. To obtain information of the species and characterization of pathogens involved in NTM pulmonary infection in Southern-central China, we identified 160 non-tuberculous infection cases from 3995 acid-fast bacilli (AFB)-positive tuberculous suspects. We then randomly selected 101 non-tuberculous patients, isolated bacteria from their sputa and genotyped the pathogens using the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequences. M. intracellulare (32.67%, 33/101), M. abscessus (32.67%, 33/101) and M. fortuitum (7.92%, 8/101) are identified in these isolates. Surprisingly, non-mycobacteria including Gordonia (8.91%, 9/101), Nocardia (5.94%, 6/101) and Tsukamurella (0.99%, 1/101) are also discovered, and the case of Tsukamurella pulmonis infection is first discovered in Southern-central China. Moreover, species of M. mucogenicum group, M. chubuense, M. kansasii, M. gastri, M. avium, M. porcinum and M. smegmatis are identified. In addition, nine immune compromised cases (8.91%, 9/101), including type two diabetes mellitus and HIV/AIDS are found to be infected with non-tuberculous bacteria. This study revealed the distribution and characteristics of non-tuberculous AFB pathogen infection occurred in Southern-central China, and suggested that physicians should be alert of the emerging of NTM and non-mycobacteria infection in AFB positive cases and take caution when choosing chemotherapy for tuberculosis-like pulmonary infections. Generally, this study may help with the development of new strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of mycobacterial infection.

  10. Identification and characterization of non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from tuberculosis suspects in Southern-central China.

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    Xiao-li Yu

    Full Text Available The incidence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM-related death has increased globally recently. To obtain information of the species and characterization of pathogens involved in NTM pulmonary infection in Southern-central China, we identified 160 non-tuberculous infection cases from 3995 acid-fast bacilli (AFB-positive tuberculous suspects. We then randomly selected 101 non-tuberculous patients, isolated bacteria from their sputa and genotyped the pathogens using the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequences. M. intracellulare (32.67%, 33/101, M. abscessus (32.67%, 33/101 and M. fortuitum (7.92%, 8/101 are identified in these isolates. Surprisingly, non-mycobacteria including Gordonia (8.91%, 9/101, Nocardia (5.94%, 6/101 and Tsukamurella (0.99%, 1/101 are also discovered, and the case of Tsukamurella pulmonis infection is first discovered in Southern-central China. Moreover, species of M. mucogenicum group, M. chubuense, M. kansasii, M. gastri, M. avium, M. porcinum and M. smegmatis are identified. In addition, nine immune compromised cases (8.91%, 9/101, including type two diabetes mellitus and HIV/AIDS are found to be infected with non-tuberculous bacteria. This study revealed the distribution and characteristics of non-tuberculous AFB pathogen infection occurred in Southern-central China, and suggested that physicians should be alert of the emerging of NTM and non-mycobacteria infection in AFB positive cases and take caution when choosing chemotherapy for tuberculosis-like pulmonary infections. Generally, this study may help with the development of new strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of mycobacterial infection.

  11. Fragment-based whole cell screen delivers hits against M. tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria

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    Wilfried Moreira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive multi-target ‘fragment drugs’ represent critical components of current tuberculosis regimens. These compounds, such as pyrazinamide, are old synthetic antimycobacterials that are activated inside Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and are smaller than the usual drug-like, single-target molecules. Based on the success of small ‘dirty’ drugs in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, we suggested previously that fragment-based whole cell screens should be introduced in our current antimycobacterial drug discovery efforts. Here, we carried out such a screen and characterized bactericidal activity, selectivity and spectrum of hits we obtained. A library of 1725 fragments was tested at a single concentration for growth inhibitory activity against M. bovis BCG as screening strain and 38 of 116 primary hits were confirmed in dose response analyses to be active against virulent M. tuberculosis. Bacterial kill experiments showed that most hits displayed bactericidal activity at their minimal inhibitory concentration. Cytotoxicity assays established that a large proportion of hits displayed a favorable selectivity index for mammalian cells. Importantly, one third of M. tuberculosis active fragments were also active against M. abscessus and M. avium, two emerging non-tuberculous mycobacterial pathogens, opening the opportunity to develop broad spectrum antimycobacterials. Activity determination against Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, as well as fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans showed only a small overlap indicating a generally narrow spectrum of these novel antimicrobial hits for mycobacteria. In conclusion, we carried out the first fragment-based whole cell screen against bacteria and identified a substantial number of hits with excellent physicochemical properties and dual activity against M. tuberculosis and

  12. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in fistula-in-ano: A new finding and its implications

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    Pankaj Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective/background: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are not known to be associated with fistula-in-ano. NTM was detected in three fistula-in-ano patients in our series. In this study, related data was reviewed to find the mycobacterial disease in patients in our database. Methods: In this study, 311 consecutive fistula-in-ano patients operated over 2 years were analyzed. The histopathology of anal fistula tract epithelial lining of every operated patient was analyzed and other tests (real-time-polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR], GeneXpert, and mycobacterial culture were conducted in patients with high index of suspicion of having mycobacterial disease. Results: Two patients had histopathological features suggestive of mycobacterial disease. Of these, one patient had NTM and the other had Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB on RT-PCR. Four patients had normal histopathology features but tested positive on RT-PCR (2 each for NTM and MTB. Therefore, a total of six patients were tested for mycobacterial disease (3 each for NTM and MTB. Mycobacterium culture was performed in two patients (both NTM but the result was negative. Five of six patients (NTM = 2, MTB = 3 presented with delayed recurrences after operation (6–18 months after complete healing. Conclusion: NTM can cause fistula-in-ano. It could be an undiagnosed contributory factor in fistula recurrence. Mycobacterial disease (both tuberculous and nontuberculous may be associated with delayed recurrence of fistula. RT-PCR is highly sensitive and can differentiate between NTM and MTB. It should perhaps be performed in all recurrent and refractory cases.

  13. Prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from environmental samples in Iran: A meta-analysis

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    Azad Khaledi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While the most nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs species are considered as opportunistic pathogens, some of them are related to several human infections. It is believed that environment is the main source for these infections. Distribution and scattering pattern of NTMs has not been well studied in Iran and a few studies about this subject have been done, so the aim of this study was to determine prevalence of NTMs in environmental samples from Iran. Materials and Methods: Data about prevalence of NTMs in environmental samples from Iran were obtained by searching databases. The studies presenting cross-sectional or cohort and the papers with sample size ≥30 were included. Then, the meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software and Cochran′s Q and I2 tests. The strategy search was based PRISMA protocol is available online (PRISMA, http://www.prisma-statement.org. Results : The results of this meta-analysis showed that overall combined prevalence of NTMs in environmental samples from Iran was 38.3%. The frequency of NTM was higher in the north of Iran (73.2%. The most prevalent rapid-growing mycobacterium was Mycobacterium fortuitum (19.8%, and the most dominant slow-growing mycobacterium was Mycobacterium flavescens (16.8%. Conclusion: In regard to increasing incidence of disease in immunocompromised patients and existence of different types of mycobacteria species in environmental samples, efforts should be focused on measures that will specifically remove NTMs from habitats where susceptible individuals are exposed.

  14. [Nontuberculous mycobacteria: M. marinum, M. ulcerans, M. xenopi - brief characteristics of the bacteria and diseases caused by them].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fol, Marek; Olek, Joanna; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2011-09-07

    Mycobacterium is a variable group of acid-fast bacillus which contains pathogenic bacteria causing tuberculosis (MTC - Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex) and leprosy (M. leprae) as well as numerous nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) causing diseases mostly in people with immunodeficiency, although some NTM strains are capable of causing illnesses in non-immunocompromised patients. This group includes for example Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium xenopi. These microorganisms are environmental mycobacteria, present in developing countries of Africa, but they may also be transferred to other continents. The most common symptoms of diseases caused by these species are skin lesions (hyperpigmentation, tumors, ulcers) and arthritis. Because of the rarity of their occurrence, these mycobacteria are relatively poorly known. Effective ways of treating the diseases caused by these bacilli are still under study.

  15. Profiling serum antibodies to Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in rhesus monkeys with nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Fangui; Pan, Jinchun; Wu, Ruike; Chen, Meiling; Kuang, Huiwen; Zhao, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been increasing in both human and animals. In this study, antibody profiles of NTM in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were determined and compared with those of monkeys infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Antibodies against 10 M. tuberculosis proteins, purified protein derivative (PPD), and mammalian old tuberculin (MOT) were detected in 14 monkeys naturally infected with NTM by indirect ELISA. Sera from 10 monkeys infected with MTBC and 10 healthy monkeys were set as controls. All antigens showed high serological reactivities to MTBC infections and low reactivities in healthy monkeys. NTM infections showed strong antibody responses to MOT and PPD; moderate antibody responses to 16kDa, U1, MPT64L, 14kDa, and TB16.3; and low antibody responses to 38kDa, Ag85b, CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6. According to the criteria of MTBC, only CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6 showed negative antibody responses in all NTM infections. Taken together, these results suggest that positive results of a PPD/MOT-based ELISA in combination with results of antibodies to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens, such as CFP10 and ESAT-6, could discriminate NTM and MTBC infections. Two positive results indicate an MTBC infection, and a negative result for an M. tuberculosis-specific antigen may preliminarily predict an NTM infection.

  16. Multicenter Study of Prevalence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis in France ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Anne-Laure; Catherinot, Emilie; Ripoll, Fabienne; Soismier, Nathalie; Macheras, Edouard; Ravilly, Sophie; Bellis, Gil; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Le Roux, Evelyne; Lemonnier, Lydie; Gutierrez, Cristina; Vincent, Véronique; Fauroux, Brigitte; Rottman, Martin; Guillemot, Didier; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    We performed a multicenter prevalence study of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) involving 1,582 patients (mean age, 18.9 years; male/female ratio, 1.06) with cystic fibrosis in France. The overall NTM prevalence (percentage of patients with at least one positive culture) was 6.6% (104/1,582 patients), with prevalences ranging from 3.7% (in the east of France) to 9.6% (in the greater Paris area). Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC; 50 patients) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC; 23 patients) species were the most common NTM, and the only ones associated with fulfillment of the American Thoracic Society bacteriological criteria for NTM lung disease. The “new” species, Mycobacterium bolletii and Mycobacterium massiliense, accounted for 40% of MABSC isolates. MABSC species were isolated at all ages, with a prevalence peak between 11 and 15 years of age (5.8%), while MAC species reached their highest prevalence value among patients over 25 years of age (2.2%). PMID:19846643

  17. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria on Ready-to-Eat, Raw and Frozen Fruits and Vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzinska, Radka; Makovcova, Jitka; Kaevska, Marija; Slany, Michal; Babak, Vladimir; Moravkova, Monika

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of fruits and vegetables is increasing worldwide because of the positive impact of these foods on human health. Ready-to-eat, raw whole, and frozen fruits and vegetables were purchased from markets and examined for the presence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) using culture, real-time PCR (qPCR), and sequencing. Using qPCR, Mycobacterium sp. at 10(0) to 10(4) ge/g (genome equivalents per gram) was found in almost all of the 178 samples; members of the M. avium complex were found only sporadically. Culture and sequencing revealed the presence of 22 viable NTM isolates in 17 samples. In addition to NTM commonly found in the environment, several rarely described isolates of viable NTM were recovered. The presence of Mycobacterium shigaense, which has been previously isolated only from human patients, was found in lettuce, the first time that this species has been found in an environmental sample. Mycobacterium parmense, Mycobacterium palustre, and Mycobacterium llatzerense, which have been previously isolated from human patients and occasionally from soil and water, were recovered from leafy green vegetables. Strawberries and cut salad mixes contained Mycobacterium algericum, Mycobacterium fallax, and Mycobacterium minnesotense. NTM are primarily nonpathogenic. However, consumption of fruits or vegetables contaminated with NTM could represent a health risk for immunocompromised people, children, and the elderly.

  18. Culture-Independent Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Samples.

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    Lindsay J Caverly

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are increasing in prevalence and are a significant cause of lung function decline in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF. NTM have been detected in culture-independent analyses of CF airway microbiota at lower rates than would be expected based on published prevalence data, likely due to poor lysing of the NTM cell wall during DNA extraction. We compared a standard bacterial lysis protocol with a modified method by measuring NTM DNA extraction by qPCR and NTM detection with bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The modified method improved NTM DNA recovery from spiked CF sputum samples by a mean of 0.53 log10 copies/mL for M. abscessus complex and by a mean of 0.43 log10 copies/mL for M. avium complex as measured by qPCR targeting the atpE gene. The modified method also improved DNA sequence based NTM detection in NTM culture-positive CF sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples; however, both qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing remained less sensitive than culture for NTM detection. We highlight the limitations of culture-independent identification of NTM from CF respiratory samples, and illustrate how alterations in the bacterial lysis and DNA extraction process can be employed to improve NTM detection with both qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  19. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory samples from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in the state of Rondonia, Brazil

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    Cleoni Alves Mendes de Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB is infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. We aimed to evaluate the contribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM to pulmonary disease in patients from the state of Rondônia using respiratory samples and epidemiological data from TB cases. Mycobacterium isolates were identified using a combination of conventional tests, polymerase chain reaction-based restriction enzyme analysis of hsp65 gene and hsp65 gene sequencing. Among the 1,812 cases suspected of having pulmonary TB, 444 yielded bacterial cultures, including 369 cases positive for MTB and 75 cases positive for NTM. Within the latter group, 14 species were identified as Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium gilvum, Mycobacterium gordonae, Mycobacterium asiaticum, Mycobacterium tusciae, Mycobacterium porcinum, Mycobacterium novocastrense, Mycobacterium simiae, Mycobacterium szulgai, Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium holsaticum and 13 isolates could not be identified at the species level. The majority of NTM cases were observed in Porto Velho and the relative frequency of NTM compared with MTB was highest in Ji-Paraná. In approximately half of the TB subjects with NTM, a second sample containing NTM was obtained, confirming this as the disease-causing agent. The most frequently observed NTM species were M. abscessus and M. avium and because the former species is resistant to many antibiotics and displays unsatisfactory cure rates, the implementation of rapid identification of mycobacterium species is of considerable importance.

  20. Chronic suppurative otitis media due to nontuberculous mycobacteria: A case of successful treatment with topical boric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Marie-Astrid; Quach, Caroline; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an increasingly recognized cause of chronic suppurative otitis media in children with tympanostomy tubes. Treatment of this condition is difficult and typically requires a combination of systemic antibiotics and surgical debridement. We present the first case of a 2-year-old male with chronic suppurative otitis media due to NTM who failed systemic antibiotic therapy and was successfully managed with topical boric acid powder. This report highlights the challenges involved in treating this infection, and introduces boric acid as a potentially valuable component of therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparing the harmful effects of nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Taylor-Robinson, David; Waldmann, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To better understand the relative effects of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function decline in cystic fibrosis, we assessed the impact of each infection in a Danish setting. METHODS: Longitudinal registry study of 432 patients with cystic...... fibrosis contributing 53,771 lung function measures between 1974 and 2014. We used a mixed effects model with longitudinally structured correlation, while adjusting for clinically important covariates. RESULTS: Infections with a significant impact on rate of decline in %FEV1 were Mycobacterium abscessus...

  2. High Rates of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation in Mozambican Children with Presumptive Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Varela, Elisa; L. García-Basteiro, Alberto; Augusto, Orvalho J.; Fraile, Oscar; Bulo, Helder; Ira, Tasmiya; Gondo, Kizito; van Ingen, Jakko; Naniche, Denise; Sacarlal, Jahit; Alonso, Pedro L.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can cause disease which can be clinically and radiologically undistinguishable from tuberculosis (TB), posing a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in high TB settings. We aim to describe the prevalence of NTM isolation and its clinical characteristics in children from rural Mozambique. Methods This study was part of a community TB incidence study in children <3 years of age. Gastric aspirate and induced sputum sampling were performed in all presumptive TB cases and processed for smear testing using fluorochrome staining and LED Microscopy, liquid and solid culture, and molecular identification by GenoType® Mycobacterium CM/AS assays. Results NTM were isolated in 26.3% (204/775) of children. The most prevalent NTM species was M. intracellulare (N = 128), followed by M. scrofulaceum (N = 35) and M. fortuitum (N = 9). Children with NTM were significantly less symptomatic and less likely to present with an abnormal chest radiograph than those with M. tuberculosis. NTM were present in 21.6% of follow-up samples and 25 children had the same species isolated from ≥2 separate samples. All were considered clinically insignificant and none received specific treatment. Children with NTM isolates had equal all cause mortality and likelihood of TB treatment as those with negative culture although they were less likely to have TB ruled out. Conclusions NTM isolation is frequent in presumptive TB cases but was not clinically significant in this patient cohort. However, it can contribute to TB misdiagnosis. Further studies are needed to understand the epidemiology and the clinical significance of NTM in children. PMID:28095429

  3. A systematic review of waterborne infections from nontuberculous mycobacteria in health care facility water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Trudy; Abebe, Lydia S; Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2017-05-01

    Healthcare-acquired infections are an increasing problem for health care providers and policy makers. Water is an overlooked source of infectious microorganisms in health care facilities. Waterborne nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous, and particularly problematic in health care facility water systems, and cause a variety of diseases. The purpose of this review is to assess health care associated NTM infections from health care facility water systems. We documented susceptible populations, modes of transmission, and the median attack rate (e.g. patients infected per patients exposed). We aimed to identify transmission risk factors and inform evidence-based policies for infection control and prevention. We searched Embase, PubMed, Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov without date restrictions. English language articles with original data on NTM waterborne infections in health care settings were included. Randomized controlled trials, descriptive studies (case reports, case series), case-control studies, cohort studies, cross-sectional surveys, and quasi-experimental studies on nosocomial waterborne infections were included. Three investigators independently screened titles and abstracts for relevant articles, and one screened full-text articles. Data were extracted by one investigator, and a second confirmed accuracy for 10% of results. We included 22 observational studies. Immunocompromised, post-surgical, and hemodialysis patients were commonly affected populations. A range of exposure routes such as uncovered central venous catheters (CVCs), wound exposure, and contamination during surgical procedures was reported. The median attack rate was 12.1% (interquartile range, 11-27.2). Waterborne NTM infection affects susceptible patients through common, preventable exposure routes. Effective prevention strategies will require both medical and environmental health expertise, and inter-professional cooperation will optimize these efforts. Copyright © 2016

  4. An unusual outbreak of nontuberculous mycobacteria in hospital respiratory wards: Association with nontuberculous mycobacterial colonization of hospital water supply network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Salvatore; Rogliani, Paola; Paone, Gregorino; Altieri, Alfonso; Alma, Mario Giuseppe; Cazzola, Mario; Puxeddu, Ermanno

    2016-06-01

    The incidence and prevalence of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is increasing worldwide arousing concerns that NTM infection may become a serious health challenge. We recently observed a significant increase of NTM-positive sputa samples from patients referred to respiratory disease wards of a large tertiary hospital in Rome. A survey to identify possible NTM contamination revealed a massive presence of NTM in the hospital water supply network. After decontamination procedures, NTM presence dropped both in water pipelines and sputa samples. We believe that this observation should encourage water network surveys for NTM contamination and prompt decontamination procedures should be considered to reduce this potential source of infection.

  5. Usefulness of three-channel multiplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis for simultaneous detection and identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yun Ji; Chung, Young Hoon; Kim, Taek Soo; Song, Sang Hoon; Park, Kyoung Un; Yim, Jae Joon; Song, Junghan; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Eui Chong

    2011-11-01

    We attempted to determine the benefits of three-channel multiplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis not only in detecting and distinguishing between nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but also in identifying NTM to the species level.

  6. The identification of biomarkers differentiating Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria via thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, N.A.; Kolk, A.H.J.; Kuijper, S.; Janssen, H.-G.; Vivo-Truyols, G.

    2013-01-01

    Infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasing, particularly among immune-compromised patients and those with damaged lungs. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) strains, however, remain the most common cause of mycobacterial infection. A rapid method of distinguishing MTB fro

  7. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floto, R.A.; Olivier, K.N.; Saiman, L.; Daley, C.L.; Herrmann, J.L.; Nick, J.A.; Noone, P.G.; Bilton, D.; Corris, P.; Gibson, R.L.; Hempstead, S.E.; Koetz, K.; Sabadosa, K.A.; Sermet-Gaudelus, I.; Smyth, A.R.; Ingen, J. van; Wallace, R.J.; Winthrop, K.L.; Marshall, B.C.; Haworth, C.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the

  8. Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria and the Performance of Interferon Gamma Release Assays in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Thomas Stig; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Lillebaek, Troels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The QuantiFERON-TB-Gold Test (QFT) is more specific than the Mantoux skin-test to discriminate between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections. Here we study the performance of the QFT in patients with NTM disease. METHODS: From 2005 to 2011...

  9. Isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from household water and shower aerosols in patients with pulmonary disease caused by NTM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Rachel; Tolson, Carla; Carter, Robyn; Coulter, Chris; Huygens, Flavia; Hargreaves, Megan

    2013-09-01

    It has been postulated that susceptible individuals may acquire infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from water and aerosol exposure. This study examined household water and shower aerosols of patients with NTM pulmonary disease. The mycobacteria isolated from clinical samples from 20 patients included M. avium (5 patients), M. intracellulare (12 patients), M. abscessus (7 patients), M. gordonae (1 patient), M. lentiflavum (1 patient), M. fortuitum (1 patient), M. peregrinum (1 patient), M. chelonae (1 patient), M. triplex (1 patient), and M. kansasii (1 patient). One-liter water samples and swabs were collected from all taps, and swimming pools or rainwater tanks. Shower aerosols were sampled using Andersen six-stage cascade impactors. For a subgroup of patients, real-time PCR was performed and high-resolution melt profiles were compared to those of ATCC control strains. Pathogenic mycobacteria were isolated from 19 homes. Species identified in the home matched that found in the patient in seven (35%) cases: M. abscessus (3 cases), M. avium (1 case), M. gordonae (1 case), M. lentiflavum (1 case), and M. kansasii (1 case). In an additional patient with M. abscessus infection, this species was isolated from potable water supplying her home. NTM grown from aerosols included M. abscessus (3 homes), M. gordonae (2 homes), M. kansasii (1 home), M. fortuitum complex (4 homes), M. mucogenicum (1 home), and M. wolinskyi (1 home). NTM causing human disease can be isolated from household water and aerosols. The evidence appears strongest for M. avium, M. kansasii, M. lentiflavum, and M. abscessus. Despite a predominance of disease due to M. intracellulare, we found no evidence for acquisition of infection from household water for this species.

  10. Bath water contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria in 24-hour home baths, hot springs, and public bathhouses of Nagano Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bath water samples were collected from 116 hot springs, 197 public bathhouses, and 38 24-hour home baths in Nagano Prefecture, Japan, during the period of April 2009 to November 2011, for determining the presence and extent of contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Cultures positive for Legionella were observed in 123 of the 3,314 bath water samples examined. The distribution and abundance of Legionella and/or combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria were investigated to clarify the contamination levels. The abundance of Legionella was demonstrated to correlate considerably with the levels of combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Legionella spp. were obtained from 61% of the water samples from 24-hour home baths, but only from 3% of the samples from public bathhouses and hot springs. This is despite the fact that a few outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in Nagano Prefecture as well as other regions of Japan have been traced to bath water contamination. The comparatively higher rate of contamination of the 24-hour home baths is a matter of concern. It is therefore advisable to routinely implement good maintenance of the water basins, particularly of the 24-hour home baths.

  11. Structural analysis of biofilm formation by rapidly and slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) such as M. abscessus, M. mucogenicum, M. chelonae and M. fortuitum, implicated in healthcare-associated infections, are often isolated from potable water supplies as part of the microbial flora. To understa...

  12. Medical Management for the Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Infection of the Parotid Gland: Avoiding Surgery May Be Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhabel, Sarah; Oughton, Matthew Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is uncommon in the head and neck; therefore there is no clear consensus on treating these infections. Our objective was to report our experience with a unique case of NTM infection of the parotid in an immunocompetent patient, in order to determine appropriate management through our experience with this pathology. A 57-year-old man, known for numerous comorbid diseases, presented to our institution complaining of right parotid swelling and pain. A computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed a multiloculated collection in the inferior portion of the right parotid gland, compatible with abscess formation. This abscess was drained by interventional radiology (IR) but required repeat drainage twice due to lack of initial improvement. He was treated with several antibiotics as culture results initially indicated Gram-positive bacilli and then Mycobacterium species, with final identification by a reference laboratory as Mycobacterium abscessus. Imipenem was initiated with amikacin and clarithromycin. His infection clinically and radiologically resolved after 5 months of antibiotherapy. In our case, the patient improved following intravenous antibiotic therapy. Our experience demonstrates that appropriate antibiotherapy can lead to resolution of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in the parotid without the risks associated with surgical intervention. PMID:27340407

  13. The Epidemiology of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: Data from a General Hospital in Athens, Greece, 2007–2013

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    Marios Panagiotou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The epidemiology of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM in Greece is largely unknown. Objectives. To determine the incidence and the demographic, microbiological, and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary NTM infection and pulmonary NTM disease. Methods. A retrospective review of the demographic, microbiological, and clinical characteristics of patients with NTM culture-positive respiratory specimens from January 2007 to May 2013. Results. A total of 120 patients were identified with at least one respiratory NTM isolate and 56 patients (46% fulfilled the microbiological ATS/IDSA criteria for NTM disease. Of patients with adequate data, 16% fulfilled the complete ATS/IDSA criteria for NTM disease. The incidence of pulmonary NTM infection and disease was 18.9 and 8.8 per 100.000 inpatients and outpatients, respectively. The spectrum of NTM species was high (13 species and predominated by M. avium-intracellulare complex (M. avium (13%, M. intracellulare (10%, M. gordonae (14%, and M. fortuitum (12%. The ratio of isolation of NTM to M. tuberculosis in all hospitalized patients was 0.59. Conclusions. The first data on the epidemiology of pulmonary NTM in Athens, Greece, are presented. NTM infection is common in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, only a significantly smaller proportion of patients fulfill the criteria for NTM disease.

  14. Colonization with nontuberculous mycobacteria is associated with positive tuberculin skin test reactions in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtman, Lynn M; Miller, Andrew D; Xia, DongLing; Curran, Elizabeth H; Mansfield, Keith G

    2011-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections can result in significant morbidity and mortality in nonhuman primate colonies. Preventative health programs designed to detect infection routinely include tuberculin skin testing (TST). Because Mammalian Old Tuberculin used for TST contains antigens common to a variety of mycobacterial species, false-positive results can occur in animals sensitized to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Over 11 mo, a large colony of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) demonstrated a 3.6% prevalence of equivocal or positive TST reactions (termed 'suspect reactions'). Culture of gastric aspirates, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and feces revealed a single animal with a positive fecal culture for Mycobacterium gordonae. PCR amplification of M. gordonae DNA in feces collected from animals with suspect TST reactions (demonstrating a 66.7% colonization rate) and colony controls (demonstrating a 14.3% colonization rate) revealed a significant association between suspect TST reactions and intestinal colonization. Gross and histopathologic evaluation revealed a multifocal lymphadenopathy and granulomatous lymphadenitis in 2 of 4 TST-positive marmosets examined. Counter to expectations, granulomatous lymphoid tissue was culture-positive for M. kansasii rather than M. gordonae. Detection of M. gordonae in the feces of TST-suspect animals likely represents an apathogenic intestinal colonization that may serve as an indicator of NTM exposure, whereas evidence of histopathologic disease is associated with the more pathogenic M. kansasii. Although a high index of suspicion for M. tuberculosis should always be maintained, colonization with NTM organisms represents a cause of suspect TST reactions in common marmosets.

  15. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria in wild boar (Sus scrofa) from Southern Spain: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jiménez, W L; Benítez-Medina, J M; Martínez, R; Carranza, J; Cerrato, R; García-Sánchez, A; Risco, D; Moreno, J C; Sequeda, M; Gómez, L; Fernández-Llario, P; Hermoso-de-Mendoza, J

    2015-02-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are widely distributed in the environment, particularly in wet soil, marshland, rivers or streams, but also are causative agents of a wide variety of infections in animals and humans. Little information is available regarding the NTM prevalence in wildlife and their effects or significance in the bovine tuberculosis (bTB) epidemiology and diagnosis. This research shows the most frequently NTM isolated in lymph nodes of wild boar (Sus scrofa) from southern Spain, relating the NTM presence with the individual characteristics, the management of animals and the possible misdiagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis in concurrent infections. A total of 219 NTM isolates were obtained from 1249 wild boar mandibular lymph nodes sampled between 2007 and 2011. All but 75 isolates were identified by the PCR-restriction analysis-hsp65, and a partial sequencing of the 16S rDNA was carried out to identify the rest of the isolates. Results showed that Mycobacterium chelonae was the most frequently isolated NTM specie (133 isolates, 60.7%), followed by Mycobacterium avium (24 isolates, 11%). No relation was found regarding sex, body condition and management, but M. chelonae was more frequently detected in adults, whereas M. avium was more prevalent in subadults. The high NTM prevalence observed in the studied wild boar populations could make difficult the bTB diagnostic.

  16. Validation of biomarkers for distinguishing Mycobacterium tuberculosis from non-tuberculous mycobacteria using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemometrics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc A Dang

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major international health problem. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB from non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM is critical for decisions regarding patient management and choice of therapeutic regimen. Recently we developed a 20-compound model to distinguish between MTB and NTM. It is based on thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and partial least square discriminant analysis. Here we report the validation of this model with two independent sample sets, one consisting of 39 MTB and 17 NTM isolates from the Netherlands, the other comprising 103 isolates (91 MTB and 12 NTM from Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa. All the MTB strains in the 56 Dutch samples were correctly identified and the model had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 94%. For the South African samples the model had a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 100%. Based on our model, we have developed a new decision-tree that allows the differentiation of MTB from NTM with 100% accuracy. Encouraged by these findings we will proceed with the development of a simple, rapid, affordable, high-throughput test to identify MTB directly in sputum.

  17. [Lymphadenitis due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria: Experience over 15 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Del Olmo Izuzquiza, Ignacio; Bustillo Alonso, Matilde; Monforte Cirac, María Luisa; Burgués Prades, Pedro; Guerrero Laleona, Carmelo

    2017-03-01

    To study the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, therapeutic management, and outcome of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lymphadenitis in a paediatric population of Aragón (Spain). A retrospective study was conducted on patients under 15 years-old diagnosed with non-tuberculous mycobacterial lymphadenitis between the years 2000 and 2015. patients with lymphadenitis and positive culture. Quantitative values are shown as mean, rank, and standard deviation, and qualitative data as frequencies. Twenty-seven cases were registered, with a mean age of presentation of 39.9 months (range 10 months-8 years). The mean time between the symptoms onset and first consultation was 1.7±1.1 months. The most frequent location was sub-maxilar in 17/27 cases (63%), on the right side in 59.3%, and size 2.96±1.26cm. Fistulae were observed in 16/27 cases. Tuberculin test was greater than 10mm in 7/24 (29.1%). Microbiological cultures were positive for Mycobacterium avium in 14/27 (51.9%), Mycobacterium intracellulare 3/27 (11.1%), and Mycobacterium lentiflavum 3/27 (11.1%). Combined treatment of antibiotics and surgery was given in 16/27 cases (59.8%), medical treatment only in7/27 (25.9%), and surgical exeresis alone in 4/27 (14.8%). Two patients required a new surgery, and one showed severe neutropenia secondary to rifabutin. Only one case (3.7%) suffered from temporary facial palsy as sequel. The most frequent treatment was the combination of antibiotics and surgery. Delay in diagnosis seemed to be responsible for the limited number of exeresis as first option, only one for every seven patients. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates from clinical and environmental sources of a metropolitan city.

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    Ali Akbar Velayati

    Full Text Available While NTM infection is mainly acquired from environmental exposure, monitoring of environmental niches for NTM is not a routine practice. This study aimed to find the prevalence of environmental NTM in soil and water in four highly populated suburbs of Tehran, Iran.A total of 4014 samples from soil and water resources were collected and studied. Sediments of each treated sample were cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen medium and observed twice per week for growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation. Colonies were studied with phenotypic tests. Molecular analysis was performed on single colonies derived from subculture of original isolates. Environmental samples were compared with 34 NTM isolates from patients who were residents of the study locations.Out of 4014 samples, mycobacteria were isolated from 862 (21.4% specimens; 536 (62.1% belonged to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM and 326 (37.8% were rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM. The five most frequent NTM were M. farcinogens (105/862; 12.1%, M. fortuitum (72/862; 8.3%, M. senegalense (58/862; 6.7%, M. kansasii (54/862; 6.2%, and M. simiae (46/862; 5.3%. In total, 62.5% (539/862 of mycobacterial positive samples were isolated from water and only 37.4% (323/862 of them were isolated from soil samples (P<0.05. Out of 5314 positive clinical samples for mycobacteria, 175 (3.2% isolates were NTM. The trend of NTM isolates increased from 1.2% (13 out of 1078 in 2004 to 3.8% (39 out of 1005 in 2014 (P = 0.0001. The major clinical isolates were M. simiae (51; 29.1%, M. kansasii (26; 14.8%, M. chelonae (28; 16%, and M. fortuitum (13; 7.4%.Comparing the distribution pattern of environmental NTM isolates with clinical isolates suggests a possible transmission link, but this does not apply to all environmental NTM species. Our study confirms an increasing trend of NTM isolation from clinical samples that needs further investigation.

  19. Patient-Centered Research Priorities for Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Infection. An NTM Research Consortium Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkle, Emily; Aksamit, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Daley, Charles L; Griffith, David; Leitman, Philip; Leitman, Amy; Malanga, Elisha; Marras, Theodore K; Olivier, Kenneth N; Prevots, D Rebecca; Prieto, Delia; Quittner, Alexandra L; Skach, William; Walsh, John W; Winthrop, Kevin L

    2016-09-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause an increasingly important chronic and debilitating lung disease in older adults. Diagnosis is often delayed, although awareness among clinicians and patients is increasing. When necessary, treatment often lasts 18-24 months and consists of three or four antibiotics that can have serious side effects. Relapses are common and commonly require resumption of prolonged therapy. Given the need for improved diagnostic techniques and clinical trials to identify new therapies or to improve existing therapies, a group of North American clinicians and researchers formed the NTM Research Consortium (NTMRC) in 2014. The NTMRC recognized the importance of including the patient voice in determining research priorities for NTM. In November 2015, patients, caregivers, patient advocates, clinical experts, and researchers gathered for a 1-day meeting in Portland, Oregon funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. The meeting goal was to define patient-centered research priorities for NTM lung infections. Patients expressed frustration with the number of people who have endured years of missed diagnoses or inadequate treatment of NTM. Participants identified as top research priorities the prevention of NTM infection; approval of more effective treatments with fewer side effects and easier administration; understanding the best chest physiotherapy methods; validating and using tools to measure quality of life; and developing a disease-specific activity and severity assessment tool. Workshop participants agreed that two complementary objectives are critical to ensure the best achievable outcomes for patients: (1) additional clinician education to improve screening and diagnosis of NTM infections; and (2) development of a geographically distributed network of experts in NTM disease to offer consultation or direct therapy after a diagnosis is made.

  20. Patient-Centered Research Priorities for Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Infection. An NTM Research Consortium Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksamit, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Daley, Charles L.; Griffith, David; Leitman, Philip; Leitman, Amy; Malanga, Elisha; Marras, Theodore K.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Prevots, D. Rebecca; Prieto, Delia; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Skach, William; Walsh, John W.; Winthrop, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause an increasingly important chronic and debilitating lung disease in older adults. Diagnosis is often delayed, although awareness among clinicians and patients is increasing. When necessary, treatment often lasts 18–24 months and consists of three or four antibiotics that can have serious side effects. Relapses are common and commonly require resumption of prolonged therapy. Given the need for improved diagnostic techniques and clinical trials to identify new therapies or to improve existing therapies, a group of North American clinicians and researchers formed the NTM Research Consortium (NTMRC) in 2014. The NTMRC recognized the importance of including the patient voice in determining research priorities for NTM. In November 2015, patients, caregivers, patient advocates, clinical experts, and researchers gathered for a 1-day meeting in Portland, Oregon funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. The meeting goal was to define patient-centered research priorities for NTM lung infections. Patients expressed frustration with the number of people who have endured years of missed diagnoses or inadequate treatment of NTM. Participants identified as top research priorities the prevention of NTM infection; approval of more effective treatments with fewer side effects and easier administration; understanding the best chest physiotherapy methods; validating and using tools to measure quality of life; and developing a disease-specific activity and severity assessment tool. Workshop participants agreed that two complementary objectives are critical to ensure the best achievable outcomes for patients: (1) additional clinician education to improve screening and diagnosis of NTM infections; and (2) development of a geographically distributed network of experts in NTM disease to offer consultation or direct therapy after a diagnosis is made. PMID:27627485

  1. Isolation and identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria from hospitalized patients and drinking water samples--examination of their correlation by chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovriki, Eleni; Gerogianni, Irini; Petinaki, Efi; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Papaioannou, Agelos; Gourgoulianis, Kostas

    2016-04-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been found to be widely dispersed in the environment and are being considered potentially pathogenic for humans and animals, while reports of their human to human transmission are absent. Water and aerosols are potential transmission modes of NTM to humans. Hospitalized patients with NTM infections were studied together with drinking water samples from their respective residence areas during 2003-2013. Cluster analysis and factor analysis were used to analyze the data matrix. A total of 367 hospitalized patients living in 30 localities in the Prefecture of Larissa were tested positive for NTM. The most frequently isolated NTM species of the 383 NTM isolates from the clinical specimens were Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 118, 30.8 %), M. gordonae (n = 87, 22.7 %), M. peregrinum (n = 46, 12.0 %), M. chelonae (n = 11, 2.9 %), M. avium (n = 8, 2.1 %), and M. intracellulare (n = 7, 1.8 %), while 88 (23.0 %) of these isolates were not identified. It is noted that in 8 patients, M. tuberculosis was isolated simultaneously with one NTM, in 15 patients, together with two types of NTM, while in 1 patient, it was found at the same time as three different NTM. In addition, 3360 drinking water samples were collected from 30 localities and analyzed during 2010 to 2013; they were found 11.2 % NTM positive. Cluster analysis and factor analysis results confirm that NTM strains are correlated to each other in both isolated samples from patients and drinking water, while the strength of their correlation varied from weak to moderate (e.g., factor loadings ranged from 0.69 to 0.74 when all data are considered). These results provide indications that drinking water could be linked with NTM cases in humans.

  2. Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria in South African Wildlife: Neglected Pathogens and Potential Impediments for Bovine Tuberculosis Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gcebe, Nomakorinte; Hlokwe, Tiny M.

    2017-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are not only emerging and opportunistic pathogens of both humans and animals, but from a veterinary point of view some species induce cross-reactive immune responses that hamper the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in both livestock and wildlife. Little information is available about NTM species circulating in wildlife species of South Africa. In this study, we determined the diversity of NTM isolated from wildlife species from South Africa as well as Botswana. Thirty known NTM species and subspecies, as well as unidentified NTM, and NTM closely related to Mycobacterium goodii/Mycobacterium smegmatis were identified from 102 isolates cultured between the years 1998 and 2010, using a combination of molecular assays viz PCR and sequencing of different Mycobacterial house-keeping genes as well as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The NTM identified in this study include the following species which were isolated from tissue with tuberculosis- like lesions in the absence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) implying their potential role as pathogens of animals: Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, Mycobacterium gastri, Mycobacterium species closely related to Mycobacterium goodii/Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium brasiliensis, Mycobacterium sinense JMD 601, Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, Mycobacterium sp. GR-2007, Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense, and Mycobacterium septicum/M. peregrinum. Mycobaterium brasiliensis, Mycobacterium gastri, Mycobacterium sp. GR-2007, and a potential novel Mycobacterium species closely related to Mycobacterium goodii were found for the first time in this study to be potential pathogens of animals. Mycobacterium simiae was isolated from a sample originating from a tuberculin skin test positive reactor, demonstrating its potential to elicit inappropriate immune responses in animals that may interfere with diagnosis of tuberculosis by immunology. Mycobacterium abscessus

  3. Disease caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria: diagnostic procedures and treatment evaluation in the North of Buenos Aires Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Imperiale

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM have emerged as pathogens frequently associated to HIV co-infection. The aims of this study were to describe the clinical importance of NTM in patients from the North of Buenos Aires Province and the drug-susceptibility patterns in relation with the therapy used. A total of 23,624 clinical specimens were investigated during the period 2004-2010. Ziehl-Neelsen stain and cultures were used for diagnosis. Molecular and biochemical tests were performed to identify the mycobacteria. TB and mycobacterioses cases were 2 118 and 108 respectively. Sixteen NTM species were found: Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare as the main causative agents. Infections produced by more than one species at the same time were confirmed (4 cases. Macrolides and fluoroquinolones were the most active in vitro drugs. Treatment evaluation showed that 68.0 % of the cases completed the therapy, 20 % died; and 12 % were relapses. The cases in which the treatment outcome was evaluated received an individual tailor-made therapeutic scheme including those drugs showing in vitro activity and presumed in vivo usefulness. More than a quarter of the patients had HIV co-infection and the majority of the deaths were associated with this co-infection.Enfermedad causada por micobacterias no tuberculosas: diagnóstico y evaluación del tratamiento en el norte del Gran Buenos Aires. Las micobacterias no tuberculosas (MNT emergieron como patógenos frecuentemente asociados a la co-infección con el HIV. EL objetivo del estudio fue describir la importancia clínica de las MNT en pacientes de la región norte de la provincia de Buenos Aires y los patrones de drogo-sensibilidad en relación con la terapia empleada. Se investigó un total de 23.624 especímenes clínicos durante, el período 2004-2010. La tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen y los cultivos se utilizaron para diagnóstico. Las micobacterias fueron identificadas mediante pruebas bioqu

  4. Cooccurrence of free-living amoebae and nontuberculous Mycobacteria in hospital water networks, and preferential growth of Mycobacterium avium in Acanthamoeba lenticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovrutsky, Alida R; Chan, Edward D; Kartalija, Marinka; Bai, Xiyuan; Jackson, Mary; Gibbs, Sara; Falkinham, Joseph O; Iseman, Michael D; Reynolds, Paul R; McDonnell, Gerald; Thomas, Vincent

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of lung and other diseases due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing. NTM sources include potable water, especially in households where NTM populate pipes, taps, and showerheads. NTM share habitats with free-living amoebae (FLA) and can grow in FLA as parasites or as endosymbionts. FLA containing NTM may form cysts that protect mycobacteria from disinfectants and antibiotics. We first assessed the presence of FLA and NTM in water and biofilm samples collected from a hospital, confirming the high prevalence of NTM and FLA in potable water systems, particularly in biofilms. Acanthamoeba spp. (genotype T4) were mainly recovered (8/17), followed by Hartmannella vermiformis (7/17) as well as one isolate closely related to the genus Flamella and one isolate only distantly related to previously described species. Concerning mycobacteria, Mycobacterium gordonae was the most frequently found isolate (9/17), followed by Mycobacterium peregrinum (4/17), Mycobacterium chelonae (2/17), Mycobacterium mucogenicum (1/17), and Mycobacterium avium (1/17). The propensity of Mycobacterium avium hospital isolate H87 and M. avium collection strain 104 to survive and replicate within various FLA was also evaluated, demonstrating survival of both strains in all amoebal species tested but high replication rates only in Acanthamoeba lenticulata. As A. lenticulata was frequently recovered from environmental samples, including drinking water samples, these results could have important consequences for the ecology of M. avium in drinking water networks and the epidemiology of disease due to this species.

  5. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  6. Microbiological Quality and Occurrence of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in Fresh-Squeezed Orange Juice Samples Purchased from Street Vendors in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Cortes-Cueto, Ana Laura; Cano-Gaona, Maria Rosalia; Leon-Montes, Nancy; Helguera-Repetto, Addy C; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Castro-Rosas, Javier; Gonzalez-Y-Merchand, Jorge A

    2016-12-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are potentially pathogenic agents commonly found in a natural ecosystem. For this reason, food is considered another source of NTM transmission for humans. The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbiological quality and the occurrence of NTM in fresh-squeezed orange juice samples purchased from street vendors. All 102 samples analyzed were positive for aerobic mesophilic bacteria (AMB), with limits ranging from 1.8 to 6.2 log CFU/ml. A total of 55 (54%), 25 (25%), and 13 (13%) orange juice samples were positive for total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC), and Escherichia coli , respectively. TC, FC, and E. coli were present with limits ranging from 1,100 most probable number (MPN)/ml, juice samples harbored NTM. These NTM were identified by using three molecular markers (hsp65, rrs, and rpoB genes) and corresponded to the fast-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium rhodesiae (n = 1), Mycobacterium obuense (n = 1), and a mixture of M. fortuitum and Mycobacterium mucogenicum in an additional sample (n = 1). No correlation was found between the presence NTM in orange juice samples with the presence and concentration of the indicator microorganisms (aerobic mesophilic bacteria, TC, and FC). Overall, these results suggest that fresh-squeezed orange juice might represent a vehicle for NTM transmission in humans. Therefore, prevention of contamination by humans (proper handling and washing of oranges) during juice preparation should be recommended.

  7. Occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgarioni, Sônia Aparecida; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Prince, Karina Andrade; de Andrade Leite, Sergio Roberto; Filho, Dirceu Vedovello; Siqueira, Vera Lucia Dias; Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany Rizzieri; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    Milk is widely consumed in Brazil and can be the vehicle of agent transmission. In this study, was evaluated the occurrence of Mycobacterium bovis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in raw and pasteurized milk consumed in the northwestern region of Paraná, Brazil. Fifty-two milk samples (20 pasteurized and 32 raw) from dairy farms near the municipality of Maringa, Parana State, Brazil were collected. Milk samples were decontaminated using 5% oxalic acid method and cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media at 35 °C and 30 °C, with and without 5-10% CO2. Mycobacteria isolates were identified by morphological features, PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis (PCR-PRA) and Mycolic acids analysis. Thirteen (25%) raw and 2 (4%) pasteurized milk samples were positive for acid fast bacilli growth. Nine different species of NTM were isolated (M. nonchromogenicum, M. peregrinum, M. smegmatis, M. neoaurum, M. fortuitum, M. chelonae, M. flavescens, M. kansasii and M. scrofulaceum). M. bovis was not detected. Raw and pasteurized milk may be considered one source for NTM human infection. The paper reinforces the need for intensification of measures in order to avoid the milk contamination and consequently prevent diseases in the south of Brazil.

  8. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 speci...

  9. Microbiological Quality of Ready-to-Eat Vegetables Collected in Mexico City: Occurrence of Aerobic-Mesophilic Bacteria, Fecal Coliforms, and Potentially Pathogenic Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Francisco Cerna-Cortes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbiological quality and the occurrence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM in a variety of salads and sprouts from supermarkets and street vendors in Mexico City. Aerobic-mesophilic bacteria (AMB were present in 100% of RTE-salads samples; 59% of samples were outside guidelines range (>5.17 log10 CFU per g. Although fecal coliforms (FC were present in 32% of samples, only 8% of them exceeded the permissible limit (100 MPN/g. Regarding the 100 RTE-sprouts, all samples were also positive for AMB and total coliforms (TC and 69% for FC. Seven NTM species were recovered from 7 salad samples; they included three M. fortuitum, two M. chelonae, one M. mucogenicum, and one M. sp. Twelve RTE-sprouts samples harbored NTM, which were identified as M. porcinum (five, M. abscessus (two, M. gordonae (two, M. mucogenicum (two, and M. avium complex (one. Most RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts had unsatisfactory microbiological quality and some harbored NTM associated with illness. No correlation between the presence of coliforms and NTM was found. Overall, these results suggest that RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts might function as vehicles for NTM transmission in humans; hence, proper handling and treatment before consumption of such products might be recommendable.

  10. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  11. Evaluation of three real-time PCR assays for differential identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria species in liquid culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yu Jung; Kim, Ji-Youn; Song, Dong Joon; Koh, Won-Jung; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC)/nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) PCR assays for differential identification of MTBC and NTM using culture-positive liquid media. Eighty-five type strains and 100 consecutive mycobacterial liquid media cultures (MGIT 960 system) were analyzed by a conventional PCR assay (MTB-ID(®) V3) and three real-time PCR assays (AdvanSure™ TB/NTM real-time PCR, AdvanSure; GENEDIA(®) MTB/NTM Detection Kit, Genedia; Real-Q MTB & NTM kit, Real-Q). The accuracy rates for reference strains were 89.4%, 100%, 98.8%, and 98.8% for the MTB-ID V3, AdvanSure, Genedia, and Real-Q assays, respectively. Cross-reactivity in the MTB-ID V3 assay was mainly attributable to non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species. The diagnostic performance was determined using clinical isolates grown in liquid media, and the overall sensitivities for all PCR assays were higher than 95%. In conclusion, the three real-time PCR assays showed better performance in discriminating mycobacterium species and non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species than the conventional PCR assay.

  12. Microbiological Quality of Ready-to-Eat Vegetables Collected in Mexico City: Occurrence of Aerobic-Mesophilic Bacteria, Fecal Coliforms, and Potentially Pathogenic Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna-Cortes, Jorge Francisco; Leon-Montes, Nancy; Cortes-Cueto, Ana Laura; Salas-Rangel, Laura P.; Helguera-Repetto, Addy Cecilia; Lopez-Hernandez, Daniel; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Fernandez-Rendon, Elizabeth; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbiological quality and the occurrence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in a variety of salads and sprouts from supermarkets and street vendors in Mexico City. Aerobic-mesophilic bacteria (AMB) were present in 100% of RTE-salads samples; 59% of samples were outside guidelines range (>5.17 log10 CFU per g). Although fecal coliforms (FC) were present in 32% of samples, only 8% of them exceeded the permissible limit (100 MPN/g). Regarding the 100 RTE-sprouts, all samples were also positive for AMB and total coliforms (TC) and 69% for FC. Seven NTM species were recovered from 7 salad samples; they included three M. fortuitum, two M. chelonae, one M. mucogenicum, and one M. sp. Twelve RTE-sprouts samples harbored NTM, which were identified as M. porcinum (five), M. abscessus (two), M. gordonae (two), M. mucogenicum (two), and M. avium complex (one). Most RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts had unsatisfactory microbiological quality and some harbored NTM associated with illness. No correlation between the presence of coliforms and NTM was found. Overall, these results suggest that RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts might function as vehicles for NTM transmission in humans; hence, proper handling and treatment before consumption of such products might be recommendable. PMID:25918721

  13. In vitro effects of citrus oils against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria of clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Philip G; Ricke, Steven C; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Parrish, Nicole M

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro activity of citrus oils against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species. Citrus essential oils were tested against a variety of Mycobacterium species and strains using the BACTEC radiometric growth system. Cold pressed terpeneless Valencia oil (CPT) was further tested using the Wayne model of in vitro latency. Exposure of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis BCG to 0.025 % cold pressed terpeneless Valencia orange oil (CPT) resulted in a 3-log decrease in viable counts versus corresponding controls. Inhibition of various clinical isolates of the M. avium complex and M. abscessus ranged from 2.5 to 5.2-logs. Some species/strains were completely inhibited in the presence of CPT including one isolate each of the following: the M. avium complex, M. chelonae and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. CPT also inhibited the growth of BCG more than 99 % in an in vitro model of latency which mimics anaerobic dormancy thought to occur in vivo. The activity of CPT against drug-resistant strains of the M. avium complex and M. abscessus suggest that the mechanism of action for CPT is different than that of currently available drugs. Inhibition of latently adapted bacilli offers promise for treatment of latent infections of MTB. These results suggest that the antimycobacterial properties of CPT warrant further study to elucidate the specific mechanism of action and clarify the spectrum of activity.

  14. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria: Predisposing conditions and clinical characteristics of six cases and a review of 63 cases in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chung-Jong; Kim, Uh-Jin; Kim, Hong Bin; Park, Sang Won; Oh, Myoung-Don; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Nam Joong

    2016-07-01

    Background Several case series have reported on clinical and radiographic characteristics of patients with vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). However, only a few patients were included, and systematic reviews are still lacking. The aim of this study was to update and summarise the pre-disposing conditions, clinical and radiographic characteristics of such cases due to NTM. Methods In this study, a systematic review was conducted of the English-language literature from 1961-2014 to investigate the pre-disposing conditions and characteristics of cases of VO due to NTM. Also, six additional cases diagnosed in the study hospitals were described; these cases are included in an analysis of a total of 69 cases of NTM VO. Results The most common species, regardless of the presence of HIV co-infection, was M. avium Complex followed by M. xenopi. Ten cases with HIV infection had a median CD4 lymphocyte count of 320/mm(3) (range = 41-465/mm(3)) at the time of diagnosis of NTM VO. The VO in the cases with HIV infections occurred at an earlier age and more often involved the thoracic spine than in the cases without HIV infection. Pre-disposing trauma or surgery was reported in 14.5% (10/69) of the cases. A variety of immunosuppressive diseases were observed in 49.3% of the patients, including the 10 with HIV infections and corticosteroids were used in 27.5% of the cases. Surgery was performed in 67.6% and improvement was reported in 80.6%. Conclusion NTM should be considered in immunocompromised patients with indolent VO without confirmation of tuberculosis.

  15. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria I: one year clinical isolates identification in Tertiary Hospital Aids Reference Center, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in pre highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Rosa Maria Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM isolates at University Hospital, Reference Center for Aids in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, during one year. We used standard biochemical tests for species identification and IS1245 PCR amplification was applied as a Mycobacterium avium specific identification marker. Four hundred and four specimens from 233 patients yielded acid-fast bacilli growth. M. tuberculosis was identified in 85% of the patients and NTM in 15%. NTM disseminated infection was a common event correlated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients and only in HIV negative patients the source of NTM was non sterile site. M. avium complex (MAC was biochemically identified in 57.8% (49/83 of NTM isolates, most of them from sterile sites (75.5%, and in 94% (46/49 the IS 1245 marker specific for M. avium was present. Twenty NTM strains showed a MAC biochemical pattern with the exception of a urease-positive (99% of MAC are urease-negative, however IS1245 was detected in 96% of the strains leading to their identification as M. avium. In this group differences in NTM source was not significant. The second most frequently isolated NTM was identified as M. scrofulaceum (7.2%, followed by M. terrae (3.6%, M. gordonae (2.4%, M. chelonae (1.2%, M. fortuitum (1.2% and one strain which could not be identified. All were IS1245 negative except for one strain identified as M. scrofulaceum. It is interesting to note that non-sterile sites were the major source of these isolates (92.8%. Our finding indicated that M. avium is still the major atypical species among in the MAC isolates recovered from Brazilian Aids patients without highty active antiretroviral therapy schema. Some discrepancies were seen between the identification methods and further investigations must be done to better characterize NTM isolates using other phenotypic and genotypic methods.

  16. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide disinfection to non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in a hospital water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M-S; Wu, M-Y; Huang, Y-T; Liao, C-H

    2016-05-01

    Chlorinated tap water in hospitals often contains low levels of non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB) and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Measures are needed to ensure a safe water supply in hospitals to prevent nosocomial infections from these waterborne pathogens. To evaluate the efficacy of ClO2 treatment of a hospital water system on the levels of NFGNB and NTM in the water. Our institution is a 1000-bed medical centre with two main buildings (B1 and B2). B1 has three intensive care units (ICUs) and transplant wards and polyethylene water pipes. B2 (control) has no ICUs and galvanized water pipes. A ClO2 generating unit was installed in the water system of B1 in April 2012 and water samples were collected in B1 and B2 before and eight times after installation. All samples were cultured for NFGNB and NTM. The ClO2 concentration was significantly lower in the hot water than in the cold water (P<0.001). After 40 weeks of ClO2 use, the overall NFGNB colonies decreased significantly (hot water: 160±143 vs 2±4cfu/mL, P<0.001; cold water: 108±138 vs 3±7cfu/mL, P<0.001). Highly prevalent nosocomial NFGNB, such as Pseudomonas spp. and Stenotrophomonas spp., were undetected three months after ClO2 disinfection; Sphingomonas spp. persisted but had lower colony counts. NTM was present in 25% (three out of 12) of sampling locations initially, but was not detected at two weeks after ClO2 disinfection. The ICUs had no overall change in the number of NFGNB nosocomial infections after the intervention. Addition of a ClO2 disinfection unit to our hospital water system reduced the numbers of NTM and NFGNB in the hot and cold water systems. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Learn about Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American College of Chest Physicians. News & Events Blog: Yoga, Tai Chi and Your Lungs: The Benefits of ... number of items"); $("#local_list_xml").quickPagination(); }, error: function() { console.log("An error occurred while processing XML ...

  18. Nontuberculous Pulmonary Mycobacteriosis in Denmark: Incidence and Prognostic Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andréjak, Claire; Thomsen, Vibeke O; Johansen, Isik S;

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Few population-based data are available regarding nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) pulmonary disease epidemiology and prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To examine NTM pulmonary colonization incidence, disease incidence, and prognostic factors. METHODS: All adults in Denmark with at least one NTM...

  19. MICOBACTERIUM PARATUBERCULOSIS AND NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIAL IN POTABLE WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) include Mycobacterium species that are not members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex. Members of the NTM group are important causes of disease in birds and mammals. Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium parat...

  20. Isolation and molecular characterization of Mycobacterium bovis from Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) from Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malama, Sydney; Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Muma, John Bwalya; Mwanza, Sydney; Djønne, Berit; Godfroid, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a chronic bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis. Infections due to M. bovis, which serves as a stable reservoir, can pose serious challenge to control and eradicate in both wildlife and livestock at the interface. This study aimed at isolating and characterizing M. bovis from Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) and black lechwe (Kobus leche smithemani) at the animal/human interface in Zambia. The samples with lesions compatible with BTB collected during the hunting seasons of 2009 and 2010 were cultured for isolation of mycobacteria using Stonebrink with pyruvate (BD Diagnostics, MD, USA) and Middlebrook 7H10 (BD Diagnostics) slants. Isolated mycobacteria were identified using IS6110 polymerase chain reaction and deletion analysis. Molecular characterization of the isolates was performed using spoligotyping and mycobacteria interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) with nine loci. Data was analyzed using BioNumerics software 6.1. Out of the 39 samples, acid fast bacilli were detected in 27 (69.2 %) based on smear microscopy. Seven isolates were found to belong to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and all were identified as M. bovis based on deletion analysis. All seven isolates were identical on spoligotyping as belonging to the SB0120 (SIT 482). MIRU-VNTR differentiated the isolates into five different patterns. This study has confirmed that M. bovis circulates in the Kafue lechwe, and non-tuberculous mycobacteria were detected in the black lechwe in Zambia which represents a wildlife reservoir, with a potential to spillover to cattle and humans. Isolates of M. bovis from lechwe antelopes are much conserved as only one spoligotype was detected. The study has shown that three loci differentiated fairly well. This option is cheap and less laborious, and hence a better option in resource-strained country like Zambia. The study further showed that some of the loci recommended by the European

  1. Environmental mycobacteria – Future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D E Schraufnagel

    2015-01-01

    An interferon gamma release assay for infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria is desperately needed. Success with tuberculosis was attained by finding bacterial antigens associated with virulence and invasive disease. This may be difficult because the damage caused by environmental mycobacteria tends to be epithelial and subepithelial. The cavities may be bronchiectatic in origin and deeper invasion may result from host reactions. Serologic testing has not yielded important clinical help for diseases caused by either M. tuberculosis or the nontuberculous mycobacteria, possibly because good bacterial or host response proteins have not been identified. This could change with a metabolomics approach. Genomic studies that give incremental gains may set the stage for major breakthroughs, but require coordination with good phenotyping. Tools are in place to open an exciting new era for understanding and control of mycobacteria.

  2. Rapid and accurate identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and common non-tuberculous mycobacteria by multiplex real-time PCR targeting different housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Rezaei Yazdi, Hadi; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of mycobacteria isolates from primary culture is important due to timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy. Conventional methods for identification of Mycobacterium species based on biochemical tests needs several weeks and may remain inconclusive. In this study, a novel multiplex real-time PCR was developed for rapid identification of Mycobacterium genus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and the most common non-tuberculosis mycobacteria species including M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and the M. gordonae in three reaction tubes but under same PCR condition. Genetic targets for primer designing included the 16S rDNA gene, the dnaJ gene, the gyrB gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Multiplex real-time PCR was setup with reference Mycobacterium strains and was subsequently tested with 66 clinical isolates. Results of multiplex real-time PCR were analyzed with melting curves and melting temperature (T (m)) of Mycobacterium genus, MTC, and each of non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species were determined. Multiplex real-time PCR results were compared with amplification and sequencing of 16S-23S rDNA ITS for identification of Mycobacterium species. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primers were each 100 % for MTC, M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and M. gordonae. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primer for genus Mycobacterium was 96 and 100 %, respectively. According to the obtained results, we conclude that this multiplex real-time PCR with melting curve analysis and these novel primers can be used for rapid and accurate identification of genus Mycobacterium, MTC, and the most common non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species.

  3. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J.; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 species) of SG-NTM were included. Identification was compared with that achieved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in-house PCR and 16S/ITS sequencing. Isolates of all species yielded a SCGE profile comprising a single fragment length (or peak) except for M. scrofulaceum (two peaks). SCGE peaks of ATCC strains were distinct except for peak overlap between Mycobacterium kansasii and M. marinum. Of clinical/environmental strains, unique peaks were seen for 7/17 (41%) species (M. haemophilum, M. kubicae, M. lentiflavum, M. terrae, M. kansasii, M. asiaticum and M. triplex); 3/17 (18%) species were identified by HPLC. There were five SCGE fragment length types (I–V) each of M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. gordonae. Overlap of fragment lengths was seen between M. marinum and M. ulcerans; for M. gordonae SCGE type III and M. paragordonae; M. avium SCGE types III and IV, and M. intracellulare SCGE type I; M. chimaera, M. parascrofulaceum and M. intracellulare SCGE types III and IV; M. branderi and M. avium type V; and M. vulneris and M. intracellulare type V. The ITS-SCGE method was able to provide the first line rapid and reproducible species identification/screening of SG-NTM and was more discriminatory than HPLC. PMID:27749897

  4. 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis has Potential as an Alternative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Slowly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Shradha; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Gray, Timothy J; Xiao, Meng; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (SG-NTM) of clinical significance remains problematic. This study evaluated a novel method of SG-NTM identification by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region followed by resolution of amplified fragments by sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Fourteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 103 clinical/environmental isolates (total n = 24 species) of SG-NTM were included. Identification was compared with that achieved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in-house PCR and 16S/ITS sequencing. Isolates of all species yielded a SCGE profile comprising a single fragment length (or peak) except for M. scrofulaceum (two peaks). SCGE peaks of ATCC strains were distinct except for peak overlap between Mycobacterium kansasii and M. marinum. Of clinical/environmental strains, unique peaks were seen for 7/17 (41%) species (M. haemophilum, M. kubicae, M. lentiflavum, M. terrae, M. kansasii, M. asiaticum and M. triplex); 3/17 (18%) species were identified by HPLC. There were five SCGE fragment length types (I-V) each of M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. gordonae. Overlap of fragment lengths was seen between M. marinum and M. ulcerans; for M. gordonae SCGE type III and M. paragordonae; M. avium SCGE types III and IV, and M. intracellulare SCGE type I; M. chimaera, M. parascrofulaceum and M. intracellulare SCGE types III and IV; M. branderi and M. avium type V; and M. vulneris and M. intracellulare type V. The ITS-SCGE method was able to provide the first line rapid and reproducible species identification/screening of SG-NTM and was more discriminatory than HPLC.

  5. The Changing Pattern of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph O Falkinham

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria are human opportunistic pathogens whose source of infection is the environment. These include both slow-growing (eg, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium and rapid-growing (eg, Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium fortuitum species. Transmission is through ingestion or inhalation of water, particulate matter or aerosols, or through trauma. The historic presentation of pulmonary disease in older individuals with predisposing lung conditions and in children has been changing. Pulmonary disease in elderly individuals who lack the classic predisposing lung conditions is increasing. Pulmonary disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis have been linked with occupational or home exposures to nontuberculous mycobacteria. There has been a shift from Mycobacterium scrofulaceum to M avium in children with cervical lymphadenitis. Further, individuals who are immunosuppressed due to therapy or HIV-infection are at a greatly increased risk for nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. The changing pattern of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease is due in part to the ability of these pathogens to survive and proliferate in habitats that they share with humans, such as drinking water. The advent of an aging population and an increase in the proportion of immunosuppressed individuals suggest that the prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease will increase.

  6. Emergence and spread of a human-transmissible multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryant, Josephine M; Grogono, Dorothy M; Rodriguez-Rincon, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lung infections with Mycobacterium abscessus, a species of multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria, are emerging as an important global threat to individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), in whom M. abscessus accelerates inflammatory lung damage, leading to increased morbidity and mortality....

  7. Sporadic cutaneous infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria: a retrospective study of 37 cases%散发性皮肤非结核分枝杆菌感染37例回顾研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金江; 贾军; 丁晓岚; 陈雪; 孙青苗; 徐健楠; 薛晨红; 杜娟; 蔡林

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the clinical and pathological characteristics of sporadic cutaneous in-fections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria ( NTM) , and investigate the diagnostic criteria and therapeu-tic principal. Methods:Totally 37 cases of sporadic cutaneous infections due to NTM were confirmed in the Department of Dermatology, Peking University People's Hospital from January 2000 to March 2014. The microbiologic and clinical data were reviewed, and their skin biopsy specimens were reassessed. Re-sults:Of all the 37 patients, 30 cases were Mycobacterium marinum infection, 6 were Mycobacterium ab-scessus infection, and one was Mycobacterium chelonea and Mycobacterium fortuitum infection. Identifica-tion of mycobacterial species by analysis of hsp65 gene in tissue DNA was more sensitive than traditional bacterial culture. The most common risk factors were traumatic injuries ( 21 of 37 ) and aquarium or fish-related job (21 of 37). One case of Mycobacterium abscessus infection occurred after autologous fat filling. Nodule and plaque were most common lesions in Mycobacterium marinum infection. Twenty-four of the 30 cases of Mycobacterium marinum infection presented with multiple lesions or sporotrichoid spread lesions. Ulceration, papules, abscess, and purulent discharge were observed in cases of Mycobac-terium abscessus infection. Infective granuloma was most common histopathological appearance. For the treatment of Mycobacterium marinum infection, rifampin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin were commonly used (combination of two antibiotics, or three antibiotics), with the cure rate 90. 00%. Four of the six Mycobacterium abscessus infections cases were cured, and one patient died. Conclusion:The most com-mon species of sporadic cutaneous infections due to NTM is Mycobacterium marinum. Traumatic injuries, aquarium or fish-related job, and cosmetic surgeries are common risk factors. Mycobacterium marinum in-fection often presents with nodules, plaques, and sometimes

  8. Micobactérias não tuberculosas em cirurgias: desafio passível de enfrentamento no Brasil? Nontuberculous mycobacteria in surgery: challenges likely to be faced in Brazil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Bezerra Cabral

    2011-01-01

    subnotificación.Infections caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (MNT represent an epidemiological and health emergency, especially in patients undergoing invasive procedures. Based on these, we aimed to analyze the scientific evidence, the scientific literature, on the occurrence in Brazil of MNT infections in surgical patients. We used as a research method integrative review of the literature using the databases Lilacs, Medline/Pubmed, ISI Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. We selected 15 publications on this theme from the last 30 years that were directed at methods of prevention and control, with a focus on post-discharge surveillance, the use of antibiotics and glutaraldehyde. Eye surgery, cosmetic, heart, laparoscopic and arthroscopic procedures were the most commonly investigated. The national situation of MNTs is concerning, especially when one recognizes the possibility of underreporting.

  9. Isolamento de micobactérias não-tuberculosas em São José do Rio Preto entre 1996 e 2005 Nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated in São José do Rio Preto, Brazil between 1996 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa da Silveira Paro Pedro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a ocorrência de micobactérias não-tuberculosas e a variabilidade das espécies isoladas na região atendida pelo Instituto Adolfo Lutz-Regional de São José do Rio Preto-no período entre 1996 e 2005, assim como mostrar a importância do diagnóstico laboratorial. MÉTODOS: A partir de amostras pulmonares e extrapulmonares, foi realizado o isolamento de micobactérias, e estas foram identificadas por métodos fenotípicos e pelo método molecular polymerase chain reaction-restriction enzyme analysis. RESULTADOS: Foram isoladas 317 cepas de micobactérias não-tuberculosas: complexo Mycobacterium avium, 182 (57,4%; M. gordonae, 33 (10,4%; M. fortuitum, 25(7,9%; M. chelonae, 8 (2,5%; complexo M. terrae, 8 (2,5%; M. kansasii, 7 (2,2%; e espécies menos freqüentes, 54 (17%. No período, foram caracterizados 72 casos (33,3% de micobacterioses, de acordo com os critérios bacteriológicos estabelecidos pela American Thoracic Society (2007.Desses, complexo M. avium foi responsável por 56 casos, sendo que 29 (51,8% foram caracterizados como doença disseminada. M. fortuitum foi responsável por 6 casos; M. gordonae, 3; M. chelonae, 2; M. abscessus, 1; M. kansasii, 1; M. intracellulare, 1; M. malmoense, 1; e Mycobacterium ssp., 1. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados obtidos mostraram a importância do diagnóstico bacteriológico das micobacterioses, pois a identificação das espécies possibilita a introdução de um tratamento adequado precocemente.OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence of nontuberculous mycobacteria and the range of species isolated between 1996 and 2005 at a regional branch of the Adolfo Lutz Institute-located in the city of São José do Rio Preto, Brazil-and to show the importance of laboratory testing. METHODS: Mycobacteria were isolated from pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens and identified through phenotyping and molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction-restriction enzyme analysis. RESULTS: We isolated 317

  10. Host response to nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of current clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Ian M; Ordway, Diane J

    2014-09-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to treat; accordingly, this review focuses primarily on these two important pathogens. Like the host response to M. tuberculosis infections, the host response to these infections is of the TH1 type but there are some subtle and as-yet-unexplained differences.

  11. Isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium avium from porcine lymph nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, van J.; Wisselink, H.J.; Solt-Smits, van C.B.; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes lymphadenitis in pigs. This presents an economical burden, as these pigs meat is considered inappropriate for consumption. In humans, lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) primarily affects children and is caused by a variety of NTM, though M. avium

  12. Isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium avium from porcine lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Wisselink, H.J.; Solt-Smits, C.B. van; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes lymphadenitis in pigs. This presents an economical burden, as these pigs meat is considered inappropriate for consumption. In humans, lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) primarily affects children and is caused by a variety of NTM, though M. avium

  13. 利奈唑胺对耐多药结核分枝杆菌及非结核分枝杆菌体外敏感性研究%In vitro bactericidal assay of linezolid on multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓飞; 张范华; 张艳; 刘伟; 张嵘

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mycobactericidal efficacy of linezolid on multidrugresistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in vitro.Methods Seven hundred and sixty-two Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 20 NTM isolates from Hangzhou were identified by using hsp65 gene sequencing from March to June,2013.Seventy MDR-TB isolates,which were screened by using proportion method,and twenty NTM isolates were tested the MIC to linezolid,and the differences of MICs to linezolid between MDR-TB and NTM werw analyzed in vitro.Results All 70 MDR-TB isolates were inhibited at concentrations of ≤ 1 mg/L by linezolid,MIC50 was 0.5 mg/L and MIC90 1 mg/L.Of all 8 isolates inhibited at concentration of 1 mg/L,there were 6 isolates resistant to isoniazid,rifampin,streptomycin and ethambutol,suggesting this resistance pattern may reduce sensitivity to linezolid.Among the NTM isolates,18 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates,whose MICs to linezolid at 8-16 mg/L,were non-resistant isolates,while 2 Mycobacterium abscessus isolates displaying MICs > 32 mg/L,were resistant to linezolid.Conclusions Linezolid showed great activity to MDR-TB and there were no linezolid-resistant MDR-TB isolates identified in this study.However,MICs of MDR-TB against linezolid increased with their resistant numbers to first-line agents.This study also showed that different NTM species have varied sensitivity to linezolid.%目的 研究利奈唑胺对耐多药结核分枝杆菌(MDR-TB)和非结核分枝杆菌(NTM)的体外药物敏感性.方法 2013年3至6月使用hsp65基因测序比对的方法鉴定杭州地区762株结核分枝杆菌和20株NTM,通过比例法药敏试验获得70株MDR-TB,测定其与20株NTM对利奈唑胺的MIC,分析利奈唑胺对MDR-TB和NTM体外抑菌浓度的差异.结果 所测70株MDR-TB的利奈唑胺MIC均≤1 mg/L,MIC50为0.5 mg/L,MIC90为1 mg/L.对异烟肼、利福平、链霉素和乙胺丁醇耐药的MDR-TB菌株占MIC为1 mg/L菌株的6/8,提示

  14. Cluster of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Skin Infections from Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    dermatitis such as allergic contact dermatitis . Additional sections and stains were prepared to exclude an infectious etiology. The additional sections... reactions shortly after receiving tattoos. Customers reported a constellation of symptoms of prolonged, erythematous, papular eruptions that were...rash in the gray portion of their tattoo, 2 had complete resolution of their initial dermatologic condition, and 3 could not be contacted for followup

  15. Pulmonary sequestration infected with nontuberculous mycobacteria:a report of two cases and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Won-Jung Koh; Goohyeon Hong; Kwhanmien Kim; Soomin Ahn; Joungho Han

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of pulmonary sequestration infected with nontuberculous mycobacteria(NTM):Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium abscessus. Chest computed tomography showed pneumonic consolidation in the right lower lobe, which received a systemic blood supply from the descending aorta in both patients. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgeries were successfully performed and pathological examinations revealed multiple caseating granulomas. A review of the literature revealed only seven previous case reports of pulmonary sequestration infected with NTM, and no case with Mycobacterium abscessus has been reported.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mycobacteria as amoeba-resistant organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Mba Medie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most environmental non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been demonstrated to invade amoebal trophozoites and cysts, but such relationships are largely unknown for members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. An environmental source has been proposed for the animal Mycobacterium bovis and the human Mycobacterium canettii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using optic and electron microscopy and co-culture methods, we observed that 89±0.6% of M. canettii, 12.4±0.3% of M. tuberculosis, 11.7±2% of M. bovis and 11.2±0.5% of Mycobacterium avium control organisms were phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga, a ratio significantly higher for M. canettii (P = 0.03, correlating with the significantly larger size of M. canetti organisms (P = 0.035. The percentage of intraamoebal mycobacteria surviving into cytoplasmic vacuoles was 32±2% for M. canettii, 26±1% for M. tuberculosis, 28±2% for M. bovis and 36±2% for M. avium (P = 0.57. M. tuberculosis, M. bovis and M. avium mycobacteria were further entrapped within the double wall of <1% amoebal cysts, but no M. canettii organisms were observed in amoebal cysts. The number of intracystic mycobacteria was significantly (P = 10(-6 higher for M. avium than for the M. tuberculosis complex, and sub-culturing intracystic mycobacteria yielded significantly more (P = 0.02 M. avium organisms (34×10(4 CFU/mL than M. tuberculosis (42×10(1 CFU/mL and M. bovis (35×10(1 CFU/mL in the presence of a washing fluid free of mycobacteria. Mycobacteria survived in the cysts for up to 18 days and cysts protected M. tuberculosis organisms against mycobactericidal 5 mg/mL streptomycin and 2.5% glutaraldehyde. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that M. tuberculosis complex organisms are amoeba-resistant organisms, as previously demonstrated for non-tuberculous, environmental mycobacteria. Intercystic survival of tuberculous mycobacteria, except for M. canettii, protect them

  17. The water environment as a source of potentially pathogenic mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovcova, Jitka; Slany, Michal; Babak, Vladimir; Slana, Iva; Kralik, Petr

    2014-06-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms of a wide variety of environmental reservoirs, including natural and municipal water, soil, aerosols, protozoans, animals and humans. Several of these species are potential pathogens which affect human health. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of NTM in the water environment. Samples were taken from 13 water-related facilities including fish ponds, storage ponds, drinking water reservoirs and an experimental recirculation system. Altogether, 396 samples of water, sediment and aquatic plants were collected and analysed. All samples were examined using conventional culture methods. Suspected microbial isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction analysis and identified using partial sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA gene. The culture revealed 94/396 samples (23.7%) that contained mycobacteria. Among known NTM we identified potentially pathogenic mycobacteria isolated from the fresh water environment for the first time: Mycobacterium asiaticum, M. chimaera, M. interjectum, M. kumamotonense, M. lentiflavum, M. montefiorense, M. nebraskense, M. paraffinicum and M. simiae. Epidemiologic studies suggest that the natural water environment is the principal source of human exposure. Our results indicate that besides the well-known potentially pathogenic mycobacteria it is important to observe occurrence, proliferation and persistence of newly discovered mycobacterial species.

  18. [Usefulness of chemotherapy associated with surgery in the management of nontuberculous mycobacterial adenitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz Santaeufemia, F J; Ramos Amador, J T; Giangaspro, E; Sánchez Granados, J M; Palenque, E; González Tomé, M I

    2005-03-01

    In recent years, lymphadenitis caused by atypical mycobacteria (also called nontuberculous mycobacteria [NTMB] or, more recently, environmental) have played a significant role in the differential diagnosis of adenitis in non-immunocompromised children. To describe the clinical and pathological findings in childhood NTMB adenitis and study the possible usefulness of antimicrobial therapy in addition to surgery. We present eight cases of neck lymphadenitis occurring over a 5-year period. All of the children received combined chemotherapy, and six also underwent surgery. Of the two remaining patients, the parents of one child refused surgery and a watchful approach was adopted in the other. Complete clinical recovery was achieved in all patients except one who did not undergo surgery. Prolonged administration of two antibiotics (of which one must be clarithromycin) in addition to surgery was well-tolerated and could be useful in patients with NTMB neck lymphadenitis.

  19. Detection of Mycobacteria by Culture and DNA-Based Methods in Animal-Derived Food Products Purchased at Spanish Supermarkets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Tello, Maitane; Elguezabal, Natalia; Juste, Ramón A; Garrido, Joseba M

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria include obligate and opportunistic pathogens that cause significant human and animal disease. The burden of tuberculosis has been largely reduced in developed territories but remains a huge problem worldwide. The significance of nontuberculous mycobacteria is growing considerably, especially in developed regions with higher life expectancy and more therapy-related immunosuppressed individuals. Due to their robustness mycobacteria can contaminate animal products by direct transmission from infected individuals or by environmental contamination during processing. The situation at market level is poorly known. Most studies analyzing commercially available foods are limited to a small or local scale and mainly focused on a particular mycobacterial species. There is a need to investigate if animal products that have passed the established controls to be for sale at main supermarkets could represent a route of contact with any mycobacteria. Thus, our goal was to study the prevalence of mycobacteria in these foods to assess if this could represent a source of human exposure. Five stores from the main supermarket chains in Spain were selected. 138 dairy and 119 meat products were purchased. All were processed using culture and multiplex real-time PCR methods. Additional molecular methods were used to specifically identify any positive result. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (2), M. avium subsp. avium (1), and M. fortuitum (1) were isolated from powdered infant formula and ground beef, chicken sausage, and mortadella cold cut, respectively. Mycobacterial DNA (M. avium, M. tuberculosis complex and other nontuberculous mycobacteria) was detected in 15% of dairy products and 2% of meat products. These results show that the prevalence of viable mycobacteria in foods of animal origin obtained at the supermarket was not substantial although a considerable proportion of them contained mycobacterial DNA. Contact with mycobacteria through this route could be

  20. Detection of Mycobacteria by Culture and DNA-Based Methods in Animal-Derived Food Products Purchased at Spanish Supermarkets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iker A. Sevilla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacteria include obligate and opportunistic pathogens that cause significant human and animal disease. The burden of tuberculosis has been largely reduced in developed territories but remains a huge problem worldwide. The significance of nontuberculous mycobacteria is growing considerably, especially in developed regions with higher life expectancy and more therapy-related immunosuppressed individuals. Due to their robustness mycobacteria can contaminate animal products by direct transmission from infected individuals or by environmental contamination during processing. The situation at market level is poorly known. Most studies analyzing commercially available foods are limited to a small or local scale and mainly focused on a particular mycobacterial species. There is a need to investigate if animal products that have passed the established controls to be for sale at main supermarkets could represent a route of contact with any mycobacteria. Thus, our goal was to study the prevalence of mycobacteria in these foods to assess if this could represent a source of human exposure. Five stores from the main supermarket chains in Spain were selected. 138 dairy and 119 meat products were purchased. All were processed using culture and multiplex real-time PCR methods. Additional molecular methods were used to specifically identify any positive result. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (2, M. avium subsp. avium (1, and M. fortuitum (1 were isolated from powdered infant formula and ground beef, chicken sausage, and mortadella cold cut, respectively. Mycobacterial DNA (M. avium, M. tuberculosis complex and other nontuberculous mycobacteria was detected in 15% of dairy products and 2% of meat products. These results show that the prevalence of viable mycobacteria in foods of animal origin obtained at the supermarket was not substantial although a considerable proportion of them contained mycobacterial DNA. Contact with mycobacteria through this

  1. Microscopy, culture, and quantitative real-time PCR examination confirm internalization of mycobacteria in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaevska, M; Lvoncik, S; Slana, I; Kulich, P; Kralik, P

    2014-07-01

    The environment is a reservoir of nontuberculous mycobacteria and is considered a source of infection for animals and humans. Mycobacteria can persist in different types of environments for a relatively long time. We have studied their possible internalization into plant tissue through intact, as well as damaged, root systems of different types of plants grown in vitro and under field conditions. The substrate into which plants were seeded was previously contaminated with different strains of Mycobacterium avium (10(8) to 10(10) cells/g of soil) and feces from animals with paratuberculosis. We detected M. avium subsp. avium, hominissuis, and paratuberculosis in the stems and leaves of the plants by both culture and real-time quantitative PCR. The presence of mycobacteria in the plant tissues was confirmed by microscopy. The concentration of mycobacteria found inside plant tissue was several orders of magnitude lower (up to 10(4) cells/g of tissue) than the initial concentration of mycobacteria present in the culture medium or substrate. These findings led us to the hypothesis that plants may play a role in the spread and transmission of mycobacteria to other organisms in the environment.

  2. Differential Macrophage Response to Slow- and Fast-Growing Pathogenic Mycobacteria

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    A. Cecilia Helguera-Repetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM have recently been recognized as important species that cause disease even in immunocompetent individuals. The mechanisms that these species use to infect and persist inside macrophages are not well characterised. To gain insight concerning this process we used THP-1 macrophages infected with M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. celatum, and M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that slow-growing mycobacteria gained entrance into these cells with more efficiency than fast-growing mycobacteria. We have also demonstrated that viable slow-growing M. celatum persisted inside macrophages without causing cell damage and without inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS, as M. tuberculosis caused. In contrast, fast-growing mycobacteria destroyed the cells and induced high levels of ROS. Additionally, the macrophage cytokine pattern induced by M. celatum was different from the one induced by either M. tuberculosis or fast-growing mycobacteria. Our results also suggest that, in some cases, the intracellular survival of mycobacteria and the immune response that they induce in macrophages could be related to their growth rate. In addition, the modulation of macrophage cytokine production, caused by M. celatum, might be a novel immune-evasion strategy used to survive inside macrophages that is different from the one reported for M. tuberculosis.

  3. NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIOSES: EPIDEMIOLOGY, CLINIC AND POSSIBILITIES OF LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS IN MODERN CONDITIONS

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    Shevchenko OS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Today there are more than 150 species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMB known, of which 99 were registered in Europe. Due to the similar clinical picture with tuberculosis, mycobacterioses are difficult to diagnose and often occur with TB as a mixed infection. Also, there are cases of NTMB detection in the sputum of persons previously suffered with tuberculosis, which can lead to a false diagnosis of recurrent disease. Currently, the role of atypical mycobacteria in human pathology is increasing. Atypical mycobacteria are characterized by a wide spectrum of sustainability and potential pathogenicity to humans and animals. It is generally accepted that the reservoir of infection are animals and the environment (water, soil. NTMB presence in water can lead to the erroneous diagnosis of mycobacteriosis due to laboratory contamination of samples with nontuberculous mycobacteria from the outside. Moreover recently it has been found the possibility of transferring NTMB from person to person on the background of existing lung disease. For many types of infections reservoir still has not been found. Aim of this work was to study identified in the Kharkiv region cases of non-tuberculous mycobacterioses, features of their clinical manifestations and laboratory diagnostic options. Materials and Methods. We examined 32 patients (25 men and 7 women, residents of Kharkiv and Kharkiv region, Ukraine, who were diagnosed with "non-tuberculous mycobacteriosis of lungs" during 2014-2016. Patients were examined with routine diagnostic algorithm for TB. Nontuberculous mycobacteriosis was diagnosed on the basis of NTMB growth in BACTEC system, after which the diagnosis was verified by the following criteria: 1. Smear: the absence of formation of Cord-factor (in the smear NTMB are located scattering; 2. Negative immunoassay (ID-test; 3. Negative GeneXpert MTB/RIF Then non-tuberculous mycobacteria were identificated by investigation on solid media

  4. Distribution and respiratory activity of mycobacteria in household water system of healthy volunteers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Izumi, Yoko; Nakamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead) have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US) or absence (Japan) of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

  5. Distribution and respiratory activity of mycobacteria in household water system of healthy volunteers in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Ichijo

    Full Text Available The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM, which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US or absence (Japan of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

  6. Thoracoscopic management for bronchiectasis with non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have emerged as important opportunistic pathogens of the human being in recent years. Patients with pre-existing bronchiectasis are susceptible to NTM. However, information about its occurrence among bronchiectatic patients in Shenzhen, China is lacking and its impact on the course of bronchiectasis following surgical intervention is unknown. This preliminary study aimed to investigate the prevalence of NTM in bronchiectasis that required surgery in our center, evaluate the role of intraoperative routine screening for NTM, and summarize our initial experience in thoracoscopic management for bronchiectatic patients with NTM. Methods A retrospective analysis of clinical, microbiological data of our bronchiectatic patients with NTM over 5 years was made and 40 patients with bronchiectasis were studied to determine the role of intraoperative routine screening for NTM. Results The prevalence of NTM in this population of patients with bronchiectasis in our center was 6.7% (7/105). The diagnostic yield of the 40 intraoperative specimens was 7.5% (3/40). Of the 7 patients with bronchiectasis and NTM, 3 patients developed postoperative wound infections. All were cured with chemotherapy for 8-12 months along with vigorous surgical debridement. Another patient had a slow growth of mycobacteria involving double lungs and the right thoracic cavity and recovered after chemotherapy for nearly 14 months and tube drainage. The affected tissue was completely resected in the remaining 3 patients with no operative mortality and postoperative morbidity, and routine intraoperative screening for NTM was initiated in these patients. Conclusions NTM is not uncommon in bronchiectatic patients which deserves surgeons' utmost attention. Routine intraoperative screening for NTM identified otherwise unsuspected patients has shown favorable outcomes. Thoracoscopic management for bronchiectasis with NTM is technically feasible although its role

  7. First evidence of amoebae-mycobacteria association in drinking water network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafont, Vincent; Mougari, Faïza; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Joyeux, Michel; Bouchon, Didier; Héchard, Yann; Moulin, Laurent

    2014-10-21

    Free-living amoebae are protozoa ubiquitously found in water systems. They mainly feed on bacteria by phagocytosis, but some bacterial species are able to resist or even escape this lethal process. Among these amoeba resistant bacteria are numerous members of the genus Mycobacterium. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that share the same ecological niches as amoebae. While several studies have demonstrated the ability of these bacteria to colonise and persist within drinking water networks, there is also strong suspicion that mycobacteria could use amoebae as a vehicle for protection and even replication. We investigated here the presence of NTM and FLA on a drinking water network during an all year round sampling campaign. We observed that 87.6% of recovered amoebal cultures carried high numbers of NTM. Identification of these amoeba and mycobacteria strains indicated that the main genera found in drinking water networks, that is, Acanthamoeba, Vermamoeba, Echinamoeba, and Protacanthamoeba are able to carry and likely to allow replication of several environmental and potentially pathogenic mycobacteria including M. llatzerense and M. chelonae. Direct Sanger sequencing as well as pyrosequencing of environmental isolates demonstrated the frequent association of mycobacteria and FLA, as they are part of the most represented genera composing amoebae's microbiome. This is the first time that an association between FLA and NTM is observed in water networks, highlighting the importance of FLA in the ecology of NTM.

  8. Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease and Tuberculosis, Hawaii, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Timothy B.; Daida, Yihe G.; Honda, Jennifer R.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Zelazny, Adrian; Honda, Stacey; Prevots, D. Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies found Hawaiians and Asian-Americans/Pacific Islanders to be independently at increased risk for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) and tuberculosis (TB). To better understand NTM infection and TB risk patterns in Hawaii, USA, we evaluated data on a cohort of patients in Hawaii for 2005–2013. Period prevalence of NTMPD was highest among Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese patients (>300/100,000 persons) and lowest among Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (50/100,000). Japanese patients were twice as likely as all other racial/ethnic groups to have Mycobacterium abscessus isolated (adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.2) but were not at increased risk for infection with other mycobacteria species. In contrast, incidence of TB was stable and was lowest among Japanese patients (no cases) and highest among Filipino, Korean, and Vietnamese patients (>50/100,000). Substantial differences exist in the epidemiology of NTMPD by race/ethnicity, suggesting behavioral and biologic factors that affect disease susceptibility. PMID:28221128

  9. Surgical resection of a cutaneous nodule in the left foot caused by mycobacteria

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    Neiva Aparecida Grazziotin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria are etiologic agents of opportunistic human infections. Although they usually affect superficial tissues, infections in bones and joints have been described. The contamination is associated with increased environmental exposure. With appropriate therapy, the cases usually progress to complete recovery of the patient. This study reports the case of a patient who developed a cutaneous nodule in her left foot acquired when her skin was punctured by a fish. The anatomopathological examination revealed chronic central suppurative granulomatous dermo-hypodermal inflammation. Furthermore, the screening for resistant acid-fast bacilli was positive.

  10. Duplex detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and medically important non-tuberculosis mycobacteria by real-time PCR based on the rnpB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeldaim, Guma; Svensson, Erik; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2016-11-01

    A duplex real-time PCR based on the rnpB gene was developed for Mycobacterium spp. The assay was specific for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) and also detected all 19 tested species of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). The assay was evaluated on 404 clinical samples: 290 respiratory samples and 114 from tissue and other non-respiratory body sites. M. tuberculosis was detected by culture in 40 samples and in 30 samples by the assay. The MTB assay showed a sensitivity similar to Roche Cobas Amplicor MTB-PCR (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA, USA). There were only nine samples with non-tuberculous mycobacteria detected by culture. Six of them were detected by the PCR assay.

  11. Zambia Country Background Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampwaye, Godfrey; Jeppesen, Søren; Kragelund, Peter

    This paper provides background data and general information for the Zambia studies focusing on local food processing sub­‐sector; and the local suppliers to the mines as part of the SAFIC project (Successful African Firms and Institutional Change).......This paper provides background data and general information for the Zambia studies focusing on local food processing sub­‐sector; and the local suppliers to the mines as part of the SAFIC project (Successful African Firms and Institutional Change)....

  12. Zambia country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-09-01

    The Zambia Country Study, which was part of the Danida-funded project Climate Change Mitigation in Southern Africa: Phase 2, aimed at methodological development, national mitigation analysis and institutional capacity building in Zambia. The study comprised the following five elements: Comprehensive evaluation of national social and economic development framework for climate change; Baseline scenario(s) projection(s); Mitigation scenario(s) projection(s); Macro-economic assessment; Implementation Issues. (au) 17 refs.

  13. Laboratory aspects of clinically significant rapidly growing mycobacteria

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    R Set

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic potential of the rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM has started being recognized. This is due to more sensitive and specific techniques in the laboratory. The RGM are generally defined as nontuberculous species of mycobacteria that show visible growth on agar media within 7 days. RGM are widely distributed in nature and have been isolated from natural water, tap water, and soil. Several biochemical tests, high performance liquid chromatography, and molecular techniques have been developed for rapid identification of these species. The American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Disease Society of America recommend that RGM should be identified to the species level using a recognized acceptable methodology such as polymerase chain reaction restriction enzyme analysis or biochemical testing and routine susceptibility testing of RGM should include amikacin, imipenem, doxycycline, the fluorinated quinolones, a sulphonamide or trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, cefoxitin, clarithromycin, linezolid, and tobramycin. The diseases caused by these organisms have varied manifestations. They have been responsible for a number of healthcare-associated outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks. For recognition of outbreaks, it is important to be familiar with the causative organisms like RGM which are most frequently involved in healthcare-associated outbreaks and pseudo outbreaks. It is essential to intervene as soon as possible to interrupt this transmission. Large gaps still exist in our knowledge of RGM. Unquestionably more studies are required. Through this review, we wish to emphasize that reporting of RGM from clinical settings along with their sensitivity patterns is an absolute need of the hour.

  14. Novel arenavirus, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akihiro; Thomas, Yuka; Moonga, Ladslav; Nakamura, Ichiro; Ohnuma, Aiko; Hang'ombe, Bernard; Takada, Ayato; Mweene, Aaron; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2011-10-01

    To investigate arenavirus in Zambia, we characterized virus from the kidneys of 5 arenavirus RNA-positive rodents (Mastomys natalensis) among 263 captured. Full-genome sequences of the viruses suggested that they were new strains similar to Lassa virus-related arenaviruses. Analyzing samples from additional rodents and other species can elucidate epizootiologic aspects of arenaviruses.

  15. Novel Arenavirus, Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Akihiro; Thomas, Yuka; Moonga, Ladslav; Nakamura, Ichiro; OHNUMA, Aiko; Hang’ombe, Bernard; Takada, Ayato; MWEENE, Aaron; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    To investigate arenavirus in Zambia, we characterized virus from the kidneys of 5 arenavirus RNA–positive rodents (Mastomys natalensis) among 263 captured. Full-genome sequences of the viruses suggested that they were new strains similar to Lassa virus–related arenaviruses. Analyzing samples from additional rodents and other species can elucidate epizootiologic aspects of arenaviruses.

  16. Agricultural Development in Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Søren; Hampwaye, Godfrey; Phiri, Douglas

    industry. The study, which is the first of its kind in Zambia, reveals that a major part of the interviewed firms find that they have performed above industry average the last five years. A minor part states performance below industry average. Close to 80% of the firms views government and business...

  17. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Karen; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-05-15

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms. In immunocompetent hosts, they are a rare cause of disease. In immunocompromised hosts, disease due to NTM is well documented. Reports of NTM disease have increased in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. This increase may reflect increased numbers of transplants, intensification of immune suppressive regimens, prolonged survival of transplant recipients, and/or improved diagnostic techniques. The difficulty of diagnosis and the impact associated with infections due to NTM in HSCT and SOT recipients necessitates that, to ensure prompt diagnosis and early initiation of therapy, a high level of suspicion for NTM disease be maintained. The most common manifestations of NTM infection in SOT recipients include cutaneous and pleuropulmonary disease, and, in HSCT recipients, catheter-related infection. Skin and pulmonary lesions should be biopsied for histologic examination, special staining, and microbiologic cultures, including cultures for bacteria, Nocardia species, fungi, and mycobacteria. Mycobacterial infections associated with catheters may be documented by tunnel or blood (isolator) cultures. Susceptibility testing of mycobacterial isolates is an essential component of optimal care. The frequent isolation of NTM other than Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) from transplant recipients limits the extrapolation of therapeutic data from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals to the population of transplant recipients. Issues involved in the management of NTM disease in transplant recipients are characterized by a case of disseminated infection due to Mycobacterium avium complex in a lung transplant recipient, with a review of the relevant literature.

  18. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections in a French Hospital: A 12-Year Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Peggy; Dutronc, Hervé; Peuchant, Olivia; Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine; Cazanave, Charles; Neau, Didier; Wirth, Gaëtane; Pellegrin, Jean-Luc; Morlat, Philippe; Mercié, Patrick; Tunon-de-Lara, José-Manuel; Doutre, Marie-Sylvie; Pélissier, Philippe; Dupon, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental organisms associated with a range of infections. Reports of NTM epidemiology are mainly focused on pulmonary infections and isolations, and extrapulmonary infections are less frequently described. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of NTM infections at the Bordeaux University Hospital, France, between January 2002 and December 2013. We used the microbiologic component of the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America's pulmonary NTM disease criteria to define cases of pulmonary NTM, and patients with isolates from a normally sterile site were classified as having extrapulmonary disease. Results In our setting, 170 patients were included. Pulmonary cases predominated (54.1%), followed by skin and soft tissue infections (22.9%), disseminated cases (10.6%), lymphadenitis (7.7%), bone and joint infections (2.9%) and the remaining 1.8% catheter-related infections. Overall, 16 NTM species were isolated. Mycobacterium avium (31.8%) and M. intracellulare (20%) were the most common species identified, followed by M. marinum (13.5%), M. kansasii (10.6%), M. xenopi (9.4%), rapidly growing mycobacteria (9.4%) and other slowly growing mycobacteria (5.3%). In general, NTM isolates were largely prevalent in people older than 50 (62.4%); patients aged 1–10 year-old exclusively yielded M. avium from lymph nodes, almost cases having being diagnosed after 2007. Among the 121 patients with complete follow-up, 78 (64.5%), 24 (19.8%), and 19 (15.7%) were cured, experienced relapse, or died, respectively. Conclusion In our study, extrapulmonary NTM infections represented almost half of cases, consisting mainly in skin and soft tissue infections. The increase lymphadenitis cases in children after 2007 could be linked to the cessation of mandatory BCG vaccination in France. We observed similar cure rates (64%) between pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections. PMID:27959960

  19. Occurrence of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria at an Acute Care Hospital Using Secondary Drinking Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of infection control strategies at acute-care hospitals has contributed to an overall decline in the number of healthcare-associated infections (HAI’s) in the United States, especially those caused by contaminated equipment used in surgical procedures and co...

  20. [Nontuberculous pulmonary mycobacteriosis complicated by pleuritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiki, Hiraku; Ueda, Seiya; Watanabe, Akira; Sato, Chika; Abe, Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    Pleuritis is a rare complication associated with nontuberculous mycobacteriosis of the lung and its etiology remains to be clarified. We investigated pleuritis associated with nontuberculous mycobacteriosis of the lung in 304 patients who visited our hospital. Of these, 9 patients (3%) had pleural effusion not attributable to any factor other than pleuritis; these cases were diagnosed as pleuritis. Massive pleural effusion requiring drainage was rare (1 patient, 0.3%) and pleuritis accompanied by pneumothorax was also rare (2 patients, 0.7%). The lung lesions in the patients with pleuritis were often extensive or contained a cavity. All these patients showed infection with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Although it is difficult to diagnose MAC-induced pleuritis, patients with this condition often present with at least 1 of the following signs: the presence of nontuberculous mycobacterium in pleural effusion, a predominance of lymphocytes among the cells detected in pleural effusion, a high adenosine deaminase level, and the disappearance of pleural effusion following treatment. Recognizing these signs may aid the diagnosis of MAC-induced pleuritis.

  1. The genealogic tree of mycobacteria reveals a long-standing sympatric life into free-living protozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmane Lamrabet

    Full Text Available Free-living protozoa allow horizontal gene transfer with and between the microorganisms that they host. They host mycobacteria for which the sources of transferred genes remain unknown. Using BLASTp, we searched within the genomes of 15 mycobacteria for homologous genes with 34 amoeba-resistant bacteria and the free-living protozoa Dictyostelium discoideum. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis of these sequences revealed that eight mycobacterial open-reading frames (ORFs were probably acquired via horizontal transfer from beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria and from Firmicutes, but the transfer histories could not be reliably established in details. One further ORF encoding a pyridine nucleotide disulfide oxidoreductase (pyr-redox placed non-tuberculous mycobacteria in a clade with Legionella spp., Francisella spp., Coxiella burnetii, the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila and D. discoideum with a high reliability. Co-culturing Mycobacterium avium and Legionella pneumophila with the amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga demonstrated that these two bacteria could live together in amoebae for five days, indicating the biological relevance of intra-amoebal transfer of the pyr-redox gene. In conclusion, the results of this study support the hypothesis that protists can serve as a source and a place for gene transfer in mycobacteria.

  2. Mycobacteria clumping increase their capacity to damage macrophages

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    Cecilia Brambilla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The rough morphotypes of non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been associated with the most severe illnesses in humans. This idea is consistent with the fact that Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a stable rough morphotype. Unlike smooth morphotypes, the bacilli of rough morphotypes grow close together, leaving no spaces among them and forming large aggregates (clumps. Currently, the initial interaction of macrophages with clumps remains unclear. Thus, we infected J774 macrophages with bacterial suspensions of rough morphotypes of Mycobacterium abscessus containing clumps and suspensions of smooth morphotypes, primarily containing isolated bacilli. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy, we observed clumps of at least 5 rough-morphotype bacilli inside the phagocytic vesicles of macrophages at 3 hours post-infection. These clumps grew within the phagocytic vesicles, killing 100% of the macrophages at 72 hours post-infection, whereas the proliferation of macrophages infected with smooth morphotypes remained unaltered at 96 hours post-infection. Thus, macrophages phagocytose large clumps, exceeding the bactericidal capacities of these cells. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines and granuloma-like structures were only produced by macrophages infected with rough morphotypes. Thus, the present study provides a foundation for further studies that consider mycobacterial clumps as virulence factors.

  3. Review: Environmental mycobacteria as a cause of human infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Halstrom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are recognized as a problem in immunodeficient individuals and are increasingly common in older people with no known immune defects. NTM are found in soil and water, but factors influencing transmission from the environment to humans are mostly unknown. Studies of the epidemiology of NTM disease have matched some clinical isolates of NTM with isolates from the patient's local environment. Definitive matching requires strain level differentiation based on molecular analyses, including partial sequencing, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD PCR, repetitive element (rep- PCR and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE of large restriction fragments. These approaches have identified hospital and residential showers and faucets, hot-tubs and garden soil as sources of transmissible pathogenic NTM. However, gaps exist in the literature, with many clinical isolates remaining unidentified within environments that have been tested, and few studies investigating NTM transmission in developing countries. To understand the environmental reservoirs and transmission routes of pathogenic NTM, different environments, countries and climates must be investigated.

  4. Mycobacteria Clumping Increase Their Capacity to Damage Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Cecilia; Llorens-Fons, Marta; Julián, Esther; Noguera-Ortega, Estela; Tomàs-Martínez, Cristina; Pérez-Trujillo, Miriam; Byrd, Thomas F.; Alcaide, Fernando; Luquin, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The rough morphotypes of non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been associated with the most severe illnesses in humans. This idea is consistent with the fact that Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a stable rough morphotype. Unlike smooth morphotypes, the bacilli of rough morphotypes grow close together, leaving no spaces among them and forming large aggregates (clumps). Currently, the initial interaction of macrophages with clumps remains unclear. Thus, we infected J774 macrophages with bacterial suspensions of rough morphotypes of M. abscessus containing clumps and suspensions of smooth morphotypes, primarily containing isolated bacilli. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy, we observed clumps of at least five rough-morphotype bacilli inside the phagocytic vesicles of macrophages at 3 h post-infection. These clumps grew within the phagocytic vesicles, killing 100% of the macrophages at 72 h post-infection, whereas the proliferation of macrophages infected with smooth morphotypes remained unaltered at 96 h post-infection. Thus, macrophages phagocytose large clumps, exceeding the bactericidal capacities of these cells. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines and granuloma-like structures were only produced by macrophages infected with rough morphotypes. Thus, the present study provides a foundation for further studies that consider mycobacterial clumps as virulence factors. PMID:27757105

  5. [Identification of mycobacteria to the species level by molecular methods in the Public Health Laboratory of Bogotá, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Toloza, Johana Esther; Rincón-Serrano, María de Pilar; Celis-Bustos, Yamile Adriana; Aguillón, Claudia Inés

    2016-01-01

    Global epidemiology of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is unknown due to the fact that notification is not required in many countries, however the number of infection reports and outbreaks caused by NTM suggest a significant increase in the last years. Traditionally, mycobacteria identification is made through biochemical profiles which allow to differentiate M. tuberculosis from NTM, and in some cases the mycobacteria species. Nevertheless, these methods are technically cumbersome and time consuming. On the other hand, the introduction of methods based on molecular biology has improved the laboratory diagnosis of NTM. To establish the NTM frequency in positive cultures for acid-fast bacilli (AAFB) which were sent to Laboratorio de Salud Pública de Bogotá over a 12 month period. A total of 100 positive cultures for acid-fast bacilli from public and private hospitals from Bogotá were identified by both biochemical methods and the molecular methods PRA (PCR-restriction enzyme analysis) and multiplex-PCR. Furthermore, low prevalence mycobacteria species and non-interpretable results were confirmed by 16SrDNA sequentiation analysis. Identification using the PRA method showed NMT occurrence in 11% of cultures. In addition, this molecular methodology allowed to detect the occurrence of more than one mycobacteria in 4% of the cultures. Interestingly, a new M. kubicae pattern of PCR-restriction analysis is reported in our study. Using a mycobacteria identification algorithm, which includes the molecular method PRA, improves the diagnostic power of conventional methods and could help to advance both NTM epidemiology knowledge and mycobacteriosis control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. First Canadian Reports of Cervical Adenitis due to Mycobacterium malmoense and a 10-Year Review of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Adenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris McCrossin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report reviews a decade of experience with nontuberculous mycobacterial adenitis at a pediatric referral centre, noting that patients are often subjected to multiple ineffective antibiotic courses, and that delays in diagnosis and referral for appropriate therapy are common. Notable clinical features include a mean age of presentation of 3.4 years, a male-to-female ratio of 1:1.5 and a gradual onset of painless, unilateral cervical adenopathy. Fever was absent in most patients (77%, and the disease failed to respond to antistaphylococcal antibiotics. The mean time to correct diagnosis was longer than three months (15 weeks. The clinical features of the disease are highlighted and presented with a practical diagnostic approach to the child with subacute/chronic adenitis. New molecular diagnostic tools and emerging mycobacteria are discussed, including the first reports of Mycobacterium malmoense adenitis in Canada.

  7. Evaluation of rapid techniques for the detection of mycobacteria in sputum with scanty bacilli or clinically evident, smear negative cases of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pottathil Shinu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to compare two rapid methods, the BBL Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT TM and Biotec FASTPlaque TB TM (FPTB assays, with the conventional Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ media assay to diagnose mycobacterial infections from paucibacillary clinical specimens. For evaluation of the clinical utility of the BBL MGIT TM and FPTB assays, respiratory tract specimens (n = 208, with scanty bacilli or clinically evident, smear negative cases and non-respiratory tract specimens (n = 119 were analyzed and the performance of each assay was compared with LJ media. MGIT and FPTB demonstrated a greater sensitivity (95.92% and 87.68%, specificity (94.59% and 98.78%, positive predictive value (94.91% and 99.16% and negative predictive value (96.56% and 90.92%, respectively, compared to LJ culture for both respiratory tract and non-respiratory tract specimens. However, the FPTB assay was unable to detect nontuberculous mycobacteria and few Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cases from paucibacillary clinical specimens. It is likely that the analytical sensitivity of FPTB is moderately low and may not be useful for the direct detection of tuberculosis in paucibacillary specimens. The current study concluded that MGIT was a dependable, highly efficient system for recovery of M. tuberculosis complexes and nontuberculous mycobacteria from both respiratory and non-respiratory tract specimens in combination with LJ media.

  8. Evidence for Mycobacteria in Sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Isaac; Ramírez-Valle, Francisco; Sanchez, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Despite its recognition as a distinct granulomatous disease for over a century, the etiology of sarcoidosis remains to be defined. Since the early 1900s, infectious agents have been suspected in causing sarcoidosis. For much of this time, mycobacteria were considered a likely culprit, yet until recently, the supporting evidence has been tenuous at best. In this review, we evaluate the reported association between mycobacteria and sarcoidosis. Historically, mycobacterial infection has been investigated using histologic stains, cultures of lesional tissue or blood, and identification of bacterial nucleic acids or bacterial antigens. More recently, advances in biochemical, molecular, and immunological methods have produced a more rigorous analysis of the antigenic drivers of sarcoidosis. The result of these efforts indicates that mycobacterial products likely play a role in at least a subset of sarcoidosis cases. This information, coupled with a better understanding of genetic susceptibility to this complex disease, has therapeutic implications. PMID:21659662

  9. Immunodeficiency in non-tuberculous mycobacterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebel, K S; Böllert, F G; Jellema, J; Bird, A G; Greening, A P

    1997-02-01

    T-cell immunity was investigated in eight patients with non-tuberculous mycobacterial disease, to see whether impaired immune function might be the explanation for their infection. Cellular immune function was evaluated in vitro by measuring the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to both non-specific mitogens (phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen) and specific recall antigens (streptokinase-streptodornase and purified protein derivative from Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and in vivo, by measuring the skin test response to a panel of recall antigens. Functionally relevant T-lymphocyte sub-populations (CD4, CD8, activated CD3 and gamma/delta T-cells) were enumerated by two-colour flow cytometry. The results were compared with those for a group of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, with groups of controls matched for age and smoking habit, and with a patient group receiving steroid treatment. The patients with non-tuberculous mycobacterial disease had poor or absent skin test responses; in vitro, their response to recall antigens was depressed, although their response to mitogens was normal. The patients had significantly raised levels of CD8 lymphocytes and activated T-cells, but lacked any circulating gamma/delta T-cells. There were also differences between the various control groups. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a deficiency in the cellular immune system of these patients, which is most readily detectable by skin testing, or by measuring lymphocyte proliferative responses to recall antigens. However, the study also shows changes in cellular immune responses in controls matched for age and smoking and in patients on steroid treatment, and underscores the need for matched controls. Further work needs to be done to ascertain whether the cellular immune deficiency is a cause of, or is caused by, the mycobacterial infections, and also to investigate the pathological significance of the alterations in T-cell sub-populations.

  10. Mycobacteria in nail salon whirlpool footbaths, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugia, Duc J; Jang, Yvonne; Zizek, Candi; Ely, Janet; Winthrop, Kevin L; Desmond, Edward

    2005-04-01

    In 2000, an outbreak of Mycobacterium fortuitum furunculosis affected customers using whirlpool footbaths at a nail salon. We swabbed 30 footbaths in 18 nail salons from 5 California counties and found mycobacteria in 29 (97%); M. fortuitum was the most common. Mycobacteria may pose an infectious risk for pedicure customers.

  11. Searching for an immunogenetic factor that will illuminate susceptibility to non-tuberculous mycobacterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affandi, Jacquita S; Hendry, Shona; Waterer, Grant; Thomson, Rachel; Wallace, Hilary; Burrows, Sally; Price, Patricia

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) disease in otherwise healthy adults is increasing as the population ages. The organisms are ubiquitous so susceptibility probably reflects a deficiency in a protective immune response. Here we investigate if singlenucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) affecting cytokines, chemokines and their receptors associate with pulmonary NTM disease. Samples from NTM patients (n=79) and healthy controls (n=188) were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Of the 16 SNPs assessed, IL28B-rs8099917*TG (rs8099917; P=0.01, OR=2.2), TNFA-1031*CC (rs1799964; p=0.02, OR=0.48) and IL10-1082*AA (rs1800896; P=0.001, OR=0.33) were significantly associated with NTM disease. IL28B-rs8099917 and IL10-1082 have been associated with perturbations of the Th1/Th2 balance, whilst TNFA-1031*CC associates with sensory neuropathy in HIV patients. IL10-1082 warrants further investigation because we observed high production of IL-10 in blood mononuclear cells from NTM patients.

  12. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria–associated Lung Disease in Hospitalized Persons, United States, 1998–2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinger, Megan E.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Viboud, Cecile; Montes de Oca, Ruben; Steiner, Claudia; Holland, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and trends of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)–associated hospitalizations in the United States were estimated using national hospital discharge data. Records were extracted for all persons with a pulmonary NTM International Classification of Diseases code (031.0) hospitalized in the 11 states with continuous data available from 1998 through 2005. Prevalence was calculated using US census data. Pulmonary NTM hospitalizations (031.0) increased significantly with age among both sexes: relative prevalence for persons 70–79 years of age compared with those 40–49 years of age was 15/100,000 for women (9.4 vs. 0.6) and 9/100,000 for men (7.6 vs. 0.83). Annual prevalence increased significantly among men and women in Florida (3.2%/year and 6.5%/year, respectively) and among women in New York (4.6%/year) with no significant changes in California. The prevalence of pulmonary NTM–associated hospitalizations is increasing in selected geographic areas of the United States. PMID:19861046

  13. Clinical Significance of Environmental Mycobacteria Isolated From Respiratory Specimens of Patients With and Without Silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Pérez, José Jesús; Pérez González, Alexandre; Morano Amado, Luis Enrique; Guerra Vales, José Luis; Vázquez Gallardo, Rafael; Salgado Barreira, Ángel; Cruz Carmona, María Jesus; González Barcala, Francisco Javier

    2016-03-01

    To describe the clinical, functional and radiographic differences of respiratory disease caused by environmental mycobacteria (EM) in patients with and without silicosis. Retrospective, observational study in patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated in the Hospital Meixoeiro (University Hospital of Vigo) microbiology laboratory between January 2007 and December 2013. Patients were grouped according to the presence or absence of silicosis and mycobacterial lung disease, using American Thoracic Society criteria. In 156 cases, at least one species of EM had been isolated from the respiratory culture. A total of 71% were identified in men, 40 (25.6%) of whom had silicosis. Sixty patients (38.5%) met American Thoracic Society microbiological criteria: 62.5% of the silicosis group and 30.2% of the non-silicosis group. The most common species were Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium genavense and Mycobacterium chelonae. American Thoracic Society criteria for environmental mycobacterial disease were met in 34 (22.7%) patients: 14 in the silicosis group and 20 in the non-silicosis group. Treatment was administered in 24 cases, with better bacteriological eradication levels in the non-silicosis group. In our series, a history of silicosis was related with a higher incidence of environmental mycobacterial disease. The causative species in the majority of cases in our setting was Mycobacterium avium complex, followed by Mycobacterium genavense. Patients with silicosis showed lower cure rates after treatment. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Direct identification of mycobacteria from liquid media using a triplex real-time PCR coupled with pyrosequencing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Uk; Cha, Choong-Hwan; Park, Seon-Hee

    2015-12-01

    Culture in enriched broth, as well as on a solid medium, is recommended for primary isolation of mycobacteria. With the introduction of liquid mycobacterial culture methods, a substantial workload regarding the identification of culture-recovered mycobacterial species, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), has been imposed on our laboratory. We thus developed a triplex, real-time PCR coupled with pyrosequencing assay that can directly identify mycobacterial species from liquid media, which can reduce the workload. In this assay, real-time PCR simultaneously detects MTC and Mycobacterium xenopi, and amplifies the region of 16S rRNA gene containing hypervariable region A for pyrosequencing analysis; subsequent, pyrosequencing identifies many other nontuberculous mycobacteria. The assay was evaluated using 333 DNA samples directly prepared from liquid media, including 24 reference strains and 309 clinical isolates. Three hundred and twenty-eight (98.5%) of the 333 samples were correctly identified. The remaining five were determined as indeterminate. In conclusion, this coupled assay would be an alternative method for rapid identification of mycobacteria directly from liquid media in a clinical laboratory with a high workload in regions where tuberculosis is endemic.

  15. Characterization of non-tuberculosis mycobacteria by neutron radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jaqueline M; Crispim, Verginia Reis; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Furtado, Vanessa Rodrigues; Duarte, Rafael Da Silva

    2013-07-01

    The genus Mycobacterium shares many characteristics with Corynebacterium and Actinomyces genera, among which the genomic guanine plus cytosine content and the production of long branched-chain fatty acids, known as mycolic acids are enhanced. Growth rate and optimal temperature of mycobacteria are variable. The genus comprises more than 140 known species; however Mycobacterium fortuitum, a fast growing nontuberculous mycobacterium, is clinically significant, because it has been associated to several lesions following surgery procedures such as liposuction, silicone breast and pacemaker implants, exposure to prosthetic materials besides sporadic lesions in the skin, soft tissues and rarely lungs. The objective of the present study is to reduce the time necessary for M. fortuitum characterization based on its morphology and the use of the neutron radiography technique substituting the classical biochemical assays. We also aim to confirm the utility of dendrimers as boron carriers. The samples were sterilized through conventional protocols using 10% formaldehyde. In the incubation process, two solutions with different molar ratios (10:1 and 20:1) of sodium borate and PAMAM G4 dendrimer and also pure sodium borate were used. After doping and sterilization procedures, the samples were deposited on CR-39 sheets, irradiated with a 4.6×10(5) n/cm(2)s thermal neutron flux for 30 min, from the J-9 irradiation channel of the Argonauta IEN/CNEN reactor. The images registered in the CR-39 were visualized in a Nikon E400 optical transmission microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix 995 digital camera. Developing the nuclear tracks registered in the CR-39 allowed a 1000× enlargement of mycobacterium images, facilitating their characterization, the use of more sophisticated equipment not being necessary. The use of neutron radiography technique reduced the time necessary for characterization. Doping with PAMAM dendrimer improved the visualization of NTM in neutron radiography

  16. Potential cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies against clinically relevant mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Moreno, K; Celis-Meneses, J S; Meneses-Ruiz, D M; Castillo-Rodal, A I; Orduña, P; Montiel, B A; López-Vidal, Y

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTb). In 2011, global mortality due to tuberculosis was 1·4 million individuals. The only available vaccine is the attenuated M. bovis [bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)] strain, which confers variable protection against pulmonary tuberculosis. Some widely distributed non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), such as M. avium and M. arupense, are also potential pathogens for humans. This work aimed to produce and characterize monoclonal antibodies against the M. bovis BCG Mexico strain of the MTb, M. avium subs. hominissuis and the M. arupense strain from NTM. Hybridomas were produced from splenocytes of BALB/c female mice immunized with radiation-inactivated mycobacteria, and the immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibody-producing clones with the highest antigenic recognition were selected. The selected clones, Mbv 2A10 for M. bovis BCG Mexico, Mav 3H1 for M. avium and Mar 2D10 for M. arupense, were used in further studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immune proteomics analyses characterized the clones as having the highest cross-reactivity with mycobacteria. Using mass spectrometry, a number of proteins recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) clones were identified. These proteins had roles in metabolic processes, hypoxia, cell cycle and dormancy. In addition, a Clustal W and Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) in-silico analysis was performed in protein sequences that result in the conserved regions within probability epitopes that could be recognized for Mbv2A10 and Mav3H1 clones.

  17. Bovine tuberculosis in African buffaloes: observations regarding Mycobacterium bovis shedding into water and exposure to environmental mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Helden Paul D

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African buffaloes are the maintenance host for Mycobacterium bovis in the endemically infected Kruger National Park (KNP. The infection is primarily spread between buffaloes via the respiratory route, but it is not known whether shedding of M. bovis in nasal and oral excretions may lead to contamination of ground and surface water and facilitate the transmission to other animal species. A study to investigate the possibility of water contamination with M. bovis was conducted in association with a BCG vaccination trial in African buffalo. Groups of vaccinated and nonvaccinated buffaloes were kept together with known infected in-contact buffalo cows to allow natural M. bovis transmission under semi-free ranging conditions. In the absence of horizontal transmission vaccinated and control buffaloes were experimentally challenged with M. bovis. Hence, all study buffaloes in the vaccination trial could be considered potential shedders and provided a suitable setting for investigating questions relating to the tenacity of M. bovis shed in water. Results Serial water samples were collected from the drinking troughs of the buffaloes once per season over an eleven-month period and cultured for presence of mycobacteria. All water samples were found to be negative for M. bovis, but 16 non-tuberculous Mycobacterium spp. isolates were cultured. The non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species were further characterised using 5'-16S rDNA PCR-sequencing, resulting in the identification of M. terrae, M. vaccae (or vanbaalenii, M. engbaekii, M. thermoresistibile as well as at least two species which have not yet been classified. Conclusion The absence of detectable levels of Mycobacterium bovis in the trough water suggests that diseased buffalo do not commonly shed the organism in high quantities in nasal and oral discharges. Surface water may therefore not be likely to play an important role in the transmission of bovine tuberculosis from buffalo

  18. Country watch. Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapyepye, E

    1994-01-01

    In Mansa District, Zambia, people are unaware of the risk factors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). To remedy this, the District HIV Prevention and Care Team invited a member of the Positive and Living Squad (PALS), John Luonde, to speak at educational sessions for various target audiences. Goals included providing information, dissipating misinformation, alleviating community fears, and mobilizing people through specific activities that addressed identified needs. The sessions began with the testimony of John Luonde and a simple question and answer period, which were followed by focus groups, often with a video, for more difficult or sensitive topics. Information materials were distributed and a condom demonstration was conducted. Although some institutions initially refused permission because of the holiday season or the possible impact on staff, Luonde returned to cover the missed groups. More than 105 people from 9 sectors of the community participated. Groups that were represented included the Mansa Sports Club, the Mutende Deaf Branch, a factory, the local army and police, and physicians from the Mansa Hospital Board. Questions from the different groups were similar. Participants saw that, although anyone could contract AIDS (the central theme of the project), they could still hope for productive years with proper treatment, self-care, and diet. Most participants wanted to change their sexual behavior and Luonde was asked to return. Women and people with physical disabilities need to be targeted. Although condoms were previously seen as promoting promiscuity, institutions are now requesting their distribution. The team is collaborating with a social marketing organization on condom use promotion. Distribution sites include bars, restaurants, filling stations, supermarkets, and hair dressers. At the request of the community, a meeting was held with the director of the Mansa Hospital Board to develop policy

  19. Molecular characterization of mycobacteria isolated from seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumárraga, M J; Bernardelli, A; Bastida, R; Quse, V; Loureiro, J; Cataldi, A; Bigi, F; Alito, A; Castro Ramos, M; Samper, S; Otal, I; Martin, C; Romano, M I

    1999-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) was diagnosed in 10 seals from three species (Arctocephalus australis, Arctocephalus tropicalis and Otaria flavescens) found in South America. The mycobacteria isolated from these cases belonged to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, as determined by RFLP using an IS6110 probe, spoligotyping, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and by PCR-restriction analysis of hsp65. Polymorphisms in gyrA, katG, oxyR and pncA were investigated in some of the isolates, as well as the presence of the MPB70 antigen. The insertion sequence IS6110 was present in three to seven copies in the genome of the mycobacteria isolated from seals. Using the IS6110 probe, six patterns (designated A, B, C, D, E and F) were identified from 10 different isolates. Patterns A and B were found for the mycobacteria isolated from two and four seals, respectively, indicating an epidemiological relationship between isolates grouped according to their IS6110 RFLP. The mycobacteria isolated from seals shared the majority of their IS6110 DNA-containing restriction fragments, and nine isolates had an identical spoligotype; only one isolate showed a minor difference in its spoligotype. In addition, none of these spoligotypes were found in other M. tuberculosis complex strains. These results suggest that the isolates from seals constitute a unique group of closely related strains. The mycobacteria isolated from seals showed polymorphisms at gyrA codon 95 and katG codon 463, as do group 1 M. tuberculosis, and M. bovis. Group 1 mycobacteria are associated with cluster cases. The spoligotypes found in the mycobacteria isolated from seals lack spacers 39-43, as does M. bovis, but the MPB70 antigen, which is highly expressed in M. bovis and minimally expressed in M. tuberculosis, was not detected in these mycobacteria. The mycobacteria isolated from seals also showed oxyR and pncA polymorphisms specific to M. tuberculosis. In conclusion, the mycobacteria that cause TB in seals in the South

  20. Zambia moves towards reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Several events in Zambia this year have marked the development of an integrated approach to reproductive health. A team met in March to draw up a national safe motherhood policy, plus strategies and guidelines. These were completed by April and are being distributed for comments. Clinical guidelines for safe motherhood in health centers have also been developed. These aim to reduce mortality and morbidity among mothers and infants by helping health workers to provide quality care to women at every stage of pregnancy and delivery. A reproductive health workshop was held in Ngwerere in May to create awareness of the concept of reproductive health, identify reproductive health problems in the area, propose solutions and outline activities. The 75 participants included community health workers, community leaders, teachers, youth leaders, and community members, as well as health workers and policymakers. The workshop was conducted in the local language so that those present were able to participate fully. June 1997 saw the official launch of Zambia's new policy framework, guidelines and strategy on family planning within reproductive health. The country's Minister of Health, Dr. Katele Kalumba, said the family planning guidelines were a sign of the government's commitment to providing a basic health care package for all Zambians. To promote widespread discussion of the whole concept of reproductive health, local newspapers printed feature articles with the headline "Let's talk reproductive health." The articles raised a variety of sensitive issues that ranged from safe sex and adolescent sexuality to safe motherhood and HIV prevention. Plans are going ahead in Zambia for drawing up a national training curriculum for safe motherhood and family planning. The curriculum for health workers will cover both pre-service and in-service training. full text

  1. Elevated serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Hong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increased serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with nonmalignant diseases have been investigated in previous reports. This study evaluates the clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. The median CA 19-9 level was higher in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease than in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease: 13.80, tuberculosis: 5.85, p < 0.001. A multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in this study showed that Mycobacterium abscessus (OR 9.97, 95% CI: 1.58, 62.80; p = 0.014 and active phase of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease (OR 12.18, 95% CI: 1.07, 138.36, p = 0.044 were found to be risk factors for serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The serum CA 19-9 levels showed a tendency to decrease during successful treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease but not in pulmonary tuberculosis. These findings suggest that CA 19-9 may be a useful marker for monitoring therapeutic responses in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, although it is not pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease-specific marker.

  2. Journal of Science and Technology (Zambia)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The University of Zambia Journal of Science and Technology provides an outlet ... of science and technology found to be relevant for national and international ... The bi-annual journal is intended, in its publications, to stimulate new research ...

  3. Medical Journal of Zambia: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Medical Journal of Zambia is a peer-reviewed quarterly journal intended for the publication of papers from all specialities of medicine (Internal Medicine, ... This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that ...

  4. Help for the hippos of Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Deanne

    2008-01-01

    Its name means "water horse," apt for the hippopotamus, which spends most of its life in deep water holes. But in Zambia's Luangwa River region, drought, deforestation, and farming are threatening the streams the hippos call home. Using aerial and satellite images, rain gauges, and soil and water samples, Conrad Heatwole, associate professor of biological systems engineering, is studying how agriculture, commerce, and tourism affect the water supply and, in turn, the wildlife in Zambia's Sout...

  5. Mycobacteria entry and trafficking into endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltierra-Uribe, Shantal Lizbeth; García-Vásquez, Manuel de Jesús; Castrejón-Jiménez, Nayeli Shantal; Estrella-Piñón, Mayra Patricia; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; García-Pérez, Blanca Estela

    2014-09-01

    Endothelial cells are susceptible to infection by mycobacteria, but the endocytic mechanisms that mycobacteria exploit to enter host cells and their mechanisms of intracellular transport are completely unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we determined that the internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), Mycobacterium smegmatis (MSM), and Mycobacterium abscessus (MAB) is dependent on the cytoskeleton and is differentially inhibited by cytochalasin D, nocodazole, cycloheximide, wortmannin, and amiloride. Using confocal microscopy, we investigated their endosomal trafficking by analyzing Rab5, Rab7, LAMP-1, and cathepsin D. Our results suggest that MSM exploits macropinocytosis to enter endothelial cells and that the vacuoles containing these bacteria fuse with lysosomes. Conversely, the entry of MTB seems to depend on more than one endocytic route, and the observation that only a subset of the intracellular bacilli was associated with phagolysosomes suggests that these bacteria are able to inhibit endosomal maturation to persist intracellularly. The route of entry for MAB depends mainly on microtubules, which suggests that MAB uses a different trafficking pathway. However, MAB is also able to inhibit endosomal maturation and can replicate intracellularly. Together, these findings provide the first evidence that mycobacteria modulate proteins of host endothelial cells to enter and persist within these cells.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides in Innate Immunity against Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides/proteins are ancient and naturallyoccurring antibiotics in innate immune responses in a variety of organisms. Additionally, these peptides have been recognized as important signaling molecules in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity. During mycobacterial infection, antimicrobial peptides including cathelicidin, defensin, and hepcidin have antimicrobial activities against mycobacteria, making them promising candidates for future drug development. Additionally, antimicrobial peptides act as immunomodulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions. Multiple crucial functions of cathelicidins in antimycobacterial immune defense have been characterized not only in terms of direct killing of mycobacteria but also as innate immune regulators, i.e., in secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and mediating autophagy activation. Defensin families are also important during mycobacterial infection and contribute to antimycobacterial defense and inhibition of mycobacterial growth both in vitro and in vivo. Hepcidin, although its role in mycobacterial infection has not yet been characterized, exerts antimycobacterial effects in activated macrophages. The present review focuses on recent efforts to elucidate the roles of host defense peptides in innate immunity to mycobacteria.

  7. ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF EXISTENCE OF MYCOBACTERIA POPULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Nuratinov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Aim. Adaptation possibilities of mycobacteria in the conditions of existence in the external environment and habitats of animals and man are studied. Adaptation mechanisms, which have pathogenic mycobacteria, allow them to survive long and circulate in the environment, which leads to special sanitary and epidemiological value of pathogens of tuberculosis. Location. Russia, Dagestan.Results. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a high resistance to influence of cold, heat, chemical and physical factors, moisture and light. They carry high and low temperatures, while more than a year pathogenic properties, and even more in the dark and without sunlight. It should be noted that the stability of pathogenic species of mycobacteria in the external environment is relatively lower than that of saprophytes, capable of quickly adapting to the external environment. Raonin’s groups have more widespread in environment, in water, soil, air, plants, and habitats of animals, products of plant and animal origin and their often isolated from clinical samples.Main conclusions. Environmental conditions define the intensity of habitats of any species of mycobacteria in certain landscapes and their circulation in macroorganism. The impact of the various elements of the environment both in the macro- and microorganisms is a response that was the basis for the development of the doctrine about “limiting factors”. This concept applies not only to the necessary for mycobacteria chemical elements, but also to all the other environmental factors (temperature, humidity, aeration conditions etc. Minimum and maximum intensity factors determine the limits of endurance species. Beyond these limits, due to sharply expressed extreme conditions and is portable microorganism existence of species is not possible. The most favorable for the species optimum intensity of environmental factors, usually occupied a middle position. This provision is significantly

  8. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  9. Elevated serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Young; Jang, Sun Hee; Kim, Song Yee; Chung, Kyung Soo; Song, Joo Han; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kang, Young Ae

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with nonmalignant diseases have been investigated in previous reports. This study evaluates the clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. The median CA 19-9 level was higher in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease than in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease: 13.80, tuberculosis: 5.85, pdisease (OR 12.18, 95% CI: 1.07, 138.36, p=0.044) were found to be risk factors for serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The serum CA 19-9 levels showed a tendency to decrease during successful treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease but not in pulmonary tuberculosis. These findings suggest that CA 19-9 may be a useful marker for monitoring therapeutic responses in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, although it is not pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease-specific marker.

  10. Mycobacterium bovis BCG mycobacteria--new application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Pestel, Joël; Biet, Franck; Locht, Camille; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2006-01-01

    The polarized response of T helper-2 (Th2) lymphocytes to an allergen is considered to be the main cause of the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we asked a question whether M. bovis BCG mycobacteria which are known for the preferential stimulation of T helper-1 (Th1) immunity, diminish the effector functions of Th2 cells from allergic patients upon stimulation with a common house dust mite Der p-1 allergen. Our results allow a positive answer to this question. We demonstrate that BCG modulates the dendritic cell-dependent allergen presentation process and switches naive T lymphocytes towards an anti-allergic Th1 profile.

  11. Post liposuction infections by rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosso, Caroline; Lienhard, Reto; Siegrist, Hans H; Malinverni, Raffaele; Clerc, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are recognized agents of surgical site infections. Recently, RGM skin and soft tissue infections have been increasingly reported. As symptoms, clinical signs and disease latency remain non-specific and microbiological detection requires targeted growth media, RGM diagnosis remains challenging for clinicians. Appropriate management is often delayed due to lack of awareness of these infections. RGM infections after plastic surgery have also been described in the setting of interventions performed in developing countries, a growing phenomenon commonly known as medical tourism. We describe a case of Mycobacterium chelonae/abscessus infection following liposuction and liposculpture procedures performed in the Dominican Republic and review the literature on this subject.

  12. Factors which influence treatment initiation for pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection in HIV negative patients; a multicentre observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Timothy M; Abbara, Aula; Kranzer, Katharina; Ritchie, Andrew; Milburn, James; Brown, Tim; Adeboyeku, David; Buckley, Jim; Davidson, Robert N; Berry, Matthew; Kon, Onn Min; John, Laurence

    2016-11-01

    Clinical, radiological and microbiological criteria inform diagnosis of pulmonary Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) disease and treatment decisions. This multicentre, review aims to characterise NTM disease meeting ATS/IDSA criteria and define factors associated with initiation of treatment. Sputum samples growing NTM from 5 London hospitals between 2010 and 2014 were identified. Data for HIV-negative individuals meeting ATS/IDSA guidelines for pulmonary NTM disease were extracted. Associations between clinical variables and treatment decision were investigated using Chi-squared, Fishers-exact or Mann Whitney tests. Factors associated with treatment in univariate analysis (p < 0.150) were included in a multivariate logistic regression model. NTM were identified from 817 individuals' sputum samples. 108 met ATS/IDSA criteria. 42/108 (39%) were initiated on treatment. Median age was 68 (56-78) in the cohort. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly associated with treatment of pulmonary NTM infection were: Cavitation on HRCT (OR: 6.49; 95% CI: 2.36-17.81), presenting with night sweats (OR 4.18; 95% CI: 1.08-16.13), and presenting with weight loss (OR 3.02; 95% CI: 1.15-7.93). Of those treated, 18(43%) have completed treatment, 9(21%) remain on treatment, 10(24%) stopped due to side effects, 5(12%) died during treatment. Mortality was 31% (n = 13) in treated versus 21% (n = 14) in the non-treated cohort. Subgroup analysis of individual NTM species did not observe any differences in treatment initiation or outcomes between groups. Decision to treat pulmonary NTM infection requires clinical judgement when interpreting clinical guidelines. Factors independently associated with decision to treat in this HIV-negative cohort include cavitation on HRCT and presenting with night sweats or weight loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by a novel tetraplex real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses.

  14. Utility of MPT64 antigen test for differentiating mycobacteria: Can correlation with liquid culture smear morphology add further value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Nerurkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Clinical presentation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM infections may or may not be the same, but the treatment is always different. Hence accurate differentiation between MTBC and NTM is of utmost importance. Aims: To assess in parallel, the utility of MPT64 antigen immunochromatography assay (MPT64 ICT and bacillary morphology on liquid culture smear, for rapid differentiation between MTBC and NTM in clinical isolates. Settings and Designs: Private sector reference laboratory, prospective. Subjects and Methods: Thousand and ninety-three mycobacterial isolates, recovered using Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube 960 liquid culture system (BD, USA, were subjected to MPT64 ICT (Standard Diagnostics Inc., Korea, para amino nitrobenzoicacid (PNB, niacin, and nitrate reduction tests. Smears prepared from culture vials were subjected to Ziehl-Neelsen staining and observed microscopically for typical patterns (chords, single cells, etc.,. PNB, nitrate and niacin tests served as the reference method for MTBC identification. Results: Thousand and fourteen and 79 isolates were identified as MTBC and NTM, respectively. MPT64 ICT correctly identified 955/1014 MTBC and all NTM isolates, yielding sensitivity and specificity of 94.2% and 100%, respectively. 936/1014 (92.3% MTBC isolates revealed characteristic serpentine chording on culture smear including 56/59 MPT64 ICT negative isolates. Sensitivity and specificity of liquid culture smear were 98.1% and 82.3%, respectively. Conclusion: Correlation of MPT64 ICT results with liquid culture smear was useful, especially in MPT64 ICT negative isolates, where the latter could help to determine need and/or type of additional confirmatory testing. Liquid culture smear, however, lacked specificity and cannot be used as a stand alone test.

  15. Mycobacteria in Terrestrial Small Mammals on Cattle Farms in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Durnez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of bovine tuberculosis and atypical mycobacterioses in cattle in developing countries is important but difficult because of the existence of wildlife reservoirs. In cattle farms in Tanzania, mycobacteria were detected in 7.3% of 645 small mammals and in cow's milk. The cattle farms were divided into “reacting” and “nonreacting” farms, based on tuberculin tests, and more mycobacteria were present in insectivores collected in reacting farms as compared to nonreacting farms. More mycobacteria were also present in insectivores as compared to rodents. All mycobacteria detected by culture and PCR in the small mammals were atypical mycobacteria. Analysis of the presence of mycobacteria in relation to the reactor status of the cattle farms does not exclude transmission between small mammals and cattle but indicates that transmission to cattle from another source of infection is more likely. However, because of the high prevalence of mycobacteria in some small mammal species, these infected animals can pose a risk to humans, especially in areas with a high HIV-prevalence as is the case in Tanzania.

  16. Floodwaters Renew Zambia's Kafue Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Not all floods are unwanted. Heavy rainfall in southern Africa between December 2003 and April 2004 provided central Zambia with floodwaters needed to support the diverse uses of water within the Kafue Flats area. The Kafue Flats are home to about one million people and provide a rich inland fishery, habitat for an array of unique wildlife, and the means for hydroelectricity production. The Flats falls between two dams: Upstream to the west (not visible here) is the Izhi-tezhi, and downstream (middle right of the images) is the Kafue Gorge dam. Since the construction of these dams, the flooded area has been reduced and the timing and intensity of the inundation has changed. During June 2004 an agreement was made with the hydroelectricity company to restore water releases from the dams according to a more natural flooding regime. These images from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) illustrate surface changes to the wetlands and other surfaces in central Zambia resulting from an unusually lengthy wet season. The Kafue Flats appear relatively dry on July 19, 2003 (upper images), with the Kafue River visible as a slender dark line that snakes from east to west on its way to join the Zambezi (visible in the lower right-hand corner). On July 21, 2004 (lower images), well into the dry season, much of the 6,500-square kilometer area of the Kafue Flats remains inundated. To the east of the Kafue Flats is Lusaka, the Zambian capital, visible as a pale area in the middle right of the picture, north of the river. In the upper portions of these images is the prominent roundish shape of the Lukanga Swamp, another important wetland. The images along the left are natural-color views from MISR's nadir camera, and the images along the right are angular composites in which red band data from MISR's 46o forward, nadir, and 46o backward viewing cameras is displayed as red, green and blue, respectively. In order to preserve brightness variations among the various

  17. Zambia: Multi-Faith Religious Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Brendan

    2006-01-01

    As countries' populations become more religiously diverse, a need to review the religious education syllabus that operates is often perceived. One such country is Zambia, which was not only traditionally religiously diverse but has become even more so with the advent of Christianity, Islam and Hinduism and other non-African faiths. This article…

  18. Power instability in rural Zambia, case Macha

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mudenda, C

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides insights on the nature of electricity supply in the rural village Macha, Zambia. It reports on case study research. Use of Information and Communication Technologies and access to e-services are constrained by the availability...

  19. Producing biodiesel from soybeans in Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drabik, Dusan; Gorter, de Harry; Timilsina, Govinda R.

    2016-01-01

    Facing a huge fiscal burden due to imports of its entire petroleum demand in the face of ample supply of agricultural land to produce biofuels, Zambia has recently introduced a biofuel mandate. However, a number of questions, particularly those related to the economics of biofuels, have not been

  20. Producing biodiesel from soybeans in Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drabik, Dusan; Gorter, de Harry; Timilsina, Govinda R.

    2016-01-01

    Facing a huge fiscal burden due to imports of its entire petroleum demand in the face of ample supply of agricultural land to produce biofuels, Zambia has recently introduced a biofuel mandate. However, a number of questions, particularly those related to the economics of biofuels, have not been

  1. Zambia: Multi-Faith Religious Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Brendan

    2006-01-01

    As countries' populations become more religiously diverse, a need to review the religious education syllabus that operates is often perceived. One such country is Zambia, which was not only traditionally religiously diverse but has become even more so with the advent of Christianity, Islam and Hinduism and other non-African faiths. This article…

  2. T Cell Reactivity against Mycolyl Transferase Antigen 85 of M. tuberculosis in HIV-TB Coinfected Subjects and in AIDS Patients Suffering from Tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Launois

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mycolyl transferase antigen 85 complex is a major secreted protein family from mycobacterial culture filtrate, demonstrating powerful T cell stimulatory properties in most HIV-negative, tuberculin-positive volunteers with latent M.tuberculosis infection and only weak responses in HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. Here, we have analyzed T cell reactivity against PPD and Ag85 in HIV-infected individuals, without or with clinical symptoms of tuberculosis, and in AIDS patients with disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Whereas responses to PPD were not significantly different in HIV-negative and HIV-positive tuberculin-positive volunteers, responses to Ag85 were significantly decreased in the HIV-positive (CDC-A and CDC-B group. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated low T cell reactivity against Ag85, irrespective of HIV infection, and finally AIDS patients suffering from NTM infections were completely nonreactive to Ag85. A one-year follow-up of twelve HIV-positive tuberculin-positive individuals indicated a decreased reactivity against Ag85 in patients developing clinical tuberculosis, highlighting the protective potential of this antigen.

  3. [Recommendations from the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases on the diagnosis and treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez Cuadros, E; Baquero Artigao, F

    2012-09-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been increasingly isolated over the last 20 years in Spain. However, as NTM disease is not a notifiable condition, there is no national registry, thus the true prevalence and incidence of these infections in children are difficult to estimate. Cervical adenitis is the most common clinical manifestation of NTM infection in immunocompetent children. The clinical course can be sub-acute or chronic, and is often associated with fluctuation, fistulisation, and scarring at a later stage. Although much less common, it is important to consider Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis, as the management and the epidemiological implications of tuberculous lymphadenitis are completely different. Diagnosis of NTM cervical lymphadenitis is based on a high level of clinical suspicion, supported by results of the tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA). Fine needle aspiration or excisional biopsy is usually required for histological and microbiological confirmation. Complete surgical excision of the affected nodes is the treatment of choice. Incision and drainage is not recommended, due to the high risk of chronic fistulisation and recurrence rate. Antibiotic treatment or conservative wait-and-see therapy may be indicated in certain circumstances. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Mycobacteria in Terrestrial Small Mammals on Cattle Farms in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durnez, Lies; Katakweba, Abdul; Sadiki, Harrison

    2011-01-01

    The control of bovine tuberculosis and atypical mycobacterioses in cattle in developing countries is important but difficult because of the existence of wildlife reservoirs. In cattle farms in Tanzania, mycobacteria were detected in 7.3% of 645 small mammals and in cow's milk. The cattle farms were...... and PCR in the small mammals were atypical mycobacteria. Analysis of the presence of mycobacteria in relation to the reactor status of the cattle farms does not exclude transmission between small mammals and cattle but indicates that transmission to cattle from another source of infection is more likely....... However, because of the high prevalence of mycobacteria in some small mammal species, these infected animals can pose a risk to humans, especially in areas with a high HIV-prevalence as is the case in Tanzania....

  5. Proximate Determinants of Fertility in Zambia: Analysis of the 2007 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumbi Chola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of proximate determinants in influencing fertility has been well documented worldwide. Bongaarts’ aggregate model of the proximate determinants (which focuses on marriage, contraception, abortion, and sterility has been widely used to analyse the influence of proximate determinants on fertility. In Zambia, however, there is limited understanding of their effects. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of proximate determinants of fertility in Zambia using Bongaarts’ model. This was a cross-sectional analysis of women’s data from the 2007 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey (ZDHS. A total of 7,146 women aged 15 to 49 years participated in the ZDHS. Bongaarts’ model was employed in the data analysis. Results showed that, overall, mean age was 27.8 years and rural-urban distribution was 56% and 44%, respectively. Marriage (40% and postpartum infecundity (22% accounted for the largest inhibiting effect on natural fertility from its biological maximum of 19.10. Contraception use accounted for only 3%. Therefore, in order to manage fertility in Zambia, policies and programmes should consider the effects of marriage, postpartum infecundity, and contraception on fertility. Without such targeted interventions, managing and maintaining population growth will remain a challenge in Zambia.

  6. Orthopoxvirus infection among wildlife in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orba, Yasuko; Sasaki, Michihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ishii, Akihiro; Thomas, Yuka; Ogawa, Hirohito; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Morikawa, Shigeru; Saijo, Masayuki; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2015-02-01

    Human monkeypox is a viral zoonosis caused by monkeypox virus, an orthopoxvirus (OPXV). The majority of human monkeypox cases have been reported in moist forested regions in West and Central Africa, particularly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). In this study we investigated zoonotic OPXV infection among wild animals in Zambia, which shares a border with DRC, to assess the geographical distribution of OPXV. We screened for OPXV antibodies in sera from non-human primates (NHPs), rodents and shrews by ELISA, and performed real-time PCR to detect OPXV DNA in spleen samples. Serological analysis indicated that 38 of 259 (14.7 %) rodents, 14 of 42 (33.3 %) shrews and 4 of 188 (2.1 %) NHPs had antibodies against OPXV. The OPXV DNA could not be detected in spleens from any animals tested. Our results indicated that wild animals living in rural human habitation areas of Zambia have been infected with OPXV.

  7. Survival of environmental mycobacteria in Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Ben Salah, Skandar; Khlif, Mohamed; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-09-01

    Free-living amoebae in water are hosts to many bacterial species living in such an environment. Such an association enables bacteria to select virulence factors and survive in adverse conditions. Waterborne mycobacteria (WBM) are important sources of community- and hospital-acquired outbreaks of nontuberculosis mycobacterial infections. However, the interactions between WBM and free-living amoebae in water have been demonstrated for only few Mycobacterium spp. We investigated the ability of a number (n = 26) of Mycobacterium spp. to survive in the trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba polyphaga. All the species tested entered the trophozoites of A. polyphaga and survived at this location over a period of 5 days. Moreover, all Mycobacterium spp. survived inside cysts for a period of 15 days. Intracellular Mycobacterium spp. within amoeba cysts survived when exposed to free chlorine (15 mg/liter) for 24 h. These data document the interactions between free-living amoebae and the majority of waterborne Mycobacterium spp. Further studies are required to examine the effects of various germicidal agents on the survival of WBM in an aquatic environment.

  8. Zambia Economic Brief, June 2015, Issue 5

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    After several years of strong economic performance, Zambia now confronts several important challenges that must be managed carefully to ensure sustained and inclusive growth in the future. On the one hand, the economy grew by an estimated 5.5–6.0 percent in 2014, somewhat above the average for African economies. Monthly copper production increased by an average of 8 percent during the seco...

  9. Bringing internet connectivity to rural Zambia using a collaborative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthee, K.W.; Mweemba, G.; Pais, A.V.; Starn, G.V.; Rijken, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an initiative to bring connectivity to rural Zambia using a collaborative approach. In particular, it focuses on a proof-of-concept Internet service that has been implemented in rural Macha located in the Southern Province of Zambia. The service operates using satellite terminals

  10. Human parainfluenza virus type 3 in wild nonhuman primates, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michihito; Ishii, Akihiro; Orba, Yasuko; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Moonga, Ladslav; Mweene, Aaron S; Ogawa, Hirohito; Nakamura, Ichiro; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) genome was detected in 4 baboons in Zambia. Antibody for HPIV3 was detected in 13 baboons and 6 vervet monkeys in 2 distinct areas in Zambia. Our findings suggest that wild nonhuman primates are susceptible to HPIV3 infection.

  11. Perceptions of and Attitudes towards Ageing in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapoma, Christopher C.; Masaiti, Gift

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects part of the wider outlook on ageing in general in Zambia and was intended to investigate perceptions of and attitudes towards the aged and ageing in Zambia by members of the community who, by definition and chronologically are not classified as aged i.e. not yet 60 years and over. Focus Group Discussions (FGD) were used to…

  12. Constraints on the development of biotechnology in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewanika, M M; Mulenga, K D

    1996-09-01

    Biotechnology can play an essential role in fostering the economic and social development of developing countries like Zambia. However, due to a number of constraints, Zambia is not in a position to exploit the emerging opportunities from biotechnology. Prominent among these constraints are the lack of a biotechnology policy, an insufficient number of trained personnel, a poor science and technology base and very little basic research in universities and research institutions. The challenge Zambia must overcome is to establish a capacity and capability to innovate its own biotechnology as well as to adapt biotechnologies developed elsewhere to the Zambian conditions and environment. Despite all the hurdles and setbacks Zambia will face as she endeavours to enter the world of biotechnology, Zambia cannot afford to be a mere spectator as the rest of the world invests and benefits from the promise of biotechnology.

  13. Pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with nontuberculous mycobacterial infection: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Chul; Moon, Jin Chang; Gang, Su Jin; Park, Seung Yong; Kim, So Ri

    2015-04-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) can be manifested in a variety of disorders including neoplasms, infection, inflammation, and vascular or congenital abnormalities. In addition, they are often accompanied with other pulmonary pathologic lesions such as consolidations and several pulmonary disorders present as similar pulmonary nodular lesions simultaneously. Diagnostic workup is important for these SPNs; however, many physicians often miss the second diagnosis for multiple pulmonary lesions with SPNs due to lack of clinical suspicion that each pulmonary nodule or pathologic lesion can have each other's diagnosis. Herein, we report 2 cases of coexistence of pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection presenting as pulmonary nodules and multiple consolidative lesions. A 60-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of multifocal pulmonary lesions including SPN with chronic exertional dyspnea. Multiple lung tissues were obtained from each lesion through percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB). At the same time, bacteriologic examination was performed using respiratory samples obtained by bronchoscopy. Based on pathologic and microbiologic results, the patient diagnosed as pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with pulmonary NTM infectious disease. In addition, a 56-year-old woman visited for the evaluation of a small SPN. The SPN was resected surgically for the pathologic examination and turned out to be pulmonary chondroid hamartoma. Interestingly, the diagnostic workup revealed that the patient had Lady Windermere syndrome which is one of features for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) pulmonary disease. Both patients were treated with the standard antibiotics against MAC as recommended by the ATS/IDSA guideline. This is the first report of 2 patients, as far as we know, that chondroid hamartoma and NTM disease develop simultaneously in the lung. This report emphasizes that physicians should endeavor to confirm the individual

  14. Comparison among three methods for mycobacteria identification Comparación entre tres métodos para identificar micobacterias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misael Mondragón-Barreto

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare three methods: Biochemical tests, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragments length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP, for the identification of mycobacteria, and to perform a cost-benefit analysis to define an optimum identification algorithm. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One-hundred-and-seven mycobacteria isolates were identified by the three methods at Instituto de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológicos, between February of 1999 and January of 2000 and the results were compared with those of a reference laboratory using the Q-Cochran statistical test. RESULTS: PCR-RFLP was the most rapid and specific procedure but also the most expensive; biochemical tests excelled for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but were lengthy and expensive for other mycobacteria; HPLC ranked in the middle for price, speed and specificity. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the expected proportion of M. tuberculosis, the following algorithm was proposed: Initially, biochemical tests should be performed; if the results indicate a non-tuberculous mycobacteria, the isolate should be analyzed with HPLC; if results are unclear, the isolate should be analyzed using PCR-RFLP. Isolates showing a previously undescribed PCR-RFLP pattern should be characterized by DNA sequencing.OBJETIVO: Comparar tres métodos: pruebas bioquímicas, cromatografía líquida de alta resolución (HPLC, por sus siglas en inglés y reacción en cadena de la polimerasa-polimorfismo del tamaño de fragmentos de restricción (PCR-RFLP para identificar micobacterias a nivel especie, analizando costo-beneficio y proponiendo un algoritmo de identificación. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Entre febrero de 1999 y enero de 2000, en los laboratorios del Instituto de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológicos se tipificaron 107 aislados de micobacterias y los resultados se compararon con los obtenidos en un laboratorio de referencia utilizando la prueba

  15. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Combined Species Identification and Drug Sensitivity Testing in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Soetaert, Karine; Timke, Markus; Van den Bossche, An; Sparbier, Katrin; De Cremer, Koen; Kostrzewa, Markus; Hendrickx, Marijke; Mathys, Vanessa

    2017-02-01

    Species identification and drug susceptibility testing (DST) of mycobacteria are important yet complex processes traditionally reserved for reference laboratories. Recent technical improvements in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has started to facilitate routine mycobacterial identifications in clinical laboratories. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of performing phenotypic MALDI-based DST in mycobacteriology using the recently described MALDI Biotyper antibiotic susceptibility test rapid assay (MBT-ASTRA). We randomly selected 72 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, subjected them to MBT-ASTRA methodology, and compared its results to current gold-standard methods. Drug susceptibility was tested for rifampin, isoniazid, linezolid, and ethambutol (M. tuberculosis, n = 39), and clarithromycin and rifabutin (NTM, n = 33). Combined species identification was performed using the Biotyper Mycobacteria Library 4.0. Mycobacterium-specific MBT-ASTRA parameters were derived (calculation window, m/z 5,000 to 13,000, area under the curve [AUC] of >0.015, relative growth [RG] of drug resistance profiles which corresponded to standard testing results. Turnaround times were not significantly different in M. tuberculosis testing, but the MBT-ASTRA method delivered on average a week faster than routine DST in NTM. Databases searches returned 90.4% correct species-level identifications, which increased to 98.6% when score thresholds were lowered to 1.65. In conclusion, the MBT-ASTRA technology holds promise to facilitate and fasten mycobacterial DST and to combine it directly with high-confidence species-level identifications. Given the ease of interpretation, its application in NTM typing might be the first in finding its way to current diagnostic workflows. However, further validations and automation are required before routine implementation can be envisioned

  16. Molecular Characterization of Mycolactone Producing Mycobacteria from Aquatic Environments in Buruli Ulcer Non-Endemic Areas in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tano, Marcellin B.; Dassi, Christelle; Mosi, Lydia; Koussémon, Marina; Bonfoh, Bassirou

    2017-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), particularly mycolactone producing mycobacteria (MPM), are bacteria found in aquatic environments causing skin diseases in humans like Buruli ulcer (BU). Although the causative agent for BU, Mycobacterium ulcerans has been identified and associated with slow-moving water bodies, the real transmission route is still unknown. This study aimed to characterize MPMs from environmental aquatic samples collected in a BU non-endemic community, Adiopodoumé, in Côte d’Ivoire. Sixty samples were collected in four types of matrices (plant biofilms, water filtrate residues, plant detritus and soils) from three water bodies frequently used by the population. Using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), MPMs were screened for the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) mycobacterial gene, the IS2404 insertion sequence, and MPM enoyl reductase (ER) gene. Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) typing with loci 6, 19, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit 1 (MIRU1) and sequence type 1(ST1) was performed to discriminate between different MPMs. Our findings showed 66.7%, 57.5% and 43.5% of positivity respectively for 16S rRNA, IS2404 and ER. MPM discrimination using VNTR typing did not show any positivity and therefore did not allow precise MPM distinction. Nevertheless, the observed contamination of some water bodies in a BU non-endemic community by MPMs suggests the possibility of pathogen dissemination and transmission to humans. These aquatic environments could also serve as reservoirs that should be considered during control and prevention strategies. PMID:28208653

  17. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease Is Not a Contraindication to Lung Transplantation in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Pressler, Tanja; Thomsen, V O;

    2013-01-01

    Whether nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease is a contraindication to lung transplantation remains controversial. We conducted a nationwide study to evaluate the clinical importance of NTM infection among lung transplant patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in Denmark and to determine if NTM...

  18. Disseminated mycobacteria chelonae infection in a kidney-pancreas transplant recipient: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafi Malik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old male with a long-standing history of type 1 diabetes with end-stage renal failure underwent combined kidney-pancreas (KP transplant from a standard criteria donor. Post-operative course was uncomplicated with good primary function of both transplant grafts. Induction was with thymoglobulin and maintenance immunosuppression was with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Nine weeks post-transplant, the patient developed dysfunction of both grafts. Panel reactive antibody testing revealed that the patient had developed a de novo donor-specific antibody and considering an antibody-mediated rejection the patient was treated with intravenous pulse methyl prednisone 500 mg ×3 doses, IV immunoglobulin 2 mg/kg in two divided doses, and ATG 7 mg/kg (total dose of 700 mg. In addition, his baseline immunosuppression was increased. Cr decreased to baseline levels, and blood sugars were in the range of 7-8 mmol/L, serum amylase normalized to 63 U/L, and the patient was discharged home. Nine days post-discharge, the patient presented to the hospital with a five-day history of fever, pain, and swelling in the left knee along with subcutaneous, erythematous, tender, nodular lesions in both legs and both arms. Skin biopsy showed Ziehl-Neelsen stain positive rods and biopsy culture and blood culture grew Mycobacteria chelonae. Antimicrobials were switched to azithromycin 500 mg OD, moxifloxacin 400 mg OD, and linezolid 600 mg BID and baseline immunosuppression was reduced to tacrolimus trough target 8-10 ng/mL and MMF to 250 mg BID. The patient gradually improved and was discharged after 28 days in the hospital. Six weeks following the diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacteria infection, the patient′s pancreas graft failed, presumably due to reduction in immuno-suppression and he is now back on insulin treatment. His renal graft continued to function well. Although rapidly growing mycobacterial infections are rare among transplant

  19. Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers: A threat to Zambia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katendi Changula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers (FVHF are caused by agents belonging to Filoviridae family, Ebola and Marburg viruses. They are amongst the most lethal pathogens known to infect humans. Incidence of FVHF outbreaks are increasing, with affected number of patients on the rise. Whilst there has been no report yet of FVHF in Zambia, its proximity to Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo, which have recorded major outbreaks, as well as the open borders, increased trade and annual migration of bats between these countries, puts Zambia at present and increased risk. Previous studies have indicated bats as potential reservoir hosts for filoviruses. An increasing population with an increasing demand for resources has forced incursion into previously uninhabited land, potentially bringing them into contact with unknown pathogens, reservoir hosts and/or amplifying hosts. The recent discovery of a novel arenavirus, Lujo, highlights the potential that every region, including Zambia, has for being the epicentre or primary focus for emerging and re-emerging infections. It is therefore imperative that surveillance for potential emerging infections, such as viral haemorrhagic fevers be instituted. In order to accomplish this surveillance, rapid detection, identification and monitoring of agents in patients and potential reservoirs is needed. International co-operation is the strategy of choice for the surveillance and fight against emerging infections. Due to the extensive area in which filoviral infections can occur, a regional approach to surveillance activities is required, with regional referral centres. There is a need to adopt shared policies for the prevention and control of infectious diseases. There is also need for optimisation of currently available tests and development of new diagnostic tests, in order to have robust, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests that can be used even where there are inadequate laboratories and diagnostic services.

  20. African Independent Churches in Zambia (Lusaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildnerová Kateřina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The African Independent churches (AICs in Zambia, as elsewhere in Africa, from their very beginning formed a protest movement against the cultural imperialism undertaken by the missionary representatives of the historic mission churches and also played an important role in the anti-colonial political struggles. In Zambia, the early AICs were closely related to witchcraft eradication movements such as the Mchape, or socially and politically oriented prophet-healing churches such as The Lumpa church of Alice Lenshina. Since the 1970s and in particular in the 1990s the Christianity in Zambia has been significantly marked by the proliferation of the African Independent Churches - both of Pentecostal and prophet-healing type. These churches that started mushrooming particularly in urban settings became part of the strengthening charismatic movement, particularly within Protestantism. A typical feature of AICs is focus on spiritual healing and religious syncretism - the local traditional customs and beliefs in dangerous ghosts, ancestral spirits, or witches are placed within the biblical religious framework where the Holy Spirit (Muzimu Oyela is considered to be the only source of healing whereas other ‘inferior spirits’ are labelled as demons. The traditional methods of healing are creatively combined with Christian healing by means of prayers, spiritual blessings, laying on of hands on patients and demon exorcism - it is believed that only a body rid of bad spirits can receive the Holy Spirit, and thus be healed. The paper draws on both secondary literature concerning African Independent Churches and primary data issued from fieldwork in Lusaka (2008-2009.

  1. HIV/AIDS合并非结核分枝杆菌肺病97例临床分析%Clinical analysis of 97 HIV/AIDS patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    银春莲; 谢周华; 裴洁; 张洁; 欧健

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate clinical features of HIV/AIDS patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease, so as to improve the diagnosis and treatment of HIV/AIDS combined with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease. Methods A retrospective study was made on 97 HIV/AIDS patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease treated in our hospital from 2009 to 2012. Results Of 97 patients, 93 (95.88%) had cough, 88 (90.72%) had sputum, 71 (73.20%) had asthma, 70 (72.16%) had fever, 69 (71.13%) had weight loss, 58 (59.79%) had fatigue, 47 (48.45%) had chest pain, and 36 (37.11%) had diarrhea. Sixty-four patients (65.98%) were infected with HIV through sexual transmission, 26 (26.80%) through intravenous drug use, 2 (2.06%) through blood transfusion, and 5 (5.15%) through unknown routes. Chest imaging showed that bilateral middle and lower lung lobes were com-monly affected, mainly in lower left lung, with diversified morphology, cavity formation and presence of bronchiectasis and pleural disease. Conclusions Because the clinical and radiologic features, and the results of sputum smear, PPD testing and tuberculosis antibody test of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease mimic tuberculosis, discrimination of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease from tuberculosis is difficult. The patients often present with superficial lymph node enlargement and sputum smear positive for acid-fast bacilli. Sputum culture/susceptibility testing suggests that the resistance to first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs is high, which should be paid due attention to in clinical practice.%目的 探讨HIV/AIDS合并非结核分枝杆菌(nontuberculosis mycobacteria, NTM)肺病的临床特点,以提高诊疗水平. 方法 对我院2009—2012年97例HIV/AIDS合并NTM肺病患者进行回顾性分析. 结果 97 例中咳嗽 93 例(95.88%),咳痰88例(90.72%),气喘71例(73.20%),发热70例(72.16%),消瘦69例(71.13%),乏力58例(59.79%),胸痛 47 例(48 . 45%),腹泻36例(37

  2. Analysis on Epidemiological and Clinical Characteristics of 63 Cases of Nontuberculous mycobacterial(NTM)Lung Disease%63例非结核分枝杆菌肺病的流行病学及临床特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁冰; 黄瑞霞; 邓虹; 何庆秋

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨非结核分枝杆菌肺病的临床特点及防治对策.方法 对2009-2011年7月广州市结核病防治所二分所经过实验室检查确诊的63例非结核分枝杆菌肺病患者进行分析.结果 非结核分枝杆菌肺病波及两肺叶为多(58%),双侧同时患病较多(51%),空洞仅占25%.涂阴培阳44%,涂阳培阳56%,菌型鉴定以龟分枝杆菌为多占44%.耐药以耐多药比例最大(占77%),耐药顺位为耐多药>耐二药>单药.仅有3例是对一二线抗结核药全敏感.其中47例为初治病例(75%),16例复治病例(25%).结论 由于生活环境的变迁可能导致了非结核分枝杆菌的习性发生了变化,以至于目前非结核分枝杆菌肺病的临床特点也发生了不同程度的改变.%Objective To investigate the nontuberculcxus mycobacterial(NTM) lung disease prevention and treatment of clinical features and treatment response. Methods Sixty - three cases of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease confirmed by the laboratory testing in the Second Clinic of Guangzhou Tuberculosis Dispensary from 2009 to July 2011 were analyzed. Results The case of both lung lobe were affected by nontuberculous mycobacterial accounted for 58%, while the case of both sides of lung were affected accounted for 51 %, and the cavityaccounted for only 25%. The bacteria - based . Identification of M. Chelonei accounted for more than 44% for the. Multiple drug resistance tuberculosis accounted for the largest proportion (77%) of drug - resistance. Conclusions As the environment changes may result in a nontuberculous mycobacteria habits change, so the current nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease also occurred in the clinical features of varying degrees of change. In order to have a better control of multidrug- resistant tuberculosis, MDR-TB. And prevent the spread and infection of both multiple drug resistance tubercle bacillus and NTM with the property of MDR, therefore nontuberculous

  3. Mapping the geographical distribution of lymphatic filariasis in Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwase, Enala T; Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Nsakashalo-Senkwe, Mutale

    2014-01-01

    volunteers from 108 geo-referenced survey sites across Zambia were examined for circulating filarial antigens (CFA) with rapid format ICT cards, and a map indicating the distribution of CFA prevalences in Zambia was prepared. 78% of survey sites had CFA positive cases, with prevalences ranging between 1...... to be an important determinant of medium-high prevalence levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LF was found to be surprisingly widespread in Zambia, although in most places with low prevalence. The produced maps and the identified environmental correlates of LF infection will provide useful guidance for planning...

  4. CarD: a new RNA polymerase modulator in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Christina L; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteria CarD is an essential RNAP binding protein that regulates many transcripts including rRNA. This article will review our present state of knowledge regarding CarD and compare the known functions of CarD with other RNAP binding proteins in E. coli, emphasizing how this information can guide future investigations.

  5. Subcellular trafficking of mycobacteria: Implications for virulence and immunogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine the properties of the compartment where mycobacteria end up after phagocytosis and which mycobacterial genes play a role in this process. In most cases, bacterial pathogens are taken up by the cell, processed in the endocytic pathway and eventually bacterial d

  6. Distribution of Environmental Mycobacteria in Karonga District, Northern Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilima, Benson Z.; Clark, Ian M.; Floyd, Sian; Fine, Paul E. M.; Hirsch, Penny R.

    2006-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium includes many species that are commonly found in the environment (in soil and water or associated with plants and animals), as well as species that are responsible for two major human diseases, tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae). The distribution of environmental mycobacteria was investigated in the context of a long-term study of leprosy, tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination, and the responses of individuals to various mycobacterial antigens in Karonga District, northern Malawi, where epidemiological studies had indicated previously that people may be exposed to different mycobacterial species in the northern and southern parts of the district. A total of 148 soil samples and 24 water samples were collected from various locations and examined to determine the presence of mycobacteria. The detection method involved semiselective culturing and acid-fast staining, following decontamination of samples to enrich mycobacteria and reduce the numbers of other microorganisms, or PCR with primers specific for the mycobacterial 16S rRNA gene, using DNA extracted directly from soil and water samples. Mycobacteria were detected in the majority of the samples, and subsequent sequence analysis of PCR products amplified directly from soil DNA indicated that most of the products were related to known environmental mycobacteria. For both methods the rates of recovery were consistently higher for dry season samples than for wet season samples. All isolates cultured from soil appeared to be strains of Mycobacterium fortuitum. This study revealed a complex pattern for the environmental mycobacterial flora but identified no clear differences between the northern and southern parts of Karonga District. PMID:16597928

  7. New report of non-tuberculous mycobacteria clinical isolates%新报道非结核分枝杆菌临床分离株

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管清华; 钱爱东

    2016-01-01

    本文综述了近5年来新报道的24种非结核分枝杆菌所致疾病及分离、鉴定情况,其中5种分别属于快生长分枝杆菌中的2个群,3种属于未分群的快生长分枝杆菌;7种分别属于慢生长分枝杆菌中的4个群,5种属于未分群的慢生长分枝杆菌;另外4种为新命名非结核分枝杆菌.本综述为非结核分枝杆菌病的临床诊断及防控提供了参考.

  8. Urine lipoarabinomannan point-of-care testing in patients affected by pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria ¿ experiences from the Danish Cystic Fibrosis cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Pressler, Tania;

    2014-01-01

    set forth to investigate if the test detects LAM in urine from a Danish cystic fibrosis (CF) population characterized by a high NTM prevalence and negligible TB exposure.MethodPatients followed at the Copenhagen CF Center were comprehensively screened for pulmonary NTM infection between May 2012...... and December 2013. Urine samples were tested for LAM using the 2013 DetermineTM TB LAM Ag strip test.ResultsThree-hundred and six patients had a total of 3,322 respiratory samples cultured for NTM and 198 had urine collected (65%). A total of 23/198 (12%) had active pulmonary NTM infection. None had active TB...

  9. Milking the region? South African capital and Zambia's dairy industry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANBR

    companies in Zambia's dairy chain? One prominent ... Retailers and especially processors are more likely to consider sourcing locally because ... continues to find ways to supply Zambian retail outlets with highly subsidized cheese and butter ...

  10. Cholera Epidemiology in Zambia from 2000 to 2010: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cholera Epidemiology in Zambia from 2000 to 2010: Implications for ... we make recommendations for improving cholera prevention and control in country. ... compared to 2003) and 115 deaths (CFR 1.6%) of the disease were reported with ...

  11. Mental illness - stigma and discrimination in Zambia : original article

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mwanza, J; Lund, C; Flisher, A.J; Mwape, L; Sikwese, A; Cooper, S; Kakuma, R; Kapungwe, A

    2010-01-01

    Objective : The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the presence, causes and means of addressing individual and systemic stigma and discrimination against people with mental illness in Zambia...

  12. Social Cash Transfer Scale-up for Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Stanfield Michelo

    2015-01-01

    What started as an experiment on the desirability and feasibility of a social cash transfer programme in Zambia has now mutated into the national flagship social protection programme. How did this happen?(?)

  13. The Confucius Institute at the University of Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter; Hampwaye, Godfrey

    2016-01-01

    , and what the implications of these differences are for the chances of producing locally relevant knowledge in Africa. This is done through a case study of the newly established Confucius Institute at the University of Zambia in Lusaka, Zambia. This case enables us to further our understanding of how...... the Confucius Institute operates, how it is governed and, more importantly, how it affects the University of Zambia’s room for manoeuvre in determining (and funding) its own vision and strategy....

  14. Tuberculosis in Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis and in a bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus on a game ranch in Central Province, Zambia : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Zieger

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacteriosis was diagnosed for the first time outside a national park in free-ranging wild animals on a game ranch in Zambia. A Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis was found dead with tuberculous lesions on a ranch near Lusaka. Acid-fast bacilli were found in the affected organs. Mycobacteria were isolated from these tissues. A bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus was found dead on the same ranch with multiple superficial abscesses in the neck region, extensive granulomatous lesions in the lung, the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes and several nodular lesions in the spleen. Few acid-fast bacilli were found in the exudate from the abscesses and lesions in the affected organs. Histologically the lesions resembled those of tuberculosis, but mycobacteria could not be isolated. In addition, 1 Kafue lechwe among 37 wild ungulates of 13 species shot on the ranch showed typical tuberculous lesions in the lungs, but the diagnosis was not confirmed by bacterial isolation. The role of the Kafue lechwe as maintenance host for tuberculosis as well as in the possible spread of this disease to other wildlife are discussed.

  15. Tuberculosis in Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) and in a bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) on a game ranch in central province, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, U; Pandey, G S; Kriek, N P; Cauldwell, A E

    1998-09-01

    Mycobacteriosis was diagnosed for the first time outside a national park in free-ranging wild animals on a game ranch in Zambia. A Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) was found dead with tuberculous lesions on a ranch near Lusaka. Acid-fast bacilli were found in the affected organs. Mycobacteria were isolated from these tissues. A bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) was found dead on the same ranch with multiple superficial abscesses in the neck region, extensive granulomatous lesions in the lung, the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes and several nodular lesions in the spleen. Few acid-fast bacilli were found in the exudate from the abscesses and lesions in the affected organs. Histologically the lesions resembled those of tuberculosis, but mycobacteria could not be isolated. In addition, 1 Kafue lechwe among 37 wild ungulates of 13 species shot on the ranch showed typical tuberculous lesions in the lungs, but the diagnosis was not confirmed by bacterial isolation. The role of the Kafue lechwe as maintenance host for tuberculosis as well as in the possible spread of this disease to other wildlife are discussed.

  16. Diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression in Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hapunda, Given; Abubakar, Amina; Pouwer, F

    2015-01-01

    Zambian patients with diabetes completed the Major Depression Inventory and a list of demographic indicators. RESULTS: Compared with control subjects (mean ± sd Major Depression Inventory score 15.10 ± 9.19), depressive symptoms were significantly more common in patients with diabetes (mean ± sd Major......AIMS: To replicate, in Zambia, a recent global study by the WHO, which reported that the odds of depression were not increased in African people with diabetes, and to explore the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with depression. METHODS: A total of 773 control subjects and 157...... Depression Inventory score 19.12 ± 8.95; P depression. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to the WHO study, we...

  17. Mycobacteria and innate cells: critical encounter for immunogenicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angelo Martino

    2008-03-01

    Protective immunity against mycobacterial infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by interactions between specific T cells and activated macrophages. To date, many aspects of mycobacterial immunity have shown that innate cells are the key elements that substantially influence the subsequent adaptive host response. During the early phases of infection, phagocytic cells and innate lymphocyte subsets play a pivotal role. Here we summarize the findings of recent investigations on macrophages, dendritic cells and T lymphocytes in the response to mycobacteria.

  18. Free-living amoebae, a training field for macrophage resistance of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, I B; Ghigo, E; Drancourt, M

    2009-10-01

    Mycobacterium species evolved from an environmental recent common ancestor by reductive evolution and lateral gene transfer. Strategies selected through evolution and developed by mycobacteria resulted in resistance to predation by environmental unicellular protists, including free-living amoebae. Indeed, mycobacteria are isolated from the same soil and water environments as are amoebae, and experimental models using Acanthamoeba spp. and Dictyostelium discoideum were exploited to analyse the mechanisms for intracellular survival. Most of these mechanisms have been further reproduced in macrophages for mycobacteria regarded as opportunistic and obligate pathogens. Amoebal cysts may protect intracellular mycobacteria against adverse conditions and may act as a vector for mycobacteria. The latter hypothesis warrants further environmental and clinical studies to better assess the role of free-living amoebae in the epidemiology of infections caused by mycobacteria.

  19. First detection of mycobacteria in African rodents and insectivores, using stratified pool screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durnez, L.; Eddyani, M.; Mgode, G. F.;

    2007-01-01

    With the rising number of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS in developing countries, the control of mycobacteria is of growing importance. Previous studies have shown that rodents and insectivores are carriers of mycobacteria. However, it is not clear how widespread mycobacteria...... are in these animals and what their role is in spreading them. Therefore, the prevalence of mycobacteria in rodents and insectivores was studied in and around Morogoro, Tanzania. Live rodents were trapped, with three types of live traps, in three habitats. Pieces of organs were pooled per habitat, species, and organ...... spp.) were isolated from C. gambianus, Mastomys natalensis, and C. hirta. This study is the first to report findings of mycobacteria in African rodents and insectivores and the first in mycobacterial ecology to estimate the prevalence of mycobacteria after stratified pool screening. The fact...

  20. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L... inches) in length may be imported into the continental United States from Zambia only under the...

  1. Rift Valley fever: Real or perceived threat for Zambia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Dautu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF in Zambia was first reported in 1974 during an epizootic of cattle and sheep that occurred in parts of Central, Southern and Copperbelt Provinces. In 1990, the disease was documented in nine districts of the provinces of Zambia. In the last two decades, there have been no reports of RVF. This long period without reported clinical disease raises questions as to whether RVF is a current or just a perceived threat. To address this question, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE disease occurrence data on RVF for the period 2005−2010 in the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC was analysed. From the analysis, it was evident that most countries that share a common border with Zambia had reported at least one occurrence of the disease during the period under review. Due to the absence of natural physical barriers between Zambia and most of her neighbours, informal livestock trade and movements is a ubiquitous reality. Analysis of the rainfall patterns also showed that Zambia received rains sufficient to support a mosquito population large enough for high risk of RVF transmission. The evidence of disease occurrence in nearby countries coupled with animal movement, and environmental risk suggests that RVF is a serious threat to Zambia. In conclusion, the current occurrence of RVF in Zambia is unclear, but there are sufficient indications that the magnitude of the circulating infection is such that capacity building in disease surveillance and courses on recognition of the disease for field staff is recommended. Given the zoonotic potential of RVF, these measures are also a prerequisite for accurate assessment of the disease burden in humans.

  2. Mental illness--stigma and discrimination in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapungwe, A; Cooper, S; Mwanza, J; Mwape, L; Sikwese, A; Kakuma, R; Lund, C; Flisher, A J

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the presence, causes and means of addressing individual and systemic stigma and discrimination against people with mental illness in Zambia. This is to facilitate the development of tailor-made antistigma initiatives that are culturally sensitive for Zambia and other low-income African countries. This is the first in-depth study on mental illness stigma in Zambia. Fifty semi-structured interviews and 6 focus group discussions were conducted with key stakeholders drawn from 3 districts in Zambia (Lusaka, Kabwe and Sinazongwe). Transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Mental illness stigma and discrimination is pervasive across Zambian society, prevailing within the general community, amongst family members, amid general and mental health care providers, and at the level of government. Such stigma appears to be fuelled by misunderstandings of mental illness aetiology; fears of contagion and the perceived dangerousness of people with mental illness; and associations between HIV/AIDS and mental illness. Strategies suggested for reducing stigma and discrimination in Zambia included education campaigns, the transformation of mental health policy and legislation and expanding the social and economic opportunities of the mentally ill. In Zambia, as in many other low-income African countries, very little attention is devoted to addressing the negative beliefs and behaviours surrounding mental illness, despite the devastating costs that ensue. The results from this study underscore the need for greater commitment from governments and policy-makers in African countries to start prioritizing mental illness stigma as a major public health and development issue.

  3. Measuring access to emergency obstetric care in rural Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Adam C.; Regan H Marsh; Nelson, Sara W.; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Burke, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Background Global health experts identify emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as the most important intervention to improve maternal survival in low- and middle-income countries. In Zambia, 1 in 27 women will die of maternal causes, yet the level of availability of EmOC is not known at the provincial level. Aims Our goal was to develop a tool to measure the availability of EmOC in rural Zambia in order to estimate pregnant women?s access to this life-saving intervention. Methods We created an ins...

  4. Mapping the geographical distribution of lymphatic filariasis in Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwase, Enala T; Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Nsakashalo-Senkwe, Mutale;

    2014-01-01

    volunteers from 108 geo-referenced survey sites across Zambia were examined for circulating filarial antigens (CFA) with rapid format ICT cards, and a map indicating the distribution of CFA prevalences in Zambia was prepared. 78% of survey sites had CFA positive cases, with prevalences ranging between 1...... presence, and to predict potential suitable habitats over unsurveyed areas. Of note, areas associated with human modification of the landscape appeared to play an important role for the general presence of LF, whereas temperature (measured as averaged seasonal land surface temperature) seemed...

  5. Measuring access to emergency obstetric care in rural Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Adam C; Marsh, Regan H.; Nelson, Sara W.; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Burke, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Global health experts identify emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as the most important intervention to improve maternal survival in low- and middle-income countries. In Zambia, 1 in 27 women will die of maternal causes, yet the level of availability of EmOC is not known at the provincial level. Aims Our goal was to develop a tool to measure the availability of EmOC in rural Zambia in order to estimate pregnant women’s access to this life-saving intervention. Methods We created an ins...

  6. Occurrence of Mycobacteria in Water Treatment Lines and in Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dantec, Corinne; Duguet, Jean-Pierre; Montiel, Antoine; Dumoutier, Nadine; Dubrou, Sylvie; Vincent, Véronique

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of recovery of atypical mycobacteria was estimated in two treatment plants providing drinking water to Paris, France, at some intermediate stages of treatment. The two plants use two different filtration processes, rapid and slow sand filtration. Our results suggest that slow sand filtration is more efficient for removing mycobacteria than rapid sand filtration. In addition, our results show that mycobacteria can colonize and grow on granular activated carbon and are able to enter distribution systems. We also investigated the frequency of recovery of mycobacteria in the water distribution system of Paris (outside buildings). The mycobacterial species isolated from the Paris drinking water distribution system are different from those isolated from the water leaving the treatment plants. Saprophytic mycobacteria (present in 41.3% of positive samples), potentially pathogenic mycobacteria (16.3%), and unidentifiable mycobacteria (54.8%) were isolated from 12 sites within the Paris water distribution system. Mycobacterium gordonae was preferentially recovered from treated surface water, whereas Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum was preferentially recovered from groundwater. No significant correlations were found among the presence of mycobacteria, the origin of water, and water temperature. PMID:12406720

  7. [Breeding and management of mycobacteria-free guinea pigs (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazda, J

    1976-08-01

    A number of mycobacterial species are detectable under conventional holding condition of guinea pigs. These mycobacteria originating in drinking water and litter caused cross reactions in the Jones-Mote hypersensitivity test. Using suitable precautions it was possible to breed and hold the animals mycobacteria-free. The precautions depend mainly in alteration of the wire mesh floor in cages to avoide the contact of the animals with the litter, in cleaning and desinfection of water bottles, in using of heated water and food and in the prevention of mycobacterial contamination from the staff. The control examination on mycobacteria without treating is given in details. Cases are refered in which a oral rece ption of mycobacteria can alter the immune response. The modification of guinea pigs management to the mycobacteria-free ones is possible in a short time and with minimal cost.

  8. Imaging features of tuberculous mastitis : Comparison with non-tuberculous mastitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Mi Sook; Chung, Soo Young; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Kim, Young Mook; Lee, Myung Hwan [College of Medicine, Hallym Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jung Gi [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the characteristic findings of tuberculosis of the breast on mammogram, sonogram, and CT and to compare the results with the imaging feature of non-tuberculous mastitis. Using mammograms and sonograms, nine cases of tuberculosis of the breast were evaluated, and for four cases, CT was used. Aspects evaluated were contour, shape and size of the lesion, homogeneity of internal content, and extension of the lesion from/to the adjacent organs. Diagnosis was based on aspiration, surgery, and pathologic findings including acid-fast bacillus (AFB) staining. Mammograms and sonograms of 19 patients with non-tuberculous mastitis of the breast were reviewed. No cases of tuberculous mastitis presented clinical evidence of acute inflammation such as fever, swelling or skin redness. Nine cases of tuberculous mastitis were seen as a distinct mass on mammogram and sonogram. Four of nine cases (44.4%) showed a relatively smooth peripheral margin on mammogram and a cold abscess form on sonogram and CT. There were other foci of tuberculosis in the chest wall, anterior mediastinum, pleural cavity or lung. Five cases demonstrated as a nodular type on US. In the non-tuberculous mastitis group, and abscess with distinct margin or direct contiguity between a breast lesion and the adjacent organ was observed neither on mammogram nor on sonogram. In an afebrile patient, relative homogeneous density with distinct margin in the breast on mammogram and a fistulous connection or direct continuity between breat abscess form with the adjacent organ on sonogram or CT is a characteristic feature of the tuberculous mastitis. The cold abscess type is a frequent subtypes of this entity, and must also be included.

  9. Lipoglycans contribute to innate immune detection of mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Krishna

    Full Text Available Innate immune recognition is based on the detection, by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, of molecular structures that are unique to microorganisms. Lipoglycans are macromolecules specific to the cell envelope of mycobacteria and related genera. They have been described to be ligands, as purified molecules, of several PRRs, including the C-type lectins Mannose Receptor and DC-SIGN, as well as TLR2. However, whether they are really sensed by these receptors in the context of a bacterium infection remains unclear. To address this question, we used the model organism Mycobacterium smegmatis to generate mutants altered for the production of lipoglycans. Since their biosynthesis cannot be fully abrogated, we manipulated the biosynthesis pathway of GDP-Mannose to obtain some strains with either augmented (∼1.7 fold or reduced (∼2 fold production of lipoglycans. Interestingly, infection experiments demonstrated a direct correlation between the amount of lipoglycans in the bacterial cell envelope on one hand and the magnitude of innate immune signaling in TLR2 reporter cells, monocyte/macrophage THP-1 cell line and human dendritic cells, as revealed by NF-κB activation and IL-8 production, on the other hand. These data establish that lipoglycans are bona fide Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns contributing to innate immune detection of mycobacteria, via TLR2 among other PRRs.

  10. Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance in Zambia: Progress towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    months after onset of paralysis to assess recovery of the children. In Zambia AFP cases are followed up regularly but there is ... vaccination status, 77% of the cases had received 1 to 4 doses of the ... fever, malaise, headache, muscle pain, nausea and vomiting to .... the PEI management, to the Ministry of Health and to the.

  11. Cost Sharing in Zambia's Public Universities: Prospects and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaiti, Gift; Shen, Hong

    2013-01-01

    This research paper explores the concept of "cost sharing" which became more prominent in Zambia education with the advent of democratic form of governance in 1991. As a way of responding to the ever diminishing tax revenues, government through the education policy of 1996, allowed higher education institutions including public…

  12. Social Isolation and Aging in Zambia: Examining the Possible Predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Chabila Mapoma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper examined social isolation and aging in Zambia by examining possible predictors. The paper produces evidence on risk factors likely to engender social isolation among the elderly population of Zambia. Snowball sampling was undertaken to select 690 adults aged 60 and over in communities as well as those living in homes for the aged. A structured questionnaire was used to solicit information from respondents. Results show that old people in Zambia experience forms of social isolation which exhibit themselves (but not limited to through such factors as loss of appetite, stress, moody, hopeless, useless, unhappy, and lonely. On balance, however, the direction of association and the number of statistically significant findings suggest that associations between variables examined and risk factors associated with social isolation amongst older people in this analysis could explain the overall situation occuring currently in Zambia and probably other developing countries. In view of this, this study recommends that further work is needed to identify and explain details of factors of social isolation using techniques such as focus group discussions as well as in-depth interviews with key informants. Such approaches may even help to explain why, for example, sex seems not to be significant in determining indicators of social isolation.

  13. Opportunities and challenges of E-learning in Zambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information System Committee (JISC) which guides on using ... “this was the first time I did an e-learning trial and I thought it was going .... host to an ICT based project that provides 24 hour access to medical ... which could be a real role model for rural Zambia. ... the students and aiming for differentiated, deeper, and more ...

  14. Cucumis zambianus (Cucurbitaceae): A New Species from Northwestern Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    During germplasm explorations within Zambia in 1984, seven Cucumis accessions were collected that could not be identified to species. Two of the accessions were studied in-depth. Based on phenotypic characters, they were closest to Cucumis pustulatus. In ITS analyses of all available Cucumis spec...

  15. The Implementation of School Based Continuous Assessment (CA) in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapambwe, William M.

    2010-01-01

    In Zambia, continuous assessment (CA) is defined as an on-going, diagnostic, classroom-based process that uses a variety of assessment tools to measure learner performance (MOE, 2005:5). Over the years, examinations have been used for selection and certification, without formal considerations on school-based continuous assessment as a component in…

  16. Textbooks and Learning Materials Program: Zambia. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Mississippi Consortium for International Development's (MCID's) intervention involved the development, publication and distribution of an Integrated Foundations of Learning Kit, focused on numeracy. This intervention was aligned with Zambia's priorities and strategies and matched the requirements of the Textbooks and Learning Materials Program…

  17. Improvement of wheat in Zambia using incomplete resistance against rusts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milliano, de W.A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The programme of wheat improvement developed in Zambia used local facilities (finance, personnel, infrastructure), low budget, and few personnel. Incomplete resistance against rusts was used to obtain durable resistance.
    The abiotic conditions, socio-economic status of the farmers,

  18. Mental Health of HIV Positive Adolescents in Zambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    around the world, especially in developing countries. Young people ... particularly affected in terms of transmission, vulnerability and ... risky sexual behaviour . Keywords: HIV, adolescents, mental health, SDQ, Zambia. 1 ..... Physiologically HIV may affect the brain structures involved in emotional and behavioural regulation.

  19. Identificação laboratorial de micobactérias em amostras respiratórias de pacientes HIV-positivos com suspeita de tuberculose Laboratory identification of mycobacteria in respiratory samples from HIV-positive patients suspected of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Aparecida Zamarioli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados retrospectivamente os registros (2000 a 2004 do Laboratório de Microbiologia do Instituto Adolfo Lutz de Santos, SP referentes a pacientes infectados pelo virus da imunodeficiência humana com suspeita de tuberculose pulmonar. Foram encaminhadas 1.321 amostras com finalidade de diagnóstico, correspondendo a 880 casos suspeitos de tuberculose em 693 pacientes. Cento e trinta e quatro baciloscopias foram positivas e em 188 culturas houve crescimento de micobactérias, correspondendo a 161 casos confirmados. Houve identificação de Mycobacterium tuberculosis em 126 (78,3% e micobactérias não tuberculosas em 39 (24,2%. Em quatro casos, houve concomitância de Mycobacterium tuberculosis e micobactérias não tuberculosas (porém em amostras distintas. O perfil de sensibilidade às drogas antituberculose revelou 18 (14,3% casos de resistência a pelo menos um medicamento. Estes resultados reforçam a necessidade de submeter à rotina laboratorial completa - baciloscopia, cultura com identificação e testes de sensibilidade às drogas - as amostras respiratórias de pacientes soropositivos para o vírus da imunodeficiência humana com suspeita de tuberculose para direcionamento terapêutico adequado.The records (2000 to 2004 of the Microbiology Laboratory of the Adolfo Lutz Institute in Santos, Brazil, were retrospectively analyzed regarding patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and suspected of pulmonary tuberculosis. 1,321 samples for diagnosis purposes were selected, corresponding to 880 suspected tuberculosis cases in 693 patients. There were 134 smear-positive samples and mycobacteria growth occurred in 188 cultures, corresponding to 161 confirmed cases. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified in 126 (78.3% and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in 39 (24.2%. In four cases, both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria were simultaneously recovered from different samples. The profile of

  20. Measuring access to emergency obstetric care in rural Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Adam C; Marsh, Regan H; Nelson, Sara W; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Burke, Thomas F

    2008-06-01

    Global health experts identify emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as the most important intervention to improve maternal survival in low- and middle-income countries. In Zambia, 1 in 27 women will die of maternal causes, yet the level of availability of EmOC is not known at the provincial level. Our goal was to develop a tool to measure the availability of EmOC in rural Zambia in order to estimate pregnant women's access to this life-saving intervention. We created an instrument for determining the availability of EmOC based on the supplies and medicines in stock at health facilities as well as the skill level of health workers. We then surveyed a random sample of 35 health centres in the Central Province of Zambia using our novel instrument. We graded health centres based on their ability to provide the six basic functions of EmOC: administering parenteral antibiotics, administering parenteral oxytocics, administering parenteral anticonvulsants, performing manual removal of the placenta, removing retained products of conception and performing assisted vaginal delivery. Of the 29 health centres providing delivery care, 65% (19) were graded as level 1 or 2, 28% (8) as level 3 or 4 and 7% (2) as level 5. No health centre received a grade of level 6. The availability of EmOC in the Central Province of Zambia is extremely limited; the majority of health centres provide only one or two basic functions of EmOC, and no health centres perform all six functions. Our grading system allows for inter- and intra-country comparisons by providing a systematic process for monitoring access to EmOC in rural, low-income countries similar to Zambia.

  1. Mycobacterium malmesburyense sp. nov., a non-tuberculous species of the genus Mycobacterium revealed by multiple gene sequence characterization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gcebe, N

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology: DOI 10.1099/ijsem.0.001678 Mycobacterium malmesburyense sp. nov., a non-tuberculous species of the genus Mycobacterium revealed by multiple gene sequence characterization Gcebe N Rutten V Gey...

  2. Cigarette price and other factors associated with brand choice and brand loyalty in Zambia: findings from the ITC Zambia Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Goma, Fastone; Chelwa, Grieve; Cheng, Xi; Zulu, Richard; Kaai, Susan C; Quah, Anne C K; Thrasher, James F; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about cigarette pricing and brand loyalty in sub-Saharan Africa. This study examines these issues in Zambia, analysing data from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Zambia Survey. Data from Wave 1 of the ITC Zambia Survey (2012) were analysed for current smokers of factory-made (FM) cigarettes compared with those who smoked both FM and roll-your-own (RYO) cigarettes, using multivariate logistic regression models to identify the predictors of brand loyalty and reasons for brand choice. 75% of FM-only smokers and 64% of FM+RYO smokers reported having a regular brand. Compared with FM-only smokers, FM+RYO smokers were, on average, older (28% vs 20% ≥40 years), low income (64% vs 43%) and had lower education (76% vs 44% 1 year) if they were aged 15-17 years (vs 40-54 years) and if they had moderate (vs low) income. Brand choice was predicted mostly by friends, taste and brand popularity. Price was more likely to be a reason for brand loyalty among FM+RYO smokers, among ≥55-year-old smokers and among those who reported being more addicted to cigarettes. These results in Zambia document the high levels of brand loyalty in a market where price variation is fairly small across cigarette brands. Future research is needed on longitudinal trends to evaluate the effect of tobacco control policies in Zambia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Loke, Mun Fai; Ong, Bee Lee; Wong, Yan Ling; Hong, Kar Wai; Tan, Kian Hin; Kaur, Sargit; Ng, Hien Fuh; Abdul Razak, Mfa; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation. Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Biolog Phenotype Microarray analysis, protein profiling with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, repetitive sequence-based PCR typing and whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenomic analyses. Results. The isolates were shown to be possibly novel slow-growing schotochromogens with highly similar biological and genotypic characteristics. Both strains have a genome size of 5.2 Mbp, G+C content of 68.8%, one rRNA operon and 52 tRNAs each. They qualified for classification into the same species with their average nucleotide identity of 99.98% and tetranucleotide correlation coefficient of 0.99999. At the subspecies level, both strains showed 98.8% band similarity in the Diversilab automated repetitive sequence-based PCR typing system, 96.2% similarity in protein profiles obtained by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and a genomic distance that is close to zero in the phylogenomic tree constructed with conserved orthologs. Detailed epidemiological tracking revealed that the elephants shared a common habitat eight years apart, thus, strengthening the possibility of a clonal relationship between the two strains.

  4. Pulmonary infections caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria−single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić-Vukičević Tatjana N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria are environmental organisms found in soil and water worldwide, and an infection caused by non-tuberculosis mycobacteria is less frequently found than the one associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study was designed to evaluate data relating to non-tuberculosis mycobacteria in patients with clinical importance. Material and Methods. Of 12 patients (pts admitted to the Department of Pulmonology, Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade during 2010- 2011, seven (58.33% were men and five (41.67% were women. Bacteriological and radiographic findings, co−morbidity, treatment management and outcome were evaluated from medical records. Results. Using GenoType® Mycobacterium CM/AS (Hain Lifescience assays for identification of isolated cultures of NTM M.xenopi was found in six (50% pts, M.avium complex in two (16.67% pts, M.kansasii and M.xenopi in one (8.33%, M. gordone, M.abscessus and M.peregrinum in one (8.33% patient each. Cavitary lesions were most frequently determined on high resolution computed tomography in five (41.67% pts, followed with consolidation in two (16.67% pts, cavitation with fibronodular lesions and bronchiectasis in one (8.33% patient each. Comorbidities were noticed in nine (75% pts, with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases most frequently found in six (50% pts. According to American Thoracic Society definition and criteria, treatment was administered in nine (75% pts. Conclusion. In order to find the right treatment, it is important to identify non-tuberculosis mycobacteria lung infection by culture methods, at least two positive, accompanied with high resolution computed tomography changes.

  5. Increased Lytic Efficiency of Bovine Macrophages Trained with Killed Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Ramon A.; Alonso-Hearn, Marta; Garrido, Joseba M.; Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker A.; Gortazar, Christian; de la Fuente, José; Dominguez, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is evolutionarily conserved in multicellular organisms and was considered to lack memory until very recently. One of its more characteristic mechanisms is phagocytosis, the ability of cells to engulf, process and eventually destroy any injuring agent. We report the results of an ex vivo experiment in bovine macrophages in which improved clearance of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) was induced by pre-exposure to a heat killed M. bovis preparation. The effects were independent of humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses and lasted up to six months. Specifically, our results demonstrate the existence of a training effect in the lytic phase of phagocytosis that can be activated by killed mycobacteria, thus suggesting a new mechanism of vaccine protection. These findings are compatible with the recently proposed concept of trained immunity, which was developed to explain the observation that innate immune responses provide unspecific protection against pathogens including other than those that originally triggered the immune response. PMID:27820836

  6. Epidemiology of injuries, outcomes, and hospital resource utilisation at a tertiary teaching hospital in Lusaka, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Seidenberg

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Limited dataset trauma registries can capture important epidemiologic data that can characterise injury care, identify patterns of injury, and inform hospital-based intervention strategies in Zambia.

  7. Dual Analysis for Mycobacteria and Propionibacteria in Sarcoidosis BAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald-Richter, Kyra A.; Beachboard, Dia C.; Seeley, Erin H.; Abraham, Susamma; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Culver, Daniel A.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Drake, Wonder P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sarcoidosis is a non-caseating granulomatous disease for which a role for infectious antigens continues to strengthen. Recent studies have reported molecular evidence of mycobacteria or propionibacteria. We assessed for immune responses against mycobacterial and propionibacterial antigens in sarcoidosis bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) using flow cytometry, and localized signals consistent with microbial antigens with sarcoidosis specimens, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS). Methods BAL cells from 27 sarcoidosis, 14 PPD- controls, and 9 subjects with nontuberculosis mycobacterial (NTM) infections were analyzed for production of IFN-γ after stimulation with mycobacterial ESAT-6 and Propionibacterium acnes proteins. To complement the immunological data, MALDI-IMS was performed to localize ESAT-6 and Propionibacterium acnes signals within sarcoidosis and control specimens. Results CD4+ immunologic analysis for mycobacteria was positive in 17/27 sarcoidosis subjects, compared to 2/14 PPD-subjects, and 5/9 NTM subjects (p=00.008 and p=00.71 respectively, Fisher's exact test). There was no significant difference for recognition of P. acnes, which occurred only in sarcoidosis subjects that also recognized ESAT-6. Similar results were also observed for the CD8+ immunologic analysis. MALDI-IMS localized signals consistent with ESAT-6 only within sites of granulomatous inflammation, whereas P. acnes signals were distributed throughout the specimen. Conclusions MALDI-IMS localizes signals consistent with ESAT-6 to sarcoidosis granulomas, whereas no specific localization of P. acnes signals is detected. Immune responses against both mycobacterial and P. acnes are present within sarcoidosis BAL, but only mycobacterial signals are distinct from disease controls. These immunologic and molecular investigations support further investigation of the microbial community within sarcoidosis granulomas. PMID:22552860

  8. ESX-1-mediated translocation to the cytosol controls virulence of mycobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, D.; Demangel, C.; Ingen, van J.; Perez, J.; Baldeon, L.; Abdallah, A.M.; Caleechurn, L.; Bottal, D.; Zon, van M.; Punder, de K.; Laan, van der T.; Kant, A.; Willemsen, P.; Bitter, W.; Soolingen, D.; Brosch, R.; Wel, van der N.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, are among the most potent human bacterial pathogens. The discovery of cytosolic mycobacteria challenged the paradigm that these pathogens exclusively localize within the phagosome of host cells. As yet the biologic

  9. ESX-1-mediated translocation to the cytosol controls virulence of mycobacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, D.; Demangel, C.; Ingen, J. van; Perez, J.; Baldeon, L.; Abdallah, A.M.; Caleechurn, L.; Bottai, D.; Zon, M. van; Punder, K. de; Laan, T. van der; Kant, A.; Bossers-de Vries, R.; Willemsen, P.; Bitter, W.; Soolingen, D. van; Brosch, R.; Wel, N. van der; Peters, P.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, are among the most potent human bacterial pathogens. The discovery of cytosolic mycobacteria challenged the paradigm that these pathogens exclusively localize within the phagosome of host cells. As yet the biologic

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Drug-Resistant Mycobacteria: Co-Evolution of Copper and INH Resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Yuling; Yang, Fan; Sun, Zhongyuan; Wang, Qingtao; Mi, Kaixia; Deng, Haiteng

    2015-01-01

    .... To better understand the resistance mechanisms of mycobacteria to copper, we generated a copper-resistant strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, mc2155-Cu from the selection of copper sulfate treated-bacteria...

  11. Comparison of filtering methods, filter processing and DNA extraction kits for detection of mycobacteria in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kaevska

    2015-09-01

    The described protocol for filter elution is recommended, and the use of the PowerWater DNA isolation kit for the highest mycobacterial DNA yield from water samples. The described protocol is suitable for parallel detection of mycobacteria using cultivation.

  12. Isolation of rapid growing mycobacteria from soil and water in Iran

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... temperature and contents of Ca and K ions in soil are important (Livanainen et ... Kamala T, Paramasivan CN, Herbert D, Venkatesan P, Prabhakar R. (1994a). ... Mycobacteria in boreal coniferous forest soil. FEMS Microbiol.

  13. Democracy in Reverse: The 2016 General Election in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Goldring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On 11 August 2016, Zambia held elections for the presidency, National Assembly, local councillors, and mayors. Concurrently, a referendum was held on whether to enhance the Bill of Rights in the Constitution of Zambia. The elections were significant for several reasons: It was the first contest under a newly amended Constitution, which introduced important changes to the electoral framework. It also marked a break with Zambia’s positive historical record of arranging generally peaceful elections. Moreover, the election featured an electoral playing field that was notably tilted in favour of the incumbent party. Ultimately, the incumbent president, Edgar Lungu of the Patriotic Front, edged out opposition challenger Hakainde Hichilema of the United Party for National Development. The election was controversial and the opposition mounted an unsuccessful legal challenge to the final results. The 2016 elections represent a reversal in the quality of Zambian democracy and raise questions about the country’s prospects for democratic consolidation.

  14. The Role of Open and Distance Learning in the Implementation of the Right to Education in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaciwena, Richard; Lubinda, Foster

    2008-01-01

    As a member of the United Nations, Zambia is committed to the observance of human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948. This is evidenced, among others, by the fact that Zambia is a signatory to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child. Zambia has a…

  15. The Urgent Need to Train Teachers for Multigrade Pedagogy in African Schooling Contexts: Lessons from Uganda and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivunja, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Our research project funded by the British Council on multigrade teaching capacity building in Uganda and Zambia found that Uganda does not have a single higher education institution training teachers in multigrade pedagogy and Zambia has only one located at Serenje village in rural Zambia. Yet the research found that in both countries many…

  16. HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth C Kapembwa; GOLDMAN, Jason D.; Shabir Lakhi; Yolan Banda; Kasonde Bowa; Vermund, Sten H.; Joseph Mulenga; David Chama; Chi, Benjamin H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives : Epidemiologic data of HIV and viral hepatitis coinfection are needed in sub-Saharan Africa to guide health policy for hepatitis screening and optimized antiretroviral therapy (ART). Materials and Methods: We screened 323 HIV-infected, ART-eligible adults for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis C antibody (HCV Ab) at a tertiary hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. We collected basic demographic, medical, and laboratory data to determine predictors for coinfection. Results: Of...

  17. Tuberculosis Infection in Zambia: The Association with Relative Wealth

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the association between household socioeconomic position and tuberculosis (TB) infection in two communities of Zambia. For this purpose we implemented a cross-sectional investigation, nested within a larger case control study. Infection was assessed using Quantiferon-TB Gold. A socioeconomic position index was constructed through principal component analysis combining data on human resources, food availability, housing quality, and access to services and infrastruct...

  18. A Brief History of Kafue National Park, Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.K. Mwima

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first documentation of the history of Zambia's oldest and largest national park: Kafue National Park. The movement of people out of the park is systematically presented. Furthermore, access and resource use and exploitation rights granted to people who lived inside the park are summarised. The paper looks at park administration, wildlife management, tourism and briefly presents areas for future studies.

  19. CPPCC Vice Chairman Abdul’ ahat Abdulrixit Visits Zambia and Namibia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>Zambia and Namibia are two African countries that have traditionally been strongly supported by China in their efforts for sustained development,and to further promote ties,Abdul’ahat Abdulrixit,Vice Chairman of the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference and President of the Chinese-African People’s Friendship Association (CAPFA),led a CAPFA delegation to visit the two countries from April 14 to 20.

  20. Quaternary fossil fauna from the Luangwa Valley, Zambia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, LC; Barham, LS; Ditchfield, P.; Elton, S; Harcourt-Smith, WH; Dawkins, P

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a large collection of Quaternary fossil fauna from the Luangwa rift valley, Zambia. Stone Age artefacts have been recovered from stratified fluvial contexts, but no in situ fossil fauna have yet been recovered. We report on 500 fossil specimens collected from the surface of point bars exposed seasonally along the banks of the main Luangwa river channel. We used non-destructive x-ray fluorescence analysis of the fossils' chemical signatures to determine whether they derive...

  1. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation.Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Biolog Phenotype Microarray analysis, protein profiling with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, repetitive sequence-based PCR typing and whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenomic analyses.Results. The isolates were shown to be possibly novel slow-growing schotochromogens with highly similar biological and genotypic characteristics. Both strains have a genome size of 5.2 Mbp, G+C content of 68.8%, one rRNA operon and 52 tRNAs each. They qualified for classification into the same species with their average nucleotide identity of 99.98% and tetranucleotide correlation coefficient of 0.99999. At the subspecies level, both strains showed 98.8% band similarity in the Diversilab automated repetitive sequence-based PCR typing system, 96.2% similarity in protein profiles obtained by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and a genomic distance that is close to zero in the phylogenomic tree constructed with conserved orthologs. Detailed epidemiological tracking revealed that the elephants shared a common habitat eight years apart, thus, strengthening the possibility of a clonal relationship between the two strains.

  2. Review of the malaria epidemiology and trends in Zambia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Freddie Masaninga; Mac Otten; Ibrahima Soce Fall; Olusegun Babaniyi; Emmanuel Chanda; Pascalina Chanda-Kapata; Busiku Hamainza; Hieronymo T Masendu; Mulakwa Kamuliwo; Wambinji Kapelwa; John Chimumbwa; John Govere

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive desk review of malaria trends was conducted between 2000-2010 in Zambia to study malaria epidemiology and trends to guide strategies and approaches for effective malaria control. This review considered data from the National Health Information Management System, Malaria Surveys and Programme Review reports and analyzed malaria in-patient cases and deaths in relation to intervention coverage for all ages. Data showed three distinct epidemiological strata after a notable malaria reduction (66%) in in-patient cases and deaths, particularly between 2000-2008. These changes occurred following the (re-)introduction and expansion of indoor residual spraying up to 90%coverage, scale-up of coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets in household from 50%to 70%, and artemisin-based combination therapy nationwide. However, malaria cases and deaths re-surged, increasing in 2009-2010 in the northern-eastern parts of Zambia. Delays in the disbursement of funds affected the implementation of interventions, which resulted in resurgence of cases and deaths. In spite of a decline in malaria disease burden over the past decade in Zambia, a reversal in impact is notable in the year 2009-2010, signifying that control gains are fragile and must be sustained toeliminate malaria.

  3. Integrating active tuberculosis case finding in antenatal services in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheya, N; Luhanga, D; Harris, J B; Morse, J; Kapata, N; Bweupe, M; Henostroza, G; Reid, S E

    2014-12-01

    Three out-patient antenatal care (ANC) clinics in Lusaka, Zambia. To estimate tuberculosis (TB) prevalence in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and symptomatic, non-HIV-infected pregnant women and explore the feasibility of routine TB screening in ANC settings. Peer educators administered TB symptom questionnaires to pregnant women attending their first ANC clinic visit. Presumptive TB patients were defined as all HIV-infected women and symptomatic non-HIV-infected women. Sputum samples were tested using smear microscopy and culture to estimate TB prevalence. All 5033 (100%) women invited to participate in the study agreed, and 17% reported one or more TB symptoms. Among 1152 presumed TB patients, 17 (1.5%) had previously undiagnosed culture-confirmed TB; 2 (12%) were smear-positive. Stratified by HIV status, TB prevalence was 10/664 (1.5%, 95%CI 0. 7-2.8) among HIV-infected women and 7/488 (1.4%, 95%CI 0.6-2.9) among symptomatic non-HIV-infected women. In HIV-infected women, the only symptom significantly associated with TB was productive cough; symptom screening was only 50% sensitive. There is a sizable burden of TB in pregnant women in Zambia, which may lead to adverse maternal and infant outcomes. TB screening in ANC settings in Zambia is acceptable and feasible. More sensitive diagnostics are needed.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of infectious bursal disease virus in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Kasanga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide sequences of the VP2 hypervariable region (VP2-HVR of 10 infectious bursal disease viruses detected in indigenous and exotic chickens in Zambia from 2004 to 2005 were determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the viruses diverged into two genotypes and belonged to the African very virulent types (VV1 and VV2. In the phylogenetic tree, strains in one genotype clustered in a distinct group and were closely related to some strains isolated in western Africa (VV1, with nucleotide similarities of 95.7%– 96.5%. Strains in the other genotype were clustered within the eastern African VV type (VV2, with nucleotide similarities of 97.3%– 98.5%. Both genotypes were distributed in the southern parts of Zambia and had a unique conserved amino acid substitution at 300 (E→A in addition to the putative virulence marker at positions 222(A, 242(I, 256(I, 294(I and 299(S. These findings represent the first documentation of the existence of the African VV-IBDV variants in both indigenous and exotic chickens in Zambia.

  5. Review of the malaria epidemiology and trends in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie Masaninga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive desk review of malaria trends was conducted between 2000–2010 in Zambia to study malaria epidemiology and trends to guide strategies and approaches for effective malaria control. This review considered data from the National Health Information Management System, Malaria Surveys and Programme Review reports and analyzed malaria in-patient cases and deaths in relation to intervention coverage for all ages. Data showed three distinct epidemiological strata after a notable malaria reduction (66% in in-patient cases and deaths, particularly between 2000–2008. These changes occurred following the (re-introduction and expansion of indoor residual spraying up to 90% coverage, scale-up of coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets in household from 50% to 70%, and artemisin-based combination therapy nationwide. However, malaria cases and deaths re-surged, increasing in 2009–2010 in the northern-eastern parts of Zambia. Delays in the disbursement of funds affected the implementation of interventions, which resulted in resurgence of cases and deaths. In spite of a decline in malaria disease burden over the past decade in Zambia, a reversal in impact is notable in the year 2009–2010, signifying that control gains are fragile and must be sustained toeliminate malaria.

  6. 77 FR 48498 - Executive-Led Trade Mission to South Africa and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... with the ] Republic of Zambia aimed at reducing poverty through economic growth (the ``Compact''). The... percent of the world's emeralds.'', add the following text: Water The Government of Zambia has entered... agency that works to reduce poverty through economic growth. The Compact will address one of...

  7. Personal and Environmental Predictors of the Intention to Use Maternal Healthcare Services in Kalomo, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sialubanje, Cephas; Massar, Karlijn; Hamer, Davidson H.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Low maternal healthcare service utilization contributes to poor maternal and new born health outcomes in rural Zambia. The purpose of this study was to identify important factors influencing women's intention to use these services in Kalomo, Zambia. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from 1007 women of reproductive…

  8. Labour migration and the generation conflict : an essay on social change in Central Western Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, W.M.J.

    1975-01-01

    Abridged abstract: Antagonism between older and younger men constitutes a striking feature of a rural community in post-independent Zambia. In the local political processes surrounding the 1973 Zambia general elections, a small group of young men organised themselves within a framework suggested by

  9. Bismarck in the Bush: Year 12 Write Zambia's History for Zambian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Peter Gray explains how his Year 12 students came to research and write a resource on the history of Zambia, for history teachers "in" Zambia. The construction of the resource stretched the Year 12 students in new ways: the Internet was useless and there were no easy digests in A-Level textbooks to get them started. They would have to read whole…

  10. Bismarck in the Bush: Year 12 Write Zambia's History for Zambian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Peter Gray explains how his Year 12 students came to research and write a resource on the history of Zambia, for history teachers "in" Zambia. The construction of the resource stretched the Year 12 students in new ways: the Internet was useless and there were no easy digests in A-Level textbooks to get them started. They would have to…

  11. Personal and Environmental Predictors of the Intention to Use Maternal Healthcare Services in Kalomo, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sialubanje, Cephas; Massar, Karlijn; Hamer, Davidson H.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Low maternal healthcare service utilization contributes to poor maternal and new born health outcomes in rural Zambia. The purpose of this study was to identify important factors influencing women's intention to use these services in Kalomo, Zambia. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from 1007 women of reproductive…

  12. 77 FR 60966 - Executive-Led Trade Mission to South Africa and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... published at 77 FR 31574, May 29, 2012, regarding the Executive- Led Trade Mission to South Africa and Zambia scheduled for November 26- 30, 2012, to revise the dates of the application deadline from October... International Trade Administration Executive-Led Trade Mission to South Africa and Zambia AGENCY:...

  13. Personal and Environmental Predictors of the Intention to Use Maternal Healthcare Services in Kalomo, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sialubanje, Cephas; Massar, Karlijn; Hamer, Davidson H.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Low maternal healthcare service utilization contributes to poor maternal and new born health outcomes in rural Zambia. The purpose of this study was to identify important factors influencing women's intention to use these services in Kalomo, Zambia. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from 1007 women of…

  14. Why Context Matters: Understanding the Material Conditions of School-Based Caring in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Monisha

    2009-01-01

    This study utilized in-depth interviewing, participant observation, and student diaries completed by participants to examine the quality of teacher-student relationships at a low-cost private school in the townships of Ndola, Zambia. Amidst economic decline and the HIV/AIDS epidemic facing Zambia today, teachers and students developed strong…

  15. Child Abuse and Aids-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior among Adolescents in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Mukuka, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To research the correlation between physical and sexual abuse by family members and AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and behavior among urban and rural adolescents in Zambia. Sample: The sample comprises 3,360 adolescents, aged 10-19, from urban and rural Zambia; 2,160 of them attended school, while 1,200 of them did…

  16. Strategies for Living with the Challenges of HIV and Antiretroviral Use in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah; Zulu, Isaac; Mumbi, Miriam; Chitalu, Ndashi; Vamos, Szonja; Gomez, Jacqueline; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to identify strategies for living with the challenges of HIV and antiretroviral (ARV) use among new medication users in urban Zambia. Participants (n = 160) were recruited from urban Lusaka, Zambia. Qualitative Data was drawn from monthly ARV treatment education intervention groups addressing HIV and antiretroviral use. Themes…

  17. Explorations in the history and sociology of territorial cults in Zambia (1500-1950 CE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Binsbergen, van W.M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Aim of this volume, which brings together seven studies of religious change in Zambia, is to describe the processes of religious change in this country during the last few centuries. These studies are: 1) Towards a theory of religious change in Central Africa. 2) Possession and mediumship in Zambia:

  18. Non-tuberculous mycobacterial soft tissue swelling in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra S Athavale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM include those mycobacterium species that are not members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. They assumed significance with the growing pandemic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS since the 1980s, when Mycobacterium avium infections were found to be associated with AIDS. However, the epidemiology of NTM disease among patients without Human immunodeficiency virus infections is not well documented. We report a case of NTM soft tissue swelling in an immunocompetent 18-year-old male who responded well to local excision and antitubercular treatment.

  19. Nonprotein Structures from Mycobacteria: Emerging Actors for Tuberculosis Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz M. Lopez-Marin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal agent of tuberculosis, is critical for protection. For many decades, consistent to classical biochemistry, most studies regarding immunity to the tubercle bacilli focused mainly on protein structures. But the atypical, highly impermeable and waxy coat of mycobacteria captured the interest of structural biologists very early, allowing the description of amazing molecules, such as previously unknown carbohydrates or fatty acids of astonishing lengths. From their discovery, cell wall components were identified as important structural pillars, but also as molecular motifs able to alter the human immune response. Recently, as new developments have emerged, classical conceptions of mycobacterial immune modulators have been giving place to unexpected discoveries that, at the turn of the last century, completely changed our perception of immunity vis-à-vis fat compounds. In this paper, current knowledge about chemical and ultrastructural features of mycobacterial cell-wall is overviewed, with an emphasis on the relationships between cell-wall nonpeptide molecules and immune response. Remarks regarding the potential of these molecules for the development of new tools against tuberculosis are finally discussed.

  20. Transformation of the Antibacterial Agent Norfloxacin by Environmental Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Michael D.; Heinze, Thomas M.; Deck, Joanna; Freeman, James P.; Williams, Anna J.; Sutherland, John B.

    2006-01-01

    Because fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents may be released into the environment, the potential for environmental bacteria to biotransform these drugs was investigated. Eight Mycobacterium sp. cultures in a sorbitol-yeast extract medium were dosed with 100 μg ml−1 of norfloxacin and incubated for 7 days. The MICs of norfloxacin for these strains, tested by an agar dilution method, were 1.6 to 25 μg ml−1. Cultures were extracted with ethyl acetate, and potential metabolites in the extracts were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The metabolites were identified using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. N-Acetylnorfloxacin (5 to 50% of the total absorbance at 280 nm) was produced by the eight Mycobacterium strains. N-Nitrosonorfloxacin (5 to 30% of the total absorbance) was also produced by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR100 and Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK. The MICs of N-nitrosonorfloxacin and N-acetylnorfloxacin were 2- to 38- and 4- to 1,000-fold higher, respectively, than those of norfloxacin for several different bacteria, including the two strains that produced both metabolites. Although N-nitrosonorfloxacin had less antibacterial activity, nitrosamines are potentially carcinogenic. The biotransformation of fluoroquinolones by mycobacteria may serve as a resistance mechanism. PMID:16957195

  1. Application of infrequent-restriction-site amplification for genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Tae Yeal; Kang, Jung Oak

    2002-01-01

    Infrequent restriction site amplification (IRS-PCR) is a method of amplifying DNA sequences, which flank an infrequent restriction site, and produces a strain-specific electrophoretic pattern. We studied the use of IRS-PCR to characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobactria (NTM). One-hundred and sixteen M. tuberculosis and nine NTM isolated at Hanyang University Hospital in Seoul, Korea were used in this study. IRS-PCR using AH1 and PX-G primers produced unique pattern...

  2. Increased Economic Relations Between China and Zambia in the Last Decade: Implications on Zambia’s Existing Bilateral Relations with the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    Committee on Human Rights Studies by Mr. Micheal Chilufya Sata in 2007, prior to his becoming the President of Zambia. The paper highlighted...continent. In his paper, Sata stated that China’s recent march into Africa was in search of natural resources, especially oil, timber and base metals to...especially in the 48 African countries that have diplomatic ties with China.60 Sata argued that the increased China and Zambia relations had negative

  3. Mycobacterium gilvum illustrates size-correlated relationships between mycobacteria and Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-03-01

    Mycobacteria are isolated from soil and water environments, where free-living amoebae live. Free-living amoebae are bactericidal, yet some rapidly growing mycobacteria are amoeba-resistant organisms that survive in the amoebal trophozoites and cysts. Such a capacity has not been studied for the environmental rapidly growing organism Mycobacterium gilvum. We investigated the ability of M. gilvum to survive in the trophozoites of Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain Linc-AP1 by using optical and electron microscopy and culture-based microbial enumerations in the presence of negative controls. We observed that 29% of A. polyphaga cells were infected by M. gilvum mycobacteria by 6 h postinfection. Surviving M. gilvum mycobacteria did not multiply and did not kill the amoebal trophozoites during a 5-day coculture. Extensive electron microscopy observations indicated that M. gilvum measured 1.4 ± 0.5 μm and failed to find M. gilvum organisms in the amoebal cysts. Further experimental study of two other rapidly growing mycobacteria, Mycobacterium rhodesiae and Mycobacterium thermoresistibile, indicated that both measured 2 μm (P < 0.05). The mechanisms underlying such an observation remain to be determined.

  4. [Identification of mycobacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry--using reference strains and clinical isolates of Mycobacterium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsuma, Katsunao; Saito, Miwako; Koshiba, Shizuko; Kaneko, Michiyo

    2014-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) method is being played an important role for the inspection of clinical microorganism as a rapid and the price reduction. Mass spectra obtained by measuring become points of identification whether the peak pattern match any species mass spectral pattern. We currently use MALDI-TOF MS for rapid and accurate diagnosis of inactivated reference and clinical isolates of Mycobacterium because of the improved pretreatment techniques compared with former inspection methods that pose a higher risk of infection to the operator. The identification matching rate of score value (SV) peak pattern spectra was compared with that of conventional methods such as strain diffusion/amplification. Also, cultures were examined after a fixed number of days. Compared with the initial inspection technique, the pretreatment stage of current MALDI-TOF MS inspection techniques can improve the analysis of inactivated acid-fast bacteria that are often used as inspection criteria strains of clinical isolates. Next, we compared the concordance rate for identification between MALDI-TOF MS and conventional methods such as diffusion/amplification by comparison of peak pattern spectra and evaluated SV spectra to identify differences in the culture media after the retention period. In examination of 158 strains of clinical isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), the identification coincidence rate in the genus level in a matching pattern was 99.4%, when the species level was included 94.9%. About 37 strains of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), the identification coincidence rate in the genus level was 94.6%. M. bovis BCG (Tokyo strain) in the reference strain was judged by the matching pattern to be MTC, and it suggested that they are M. tuberculosis and affinity species with high DNA homology. Nontuberculous mycobacterial M. gordonae strain JATA 33-01 shared peak pattern spectra, excluding the

  5. Intracellular lipophilic inclusions of mycobacteria in vitro and in sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, Natalie J; Christensen, Henriette; Minnikin, David E; Adegbola, Richard A; Barer, Michael R

    2002-10-01

    Although most mycobacterial lipids are thought to be associated with the cell envelope, the authors previously observed substantial deposits of intracellular lipophilic material. A Nile-red-based cytological assay was used to determine factors which affect the presence and natural history of intracellular lipophilic inclusions (ILIs) in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Development of ILIs was associated with stationary-phase cultures in broth and with aged (6 days) colonies on agar. Using variants of Youmans' defined medium, the frequency and size of ILIs was observed to be minimal in carbon-poor medium. ILIs were observed to form within 15 min after provision of fatty acids to the medium and after a period of several days in nitrogen-poor medium. Analysis of the non-polar lipid extracts of ILI-rich and -poor preparations indicated that the triacylglycerols (TAGs) were a major component of the inclusions. The acyl substituents of the TAGs varied according to whether they were formed in Middlebrook 7H9 broth, in low-nitrogen Youmans' broth or rapidly after oleic acid supplementation of Youmans' broth. These studies support a storage function for TAGs in mycobacteria in addition to their previously suggested occurrence as components of the cell envelope. To assess a possible role for ILIs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a combined acid-fast (Auramine)/Nile red assay was applied to heavily positive sputum samples from patients with tuberculosis. Strong intracellular Nile red signals were obtained from acid-fast cells, indicating that ILI occur in M. tuberculosis in vivo. This may reflect a distinct physiological state of these cells, which it has not been possible to reproduce in vitro. These findings indicate that the uptake of long-chain fatty acids and TAG biosynthetic and degradative pathways are important aspects of mycobacterial lipid metabolism, meriting further investigation.

  6. Prevalence of Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Mycobacteria growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livani S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Identification and monitoring ofmultidrugresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains (MDR ishighlighted by the high risk of their spreading in different areas.Prevalence of these strains was evaluated in Golestan province innortheast of Iran.Material and Methods: Drug susceptibility testing to Isoniazid andrifampin was carried out for 148 clinical samples that had grown inMycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT system, according to themanufacturer's instructions (Becton-Dickinson, USA. The associationof drug resistance frequency with demographic characteristics andgrowth time were investigated. The appropriate statistical tests, X2 andstudent Ttest were performed for comparison of these variants. A pvalue>0.05 was considered significant in all cases.Results: The turnaround time required for growth of Mycobacteriumtuberculosis in MGIT system was between 2 to 55 days (mean16.3±10.4 days. Of all samples studied, 17.6% and 3.4% wereresistant to Isoniazid and rifampin, respectively, and 3.4% (5 sampleswere MDR (CI 95%; 1- 6%. The turnaround time required fordetermining MDR cases was 9.6 days. No statistically significantassociation was found between the resistance to the drugs and none ofthe factors including sex, age, type of clinical sample, and positivity ofthe smear.Conclusion: The prevalence of MDR in the studied region wasdetermined to be 3.4% which is similar to the country-wideevaluations. The turnaround time for Mycobacterium growth and antidrug susceptibility result can be shortened by MGIT method.Key words: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium GrowthIndicator Tube, Multidrug Resistant

  7. Identification of apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase (Lnt) in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschumi, Andreas; Nai, Corrado; Auchli, Yolanda; Hunziker, Peter; Gehrig, Peter; Keller, Peter; Grau, Thomas; Sander, Peter

    2009-10-02

    Lipoproteins of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria carry a thioether-bound diacylglycerol but differ by a fatty acid amide bound to the alpha-amino group of the universally conserved cysteine. In Escherichia coli the N-terminal acylation is catalyzed by the N-acyltransferase Lnt. Using E. coli Lnt as a query in a BLASTp search, we identified putative lnt genes also in Gram-positive mycobacteria. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LppX, heterologously expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis, was N-acylated at the N-terminal cysteine, whereas LppX expressed in a M. smegmatis lnt::aph knock-out mutant was accessible for N-terminal sequencing. Western blot analyses of a truncated and tagged form of LppX indicated a smaller size of about 0.3 kDa in the lnt::aph mutant compared with the parental strain. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight analyses of a trypsin digest of LppX proved the presence of the diacylglycerol modification in both strains, the parental strain and lnt::aph mutant. N-Acylation was found exclusively in the M. smegmatis parental strain. Complementation of the lnt::aph mutant with M. tuberculosis ppm1 restored N-acylation. The substrate for N-acylation is a C16 fatty acid, whereas the two fatty acids of the diacylglycerol residue were identified as C16 and C19:0 fatty acid, the latter most likely tuberculostearic acid. We demonstrate that mycobacterial lipoproteins are triacylated. For the first time to our knowledge, we identify Lnt activity in Gram-positive bacteria and assigned the responsible genes. In M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis the open reading frames are annotated as MSMEG_3860 and M. tuberculosis ppm1, respectively.

  8. Nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris; Snell, David

    2016-11-10

    Critical illness in the developing world is a substantial burden for individuals, families, communities and healthcare services. The management of these patients will depend on the resources available. Simple conditions such as a fractured leg or a strangulated hernia can have devastating effects on individuals, families and communities. The recent Lancet Commission on Global Surgery and the World Health Organization promise to strengthen emergency and essential care will increase the focus on surgical services within the developing world. This article provides an overview of nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia, a lower middle income country (LMIC) in sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. Child Labour or School Attendance? Evidence from Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    1996-01-01

    effects in a logit model. The empirical analysis suggests that both economic and sociological variables are important determinants for the choice between school attendance and child labour. In particular, we find some support for the hypothesis that poverty forces households to keep their children away......In this paper, we investigate what affects school attendance and child labour in an LDC, using data for Zambia. Since the data come from a household survey with information on all household members, it allows us to take account of unobserved household effects by introducing household specific...

  10. Perinatal transmission of HIV-I in Zambia.

    OpenAIRE

    Hira, S K; Kamanga, J.; Bhat, G J; Mwale, C; Tembo, G.; Luo, N; Perine, P L

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the occurrence of vertical transmission of HIV-I from women positive for the virus and the prognosis for their babies. DESIGN--Women presenting in labour were tested for HIV-I. Their newborn babies were also tested. Women positive for the virus were followed up with their babies for two years. SETTING--Teaching hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. SUBJECTS--1954 Women, of whom 227 were seropositive. Of 205 babies, 192 were positive for HIV-I. After birth 109 seropositive mother...

  11. Filarial infections in domestic dogs in Lusaka, Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwila, Joyce; Mwase, Enala T.; Nejsum, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Filariae are common parasites of dogs in many parts of the world, but little is known about the status of these infections in sub-Saharan Africa. A study was carried out to determine the occurrence and species of filariae among 272 dogs in Lusaka, Zambia. Giemsa stained blood smear and Knott...... not identified in any of the dogs and the status of this infection remains unclear. Further studies are needed to explore the occurrence of filariae in Zambian dogs and the zoonotic potential for humans....

  12. Rapid differentiation between clinically relevant mycobacteria in microscopy positive clinical specimens and mycobacterial isolates by line probe assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Lundgren, Bettina H; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2002-01-01

    The Inno LiPA Mycobacteria assay, based on PCR amplification of the 16-23S rRNA spacer region of Mycobacterium species, has been designed for identification of mycobacteria grown in culture media and discrimination between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansas...

  13. T细胞斑点检测在鉴别结核分枝杆菌与非结核分枝杆菌感染中的价值%The value of T-SPOT for the differential diagnosis between tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈彦恒; 桂徐蔚; 沈芸; 沙巍

    2016-01-01

    目的:评价T细胞斑点检测(T cell spot test,T-SPOT)在鉴别结核分枝杆菌(mycobacterium tuberculosis,Mtb)与非结核分枝杆菌(nontuberculous mycobacteria,NTM)感染中的价值。方法选择本院2013年1月至2015年7月间住院并确诊为分枝杆菌感染的177例患者,在这177例患者中,有106例患者明确为结核分枝杆菌感染,其中82例为痰培养明确(其中有1例胸水同时培养明确),17例为灌洗液培养明确,3例胸水培养明确,1例心包积液培养明确,1例皮肤脓液培养明确,3例脑脊液培养明确;另71例患者则为本院或外院痰或支气管肺泡灌洗液培养明确为NTM感染。对所有研究对象外周血进行T-SPOT检测,分析检测结果。结果 Mtb患者的T-SPOT检测阳性率为96.23%(102/106);而NTM患者的T-SPOT检测阳性率为39.44%(28/71), T-SPOT检测鉴别Mtb与NTM感染的灵敏度为96.23%(102/106),特异度为60.56%(43/71),差异具有显著性(P<0.05)。结论 T-SPOT作为一种新的诊断技术,在鉴别诊断Mtb与NTM感染方面具有极高的灵敏度和较好的特异度,在临床诊断中具有较好的应用价值。%Objective To evaluate the value of T-SPOT for the differential diagnosis between tuberculosis and disease of non-tuberculosis mycobacteria.Method During January 2013 to July 2015,106 patients with culture-confirmed mycobacterium tuberculosis and 71 patients with culture-confirmed nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) were enrolled from Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital. For 106 tuberculosis cases, 82 cases were sputum culture positive 1 of which was both hydrothrax culture positive, 17 cases were bronchoalveolar lavage fluid culture positive, 1 case was hydrothorax culture positive, 1 case was hydropericardium culture positive, 1 case was shin fester culture positive, 3 cases were cerebrospinal fluid culture positive, and 71 were identified as non-tuberculosis mycobacteria

  14. [A case of disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteriosis during purpura associated with hypergammaglobulinemia and hepatitis type C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shiro; Miyauchi, Shunichi; Umekita, Kunihiko; Kusumoto, Norio; Takajo, Ichiro; Kuroki, Masayuki; Kai, Yasufumi; Nagatomo, Yasuhiro; Okayama, Akihiko

    2008-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman with hepatitis due to hepatitis C virus followed up using oral predonisolone (3 mg/day) for two years because of hypergammaglobulinemia-associated purpura reported fever and lumbago in February 2005. Upon admission in June, she was found in chest-computed tomography to have atelectasia in the right middle lung lobe and a nodule with a cavity in the right lower lobe. She tested positive for tuberculous glycolipid antibody. Gallium scintigraphy showed an abnormal accumulation in the lower lumbar vertebra. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal enhancement at L4, L5, and their intervertebral disc. Mycobacterium intracellulare (M. intracellulare) was detected in blood culture, bronchoalveolar lavage, and a biopsy specimen from the intervertebral disc, yielding a diagnosis of disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteriosis (NTM) due to M. intracellulare. She was treated with clarithromycin (CAM), ethambutol (EB), and rifampicin (RFP), but EB and RFP were discontinued due to of the fever they induced. She was then treated with a combination of CAM, levofloxacin, and streptomycin and followed up as an out patient. Based on case reports of disseminated NTM infection in Japan, the prognosis is poor and a protocol must be established for its treatment.

  15. High-resolution CT of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in adult CF patients: diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, Sinead; Lavelle, Lisa; Kilcoyne, Aoife; McCarthy, Colin; Dodd, Jonathan D. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); DeJong, Pim A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles G. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine and National Referral Centre for Adult Cystic Fibrosis, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-12-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for the detection of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection (NTM) in adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Twenty-seven CF patients with sputum-culture-proven NTM (NTM+) underwent HRCT. An age, gender and spirometrically matched group of 27 CF patients without NTM (NTM-) was included as controls. Images were randomly and blindly analysed by two readers in consensus and scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Significant differences were seen between NTM (+) and NTM (-) patients in the severity of the bronchiectasis subscore [45 % (1.8/4) vs. 35 % (1.4/4), P = 0.029], collapse/consolidation subscore [33 % (1.3/3) vs. 15 % (0.6/3)], tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules subscore [43 % (1.7/3) vs. 25 % (1.0/3), P = 0.002] and the total CT score [56 % (18.4/33) vs. 46 % (15.2/33), P = 0.002]. Binary logistic regression revealed BMI, peribronchial thickening, collapse/consolidation and tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules to be predictors of NTM status (R{sup 2} = 0.43). Receiver-operator curve analysis of the regression model showed an area under the curve of 0.89, P < 0.0001. In adults with CF, seven or more bronchopulmonary segments showing tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules on HRCT is highly suggestive of NTM colonisation. (orig.)

  16. Nutritional status and eating disorders: neglected risks factor for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Karina; Morera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTMLD) in immunocompetent patients is an increasingly important epidemiologic concern. However, risk factors associated with susceptibility to NTMLD are not completely known. A prevalence of NTMLD appears to be rising, mainly in some populations such as middle-aged or elderly thin women, (a group including those with Lady Windermere syndrome) with neither remarkable history of respiratory disease nor smoking habit. Right middle lobe (RML) and lingula are often involved. Various predisposing factors and genetic defects have been described as possible causes of development of NTMLD, namely: voluntary suppression of cough, RML anatomical factors, menopause and mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Malnutrition is also an important and common risk factor associated with other mycobacterial disease like tuberculosis (TB) and its probable association with NTMLD as have been pointed out for some authors. However, a real description of all nutritional aspects and eating habits of patients prior to NTMLD diagnosis is lacking. We hypothesized that malnutrition and eating disorders like anorexia nervosa could be risk factors that may promoting NTMLD. From a clinical viewpoint, if this hypothesis proves to be correct, eating habits and nutritional aspects should be taken into account in the diagnosis process of suspected NTMLD, since they are easily identifiable and treatable conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors Influencing Poverty Alleviation amongst Microfinance Adopting Households in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavhungu Abel Mafukata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the factors having the most influence on the alleviation of poverty amongst the households adopting microfinance in Zambia. Ninety nine (n=99 respondents were randomly and purposively selected from amongst 340 microfinance adopters of the so-called Micro Bankers Trust programme operating a microfinance business in the Makululu Compound of Kabwe, Zambia. Socio-demographic primary data were collected through face-to-face interviews based on a semi-structured questionnaire instrument. The data were entered into an excel spreadsheet for analysis. The descriptive data were thereafter exported and fitted to an empirical model. The descriptive results revealed that the majority of the respondents were married, unemployed, fairly educated younger women from larger-sized poor households who drew their household income mainly from microfinance activities. The majority of the respondents thought microfinance had improved their well-being in some crucial areas. The results of the empirical model found that some respondents were indeed alleviated from poverty through microfinance. Conclusion drawn in this paper is that microfinance does alleviate poverty of the poor.

  18. e-Government for Development Information Exchange (DIE): Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bwalya Kelvin

    In most parts of the world, political systems which utilize authoritative rule and mostly employ top-down decision-making processes are slowly transcending towards democratic norms. Information Technology Systems have been identified and adopted as one of the most efficient vehicles for appropriate, transparent and inclusive / participatory decision making. Zambia has shown a higher propensity to indigenous knowledge systems which are full of inefficiencies, a lot of red tape in public service delivery, and prone to corrupt practices. Despite that being the case, it is slowly trying to implement e-government. The adoption of e-government promises a sharp paradigm shift where public institutions will be more responsive and transparent, promote efficient PPP (Public Private Partnerships), and empower citizens by making knowledge and other resources more directly accessible. This paper examines three cases from Zambia where ICT in support of e-government has been implemented for Development Information Exchange (DIE) - knowledge-based decision making. The paper also assesses the challenges, opportunities, and issues together with e-government adoption criteria regarding successful encapsulation of e-government into the Zambian contextual environment. I propose a conceptual model which offers balanced e-government adoption criteria involving a combination of electronic and participatory services. This conceptual e-government adoption model can later be replicated to be used at the Southern African Development Community (SADC) level given the similarity in the contextual environment.

  19. Telemedicine in Primary Health: The Virtual Doctor Project Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustarde Paul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper is a commentary on a project application of telemedicine to alleviate primary health care problems in Lundazi district in the Eastern province of Zambia. The project dubbed 'The Virtual Doctor Project' will use hard body vehicles fitted with satellite communication devices and modern medical equipment to deliver primary health care services to some of the neediest areas of the country. The relevance and importance of the project lies in the fact that these areas are hard-to-reach due to rugged natural terrain and have very limited telecommunications infrastructure. The lack of these and other basic services makes it difficult for medical personnel to settle in these areas, which leads to an acute shortage of medical personnel. We comment on this problem and how it is addressed by 'The Virtual Doctor Project', emphasizing that while the telemedicine concept is not new in sub-Saharan Africa, the combination of mobility and connectivity to service a number of villages 'on the go' is an important variation in the shift back to the 1978 Alma Ata principles of the United Nations World Health Organization [WHO]. This overview of the Virtual Doctor Project in Zambia provides insight into both the potential for ICT, and the problems and limitations that any "real-world" articulation of this technology must confront.

  20. Bacteria Isolations from Broiler and Layer Chicks in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetron Mweemba Munang’andu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chick mortality (CM is one of the major constraints to the expansion of the poultry industry in Zambia. Of the 2,829 avian disease cases submitted to the national diagnostic laboratory based at the Central Veterinary Research Institute in Lusaka between 1995 and 2007, 34.39% (973/2,829 were from CM cases. The disease accounted for 40.2% (218,787/544,903 mortality in the affected flocks with 89.6% (196,112/218,787 of the affected birds dying within seven days. Major bacteria species involved were Escherichia coli, Salmonella gallinarum, and Proteus species being isolated from 84.58%, 46.15%, and 26.93% of the reported CM cases (n=973, respectively. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, and Salmonella dublin indicates that poultry has the potential of transmitting zoonotic pathogenic bacteria to humans. The proportion of Salmonella gallinarum reactors in the adult breeding stock was generally low (<0.5% throughout the study period although its prevalence in CM cases was correlated (r=0.68, P<0.011 with seroprevalence of the same pathogen in the adult breeding stock. Given that the disease accounts for a large proportion of the avian diseases in Zambia as shown in the present study (34.39%, n=2,829, it is imperative that an effective disease control strategy aimed at reducing its occurrence should be developed.

  1. Will savannas survive outside the parks? A lesson from Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsch, W.; Merbold, L.; Scholes, B.; Mukelabai, M.

    2012-04-01

    Miombo woodlands cover the transition zone between dry open savannas and moist forests in Southern Africa. They cover about 2.7 million km2 in southern Africa and provide many ecosystem services that support rural life, including medical products, wild foods, construction timber and fuel. In Zambia, as in many of its neighbouring countries, miombo woodlands are currently experiencing accelerating degradation and clearing, mostly with charcoal production as the initial driver. Domestic energy needs in the growing urban areas are largely satisfied by charcoal, which is less energy-efficient fuel on a tree-to-table basis than the firewood that is used in rural areas, but has a higher energy density and is thus cheaper to transport. This study uses data from inventories and from eddy covariance measurements of carbon exchange to characterize the impact of charcoal production on miombo woodlands. We address the following questions: (i) how much carbon is lost at local as well as at national scale and (ii) does forest degradation result in the loss of a carbon sink? On the basis of our data we (iii) estimate the per capita emissions through deforestation and forest degradation in Zambia and relate it to fossil fuel emissions. Furthermore, (iv) a rough estimate of the energy that is provided by charcoal production to private households at a national level is calculated and (v) options for alternative energy supply to private households are discussed.

  2. determinants of intra-industry trade between zambia and it's trading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eyerusalem

    IIT between Zambia and its trading partners in the SADC region and to identify .... preference for diversity but because of economies of scale, it is not profitable to ... Historically, Asia was the largest export market for Zambian commodities, ...

  3. Aspergillus section Flavi community structure in Zambia influences aflatoxin contamination of Maize and Groundnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are cancer-causing, immuno-suppressive mycotoxins that frequently contaminate important staples in Zambia including maize and groundnut. Several species within Aspergillus section Flavi have been implicated as causal agents of aflatoxin contamination in Africa. However, Aspergillus popula...

  4. The reach and impact of social marketing and reproductive health communication campaigns in Zambia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Rossem, Ronan; Meekers, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    .... To address reproductive health problems and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zambia, several social marketing and health communication programs focusing on reproductive and HIV/AIDS prevention programs are being implemented...

  5. Zhejiang Daheng Group Newly Acquired the Mining Right of Copper Mines in Zambia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>Recently,Daheng Group,a company headquartered in Zhuji,Zhejiang,has acquired themining right of two coppermines in Zambia. It has been learned that these two coppermines have an area of over 300sq km

  6. Food Sector Transformation and Standards in Zambia: Smallholder Farmer Participation and Growth in the Dairy Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Neven, David; Katjiuongua, Hikuepi; Adjosoediro, Ingrid; Reardon, Thomas; Chuzu, Pia Nwanza; Tembo, Gelson; Ndiyoi, Mukelabai

    2006-01-01

    Market liberalization in Zambia has led to a rapid and fundamental transformation of its dairy sector. Mainly through foreign direct investment and international partnerships, a new formal dairy sector, characterized by institutional, organizational and technological innovation, emerged from the ashes of abandoned government projects. Sensing the development opportunity that arose from an untapped milk supply potential in Zambia's traditional smallholder livestock production and a growing mil...

  7. Strategies of Successful Poverty Reduction: Case Studies of Tanzania and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    SUCCESSFUL POVERTY REDUCTION: CASE STUDIES OF TANZANIA AND ZAMBIA by Jacqueline A. Natter March 2015 Thesis Co-Advisors: Robert E. Looney...March 2015 Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS S1RA 1EGIES OF SUCCESSF1JL POVERTY REDUCTION: CASE STUDIES OF TANZANIA AND...growth in the 21st century, Tanzania has been able to translate that growth into poverty reduction while Zambia has not. A contextual picture of the two

  8. Comparison of two in-house real-time PCR assays with MTB Q-PCR Alert and GenoType MTBDRplus for the rapid detection of mycobacteria in clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagar, Amie-Louise; Neish, Barry; Laurenson, Ian F

    2012-10-01

    An in-house IS6110 real-time PCR (IH IS6110), MTB Q-PCR Alert (Q-PCR) and GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR; Hain Lifescience) were compared for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in 87 specimens following automated NucliSENS easyMAG DNA extraction. This included 82 first smear-positive specimens and three smear-negative specimens. Another in-house real-time PCR with a Mycobacterium genus-specific probe for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (IH ITS) was used to allow a full comparison with culture results. The sensitivities of IH IS6110, Q-PCR, MTBDR and IH ITS for MTBC detection were 100, 92, 87 and 87 %, respectively, compared with culture. Both IS6110-based real-time PCRs (in-house and Q-PCR) were similar in performance, with 91.2 % concordant results for MTBC detection. Inhibition rates were low, with zero to three specimens producing uninterpretable results. However, the Q-PCR failed to detect MTBC in five samples that were smear negative or had few acid-fast bacilli (one to 10 bacilli in 10 microscopic fields) detected by IH IS6110. IH ITS was the least sensitive assay but may be useful when used in conjunction with IS6110 PCR results to determine the presence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in smear-negative specimens. None of the real-time PCR assays tested provided drug-resistance data. It was concluded that an IH IS6110 assay could easily be incorporated into the workflow of a diagnostic laboratory for rapid and accurate identification of MTBC from clinical specimens. The inclusion of an internal control and amplification of an ITS target enhance the diagnostic utility of the test.

  9. Structural insights into the mycobacteria transcription initiation complex from analysis of X-ray crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Elizabeth A.; Lilic, Mirjana; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.

    2017-07-13

    The mycobacteria RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a target for antimicrobials against tuberculosis, motivating structure/function studies. Here we report a 3.2 Å-resolution crystal structure of a Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) open promoter complex (RPo), along with structural analysis of the Msm RPo and a previously reported 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of an Msm transcription initiation complex with a promoter DNA fragment. We observe the interaction of the Msm RNAP α-subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) with DNA, and we provide evidence that the αCTD may play a role in Mtb transcription regulation. Our results reveal the structure of an Actinobacteria-unique insert of the RNAP β' subunit. Finally, our analysis reveals the disposition of the N-terminal segment of Msm σA, which may comprise an intrinsically disordered protein domain unique to mycobacteria. The clade-specific features of the mycobacteria RNAP provide clues to the profound instability of mycobacteria RPo compared with E. coli.

  10. New Insights in to the Intrinsic and Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J. Nasiri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases caused by clinically important Mycobacteria continue to be an important public health problem worldwide primarily due to emergence of drug resistance crisis. In recent years, the control of tuberculosis (TB, the disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB, is hampered by the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR, defined as resistance to at least isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF, two key drugs in the treatment of the disease. Despite the availability of curative anti-TB therapy, inappropriate and inadequate treatment has allowed MTB to acquire resistance to the most important anti-TB drugs. Likewise, for most mycobacteria other than MTB, the outcome of drug treatment is poor and is likely related to the high levels of antibiotic resistance. Thus, a better knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance in mycobacteria could aid not only to select the best therapeutic options but also to develop novel drugs that can overwhelm the existing resistance mechanisms. In this article, we review the distinctive mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria.

  11. Role of Phosphatidylinositol Mannosides in the Interaction between Mycobacteria and DC-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, N.N.; Ummels, R.; Maaskant, J.J.; Gurcha, S.S.; Besra, G.S.; Ainge, G.D.; Larsen, D.S.; Painter, G.F.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.J.E.; Geurtsen, J.J.G.; Appelmelk, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    2)-linked mannosyl residues identical to the mannose cap on ManLAM, but not for di- and tetramannosylated PIM2 and PIM4, respectively. To determine the role of PIM6 in the binding of whole mycobacteria to DC-SIGN, a mutant strain of M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin deficient in the production of PI

  12. Mild Nutrient Starvation Triggers the Development of a Small-Cell Survival Morphotype in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-Lu; Gengenbacher, Martin; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria, generally believed to be non-sporulating, are well known to survive shock starvation in saline for extended periods of time in a non-replicating state without any apparent morphological changes. Here, we uncover that mycobacteria can undergo cellular differentiation by exposing Mycobacterium smegmatis to mild starvation conditions. Traces of various carbon sources in saline triggered the development of a novel small resting cell (SMRC) morphotype. Development of SMRCs could also be observed for other mycobacteria, suggesting evolutionary conservation of this differentiation pathway. Fluorescence microscopic analyses showed that development of SMRCs progresses via septated, multi-nucleoided cell intermediates, which divide to generate mono-nucleoided SMRCs. Intriguingly, saline shock-starved large resting cells (LARCs), which did not show cell size or surface changes when observed by scanning electron microscopy, remodeled their internal structure to septated, multi-nucleoided cells, similar to the intermediates seen during differentiation to SMRCs. Our results suggest that mycobacteria harbor a starvation-induced differentiation program in which at first septated, multi-nucleoided cells are generated. Under zero-nutrient conditions bacteria terminate development at this stage as LARCs. In the presence of traces of a carbon source, these multi-nucleoided cells continue differentiation into mono-nucleoided SMRCs. Both SMRCs and LARCs exhibited extreme antibiotic tolerance. SMRCs showed increased long-term starvation survival, which was associated with the presence of lipid inclusion bodies.

  13. Non-tuberculous iliopsoas abscess due to perforated diverticulitis presenting with intestinal obstruction and a groin mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, V.; Jackson, M. [Dept. of Surgery, Worthing and Southlands Hospital, West Sussex (United Kingdom); Farrugia, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Worthing and Southlands Hospital, West Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2001-06-01

    Psoas abscess is an uncommon condition and, contrary to traditional teaching, tends to be of non-tuberculous aetiology in developed countries. Diagnosis can be delayed since presenting features are non-specific and in many instances misleading, necessitating a high degree of clinical suspicion and early resort to cross-sectional imaging using CT or MRI. We present a case of iliopsoas abscess secondary to perforated diverticulitis to illustrate the difficulty encountered in early diagnosis and to show that successful management of secondary psoas abscess necessitates surgical resection of the underlying condition in most cases. (orig.)

  14. Non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease: diagnosis based on computed tomography of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Nakwon; Han, Sung Koo; Yim, Jae-Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 101 Daehak-Ro, Jongno-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun; Lee, Hyun-Ju [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Ae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Severance Hospital, Institute of Chest Diseases, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Ho [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To elucidate the accuracy and inter-observer agreement of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTM-LD) diagnosis based on chest CT findings. Two chest radiologists and two pulmonologists interpreted chest CTs of 66 patients with NTM-LD, 33 with pulmonary tuberculosis and 33 with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. These observers selected one of these diagnoses for each case without knowing any clinical information except age and sex. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated according to degree of observer confidence. Inter-observer agreement was assessed using Fleiss' κ values. Multiple logistic regression was performed to elucidate which radiological features led to the correct diagnosis. The sensitivity of NTM-LD diagnosis was 56.4 % (95 % CI 47.9-64.7) and specificity 80.3 % (73.1-86.0). The specificity of NTM-LD diagnosis increased with confidence: 44.4 % (20.5-71.3) for possible, 77.4 % (67.4-85.0) for probable, 95.2 % (87.2-98.2) for definite (P < 0.001) diagnoses. Inter-observer agreement for NTM-LD diagnosis was moderate (κ = 0.453). Tree-in-bud pattern (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 6.24, P < 0.001), consolidation (aOR 1.92, P = 0.036) and atelectasis (aOR 3.73, P < 0.001) were associated with correct NTM-LD diagnoses, whereas presence of pleural effusion (aOR 0.05, P < 0.001) led to false diagnoses. NTM-LD diagnosis based on chest CT findings is specific but not sensitive. (orig.)

  15. Lung and Nodal Involvement in Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease: PET/CT Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginevra Del Giudice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Systematic use of 18F-FDG PET/CT has the potential to simultaneously assess both pulmonary and lymph node involvement in nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM lung infection. Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the assessment of both mediastinal lymph nodes and lung involvement in NTM patients compared with active tuberculosis (TB patients. Methods. 26 patients with pulmonary NTM disease were selected; six consecutive patients had undergone 18F-FDG PET/CT and data was compared with 6 active TB patients. Results. NTM exhibited different radiological lung patterns with an average SUV max value at PET/CT scan of 3,59 ± 2,32 (range 1,14 to 9,01 on pulmonary lesions and a mean value of SUV max 1,21 ± 0,29 (range 0,90 to 1,70 on mediastinal lymph nodes. Pulmonary lesions in TB showed an average SUV max value of 10,07 ± 6,45 (range 1,20 to 22,75 whilst involved mediastinal lymph nodes exhibited a mean SUV max value of 7,23 ± 3,03 (range 1,78 to 15,72. Conclusions. The differences in PET uptake in a broad range of lung lesions and lymph nodes between NTM and M. tuberculosis patients suggest a potential role for PET/CT scan in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary mycobacterial disease.

  16. Human impact on Karst: the example of Lusaka (Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Waele Jo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Lusaka, the capital of Zambia with over 2,000,000 inhabitants, is built on an extensive plateau composed mainly of schists and dolomitic marbles, constituting a very important aquifer that provides the city with almost half of its drinking water needs. Recent demographic growth, leading to uncontrolled urban expansion, and mismanagement of the water resource and of urban waste has lead, in the past 20 years, to an overexploitation of the aquifer and to a generalised water quality depletion, putting in serious danger the future social and economical development of the capital. This third world city has, for these reasons, become a terrifying example of human impact on a vulnerable karst environment, and if no measures will be taken in the very near future, quality of life in the city will be at serious risk.

  17. Tuberculosis Infection in Zambia: The Association with Relative Wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Delia; Hargreaves, James; Ayles, Helen; Fielding, Katherine; Simwinga, Musonda; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the association between household socioeconomic position and tuberculosis (TB) infection in two communities of Zambia. For this purpose we implemented a cross-sectional investigation, nested within a larger case control study. Infection was assessed using Quantiferon-TB Gold. A socioeconomic position index was constructed through principal component analysis combining data on human resources, food availability, housing quality, and access to services and infrastructures. In this study, higher socioeconomic position, rather than lower, was associated with significantly higher risk of TB infection. None of the traditional risk factors for TB infection mediated this association, suggesting that in these two communities TB transmission may occur through exposure to as yet undefined risk factors that are associated with higher socioeconomic position. Although further studies are needed, these results suggest emerging new patterns of TB transmission and a role of socioeconomic position on the risk of TB infection opposite to that expected. PMID:19478266

  18. Lymphatic filariasis in Luangwa District, South-East Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shawa, Sheila Tamara; Mwase, Enala T.; Pedersen, Erling Møller

    2013-01-01

    in an endemic area of Luangwa District, South-East Zambia, as a background for planning and implementation of control. Methods. Two neighbouring rural communities were registered and a questionnaire survey undertaken. Clinical examination, and sampling of blood for circulating filarial antigens (CFA; marker...... of adult worm infection) and antibodies to Bm14 antigen (marker of exposure to transmission), were carried out during the daytime. Blood from CFA positive individuals was examined for microfilariae (mf) at night. Vector surveys were carried out in selected households, using light traps. Results: 985...... individuals aged ≥ 1 year were registered. The CFA prevalence increased with age from 1.2% in age group 1-14 years to 20.6% in age group 50+ years (overall 8.6%). Wuchereria bancrofti mf were identified in 10.9% of CFA positive individuals (corresponding to a community prevalence of 0.9%). Prevalence...

  19. Acceptability of neonatal male circumcision in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Emily; Stringer, Elizabeth; Mugisa, Bridget; Temba, Salome; Bowa, Kasonde; Linyama, David

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal male circumcision (NMC) is being scaled up in Zambia and elsewhere in Southern Africa as a long-term HIV prevention strategy. We conducted 12 focus group discussions with 129 parents and grandparents in Lusaka, recruited from two sites providing free NMC services and information about NMC, to explore the acceptability of circumcising newborn boys. Most participants recognized the benefits of circumcision for HIV prevention, and the advantages of circumcising their children and grandchildren at a young age. Fear of negative outcomes, concerns about pain, and issues around cultural identity may challenge NMC uptake. To effectively promote the service, the upper age limit for NMC must be emphasized, and fathers must be targeted by messaging campaigns.

  20. Filarial infections in domestic dogs in Lusaka, Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwila, Joyce; Mwase, Enala T.; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Filariae are common parasites of dogs in many parts of the world, but little is known about the status of these infections in sub-Saharan Africa. A study was carried out to determine the occurrence and species of filariae among 272 dogs in Lusaka, Zambia. Giemsa stained blood smear and Knott......'s concentration methods revealed microfilariae in 16 (5.9%) of the dogs. PCR confirmed that most of these dogs had Acanthocheilonema reconditum infection. Ten (4.0%) of the examined dogs were positive for Dirofilaria immitis circulating antigen (by DiroCHEK(®) test), but D. immitis microfilariae were...... not identified in any of the dogs and the status of this infection remains unclear. Further studies are needed to explore the occurrence of filariae in Zambian dogs and the zoonotic potential for humans....

  1. Rapid identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterium using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry%MALDI-TOF质谱快速鉴定非结核分枝杆菌方法的建立和评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周昭彦; 胡必杰; 鲍容; 马坚; 黄声雷; 谢红梅

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare and develop the method for identification of Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS),and evaluate the feasibility,accuracy and repeatability of MALDI-TOF MS to discriminate NTM.Methods Fifteen clinical strains were collected from January to March in 2012 and 68 environmental strains were retrospectively collected from 2011 to 2012.A protocol for sample pre-treatment and protein extraction was developed and utilized it to identify clinical and environmental isolates.The results from 16 s rRNA sequencing were served as control.Results Method A was more effective in protein extraction.Although all the three methods got the same species result,a total of 83 strains belonging to 10 distinct species grown in Middle brook 7H10 media were analyzed.All members of the NTM were identified accurately at the genus level and 80.7% (67/83) of strains could be identified at the species level.Six strains were identified at the complex level.81.9% (68/83) of NTM got high spectral scores.The identification of cultured colony could be completed in 1.5 hours.And it had good reproducibility.Conclusion MALDI-TOF MS can be used as a rapid and accurate method for identification of Mycobacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories,implying its good application prospects.%目的 建立基质辅助激光解析/电离飞行时间质谱(MALDI-TOF MS)鉴定非结核分枝杆菌(NTM)的方法,评估其快速鉴定临床和环境分离NTM的可行性、准确性和重复性.方法 回顾性收集2012年1至3月上海复旦大学附属中山医院微生物实验室临床分离NTM 15株及2011至2012年医院供水系统环境分离NTM 68株.比较3种样本前处理和蛋白抽提方案,采用MALDI-TOFMS技术检测临床和环境分离NTM,并以16S rRNA测序结果为对照.结果 3种方法均鉴定出相同细菌,但方法1的鉴定值高于其他2

  2. Child spacing and contraception among the poor in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan K Pillai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vijayan K Pillai1, Rashmi Gupta21School of Social Work, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA; 2Department of Social Work, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: For decades, family planning programs have targeted women in developing countries. These programs bestow a great deal of autonomy on women with respect to fertility decision making. It is well known that a number of close relatives in multigenerational and extended family systems influence women’s fertility decisions with respect to child spacing and contraceptive use. One approach toward a systematic study of fertility decision making is to explicitly consider the husband’s influences on fertility decision making. This study examines the effects of a selected number of factors on the desired birth interval lengths. We interviewed husbands and wives separately from 165 randomly selected households from two poor neighborhoods in the city of Kitwe, Zambia. Three ordinal birth interval groups were obtained for both husbands and wives separately. The effect of selected factors on the likelihood of influencing the three groups was examined using ordinal logistic regression methods. Data from husbands and wives were analyzed separately. Qualitative methods such as semistructured interviews were used to gather extensive information on the various factors that husbands and wives perceive to influence their child spacing decisions. We found differences in accounts with respect to child spacing between husbands and wives, likely due to a lack of communication. A gender-sensitive approach is necessary to promote spacing methods among poor couples in Zambia.Keywords: child spacing, contraceptive use, correspondence analysis, couple decision making

  3. Identification of a novel polyomavirus from vervet monkeys in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Ishii, Akihiro; Ogawa, Hirohito; Nakamura, Ichiro; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Thomas, Yuka; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi; Orba, Yasuko

    2013-06-01

    To examine polyomavirus (PyV) infection in wildlife, we investigated the presence of PyVs in Zambia with permission from the Zambia Wildlife Authority. We analysed 200 DNA samples from the spleens and kidneys (n = 100 each) of yellow baboons and vervet monkeys (VMs) (n = 50 each). We detected seven PyV genome fragments in 200 DNA samples using a nested broad-spectrum PCR method, and identified five full-length viral genomes using an inverse PCR method. Phylogenetic analysis of virally encoded proteins revealed that four PyVs were closely related to either African green monkey PyV or simian agent 12. Only one virus detected from a VM spleen was found to be related, with relatively low nucleotide sequence identity (74 %), to the chimpanzee PyV, which shares 48 % nucleotide sequence identity with the human Merkel cell PyV identified from Merkel cell carcinoma. The obtained entire genome of this virus was 5157 bp and had large T- and small t-antigens, and VP1 and VP2 ORFs. This virus was tentatively named vervet monkey PyV 1 (VmPyV1) as a novel PyV. Comparison with other PyVs revealed that VmPyV1, like chimpanzee PyV, had a longer VP1 ORF. To examine whether the VmPyV1 genome could produce viral proteins in cultured cells, the whole genome was transfected into HEK293T cells. We detected VP1 protein expression in the transfected HEK293T cells by immunocytochemical and immunoblot analyses. Thus, we identified a novel PyV genome from VM spleen.

  4. Health worker perspectives on user fee removal in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carasso Barbara S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background User fees for primary care services were removed in rural districts in Zambia in 2006. Experience from other countries has suggested that health workers play a key role in determining the success of a fee removal policy, but also find the implementation of such a policy challenging. The policy was introduced against a backdrop of a major shortage in qualified health staff. Methods As part of a larger study on the experience and effect of user fee removal in Zambia, a number of case studies at the facility level were conducted. As part of these, quantitative and qualitative data were collected to evaluate health workers’ satisfaction and experiences in charging and non-charging facilities. Results Our findings show that health-care workers have mixed feelings about the policy change and its consequences. We found some evidence that personnel motivation was higher in non-charging facilities compared to facilities still charging. Yet it is unclear whether this effect was due to differences in the user fee policy or to the fact that a lot of staff interviewed in non-charging facilities were working in mission facilities, where we found a significantly higher motivation. Health workers expressed satisfaction with an apparent increase in the number of patients visiting the facilities and the removal of a deterring factor for many needy patients, but also complained about an increased workload. Furthermore, working conditions were said to have worsened, which staff felt was linked to the absence of additional resources to deal with the increased demand or replace the loss of revenue generated by fees. Conclusion These findings highlight the need to pay attention to supply-side measures when removing demand-side barriers such as user fees and in particular to be concerned about the burden that increased demand can place on already over-stretched health workers.

  5. Social factors affecting ART adherence in rural settings in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Ikuma; Dube, Christopher; Kakimoto, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Norio; Simpungwe, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the factors that influence ART adherence arising in rural settings in Zambia. A survey was conducted with face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire and written informed consent was obtained at ART sites in Mumbwa District in rural Zambia. The questionnaire included items such as the socio-demographic characteristics of respondents, support for adherence, ways to remember when to take ARVs at scheduled times, and the current status of adherence. Valid responses were obtained from 518 research participants. The mean age of the respondents was 38.3 years and the average treatment period was 12.5 months. More than half of the respondents (51%) were farmers, about half (49%) did not own a watch, and 10% of them used the position of the sun to remember when to take ARVs. Sixteen percent of respondents experienced fear of stigma resulting from taking ARVs at work or home, and 10% felt pressured to share ARVs with someone. Eighty-eight percent of the participants reported that they had never missed ARVs in the past four days. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified age (38 years old or less, odds ratio (OR) = 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3–4.8, p = 0.005), “remembering when to take ARVs based on the position of the sun” (OR = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.3–8.8, p = 0.016), and “feeling pressured to share ARVs with someone” (OR = 4.4, 95% CI: 1.6–12.0, p = 0.004) as independent factors for low adherence. As ART services expand to rural areas, program implementers should pay more attention to more specific factors arising in rural settings since they may differ from those in urban settings. PMID:21400314

  6. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identification of mycobacteria in routine clinical practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El Khéchine, Amel; Couderc, Carine; Flaudrops, Christophe; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-01-01

    .... Matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has previously been proven to effectively identify mycobacteria grown in high-concentration inocula from collections...

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Drug-Resistant Mycobacteria: Co-Evolution of Copper and INH Resistance: e0127788

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yuling Chen; Fan Yang; Zhongyuan Sun; Qingtao Wang; Kaixia Mi; Haiteng Deng

    2015-01-01

    .... To better understand the resistance mechanisms of mycobacteria to copper, we generated a copper-resistant strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, mc2155-Cu from the selection of copper sulfate treated-bacteria...

  8. Correlation between virulence of various strains of mycobacteria and their susceptibility to ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, S; Kawalski, H; Oklek, K; Dworniczak, S; Matsuno, T; Waldemar-Klimmek, K; Rajca, M; Shani, J

    1998-01-01

    Ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) has antibacterial, antiviral, antiprotozoal and antifungal properties, in addition to many biological effects. Our laboratory has demonstrated a synergistic effect of EEP and antibiotics on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and suggested that the bactericidal effect of EEP was expressed mainly on virulent mycobacteria rather than on non-virulent (attenuated) ones. The present study was designed to reconfirm the latter finding, by subjecting 17 different mycobacteria strains to EEP, and evaluating whether there is a correlation between the virulence of the mycobacteria strains studied and their susceptibility to EEP. Our findings demonstrate that while the four non-virulent strains studied are not susceptible to EEP, out of the 13 virulent strains studied seven are susceptible and six are resistant to it. These results suggest that while there is no full correlation between virulence of the mycobacteria tested and their susceptibility to EEP, the few strains that were resistant to EEP were non-virulent.

  9. Provision of Learning and Teaching Materials for Pupils with Visual Impairment: Results from a National Survey in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akakandelwa, Akakandelwa; Munsanje, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the provision of learning and teaching materials for pupils with visual impairment in basic and high schools of Zambia. A survey approach utilizing a questionnaire, interviews and a review of the literature was adopted for the study. The findings demonstrated that most schools in Zambia did not provide…

  10. Provision of Learning and Teaching Materials for Pupils with Visual Impairment: Results from a National Survey in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akakandelwa, Akakandelwa; Munsanje, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the provision of learning and teaching materials for pupils with visual impairment in basic and high schools of Zambia. A survey approach utilizing a questionnaire, interviews and a review of the literature was adopted for the study. The findings demonstrated that most schools in Zambia did not provide…

  11. University Adult Education in Independent Zambia: The Role of a Department of Extra-Mural Studies in National Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Clement Abiazem

    1971-01-01

    Like other African countries, Zambia's most pragmatic approach to national development must lie in adult education. The University of Zambia is one agency involved toward this goal and its emphasis is on rapid expansion of university-type education and the training of adult educators. (Author/JB)

  12. Moving Towards Inclusive Education Policies and Practices? Basic Education for AIDS Orphans and Other Vulnerable Children in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Sue; Kanyanta, Sylvester Bonaventure

    2007-01-01

    The global spread of HIV and AIDS has presented a major threat to development, affecting the health of the poor and many aspects of social and economic development. The greatest impact of the epidemic has been felt in sub-Saharan Africa, and Zambia ranks among the worst hit countries. The Free Basic Education Policy in Zambia upholds the right of…

  13. Prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections among tuberculosis suspects in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambo Aliyu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nigeria is ranked in the top five countries for tuberculosis deaths worldwide. This study investigated the mycobacterial agents associated with presumptive clinical pulmonary tuberculosis (TB in Nigeria and evaluated the pattern and frequency of mycobacterial infections over twelve calendar months period. METHODS: Sputum samples from 1,603 consecutive new cases with presumptive diagnosis of TB were collected from August 2010 to July 2011. All sputum samples were incubated for detection of mycobacterial growth and those with positive acid fast bacilli (AFB growth were tested to detect mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB complex and characterized to differentiate between MTB complex species. Cultures suggestive of Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections (NTM were sub-cultured and characterized. RESULTS: Of the 1,603 patients screened, 444 (28% culture-positive cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were identified. Of these, 375 (85% were due to strains of MTB complex (354 cases of M. tuberculosis, 20 M. africanum and one case of M. bovis and 69 (15% were due to infection with NTM. In contrast to the MTB complex cases, the NTM cases were more likely to have been diagnosed during the calendar months of the Harmattan dust season (OR = 2.34, 1.28-4.29; p = 0.01, and aged older than 35 years (OR = 2.77, 1.52-5.02, p = 0.0007, but less likely to have AFB identified on their sputum smear (OR = 0.06, 0.02-0.14, p<0.0001. Among those with NTM infection, cases 35 years or younger were more likely to have co-infection with HIV (3.76, 1.72-8.22; p = 0.0009 compared to those older than 35 years. INTERPRETATION: The high proportion of younger patients with clinical pulmonary TB due to NTM and co-infection with HIV and the likely role of the seasonal dust exposure in the occurrence of the disease, present novel public health challenges for prevention and treatment.

  14. Mycobacteria emulsified in olive oil-in-water trigger a robust immune response in bladder cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera-Ortega, Estela; Blanco-Cabra, Núria; Rabanal, Rosa Maria; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Roldán, Mónica; Guallar-Garrido, Sandra; Torrents, Eduard; Luquin, Marina; Julián, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic composition of mycobacterial cell walls leads to the formation of clumps when attempting to resuspend mycobacteria in aqueous solutions. Such aggregation may interfere in the mycobacteria-host cells interaction and, consequently, influence their antitumor effect. To improve the immunotherapeutic activity of Mycobacterium brumae, we designed different emulsions and demonstrated their efficacy. The best formulation was initially selected based on homogeneity and stability. Both olive oil (OO)- and mineral oil-in-water emulsions better preserved the mycobacteria viability and provided higher disaggregation rates compared to the others. But, among both emulsions, the OO emulsion increased the mycobacteria capacity to induce cytokines’ production in bladder tumor cell cultures. The OO-mycobacteria emulsion properties: less hydrophobic, lower pH, more neutralized zeta potential, and increased affinity to fibronectin than non-emulsified mycobacteria, indicated favorable conditions for reaching the bladder epithelium in vivo. Finally, intravesical OO-M. brumae-treated mice showed a significantly higher systemic immune response, together with a trend toward increased tumor-bearing mouse survival rates compared to the rest of the treated mice. The physicochemical characteristics and the induction of a robust immune response in vitro and in vivo highlight the potential of the OO emulsion as a good delivery vehicle for the mycobacterial treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:27265565

  15. Anthelmintic efficacy in captive wild impala antelope (Aepyceros melampus) in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalubamba, King S; Mudenda, Ntombi B

    2012-05-25

    There has been an increase in the number of wild ungulates kept in captivity for ecotourism and conservation in Zambia and these animals are susceptible to a number of diseases including gastrointestinal helminth infections. Surveys to determine anthelmintic efficacy to gastrointestinal nematodes in captive-wildlife are not common and there have been no reports of anthelmintic resistance in captive-wildlife in Zambia. This study was carried out to determine the efficacy of the benzimidazole anthelmintic fenbendazole in captive wild impala (Aepyceros melampus) in Zambia. During the month of April 2011, at the end of the rainy season, the faecal egg count reduction test was performed at a private game facility for assessing anthelmintic efficacy of oral fenbendazole and the anthelmintic treatment showed an efficacy of 90%. Haemonchus spp. and Trichostrongylus spp. were the predominant genera present before treatment, but Haemonchus spp. larvae were the only genus recovered from the faecal cultures after anthelmintic treatment. This represents the first documentation of anthelmintic treatment failure in captive wild-antelopes in Zambia. It also demonstrated the ineffectiveness of the common traditional practice of deworming captive-wild antelopes at the end of the rainy season due to the rapid re-infection of impala that occurs due to high pasture infectivity. Suggestions on changes to current anthelmintic use/practices that will make them more efficacious and reduce the possibility of development of anthelmintic resistance in captive wild game in Zambia are also made.

  16. NF- κB Essential Modulator Deficiency Leading to Disseminated Cutaneous Atypical Mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Braue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available NF- κB essential modulator (NEMO is a kinase integral to the macrophage TNF-α pathway, which leads to the intracellular destruction of Mycobacteria species. Defects in the NEMO pathway lead to a spectrum of diseases, including but not limited to ectodermal dysplasia, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases, and incontinentia pigmenti. In addition, paucity of NEMO can lead to the inability to mount a proper immune response against opportunistic pyogenic and mycobacterial infections, leading to dissemination to various organ systems. This manuscript will discuss the numerous clinical manifestations of NEMO deficiency, the differential diagnosis for atypical mycobacterial infections in immunocompetent adults, and feature a case report of rare isolated susceptibility to disseminated atypical mycobacteria due to a mutation in the first exon of the NEMO gene.

  17. 78 FR 4148 - Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... treatment of tuberculosis (TB), prevention of multi-drug resistance, and surveillance programs, CDC is... Performance Evaluation Program (MPEP) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Drug... the Model Performance Evaluation Program for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Non-tuberculous...

  18. Development of a rapid ATP bioluminescence assay for biocidal susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Renuka; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2010-10-01

    An ATP-based biocide susceptibility assay for mycobacteria was developed by optimizing the cell lysis and assay conditions. Compared to the conventional agar plating method, the assay was rapid (1.5 h) and showed high sensitivity and specificity as determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The test species, Mycobacterium immunogenum, M. chelonae, and M. abscessus, showed various susceptibilities to the glutaraldehyde- and isothiazolone-based test biocides.

  19. Mycobacteriocins produced by rapidly growing mycobacteria are Tween-hydrolyzing esterases.

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, H; Tomioka, H.; Watanabe, T; YONEYAMA, T.

    1983-01-01

    Smegmatocin, a protein produced by Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 14468, was found to have an esterase activity, hydrolyzing Tween 80, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate, added to the assay medium for various "bacteriocins" from mycobacteria. Because M. diernhoferi ATCC 19340 (indicator strain for smegmatocin) is highly susceptible to oleic acid and smegmatocin requires Tween 80 for manifestation of its anti-M. diernhoferi activity, it is likely that smegmatocin-mediated antimicrobial action i...

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Drug-Resistant Mycobacteria: Co-Evolution of Copper and INH Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Yuling Chen; Fan Yang; Zhongyuan Sun; Qingtao Wang; Kaixia Mi; Haiteng Deng

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a worldwide public health threat. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is capable of resisting various stresses in host cells, including high levels of ROS and copper ions. To better understand the resistance mechanisms of mycobacteria to copper, we generated a copper-resistant strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, mc2155-Cu from the selection of copper sulfate treated-bacteria. The mc2155-Cu strain has a 5-fold higher resistance to coppe...

  1. Pacemaker pocket infection due to Mycobacterium goodii, a rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, David K; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2017-01-10

    A woman aged 74 years with an implanted dual-chamber pacemaker presented with pacemaker site infection after failing empiric antimicrobial therapy. The pathogen was later identified as Mycobacterium goodii, a rapidly growing mycobacteria species. The pacemaker was subsequently removed and the patient was treated with oral ciprofloxacin and doxycycline with clinical improvement. In this article, we describe a rare case of pacemaker site infection by M. goodii. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Study of different types of mycobacteria in sediments of fish breeding pools of north of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazesaeed K

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 307 samples of the sediments of fish breeding pools of the different parts of North of Iran were tested for the survey of different environmental Mycobacteria. After the process of cultivation, 107 cases of Mycobacterium were gained which after the performance of different biochemical tests. 112 cases of Mycobacterium were identified. From among the isolated Mycobacteria, the highest rank belonged to M.fortuitum with the frequency of 13.97% and the next M.gordonae 10.66% M.xenopi, M.nonchromagenicum 8.2% and the last M.marinum with the frequency of 5.74%. M.marinum was the case of Tuberculosis of fish and had important role in the creation of granuloma. Next to that, M.fortuitum, M.kanasasii and M.gordenae had less importance. The existence of such Mycobacteria in the fish breeding pools were on one hand the cause of pollution of fish and on the other hand the fishman and other people who are somehow connected to the fish and the pools sediments are subject to disease in case of existence of injury in their hands or feet

  3. Comparison of filtering methods, filter processing and DNA extraction kits for detection of mycobacteria in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kaevska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. Mycobacteria have been isolated from almost all types of natural waters, as well as from man-made water distribution systems. Detection of mycobacteria using PCR has been described in different types of water; however, currently, there is no standardised protocol for the processing of large volumes of water. Material and Methods. In the present study, different filtering methods are tested and optimised for tap or river water filtration up to 10 L, as well as filter processing and DNA isolation using four commercially available kits. Results. The PowerWater DNA isolation kit (MoBio, USA, together with a kit used for soil and other environmental samples (PowerSoil DNA isolation kit, MoBio, had the highest efficiency. Filtration of 10 L of water and elution of the filter in PBS with the addition of 0.05% of Tween 80 is suggested. Conclusions. The described protocol for filter elution is recommended, and the use of the PowerWater DNA isolation kit for the highest mycobacterial DNA yield from water samples. The described protocol is suitable for parallel detection of mycobacteria using cultivation.

  4. ESX-1-mediated translocation to the cytosol controls virulence of mycobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Houben, Diane

    2012-05-08

    Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, are among the most potent human bacterial pathogens. The discovery of cytosolic mycobacteria challenged the paradigm that these pathogens exclusively localize within the phagosome of host cells. As yet the biological relevance of mycobacterial translocation to the cytosol remained unclear. In this current study we used electron microscopy techniques to establish a clear link between translocation and mycobacterial virulence. Pathogenic, patient-derived mycobacteria species were found to translocate to the cytosol, while non-pathogenic species did not. We were further able to link cytosolic translocation with pathogenicity by introducing the ESX-1 (type VII) secretion system into the non-virulent, exclusively phagolysosomal Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Furthermore, we show that translocation is dependent on the C-terminus of the early-secreted antigen ESAT-6. The C-terminal truncation of ESAT-6 was shown to result in attenuation in mice, again linking translocation to virulence. Together, these data demonstrate the molecular mechanism facilitating translocation of mycobacteria. The ability to translocate from the phagolysosome to the cytosol is with this study proven to be biologically significant as it determines mycobacterial virulence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of hemostatic field dressing for bacteria, mycobacteria, or fungus contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clinton K; Brunstetter, Tyson; Beckius, Miriam; Dunne, James R; Mende, Katrin

    2013-03-01

    Infectious complications have a major impact on wounded warriors. Pathogens causing infections include multidrug-resistant bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. The potential sources for these pathogens include nosocomial transmission, the environment (e.g., dirt), or the patients (skin flora) themselves. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the possibility that hemostatic field dressings might act as an inoculation source of pathogens into wounds. To accomplish this, hemostatic field dressings were assessed for the presence of bacterial, fungal, or mycobacterial contamination. We evaluated two samples of QuikClot Combat Gauze and two samples of CELOX Gauze subjected to normal stresses associated with storage after receipt from the manufacturer. We then evaluated 16 samples of QuikClot Combat Gauze that were collected from personnel deployed in Afghanistan and had undergone routine mechanical stress. Samples underwent screening with Trypticase Soy Broth, blood agar plates, MacConkey agar plates, CHROMagar Staphylococcus aureus plates, chocolate agar plates, Potato Flake agar, Lowenstein-Jensen media, and Middlebrook 7H11 media. No bacteria, fungi, or mycobacteria were recovered from the dressings. It does not appear that hemostatic field dressings are contaminated, even after subjected to field conditions. Further research is needed to identify inoculation sources of fungi and mycobacteria, which cause infections.

  6. Detection of mycobacteria in aquarium fish in Slovenia by culture and molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, M; Jencic, V; Zolnir-Dovc, M; Ocepek, M

    2005-04-06

    Thirty-five aquarium fish were investigated for the presence of mycobacteria by culture and molecular methods. The following species were examined: goldfish Carassius auratus auratus, guppy Poecilia reticulata, 4 three-spot gourami Trichogaster trichopterus, dwarf gourami Colisa lalia, Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens, freshwater angelfish Pterophyllum scalare, African cichlid fish Cichlidae spp., cichlid fish Microgeophagus altispinosus, cichlid fish Pseudotropheus lombardoi, blue streak hap Labidochromis caeruleus, sterlet Acipenser ruthenus, southern platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus, and catfish Corydoras spp. Isolates of mycobacteria were obtained in 29 cases (82.9%). Two specimens were positive using Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining, but the cultivation failed. Four specimens were both ZN- and culture-negative. On the basis of GenoType Mycobacterium assay (Hain Life-science) and restriction enzyme analysis of the amplified products (PCR-RFLP), 23 isolates (79.3%) were identified: 7 as Mycobacterium fortuitum, 6 as M. gordonae, 6 as M. marinum, 3 as M. chelonae, and 1 as M. peregrinum. Five isolates remained unidentified (Mycobacterium spp.). One case probably represented a mixed infection (M. marinum/M. fortuitum). Since M. marinum infections are also detected in humans, the significance of mycobacteria in aquarium fish should not be overlooked.

  7. Factors Affecting Phage D29 Infection: A Tool to Investigate Different Growth States of Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Benjamin M. C.; Gerrard, Zara E.; Huxley, Jonathan N.; Rees, Catherine E. D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages D29 and TM4 are able to infect a wide range of mycobacteria, including pathogenic and non-pathogenic species. Successful phage infection of both fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria can be rapidly detected using the phage amplification assay. Using this method, the effect of oxygen limitation during culture of mycobacteria on the success of phage infection was studied. Both D29 and TM4 were able to infect cultures of M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) grown in liquid with aeration. However when cultures were grown under oxygen limiting conditions, only TM4 could productively infect the cells. Cell attachment assays showed that D29 could bind to the cells surface but did not complete the lytic cycle. The ability of D29 to productively infect the cells was rapidly recovered (within 1 day) when the cultures were returned to an aerobic environment and this recovery required de novo RNA synthesis. These results indicated that under oxygen limiting conditions the cells are entering a growth state which inhibits phage D29 replication, and this change in host cell biology which can be detected by using both phage D29 and TM4 in the phage amplification assay. PMID:25184428

  8. Comparison of filtering methods, filter processing and DNA extraction kits for detection of mycobacteria in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaevska, Marija; Slana, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been isolated from almost all types of natural waters, as well as from man-made water distribution systems. Detection of mycobacteria using PCR has been described in different types of water; however, currently, there is no standardised protocol for the processing of large volumes of water. In the present study, different filtering methods are tested and optimised for tap or river water filtration up to 10 L, as well as filter processing and DNA isolation using four commercially available kits. The PowerWater DNA isolation kit (MoBio, USA), together with a kit used for soil and other environmental samples (PowerSoil DNA isolation kit, MoBio), had the highest efficiency. Filtration of 10 L of water and elution of the filter in PBS with the addition of 0.05% of Tween 80 is suggested. The described protocol for filter elution is recommended, and the use of the PowerWater DNA isolation kit for the highest mycobacterial DNA yield from water samples. The described protocol is suitable for parallel detection of mycobacteria using cultivation.

  9. Synergism between ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) and anti-tuberculosis drugs on growth of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, S; Dworniczak, S; Waldemar-Klimmek, K; Rajca, M; Tomczyk, A; Shani, J

    1999-01-01

    Ethanolic extract of propolis exerts a strong anti-bacterial activity, in addition to antifungal, antiviral and antiprotozoal properties. In previous studies from these laboratories we have demonstrated that the intensity of the bactericidal activity of EEP is correlated with the virulence of the mycobacteria tested, and that EEP has a synergistic effect with antibiotics on growth of staphylococcus aureus. In the present study we investigated whether the same synergism and correlation exists between EEP and some anti-tuberculosis drugs on tuberculosis mycobacteria with different degrees of virulence. Six standard strains and 11 wild strains of mycobacteria were exposed for 30 days to EEP, with or without streptomycin, rifamycin, isoniazid or ethambutol. Out of the 17 strains, 8 were resistant to at least two standard antibiotics, and were considered "multi-resistant strains". The rest were either susceptible or resistant to only one of the antimycobacterial drugs. Antagonism was recorded only in one case, when Staphylococcus aureus were treated with a mixture of EEP and ethambutol, suggesting that a chemical bond could have been formed between this anti-tuberculosis antibiotic and one of the active components of the ethanol extract of propolis.

  10. Factors affecting phage D29 infection: a tool to investigate different growth states of mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M C Swift

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages D29 and TM4 are able to infect a wide range of mycobacteria, including pathogenic and non-pathogenic species. Successful phage infection of both fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria can be rapidly detected using the phage amplification assay. Using this method, the effect of oxygen limitation during culture of mycobacteria on the success of phage infection was studied. Both D29 and TM4 were able to infect cultures of M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP grown in liquid with aeration. However when cultures were grown under oxygen limiting conditions, only TM4 could productively infect the cells. Cell attachment assays showed that D29 could bind to the cells surface but did not complete the lytic cycle. The ability of D29 to productively infect the cells was rapidly recovered (within 1 day when the cultures were returned to an aerobic environment and this recovery required de novo RNA synthesis. These results indicated that under oxygen limiting conditions the cells are entering a growth state which inhibits phage D29 replication, and this change in host cell biology which can be detected by using both phage D29 and TM4 in the phage amplification assay.

  11. Factors affecting phage D29 infection: a tool to investigate different growth states of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Benjamin M C; Gerrard, Zara E; Huxley, Jonathan N; Rees, Catherine E D

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages D29 and TM4 are able to infect a wide range of mycobacteria, including pathogenic and non-pathogenic species. Successful phage infection of both fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria can be rapidly detected using the phage amplification assay. Using this method, the effect of oxygen limitation during culture of mycobacteria on the success of phage infection was studied. Both D29 and TM4 were able to infect cultures of M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) grown in liquid with aeration. However when cultures were grown under oxygen limiting conditions, only TM4 could productively infect the cells. Cell attachment assays showed that D29 could bind to the cells surface but did not complete the lytic cycle. The ability of D29 to productively infect the cells was rapidly recovered (within 1 day) when the cultures were returned to an aerobic environment and this recovery required de novo RNA synthesis. These results indicated that under oxygen limiting conditions the cells are entering a growth state which inhibits phage D29 replication, and this change in host cell biology which can be detected by using both phage D29 and TM4 in the phage amplification assay.

  12. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIA IN OTHER CELLS OF LUNG AND LIVER EXEPT IN MACROPHAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrina Kazachka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the key cells for invading and replication of mycobacteria in the host and they play principal role in the pathogenesis of the tuberculosis. The aim of the present study was to reveal if mycobacterium invade other cells except these of immune defense and macrophages fi rst of all as a common feature. The results of ultrastructural studies of lungs of Mycobacterium bovis intraperitonealy infected rabbits and livers of Mycobacterium avium subcutaneously infected chickens showed the presence of mycobacteria into the cytoplasm of pneumocytes II type and capillary endothelial cells of rabbit lungs as well as in the cytoplasm of chicken liver parenchyma cells. On the base of these results and in particular invading of pneumocytes II type as a producers of the surfactant it was suggested that the surfactant or some of his components likely enhance phagocytosis of mycobacteria by macrophages. It could be a reason for mycobacterium affi nity to invade pneumocyte II type and to manipulate quality and quantity of the surfactant or some of his components. These results show that M. bovis invaded pneumocytes II type in vivo and it is an important step may be in the investigation of the possibility role of these cells in the pathogenesis of lung infection.

  13. Health Seeking Behaviour among Individuals with Presumptive Tuberculosis in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapata, Nathan; Masiye, Felix; Maboshe, Mwendaweli; Klinkenberg, Eveline; Cobelens, Frank; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) prevalence surveys offer a unique opportunity to study health seeking behaviour at the population level because they identify individuals with symptoms that should ideally prompt a health consultation. Objective To assess the health-seeking behaviour among individuals who were presumptive TB cases in a national population based TB prevalence survey. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted between 2013 and 2014 among 66 survey clusters in Zambia. Clusters were census supervisory areas (CSAs). Participants (presumptive TB cases) were individuals aged 15 years and above; having either cough, fever or chest pain for 2 weeks or more; and/or having an abnormal or inconclusive chest x-ray image. All survey participants were interviewed about symptoms and had a chest X-ray taken. An in-depth interview was conducted to collect information on health seeking behaviour and previous TB treatment. Results Of the 6,708 participants, the majority reported at least a history of chest pain (3,426; 51.1%) followed by cough (2,405; 35.9%), and fever (1,030; 15.4%) for two weeks or more. Only 34.9% (2,340) had sought care for their symptoms, mainly (92%) at government health facilities. Of those who sought care, 13.9% (326) and 12.1% (283) had chest x-ray and sputum examinations, respectively. Those ever treated for TB were 9.6% (644); while 1.7% (114) was currently on treatment. The average time (in weeks) from onset of symptoms to first care-seeking was 3 for the presumptive TB cases. Males, urban dwellers and individuals in the highest wealth quintile were less likely to seek care for their symptoms. The likelihood of having ever been treated for TB was highest among males, urban dwellers; respondents aged 35–64 years, individuals in the highest wealth quintile, or HIV positive. Conclusion Some presumptive TB patients delay care-seeking for their symptoms. The health system misses opportunities to diagnose TB among those who seek care. Improving

  14. Experiences of the first female physics graduates of the University of Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwewa, Chilufya; Namumba, Brenda; Mofya, Mwape

    2013-03-01

    Although the Department of Physics was established together with the University of Zambia in 1966, it has only graduated eight females to date. This calls for concern since the University of Zambia is the only institution that offers a physics degree program in Zambia. In this paper, three of these females discuss their understanding of the factors that have led to members of their gender shunning physics. They outline the way they themselves came to do physics and they discuss the problems they faced as they studied physics and the rewards they received from this. They propose ways and means of motivating other females to take up physics and of making studies easier and more fulfilling for those who opt to do so.

  15. Temporal changes and determinants of childhood nutritional status in Kenya and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Daniel; Cacciola, Thomas; Barrios, Pamela; Simon, James

    2017-06-05

    The prevalence of undernutrition is decreasing in many parts of the developing world, but challenges remain in many countries. The objective of this study was to determine factors influencing childhood nutrition status in Kenya and Zambia. The objective of this study is to determine factors associated with temporal changes in childhood nutritional status in two countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Data from national demographic and health surveys from the World Bank for Kenya (1998-2009) and Zambia (1996-2014) were used to select the youngest child of each household with complete data for all variables studied. Multiple linear regression analyses were used for data from 2902 and 11,335 children from Kenya and Zambia, respectively, in each year to determine the relationship between social and economic factors and measures of nutritional status, including wasting, stunting, and overweight. There was a decreased prevalence of stunting (35% in Kenya and 40% in Zambia), while the prevalence of wasting was unchanged (6-8% in both countries). From 1998 to 2009, there was a protective effect against stunting for wealthier families and households with electricity, for both countries. Finally, better educated mothers were less likely to have stunted children and girls were less likely to be stunted than boys. Based on the data analyzed, there was a higher risk of stunting in both Kenya and Zambia, for those with lower literacy, less education, no electricity, living in rural areas, no formal toilet, no car ownership, and those with an overall lower wealth index. Improving the education of mothers was also a significant determinant in improving the nutritional status of children in Kenya and Zambia. More broad-based efforts to reduce the prevalence of undernutrition need to focus on reducing the prevalence of undernutrition without promoting excess weight gain. Future economic advances need to consider integrated approaches to improving economic standings of households without

  16. From vision to reality: implementing health reforms in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, S

    1997-06-01

    This study describes how members of a health team, from the national health system to the local population, implement reform directives and activities in Lusaka, Zambia. In order to determine the influence of the different actors in the health system on the policy outcomes, the study applied the three-dimensional definition of power by Luke and the concept of veto point of Pressman and Wildavsky. This research showed that the different actors expressed agreement on the nature of the National Strategic Health Plan by the Ministry of Health, which became operational in 1995, but the consensus was nevertheless accompanied with opposing attitudes especially on its strong democratization tone. The information provided by the actors also differs in terms of the rationale and implementation mode of policies. Furthermore, in the Lusaka health system, the Minister, district managers, and in-charges were seen as influential on the implementation processes of the reform, sitting in a critical veto point and exercising three types of powers which were expressed through overt, covert, and latent conflicts.

  17. Seroprevalence of Canine Parvovirus in Dogs in Lusaka District, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis is a highly contagious enteric disease of young dogs. Limited studies have been done in Zambia to investigate the prevalence of CPV in dogs. Blood was collected from dogs from three veterinary clinics (clinic samples, n = 174) and one township of Lusaka (field samples, n = 56). Each dog's age, sex, breed, and vaccination status were recorded. A haemagglutination assay using pig erythrocytes and modified live parvovirus vaccine as the antigen was used. Antibodies to CPV were detected in 100% of dogs (unvaccinated or vaccinated). The titres ranged from 160 to 10240 with a median of 1280. Vaccinated dogs had significantly higher antibody titres compared to unvaccinated (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference in titres of clinic samples compared to field samples (p < 0.0001) but not within breed (p = 0.098) or sex (p = 0.572). Multiple regression analysis showed that only age and vaccination status were significant predictors of antibody titres. The presence of antibody in all dogs suggests that the CPV infection is ubiquitous and the disease is endemic, hence the need for research to determine the protection conferred by vaccination and natural exposure to the virus under local conditions. PMID:27699205

  18. Urban women's informal savings and credit systems in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'reilly, C

    1996-05-01

    This article is based on findings from semi-structured interviews and discussions among "chilimba" groups in Zambia. Chilimba groups are primarily women's groups that engage in credit and savings programs. Group membership ranges from 4 to 20 members. The women agree on a fixed, regular cash contribution that is given in turn to each member in a specified order. Market groups tend to be larger and contributions of about a dollar are made daily. Smaller groups tend to make larger, but less frequent contributions. Default is rare, as the commitment is taken very seriously. New members are added at the end of the rotation. Loans can be used for domestic or business use. Chilimba groups are evidence that very poor people desire savings. Chilimba brings together people with similar financial needs and resources. Chilimba does not require formal, written procedures or formal institutional frameworks. Chilimba is not a remedy for reducing overall poverty. It is appropriate only for people with some regular source of income. It does not serve as a safety net in emergencies. Long-term loans are not possible. A limitation is its openness and lack of structure that permit potential abuse. It is a livelihood strategy for women, but benefits could be gained from including men. It is urged that groups consider whether the position of the poor is being enhanced or undermined. Different models need to be tested. Members themselves must decide on the type and phasing of activities.

  19. Seroprevalence of Canine Parvovirus in Dogs in Lusaka District, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngonda Saasa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus (CPV enteritis is a highly contagious enteric disease of young dogs. Limited studies have been done in Zambia to investigate the prevalence of CPV in dogs. Blood was collected from dogs from three veterinary clinics (clinic samples, n=174 and one township of Lusaka (field samples, n=56. Each dog’s age, sex, breed, and vaccination status were recorded. A haemagglutination assay using pig erythrocytes and modified live parvovirus vaccine as the antigen was used. Antibodies to CPV were detected in 100% of dogs (unvaccinated or vaccinated. The titres ranged from 160 to 10240 with a median of 1280. Vaccinated dogs had significantly higher antibody titres compared to unvaccinated (p<0.001. There was a significant difference in titres of clinic samples compared to field samples (p<0.0001 but not within breed (p=0.098 or sex (p=0.572. Multiple regression analysis showed that only age and vaccination status were significant predictors of antibody titres. The presence of antibody in all dogs suggests that the CPV infection is ubiquitous and the disease is endemic, hence the need for research to determine the protection conferred by vaccination and natural exposure to the virus under local conditions.

  20. Climate Trends and Farmers' Perceptions of Climate Change in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Brian P; Wineman, Ayala; Sitko, Nicholas J

    2017-02-01

    A number of studies use meteorological records to analyze climate trends and assess the impact of climate change on agricultural yields. While these provide quantitative evidence on climate trends and the likely effects thereof, they incorporate limited qualitative analysis of farmers' perceptions of climate change and/or variability. The present study builds on the quantitative methods used elsewhere to analyze climate trends, and in addition compares local narratives of climate change with evidence found in meteorological records in Zambia. Farmers offer remarkably consistent reports of a rainy season that is growing shorter and less predictable. For some climate parameters-notably, rising average temperature-there is a clear overlap between farmers' observations and patterns found in the meteorological records. However, the data do not support the perception that the rainy season used to begin earlier, and we generally do not detect a reported increase in the frequency of dry spells. Several explanations for these discrepancies are offered. Further, we provide policy recommendations to help farmers adapt to climate change/variability, as well as suggestions to shape future climate change policies, programs, and research in developing countries.

  1. Coal prospects in Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-01

    Increasing demand for coal in Asia is stimulating interest in the potentially large coal resources in Southern African countries such as Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia. These countries have been slow to utilise their coal as local demand has been limited and the means to export coal has been inadequate. The governments in these regions are now recognising coal as a strategically important commodity, capable of earning foreign revenue but also adding value to the economy by generating much needed electricity. This report looks in turn at the role of coal in the energy economies of each of these countries. As in most emerging economies, the provision of a reliable and cost-effective supply of electricity to industries and people is essential for economic growth and the welfare of communities. Demand for Africa's mineral commodities such as diamonds and copper is driving a massive need for electricity and coal will play a major role. Not only does the mining industry need power, but with these growing industries come communities and commerce which are also in need of energy.

  2. Climate Trends and Farmers' Perceptions of Climate Change in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Brian P.; Wineman, Ayala; Sitko, Nicholas J.

    2017-02-01

    A number of studies use meteorological records to analyze climate trends and assess the impact of climate change on agricultural yields. While these provide quantitative evidence on climate trends and the likely effects thereof, they incorporate limited qualitative analysis of farmers' perceptions of climate change and/or variability. The present study builds on the quantitative methods used elsewhere to analyze climate trends, and in addition compares local narratives of climate change with evidence found in meteorological records in Zambia. Farmers offer remarkably consistent reports of a rainy season that is growing shorter and less predictable. For some climate parameters—notably, rising average temperature—there is a clear overlap between farmers' observations and patterns found in the meteorological records. However, the data do not support the perception that the rainy season used to begin earlier, and we generally do not detect a reported increase in the frequency of dry spells. Several explanations for these discrepancies are offered. Further, we provide policy recommendations to help farmers adapt to climate change/variability, as well as suggestions to shape future climate change policies, programs, and research in developing countries.

  3. Acceptability and uptake of neonatal male circumcision in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Emily; Li, Michelle; Mugisa, Bridget; Bowa, Kasonde; Linyama, David; Stringer, Elizabeth; Stringer, Jeffrey

    2013-07-01

    Neonatal male circumcision (NMC) is an uncommon procedure in Southern Africa, but is being scaled up in Zambia for long-term HIV prevention. We conducted a cross-sectional survey on NMC with a convenience sample of mothers of newborn boys at two public clinics in Lusaka. Following the survey, mothers received information on availability of NMC, and uptake of the service was tracked. Predictors of uptake were assessed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Of the 1,249 eligible mothers approached, 1000 (80%) agreed to participate. Although 97% of surveyed mothers said they definitely or probably planned to have their newborn son circumcised, only 11% of participants brought their newborn sons for NMC. Significant predictors of uptake in adjusted models included: Older maternal age (AOR 3.77, 95% CI 1.48-9.63 for age 36 and above compared to mothers age 25 and below), having attended antenatal care at an NMC site (AOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.32-3.44), older paternal age (AOR 4.36, 95% CI 1.28-14.91 for age 26-35 compared to fathers age 25 and below), and the infant's father being circumcised (AOR 2.21, 95% CI 1.35-3.62). While acceptability studies in Southern Africa have suggested strong support for MC among parents for having their sons circumcised, this may not translate to high uptake of newly-introduced NMC services.

  4. HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Kapembwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Epidemiologic data of HIV and viral hepatitis coinfection are needed in sub-Saharan Africa to guide health policy for hepatitis screening and optimized antiretroviral therapy (ART. Materials and Methods: We screened 323 HIV-infected, ART-eligible adults for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and hepatitis C antibody (HCV Ab at a tertiary hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. We collected basic demographic, medical, and laboratory data to determine predictors for coinfection. Results: Of 323 enrolled patients, 32 (9.9%; 95% CI=6.7-13.2% were HBsAg positive, while 4 (1.2%; 95% CI=0.03-2.4% were HCV Ab positive. Patients with hepatitis B coinfection were more likely to be 200 IU/L was uncommon and did not differ between the two groups (3.4% vs. 2.3%; P=0.5. We were unable to determine predictors of hepatitis C infection due to the low prevalence of disease. Conclusions: HIV and hepatitis B coinfection was common among patients initiating ART at this tertiary care facility. Routine screening for hepatitis B should be considered for HIV-infected persons in southern Africa.

  5. Molecular epidemiology and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for diagnosis of infection with rabies virus in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleya, Walter; Namangala, Boniface; Mweene, Aaron; Zulu, Luke; Fandamu, Paul; Banda, Douglas; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi; Ishii, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The National Livestock Epidemiology and Information Center (NALEIC) in Zambia reported over 132 cases of canine rabies diagnosed by the direct fluorescent antibody test (DFAT) from 2004 to 2009. In this study, the lineage of rabies virus (RABV) in Zambia was determined by phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) gene sequences. Total RNA was extracted from 87-DFAT brain specimens out of which only 35 (40%) were positive on nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for each gene, and 26 being positive for both genes. Positive specimens for the N (n=33) and G (n=35) genes were used for phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the N gene showed two phylogenetic clusters in Zambia belonging to the Africa 1b lineage present in eastern and southern Africa. While one cluster exclusively comprised Zambian strains, the other was more heterogeneous regarding the RABV origins and included strains from Tanzania, Mozambique and Zambia. Phylogenetic analysis of the G gene revealed similar RABV strains in different hosts and regions of Zambia. We designed primers for reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay from the consensus sequence of the N gene in an attempt to improve the molecular diagnosis of RABV in Zambia. The specificity and reproducibility of the RT-LAMP assay was confirmed with actual clinical specimens. Therefore, the RT-LAMP assay presented in this study may prove to be useful for routine diagnosis of rabies in Zambia.

  6. Doença pulmonar por Mycobacterium tuberculosis e micobactérias não-tuberculosas entre pacientes recém-diagnosticados como HIV positivos em Moçambique, África Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial isolates among patients with recent HIV infection in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabete Abrantes Nunes

    2008-10-01

    -rifampicina continua sendo a escolha apropriada para o início do tratamento.OBJECTIVE: Mycobacteriosis is frequently diagnosed among HIV-infected patients. In Mozambique, where few patients are under antiretroviral therapy and the prevalence of tuberculosis is high, there is need for better characterization of mycobacteria at the species level, as well as for the identification of patterns of resistance to antituberculous drugs. METHODS: We studied a sample of 503 HIV-infected individuals suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis. Of those 503, 320 tested positive for mycobacteria through sputum smear microscopy or culture of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. RESULTS: Acid-fast bacilli were observed in the sputum of 73% of the individuals presenting positive cultures. Of 277 isolates tested, only 3 were nontuberculous mycobacteria: 2 were identified as Mycobacterium avium and one was identified as M. simiae. Strains initially characterized as M. tuberculosis complex through polymerase chain reaction restriction analysis (PRA of the hsp65 gene were later confirmed as such through PRA of the gyrB gene. Among the M. tuberculosis isolates, resistance patterns were as follows: to isoniazid, 14%; to rifampin, 6%; and multidrug resistance, 5%. Previously treated cases showed significantly higher rates of resistance to first-line antituberculous drugs. The most common radiological pattern was interstitial infiltrate (in 67%, followed by mediastinal lymph node enlargement (in 30%, bronchiectasis (in 28%, miliary nodules (in 18% and cavitation (in 12%. Patients infected with nontuberculous mycobacteria presented clinical profiles indistinguishable from those of other patients. The median CD4 lymphocyte count in this group was 134 cells/mm³. CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong association between tuberculosis and AIDS in Mozambique, as expected in a country with a high prevalence of tuberculosis. Although drug resistance rates are high, the isoniazid-rifampin regimen continues to be the appropriate

  7. Azurophil granule proteins constitute the major mycobactericidal proteins in human neutrophils and enhance the killing of mycobacteria in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna Jena

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mycobacteria reside in, and are in turn controlled by, macrophages. However, emerging data suggest that neutrophils also play a critical role in innate immunity to tuberculosis, presumably by their different antibacterial granule proteins. In this study, we purified neutrophil azurophil and specific granules and systematically analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of some purified azurophil and specific granule proteins against M. smegmatis, M. bovis-BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Using gel overlay and colony forming unit assays we showed that the defensin-depleted azurophil granule proteins (AZP were more active against mycobacteria compared to other granule proteins and cytosolic proteins. The proteins showing antimycobacterial activity were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate that the AZP disintegrate bacterial cell membrane resulting in killing of mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of AZP to murine macrophage RAW 264.7, THP-1 and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages significantly reduced the intracellular survival of mycobacteria without exhibiting cytotoxic activity on macrophages. Immunofluorescence studies showed that macrophages actively endocytose neutrophil granular proteins. Treatment with AZP resulted in increase in co-localization of BCG containing phagosomes with lysosomes but not in increase of autophagy. These data demonstrate that neutrophil azurophil proteins may play an important role in controlling intracellular survival of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  8. Azurophil granule proteins constitute the major mycobactericidal proteins in human neutrophils and enhance the killing of mycobacteria in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Prajna; Mohanty, Soumitra; Mohanty, Tirthankar; Kallert, Stephanie; Morgelin, Matthias; Lindstrøm, Thomas; Borregaard, Niels; Stenger, Steffen; Sonawane, Avinash; Sørensen, Ole E

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria reside in, and are in turn controlled by, macrophages. However, emerging data suggest that neutrophils also play a critical role in innate immunity to tuberculosis, presumably by their different antibacterial granule proteins. In this study, we purified neutrophil azurophil and specific granules and systematically analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of some purified azurophil and specific granule proteins against M. smegmatis, M. bovis-BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Using gel overlay and colony forming unit assays we showed that the defensin-depleted azurophil granule proteins (AZP) were more active against mycobacteria compared to other granule proteins and cytosolic proteins. The proteins showing antimycobacterial activity were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate that the AZP disintegrate bacterial cell membrane resulting in killing of mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of AZP to murine macrophage RAW 264.7, THP-1 and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages significantly reduced the intracellular survival of mycobacteria without exhibiting cytotoxic activity on macrophages. Immunofluorescence studies showed that macrophages actively endocytose neutrophil granular proteins. Treatment with AZP resulted in increase in co-localization of BCG containing phagosomes with lysosomes but not in increase of autophagy. These data demonstrate that neutrophil azurophil proteins may play an important role in controlling intracellular survival of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  9. Mycobacteria in pond waters as a source of non-specific reactions to bovine tuberculin in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazda, J; Cook, B R

    1988-12-01

    When 71 samples were collected from ponds throughout New Zealand, 35 (49.3%) were found to contain mycobacteria. The majority of these strains (62.9%) belonged to a homogeneous group (tentative designation H-Group, which differed from any known mycobacterial species. Mycobacteria of this H-group had also been found in sphagnum vegetation growing in the immediate vicinity of many of the ponds. H-Group mycobacteria induce sensitization in guinea pigs against bovine tuberculin. The PPD sensitin prepared from these mycobacteria gave rise to larger reactions in guinea pigs than did bovine tuberculin when used in the same concentrations (500 and 50 TU). The possible sensitization of cattle to bovine tuberculin via drinking water containing H-Group mycobacteria, is discussed. The larger size of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions in guinea pigs using the same concentrations of bovine and homologous tuberculin, suggests that comparative intradermal testing might enable this non-specific reaction to be distinguished from the specific reaction developed during bovine tuberculosis infection in cattle.

  10. Perspectives on literacy, gender and change: a case for Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwansa, D M

    1995-01-01

    This study examines illiterate participants' perceptions of literacy training that was conducted after 6-12 months of training in one urban Copperbelt province and one center in rural Luapula province in Zambia. Interviews were conducted among 29 female and 11 male participants and 15 male and 3 female officials. Analysis is based on interviews, observations, and written records. The researcher identified five broad areas of change: affective, attitudinal, pedagogic, economic, and sociopolitical. This study shows that literacy in rural areas is beneficial to people personally, to gender relations, and to socioeconomic development. The findings support the arguments advanced by Rockhill (1987), Bhola (1981), Freire (1970), and Nyerere (1978) about the need to reduce the fears and insecurities associated with being illiterate and the gain from developing people and not just production. The literacy training did not enrich people culturally nor did it alleviate poverty; it concentrated on integrating people into new modes of production. Affective changes included changes in self-esteem and feeling happier. Attitudinal changes included positive learning experiences about child care among both men and women. Nutrition and sanitation improved. Couples reported a greater effort at demonstrating polite behavior and respect toward each other. Literacy increased their status among friends and was accepted in steps, such as being proud of knowing how to write their name. Some participants changed their attitudes toward family planning, and clinic attendance increased. Literacy gave some more confidence and awareness of social relations. Literacy helped read seed and fertilizer labels. Lack of reading materials was a problem. Participants reported reading the Bible and magazines and writing letters. Participants tended to participate in church or literacy groups rather than political ones.

  11. Diagnostic approaches to malaria in Zambia, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukonka, Victor M; Chanda, Emmanuel; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Elbadry, Maha A; Wamulume, Pauline K; Mwanza-Ingwe, Mercy; Lubinda, Jailos; Laytner, Lindsey A; Zhang, Wenyi; Mushinge, Gabriel; Haque, Ubydul

    2015-06-03

    Malaria is an important health burden in Zambia with proper diagnosis remaining as one of the biggest challenges. The need for reliable diagnostics is being addressed through the introduction of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). However, without sufficient laboratory amenities in many parts of the country, diagnosis often still relies on non-specific, clinical symptoms. In this study, geographical information systems were used to both visualize and analyze the spatial distribution and the risk factors related to the diagnosis of malaria. The monthly reported, district-level number of malaria cases from January 2009 to December 2014 were collected from the National Malaria Control Center (NMCC). Spatial statistics were used to reveal cluster tendencies that were subsequently linked to possible risk factors, using a non-spatial regression model. Significant, spatio-temporal clusters of malaria were spotted while the introduction of RDTs made the number of clinically diagnosed malaria cases decrease by 33% from 2009 to 2014. The limited access to road network(s) was found to be associated with higher levels of malaria, which can be traced by the expansion of health promotion interventions by the NMCC, indicating enhanced diagnostic capability. The capacity of health facilities has been strengthened with the increased availability of proper diagnostic tools and through retraining of community health workers. To further enhance spatial decision support systems, a multifaceted approach is required to ensure mobilization and availability of human, infrastructural and technological resources. Surveillance based on standardized geospatial or other analytical methods should be used by program managers to design, target, monitor and assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of malaria diagnostic resources country-wide.

  12. Nutrient and carbon cycling in the Kafue River (Zambia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbruegg, R.; Senn, D.; Lehmann, M.; Wamulume, J.; Nyambe, I.; Wehrli, B.

    2008-12-01

    The lower Kafue River in central Zambia flows through the Kafue Flats (830 sq. km), a sensitive floodplain ecosystem (Ramsar site), and serves as an important subsistence fishery. The lower Kafue River (Qavg ~ 300 m3/s) is heavily impacted by two dams that regulate flow and flooding, and in so doing have substantially degraded the habitats. While the hydrology and ecology of the system have been studied extensively in some sections, there have been no systematic studies of the dam impacts on floodplain biogeochemistry. In May 2008 we initiated a study of C, N, and P cycling in the lower Kafue River through sampling at 10-20 km resolution along 300 km of river. Low inorganic nitrogen levels (40 uM), suggesting that the riverine N budget is dominated by organic N. Phosphate concentrations increased by a factor of 4 along the river (0.2 uM to 0.8 uM), and transitioned from representing only a small fraction of total P upstream to accounting for nearly 100% of total P at downstream stations. Along one short (35 km; travel time ~ 16 h), relatively pristine stretch of river with a substantial flow rate (400 m3/s) and no visible tributaries, dissolved oxygen levels decreased from >5 mg/l to 1 mg/l. A drop in pH from (7.9 to 7.2) accompanied the sharp oxygen decline, consistent with respiration occurring either within the river or in the adjacent floodplain. Low dissolved oxygen levels (<2 mg/l). persisted for another 150 km downstream despite reaeration. This presentation will explore in greater detail the factors contributing to this persistent low oxygen stretch in the Kafue River, along with an exploration of N, C, and P cycling in the system

  13. The Use of Insects as Human Food in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel E. Ghaly

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The life cycle and culture structure of two commonly eaten worms in Zambia (Isoberlinia paniculata and Miombo/Mopani were evaluated. The worms were grown on an artificial medium to evaluate the potential of producing them on a commercial scale. Approach: An interesting characteristic of the worms studied was that they reached their maximum weight and maximum length at the same time. Results: The larvae started to decrease in weight soon after reaching their maximum size suggesting that they should be harvested shortly before reaching their maximum length (36 days old. Only 10% mortality was observed with the older larvae of the Miombo/Mopani worm. A system where eggs are separated from adults and hatched in separate chambers would alleviate the danger of losing the population due to microbial infection. The high moisture content of the live larvae (60.5-60.9% could cause handling and storage problems. Drying and grinding the larvae would reduce them to easily manageable forms and would improve their marketability as a novel food. The results obtained from this study showed the potential of using these insects as a protein source for human consumption. They had structured animal protein that contained the essential amino acids, lipids, vitamins, minerals and energy required for human growth and their nutrition contents are comparable to those of conventional foods. These worms are harvested from trees in Africa but the industry is facing droughts and overexploitation that has lead to local extinctions in several areas. Conclusion/Recommendations: Therefore, further research is required to evaluate their growth on low substrates and to assess the effects of environmental parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, CO2 and heat production on food consumption and protein yield and quality. This information will aid in the design of an optimal commercial insect production system. Appropriate processing and marketing

  14. Strategies of the Poorest in Local Water Conflict and Cooperation - Evidence from Vietnam, Bolivia and Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funder, M.; Bustamante Zenteno, R.R.; Cossio Rojas, V.; Huong, P.T.M.; Koppen, van B.; Mweemba, C.; Nyambe, L.; Phuong, L.T.T.; Skielboe, T.

    2012-01-01

    Media stories often speak of a future dominated by large-scale water wars. Rather less attention has been paid to the way water conflicts already play out at local levels and form part of people’s everyday lives. Based on case study studies from Vietnam, Bolivia and Zambia, this paper examines the s

  15. Returns to Schooling in Less Developed Countries: New Evidence from Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Skyt; Westergård-Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2001-01-01

    In our analysis of returns to schooling in Zambia, we look at the rural and urban population separately, and estimate the returns to schooling in each region based on a selection model in two stages. For urban areas we find that the returns to primary schooling are nil whereas the returns to scho...

  16. The Impact of an Unconditional Cash Transfer on Early Child Development: The Zambia Child Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenfeld, David; Prencipe, Leah; Handa, Sudhanshu; Hawkinson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on unconditional cash transfers (UCTs) despite their growing prevalence in Africa, including South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Malawi, Lesotho, and Uganda. In this study, researchers implemented a randomized control trial with over 2,500 households to investigate the impact of Africa's child grant program on…

  17. Factors Related to Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion: A Case for Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwana, Florence Chuzu; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive education has become a global trend in the provision of services for students with disabilities. In Zambia and other developing nations, international initiatives from UNESCO and other nongovernmental organisations have contributed to the consensus that all children have a right to a free and appropriate education and that all students…

  18. Un/Doing Gender? A Case Study of School Policy and Practice in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Monisha

    2009-01-01

    This article explores an attempt to disrupt gender inequality in a unique, low-cost private school in Ndola, Zambia. It examines deliberate school policies aimed at "undoing gender" or fostering greater gender equity. These include efforts to maintain gender parity at all levels of the school and the requirement that both young men and…

  19. Aflatoxin contamination of groundnut and maize in Zambia: observed and potential concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize and groundnut, important staples in Zambia, are susceptible to aflatoxin-producing fungi. Aflatoxins are potent human carcinogens also associated with stunting and immunosuppression. Although health and economic burdens of aflatoxins are well known, patterns of contamination in maize and grou...

  20. Condition and management of the rangelands in the western province of Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, R.M.T.

    1996-01-01


    A land evaluation for extensive grazing was conducted to determine the potential carrying capacity (CC) of the Western Province of Zambia. A hierarchical land classification resulted in Land Regions (9), Land Systems (32), Land Units (124) and Land Facets (415). The vegetation was

  1. Developing a Nutrition and Health Education Program for Primary Schools in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jane; Muehlhoff, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    School-based health and nutrition interventions in developing countries aim at improving children's nutrition and learning ability. In addition to the food and health inputs, children need access to education that is relevant to their lives, of good quality, and effective in its approach. Based on evidence from the Zambia Nutrition Education in…

  2. Extremely Drug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Infections in Patients in Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Lukwesa-Musyani, Chileshe

    2013-01-01

    Two cases of extremely drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg isolated from patients in Zambia were investigated by utilizing MIC determinations and whole-genome sequencing. The isolates were resistant to, and harbored genes toward, nine drug classes, including fluoroquinolones...

  3. The emergence and evolution of HIV counselling in Zambia: a 25-year history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simbaya, J.; Moyer, E.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related counselling practices have evolved since emerging in Zambia in 1987. Whereas, initially, the goal of HIV counselling was to provide psychological support to the dying and their families, as knowledge about HIV grew, counselling objectives expanded to include behavioural change, encouragi

  4. Natural and human induced factors influencing the abundance of Schistosoma host snails in Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monde, Concillia; Syampungani, Stephen; Brink, van den Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a global public health problem affecting about 240 million people. In Zambia, 2 million are infected while 3 million live with the risk of getting infected. Research and interventions relating to schistosomiasis are mainly linked to disease epidemiology. Malacological and

  5. The emergence and evolution of HIV counselling in Zambia: a 25-year history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simbaya, J.; Moyer, E.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related counselling practices have evolved since emerging in Zambia in 1987. Whereas, initially, the goal of HIV counselling was to provide psychological support to the dying and their families, as knowledge about HIV grew, counselling objectives expanded to include behavioural change, encouragi

  6. Chloroquine- and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine-resistant falciparum malaria in vivo - a pilot study in rural Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, HM; Kager, J; Koetsier, DW; van der Werf, TS

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chloroquine (CQ) and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) are the predominantly used antimalarials in Zambia and other parts of East Africa, but increasing resistance of P. falciparum is a major concern. METHODS Seventy consecutive patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were enrolled.

  7. Exploring Understandings of Inclusion in Schools in Zambia and Tanzania Using Reflective Writing and Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Susie

    2011-01-01

    In this article I explore insights gained from participating in an exploratory, small-scale study led by the Enabling Education Network (EENET) in 17 schools in northern Zambia and five schools in Tanzania. Facilitating South-based research, while based in a Northern university, raises complex ethical issues about voice and control which are…

  8. Developing a Nutrition and Health Education Program for Primary Schools in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jane; Muehlhoff, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    School-based health and nutrition interventions in developing countries aim at improving children's nutrition and learning ability. In addition to the food and health inputs, children need access to education that is relevant to their lives, of good quality, and effective in its approach. Based on evidence from the Zambia Nutrition Education in…

  9. Chiefs and the State in independent Zambia : exploring the Zambian national press

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, W.M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Zambia is among the few African countries where chiefs occupy an honorable position at the national level, and where a House of Chiefs is established, complementary to Parliament. This paper examines the relationship between chiefs and the central government on the basis of an analysis of newspaper

  10. Determinants of child nutritional status in the eastern province of Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manda, Julius; Gardebroek, Koos; Khonje, Makaiko G.; Alene, Arega D.; Mutenje, Munyaradzi; Kassie, Menale

    2016-01-01

    Using household survey data from a sample of 810 households, this paper analyses the determinants of children’s nutritional status and evaluates the impacts of improved maize varieties on child malnutrition in eastern Zambia. The paper uses an endogenous switching regression technique, combined w

  11. Cost of abortions in Zambia: A comparison of safe abortion and post abortion care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Divya; Leone, Tiziana; Coast, Ernestina; Murray, Susan Fairley; Hukin, Eleanor; Vwalika, Bellington

    2017-02-01

    Unsafe abortion is a significant but preventable cause of maternal mortality. Although induced abortion has been legal in Zambia since 1972, many women still face logistical, financial, social, and legal obstacles to access safe abortion services, and undergo unsafe abortion instead. This study provides the first estimates of costs of post abortion care (PAC) after an unsafe abortion and the cost of safe abortion in Zambia. In the absence of routinely collected data on abortions, we used multiple data sources: key informant interviews, medical records and hospital logbooks. We estimated the costs of providing safe abortion and PAC services at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka and then projected these costs to generate indicative cost estimates for Zambia. Due to unavailability of data on the actual number of safe abortions and PAC cases in Zambia, we used estimates from previous studies and from other similar countries, and checked the robustness of our estimates with sensitivity analyses. We found that PAC following an unsafe abortion can cost 2.5 times more than safe abortion care. The Zambian health system could save as much as US$0.4 million annually if those women currently treated for an unsafe abortion instead had a safe abortion.

  12. Condition and management of the rangelands in the Western Province of Zambia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, R.M.T.

    1996-01-01

    A land evaluation for extensive grazing was conducted to determine the potential carrying capacity (CC) of the Western Province of Zambia. A hierarchical land classification resulted in Land Regions (9), Land Systems (32), Land Units (124) and Land Facets (415). The vegetation was surveyed, resultin

  13. The Kazanga festival : ethnicity as cultural mediation and transformation in central western Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the cultural dynamics of ethnicity in the context of a postcolonial African State, Zambia. The opening sections define ethnicity and pinpoint its central dilemma: while unmistakably constructed and thus selectively empowering the brokers coordinating the construction process, eth

  14. Disease constraints for utilization of the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) on game ranches in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron M; Munag'andu, Hetron M; Siamudaala, Victor M; Nambota, Andrew; Bwalya, John M; Munyeme, Musso; Mweene, Aaron S; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Eco-tourism depending on wildlife is becoming increasingly profitable and landowners are beginning to favor game farming and ecotourism. In these areas, large-scale translocation of wildlife involves a diversity of species and large populations. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is one of the major tourist attractions in Zambia. It accounts for 8.7% and 12.4% of the total animal species hunted in the Game Management Areas and the total hunting revenue earned in Zambia, respectively. It is ecologically an important animal species essential for the purpose of habitat control and facilitating the provision of suitable grazing pastures. However, the rearing of the African buffalo on game ranches has been hampered by its carrier state of the Southern Africa Terroritory (SAT) serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus (FMD). The African buffalo is also known to be a carrier of Theileria parva lawrencei, the causative agent of corridor disease (CD) that continues to have devastating effects on the livestock industry in Zambia. In addition, the importation of buffaloes from countries with populations endemic to bovine tuberculosis is highly restricted. Veterinary regulations in Zambia, strongly advocate against the translocation of buffaloes from protected areas to private ranches for disease control purposes thereby mounting a considerable constraint on the economic and ecological viability of the industry. It is hoped that this review will motivate the relevant government authorities in exploiting ways in which this animal species play a central role in eco-tourism.

  15. Tuberculosis in the mines of Zambia:A case for intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pascalina Chanda-Kapata; Doris Osei-Afriyie; Connrad Mwansa; Nathan Kapata

    2016-01-01

    Zambia is among the sub-Saharan countries highly burdened with tuberculosis (TB) and has an estimated prevalence rate of 638 per 100 000 population in those aged 15 years and above. The mining industry is the main contributor to the country's gross national product, although it is associated with public health challenges, with TB in the mines being among the occupational health diseases having a negative economic impact and threatening to delay the control of TB in the country. We reviewed available evidence on the extent of the burden of TB in the mines so as to inform the development of targeted interventions for the post-2015 End TB Strategy. This was a review of published data from Medline/Pubmed, Cochrane Library and Embase, including unpublished “grey”literature on the burden of TB and the risk factors of TB in the mines of Zambia. There is limited research in Zambia to fully understand the burden of TB and risk factors asso-ciated with TB in the mines. However, the few studies and data available have shown that TB is a significant health problem requiring interventions to improve the quality of life of miners, ex-miners and surrounding communities. TB is a potential problem in the mines of Zambia and the actual burden needs to be determined. Exposure to silica as a risk factor needs further investigation.

  16. The Information Marketing Concept and the Implementation of National Information Policy (NIP) in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundu, Maurice C.

    This paper describes the purpose of a national information policy in general, the process that led to the formation of such a policy in Zambia, and the requirements for its successful implementation. Particular attention is paid to the concept of information marketing. It is argued that such a concept would be an implementation requirement if…

  17. Assessing the Consequences of Stigma for Tuberculosis Patients in Urban Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Anne Lia; de laat, Myrthe Manon; Kapata, Nathan; Gerrets, Rene; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Grobusch, Martin Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Stigma is one of the many factors hindering tuberculosis (TB) control by negatively affecting hospital delay and treatment compliance. In Zambia, the morbidity and mortality due to TB remains high, despite extended public health attempts to control the epidemic and to diminish stigma.

  18. Predictors of Attitudes toward Intimate Partner Violence: A Comparative Study of Men in Zambia and Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawoko, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Attitudes toward intimate partner violence (IPV) were compared between Zambian and Kenyan men on sociodemographic, attitudinal, and structural predictors of such attitudes. Data were retrieved from the latest Demographic and Health Surveys in each country. The results showed that many men in Zambia (71%) and Kenya (68%) justified IPV to punish a…

  19. Adoption and Impacts of Sustainable Agricultural Practices on Maize Yields and Incomes: Evidence from Rural Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manda, J.; Alene, A.D.; Gardebroek, C.; Kassie, M.; Tembo, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses a multinomial endogenous treatment effects model and data from a sample of over 800 households and 3,000 plots to assess the determinants and impacts of adoption of sustainable agricultural practices (SAPs) on maize yields and household incomes in rural Zambia. Results show that adop

  20. Socio-economic development of women in Zambia, an analysis of two women's organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touwen, Anne

    1990-01-01

    This report on the role of local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in the improvement of the socioeconomic position of women in Zambia is based on anthropological fieldwork carried out in 1988 and 1989, and a consultancy mission undertaken on behalf of the Organization of Dutch volunteers abroad

  1. Information Provision in Emergency Settings: The Experience of Refugee Communities in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyengo, Brendah Kakulwa; Kanyengo, Christine Wamunyima

    2011-01-01

    This article identifies information provision services in emergency settings using Zambia as a case study by identifying innovative ways of providing library and information services. The thrust of the article is to analyze information management practices of organizations that work within refugee camps and how they take specific cognizance of the…

  2. Rural communities in the Central African context : the Nkoya of Central Western Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, W.M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Nkoya is an ethnic and linguistic label applying to about 50,000 people inhabiting the wooded plateau of Central Western Zambia. The author discusses the valley as the effective rural community and the villages as the main constituent social units within the valley and finally indicates the place of

  3. CORRESPONDENCE INSTRUCTION IN ETHIOPIA, KENYA, TANZANIA, MALAWI, ZAMBIA, AND UGANDA--EXPERIENCES, NEEDS, AND INTEREST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDSTROEM, LARS-OLOF

    THIS REPORT ON THE SALIENT FEATURES AND CONCERNS OF CORRESPONDENCE INSTRUCTION IN ETHIOPIA, KENYA, TANZANIA, MALAWI, ZAMBIA, AND UGANDA--(1) DISCUSSES ADVANTAGES, DISADVANTAGES, AND REQUIREMENTS OF THE CORRESPONDENCE METHOD IN AN AFRICAN CONTEXT, (2) SURVEYS CONDITIONS AND FACILITIES (POSTAL SERVICES, ROADS, INSTRUCTIONAL RADIO AND TELEVISION,…

  4. Gender, British Administration and Mission Management of Education in Zambia 1900-1939

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Julia

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of including gender in the analytical framework in a study of the management and provision of education in Zambia from 1900 to 1939. It shows that a focus on gender allows females to enter the historical narrative and the leadership of women such as Mabel Shaw, Hannah Frances Davidson and Julia Smith can be given…

  5. Religious innovation and political conflict in Zambia : a contribution to the interpretation of the Lumpa rising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, W.M.J.

    1976-01-01

    This article explores the deeper structural implications of the Lumpa rising in 1964, in the context of religious innovation, class formation, and the state in Zambia. After having mentioned the specific problems raised by Lumpa, the A. first discusses the background of religious innovation in Centr

  6. Factors Related to Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion: A Case for Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwana, Florence Chuzu; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive education has become a global trend in the provision of services for students with disabilities. In Zambia and other developing nations, international initiatives from UNESCO and other nongovernmental organisations have contributed to the consensus that all children have a right to a free and appropriate education and that all students…

  7. Comparative Policy Brief: Status of Intellectual Disabilities in the Republic of Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mung'omba, James

    2008-01-01

    In the Republic of Zambia, an estimated 256,000 persons have some form of disability, and of these, 5.4% have intellectual disabilities. Even now, traditional beliefs about the etiology of intellectual disabilities persist and considerable stigma is attached to the presence of persons with intellectual disabilities who are often excluded from…

  8. The Nature and Role of Religious Studies at the University of Zambia: 1985-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Brendan

    2008-01-01

    The place of religion in higher education has been and remains a complex issue internationally. This article aims to outline the nature and development of Religious Studies at the University of Zambia in Lusaka (UNZA) as an instance of how religion entered higher education in an African setting. In doing so, it will also provide perspectives on…

  9. Un/Doing Gender? A Case Study of School Policy and Practice in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Monisha

    2009-01-01

    This article explores an attempt to disrupt gender inequality in a unique, low-cost private school in Ndola, Zambia. It examines deliberate school policies aimed at "undoing gender" or fostering greater gender equity. These include efforts to maintain gender parity at all levels of the school and the requirement that both young men and women carry…

  10. Iodine levels in Edible Salt Sold in Malawi, Kenya and Zambia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iodine levels in Edible Salt Sold in Malawi, Kenya and Zambia. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... on the packets, which indicated that the salt was fortified with sufficient amount of potassium ... On the other hand, 50 % of Malawian samples had levels within the recommended range of 80-100 mg/kg.

  11. Aspects of productivity of traditionally managed Barotse cattle in the Western Province of Zambia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, van E.G.M.

    1994-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, traditionally managed livestock is important because of the provision of draught power and manure, the provision of security and investment possibilities, for the provision of meat and milk, and for social purposes (eg. brideprice, gifts). In the Western Province of Zambia

  12. Assessing the Consequences of Stigma for Tuberculosis Patients in Urban Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Anne Lia; de laat, Myrthe Manon; Kapata, Nathan; Gerrets, Rene; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Grobusch, Martin Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Stigma is one of the many factors hindering tuberculosis (TB) control by negatively affecting hospital delay and treatment compliance. In Zambia, the morbidity and mortality due to TB remains high, despite extended public health attempts to control the epidemic and to diminish stigma. Stu

  13. Comparative Policy Brief: Status of Intellectual Disabilities in the Republic of Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mung'omba, James

    2008-01-01

    In the Republic of Zambia, an estimated 256,000 persons have some form of disability, and of these, 5.4% have intellectual disabilities. Even now, traditional beliefs about the etiology of intellectual disabilities persist and considerable stigma is attached to the presence of persons with intellectual disabilities who are often excluded from…

  14. Folklore as an Instrument of Education among the Chewa People of Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Dennis; Morgan, W. John

    2013-01-01

    This article considers the folklore of the Chewa people of Zambia as an instrument of education. It suggests that there is only a fine distinction between Chewa culture ["mwambo wa a Chewa"] and Chewa education ["maphunziro ya Uchewa"]. The former comprises tribal "truths" to be imposed on the minds of the younger…

  15. 77 FR 66797 - Executive-Led Trade Mission to South Africa and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... participation fee is $4900 for large firms and $4,350 for small or medium-sized enterprises (SME) \\1\\ and trade....gov/doctm/tmcal.html-- and other Internet web sites, press releases to general and trade media, direct... International Trade Administration Executive-Led Trade Mission to South Africa and Zambia AGENCY: International...

  16. 77 FR 31574 - Executive-Led Trade Mission to South Africa and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ....gov/doctm/tmcal.html-- and other Internet web sites, press releases to general and trade media, direct... International Trade Administration Executive-Led Trade Mission to South Africa and Zambia AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. Mission Description The United States...

  17. Diagnosis and genotyping of African swine fever viruses from 2015 outbreaks in Zambia

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    Jonas Thoromo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 2015, a highly fatal haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs resembling African swine fever (ASF occurred in North Western, Copperbelt, and Lusaka provinces of Zambia. Molecular diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction targeting specific amplification of p72 (B646L gene of ASF virus (ASFV was conducted. Fourteen out of 16 domestic pigs from the affected provinces were found to be positive for ASFV. Phylogenetic analyses based on part of the p72 and the complete p54 (E183L genes revealed that all the ASFVs detected belonged to genotypes I and Id, respectively. Additionally, epidemiological data suggest that the same ASFV spread from Lusaka to other provinces possibly through uncontrolled and/or illegal pig movements. Although the origin of the ASFV that caused outbreaks in domestic pigs in Zambia could not be ascertained, it appears likely that the virus may have emerged from within the country or region, probably from a sylvatic cycle. It is recommended that surveillance of ASF, strict biosecurity, and quarantine measures be imposed in order to prevent further spread and emergence of new ASF outbreaks in Zambia.Keywords: African swine fever; Asfarviridae; Molecular epidemiology; Zambia

  18. Living the end of empire : politics and society in late colonial Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gewald, J.B.; Hinfelaar, M.; Macola, G.

    2011-01-01

    Building on the foundational work of the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute, the essays in this collective volume offer a picture of the late colonial period in Zambia. The volume is based on untapped archival material and sources that have emerged in recent years and throws new light on some of the histo

  19. Socio-economic development of women in Zambia, an analysis of two women's organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touwen, Anne

    1990-01-01

    This report on the role of local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in the improvement of the socioeconomic position of women in Zambia is based on anthropological fieldwork carried out in 1988 and 1989, and a consultancy mission undertaken on behalf of the Organization of Dutch volunteers abroad

  20. Isolation and molecular identification of biodegrading Mycobacteria from water supplies of Iranian hospitals.

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    Davood Azadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Some microorganisms, mainly members of two genera including Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium, were found to be capable of transforming and degrading of polluting agents. We herein report the isolation of a few mycobacteria with the ability to biodegrade organic and inorganic compounds from water supplies of Iranian hospitals.The water samples were collected from hospital water supplies. Isolation processes were done according to standard methods. The colonies were subcultured on Löwenstein-Jensen medium to obtain a pure culture. The identification and characterization of the isolates were based on conventional and molecular methods including direct sequence analysis of almost full length of 16S rRNA gene.The almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequences of the studied strains revealed that the isolates WP16, AW18-1 and AW18-3 were identified as M. fredriksbergense, AW18-2 as M. austroafricanum, AW27-2 as M. obuenseand AW27-6 as M. phocaicum.The relationship between our isolates and standard strains of Mycobacterium was supported by a phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA gene.In the current study we were able to isolate and characterize six mycobacteria with capability of transforming and degrading polluting agents from Iranian hospital environments. This is indeed the first report on isolation and characterization of mycobacteria with degrading capability of polluting agents from Iranian hospitals. It can be considered as a pioneer study to open up a new horizon in the study of microbial diversity in Iran with an objective-based and applied approach to tackle environmental challenges.

  1. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Igarashi, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: tigarash@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Primate Model, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Harashima, Hideyoshi, E-mail: harasima@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Sugita, Masahiko, E-mail: msugita@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection.

  2. Neutrophils exert protection in the early tuberculous granuloma by oxidative killing of mycobacteria phagocytosed from infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cambier, C J; Davis, J Muse; Hall, Christopher J; Crosier, Philip S; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2012-09-13

    Neutrophils are typically the first responders in host defense against invading pathogens, which they destroy by both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms. However, despite a longstanding recognition of neutrophil presence at disease sites in tuberculosis, their role in defense against mycobacteria is unclear. Here we exploit the genetic tractability and optical transparency of zebrafish to monitor neutrophil behavior and its consequences during infection with Mycobacterium marinum, a natural fish pathogen. In contrast to macrophages, neutrophils do not interact with mycobacteria at initial infection sites. Neutrophils are subsequently recruited to the nascent granuloma in response to signals from dying infected macrophages within the granuloma, which they phagocytose. Some neutrophils then rapidly kill the internalized mycobacteria through NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanisms. Our results provide a mechanistic link to the observed patterns of neutrophils in human tuberculous granulomas and the susceptibility of humans with chronic granulomatous disease to mycobacterial infection.

  3. Thiacetazone, an antitubercular drug that inhibits cyclopropanation of cell wall mycolic acids in mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Alahari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycolic acids are a complex mixture of branched, long-chain fatty acids, representing key components of the highly hydrophobic mycobacterial cell wall. Pathogenic mycobacteria carry mycolic acid sub-types that contain cyclopropane rings. Double bonds at specific sites on mycolic acid precursors are modified by the action of cyclopropane mycolic acid synthases (CMASs. The latter belong to a family of S-adenosyl-methionine-dependent methyl transferases, of which several have been well studied in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, namely, MmaA1 through A4, PcaA and CmaA2. Cyclopropanated mycolic acids are key factors participating in cell envelope permeability, host immunomodulation and persistence of M. tuberculosis. While several antitubercular agents inhibit mycolic acid synthesis, to date, the CMASs have not been shown to be drug targets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We have employed various complementary approaches to show that the antitubercular drug, thiacetazone (TAC, and its chemical analogues, inhibit mycolic acid cyclopropanation. Dramatic changes in the content and ratio of mycolic acids in the vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG, as well as in the related pathogenic species Mycobacterium marinum were observed after treatment with the drugs. Combination of thin layer chromatography, mass spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR analyses of mycolic acids purified from drug-treated mycobacteria showed a significant loss of cyclopropanation in both the alpha- and oxygenated mycolate sub-types. Additionally, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS NMR analyses on whole cells was used to detect cell wall-associated mycolates and to quantify the cyclopropanation status of the cell envelope. Further, overexpression of cmaA2, mmaA2 or pcaA in mycobacteria partially reversed the effects of TAC and its analogue on mycolic acid cyclopropanation, suggesting that the drugs act directly on CMASs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This

  4. Modifying culture conditions in chemical library screening identifies alternative inhibitors of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher H; Nisa, Shahista; Dempsey, Sandi; Jack, Cameron; O'Toole, Ronan

    2009-12-01

    In this study, application of a dual absorbance/fluorescence assay to a chemical library screen identified several previously unknown inhibitors of mycobacteria. In addition, growth conditions had a significant effect on the activity profile of the library. Some inhibitors such as Se-methylselenocysteine were detected only when screening was performed under nutrient-limited culture conditions as opposed to nutrient-rich culture conditions. We propose that multiple culture condition library screening is required for complete inhibitory profiling and for maximal antimycobacterial compound detection.

  5. Identification of a Novel Conjugative Plasmid in Mycobacteria That Requires Both Type IV and Type VII Secretion

    KAUST Repository

    Ummels, R.

    2014-09-23

    Conjugative plasmids have been identified in a wide variety of different bacteria, ranging from proteobacteria to firmicutes, and conjugation is one of the most efficient routes for horizontal gene transfer. The most widespread mechanism of plasmid conjugation relies on different variants of the type IV secretion pathway. Here, we describe the identification of a novel type of conjugative plasmid that seems to be unique for mycobacteria. Interestingly, while this plasmid is efficiently exchanged between different species of slow-growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it could not be transferred to any of the fast-growing mycobacteria tested. Genetic analysis of the conjugative plasmid showed the presence of a locus containing homologues of three type IV secretion system components and a relaxase. In addition, a new type VII secretion locus was present. Using transposon insertion mutagenesis, we show that in fact both these secretion systems are essential for conjugation, indicating that this plasmid represents a new class of conjugative plasmids requiring two secretion machineries. This plasmid could form a useful new tool to exchange or introduce DNA in slow-growing mycobacteria. IMPORTANCE: Conjugative plasmids play an important role in horizontal gene transfer between different bacteria and, as such, in their adaptation and evolution. This effect is most obvious in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. Thus far, conjugation of natural plasmids has been described only rarely for mycobacterial species. In fact, it is generally accepted that M. tuberculosis does not show any recent sign of horizontal gene transfer. In this study, we describe the identification of a new widespread conjugative plasmid that can also be efficiently transferred to M. tuberculosis. This plasmid therefore poses both a threat and an opportunity. The threat is that, through the acquisition of antibiotic resistance markers, this plasmid could start a rapid spread of

  6. Health workforce responses to global health initiatives funding: a comparison of Malawi and Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brugha Ruairí

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shortages of health workers are obstacles to utilising global health initiative (GHI funds effectively in Africa. This paper reports and analyses two countries' health workforce responses during a period of large increases in GHI funds. Methods Health facility record reviews were conducted in 52 facilities in Malawi and 39 facilities in Zambia in 2006/07 and 2008; quarterly totals from the last quarter of 2005 to the first quarter of 2008 inclusive in Malawi; and annual totals for 2004 to 2007 inclusive in Zambia. Topic-guided interviews were conducted with facility and district managers in both countries, and with health workers in Malawi. Results Facility data confirm significant scale-up in HIV/AIDS service delivery in both countries. In Malawi, this was supported by a large increase in lower trained cadres and only a modest increase in clinical staff numbers. Routine outpatient workload fell in urban facilities, in rural health centres and in facilities not providing antiretroviral treatment (ART, while it increased at district hospitals and in facilities providing ART. In Zambia, total staff and clinical staff numbers stagnated between 2004 and 2007. In rural areas, outpatient workload, which was higher than at urban facilities, increased further. Key informants described the effects of increased workloads in both countries and attributed staff migration from public health facilities to non-government facilities in Zambia to PEPFAR. Conclusions Malawi, which received large levels of GHI funding from only the Global Fund, managed to increase facility staff across all levels of the health system: urban, district and rural health facilities, supported by task-shifting to lower trained staff. The more complex GHI arena in Zambia, where both Global Fund and PEPFAR provided large levels of support, may have undermined a coordinated national workforce response to addressing health worker shortages, leading to a less effective

  7. The reach and impact of social marketing and reproductive health communication campaigns in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meekers Dominique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like many sub-Saharan African countries, Zambia is dealing with major health issues, including HIV/AIDS, family planning, and reproductive health. To address reproductive health problems and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zambia, several social marketing and health communication programs focusing on reproductive and HIV/AIDS prevention programs are being implemented. This paper describes the reach of these programs and assesses their impact on condom use. Methods This paper assesses the reach of selected radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS and of communications about the socially marketed Maximum condoms in Zambia, as well as their impact on condom use, using data from the 2001–2002 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey. To control for self-selection and endogeneity, we use a two-stage regression model to estimate the effect of program exposure on the behavioural outcomes. Results Those who were exposed to radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS were more likely to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.16 for men and 1.06 for women. Men highly exposed to Maximum condoms social marketing communication were more likely than those with low exposure to the program to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.48, and to have used a condom at their last sexual intercourse (OR = 1.23. Conclusion Findings suggest that the reproductive health and social marketing campaigns in Zambia reached a large portion of the population and had a significant impact on condom use. The results suggest that future reproductive health communication campaigns that invest in radio programming may be more effective than those investing in television programming, and that future campaigns should seek to increase their impact among women, perhaps by focusing on the specific constrains that prevent females from using condoms.

  8. Estudo comparativo entre um sistema de sonda genética e métodos clássicos na identificação das micobactérias Gene probes versus classical methods in the identification of mycobacteria

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    Andréa Gobetti Vieira Coelho

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O aparecimento da co-infecção tuberculose/HIV e o aumento de casos de doenças provocadas por micobactérias não-tuberculosas (MNT exigem repostas laboratoriais rápidas tanto no isolamento como na identificação das micobactérias. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a identificação das micobactérias através de sonda genética em comparação com os métodos bioquímicos clássicos. MÉTODOS: Entre 2002 e 2004, foram analisadas 178 culturas de micobactérias, confirmadas como bacilos álcool-ácido resistentes e obtidas de isolados clínicos de pacientes sintomáticos respiratórios ou com suspeita clínica de tuberculose pulmonar e/ou micobacterioses, atendidos nas Unidades de Saúde da Baixada Santista. RESULTADOS: A sonda genética identificou 137 amostras (77% como complexo Mycobacterium tuberculosis e 41 (23% como MNT. A discordância observada de 3% entre os métodos ocorreu apenas no ano de implantação (2002. Ao comparar os métodos, a sensibilidade, especificidade, valor preditivo positivo e valor preditivo negativo da sonda genética foram 98%, 93%, 98% e 93%, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES: Apesar do custo elevado, a identificação de micobactérias pela técnica molecular é mais rápida: máximo de 3 h vs. 28-30 dias para os métodos clássicos. A utilização de sondas genéticas é uma técnica molecular validada, simples e disponível no mercado, com elevada especificidade, sensibilidade e rapidez, o que justifica sua implantação e uso rotineiro em laboratórios de referência, facilitando o diagnóstico e permitindo uma intervenção clínica ágil.OBJECTIVE: The emergence of tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and the increase in the number of cases of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM require rapid laboratory test results in the isolation and identification of mycobacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the identification of mycobacteria by means of gene probes in comparison with

  9. Disappearance of some human African trypanosomiasis transmission foci in Zambia in the absence of a tsetse fly and trypanosomiasis control program over a period of forty years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanakasale, Victor; Songolo, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We conducted a situation analysis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Zambia from January 2000 to April 2007. The aim of this survey was to identify districts in Zambia that were still recording cases of HAT. Three districts namely, Mpika, Chama, and Chipata were found to be still reporting cases of HAT and thus lay in HAT transmission foci in North Eastern Zambia. During the period under review, 24 cases of HAT were reported from these three districts. We thereafter reviewed literature on the occurrence of HAT in Zambia from the early 1960s to mid 1990s. This revealed that HAT transmission foci were widespread in Western, North Western, Lusaka, Eastern, Luapula, and Northern Provinces of Zambia during this period. In this article we have tried to give possible reasons as to why the distribution of HAT transmission foci is so different between before and after 2000 when there has been no active national tsetse fly and trypanosomiasis control program in Zambia.

  10. Sexual and reproductive health services for young people in Kenya and Zambia : Providers attitudes and young peoples needs and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Warenius, Linnéa

    2008-01-01

    Background: Unintended pregnancy, abortion and STI, including HIV are common sexual and reproductive health problems among young people in Kenya and Zambia. Yet, the reproductive health services are underutilised. Nurses and midwives are key providers in the promotion young people s sexual and reproductive health in Kenya and Zambia. Aim: The overall aim was to describe and explore young people s sexual and reproductive health needs and experiences and to describe health ...

  11. COMPARISON OF CYTOCHROMES IN MYCOBACTERIA GROWN IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Takashi; Sato, Ryo; Shoji, Ko

    1964-01-01

    Kusaka, Takashi (National Institute for Leprosy Research, Tokyo, Japan), Ryo Sato, and Ko Shoji. Comparison of cytochromes in mycobacteria grown in vitro and in vivo. J. Bacteriol. 87:1383–1388. 1964.—Spectrophotometric investigations were made on cell suspensions or particulate fractions of four species of mycobacteria which had been cultivated in vitro. The results obtained indicated the presence in Mycobacterium smegmatis of cytochromes of the a, b1, and c types, as well as a CO-binding pigment similar to cytochrome o; in BCG and M. avium, cytochromes of the a, b, and c types were present; and, in M. paratuberculosis, cytochromes of the a, b1, and c types were present. Although no clear interrelations were evident between the cytochrome patterns of these organisms and the ease with which they can be cultivated in vitro, it was found that the total reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase activity of the particulate fraction was remarkably low in M. paratuberculosis, which can be grown in vitro only with great difficulty. The cells of BCG grown in vivo and those of M. lepraemurium isolated from leprous nodules of mice were found to be completely deficient in cytochrome pigments. PMID:14188717

  12. Glutamine synthetase sequence evolution in the mycobacteria and their use as molecular markers for Actinobacteria speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiid Ian JF

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the gene encoding for glutamine synthetase (glnA is essential in several organisms, multiple glnA copies have been identified in bacterial genomes such as those of the phylum Actinobacteria, notably the mycobacterial species. Intriguingly, previous reports have shown that only one copy (glnA1 is essential for growth in M. tuberculosis, while the other copies (glnA2, glnA3 and glnA4 are not. Results In this report it is shown that the glnA1 and glnA2 encoded glutamine synthetase sequences were inherited from an Actinobacteria ancestor, while the glnA4 and glnA3 encoded GS sequences were sequentially acquired during Actinobacteria speciation. The glutamine synthetase sequences encoded by glnA4 and glnA3 are undergoing reductive evolution in the mycobacteria, whilst those encoded by glnA1 and glnA2 are more conserved. Conclusion Different selective pressures by the ecological niche that the organisms occupy may influence the sequence evolution of glnA1 and glnA2 and thereby affecting phylogenies based on the protein sequences they encode. The findings in this report may impact the use of similar sequences as molecular markers, as well as shed some light on the evolution of glutamine synthetase in the mycobacteria.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Drug-Resistant Mycobacteria: Co-Evolution of Copper and INH Resistance.

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    Yuling Chen

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a worldwide public health threat. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is capable of resisting various stresses in host cells, including high levels of ROS and copper ions. To better understand the resistance mechanisms of mycobacteria to copper, we generated a copper-resistant strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, mc2155-Cu from the selection of copper sulfate treated-bacteria. The mc2155-Cu strain has a 5-fold higher resistance to copper sulfate and a 2-fold higher resistance to isoniazid (INH than its parental strain mc2155, respectively. Quantitative proteomics was carried out to find differentially expressed proteins between mc2155 and mc2155-Cu. Among 345 differentially expressed proteins, copper-translocating P-type ATPase was up-regulated, while all other ABC transporters were down-regulated in mc2155-Cu, suggesting copper-translocating P-type ATPase plays a crucial role in copper resistance. Results also indicated that the down-regulation of metabolic enzymes and decreases in cellular NAD, FAD, mycothiol, and glutamine levels in mc2155-Cu were responsible for its slowing growth rate as compared to mc2155. Down-regulation of KatG2 expression in both protein and mRNA levels indicates the co-evolution of copper and INH resistance in copper resistance bacteria, and provides new evidence to understanding of the molecular mechanisms of survival of mycobacteria under stress conditions.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Drug-Resistant Mycobacteria: Co-Evolution of Copper and INH Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuling; Yang, Fan; Sun, Zhongyuan; Wang, Qingtao; Mi, Kaixia; Deng, Haiteng

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a worldwide public health threat. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is capable of resisting various stresses in host cells, including high levels of ROS and copper ions. To better understand the resistance mechanisms of mycobacteria to copper, we generated a copper-resistant strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, mc2155-Cu from the selection of copper sulfate treated-bacteria. The mc2155-Cu strain has a 5-fold higher resistance to copper sulfate and a 2-fold higher resistance to isoniazid (INH) than its parental strain mc2155, respectively. Quantitative proteomics was carried out to find differentially expressed proteins between mc2155 and mc2155-Cu. Among 345 differentially expressed proteins, copper-translocating P-type ATPase was up-regulated, while all other ABC transporters were down-regulated in mc2155-Cu, suggesting copper-translocating P-type ATPase plays a crucial role in copper resistance. Results also indicated that the down-regulation of metabolic enzymes and decreases in cellular NAD, FAD, mycothiol, and glutamine levels in mc2155-Cu were responsible for its slowing growth rate as compared to mc2155. Down-regulation of KatG2 expression in both protein and mRNA levels indicates the co-evolution of copper and INH resistance in copper resistance bacteria, and provides new evidence to understanding of the molecular mechanisms of survival of mycobacteria under stress conditions.

  15. Detection of pathogenic mycobacteria based on functionalized quantum dots coupled with immunomagnetic separation.

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    Emmanouil Liandris

    Full Text Available Mycobacteria have always proven difficult to identify due to their low growth rate and fastidious nature. Therefore molecular biology and more recently nanotechnology, have been exploited from early on for the detection of these pathogens. Here we present the first stage of development of an assay incorporating cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs for the detection of mycobacterial surface antigens. The principle of the assay is the separation of bacterial cells using magnetic beads coupled with genus-specific polyclonal antibodies and monoclonal antibodies for heparin-binding hemagglutinin. These complexes are then tagged with anti-mouse biotinylated antibody and finally streptavidin-conjugated QDs which leads to the detection of a fluorescent signal. For the evaluation of performance, the method under study was applied on Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (positive controls, as well as E. coli and Salmonella spp. that constituted the negative controls. The direct observation of the latter category of samples did not reveal fluorescence as opposed to the mycobacteria mentioned above. The minimum detection limit of the assay was defined to 10(4 bacteria/ml, which could be further decreased by a 1 log when fluorescence was measured with a spectrofluorometer. The method described here can be easily adjusted for any other protein target of either the pathogen or the host, and once fully developed it will be directly applicable on clinical samples.

  16. Adolescent HIV disclosure in Zambia: barriers, facilitators and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitau Mburu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As adolescents living with HIV gain autonomy over their self-care and begin to engage in sexual relationships, their experiences of being informed about their HIV status and of telling others about their HIV status may affect their ability to cope with having the disease. Methods: In 2010, we conducted a qualitative study among adolescents aged 10–19 living with HIV in Zambia, and with their parents and health care providers. Through interviews and focus group discussions, we explored the disclosure of HIV status to adolescents living with HIV; adolescents’ disclosure of their status to others; and the impact of both forms of disclosure on adolescents. Results: Our study identified three main barriers to disclosure of HIV status: local norms that deter parents from communicating with their children about sexuality; fear of HIV stigma; and an underlying presumption that adolescents would not understand the consequences of a HIV diagnosis on their lives and relationships. With regard to adolescents’ disclosure of their HIV status to their sexual partners, our study identified fear of rejection as a common barrier. In rare cases, open family conversations about HIV helped adolescents come to terms with a HIV diagnosis. Findings indicated that disclosure had various outcomes at the individual and interpersonal levels. At the individual level, some adolescents described being anxious, depressed and blaming themselves after being told they had HIV. At the interpersonal level, disclosure created opportunities for adolescents to access adherence support and other forms of psychosocial support from family members and peers. At the same time, it occasionally strained adolescents’ sexual relationships, although it did not always lead to rejection. Conclusions: There is a need for public health interventions that guide adolescents living with HIV, their parents and families through the disclosure process. Such interventions should help

  17. [A case of non-tuberculous mycobacteriosis with pleurisy with a past history of dense exposure to environmental asbestos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Miyuki; Kashio, Makoto; Tanaka, Nobuya; Masuno, Tomiya; Kamei, Junko; Tsuyuguchi, Izuo

    2008-08-01

    We report a case of non-tuberculous mycobacteriosis (NTM) with pleurisy in a 75-year-old man. The patient was admitted with a diagnosis of pneumonia. Chest radiography and CT scans revealed a tumorous shadow that increased rapidly in size despite treatment with antibiotics. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) disclosed numerous asbestos bodies, suggesting dense exposure and pulmonary silicosis. The tumorous chest shadow remained undiagnosed. Repeated microscopic examination of sputum and BALF revealed no acidophilic-bacilli. Diagnostic pneumonectomy was performed to further explore the nature of the tumorous shadow on chest radiography. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of excised lung tissue disclosed no acid-bacilli; however, the washed fluid of the tissue specimen showed acid-fast bacilli that were subsequently verified as M. avium by in vitro culture. The X-ray findings in our case were not consistent with NTM or specific for disease due to asbestos inhalation. A final diagnosis of NTM was confirmed via open biopsy of the lung. Our case suggests that in addition to tuberculosis, NTM should be taken into consideration as a complication of silicosis.

  18. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium).

  19. ATP synthase in slow- and fast-growing mycobacteria is active in ATP synthesis and blocked in ATP hydrolysis direction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, A.C.; Driessen, N.N.; Hahn, M.M.; Lill, H.; Bald, D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase is a validated drug target for the treatment of tuberculosis, and ATP synthase inhibitors are promising candidate drugs for the treatment of infections caused by other slow-growing mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans. ATP synthase is an essential enzyme

  20. ATP synthase in slow- and fast-growing mycobacteria is active in ATP synthesis and blocked in ATP hydrolysis direction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, A.C.; Driessen, N.N.; Hahn, M.M.; Lill, H.; Bald, D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase is a validated drug target for the treatment of tuberculosis, and ATP synthase inhibitors are promising candidate drugs for the treatment of infections caused by other slow-growing mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans. ATP synthase is an essential enzyme

  1. Mycobacterium branderi infection: Case report and literature review of an unusual and difficult-to-treat non-tuberculous mycobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L. Turvey

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man with significant smoking history presented with fever, unintentional weight loss, night sweats, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Multiple respiratory specimens grew Mycobacterium branderi. Computed tomography scanning of the chest revealed a cavitary right upper lung lesion. Bronchoscopy and thoracoscopic biopsy were negative for malignancy but showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation, which was culture negative. Due to clinical and radiologic progression despite therapy with clarithromycin, ethambutol and moxifloxacin, the lesion was surgically resected and the patient’s symptoms resolved. Mycobacteria were seen in histopathology but did not grow from resected tissue. The patient received an additional 6 months of medical therapy and remains asymptomatic 1 month after completing antimicrobials. Cases of M. branderi causing human infection are very rarely reported. This is a novel case of multi-drug resistant M. branderi pulmonary infection in an apparently immunocompetent patient, progressive despite medical therapy and requiring surgical resection for definitive management.

  2. Essential Role of the ESX-5 Secretion System in Outer Membrane Permeability of Pathogenic Mycobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Ates, Louis S.

    2015-05-04

    Mycobacteria possess different type VII secretion (T7S) systems to secrete proteins across their unusual cell envelope. One of these systems, ESX-5, is only present in slow-growing mycobacteria and responsible for the secretion of multiple substrates. However, the role of ESX-5 substrates in growth and/or virulence is largely unknown. In this study, we show that esx-5 is essential for growth of both Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium bovis. Remarkably, this essentiality can be rescued by increasing the permeability of the outer membrane, either by altering its lipid composition or by the introduction of the heterologous porin MspA. Mutagenesis of the first nucleotide-binding domain of the membrane ATPase EccC5 prevented both ESX-5-dependent secretion and bacterial growth, but did not affect ESX-5 complex assembly. This suggests that the rescuing effect is not due to pores formed by the ESX-5 membrane complex, but caused by ESX-5 activity. Subsequent proteomic analysis to identify crucial ESX-5 substrates confirmed that all detectable PE and PPE proteins in the cell surface and cell envelope fractions were routed through ESX-5. Additionally, saturated transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS) was applied to both wild-type M. marinum cells and cells expressing mspA to identify genes that are not essential anymore in the presence of MspA. This analysis confirmed the importance of esx-5, but we could not identify essential ESX-5 substrates, indicating that multiple of these substrates are together responsible for the essentiality. Finally, examination of phenotypes on defined carbon sources revealed that an esx-5 mutant is strongly impaired in the uptake and utilization of hydrophobic carbon sources. Based on these data, we propose a model in which the ESX-5 system is responsible for the transport of cell envelope proteins that are required for nutrient uptake. These proteins might in this way compensate for the lack of MspA-like porins in slow

  3. Health system productivity change in Zambia: A focus on the child health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achoki, Tom; Kinfu, Yohannes; Masiye, Felix; Frederix, Geert W J; Hovels, Anke; Leufkens, Hubert G

    2017-02-01

    Efficiency and productivity improvement have become central in global health debates. In this study, we explored productivity change, particularly the contribution of technological progress and efficiency gains associated with improvements in child survival in Zambia (population 15 million). Productivity was measured by applying the Malmquist productivity index on district-level panel data. The effect of socioeconomic factors was further analyzed by applying an ordinary least squares regression technique. During 2004-2009, overall productivity in Zambia increased by 5.0 per cent, a change largely attributed to technological progress rather than efficiency gains. Within-country productivity comparisons revealed wide heterogeneity in favor of more urbanized and densely populated districts. Improved cooking methods, improved sanitation, and better educated populations tended to improve productive gains, whereas larger household size had an adverse effect. Addressing such district-level factors and ensuring efficient delivery and optimal application of existing health technologies offer a practical pathway for further improving population health.

  4. Social indicators and physical abuse of women by intimate partners: a study of women in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okenwa, Leah; Lawoko, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Intimate partner physical abuse (IPPA) of women is a societal problem with sinister implications on health. IPPA has been integrally linked to social status though the direction of association remains elusive, not the least in sub-Saharan Africa. This article investigated the association between IPPA and social status of women in Zambia. Data comprising 3,969 currently partnered women were retrieved from the 2001 Zambian Demographic and Health Survey and analyzed using chi-square test and logistic regression. IPPA augmented with low education, income-generating activity, access to information, autonomy over household health issues, and having tolerant attitudes toward IPPA. Tolerant attitude toward IPPA and illiteracy were independent risk factors for IPPA. Educational interventions are recommended to prevent IPPA in Zambia.

  5. Factors associated with attitudes toward intimate partner violence: a study of women in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawoko, Stephen

    2006-10-01

    Demographic, social, and empowerment factors associated with attitudes toward intimate partner violence (IPV) were investigated in a random sample of women (n = 5,029) aged 15-49 years in Zambia. Data was retrieved from the Zambia Demographic and Health Survey 2001-2002 (2003). The findings indicated demographic, social, and structural differences in attitudes toward IPV. Married/previously married and less educated women, employees in the agricultural sector, and women with a history of IPV were more likely to tolerate IPV. In addition, structurally disempowered women (i.e., women lacking access to information and autonomy in household decisions) were more likely to justify IPV than more-empowered peers. Most variables remained significant even when possible confounding was adjusted for using a logistic regression. The findings are discussed and implications for prevention as well as methodological issues considered.

  6. Genomic research in Zambia: confronting the ethics, policy and regulatory frontiers in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Kapata, Nathan; Moraes, Albertina Ngomah; Chongwe, Gershom; Munthali, James

    2015-10-29

    Genomic research has the potential to increase knowledge in health sciences, but the process has to ensure the safety, integrity and well-being of research participants. A legal framework for the conduct of health research in Zambia is available. However, the ethical, policy and regulatory framework to operationalise genomic research requires a paradigm shift. This paper outlines the current legal and policy framework as well as the ethics environment, and suggests recommendations for Zambia to fully benefit from the opportunity that genomic research presents. This will entail creating national research interest, improving knowledge levels, and building community trust among researchers, policymakers, donors, regulators and, most importantly, patients and research participants. A real balancing act of the risk and benefits will need to be objectively undertaken.

  7. Satellite Estimates of Crop Area and Maize Yield in Zambia's Agricultural Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, G.; Lobell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting crop yield and area from satellite is a valuable tool to monitor different aspects of productivity dynamics and food security. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where the agricultural landscape is complex and dominated by smallholder systems, such dynamics need to be investigated at the field scale. We leveraged the large data pool and computational power of Google Earth Engine to 1) generate 30 m resolution cover maps of selected provinces of Zambia, 2) estimate crop area, and 3) produce yearly maize yield maps using the recently developed SCYM (Scalable satellite-based Crop Yield Mapper) algorithm. We will present our results and their validation against a ground survey dataset collected yearly by the Zambia Ministry of Agriculture from about 12,500 households.

  8. Modeling flooding patterns in the Kafue Flats, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Philipp; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    The Kafue Flats is one of the most important wetlands in Zambia. In the early 70's the Kafue Gorge reservoir was built mainly for hydropower production not far downstream the outlet of the Kafue Flats. Only a few years later a dam was constructed upstream the Flats to extend the limited storage of Kafue Gorge. Besides its ecological value the Kafue Flats are also important economically. Around 700 000 people are dependent mainly on fisheries and flood recession agriculture. An increasing number of large irrigation schemes are drawing water from the Kafue river along the wetland. Floodplains in semi-arid and arid areas are often the only source of water supply available throughout the year. They provide numerous economical and ecological services of tremendous value. The ecological uniqueness of many wetlands results largely from a strong seasonality of flooding. As the pressure on water resources grows these natural seasonal patterns are often altered due to water abstractions or the construction of dams. Many efforts have been taken to restore more natural flooding patterns. To assess both, the effects of altered flow regimes and of restoration efforts, a hydrological model reproducing the dynamics of the flooding is required. However, in many cases hydrological modeling of these floodplains is often hampered by the poor availability of data. Data gathering is also limited by the large extent and the limited accessibility of the wetlands. Therefore the application of remote sensing techniques is an attractive approach. The model presented in this study is based on a relatively simple approach which was initially designed for the Okavango Delta. The model is based on the widely used software MODFLOW. However, due to a different environment and technical advances of the software there are some significant differences between the Okavango Delta model and the model presented hereafter. The model is based on MODFLOW 2005 and basically consists of two layers: a

  9. Structural study and geochronology in the Hook Batholith, Central Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naydenov, K.; Lehmann, J.; Saalmann, K.; Milani, L.; Kinnaird, J.; Charlesworth, G.; Frei, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Pan-African Hook batholith is emplaced N of the Mwembeshi dislocation, a regional scale structure at the contact between Zambezi Belt and Lufilian Arc in Central Zambia. Exposed over 12000 km2 the batholith is composed mainly of fine-grained and coarse-grained porphyritic granites and leucogranites affected by solid-state deformation along high-strain zones. Two main zones of deformation were investigated - the Itezhi-Tezhi Zone (ITZ) in the SW part of the batholith and the Nalusanga Zone (NZ) to the NE. The 2.5 km wide, N-S trending, subvertical ITZ is a medium-grade, pure shear dominated structure, reflecting probably regional scale E-W shortening. In the central part of the zone, augen-gneiss textures developed. Mineral lineations plunging ~40° S are recorded occasionally. The deformed feldspar porphyroclasts show symmetrical tails and rarely sinistral stair-stepping. In the SE part of the Hook batholith the continuation of the ITZ trends E-W. This orientation can be explained by rotation of the original ITZ trend by N-S shortening that also has been recorded in the siliciclastic metasediments S of the contact. S dipping, up to 15 cm wide thrust zones observed in the ITZ area were probably formed during this tectonic event. The 3 km wide NZ is a subvertical to steeply SSW dipping structure, parallel to the NE contact of the batholith, with well-developed foliation and mineral stretching lineations. Field and microstructural analyses defined the NZ as a medium-grade, non-coaxial, sinistral strike-slip shear zone. The transition from weak foliated granite to S-C mylonites and ultramylonites was observed. The sinistral shearing is consistent with E-W shortening in agreement with the tectonic framework of the ITZ. The low grade metasediments to the E of the granite are folded in N to NNW trending structures also implying E-W shortening. Temperature conditions during the deformation in ITZ and NZ inferred from microstructural analyses are about 500°-550°C. The

  10. The Effectiveness of Using Virtual Laboratories to Teach Computer Networking Skills  in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Lampi, Evans

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in computer networking skills, when real equipment is limited or unavailable, is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in the acquisition of computer network configuration and troubleshooting skills. The study was conducted in the developing country of Zambia, where there is an acute shortage of network lab equipment. Effectiveness was determined by the transfer ...

  11. Task-shifting: experiences and opinions of health workers in Mozambique and Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrinho Paulo; Sidat Mohsin; Goma Fastone; Dussault Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper describes the task-shifting taking place in health centres and district hospitals in Mozambique and Zambia. The objectives of this study were to identify the perceived causes and factors facilitating or impeding task-shifting, and to determine both the positive and negative consequences of task-shifting for the service users, for the services and for health workers. Methods Data collection involved individual and group interviews and focus group discussions with...

  12. Zambia Poverty Assessment : Stagnant Poverty and Inequality in a Natural Resource-Based Economy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    As in many countries throughout Sub-Saharan Africa and around the developing world, poverty in Zambia is overwhelmingly a rural phenomenon. In 2010 the moderate poverty rate in rural areas was 74 percent, more than double the urban poverty rate of 35 percent. The economic growth continued throughout the decade, reaching an impressive annual average of 5.7 percent, and by 2011 the World Ban...

  13. WP 80 - An overview of women’s work and employment in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    *Management Summary* This report provides information on Zambia on behalf of the implementation of the DECISIONS FOR LIFE project in that country. The DECISIONS FOR LIFE project aims to raise awareness amongst young female workers about their employment opportunities and career possibilities, family building and the work-family balance. This report is part of the Inventories, to be made by the University of Amsterdam, for all 14 countries involved. It focuses on a gender analysis of work and ...

  14. Household lifestyle, energy related practices and perceptions of energy efficiency: Evidence from Kitwe, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilias Makashini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Southern Africa is noted for not only constant power shortages but also poor access to electricity. In Zambia, for example, 75% of the population does not have access to electricity. This is partly because although Zambia has one of the lowest energy tariffs in Southern Africa, when compared with household monthly income, the resource is still reasonably unaffordable. Therefore, there is need to find innovative ways of reducing energy cost. Recent studies have indicated that there are patterns that show that there is a relationship between households' lifestyles and energy consumption. This means that understanding household lifestyles and how that impacts on energy use would be crucial in helping occupants to change their behaviours. This would result in the minimisation of energy consumption and thus a reduction in energy bills. However, there is a dearth of scholarly literature about households' lifestyles and their impacts on energy consumption in most developing countries including Zambia. This study investigates the perceptions of different lifestyles on household energy consumption and knowledge about energy efficiency in the city of Kitwe, the second largest city in Zambia. Motivation and barriers to energy efficiency have also been investigated. To achieve this, a mixed research approach was adopted. Firstly, a quantitative closed structured questionnaire instrument was used to collect data from 59 households in Kitwe. Secondly, mini-focus group discussions (average size of 5 ― brought about by the curiosity of residents and hence the contribution as families per household ― were undertaken in the informal settlement. The major findings are that households are generally motivated to implement energy saving strategies like covering pots when cooking, switching off lights in rooms that are not in use and that more information is needed as lack of knowledge and ‘landlord control' were identified as some of the barriers to energy

  15. Provisioning of game meat to rural communities as a benefit of sport hunting in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paula A; Belant, Jerrold L

    2015-01-01

    Sport hunting has reportedly multiple benefits to economies and local communities; however, few of these benefits have been quantified. As part of their lease agreements with the Zambia Wildlife Authority, sport hunting operators in Zambia are required to provide annually to local communities free of charge i.e., provision a percentage of the meat obtained through sport hunting. We characterized provisioning of game meat to rural communities by the sport hunting industry in Zambia for three game management areas (GMAs) during 2004-2011. Rural communities located within GMAs where sport hunting occurred received on average > 6,000 kgs per GMA of fresh game meat annually from hunting operators. To assess hunting industry compliance, we also compared the amount of meat expected as per the lease agreements versus observed amounts of meat provisioned from three GMAs during 2007-2009. In seven of eight annual comparisons of these GMAs, provisioning of meat exceeded what was required in the lease agreements. Provisioning occurred throughout the hunting season and peaked during the end of the dry season (September-October) coincident with when rural Zambians are most likely to encounter food shortages. We extrapolated our results across all GMAs and estimated 129,771 kgs of fresh game meat provisioned annually by the sport hunting industry to rural communities in Zambia at an approximate value for the meat alone of >US$600,000 exclusive of distribution costs. During the hunting moratorium (2013-2014), this supply of meat has halted, likely adversely affecting rural communities previously reliant on this food source. Proposed alternatives to sport hunting should consider protein provisioning in addition to other benefits (e.g., employment, community pledges, anti-poaching funds) that rural Zambian communities receive from the sport hunting industry.

  16. Contraception and family planning among HIV-seroconcordant and -serodiscordant couples in the US and Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah L Jones

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Deborah L Jones1, Olga Villar-Loubet1, Chipepo Kankasa2, Ndashi Chitalu2, Miriam Mumbi2, Stephen M Weiss11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Paediatrics, University of Zambia School of Medicine, Lusaka, ZambiaAbstract: With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, remarkable progress has been made in the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. As a result, in both the developed and developing world, reproductive decision-making and family planning has re-emerged as an important health issue among HIV-seroconcordant and -serodiscordant couples. This study sought to explore contraceptive attitudes and practices among HIV-seropositive and -serodiscordant couples in the US and Zambia and to compare contraceptive decision-making between seroconcordant and discordant couples. Study results suggest that while most participants expressed a willingness to use protection to prevent pregnancy, the majority were not using protection consistently. Similarly, among seropositive younger men in both the US and Zambia, more men expressed a desire to have children than women of either serostatus group. Study outcomes also suggest that male and female condom use to reduce HIV transmission within couples is limited. Thus, as males are largely the sexual decision makers regarding condom use, women’s attitudes or plans regarding child bearing may be eclipsed by those of their male partners, and recent reductions in provision of female condoms in the developing world may further reduce women’s options to protect themselves and prevent pregnancy. Education and counseling on vertical and horizontal transmission of HIV among both seropositive and serodiscordant couples should be an element of family planning efforts. Conversely, family planning should be a critical element of HIV counseling and testing strategies to

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the available strategies for diagnosing malaria in outpatient clinics in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanda Pascalina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria in Zambia accounts for about 4 million clinical cases and 8 000 deaths annually. Artemether-lumefantrine (ACT, a relatively expensive drug, is being used as first line treatment of uncomplicated malaria. However, diagnostic capacity in Zambia is low, leading to potentially avoidable wastage of drugs due to unnecessary anti malarial treatment. Methods A cost-effectiveness evaluation of the three current alternatives to malaria diagnosis (clinical, microscopy and Rapid Diagnostic Tests- RDT was conducted in 12 facilities from 4 districts in Zambia. The analysis was conducted along an observational study, thus reflecting practice in health facilities under routine conditions. Average and incremental cost effectiveness ratios were estimated from the providers' perspective. Effectiveness was measured in relation to malaria cases correctly diagnosed by each strategy. Results Average cost-effectiveness ratios show that RDTs were more efficient (US$ 6.5 than either microscopy (US$ 11.9 or clinical diagnosis (US$ 17.1 for malaria case correctly diagnosed. In relation to clinical diagnoses the incremental cost per case correctly diagnosed and treated was US$ 2.6 and US$ 9.6 for RDT and microscopy respectively. RDTs would be much cheaper to scale up than microscopy. The findings were robust to changes in assumptions and various parameters. Conclusion RDTs were the most cost effective method at correctly diagnosing malaria in primary health facilities in Zambia when compared to clinical and microscopy strategies. However, the treatment prescription practices of the health workers can impact on the potential that a diagnostic test has to lead to savings on antimalarials. The results of this study will serve to inform policy makers on which alternatives will be most efficient in reducing malaria misdiagnosis by taking into account both the costs and effects of each strategy.

  18. Provisioning of game meat to rural communities as a benefit of sport hunting in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A White

    Full Text Available Sport hunting has reportedly multiple benefits to economies and local communities; however, few of these benefits have been quantified. As part of their lease agreements with the Zambia Wildlife Authority, sport hunting operators in Zambia are required to provide annually to local communities free of charge i.e., provision a percentage of the meat obtained through sport hunting. We characterized provisioning of game meat to rural communities by the sport hunting industry in Zambia for three game management areas (GMAs during 2004-2011. Rural communities located within GMAs where sport hunting occurred received on average > 6,000 kgs per GMA of fresh game meat annually from hunting operators. To assess hunting industry compliance, we also compared the amount of meat expected as per the lease agreements versus observed amounts of meat provisioned from three GMAs during 2007-2009. In seven of eight annual comparisons of these GMAs, provisioning of meat exceeded what was required in the lease agreements. Provisioning occurred throughout the hunting season and peaked during the end of the dry season (September-October coincident with when rural Zambians are most likely to encounter food shortages. We extrapolated our results across all GMAs and estimated 129,771 kgs of fresh game meat provisioned annually by the sport hunting industry to rural communities in Zambia at an approximate value for the meat alone of >US$600,000 exclusive of distribution costs. During the hunting moratorium (2013-2014, this supply of meat has halted, likely adversely affecting rural communities previously reliant on this food source. Proposed alternatives to sport hunting should consider protein provisioning in addition to other benefits (e.g., employment, community pledges, anti-poaching funds that rural Zambian communities receive from the sport hunting industry.

  19. The influence of quality maternity waiting homes on utilization of facilities for delivery in rural Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Elizabeth G; Semrau, Katherine; Hamer, Davidson H; Vian, Taryn; Nambao, Mary; Mataka, Kaluba; Scott, Nancy A

    2017-05-30

    Residential accommodation for expectant mothers adjacent to health facilities, known as maternity waiting homes (MWH), is an intervention designed to improve access to skilled deliveries in low-income countries like Zambia where the maternal mortality ratio is estimated at 398 deaths per 100,000 live births. Our study aimed to assess the relationship between MWH quality and the likelihood of facility delivery in Kalomo and Choma Districts in Southern Province, Zambia. We systematically assessed and inventoried the functional capacity of all existing MWH using a quantitative facility survey and photographs of the structures. We calculated a composite score and used multivariate regression to quantify MWH quality and its association with the likelihood of facility delivery using household survey data collected on delivery location in Kalomo and Choma Districts from 2011-2013. MWH were generally in poor condition and composite scores varied widely, with a median score of 28.0 and ranging from 12 to 66 out of a possible 75 points. Of the 17,200 total deliveries captured from 2011-2013 in 40 study catchment area facilities, a higher proportion occurred in facilities where there was either a MWH or the health facility provided space for pregnant waiting mothers compared to those with no accommodations (60.7% versus 55.9%, p facilities had an MWH, those women with MWHs in their catchment area that were rated medium or high quality had a 95% increase in the odds of facility delivery than those whose catchment area MWHs were of poor quality (OR: 1.95, 95% CI 1.76, 2.16). Improving both the availability and the quality of MWH represents a potentially useful strategy to increasing facility delivery in rural Zambia. The Zambia Chlorhexidine Application Trial is registered at Clinical Trials.gov (identifier: NCT01241318).

  20. Effects of Policy Reforms on Price Transmission in Coffee Markets: Evidence from Zambia and Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda; Abdulai, Awudu

    2013-01-01

    In the late 1990s, several governments in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) embarked on various market reforms to improve commodity market performance. The success of such market reforms depends partly on the strength of the transmission of price signals between spatially separated markets and between different levels of commodity value chains. This study takes a look at these issues through an analysis of coffee producer prices for Zambia and Tanzania.

  1. Outbreak of Plague in a High Malaria Endemic Region - Nyimba District, Zambia, March-May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyange, Nyambe; Kumar, Ramya; Inambao, Akatama; Moonde, Loveness; Chama, Jonathan; Banda, Mapopa; Tembo, Elliot; Nsonga, Beron; Mwaba, John; Fwoloshi, Sombo; Musokotwane, Kebby; Chizema, Elizabeth; Kapin'a, Muzala; Hang'ombe, Benard Mudenda; Baggett, Henry C; Hachaambwa, Lottie

    2016-08-12

    Outbreaks of plague have been recognized in Zambia since 1917 (1). On April 10, 2015, Zambia's Ministry of Health was notified by the Eastern Provincial Medical Office of possible bubonic plague cases in Nyimba District. Eleven patients with acute fever and cervical lymphadenopathy had been evaluated at two rural health centers during March 28-April 9, 2015; three patients died. To confirm the outbreak and develop control measures, the Zambia Ministry of Health's Field Epidemiology Training Program (ZFETP) conducted epidemiologic and laboratory investigations in partnership with the University of Zambia's schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine and the provincial and district medical offices. Twenty-one patients with clinically compatible plague were identified, with symptom onset during March 26-May 5, 2015. The median age was 8 years, and all patients were from the same village. Blood specimens or lymph node aspirates from six (29%) patients tested positive for Yersinia pestis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There is an urgent need to improve early identification and treatment of plague cases. PCR is a potential complementary tool for identifying plague, especially in areas with limited microbiologic capacity. Twelve (57%) patients, including all six with PCR-positive plague and all three who died, also tested positive for malaria by rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Plague patients coinfected with malaria might be misdiagnosed as solely having malaria, and appropriate antibacterial treatment to combat plague might not be given, increasing risk for mortality. Because patients with malaria might be coinfected with other pathogens, broad spectrum antibiotic treatment to cover other pathogens is recommended for all children with severe malaria, until a bacterial infection is excluded.

  2. WP 80 - An overview of women’s work and employment in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Maarten Klaveren; Kea Tijdens; Melanie Hughie Williams; Nuria Ramos Martin

    2009-01-01

    *Management Summary* This report provides information on Zambia on behalf of the implementation of the DECISIONS FOR LIFE project in that country. The DECISIONS FOR LIFE project aims to raise awareness amongst young female workers about their employment opportunities and career possibilities, family building and the work-family balance. This report is part of the Inventories, to be made by the University of Amsterdam, for all 14 countries involved. It focuses on a gender analysis of work and ...

  3. Delegation of Zambian Chiefs Extols Africa-China and Zambia-China Friendship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>Chiefs are traditional leaders in Zambia.Among the country’s 73 tribes,there are altogether four paramount chiefs,48 senior chiefs and 286 chiefs.These people,who inherit their title through the maternal line,play an important and special role in Zambia’s political,economic and social life and have the respect of people from all walks of life.

  4. The climate change agenda in Zambia: National interests and the role of development cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Funder, Mikkel; Mweemba, Carol Emma; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2013-01-01

    In the past ten years a significant number of policies and projects have been implemented in African countries in order to address climate change. At the same time, African countries have become more vocal in the global climate change negotiations. And yet there has been little analysis of domestic climate change agendas in African countries. This working paper is a modest first step in understanding the climate change agenda in one particular country, namely Zambia. The paper focuses on thre...

  5. Malaria prevention in Zambia: a practical application of the diffusion of innovations model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steury, Elinda Enright

    2013-04-01

    Transcultural nursing educators can be change agents for health issues in other cultures. Yet unfamiliar disease processes and the foreign environment provide challenges that must be overcome to achieve a lasting, effective, and positive change. Rogers's Diffusion of Innovations Model can be used to plan and implement community-focused interventions into the cultures of developing nations, specifically malaria prevention in Zambia. Transcultural nurse educators could use concepts from the model to effect change in other cultures or communities.

  6. Reclamation of lead/zinc processing wastes at Kabwe, Zambia: A phytogeochemical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Leteinturier, B.; Laroche, J.; Matera, J; Malaisse, François

    2001-01-01

    The lead/zinc mining industry of Kabwe (Central Province of Zambia), in operation from 1906 to 1994, generated metalliferous slag heaps covering an area of over 75 ha. The slag heaps are responsible for aerosol emissions with a high heavy metal content over the mine townships of Kasanda and Chowa, resulting in health risks for the local population. In this phytogeochemical investigation, soil samples showed very high lead, zinc and copper concentrations in topsoil. Plant surveys identified 39...

  7. Shock and Livestock Transactions in Rural Zambia: a Re-examination of the Buffer Stock Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    MIURA, Ken; KANNO, Hiromitsu; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    This study re-examines the buffer stock hypothesis regarding livestock by taking into account differences in wealth level, asset types, and periods after a shock. This paper takes advantage of a unique panel data set of agricultural households in Southern Province, Zambia. The data were collected by weekly interviews of 48 sample households from November 2007 to December 2009, covering two crop years in which an unusually heavy rainfall event took place. If we consider delayed responses to th...

  8. Isolation of mycobacteria by Bactec 460 TB system from clinical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports our experience with the BACTEC 460 TB system in the past five years and its performance characteristics and its advantages over the conventional LJ medium for mycobacterial culture. Clinical specimens (3597 from patients suspected to have tuberculosis were submitted for mycobacterial culture between May 2000 and August 2005 and were processed using the BACTEC 460 TB system. Pulmonary samples were 1568 while the extra pulmonary samples were 2029. BACTEC achieved detection of 681 (18.93% M. tuberculosis cases (499- pulmonary, 182- extrapulmonary with a recovery time shorter by 13.2 days compared to conventional method, while 577 (84.7% were non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. Automated systems can have a great impact and thrust on an early diagnosis of tuberculosis allowing an early and appropriate management of the patient and thereby a better disease outcome.

  9. Association of mycobacteria in recirculating aquaculture systems and mycobacterial disease in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanong, Roy P E; Pouder, Deborah B; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2010-12-01

    Mycobacterium marinum isolates cultivated from tissue containing granulomatous lesions in Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus and from biofilm samples collected from their tank and water recirculating system had identical (L1 of 11 bands) repetitive-sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) DNA fingerprints. A second M. marinum clone sharing 4 of 11 rep-PCR bands with the first clone was isolated from some fish tissues but not from system samples. Water samples yielded low numbers of colonies of mycobacteria (0.08-1.3/mL), but high numbers were recovered from biofilms (260-12,000/swab) and filters (63-21,000/ filter). Mycobacterium hemophilum, M. chelonae, M. trivale, M. gastri, and M. gordonae were isolated from system samples alone.

  10. Genetic perspectives on the origin of clicks in Bantu languages from southwestern Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Chiara; Butthof, Anne; Bostoen, Koen; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2013-04-01

    Some Bantu languages spoken in southwestern Zambia and neighboring regions of Botswana, Namibia, and Angola are characterized by the presence of click consonants, whereas their closest linguistic relatives lack such clicks. As clicks are a typical feature not of the Bantu language family, but of Khoisan languages, it is highly probable that the Bantu languages in question borrowed the clicks from Khoisan languages. In this paper, we combine complete mitochondrial genome sequences from a representative sample of populations from the Western Province of Zambia speaking Bantu languages with and without clicks, with fine-scaled analyses of Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms and short tandem repeats to investigate the prehistoric contact that led to this borrowing of click consonants. Our results reveal complex population-specific histories, with female-biased admixture from Khoisan-speaking groups associated with the incorporation of click sounds in one Bantu-speaking population, while concomitant levels of potential Khoisan admixture did not result in sound change in another. Furthermore, the lack of sequence sharing between the Bantu-speaking groups from southwestern Zambia investigated here and extant Khoisan populations provides an indication that there must have been genetic substructure in the Khoisan-speaking indigenous groups of southern Africa that did not survive until the present or has been substantially reduced.

  11. Cholera epidemic associated with raw vegetables--Lusaka, Zambia, 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-03

    Zambia experienced widespread cholera epidemics in 1991 (13,154 cases), 1992 (11,659), and 1999 (11,327). In response to the large outbreak in 1999, the Zambian Ministry of Health (ZMOH) urged use of in-home chlorination with the locally produced solution, Clorin, and the practice increased substantially Clorin had been introduced in Zambia in 1998 as part of the Safe Water System (SWS), a point-of-use water disinfection and safe-water storage strategy launched by the Society for Family Health, in partnership with ZMOH, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and CDC. Although no outbreaks were reported during 2000-2002, cholera remained endemic. Epidemic cholera returned to Zambia in November 2003, when cases of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Ogawa, biotype El Tor were confirmed in the capital city, Lusaka. During November 28, 2003-January 4, 2004, an estimated 2,529 cholera cases and 128 cholera deaths (case-fatality rate [CFR] = 5.1%) occurred in Lusaka. In February 2004, the Lusaka District Health Management Team (LDHMT) invited CDC to assist in an investigation of the epidemic. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which implicated foodborne transmission via raw vegetables and demonstrated a protective role for hand washing with soap. The results underscore the importance of hygiene, clean water, and sanitary food handling for cholera prevention.

  12. Patch-occupancy survey of elephant (Loxodonta africana surrounding Livingstone, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Youldon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild elephants represent the biggest human–wildlife conflict issue in Livingstone, Zambia. However, little is known about their movements. This survey investigated elephants’ habitat use outside a core protected and fenced zone that forms part of Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park, Zambia. Using ‘patch-occupancy’ methodology, indications of elephant presence (feeding behaviour, dung and tracks were surveyed. The survey aimed to assist proposed future monitoring exercises by defining the geographical extent that should be considered to improve accuracy in species abundance estimates. Results were supplemented using collected indications of elephant presence from prior monitoring exercises, and during this survey. Elephant presence was confirmed up to 8 km from the boundary of the protected core habitat, focussed in: (1 an unfenced zone of the national park, (2 along a road leading from the national park to the Dambwa Forest to the north and (3 along two rivers located to the west (Sinde River and east (Maramba River of the core area. Detection probability of elephant presence was high using these methods, and we recommend regular sampling to determine changes in habitat use by elephants, as humans continue to modify land-use patterns.Conservation implications: Identification of elephant ranging behaviour up to 8 km outside of the Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park in southern Zambia will assist in managing human– elephant conflict in the area, as well as in assessing this seasonal population’s abundance.

  13. Operational scale entomological intervention for malaria control: strategies, achievements and challenges in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Mukonka, Victor M; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Macdonald, Michael B; Haque, Ubydul

    2013-01-08

    While consensus on malaria vector control policy and strategy has stimulated unprecedented political-will, backed by international funding organizations and donors, vector control interventions are expansively being implemented based on assumptions with unequaled successes. This manuscript reports on the strategies, achievements and challenges of the past and contemporary malaria vector control efforts in Zambia. All available information and accessible archived documentary records on malaria vector control in Zambia were reviewed. Retrospective analysis of routine surveillance data from the Health Management Information System (HMIS), data from population-based household surveys and various operations research reports was conducted to assess the status in implementing policies and strategies. Empirical evidence is critical for informing policy decisions and tailoring interventions to local settings. Thus, the World Health Organization (WHO) encourages the adoption of the integrated vector management (IVM) strategy which is a rational decision making process for optimal use of available resources. One of the key features of IVM is capacity building at the operational level to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate vector control and its epidemiological and entomological impact. In Zambia, great progress has been made in implementing WHO-recommended vector control policies and strategies within the context of the IVM Global Strategic framework with strong adherence to its five key attributes. The country has solid, consistent and coordinated policies, strategies and guidelines for malaria vector control. The Zambian experience demonstrates the significance of a coordinated multi-pronged IVM approach effectively operationalized within the context of a national health system.

  14. Diagnosis and genotyping of African swine fever viruses from 2015 outbreaks in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoromo, Jonas; Simulundu, Edgar; Chambaro, Herman M; Mataa, Liywalii; Lubaba, Caesar H; Pandey, Girja S; Takada, Ayato; Misinzo, Gerald; Mweene, Aaron S

    2016-04-29

    In early 2015, a highly fatal haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs resembling African swine fever (ASF) occurred in North Western, Copperbelt, and Lusaka provinces of Zambia. Molecular diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction targeting specific amplification of p72 (B646L) gene of ASF virus (ASFV) was conducted. Fourteen out of 16 domestic pigs from the affected provinces were found to be positive for ASFV. Phylogenetic analyses based on part of the p72 and the complete p54 (E183L) genes revealed that all the ASFVs detected belonged to genotypes I and Id, respectively. Additionally, epidemiological data suggest that the same ASFV spread from Lusaka to other provinces possibly through uncontrolled and/or illegal pig movements. Although the origin of the ASFV that caused outbreaks in domestic pigs in Zambia could not be ascertained, it appears likely that the virus may have emerged from within the country or region, probably from a sylvatic cycle. It is recommended that surveillance of ASF, strict biosecurity, and quarantine measures be imposed in order to prevent further spread and emergence of new ASF outbreaks in Zambia.

  15. The Local Social and Environmental Impacts of Smallholder-Based Biofuel Investments in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura German

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available High oil prices, recent commitments by industrialized countries to enhance the use of renewable energy, and efforts by developing countries to stimulate foreign investment as a pathway to development have fueled high levels of interest in the biofuel sector throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. Zambia is no exception. A large, land-locked country with high pump prices and vast tracts of land considered by many to be "degraded" or "underutilized," investor interest in the sector has remained high despite uncertainties associated with unproven feedstocks and market fluctuations. While investment in multiple feedstock and production models may be observed, one of the primary investments has been in jatropha outgrower schemes in which small-scale farmers grow feedstock on contract with domestic and foreign investors. We assess the history and evolution of the largest such scheme in Zambia, as well as the social and environmental impacts in two districts with large numbers of outgrowers. Findings suggest that, although such a production model may hold promise for enhancing rural livelihood benefits from the emerging biofuel sector, to date, small-scale farmers have borne the brunt of the risk and uncertainty that are the trademarks of this emerging industry. We conclude with a discussion of options to minimize forest conversion and protect farmers against high-risk investments, while harnessing the potential of this business model for enhancing rural livelihoods in Zambia and elsewhere.

  16. Prevalence and correlates for psychosocial distress among in-school adolescents in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seter eSiziya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is scanty information on correlates for psychosocial distress in Zambia. Secondary analysis was conducted using data collected in 2004 in Zambia during the global school-based health survey to determine the prevalence and correlates for psychosocial distress. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate magnitudes of associations between exposure factors and the outcome, while the Yates’ corrected Chi-squared test was used to compare proportions at the 5% significance level. A total of 2257 students participated in the survey of which 54.2% were males. Males were generally older than females (p<0.001. Significantly more females than males were bullied (p=0.036, involved in a fight (p=0.019 and consumed alcohol (p=0.012. Psychosocial distress was detected in 15.7% of the participants (14.4% of males and 16.8% of females. Age less than 14 years, male gender, parental support for males and having close friends were protective factors against psychosocial distress. Risk factors for psychosocial distress were: being bullied, involvement in a fight, alcohol consumption, being physically active and parental support. . Age less than 14 years, male gender, parental support for males, having close friends, being bullied, involvement in a fight, alcohol consumption, being physically active and parental support were significantly associated with psychosocial distress. The prevalence of psychosocial distress among adolescents in Zambia appears to be common. There is a need to validate the psychosocial distress indicators that were used in the current study.

  17. Evidence of Yersinia pestis DNA from fleas in an endemic plague area of Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang'ombe Bernard M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis is a bacterium that causes plague which infects a variety of mammals throughout the world. The disease is usually transmitted among wild rodents through a flea vector. The sources and routes of transmission of plague are poorly researched in Africa, yet remains a concern in several sub-Saharan countries. In Zambia, the disease has been reported on annual basis with up to 20 cases per year, without investigating animal reservoirs or vectors that may be responsible in the maintenance and propagation of the bacterium. In this study, we undertook plague surveillance by using PCR amplification of the plasminogen activator gene in fleas. Findings Xenopsylla species of fleas were collected from 83 rodents trapped in a plague endemic area of Zambia. Of these rodents 5 had fleas positive (6.02% for Y. pestis plasminogen activator gene. All the Y. pestis positive rodents were gerbils. Conclusions We conclude that fleas may be responsible in the transmission of Y. pestis and that PCR may provide means of plague surveillance in the endemic areas of Zambia.

  18. ISOLATION AND ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING OF RAPIDLY-GROWING MYCOBACTERIA FROM GRASSLAND SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kyselková

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM are common soil saprophytes, but certain strains cause infections in human and animals. The infections due to RGM have been increasing in past decades and are often difficult to treat. The susceptibility to antibiotics is regularly evaluated in clinical isolates of RGM, but the data on soil RGM are missing. The objectives of this study was to isolate RGM from four grassland soils with different impact of manuring, and assess their resistance to antibiotics and the ability to grow at 37°C and 42°C. Since isolation of RGM from soil is a challenge, a conventional decontamination method (NaOH/malachite green/cycloheximide and a recent method based on olive oil/SDS demulsification were compared. The olive oil/SDS method was less efficient, mainly because of the emulsion instability and plate overgrowing with other bacteria. Altogether, 44 isolates were obtained and 23 representatives of different RGM genotypes were screened. The number of isolates per soil decreased with increasing soil pH, consistently with previous findings that mycobacteria were more abundant in low pH soils. Most of the isolates belonged to the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The majority of isolates was resistant to 2-4 antibiotics. Multiresistant strains occurred also in a control soil that has a long history without the exposure to antibiotic-containing manure. Seven isolates grew at 37°C, including the species M. septicum and M. fortuitum known for infections in humans. This study shows that multiresistant RGM close to known human pathogens occur in grassland soils regardless the soil history of manuring.

  19. The critical role of DNA extraction for detection of mycobacteria in tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Radomski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nucleic acid-based methods offer promise for both targeted and exploratory investigations of microbes in tissue samples. As the starting material for such studies is a mixture of host and microbial DNA, we have critically evaluated the DNA extraction step to determine the quantitative and qualitative parameters that permit faithful molecular detection of mycobacteria in infected tissue. Specifically, we assessed: 1 tissue disruption procedures; 2 DNA extraction protocols; and 3 inhibition of bacterial PCR by host DNA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Regarding DNA extraction, we found that 1 grinding was not necessary if bead-beating is done, 2 the reference mycobacterial DNA extraction method recovered more pure DNA than commercial spin column kits, 3 lysozyme digestion of 1 hour was sufficient, and 4 repeated steps of phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol offered minimal gain in DNA quality. By artificially mixing mycobacterial DNA with DNA extracted from uninfected mice, we found that bacterial real-time quantitative PCR was only reliable when the quantity of host DNA was < 3 µg in a final volume of 25 µl and the quality was high (260/280 nm ratio = 1.89 ± 0.08. Findings from spiked DNA studies were confirmed using DNA extracted from mice infected with different intracellular pathogens (M. tuberculosis, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings point to the most appropriate methods for extracting DNA from tissue samples for the purpose of detecting and quantifying mycobacteria. These data also inform on the limits of detection for two mycobacterial species and indicate that increasing the sample mass to improve analytic sensitivity comes at the cost of inhibition of PCR by host DNA.

  20. Sulfate Reducing Bacteria and Mycobacteria Dominate the Biofilm Communities in a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Smith, C Kimloi; LaPara, Timothy M; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2015-07-21

    The quantity and composition of bacterial biofilms growing on 10 water mains from a full-scale chloraminated water distribution system were analyzed using real-time PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene and next-generation, high-throughput Illumina sequencing. Water mains with corrosion tubercles supported the greatest amount of bacterial biomass (n = 25; geometric mean = 2.5 × 10(7) copies cm(-2)), which was significantly higher (P = 0.04) than cement-lined cast-iron mains (n = 6; geometric mean = 2.0 × 10(6) copies cm(-2)). Despite spatial variation of community composition and bacterial abundance in water main biofilms, the communities on the interior main surfaces were surprisingly similar, containing a core group of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assigned to only 17 different genera. Bacteria from the genus Mycobacterium dominated all communities at the main wall-bulk water interface (25-78% of the community), regardless of main age, estimated water age, main material, and the presence of corrosion products. Further sequencing of the mycobacterial heat shock protein gene (hsp65) provided species-level taxonomic resolution of mycobacteria. The two dominant Mycobacteria present, M. frederiksbergense (arithmetic mean = 85.7% of hsp65 sequences) and M. aurum (arithmetic mean = 6.5% of hsp65 sequences), are generally considered to be nonpathogenic. Two opportunistic pathogens, however, were detected at low numbers: M. hemophilum (arithmetic mean = 1.5% of hsp65 sequences) and M. abscessus (arithmetic mean = 0.006% of hsp65 sequences). Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulfovibrio, which have been implicated in microbially influenced corrosion, dominated all communities located underneath corrosion tubercules (arithmetic mean = 67.5% of the community). This research provides novel insights into the quantity and composition of biofilms in full-scale drinking water distribution systems, which is critical for assessing the risks to public health and to the

  1. Whole-genome analysis of mycobacteria from birds at the San Diego Zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Wayne; Braun, Josephine; Burchell, Jennifer; Witte, Carmel L; Rideout, Bruce A

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria isolated from more than 100 birds diagnosed with avian mycobacteriosis at the San Diego Zoo and its Safari Park were cultured postmortem and had their whole genomes sequenced. Computational workflows were developed and applied to identify the mycobacterial species in each DNA sample, to find single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between samples of the same species, to further differentiate SNPs between as many as three different genotypes within a single sample, and to identify which samples are closely clustered genomically. Nine species of mycobacteria were found in 123 samples from 105 birds. The most common species were Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium genavense, which were in 49 and 48 birds, respectively. Most birds contained only a single mycobacterial species, but two birds contained a mixture of two species. The M. avium samples represent diverse strains of M. avium avium and M. avium hominissuis, with many pairs of samples differing by hundreds or thousands of SNPs across their common genome. By contrast, the M. genavense samples are much closer genomically; samples from 46 of 48 birds differ from each other by less than 110 SNPs. Some birds contained two, three, or even four genotypes of the same bacterial species. Such infections were found in 4 of 49 birds (8%) with M. avium and in 11 of 48 birds (23%) with M. genavense. Most were mixed infections, in which the bird was infected by multiple mycobacterial strains, but three infections with two genotypes differing by ≤ 10 SNPs were likely the result of within-host evolution. The samples from 31 birds with M. avium can be grouped into nine clusters within which any sample is ≤ 12 SNPs from at least one other sample in the cluster. Similarly, the samples from 40 birds with M. genavense can be grouped into ten such clusters. Information about these genomic clusters is being used in an ongoing, companion study of mycobacterial transmission to help inform management of bird collections.

  2. Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection of the musculoskeletal system: pattern of infection and efficacy of combined surgical/antimicrobial treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J W; Kim, Y S; Yoon, J O; Kim, J S; Chang, J S; Kim, J M; Chun, J M; Jeon, I H

    2014-11-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection of the musculoskeletal tissue is a rare disease. An early and accurate diagnosis is often difficult because of the indolent clinical course and difficulty of isolating pathogens. Our goal was to determine the clinical features of musculoskeletal NTM infection and to present the treatment outcomes. A total of 29 patients (nine females, 20 males between 34 and 85 years old, mean age 61.7 years; 34 to 85) with NTM infection of the musculoskeletal system between 1998 to 2011 were identified and their treatment retrospectively analysed. Microbiological studies demonstrated NTM in 29 patients: the isolates were Mycobacterium intracellulare in six patients, M. fortuitum in three, M. abscessus in two and M. marinum in one. In the remaining patients we failed to identify the species. The involved sites were the hand/wrist in nine patients the knee in five patients, spine in four patients, foot in two patients, elbow in two patients, shoulder in one, ankle in two patients, leg in three patients and multiple in one patient. The mean interval between the appearance of symptoms and diagnosis was 20.8 months (1.5 to 180). All patients underwent surgical treatment and antimicrobial medication according to our protocol for chronic musculoskeletal infection: 20 patients had NTM-specific medication and nine had conventional antimicrobial therapy. At the final follow-up 22 patients were cured, three failed to respond to treatment and four were lost to follow-up. Identifying these diseases due the initial non-specific presentation can be difficult. Treatment consists of surgical intervention and adequate antimicrobial therapy, which can result in satisfactory outcomes.

  3. Tourism as a Poverty Reduction Tool: The Case of Mukuni Village in the Southern Province of Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Horák

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, tourism is becoming one of the cornerstones of national economic growth and as a means of poverty alleviation, especially in the tourist attractions in rural areas. This article assesses the levels of utilization of tourism potentials in Zambia, in general, and the Mukuni village in the Southern province in Zambia, in particular, with reference to poverty reduction. The world famous Victoria Falls is situated in the Southern province and therefore this area is the most visited places in Zambia and attracts more tourists throughout the whole year. The main income of the local people, which includes the Tonga tribe comes from tourism. Even though tourism has brought positive results, including the realization of some local development projects and prosperity to the people, it has also brought some negative effects such as sociocultural change, pollution and waste in the tourist destination areas in Zambia.For the Mukuni people and Zambia as a whole to fully exploit tourism potentials, stricter laws protecting the destruction of the environment and the preservation culture of the indigenous people should be enforced in the tourist destination areas. The government should use the levy from tourism to provide better infrastructure, create job opportunities and create wealth within the tourist areas for sustainable tourism development and poverty reduction.

  4. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Identification of Mycobacteria in Routine Clinical Practice: e24720

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amel El Khéchine; Carine Couderc; Christophe Flaudrops; Didier Raoult; Michel Drancourt

    2011-01-01

    .... Matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has previously been proven to effectively identify mycobacteria grown in high-concentration inocula from collections...

  5. Universal stress protein Rv2624c alters abundance of arginine and enhances intracellular survival by ATP binding in mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qiong; Hu, Xinling; Shi, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Meihao; Wang, Jianwei; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein family is a family of stress-induced proteins. Universal stress proteins affect latency and antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria. Here, we showed that Mycobacterium smegmatis overexpressing M. tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2624c exhibits increased survival in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested that Rv2624c affects histidine metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that Rv2624c affects the abundance of arginine, a modulator of both mycobacteria and infected THP-1 cells. Biochemical analysis showed that Rv2624c is a nucleotide-binding universal stress protein, and an Rv2624c mutant incapable of binding ATP abrogated the growth advantage in THP-1 cells. Rv2624c may therefore modulate metabolic pathways in an ATP-dependent manner, changing the abundance of arginine and thus increasing survival in THP-1 cells. PMID:27762279

  6. Complete plasmid sequence carrying type IV-like and type VII secretion systems from an atypical mycobacteria strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Sergio Mascarenhas; Marín, Michel Abanto; Freitas, Fernanda S; Fonseca, Erica Lourenço; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo

    2017-07-01

    The genus Mycobacterium is highly diverse and ubiquitous in nature, comprehending fast- and slow-growing species with distinct impact in public health. The plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer represents one of the major events in bacteria evolution. Here, we report the complete sequence of a 160,489 bp circular plasmid (pCBMA213_2) from an atypical and fast-growing environmental mycobacteria. This is a unique plasmid, in comparison with the characterised mycobacteria plasmids, harboring a type IV-like and ESX-P2 type VII secretion systems. pCBMA213_2 can be further explored for evolutionary and conjugation studies as well as a tool to manipulate DNA within this bacteria genus.

  7. Phosphorylation of the Peptidoglycan Synthase PonA1 Governs the Rate of Polar Elongation in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Karen J; Boutte, Cara C; Kester, Jemila C; Baer, Christina E; Barczak, Amy K; Meniche, Xavier; Chao, Michael C; Rego, E Hesper; Sassetti, Christopher M; Fortune, Sarah M; Rubin, Eric J

    2015-06-01

    Cell growth and division are required for the progression of bacterial infections. Most rod-shaped bacteria grow by inserting new cell wall along their mid-section. However, mycobacteria, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, produce new cell wall material at their poles. How mycobacteria control this different mode of growth is incompletely understood. Here we find that PonA1, a penicillin binding protein (PBP) capable of transglycosylation and transpeptidation of cell wall peptidoglycan (PG), is a major governor of polar growth in mycobacteria. PonA1 is required for growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis and is critical for M. tuberculosis during infection. In both cases, PonA1's catalytic activities are both required for normal cell length, though loss of transglycosylase activity has a more pronounced effect than transpeptidation. Mutations that alter the amount or the activity of PonA1 result in abnormal formation of cell poles and changes in cell length. Moreover, altered PonA1 activity results in dramatic differences in antibiotic susceptibility, suggesting that a balance between the two enzymatic activities of PonA1 is critical for survival. We also find that phosphorylation of a cytoplasmic region of PonA1 is required for normal activity. Mutations in a critical phosphorylated residue affect transglycosylase activity and result in abnormal rates of cell elongation. Together, our data indicate that PonA1 is a central determinant of polar growth in mycobacteria, and its governance of cell elongation is required for robust cell fitness during both host-induced and antibiotic stress.

  8. Phosphorylation of the Peptidoglycan Synthase PonA1 Governs the Rate of Polar Elongation in Mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J Kieser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell growth and division are required for the progression of bacterial infections. Most rod-shaped bacteria grow by inserting new cell wall along their mid-section. However, mycobacteria, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, produce new cell wall material at their poles. How mycobacteria control this different mode of growth is incompletely understood. Here we find that PonA1, a penicillin binding protein (PBP capable of transglycosylation and transpeptidation of cell wall peptidoglycan (PG, is a major governor of polar growth in mycobacteria. PonA1 is required for growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis and is critical for M. tuberculosis during infection. In both cases, PonA1's catalytic activities are both required for normal cell length, though loss of transglycosylase activity has a more pronounced effect than transpeptidation. Mutations that alter the amount or the activity of PonA1 result in abnormal formation of cell poles and changes in cell length. Moreover, altered PonA1 activity results in dramatic differences in antibiotic susceptibility, suggesting that a balance between the two enzymatic activities of PonA1 is critical for survival. We also find that phosphorylation of a cytoplasmic region of PonA1 is required for normal activity. Mutations in a critical phosphorylated residue affect transglycosylase activity and result in abnormal rates of cell elongation. Together, our data indicate that PonA1 is a central determinant of polar growth in mycobacteria, and its governance of cell elongation is required for robust cell fitness during both host-induced and antibiotic stress.

  9. Mycobacterium branderi infection: Case report and literature review of an unusual and difficult-to-treat non-tuberculous mycobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Shannon L; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Hernandez, Cristina; Kabbani, Dima; Doucette, Karen; Cervera, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    A 67-year-old man with significant smoking history presented with fever, unintentional weight loss, night sweats, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Multiple respiratory specimens grew Mycobacterium branderi. Computed tomography scanning of the chest revealed a cavitary right upper lung lesion. Bronchoscopy and thoracoscopic biopsy were negative for malignancy but showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation, which was culture negative. Due to clinical and radiologic progression despite therapy with clarithromycin, ethambutol and moxifloxacin, the lesion was surgically resected and the patient's symptoms resolved. Mycobacteria were seen in histopathology but did not grow from resected tissue. The patient received an additional 6 months of medical therapy and remains asymptomatic 1 month after completing antimicrobials. Cases of M. branderi causing human infection are very rarely reported. This is a novel case of multi-drug resistant M. branderi pulmonary infection in an apparently immunocompetent patient, progressive despite medical therapy and requiring surgical resection for definitive management. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Tuberculous and Non-Tuberculous Granulomatous Lymphadenitis in Patients Receiving ImatinibMesylate (Glivec for Metastatic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

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    Abbas Agaimy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imatinib mesylate (IM is the standard treatment for BCR-ABL-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML and is the first-line adjuvant and palliative treatment for metastatic and inoperable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST. IM is not known to be associated with an increased risk for development of granulomatous diseases. Methods: We describe our experience with 2 patients (42 and 62 years of age who developed granulomatous disease during IM treatment for metastatic GIST. Results: Mean duration of IM treatment was 12 (range 8-16 months. Enlarged lymph nodes with increased metabolism on FDG-PET-CT examination were detected and resected. Affected sites were supraclavicular (1 and subcarinal/mediastinal (1 lymph nodes. Histological examination revealed caseating and non-caseating granulomas suggestive of tuberculosis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by PCR in lymph nodes of 1 patient who was then successfully treated by anti-tuberculous agents. The other patient had negative sputum test for acid-fast bacilli and PCR-DNA-analysis was negative for M. tuberculosis and other mycobacteria. He received no anti-tuberculous therapy and had no evidence of progressive lymphadenopathy or new lung lesions during follow-up. Conclusion: Our observations underline the necessity to obtain biopsy material from enlarged or metabolically active lymph nodes developing during IM treatment for timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment of these rare complications. Follow-up without treatment is safe for patients without detectable microorganisms by sputum examination and PCR.

  11. Differential effects of Radix Paeoniae Rubra (Chishao on cytokine and chemokine expression inducible by mycobacteria

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    Li James

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon initial infection with mycobacteria, macrophages secrete multiple cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, to mediate host immune responses against the pathogen. Mycobacteria also induce the production of IL-10 via PKR activation in primary human monocytes and macrophages. As an anti-inflammatory cytokine, over-expression of IL-10 may contribute to mycobacterial evasion of the host immunity. Radix Paeoniae Rubra (RPR, Chishao, a Chinese medicinal herb with potentials of anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and neuroprotective effects, is used to treat tuberculosis. This study investigates the immunoregulatory effects of RPR on primary human blood macrophages (PBMac during mycobacterial infection. Methods The interaction of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG with PBMac was used as an experimental model. A series of procedures involving solvent extraction and fractionation were used to isolate bioactive constituents in RPR. RPR-EA-S1, a fraction with potent immunoregulatory effects was obtained with a bioactivity guided fractionation scheme. PBMac were treated with crude RPR extracts or RPR-EA-S1 before BCG stimulation. The expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α were measured by qPCR and ELISA. Western blotting was used to determine the effects of RPR-EA-S1 on signaling kinases and transcriptional factors in the BCG-activated PBMac. Results In BCG-stimulated macrophages, crude RPR extracts and fraction RPR-EA-S1 specifically inhibited IL-10 production while enhanced IL-8 expression at both mRNA and protein levels without affecting the expressions of IL-6 and TNF-α. Inhibition of BCG-induced IL-10 expression by RPR-EA-S1 occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner. RPR-EA-S1 did not affect the phosphorylation of cellular protein kinases including MAPK, Akt and GSK3β. Instead, it suppressed the degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm and inhibited the

  12. Deciphering the genetic basis for polyketide variation among mycobacteria producing mycolactones

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    Wilson Peter

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycolactones are immunosuppressive and cytotoxic polyketides, comprising five naturally occurring structural variants (named A/B, C, D, E and F, produced by different species of very closely related mycobacteria including the human pathogen, Mycobacterium ulcerans. In M. ulcerans strain Agy99, mycolactone A/B is produced by three highly homologous type I polyketide megasynthases (PKS, whose genes (mlsA1: 51 kb, mlsA2: 7.2 kb and mlsB: 42 kb are found on a 174 kb plasmid, known as pMUM001. Results We report here comparative genomic analysis of pMUM001, the complete DNA sequence of a 190 kb megaplasmid (pMUM002 from Mycobacterium liflandii 128FXT and partial sequence of two additional pMUM replicons, combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS analysis. These data reveal how PKS module and domain differences affecting MlsB correlate with the production of mycolactones E and F. For mycolactone E these differences from MlsB in M. ulcerans Agy99 include replacement of the AT domain of the loading module (acetate to propionate and the absence of an entire extension module. For mycolactone F there is also a reduction of one extension module but also a swap of ketoreductase domains that explains the characteristic stereochemistry of the two terminal side-chain hydroxyls, an arrangement unique to mycolactone F Conclusion The mycolactone PKS locus on pMUM002 revealed the same large, three-gene structure and extraordinary pattern of near-identical PKS domain sequence repetition as observed in pMUM001 with greater than 98.5% nucleotide identity among domains of the same function. Intra- and inter-strain comparisons suggest that the extreme sequence homogeneity seen among the mls PKS genes is caused by frequent recombination-mediated domain replacement. This work has shed light on the evolution of mycolactone biosynthesis among an unusual group of mycobacteria and highlights the potential of the mls locus to

  13. Exploring the role and capacity of school teachers in Zambia to support orphans and vulnerable children: considerations for educational resource allocation in Lusaka, Zambia.

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    Henning, Margaret Jo; Chi, Chunhuei

    This study investigated teachers' perceptions of their role as HIV/AIDS educators and also their role in providing care for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) across the different school systems in Lusaka, Zambia. Researchers used a combined quantitative and qualitative narrative approach. Original cross-sectional data were collected through face-to-face survey and in-depth interviews with school teachers in the Lusaka. A sample of 720 teachers from 123 schools completed surveys in 2008, with a 91% response rate for teachers, and 100% for schools sampled. Teachers for all school types reported that schools and teachers are the appropriate community resource for HIV-prevention education for youth and support for OVC. This study suggests that schools could serve as a source and alternative mechanism of support for vulnerable children.

  14. Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Patients with Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Bloodstream Infection in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sai-Nan Bian; Li-Fan Zhang; Yue-Qiu Zhang; Qi-Wen Yang; Peng Wang; Ying-Chun Xu; Xiao-Chun Shi

    2016-01-01

    Background:Nontuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) bloodstream infection (BSI) is relatively rare.We aimed in this study to evaluate the clinical characteristics,laboratory evaluation,and outcomes of patients with NTM BSI.Methods:We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of inpatients with NTM BSI at our institution between January 2008 and January 2015 and recorded clinical parameters including age,gender,underlying disease,clinical manifestation,organs involved with NTM disease,species of NTM,laboratory data,treatment and outcome of these patients.We also reviewed the reported cases and case series ofNTM BSI by searching PubMed,EMBASE,and Wanfang databases.Data of normal distribution were expressed by mean ± standard deviation (SD).Data of nonnormal distribution were expressed by median and interquartile range (IQR).Results:Among the ten patients with NTM BSI,the median age was 51 years (IQR 29-57 years) and three patients were males.Eight patients were immunocompromised,with underlying diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (one patient),rheumatic diseases (two patients),breast cancer (one patient),myelodysplastic syndrome (two patients),and aplastic anemia (two patients).Other organ(s) involved were lung (two patients),endocardium (two patients),brain,spinal cord,and soft tissue (one each patient).The median lymphocyte was 0.66 × 109/L (IQR 0.24-1.93 × 109/L).The median cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count was 179/ mm3 (IQR 82-619/mm3).Five patients died (three with hematological diseases,one with breast cancer,and one with rheumatic disease),three recovered,and two were lost to follow-up.Conclusions:We reported all cases in our hospital diagnosed with bloodstream NTM infection that was rarely reported.In this group of patients,patients usually had a high fever and could have multiple organ involvements.All patients with poor prognosis had underlying diseases.

  15. Fitting the HIV epidemic in Zambia: a two-sex micro-simulation model.

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    Pauline M Leclerc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In describing and understanding how the HIV epidemic spreads in African countries, previous studies have not taken into account the detailed periods at risk. This study is based on a micro-simulation model (individual-based of the spread of the HIV epidemic in the population of Zambia, where women tend to marry early and where divorces are not frequent. The main target of the model was to fit the HIV seroprevalence profiles by age and sex observed at the Demographic and Health Survey conducted in 2001. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A two-sex micro-simulation model of HIV transmission was developed. Particular attention was paid to precise age-specific estimates of exposure to risk through the modelling of the formation and dissolution of relationships: marriage (stable union, casual partnership, and commercial sex. HIV transmission was exclusively heterosexual for adults or vertical (mother-to-child for children. Three stages of HIV infection were taken into account. All parameters were derived from empirical population-based data. Results show that basic parameters could not explain the dynamics of the HIV epidemic in Zambia. In order to fit the age and sex patterns, several assumptions were made: differential susceptibility of young women to HIV infection, differential susceptibility or larger number of encounters for male clients of commercial sex workers, and higher transmission rate. The model allowed to quantify the role of each type of relationship in HIV transmission, the proportion of infections occurring at each stage of disease progression, and the net reproduction rate of the epidemic (R(0 = 1.95. CONCLUSIONS: The simulation model reproduced the dynamics of the HIV epidemic in Zambia, and fitted the age and sex pattern of HIV seroprevalence in 2001. The same model could be used to measure the effect of changing behaviour in the future.

  16. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and albuminuria in rural Zambia: a hospital-based survey.

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    Rasmussen, Jon B; Thomsen, Jakúp A; Rossing, Peter; Parkinson, Shelagh; Christensen, Dirk L; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2013-09-01

    To assess albuminuria in rural Zambia among patients with diabetes mellitus only (DM group), hypertension only (HTN group) and patients with combined DM and HTN (DM/HTN group). A cross-sectional survey was conducted at St. Francis Hospital in the Eastern province of Zambia. Albumin-creatinine ratio in one urine sample was used to assess albuminuria. Other information obtained included age, sex, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c ), random capillary glucose, time since diagnosis, medication and family history of DM or HTN. A total of 193 participants were included (DM group: n = 33; HTN group: n = 92; DM/HTN group: n = 68). The participants in the DM group used insulin more frequently as diabetes medication than the DM/HTN group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the DM group was younger and had lower BMI, WC and BP than the two other groups. In the DM group, HTN group and DM/HTN group, microalbuminuria was found in 12.1%, 19.6% and 29.4% (P = 0.11), and macroalbuminuria was found in 0.0%, 3.3% and 13.2% (P = 0.014), respectively. The urine albumin (P = 0.014) and albumin-creatinine ratio (P = 0.0006) differed between the three groups. This hospital-based survey in rural Zambia found a lower frequency of albuminuria among the participants than in previous studies of patients with DM or HTN in urban sub-Saharan Africa. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Operational scale entomological intervention for malaria control: strategies, achievements and challenges in Zambia

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    Chanda Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While consensus on malaria vector control policy and strategy has stimulated unprecedented political-will, backed by international funding organizations and donors, vector control interventions are expansively being implemented based on assumptions with unequaled successes. This manuscript reports on the strategies, achievements and challenges of the past and contemporary malaria vector control efforts in Zambia. Case description All available information and accessible archived documentary records on malaria vector control in Zambia were reviewed. Retrospective analysis of routine surveillance data from the Health Management Information System (HMIS, data from population-based household surveys and various operations research reports was conducted to assess the status in implementing policies and strategies. Discussion and evaluation Empirical evidence is critical for informing policy decisions and tailoring interventions to local settings. Thus, the World Health Organization (WHO encourages the adoption of the integrated vector management (IVM strategy which is a rational decision making process for optimal use of available resources. One of the key features of IVM is capacity building at the operational level to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate vector control and its epidemiological and entomological impact. In Zambia, great progress has been made in implementing WHO-recommended vector control policies and strategies within the context of the IVM Global Strategic framework with strong adherence to its five key attributes. Conclusions The country has solid, consistent and coordinated policies, strategies and guidelines for malaria vector control. The Zambian experience demonstrates the significance of a coordinated multi-pronged IVM approach effectively operationalized within the context of a national health system.

  18. "These things are dangerous": Understanding induced abortion trajectories in urban Zambia.

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    Coast, Ernestina; Murray, Susan F

    2016-03-01

    Unsafe abortion is a significant but preventable cause of global maternal mortality and morbidity. Zambia has among the most liberal abortion laws in sub-Saharan Africa, however this alone does not guarantee access to safe abortion, and 30% of maternal mortality is attributable to unsafe procedures. Too little is known about the pathways women take to reach abortion services in such resource-poor settings, or what informs care-seeking behaviours, barriers and delays. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted in 2013 with 112 women who accessed abortion-related care in a Lusaka tertiary government hospital at some point in their pathway. The sample included women seeking safe abortion and also those receiving hospital care following unsafe abortion. We identified a typology of three care-seeking trajectories that ended in the use of hospital services: clinical abortion induced in hospital; clinical abortion initiated elsewhere, with post-abortion care in hospital; and non-clinical abortion initiated elsewhere, with post-abortion care in hospital. Framework analyses of 70 transcripts showed that trajectories to a termination of an unwanted pregnancy can be complex and iterative. Individuals may navigate private and public formal healthcare systems and consult unqualified providers, often trying multiple strategies. We found four major influences on which trajectory a woman followed, as well as the complexity and timing of her trajectory: i) the advice of trusted others ii) perceptions of risk iii) delays in care-seeking and receipt of services and iv) economic cost. Even though abortion is legal in Zambia, girls and women still take significant risks to terminate unwanted pregnancies. Levels of awareness about the legality of abortion and its provision remain low even in urban Zambia, especially among adolescents. Unofficial payments required by some providers can be a major barrier to safe care. Timely access to safe abortion services depends on chance rather

  19. Underperformance of African protected area networks and the case for new conservation models: insights from Zambia.

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    Lindsey, Peter A; Nyirenda, Vincent R; Barnes, Jonathan I; Becker, Matthew S; McRobb, Rachel; Tambling, Craig J; Taylor, W Andrew; Watson, Frederick G; t'Sas-Rolfes, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many African protected areas (PAs) are not functioning effectively. We reviewed the performance of Zambia's PA network and provide insights into how their effectiveness might be improved. Zambia's PAs are under-performing in ecological, economic and social terms. Reasons include: a) rapidly expanding human populations, poverty and open-access systems in Game Management Areas (GMAs) resulting in widespread bushmeat poaching and habitat encroachment; b) underfunding of the Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) resulting in inadequate law enforcement; c) reliance of ZAWA on extracting revenues from GMAs to cover operational costs which has prevented proper devolution of user-rights over wildlife to communities; d) on-going marginalization of communities from legal benefits from wildlife; e) under-development of the photo-tourism industry with the effect that earnings are limited to a fraction of the PA network; f) unfavourable terms and corruption which discourage good practice and adequate investment by hunting operators in GMAs; g) blurred responsibilities regarding anti-poaching in GMAs resulting in under-investment by all stakeholders. The combined effect of these challenges has been a major reduction in wildlife densities in most PAs and the loss of habitat in GMAs. Wildlife fares better in areas with investment from the private and/or NGO sector and where human settlement is absent. There is a need for: elevated government funding for ZAWA; greater international donor investment in protected area management; a shift in the role of ZAWA such that they focus primarily on national parks while facilitating the development of wildlife-based land uses by other stakeholders elsewhere; and new models for the functioning of GMAs based on joint-ventures between communities and the private and/or NGO sector. Such joint-ventures should provide defined communities with ownership of land, user-rights over wildlife and aim to attract long-term private/donor investment. These

  20. Molecular characterization of infectious bursal disease viruses detected in vaccinated commercial broiler flocks in Lusaka, Zambia.

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    Ndashe, Kunda; Simulundu, Edgar; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Moonga, Ladslav; Ogawa, Hirohito; Takada, Ayato; Mweene, Aaron S

    2016-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious, and immunosuppressive viral disease of young chickens and remains one of the economically most important diseases threatening the poultry industry worldwide. In this study, 16 and 11 nucleotide sequences of the VP2 hypervariable region (VP2-HVR) and part of VP1, respectively, of IBD virus (IBDV) detected in vaccinated broiler chickens in Lusaka in 2012 were determined. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these Zambian IBDVs separated into three genotypes of very virulent (VV) IBDVs. Although the majority of these viruses belonged to the African VV type (VV1), which consisted of viruses from West Africa, South Africa and Zambia, one virus belonged to the East African VV type (VV2). Interestingly, a Zambian IBDV belonging to the VV3 genotype (composed of viruses from several continents) clustered with attenuated vaccine strains. Although sequence analysis of VP2-HVR showed that all detected Zambian IBDVs had conserved putative virulence marker amino acids (i.e., 222A, 242I, 256I, 294I and 299S), one virus had two unique amino acid substitutions, N280S and E300A. This study demonstrates the diversity of Zambian IBDVs and documents for the first time the possible involvement of attenuated vaccine strains in the epidemiology of IBD in Zambia. Strict biosecurity of poultry farms, monitoring of live vaccine use in the field, surveillance and characterization of IBDV in poultry and development of a vaccine from local or regional IBDV field strains are recommended for improved IBD control in Zambia.