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Sample records for nontrivial collective behavior

  1. The ecology of collective behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah M Gordon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Similar patterns of interaction, such as network motifs and feedback loops, are used in many natural collective processes, probably because they have evolved independently under similar pressures. Here I consider how three environmental constraints may shape the evolution of collective behavior: the patchiness of resources, the operating costs of maintaining the interaction network that produces collective behavior, and the threat of rupture of the network. The ants are a large and successful taxon that have evolved in very diverse environments. Examples from ants provide a starting point for examining more generally the fit between the particular pattern of interaction that regulates activity, and the environment in which it functions.

  2. Mathematical Analysis for Non-reciprocal-interaction-based Model of Collective Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Takeshi; Osuka, Koichi; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro; Ishiguro, Akio

    2017-12-01

    In many natural and social systems, collective behaviors emerge as a consequence of non-reciprocal interaction between their constituents. As a first step towards understanding the core principle that underlies these phenomena, we previously proposed a minimal model of collective behavior based on non-reciprocal interactions by drawing inspiration from friendship formation in human society, and demonstrated via simulations that various non-trivial patterns emerge by changing parameters. In this study, a mathematical analysis of the proposed model wherein the system size is small is performed. Through the analysis, the mechanism of the transition between several patterns is elucidated.

  3. Effects of departing individuals on collective behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yuta; Okuda, Shoma; Migita, Masao; Murakami, Hisashi; Tomaru, Takenori

    2017-07-01

    Utilizing living organisms' abilities is an effective approach to realize flexible and unconventional computing. One possible bio-inspired computer might be developed from animal collective research by clarifying collective behaviors. Therefore, it is important to reveal how collective animal behaviors emerge. In many studies, individuals departing from the other individualsare generally ignored. Is it not possible that such departing individuals contribute to the organization of such collectives? To investigate the effects of individuals departing from a collective against collective behaviors, we observed and analyzed the behaviors of 40 soldier crabs in four types of experimental arenas. The recorded behaviors demonstrate a temporally changing pattern and the existence of departing individuals. We analyzed the relationship between global activity and cohesion levels and verified the features of departing individuals. The results imply that departing individuals contribute to collective behaviors.

  4. Orbifolds, quantum cosmology, and nontrivial topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagundes, Helio V.; Vargas, Teofilo

    2006-01-01

    In order to include nontrivial topologies in the problem of quantum creation of a universe, it seems to be necessary to generalize the sum over compact, smooth 4-manifolds to a sum over finite-volume, compact 4-orbifolds. We consider in detail the case of a 4-spherical orbifold with a cone-point singularity. This allows for the inclusion of a nontrivial topology into the semiclassical path integral approach to quantum cosmology, in the context of a Robertson-Walker minisuperspace. (author)

  5. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics: another nontrivial quantum superpotential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervero, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A nontrivial example of a quantum superpotential in the framework of supersymmetric quantum mechanics is constructed using integrable soliton-like functions. The model is shown to be fully solvable and some consequences regarding the physical properties of the model such as transparence and boundary effects are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Collective Motion in Behaviorally Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhagen, Katherine

    Collective motion is a widespread phenomenon in nature where individuals actively propel themselves, gather together and move as a group. Some examples of collective motion are bird flocks, fish schools, bacteria swarms, cell clusters, and crowds of people. Many models seek to understand the effects of activity in collective systems including things such as environmental disorder, density, and interaction details primarily at infinite size limits and with uniform populations. In this dissertation I investigate the effects of finite sizes and behavioral heterogeneity as it exists in nature. Behavioral heterogeneity can originate from several different sources. Mixed populations of individuals can have inherently different behaviors such as mutant bacteria, injured fish, or agents that prefer individualistic behavior over coordinated motion. Alternatively, agents may modify their own behavior based on some local environmental dependency, such as local substrate, or density. In cases such as mutant cheaters in bacteria or malfunctioning drones in swarms, mixed populations of behaviorally heterogeneous agents can be modelled as arising in the form of aligning and non-aligning agents. When this kind of heterogeneity is introduced, there is a critical carrying capacity of non-aligners above which the system is unable to form a cohesive ordered group. However, if the cohesion of the group is relaxed to allow for fracture, the system will actively sort out non-aligning agents the system will exist at a critical non-aligner fraction. A similar heterogeneity could result in a mixture of high and low noise individuals. In this case there is also a critical carry capacity beyond which the system is unable to reach an ordered state, however the nature of this transition depends on the model details. Agents which are part of an ordered collective may vary their behavior as the group changes environments such as a flock of birds flying into a cloud. Using a unique model of a

  7. Collective Behavior of Water on Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David; Willard, Adam; Chandler, David

    2012-02-01

    We present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of a interface between water and a platinum electrode. Using importance sampling techniques we probe a variety of collective phenomenon that emerge at the interface. We consider platinum electrodes with two different geometries and discuss how different behaviors result from a competition between geometrical frustration and favorable local interactions.

  8. Collective behaviors of book holding durations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ren-De; Guo, Qiang; Han, Jing-Ti; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Duration can directly reflect the collective reading behaviors of library user book holding. In this paper, by introducing the burstiness and memory coefficients, we empirically investigate the collective book holding behavior of three university libraries. The statistical results show that there are similar properties among the students with different backgrounds, presenting the burstiness = - 0.2 and memory = 0.5 for three datasets, which indicates that memory and random effects coexist in student book holding durations. In addition, we analyze the behavior patterns without duplicate durations by merging a series of books borrowed and returned at the same time. The results show the average burstiness B increases to -0.16 and memory M drops to 0.16 for three datasets, which indicates that both duplicate behavior and student's preference affect the memory effect. Furthermore, we present a model which assumes student's next book holding duration follows the previous one with probability p, and with probability 1 - p, the student would hold the book independently. The experimental results show that the presented model can reproduce the burstiness and memory effect of student book holding durations when p = 0.5 for empirical datasets and p = 0.2 for de-duplicate datasets, which indicate that the student's preferential holding behavior occurs with the probability p. This work helps in deeply understanding the regularity of duration-based human behaviors.

  9. Collective behavior of light in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscese, Fabio

    2018-03-01

    Under the action of light-by-light scattering, light beams show collective behaviors in vacuum. For instance, in the case of two counterpropagating laser beams with specific initial helicity, the polarization of each beam oscillates periodically between the left and right helicity. Furthermore, the amplitudes and the corresponding intensities of each polarization propagate like waves. Such polarization waves might be observationally accessible in future laser experiments, in a physical regime complementary to those explored by particle accelerators.

  10. Interplay between media and social influence in the collective behavior of opinion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaiori, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Messages conveyed by media act as a major drive in shaping attitudes and inducing opinion shift. On the other hand, individuals are strongly affected by peer pressure while forming their own judgment. We solve a general model of opinion dynamics where individuals either hold one of two alternative opinions or are undecided and interact pairwise while exposed to an external influence. As media pressure increases, the system moves from pluralism to global consensus; four distinct classes of collective behavior emerge, crucially depending on the outcome of direct interactions among individuals holding opposite opinions. Observed nontrivial behaviors include hysteretic phenomena and resilience of minority opinions. Notably, consensus could be unachievable even when media and microscopic interactions are biased in favor of the same opinion: The unfavored opinion might even gain the support of the majority.

  11. Mob control models of threshold collective behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Breer, Vladimir V; Rogatkin, Andrey D

    2017-01-01

    This book presents mathematical models of mob control with threshold (conformity) collective decision-making of the agents. Based on the results of analysis of the interconnection between the micro- and macromodels of active network structures, it considers the static (deterministic, stochastic and game-theoretic) and dynamic (discrete- and continuous-time) models of mob control, and highlights models of informational confrontation. Many of the results are applicable not only to mob control problems, but also to control problems arising in social groups, online social networks, etc. Aimed at researchers and practitioners, it is also a valuable resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students as well as doctoral candidates specializing in the field of collective behavior modeling.

  12. Dirac fermions in nontrivial topology black hole backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozdz, Marek; Nakonieczny, Lukasz; Rogatko, Marek

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the behavior of the Dirac fermions in a general spherically symmetric black hole background with a nontrivial topology of the event horizon. Both massive and massless cases are taken into account. We will conduct an analytical study of intermediate and late-time behavior of massive Dirac hair in the background of a black hole with a global monopole and dilaton black hole pierced by a cosmic string. In the case of a global monopole swallowed by a static black hole, the intermediate late-time behavior depends on the mass of the Dirac field, the multiple number of the wave mode, and the global monopole parameter. The late-time behavior is quite independent of these factors and has a decay rate proportional to t -5/6 . As far as the black hole pierced by a cosmic string is concerned, the intermediate late-time behavior depends only on the hair mass and the multipole number of the wave mode, while the late-time behavior dependence is the same as in the previous case. The main modification stems from the topology of the S 2 sphere pierced by a cosmic string. This factor modifies the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator acting on the transverse manifold.

  13. Slavnov-Taylor constraints for nontrivial backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binosi, D.; Quadri, A.

    2011-01-01

    We devise an algebraic procedure for the evaluation of Green's functions in SU(N) Yang-Mills theory in the presence of a nontrivial background field. In the ghost-free sector the dependence of the vertex functional on the background is shown to be uniquely determined by the Slavnov-Taylor identities in terms of a certain 1-PI correlator of the covariant derivatives of the ghost and the antighost fields. At nonvanishing background this amplitude is shown to encode the quantum deformations to the tree-level background-quantum splitting. The approach only relies on the functional identities of the model (Slavnov-Taylor identities, b-equation, antighost equation) and thus it is valid beyond perturbation theory, and, in particular, in a lattice implementation of the background field method. As an example of the formalism we analyze the ghost two-point function and the Kugo-Ojima function in an instanton background in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory, quantized in the background Landau gauge.

  14. Collective iteration behavior for online social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Li, Ren-De; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the patterns of collective behavior in online social network (OSNs) is critical to expanding the knowledge of human behavior and tie relationship. In this paper, we investigate a specific pattern called social signature in Facebook and Wiki users' online communication behaviors, capturing the distribution of frequency of interactions between different alters over time in the ego network. The empirical results show that there are robust social signatures of interactions no matter how friends change over time, which indicates that a stable commutation pattern exists in online communication. By comparing a random null model, we find the that commutation pattern is heterogeneous between ego and alters. Furthermore, in order to regenerate the pattern of the social signature, we present a preferential interaction model, which assumes that new users intend to look for the old users with strong ties while old users have tendency to interact with new friends. The experimental results show that the presented model can reproduce the heterogeneity of social signature by adjusting 2 parameters, the number of communicating targets m and the max number of interactions n, for Facebook users, m = n = 5, for Wiki users, m = 2 and n = 8. This work helps in deeply understanding the regularity of social signature.

  15. Artificial intelligence: Collective behaviors of synthetic micromachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wentao

    Synthetic nano- and micromotors function through the conversion of chemical free energy or forms of energy into mechanical motion. Ever since the first reports, such motors have been the subject of growing interest. In addition to motility in response to gradients, these motors interact with each other, resulting in emergent collective behavior like schooling, exclusion, and predator-prey. However, most of these systems only exhibit a single type of collective behavior in response to a certain stimuli. The research projects in the disseratation aim at designing synthetic micromotors that can exhibit transition between various collective behaviors in response to different stimuli, as well as quantitative understanding on the pairwise interaction and propulsion mechanism of such motors. Chapter 1 offers an overview on development of synthetic micromachines. Interactions and collective behaviors of micromotors are also summarized and included. Chapter 2 presents a silver orthophosphate microparticle system that exhibits collective behaviors. Transition between two collective patterns, clustering and dispersion, can be triggered by shift in chemical equilibrium upon the addition or removal of ammonia, in response to UV light, or under two orthogonal stimuli (UV and acoustic field) and powering mechanisms. The transitions can be explained by the self-diffusiophoresis mechanism resulting from either ionic or neutral solute gradients. Potential applications of the reported system in logic gates, microscale pumping, and hierarchical assembly have been demonstrated. Chapter 3 introduces a self-powered oscillatory micromotor system in which active colloids form clusters whose size changes periodically. The system consists of an aqueous suspension of silver orthophosphate particles under UV radiation, in the presence of a mixture of glucose and hydrogen peroxide. The colloid particles first attract with each other to form clusters. After a lag time of around 5min, chemical

  16. Nontrivial asymptotically nonfree gauge theories and dynamical unification of couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, J.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence for the nontriviality of asymptotically nonfree (ANF) Yang-Mills theories is found on the basis of optimized perturbation theory. It is argued that these theories with matter couplings can be made nontrivial by means of the reduction of couplings, leading to the idea of the dynamical unification of couplings (DUC). The second-order reduction of couplings in the ANF SU(3)-gauged Higgs-Yukawa theory, which is assumed to be nontrivial here, is carried out to motivate independent investigations on its nontriviality and DUC

  17. Collective motion in behaviorally heterogeneous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Copenhagen, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Collective motion is a widespread phenomenon in nature where individuals actively propel themselves, gather together and move as a group. Some examples of collective motion are bird flocks, fish schools, bacteria swarms, cell clusters, and crowds of people. Many models seek to understand the effects of activity in collective systems including things such as environmental disorder, density, and interaction details primarily at infinite size limits and with uniform populations. In this disserta...

  18. Collective Behavior of Amoebae in Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Albert

    2005-03-01

    We have discovered new aspects of social behavior in Dictyostelium discoideum by culturing high density colonies in liquid media depleted of nutrients in confined geometries by using three different preparations: I. thin (15-40um thick) and II. ultrathin (behavior of cells despite flattening that increased their areas by over an order of magnitude. We also observed that the earliest synchronized response of cells following the onset of starvation, a precursor to aggregation, was hastened by reducing the thickness of the aqueous culture layer. We were surprised to find that the threshold concentration for aggregation was raised by thin film confinement when compared to bulk behavior. Finally, both the ultra thin and microfluidic preparations reveal, with new clarity, vortex states of aggregation.

  19. Reconciling long-term cultural diversity and short-term collective social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, Luca; Picciolo, Francesco; Allansdottir, Agnes; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2012-01-24

    An outstanding open problem is whether collective social phenomena occurring over short timescales can systematically reduce cultural heterogeneity in the long run, and whether offline and online human interactions contribute differently to the process. Theoretical models suggest that short-term collective behavior and long-term cultural diversity are mutually excluding, since they require very different levels of social influence. The latter jointly depends on two factors: the topology of the underlying social network and the overlap between individuals in multidimensional cultural space. However, while the empirical properties of social networks are intensively studied, little is known about the large-scale organization of real societies in cultural space, so that random input specifications are necessarily used in models. Here we use a large dataset to perform a high-dimensional analysis of the scientific beliefs of thousands of Europeans. We find that interopinion correlations determine a nontrivial ultrametric hierarchy of individuals in cultural space. When empirical data are used as inputs in models, ultrametricity has strong and counterintuitive effects. On short timescales, it facilitates a symmetry-breaking phase transition triggering coordinated social behavior. On long timescales, it suppresses cultural convergence by restricting it within disjoint groups. Moreover, ultrametricity implies that these results are surprisingly robust to modifications of the dynamical rules considered. Thus the empirical distribution of individuals in cultural space appears to systematically optimize the coexistence of short-term collective behavior and long-term cultural diversity, which can be realized simultaneously for the same moderate level of mutual influence in a diverse range of online and offline settings.

  20. Revealed preference tests for collective household behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherchye, L.J.H.; de Rock, B.; Vermeulen, F.M.P.; Verriest, E.; Molina, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter contains a state of the art of revealed preference tests for consistency of observed household behavior with Pareto efficiency. These tests are entirely nonparametric, since they do not require any assumptions regarding the parametric form of individual preferences or the intrahousehold

  1. Determination of collective behavior of the financial market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shouwei; Xu, Tao; He, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we adopt the network synchronization to measure the collective behavior in the financial market, and then analyze the factors that affect the collective behavior. Based on the data from the Chinese financial market, we find that the clustering coefficient, the average shortest path length and the volatility fluctuation have a positive effect on the collective behavior respectively, while the average return has a negative effect on it; the effect of the average shortest path length on the collective behavior is the greatest in the above four variables; the above results are robust against the window size and the time interval between adjacent windows of the stock network; the effect of network structures and stock market properties on the collective behavior during the financial crisis is the same as those during other periods.

  2. Clustering User Behavior in Scientific Collections

    OpenAIRE

    Blixhavn, Øystein Hoel

    2014-01-01

    This master thesis looks at how clustering techniques can be appliedto a collection of scientific documents. Approximately one year of serverlogs from the CERN Document Server (CDS) are analyzed and preprocessed.Based on the findings of this analysis, and a review of thecurrent state of the art, three different clustering methods are selectedfor further work: Simple k-Means, Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering(HAC) and Graph Partitioning. In addition, a custom, agglomerativeclustering algor...

  3. Collective Behaviors in Spatially Extended Systems with Local Interactions and Synchronous Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChatÉ, H.; Manneville, P.

    1992-01-01

    Assessing the extent to which dynamical systems with many degrees of freedom can be described within a thermodynamics formalism is a problem that currently attracts much attention. In this context, synchronously updated regular lattices of identical, chaotic elements with local interactions are promising models for which statistical mechanics may be hoped to provide some insights. This article presents a large class of cellular automata rules and coupled map lattices of the above type in space dimensions d = 2 to 6.Such simple models can be approached by a mean-field approximation which usually reduces the dynamics to that of a map governing the evolution of some extensive density. While this approximation is exact in the d = infty limit, where macroscopic variables must display the time-dependent behavior of the mean-field map, basic intuition from equilibrium statistical mechanics rules out any such behavior in a low-dimensional systems, since it would involve the collective motion of locally disordered elements.The models studied are chosen to be as close as possible to mean-field conditions, i.e., rather high space dimension, large connectivity, and equal-weight coupling between sites. While the mean-field evolution is never observed, a new type of non-trivial collective behavior is found, at odds with the predictions of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Both in the cellular automata models and in the coupled map lattices, macroscopic variables frequently display a non-transient, time-dependent, low-dimensional dynamics emerging out of local disorder. Striking examples are period 3 cycles in two-state cellular automata and a Hopf bifurcation for a d = 5 lattice of coupled logistic maps. An extensive account of the phenomenology is given, including a catalog of behaviors, classification tables for the celular automata rules, and bifurcation diagrams for the coupled map lattices.The observed underlying dynamics is accompanied by an intrinsic quasi-Gaussian noise

  4. Active Mesogenic Droplets: Impact of Liquid Crystallinity and Collective Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Christian

    Droplets of common mesogenic compounds show a self-propelled motion when immersed in aqueous solutions containing ionic surfactants at concentrations well above the critical micelle concentration. After introducing some general properties of this type of artificial microswimmer, we focus on two topics: the influence of liquid crystallinity on the swimming behavior and the collective behavior of ensembles of a larger number of droplets. The mesogenic properties are not essential for the basic mechanism of self-propulsion, nevertheless they considerably influence the swimming behavior of the droplets. For instance, the shape of the trajectories strongly depends on whether the droplets are in the nematic or isotropic state. The droplet swimmers are also ideally suited for the study of collective behavior: Microfluidics enables the generation of large numbers of identical swimmers and we can tune their buoyancy. We report on the collective behavior in three-dimensional environments. Supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SPP 1726 ``Microswimmers'').

  5. Nontrivial Periodic Solutions for Nonlinear Second-Order Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieshan He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the existence of nontrivial periodic solutions and positive periodic solutions to a nonlinear second-order difference equation. Under some conditions concerning the first positive eigenvalue of the linear equation corresponding to the nonlinear second-order equation, we establish the existence results by using the topological degree and fixed point index theories.

  6. Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation for strongly damped mechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, Alexander; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2008-01-01

    Some non-trivial effects are investigated, which can occur if strongly damped mechanical systems are subjected to strong high-frequency (HF) excitation. The main result is a theoretical prediction, supported by numerical simulation, that for such systems the (quasi-)equilibrium states can change...... that can be substantial depending on the strength of the HF excitation) for finite values of the damping. The analysis is focused on the differences between the classic results for weakly damped systems, and new effects for which the strong damping terms are responsible. The analysis is based on a slightly...... modified averaging technique, and includes an elementary example of an elliptically excited pendulum for illustration, alongside with a generalization to a broader class of strongly damped dynamical systems with HF excitation. As an application example, the nontrivial behavior of a classical optimally...

  7. Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation for strongly damped mechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, Alexander; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    Some nontrivial effects are investigated, which can occur if strongly damped mechanical systems are subjected to strong high-frequency (HF) excitation. The main result is a theoretical prediction, supported by numerical simulation, that for such systems the (quasi-)equilibrium states can change...... that can be substantial (depending on the strength of the HF excitation) for finite values of the damping. The analysis is focused on the differences between the classic results for weakly damped systems, and new effects for which the strong damping terms are responsible. The analysis is based...... on a slightly modified averaging technique, and includes an elementary example of an elliptically excited pendulum for illustration, alongside with a generalization to a broader class of strongly damped dynamical systems with HF excitation. As an application example, the nontrivial behavior of a classical...

  8. Model of Collective Fish Behavior with Hydrodynamic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filella, Audrey; Nadal, François; Sire, Clément; Kanso, Eva; Eloy, Christophe

    2018-05-01

    Fish schooling is often modeled with self-propelled particles subject to phenomenological behavioral rules. Although fish are known to sense and exploit flow features, these models usually neglect hydrodynamics. Here, we propose a novel model that couples behavioral rules with far-field hydrodynamic interactions. We show that (1) a new "collective turning" phase emerges, (2) on average, individuals swim faster thanks to the fluid, and (3) the flow enhances behavioral noise. The results of this model suggest that hydrodynamic effects should be considered to fully understand the collective dynamics of fish.

  9. Collective animal behavior from Bayesian estimation and probability matching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Pérez-Escudero

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Animals living in groups make movement decisions that depend, among other factors, on social interactions with other group members. Our present understanding of social rules in animal collectives is mainly based on empirical fits to observations, with less emphasis in obtaining first-principles approaches that allow their derivation. Here we show that patterns of collective decisions can be derived from the basic ability of animals to make probabilistic estimations in the presence of uncertainty. We build a decision-making model with two stages: Bayesian estimation and probabilistic matching. In the first stage, each animal makes a Bayesian estimation of which behavior is best to perform taking into account personal information about the environment and social information collected by observing the behaviors of other animals. In the probability matching stage, each animal chooses a behavior with a probability equal to the Bayesian-estimated probability that this behavior is the most appropriate one. This model derives very simple rules of interaction in animal collectives that depend only on two types of reliability parameters, one that each animal assigns to the other animals and another given by the quality of the non-social information. We test our model by obtaining theoretically a rich set of observed collective patterns of decisions in three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, a shoaling fish species. The quantitative link shown between probabilistic estimation and collective rules of behavior allows a better contact with other fields such as foraging, mate selection, neurobiology and psychology, and gives predictions for experiments directly testing the relationship between estimation and collective behavior.

  10. Nontrivial ac spin response in the effective Luttinger model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Liangbin; Zhong Jiansong; Hu Kaige

    2006-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional effective Luttinger Hamiltonian and the exact Heisenberg equations of motion and within a self-consistent semiclassical approximation, we present a theoretical investigation on the nontrivial ac spin responses due to the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of holes in p-doped bulk semiconductors. We show that the nontrivial ac spin responses induced by the combined action of an ac external electric field and the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of holes may lead to the generation of a nonvanishing ac spin Hall current in a p-doped bulk semiconductor, which shares some similarities with the dissipationless dc spin Hall current conceived previously and also exhibits some interesting new features that was not found before

  11. Quantization ambiguity and non-trivial vacuum structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, H.J.; Swieca, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is an ambiguity in quantization of any system whose configuration space has a non-trivial topology characterized by a Chern number. In field theories this ambiguity manifests itself through the existence of theta-sectors. The point of view adopted gives a simple interpretation of the difference between the temporal and Coulomb gauge descriptions of instantons. The general ideas are exemplified in the O(3) non-linear sigma-model in two dimensions [pt

  12. An Algorithm for Global Optimization Inspired by Collective Animal Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Cuevas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A metaheuristic algorithm for global optimization called the collective animal behavior (CAB is introduced. Animal groups, such as schools of fish, flocks of birds, swarms of locusts, and herds of wildebeest, exhibit a variety of behaviors including swarming about a food source, milling around a central locations, or migrating over large distances in aligned groups. These collective behaviors are often advantageous to groups, allowing them to increase their harvesting efficiency, to follow better migration routes, to improve their aerodynamic, and to avoid predation. In the proposed algorithm, the searcher agents emulate a group of animals which interact with each other based on the biological laws of collective motion. The proposed method has been compared to other well-known optimization algorithms. The results show good performance of the proposed method when searching for a global optimum of several benchmark functions.

  13. A cluster phase analysis for collective behavior in team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Felip, Maurici A; Davis, Tehran J; Frank, Till D; Dixon, James A

    2018-06-01

    Collective behavior can be defined as the ability of humans to coordinate with others through a complex environment. Sports offer exquisite examples of this dynamic interplay, requiring decision making and other perceptual-cognitive skills to adjust individual decisions to the team self-organization and vice versa. Considering players of a team as periodic phase oscillators, synchrony analyses can be used to model the coordination of a team. Nonetheless, a main limitation of current models is that collective behavior is context independent. In other words, players on a team can be highly synchronized without this corresponding to a meaningful coordination dynamics relevant to the context of the game. Considering these issues, the aim of this study was to develop a method of analysis sensitive to the context for evidence-based measures of collective behavior. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inform: Efficient Information-Theoretic Analysis of Collective Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas G. Moore

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of collective behavior has traditionally relied on a variety of different methodological tools ranging from more theoretical methods such as population or game-theoretic models to empirical ones like Monte Carlo or multi-agent simulations. An approach that is increasingly being explored is the use of information theory as a methodological framework to study the flow of information and the statistical properties of collectives of interacting agents. While a few general purpose toolkits exist, most of the existing software for information theoretic analysis of collective systems is limited in scope. We introduce Inform, an open-source framework for efficient information theoretic analysis that exploits the computational power of a C library while simplifying its use through a variety of wrappers for common higher-level scripting languages. We focus on two such wrappers here: PyInform (Python and rinform (R. Inform and its wrappers are cross-platform and general-purpose. They include classical information-theoretic measures, measures of information dynamics and information-based methods to study the statistical behavior of collective systems, and expose a lower-level API that allow users to construct measures of their own. We describe the architecture of the Inform framework, study its computational efficiency and use it to analyze three different case studies of collective behavior: biochemical information storage in regenerating planaria, nest-site selection in the ant Temnothorax rugatulus, and collective decision making in multi-agent simulations.

  15. Information Seeking Behavior in Digital Image Collections: A Cognitive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Krystyna K.

    2006-01-01

    Presents the results of a qualitative study that focuses on search patterns of college students and community users interacting with a digital image collection. The study finds a distinct difference between the two groups of users and examines the role of mental models in information seeking behavior in digital libraries.

  16. Conceptualization of Collective Behavior Events in the New York "Times."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Joseph A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reports that most collective behavior events reported in the New York "Times" are described in terms of emotionality and anonymity of membership and are alleged to be violent and spontaneous, and that there are significant rank-order correlations between the reported presence of control agents, reported violence, and attributions of spontaneity.…

  17. Macroenvironmental regulation of hair cycling and collective regenerative behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikus, Maksim V; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The hair follicle (HF) regeneration paradigm provides a unique opportunity for studying the collective behavior of stem cells in living animals. Activation of HF stem cells depends on the core inhibitory BMP and activating WNT signals operating within the HF microenvironment. Additionally, HFs receive multilayered signaling inputs from the extrafollicular macroenvironment, which includes dermis, adipocytes, neighboring HFs, hormones, and external stimuli. These activators/inhibitors are integrated across multiple stem-cell niches to produce dynamic hair growth patterns. Because of their pigmentation, these patterns can be easily studied on live shaved animals. Comparing to autonomous regeneration of one HF, populations of HFs display coupled decision making, allowing for more robust and adaptable regenerative behavior to occur collectively. The generic cellular automata model used to simulate coordinated HF cycling here can be extended to study population-level behavior of other complex biological systems made of cycling elements.

  18. Collective signaling behavior in a networked-oscillator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.-H.; Hui, P. M.

    2007-09-01

    We propose and study the collective behavior of a model of networked signaling objects that incorporates several ingredients of real-life systems. These ingredients include spatial inhomogeneity with grouping of signaling objects, signal attenuation with distance, and delayed and impulsive coupling between non-identical signaling objects. Depending on the coupling strength and/or time-delay effect, the model exhibits completely, partially, and locally collective signaling behavior. In particular, a correlated signaling (CS) behavior is observed in which there exist time durations when nearly a constant fraction of oscillators in the system are in the signaling state. These time durations are much longer than the duration of a spike when a single oscillator signals, and they are separated by regular intervals in which nearly all oscillators are silent. Such CS behavior is similar to that observed in biological systems such as fireflies, cicadas, crickets, and frogs. The robustness of the CS behavior against noise is also studied. It is found that properly adjusting the coupling strength and noise level could enhance the correlated behavior.

  19. Engineering Sensorial Delay to Control Phototaxis and Emergent Collective Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mite Mijalkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collective motions emerging from the interaction of autonomous mobile individuals play a key role in many phenomena, from the growth of bacterial colonies to the coordination of robotic swarms. For these collective behaviors to take hold, the individuals must be able to emit, sense, and react to signals. When dealing with simple organisms and robots, these signals are necessarily very elementary; e.g., a cell might signal its presence by releasing chemicals and a robot by shining light. An additional challenge arises because the motion of the individuals is often noisy; e.g., the orientation of cells can be altered by Brownian motion and that of robots by an uneven terrain. Therefore, the emphasis is on achieving complex and tunable behaviors from simple autonomous agents communicating with each other in robust ways. Here, we show that the delay between sensing and reacting to a signal can determine the individual and collective long-term behavior of autonomous agents whose motion is intrinsically noisy. We experimentally demonstrate that the collective behavior of a group of phototactic robots capable of emitting a radially decaying light field can be tuned from segregation to aggregation and clustering by controlling the delay with which they change their propulsion speed in response to the light intensity they measure. We track this transition to the underlying dynamics of this system, in particular, to the ratio between the robots’ sensorial delay time and the characteristic time of the robots’ random reorientation. Supported by numerics, we discuss how the same mechanism can be applied to control active agents, e.g., airborne drones, moving in a three-dimensional space. Given the simplicity of this mechanism, the engineering of sensorial delay provides a potentially powerful tool to engineer and dynamically tune the behavior of large ensembles of autonomous mobile agents; furthermore, this mechanism might already be at work within

  20. Collective behavior of mice passing through an exit under panic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Zhang, Xuelin; Huang, Shenshi; Li, Changhai; Lu, Shouxiang

    2018-04-01

    Collective movement of animal in emergency condition has attracted growing attentions among researchers. However, many rules still need to be confirmed with adequate explanation. Study of collective behavior of mice can improve our understanding about the dynamics of pedestrian movement. However, its rules still need to be confirmed with adequate explanation. In this paper, collective behavior of mice passing through an exit under panic was investigated. The results showed that the total evacuation time decreased with exit width increasing in a certain range. Based on the different tendency of the curve in temporal evolution, the process of mice flow was divided into three stages. The density of mice near the exit peaks at a certain horizontal offset and starts to decrease over time. With the increase of the exit width, the duration of the higher density state decreased. We found that the frequency of time intervals obeyed a lognormal distribution or an exponential decay for different exit widths. In addition, the relationship between the group size and the group flow rate in different scenarios was analyzed. The phenomena found in our experiments show the collective behavioral characteristic of mice under panic. Our analysis in this paper will deepen our understanding of crowd dynamics in emergency condition.

  1. On effective temperature in network models of collective behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porfiri, Maurizio; Ariel, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Collective behavior of self-propelled units is studied analytically within the Vectorial Network Model (VNM), a mean-field approximation of the well-known Vicsek model. We propose a dynamical systems framework to study the stochastic dynamics of the VNM in the presence of general additive noise. We establish that a single parameter, which is a linear function of the circular mean of the noise, controls the macroscopic phase of the system—ordered or disordered. By establishing a fluctuation–dissipation relation, we posit that this parameter can be regarded as an effective temperature of collective behavior. The exact critical temperature is obtained analytically for systems with small connectivity, equivalent to low-density ensembles of self-propelled units. Numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate the applicability of this new notion of effective temperature to the Vicsek model. The identification of an effective temperature of collective behavior is an important step toward understanding order–disorder phase transitions, informing consistent coarse-graining techniques and explaining the physics underlying the emergence of collective phenomena.

  2. Emergent collective decision-making: Control, model and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tian

    In this dissertation we study emergent collective decision-making in social groups with time-varying interactions and heterogeneously informed individuals. First we analyze a nonlinear dynamical systems model motivated by animal collective motion with heterogeneously informed subpopulations, to examine the role of uninformed individuals. We find through formal analysis that adding uninformed individuals in a group increases the likelihood of a collective decision. Secondly, we propose a model for human shared decision-making with continuous-time feedback and where individuals have little information about the true preferences of other group members. We study model equilibria using bifurcation analysis to understand how the model predicts decisions based on the critical threshold parameters that represent an individual's tradeoff between social and environmental influences. Thirdly, we analyze continuous-time data of pairs of human subjects performing an experimental shared tracking task using our second proposed model in order to understand transient behavior and the decision-making process. We fit the model to data and show that it reproduces a wide range of human behaviors surprisingly well, suggesting that the model may have captured the mechanisms of observed behaviors. Finally, we study human behavior from a game-theoretic perspective by modeling the aforementioned tracking task as a repeated game with incomplete information. We show that the majority of the players are able to converge to playing Nash equilibrium strategies. We then suggest with simulations that the mean field evolution of strategies in the population resemble replicator dynamics, indicating that the individual strategies may be myopic. Decisions form the basis of control and problems involving deciding collectively between alternatives are ubiquitous in nature and in engineering. Understanding how multi-agent systems make decisions among alternatives also provides insight for designing

  3. A persistent homology approach to collective behavior in insect swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    Various animals from birds and fish to insects tend to form aggregates, displaying self-organized collective swarming behavior. Due to their frequent occurrence in nature and their implications for engineered, collective systems, these systems have been investigated and modeled thoroughly for decades. Common approaches range from modeling them with coupled differential equations on the individual level up to continuum approaches. We present an alternative, topology-based approach for describing swarming behavior at the macroscale rather than the microscale. We study laboratory swarms of Chironomus riparius, a flying, non-biting midge. To obtain the time-resolved three-dimensional trajectories of individual insects, we use a multi-camera stereoimaging and particle-tracking setup. To investigate the swarming behavior in a topological sense, we employ a persistent homology approach to identify persisting structures and features in the insect swarm that elude a direct, ensemble-averaging approach. We are able to identify features of sub-clusters in the swarm that show behavior distinct from that of the remaining swarm members. The coexistence of sub-swarms with different features resembles some non-biological systems such as active colloids or even thermodynamic systems.

  4. Measuring and modeling behavioral decision dynamics in collective evacuation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean M Carlson

    Full Text Available Identifying and quantifying factors influencing human decision making remains an outstanding challenge, impacting the performance and predictability of social and technological systems. In many cases, system failures are traced to human factors including congestion, overload, miscommunication, and delays. Here we report results of a behavioral network science experiment, targeting decision making in a natural disaster. In a controlled laboratory setting, our results quantify several key factors influencing individual evacuation decision making in a controlled laboratory setting. The experiment includes tensions between broadcast and peer-to-peer information, and contrasts the effects of temporal urgency associated with the imminence of the disaster and the effects of limited shelter capacity for evacuees. Based on empirical measurements of the cumulative rate of evacuations as a function of the instantaneous disaster likelihood, we develop a quantitative model for decision making that captures remarkably well the main features of observed collective behavior across many different scenarios. Moreover, this model captures the sensitivity of individual- and population-level decision behaviors to external pressures, and systematic deviations from the model provide meaningful estimates of variability in the collective response. Identification of robust methods for quantifying human decisions in the face of risk has implications for policy in disasters and other threat scenarios, specifically the development and testing of robust strategies for training and control of evacuations that account for human behavior and network topologies.

  5. Mapping collective behavior in the big-data era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; O'Brien, Michael J; Brock, William A

    2014-02-01

    The behavioral sciences have flourished by studying how traditional and/or rational behavior has been governed throughout most of human history by relatively well-informed individual and social learning. In the online age, however, social phenomena can occur with unprecedented scale and unpredictability, and individuals have access to social connections never before possible. Similarly, behavioral scientists now have access to "big data" sets - those from Twitter and Facebook, for example - that did not exist a few years ago. Studies of human dynamics based on these data sets are novel and exciting but, if not placed in context, can foster the misconception that mass-scale online behavior is all we need to understand, for example, how humans make decisions. To overcome that misconception, we draw on the field of discrete-choice theory to create a multiscale comparative "map" that, like a principal-components representation, captures the essence of decision making along two axes: (1) an east-west dimension that represents the degree to which an agent makes a decision independently versus one that is socially influenced, and (2) a north-south dimension that represents the degree to which there is transparency in the payoffs and risks associated with the decisions agents make. We divide the map into quadrants, each of which features a signature behavioral pattern. When taken together, the map and its signatures provide an easily understood empirical framework for evaluating how modern collective behavior may be changing in the digital age, including whether behavior is becoming more individualistic, as people seek out exactly what they want, or more social, as people become more inextricably linked, even "herdlike," in their decision making. We believe the map will lead to many new testable hypotheses concerning human behavior as well as to similar applications throughout the social sciences.

  6. NON-TRIVIALITY OF THE RESULTS OF MILGRAM FIELD EXPERIMENT IN MOSCOW AND NEW YORK SUBWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Mitina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-triviality of the results of the field experiment conducted on Stanley Milgram’s methodology in the New York and Moscow subway have been studied. The statistical significance of the difference between empirical and predicted results has been taken as the non-triviality criterion. 208 respondents (psychologists and students studying psychology were asked to predict an experimental result in dependence on an experimenter’s and subject’s gender, a subject’s age, and a city where the experiment was carried out. The obtained results have confirmed our hypothesis on non-triviality of the experiments in subways: it has been showed that there is a statistically significant difference between real behavior of subway passengers (in New York and in Moscow and predictions made by Moscow and Tashkent respondents. Practically in most cases the predicted probability that a subject gives a seat after request of experimenter (young woman or young man is much less than in reality. The structural equation modeling (SEM has been used to analyze the data by constructing the model taking account of all factors mentioned above. The model fit the experimental data well (CFI = 0.919. It has been found that predicted results depend not only on gender, age, and residence of a respondent but also on the degree of familiarity with the research. The obtained data give an important material for a further study of the role of situational (an experiment design and individual (respondent characteristics factors in predicted results; they contribute to further understanding of the problem of creation and support of non-formal social norms in various cultures and show new aspects of research carried out on experimental methodology of Stanley Milgram.

  7. Water collection behavior and hanging ability of bioinspired fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yongping; Chen, Yuan; Xue, Yan; Zheng, Yongmei; Jiang, Lei

    2012-03-13

    Since the water-collecting ability of the wetted cribellate spider capture silk is the result of a unique fiber structure, bioinspired fibers have been researched significantly so as to expose a new water-acquiring route in fogging-collection projects. However, the design of the geometry of bioinspired fiber is related to the ability of hanging drops, which has not been investigated in depth so far. Here, we fabricate bioinspired fibers to investigate the water collection behavior and the influence of geometry (i.e., periodicity of spindle knot) on the hanging-drop ability. We especially discuss water collection related to the periodicity of geometry on the bioinspired fiber. We reveal the length of the three phase contact line (TCL) at threshold conditions in conjunction with the maximal volume of a hanging drop at different modes. The study demonstrates that the geometrical structure of bioinspired fiber induces much stronger water hanging ability than that of uniform fiber, attributed to such special geometry that offers effectively an increasing TCL length or limits the contact length to be shorted. In addition, the geometry also improves the fog-collection efficiency by controlling tiny water drops to be collected in the large water drops at a given location.

  8. High-order noise filtering in nontrivial quantum logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Todd; Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael J

    2012-07-13

    Treating the effects of a time-dependent classical dephasing environment during quantum logic operations poses a theoretical challenge, as the application of noncommuting control operations gives rise to both dephasing and depolarization errors that must be accounted for in order to understand total average error rates. We develop a treatment based on effective Hamiltonian theory that allows us to efficiently model the effect of classical noise on nontrivial single-bit quantum logic operations composed of arbitrary control sequences. We present a general method to calculate the ensemble-averaged entanglement fidelity to arbitrary order in terms of noise filter functions, and provide explicit expressions to fourth order in the noise strength. In the weak noise limit we derive explicit filter functions for a broad class of piecewise-constant control sequences, and use them to study the performance of dynamically corrected gates, yielding good agreement with brute-force numerics.

  9. Future foam: Nontrivial topology from bubble collisions in eternal inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Yang, I-S.; Sekino, Yasuhiro; Shenker, Stephen; Susskind, Leonard; Yeh, C.-P.

    2008-01-01

    We study pocket universes which have zero cosmological constant and nontrivial boundary topology. These arise from bubble collisions in eternal inflation. Using a simplified dust model of collisions we find that boundaries of any genus can occur. Using a radiation shell model we perform analytic studies in the thin-wall limit to show the existence of geometries with a single toroidal boundary. We give plausibility arguments that higher genus boundaries can also occur. In geometries with one boundary of any genus a timelike observer can see the entire boundary. Geometries with multiple disconnected boundaries can also occur. In the spherical case with two boundaries the boundaries are separated by a horizon. Our results suggest that the holographic dual description for eternal inflation, proposed by Freivogel, Sekino, Susskind and Yeh, should include summation over the genus of the base space of the dual conformal field theory. We point out peculiarities of this genus expansion compared to the string perturbation series.

  10. Magnetically charged calorons with non-trivial holonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takumi; Nakamula, Atsushi; Takesue, Koki

    2018-06-01

    Instantons in pure Yang-Mills theories on partially periodic space R^3× {S}^1 are usually called calorons. The background periodicity brings on characteristic features of calorons such as non-trivial holonomy, which plays an essential role for confinement/deconfinement transition in pure Yang-Mills gauge theory. For the case of gauge group SU(2), calorons can be interpreted as composite objects of two constituent "monopoles" with opposite magnetic charges. There are often the cases that the two monopole charges are unbalanced so that the calorons possess net magnetic charge in R3. In this paper, we consider several mechanism how such net magnetic charges appear for certain types of calorons through the ADHM/Nahm construction with explicit examples. In particular, we construct analytically the gauge configuration of the (2 , 1)-caloron with U(1)-symmetry, which has intrinsically magnetic charge.

  11. Imprints of spherical nontrivial topologies on the cosmic microwave background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niarchou, Anastasia; Jaffe, Andrew

    2007-08-24

    The apparent low power in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropy power spectrum derived from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe motivated us to consider the possibility of a nontrivial topology. We focus on simple spherical multiconnected manifolds and discuss their implications for the CMB in terms of the power spectrum, maps, and the correlation matrix. We perform a Bayesian model comparison against the fiducial best-fit cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant based both on the power spectrum and the correlation matrix to assess their statistical significance. We find that the first-year power spectrum shows a slight preference for the truncated cube space, but the three-year data show no evidence for any of these spaces.

  12. Effects of Strategies Marketing of Collective Buying about Impulsive Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzi Elen Ferreira Dias

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has the second largest e-commerce market in the world. One model used in this sector is "collective buying", a feature of which is impulse sales. Consumer behavior can be influenced by several factors, two of which are addressed in this article: the individual impulsivity of consumers and strategies of mix marketing. Impulsive buying is characterized by an unplanned purchase, i.e. the need to acquire the product arises just before the purchase. Consumers respond differently to mixed strategies depending on their degree of impulsivity. Thus, this article aims to analyze the efficacy of different marketing mix strategies for impulsive and non-impulsive consumer purchasing behavior. 137 participants were given a questionnaire containing the Buying Impulsiveness scale from Rook and Fisher (1995, and statements about the marketing strategies used by collective buying sites. Through a regression analysis, three strategies were found to relate more to impulsivity: search for products from well-known brands, search for deals with big discounts and confidence in receiving the product. For e-commerce and researchers, this study elucidates which strategies, from the consumer's perspective, effectively persuade purchasing behavior.

  13. Quantitative analysis of bloggers' collective behavior powered by emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Marija; Paltoglou, Georgios; Tadić, Bosiljka

    2011-02-01

    Large-scale data resulting from users' online interactions provide the ultimate source of information to study emergent social phenomena on the Web. From individual actions of users to observable collective behaviors, different mechanisms involving emotions expressed in the posted text play a role. Here we combine approaches of statistical physics with machine-learning methods of text analysis to study the emergence of emotional behavior among Web users. Mapping the high-resolution data from digg.com onto bipartite networks of users and their comments onto posted stories, we identify user communities centered around certain popular posts and determine emotional contents of the related comments by the emotion classifier developed for this type of text. Applied over different time periods, this framework reveals strong correlations between the excess of negative emotions and the evolution of communities. We observe avalanches of emotional comments exhibiting significant self-organized critical behavior and temporal correlations. To explore the robustness of these critical states, we design a network-automaton model on realistic network connections and several control parameters, which can be inferred from the dataset. Dissemination of emotions by a small fraction of very active users appears to critically tune the collective states.

  14. Nontrivial paths and periodic orbits of the T-fractal billiard table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, Michel L.; Miller, Robyn L.; Niemeyer, Robert G.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce and prove numerous new results about the orbits of the T-fractal billiard. Specifically, in section 3, we give a variety of sufficient conditions for the existence of a sequence of compatible periodic orbits. In section 4, we examine the limiting behavior of particular sequences of compatible periodic orbits. Additionally, sufficient conditions for the existence of particular nontrivial paths are given in section 4. The proofs of two results of Lapidus and Niemeyer (2013 The current state of fractal billiards Fractal Geometry and Dynamical Systems in Pure and Applied Mathematics II: Fractals in Applied Mathematics (Contemporary Mathematics vol 601) ed D Carfi et al (Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society) pp 251-88 (e-print: arXiv:math.DS.1210.0282v2, 2013) appear here for the first time, as well. In section 5, an orbit with an irrational initial direction reaches an elusive point in a way that yields a nontrivial path of finite length, yet, by our convention, constitutes a singular orbit of the fractal billiard table. The existence of such an orbit seems to indicate that the classification of orbits may not be so straightforward. A discussion of our results and directions for future research is then given in section 6.

  15. Collective behavior in the spatial spreading of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Barttfeld, Pablo; Havlin, Shlomo; Sigman, Mariano; Makse, Hernán A.

    2012-06-01

    Obesity prevalence is increasing in many countries at alarming levels. A difficulty in the conception of policies to reverse these trends is the identification of the drivers behind the obesity epidemics. Here, we implement a spatial spreading analysis to investigate whether obesity shows spatial correlations, revealing the effect of collective and global factors acting above individual choices. We find a regularity in the spatial fluctuations of their prevalence revealed by a pattern of scale-free long-range correlations. The fluctuations are anomalous, deviating in a fundamental way from the weaker correlations found in the underlying population distribution indicating the presence of collective behavior, i.e., individual habits may have negligible influence in shaping the patterns of spreading. Interestingly, we find the same scale-free correlations in economic activities associated with food production. These results motivate future interventions to investigate the causality of this relation providing guidance for the implementation of preventive health policies.

  16. Fractals as objects with nontrivial structures at all scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacan, Francis; Tresser, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Toward the middle of 2001, the authors started arguing that fractals are important when discussing the operational resilience of information systems and related computer sciences issues such as artificial intelligence. But in order to argue along these lines it turned out to be indispensable to define fractals so as to let one recognize as fractals some sets that are very far from being self similar in the (usual) metric sense. This paper is devoted to define (in a loose sense at least) fractals in ways that allow for instance all the Cantor sets to be fractals and that permit to recognize fractality (the property of being fractal) in the context of the information technology issues that we had tried to comprehend. Starting from the meta-definition of a fractal as an “object with non-trivial structure at all scales” that we had used for long, we ended up taking these words seriously. Accordingly we define fractals in manners that depend both on the structures that the fractals are endowed with and the chosen sets of structure compatible maps, i.e., we approach fractals in a category-dependent manner. We expect that this new approach to fractals will contribute to the understanding of more of the fractals that appear in exact and other sciences than what can be handled presently

  17. Nontrivial correlation between the CKM and MNS matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhizhong

    2005-01-01

    We point out that the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark mixing matrix V CKM and the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (MNS) lepton mixing matrix V MNS can naturally be correlated in a class of seesaw models if the Dirac neutrino mass matrix and the up-type quark mass matrix are symmetric and identical, but the texture of their correlation matrix F ν is rather nontrivial. The bimaximal mixing pattern of F ν is disfavored by current data, and other special forms of F ν may suffer from fine-tuning of the free phase parameters in fitting the so-called quark-lepton complementarity relation. A straightforward calculation of F ν in terms of V CKM and V MNS reveals a striking feature of F ν : its (1,3) element cannot be zero or too small, no matter whether the (1,3) elements of V CKM and V MNS are vanishing or not. We also add some brief comments on possible radiative corrections to V CKM and V MNS

  18. 76 FR 43265 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Evacuation Movement and Behavior Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Evacuation Movement and Behavior Questionnaire AGENCY: National Institute of... collecting data on evacuation behavior and movement of occupants from approximately 50 high-rise building...

  19. Ontogeny of collective behavior reveals a simple attraction rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Robert C; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G

    2017-02-28

    The striking patterns of collective animal behavior, including ant trails, bird flocks, and fish schools, can result from local interactions among animals without centralized control. Several of these rules of interaction have been proposed, but it has proven difficult to discriminate which ones are implemented in nature. As a method to better discriminate among interaction rules, we propose to follow the slow birth of a rule of interaction during animal development. Specifically, we followed the development of zebrafish, Danio rerio , and found that larvae turn toward each other from 7 days postfertilization and increase the intensity of interactions until 3 weeks. This developmental dataset allows testing the parameter-free predictions of a simple rule in which animals attract each other part of the time, with attraction defined as turning toward another animal chosen at random. This rule makes each individual likely move to a high density of conspecifics, and moving groups naturally emerge. Development of attraction strength corresponds to an increase in the time spent in attraction behavior. Adults were found to follow the same attraction rule, suggesting a potential significance for adults of other species.

  20. Dynamic behavior of IREB in a collective ion acceleration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, T.A.; Rhee, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report an experimental study of dynamic behavior of net current in conjunction with collective ion acceleration. In the presence of neutral gas, either puffed in or released from the anode foil, the IREB injected is subject to the charge and current neutralizations, resulting in a complicated time and space dependent beam distribution in the drift tube. To investigate the dynamic behavior of the current in the drift tube, typically a 0.5 MeV, 70 kA, 100 ns electron beam of 2.54 cm diam is injected through a foil anode into a drift tube of 15 cm diam. Reproducibility of experiment was improved by using a specially designed anode system with a foil changer which allowed the production of many shots of high current electron beam without disturbing the vacuum condition. The net currents were measured by a Rogowski coil built in the anode system, and a movable Faraday cup along the drift tube. The ions accelerated were diagnosed mainly by a Thomson spectrometer system placed at the end of the drift tube

  1. Collective mechanical behavior of multilayer colloidal arrays of hollow nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Retsch, Markus; Thomas, Edwin L; Boyce, Mary C

    2012-04-03

    The collective mechanical behavior of multilayer colloidal arrays of hollow silica nanoparticles (HSNP) is explored under spherical nanoindentation through a combination of experimental, numerical, and theoretical approaches. The effective indentation modulus E(ind) is found to decrease with an increasing number of layers in a nonlinear manner. The indentation force versus penetration depth behavior for multilayer hollow particle arrays is predicted by an approximate analytical model based on the spring stiffness of the individual particles and the multipoint, multiparticle interactions as well as force transmission between the layers. The model is in good agreement with experiments and with detailed finite element simulations. The ability to tune the effective indentation modulus, E(ind), of the multilayer arrays by manipulating particle geometry and layering is revealed through the model, where E(ind) = (0.725m(-3/2) + 0.275)E(mon) and E(mon) is the monolayer modulus and m is number of layers. E(ind) is seen to plateau with increasing m to E(ind_plateau) = 0.275E(mon) and E(mon) scales with (t/R)(2), t being the particle shell thickness and R being the particle radius. The scaling law governing the nonlinear decrease in indentation modulus with an increase in layer number (E(ind) scaling with m(-3/2)) is found to be similar to that governing the indentation modulus of thin solid films E(ind_solid) on a stiff substrate (where E(ind_solid) scales with h(-1.4) and also decreases until reaching a plateau value) which also decreases with an increase in film thickness h. However, the mechanisms underlying this trend for the colloidal array are clearly different, where discrete particle-to-particle interactions govern the colloidal array behavior in contrast to the substrate constraint on deformation, which governs the thickness dependence of the continuous thin film indentation modulus.

  2. Coherence and incoherence collective behavior in financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shangmei; Xie, Qiuchao; Lu, Qing; Jiang, Xin; Chen, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Financial markets have been extensively studied as highly complex evolving systems. In this paper, we quantify financial price fluctuations through a coupled dynamical system composed of phase oscillators. We find that a Financial Coherence and Incoherence (FCI) coexistence collective behavior emerges as the system evolves into the stable state, in which the stocks split into two groups: one is represented by coherent, phase-locked oscillators, the other is composed of incoherent, drifting oscillators. It is demonstrated that the size of the coherent stock groups fluctuates during the economic periods according to real-world financial instabilities or shocks. Further, we introduce the coherent characteristic matrix to characterize the involvement dynamics of stocks in the coherent groups. Clustering results on the matrix provides a novel manifestation of the correlations among stocks in the economic periods. Our analysis for components of the groups is consistent with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS) classification and can also figure out features for newly developed industries. These results can provide potentially implications on characterizing the inner dynamical structure of financial markets and making optimal investment into tragedies.

  3. Spatially quantifying the leadership effectiveness in collective behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haitao [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang Ning [Department of Control Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Michael Z Q [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Su Riqi; Zhou Tao [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhou Changsong, E-mail: zht@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: cszhou@hkbu.edu.hk, E-mail: zhutou@ustc.edu [Department of Physics, Centre for Nonlinear Studies, and Beijing-Hong Kong-Singapore Joint Centre for Nonlinear and Complex Systems (Hong Kong), Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-15

    Among natural biological flocks/swarms or mass social activities, when the collective behavior of the followers has been dominated by the direction or opinion of one leader group, it seems difficult for later-coming leaders to reverse the orientation of the mass followers, especially when they are in quantitative minority. This paper, however, reports a counter-intuitive phenomenon, i.e. Following the Later-coming Minority, provided that the later-comers obey a favorable distribution pattern that enables them to spread their influence to as many followers as possible within a given time and to be dense enough to govern these local followers they can influence directly from the beginning. We introduce a discriminant index to quantify the whole group's orientation under competing leaderships, with which the eventual orientation of the mass followers can be predicted before launching the real dynamical procedure. From the application point of view, this leadership effectiveness index also helps us to design an economical way for the minority later-coming leaders to defeat the dominating majority leaders solely by optimizing their spatial distribution pattern provided that the premeditated goal is available. Our investigation provides insights into effective leadership in biological systems with meaningful implications for social and industrial applications.

  4. Spatially quantifying the leadership effectiveness in collective behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haitao; Wang Ning; Chen, Michael Z Q; Su Riqi; Zhou Tao; Zhou Changsong

    2010-01-01

    Among natural biological flocks/swarms or mass social activities, when the collective behavior of the followers has been dominated by the direction or opinion of one leader group, it seems difficult for later-coming leaders to reverse the orientation of the mass followers, especially when they are in quantitative minority. This paper, however, reports a counter-intuitive phenomenon, i.e. Following the Later-coming Minority, provided that the later-comers obey a favorable distribution pattern that enables them to spread their influence to as many followers as possible within a given time and to be dense enough to govern these local followers they can influence directly from the beginning. We introduce a discriminant index to quantify the whole group's orientation under competing leaderships, with which the eventual orientation of the mass followers can be predicted before launching the real dynamical procedure. From the application point of view, this leadership effectiveness index also helps us to design an economical way for the minority later-coming leaders to defeat the dominating majority leaders solely by optimizing their spatial distribution pattern provided that the premeditated goal is available. Our investigation provides insights into effective leadership in biological systems with meaningful implications for social and industrial applications.

  5. Collective cell behavior on basement membranes floating in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Sarah; Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Morley, Cameron; Sawyer, W.; Angelini, Thomas

    The basement membrane is an essential part of the polarity of endothelial and epithelial tissues. In tissue culture and organ-on-chip devices, monolayer polarity can be established by coating flat surfaces with extracellular matrix proteins and tuning the trans-substrate permeability. In epithelial 3D culture, spheroids spontaneously establish inside-out polarity, morphing into hollow shell-like structures called acini, generating their own basement membrane on the inner radius of the shell. However, 3D culture approaches generally lack the high degree of control provided by the 2D culture plate or organ-on-chip devices, making it difficult to create more faithful in vitro tissue models with complex surface curvature and morphology. Here we present a method for 3D printing complex basement membranes covered in cells. We 3D print collagen-I and Matrigel into a 3D growth medium made from jammed microgels. This soft, yielding material allows extracellular matrix to be formed as complex surfaces and shapes, floating in space. We then distribute MCF10A epithelial cells across the polymerized surface. We envision employing this strategy to study 3D collective cell behavior in numerous model tissue layers, beyond this simple epithelial model.

  6. Collective Behavior of Animals: Swarming and Complex Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cañizo, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this short note we review some of the individual based models of the collective motion of agents, called swarming. These models based on ODEs (ordinary differential equations exhibit a complex rich asymptotic behavior in terms of patterns, that we show numerically. Moreover, we comment on how these particle models are connected to partial differential equations to describe the evolution of densities of individuals in a continuum manner. The mathematical questions behind the stability issues of these PDE (partial differential equations models are questions of actual interest in mathematical biology research.

    En esta nota repasamos algunos modelos basados en individuos para describir el movimiento colectivo de agentes, a lo que nos referimos usando la voz inglesa swarming. Estos modelos se basan en EDOs (ecuaciones diferenciales ordinarias y muestran un comportamiento asintótico complejo y rico en patrones, que mostramos numéricamente. Además, comentamos cómo se conectan estos modelos de partículas con las ecuaciones en derivadas parciales para describir la evolución de densidades de individuos de forma continua. Las cuestiones matemáticas relacionadas con la estabilidad de de estos modelos de EDP's (ecuaciones en derivadas parciales despiertan gran interés en la investigación en biología matemática.

  7. Catalytic micromotors and micropumps and their collective behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibele, Michael Edward

    The overarching goal which initiated this research was the desire to learn how to synthesize artificial micrometer- and nanometer-sized objects which have the ability to move autonomously in solution, and to be able to understand, predict, and control their movements. In the natural world, such motion is common. Bacteria, for instance, use flagella, cilia, or other mechanisms to chemotax to nutrient-rich regions of their environments. However, at the outset of this research, only a few simple examples of artificially powered motions on the microscale had been reported in the literature. This dissertation discusses the evolution of artificial catalytic micromotors and micropumps from the initial bimetallic-microrod design, which catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to the current state of the field, in which particle motion can also be powered by hydrazine-derived fuels or by ultraviolet light. Analyses of these new motors are presented, with particular emphasis given to the motormotor interactions which occur in solution and which give rise to collective behavior in dense populations of the motors. The first artificial autonomous micromotor ever synthesized consisted of a bimetallic microrod with spatially segregated gold and platinum segments. When placed in aqueous solutions containing H2O2, this microrod decomposed the H2O2 asymmetrically on its two metallic surfaces and powered its own motion through solution via self-electrophoresis. In this dissertation, it is shown that a similar self-electrophoretic mechanism is at play in a micropump system comprised of spatially segregated, lithographically patterned, palladium and gold features, which operates in solutions of either hydrazine (N2H4) or N,N-dimethylhydrazine [(CH 3)2N(NH3)]. While this new electrophoretic system is interesting from a theoretical standpoint, N2H4 is highly toxic, and the decision was made to move on to other more environmentally friendly systems. The bulk of this

  8. Interplay between cost and benefits triggers nontrivial vaccination uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinegger, Benjamin; Cardillo, Alessio; Rios, Paolo De Los; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Arenas, Alex

    2018-03-01

    The containment of epidemic spreading is a major challenge in science. Vaccination, whenever available, is the best way to prevent the spreading, because it eventually immunizes individuals. However, vaccines are not perfect, and total immunization is not guaranteed. Imperfect immunization has driven the emergence of antivaccine movements that totally alter the predictions about the epidemic incidence. Here, we propose a mathematically solvable mean-field vaccination model to mimic the spontaneous adoption of vaccines against influenzalike diseases and the expected epidemic incidence. The results are in agreement with extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the epidemics and vaccination coevolutionary processes. Interestingly, the results reveal a nonmonotonic behavior on the vaccination coverage that increases with the imperfection of the vaccine and after decreases. This apparent counterintuitive behavior is analyzed and understood from stability principles of the proposed mathematical model.

  9. Topologically nontrivial black holes in Lovelock-Born-Infeld gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangkhah, N.

    2018-04-01

    We present the black hole solutions possessing horizon with nonconstant-curvature and additional scalar restrictions on the base manifold in Lovelock gravity coupled to Born-Infeld (BI) nonlinear electrodynamics. The asymptotic and near origin behavior of the metric is presented and we analyze different behaviors of the singularity. We find that, in contrast to the case of black hole solutions of BI-Lovelock gravity with constant curvature horizon and Maxwell-Lovelock gravity with non constant horizon which have only timelike singularities, spacelike, and timelike singularities may exist for BI-Lovelock black holes with nonconstant curvature horizon. By calculating the thermodynamic quantities, we study the effects of nonlinear electrodynamics via the Born-Infeld action. Stability analysis shows that black holes with positive sectional curvature, κ , possess an intermediate unstable phase and large and small black holes are stable. We see that while Ricci flat Lovelock-Born-Infeld black holes having exotic horizons are stable in the presence of Maxwell field or either Born Infeld field with large born Infeld parameter β , unstable phase appears for smaller values of β , and therefore nonlinearity brings in the instability.

  10. Quasilinear Elliptic Equations with Hardy-Sobolev Critical Exponents: Existence and Multiplicity of Nontrivial Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanwei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the existence of positive solutions and multiplicity of nontrivial solutions for a class of quasilinear elliptic equations by using variational methods. Our obtained results extend some existing ones.

  11. Nontrivial Solution of Fractional Differential System Involving Riemann-Stieltjes Integral Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge-Feng Yang

    2012-01-01

    differential system involving the Riemann-Stieltjes integral condition, by using the Leray-Schauder nonlinear alternative and the Banach contraction mapping principle, some sufficient conditions of the existence and uniqueness of a nontrivial solution of a system are obtained.

  12. Control of longitudinal collective behavior in the Muon Collider rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hao

    1997-05-01

    The longitudinal bunch collective effects in a Muon Collider ring are theoretically examined. The situation involves an intense bunch, a short bunch, a small momentum compaction, a rather large impedance compared with the stability threshold criterion, and luminosity life time limited by muon decay to a thousand turns. Qualitative descriptions of stability are given and a scaling law for the instability threshold is derived. Numerical simulation results for the impedance-related instabilities are given for two cases of current interest - a 250 GeV x 250 GeV demonstration machine and a 2 TeV x 2 TeV high energy machine. The results of these simulations are in good agreement with the predictions of the scaling law and show that the longitudinal collective effects are controllable with a proper choice of parameters (viz. rf voltage, rf frequency, linear and non-linear longitudinal chromaticity)

  13. Understanding recurrent crime as system-immanent collective behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž; Donnay, Karsten; Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Containing the spreading of crime is a major challenge for society. Yet, since thousands of years, no effective strategy has been found to overcome crime. To the contrary, empirical evidence shows that crime is recurrent, a fact that is not captured well by rational choice theories of crime. According to these, strong enough punishment should prevent crime from happening. To gain a better understanding of the relationship between crime and punishment, we consider that the latter requires prior discovery of illicit behavior and study a spatial version of the inspection game. Simulations reveal the spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance between "criminals", "inspectors", and "ordinary people" as a consequence of spatial interactions. Such cycles dominate the evolutionary process, in particular when the temptation to commit crime or the cost of inspection are low or moderate. Yet, there are also critical parameter values beyond which cycles cease to exist and the population is dominated either by a stable mixture of criminals and inspectors or one of these two strategies alone. Both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions to different final states are possible, indicating that successful strategies to contain crime can be very much counter-intuitive and complex. Our results demonstrate that spatial interactions are crucial for the evolutionary outcome of the inspection game, and they also reveal why criminal behavior is likely to be recurrent rather than evolving towards an equilibrium with monotonous parameter dependencies.

  14. Understanding recurrent crime as system-immanent collective behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Perc

    Full Text Available Containing the spreading of crime is a major challenge for society. Yet, since thousands of years, no effective strategy has been found to overcome crime. To the contrary, empirical evidence shows that crime is recurrent, a fact that is not captured well by rational choice theories of crime. According to these, strong enough punishment should prevent crime from happening. To gain a better understanding of the relationship between crime and punishment, we consider that the latter requires prior discovery of illicit behavior and study a spatial version of the inspection game. Simulations reveal the spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance between "criminals", "inspectors", and "ordinary people" as a consequence of spatial interactions. Such cycles dominate the evolutionary process, in particular when the temptation to commit crime or the cost of inspection are low or moderate. Yet, there are also critical parameter values beyond which cycles cease to exist and the population is dominated either by a stable mixture of criminals and inspectors or one of these two strategies alone. Both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions to different final states are possible, indicating that successful strategies to contain crime can be very much counter-intuitive and complex. Our results demonstrate that spatial interactions are crucial for the evolutionary outcome of the inspection game, and they also reveal why criminal behavior is likely to be recurrent rather than evolving towards an equilibrium with monotonous parameter dependencies.

  15. Evolutionary Dynamics of Collective Behavior Selection and Drift: Flocking, Collapse, and Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shaolin; Wang, Yaonan; Chen, Yao; Wang, Zhen

    2016-06-14

    Behavioral choice is ubiquitous across a wide range of interactive decision-making processes and a myriad of scientific disciplines. With regard to this issue, one entitative problem is actually to understand how collective social behaviors form and evolve among populations when they face a variety of conflict alternatives. In this paper, a selection-drift dynamic model is formulated to characterize the behavior imitation and exploration processes in social populations. Based on the proposed framework, several typical behavior evolution patterns, including behavioral flocking, collapse, and oscillation, are reproduced with different kinds of behavior networks. Interestingly, for the selection-drift dynamics on homogeneous symmetric behavior networks, we unveil the phase transition from behavioral flocking to collapse and derive the bifurcation diagram of the evolutionary stable behaviors in social behavior evolution. While via analyzing the survival conditions of the best behavior on heterogeneous symmetric behavior networks, we propose a selection-drift mechanism to guarantee consensus at the optimal behavior. Moreover, when the selection-drift dynamics on asymmetric behavior networks is simulated, it is shown that breaking the symmetry in behavior networks can induce various behavioral oscillations. These obtained results may shed new insights into understanding, detecting, and further controlling how social norm and cultural trends evolve.

  16. Bistable collective behavior of polymers tethered in a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanovic, Dino; Bailey, Joe; Harker, Anthony H.; Fassati, Ariberto; Hoogenboom, Bart W.; Ford, Ian J.

    2012-06-01

    Polymer-coated pores play a crucial role in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport and in a number of biomimetic and nanotechnological applications. Here we present Monte Carlo and Density Functional Theory approaches to identify different collective phases of end-grafted polymers in a nanopore and to study their relative stability as a function of intermolecular interactions. Over a range of system parameters that is relevant for nuclear pore complexes, we observe two distinct phases: one with the bulk of the polymers condensed at the wall of the pore, and the other with the polymers condensed along its central axis. The relative stability of these two phases depends on the interpolymer interactions. The existence the two phases suggests a mechanism in which marginal changes in these interactions, possibly induced by nuclear transport receptors, cause the pore to transform between open and closed configurations, which will influence transport through the pore.

  17. Collective, stochastic and nonequilibrium behavior of highly excited hadronic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, P [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA). Theoretical Div.

    1984-04-23

    We discuss selected problems concerning the dynamics and stochastic behavior of highly excited matter, particularly the QCD plasma. For the latter we consider the equation of state, kinetics, quasiparticles, flow properties and possible chaos and turbulence. The promise of phase space distribution functions for covariant transport and kinetic theory is stressed. The possibility and implications of a stochastic bag are spelled out. A simplified space-time model of hadronic collisions is pursued, with applications to A-A collisions and other matters. The domain wall between hadronic and plasma phase is of potential importance: its thickness and relation to surface tension is noticed. Finally, we review the recently developed stochastic cell model of multiparticle distributions and KNO scaling. This topic leads to the notion that fractional dimensions are involved in a rather general dynamical context. We speculate that various scaling phenomena are independent of the full dynamical structure, depending only on a general stochastic framework having to do with simple maps and strange attractors. 42 refs.

  18. Collective, stochastic and nonequilibrium behavior of highly excited hadronic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, P.

    1983-01-01

    We discuss selected problems concerning the dynamic and stochasticc behavior of highly excited matter, particularly the QCD plasma. For the latter we consider the equation of state, kinetics, quasiparticles, flow properties and possible chaos and turbulence. The promise of phase space distribution functions for covariant transport and kinetic theory is stressed. The possibility and implications of a stochastic bag are spelled out. A simplified space-time model of hadronic collisions is pursued, with applications to A-A collisions and other matters. The domain wall between hadronic and plasma phase is of potential importance: its thickness and relation to surface tension are noticed. Finally we reviewed the recently developed stochastic cell model of multiparticle distributions and KNO scaling. This topic leads to the notion that fractal dimensions are involved in a rather general dynamical context. We speculate that various scaling phenomena are independent of the full dynamical structure, depending only on a general stochastic framework having to do with simple maps and strange attractors. 42 references

  19. Generalized hedgehog ansatz and Gribov copies in regions with nontrivial topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Salgado-Rebolledo, Patricio

    2013-02-01

    In this paper the arising of Gribov copies both in Landau and Coulomb gauges in regions with nontrivial topologies but flat metric, (such as closed tubes S1×D2, or R×T2) will be analyzed. Using a novel generalization of the hedgehog ansatz beyond spherical symmetry, analytic examples of Gribov copies of the vacuum will be constructed. Using such ansatz, we will also construct the elliptic Gribov pendulum. The requirement of absence of Gribov copies of the vacuum satisfying the strong boundary conditions implies geometrical constraints on the shapes and sizes of the regions with nontrivial topologies.

  20. Electroweak chiral Lagrangian from the topcolor-assisted technicolor model with nontrivial technicolor fermion condensation and walking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Fengjun; Jiang Shaozhou; Wang Qing

    2011-01-01

    The electroweak chiral Lagrangian for the topcolor-assisted technicolor model proposed by K. Lane, which uses nontrivial patterns of techniquark condensation and walking, was investigated in this study. We found that the features of the model are qualitatively similar to those of Lane's previous natural topcolor-assisted technicolor prototype model, but there is no limit on the upper bound of the Z ' mass. We discuss the phase structure and possible walking behavior of the model. We obtained the values of all coefficients of the electroweak chiral Lagrangian up to an order of p 4 . We show that although the walking effect reduces the S parameter to half its original value, it maintains an order of 2. Moreover, a special hypercharge arrangement is needed to achieve further reductions in its value.

  1. Analyticity of event horizons of five-dimensional multi-black holes with nontrivial asymptotic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    We show that there exist five-dimensional multi-black hole solutions which have analytic event horizons when the space-time has nontrivial asymptotic structure, unlike the case of five-dimensional multi-black hole solutions in asymptotically flat space-time.

  2. Modeling collective animal behavior with a cognitive perspective: a methodological framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weitz

    Full Text Available The last decades have seen an increasing interest in modeling collective animal behavior. Some studies try to reproduce as accurately as possible the collective dynamics and patterns observed in several animal groups with biologically plausible, individual behavioral rules. The objective is then essentially to demonstrate that the observed collective features may be the result of self-organizing processes involving quite simple individual behaviors. Other studies concentrate on the objective of establishing or enriching links between collective behavior researches and cognitive or physiological ones, which then requires that each individual rule be carefully validated. Here we discuss the methodological consequences of this additional requirement. Using the example of corpse clustering in ants, we first illustrate that it may be impossible to discriminate among alternative individual rules by considering only observational data collected at the group level. Six individual behavioral models are described: They are clearly distinct in terms of individual behaviors, they all reproduce satisfactorily the collective dynamics and distribution patterns observed in experiments, and we show theoretically that it is strictly impossible to discriminate two of these models even in the limit of an infinite amount of data whatever the accuracy level. A set of methodological steps are then listed and discussed as practical ways to partially overcome this problem. They involve complementary experimental protocols specifically designed to address the behavioral rules successively, conserving group-level data for the overall model validation. In this context, we highlight the importance of maintaining a sharp distinction between model enunciation, with explicit references to validated biological concepts, and formal translation of these concepts in terms of quantitative state variables and fittable functional dependences. Illustrative examples are provided of the

  3. COLLECTIVE VORTEX BEHAVIORS: DIVERSITY, PROXIMATE, AND ULTIMATE CAUSES OF CIRCULAR ANIMAL GROUP MOVEMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Johann; Bode, Nikolai W F; Denoël, Mathieu

    2016-03-01

    Ant mill, caterpillar circle, bat doughnut, amphibian vortex, duck swirl, and fish torus are different names for rotating circular animal formations, where individuals turn around a common center. These "collective vortex behaviors" occur at different group sizes from pairs to several million individuals and have been reported in a large number of organisms, from bacteria to vertebrates, including humans. However, to date, no comprehensive review and synthesis of the literature on vortex behaviors has been conducted. Here, we review the state of the art of the proximate and ultimate causes of vortex behaviors. The ubiquity of this behavioral phenomenon could suggest common causes or fundamental underlying principles across contexts. However, we find that a variety of proximate mechanisms give rise to vortex behaviors. We highlight the potential benefits of collective vortex behaviors to individuals involved in them. For example, in some species, vortices increase feeding efficiency and could give protection against predators. It has also been argued that vortices could improve collective decision-making and information transfer. We highlight gaps in our understanding of these ubiquitous behavioral phenomena and discuss future directions for research in vortex studies.

  4. Bounded rationality, information, legal protection, and non-trivial contractual problems: Their influence on interorganizational relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Carsten Allan

    This paper attempts to generalize findings of the traditional literature of transaction cost economics (Willamson, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1985; Ouchi, 1980; Williamson & Ouchi 1981) by introducing more general factors or variables. Two of the most important of these are that asset specificity is repla......This paper attempts to generalize findings of the traditional literature of transaction cost economics (Willamson, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1985; Ouchi, 1980; Williamson & Ouchi 1981) by introducing more general factors or variables. Two of the most important of these are that asset specificity...... is replaced by a more general condition, vulnerability, and that the so-called market failure condition is replaced by a condition called contractual non-triviality. Sufficient conditions for non-triviality are found in terms of specific set of values for the basic set of factors....

  5. Spin model for nontrivial types of magnetic order in inverse-perovskite antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Kobayashi, Masaya; Okabe, Reoya; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2018-02-01

    Nontrivial magnetic orders in the inverse-perovskite manganese nitrides are theoretically studied by constructing a classical spin model describing the magnetic anisotropy and frustrated exchange interactions inherent in specific crystal and electronic structures of these materials. With a replica-exchange Monte Carlo technique, a theoretical analysis of this model reproduces the experimentally observed triangular Γ5 g and Γ4 g spin-ordered patterns and the systematic evolution of magnetic orders. Our Rapid Communication solves a 40-year-old problem of nontrivial magnetism for the inverse-perovskite manganese nitrides and provides a firm basis for clarifying the magnetism-driven negative thermal expansion phenomenon discovered in this class of materials.

  6. Programming Non-Trivial Algorithms in the Measurement Based Quantum Computation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsing, Paul [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Fanto, Michael [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Lott, Capt. Gordon [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Tison, Christoper C. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

    2014-01-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a quantum circuit model algorithm as measurement based quantum computing (MBQC) algorithm1, 2 via a large cluster state. As means of illustration we draw upon our numerical modeling experience to describe a large graph state capable of searching a logical 8 element list (a non-trivial version of Grover's algorithm3 with feedforward). We develop several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of cluster states and graph state equations which can be generalized into any circuit model operations. Such a resulting cluster state will be able to carry out the desired operation with appropriate measurements and feed forward error correction. We also discuss the physical implementation and the analysis of the principal 3-qubit entangling gate (Toffoli) required for a non-trivial feedforward realization of an 8-element Grover search algorithm.

  7. Integrating simultaneous prosocial and antisocial behavior into theories of collective action

    OpenAIRE

    Basurto, Xavier; Blanco, Esther; Nenadovic, Mateja; Vollan, Bj?rn

    2016-01-01

    Trust and cooperation constitute cornerstones of common-pool resource theory, showing that ?prosocial? strategies among resource users can overcome collective action problems and lead to sustainable resource governance. Yet, antisocial behavior and especially the coexistence of prosocial and antisocial behaviors have received less attention. We broaden the analysis to include the effects of both ?prosocial? and ?antisocial? interactions. We do so in the context of marine protected areas (MPAs...

  8. Collecting real-time data with a behavioral simulation: A new methodological trait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristina Risom

    interactive methods of collecting data [1, 2]. To collect real-time data as opposed to retrospective data, new methodological traits are needed. The paper proposes that a behavioral simulation supported by Web technology is a valid new research strategy to handle the collection of real-time data. Adapting...... the knowledge on agent-based modeling [3, 4], a behavioral simulation synergizes the benefits of self-administered questionnaires and the experimental design, and furthermore, introduces role-playing [5, 6] and scenario [7-11] strategies as very effective methods to ensure high interaction with the respondents....... The Web technology is the key to make a simulation for data collection objectives 'light'. Additionally, Web technology can be a solution to some of the challenges facing the traditional research methodologies such as time, ease, flexibility and cost, but perhaps more interesting, a possible solution...

  9. The development of collective personality: the ontogenetic drivers of behavioral variation across groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Bengston

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For the past decade, the study of personality has become a topic on the frontier of behavioral ecology. However, most studies have focused on exploring inter-individual behavioral variation in solitary animals, and few account for the role that social interactions may have on the development of an individual’s personality. Moreover, a social group may exhibit collective personality: an emergent behavioral phenotype displayed at the group-level, which is not necessarily the sum or average of individual personalities within that group. The social environment, in many cases, can determine group success, which then influences the relative success of all the individuals in that group. In addition, group-level personality may itself evolve, subject to the same selection pressures as individual-level behavioral variation, when the group is a unit under selection. Therefore, we reason that understanding how collective personalities emerge and change over time will be imperative to understanding individual- and group-level behavioral evolution.Personality is considered to be fixed over an individual’s lifetime. However, behavior may shift throughout development, particularly during adolescence. Therefore, juvenile behavior should not be compared with adult behavior when assessing personality. Similarly, as conditions within a group and/or the local environment can shift, group behavior may similarly fluctuate as it matures. We discuss potential within-group factors, such as group initiation, group maturation, genetic make-up of the group, and the internal social environment, and external factors, such as well as how local environment may play a role in generating group-level personalities. There are a variety of studies that explore group development or quantify group personality, but few that integrate both processes. Therefore, we conclude by discussing potential ways to evaluate development of collective personality, and propose several focal

  10. An Animal Model for Collective Behavior in Humans: The Impact of Manipulated Trust and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    political choice, in consumer preferences , etc.). Numerous terms and theories have been posited in order to explain this group effect (‘Herd morality’; ‘Herd...human collective behavior (e.g. in the stock market, in political choice, in consumer preferences , etc), as well as disclosing the underlying

  11. Artificial intelligence exploration of unstable protocells leads to predictable properties and discovery of collective behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Points, Laurie J; Taylor, James Ward; Grizou, Jonathan; Donkers, Kevin; Cronin, Leroy

    2018-01-30

    Protocell models are used to investigate how cells might have first assembled on Earth. Some, like oil-in-water droplets, can be seemingly simple models, while able to exhibit complex and unpredictable behaviors. How such simple oil-in-water systems can come together to yield complex and life-like behaviors remains a key question. Herein, we illustrate how the combination of automated experimentation and image processing, physicochemical analysis, and machine learning allows significant advances to be made in understanding the driving forces behind oil-in-water droplet behaviors. Utilizing >7,000 experiments collected using an autonomous robotic platform, we illustrate how smart automation cannot only help with exploration, optimization, and discovery of new behaviors, but can also be core to developing fundamental understanding of such systems. Using this process, we were able to relate droplet formulation to behavior via predicted physical properties, and to identify and predict more occurrences of a rare collective droplet behavior, droplet swarming. Proton NMR spectroscopic and qualitative pH methods enabled us to better understand oil dissolution, chemical change, phase transitions, and droplet and aqueous phase flows, illustrating the utility of the combination of smart-automation and traditional analytical chemistry techniques. We further extended our study for the simultaneous exploration of both the oil and aqueous phases using a robotic platform. Overall, this work shows that the combination of chemistry, robotics, and artificial intelligence enables discovery, prediction, and mechanistic understanding in ways that no one approach could achieve alone.

  12. Dynamical Modeling of Collective Behavior from Pigeon Flight Data: Flock Cohesion and Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ke; Small, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Several models of flocking have been promoted based on simulations with qualitatively naturalistic behavior. In this paper we provide the first direct application of computational modeling methods to infer flocking behavior from experimental field data. We show that this approach is able to infer general rules for interaction, or lack of interaction, among members of a flock or, more generally, any community. Using experimental field measurements of homing pigeons in flight we demonstrate the existence of a basic distance dependent attraction/repulsion relationship and show that this rule is sufficient to explain collective behavior observed in nature. Positional data of individuals over time are used as input data to a computational algorithm capable of building complex nonlinear functions that can represent the system behavior. Topological nearest neighbor interactions are considered to characterize the components within this model. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with simulated noisy data generated from the classical (two dimensional) Vicsek model. When applied to experimental data from homing pigeon flights we show that the more complex three dimensional models are capable of simulating trajectories, as well as exhibiting realistic collective dynamics. The simulations of the reconstructed models are used to extract properties of the collective behavior in pigeons, and how it is affected by changing the initial conditions of the system. Our results demonstrate that this approach may be applied to construct models capable of simulating trajectories and collective dynamics using experimental field measurements of herd movement. From these models, the behavior of the individual agents (animals) may be inferred. PMID:22479176

  13. Dynamical modeling of collective behavior from pigeon flight data: flock cohesion and dispersion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciano Dieck Kattas

    Full Text Available Several models of flocking have been promoted based on simulations with qualitatively naturalistic behavior. In this paper we provide the first direct application of computational modeling methods to infer flocking behavior from experimental field data. We show that this approach is able to infer general rules for interaction, or lack of interaction, among members of a flock or, more generally, any community. Using experimental field measurements of homing pigeons in flight we demonstrate the existence of a basic distance dependent attraction/repulsion relationship and show that this rule is sufficient to explain collective behavior observed in nature. Positional data of individuals over time are used as input data to a computational algorithm capable of building complex nonlinear functions that can represent the system behavior. Topological nearest neighbor interactions are considered to characterize the components within this model. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated with simulated noisy data generated from the classical (two dimensional Vicsek model. When applied to experimental data from homing pigeon flights we show that the more complex three dimensional models are capable of simulating trajectories, as well as exhibiting realistic collective dynamics. The simulations of the reconstructed models are used to extract properties of the collective behavior in pigeons, and how it is affected by changing the initial conditions of the system. Our results demonstrate that this approach may be applied to construct models capable of simulating trajectories and collective dynamics using experimental field measurements of herd movement. From these models, the behavior of the individual agents (animals may be inferred.

  14. A Review of Empirical Studies Investigating Antecedents and Consequences of Collective Learning Behaviors in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina D. Spânu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a systematic review of the field research conducted in medical settings investigating collective learning behaviors. The review was driven by several research foci. Our main interest was in identifying antecedents and consequences of collective learning in hospitals. We also report results on the types of research questions addressed, research designs used, and types of medical teams investigated. Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. Our findings revealed that highly contextualized studies that use different ways of measuring learning, different ways of conceptualizing medical teams, and different research methodologies, discuss similar antecedents. Variables like leadership behaviors, unit interpersonal climate, and hierarchical position were found to play a role in explaining organizational learning in hospitals across studies. We also found that despite an intense public discourse on the link between collective learning processes and patients’ safety and medical organizations’ performance, few studies actually report empirical data supporting this relationship.

  15. Seasonality directs contrasting food collection behavior and nutrient regulation strategies in ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C Cook

    Full Text Available Long-lived animals, including social insects, often display seasonal shifts in foraging behavior. Foraging is ultimately a nutrient consumption exercise, but the effect of seasonality per se on changes in foraging behavior, particularly as it relates to nutrient regulation, is poorly understood. Here, we show that field-collected fire ant colonies, returned to the laboratory and maintained under identical photoperiod, temperature, and humidity regimes, and presented with experimental foods that had different protein (p to carbohydrate (c ratios, practice summer- and fall-specific foraging behaviors with respect to protein-carbohydrate regulation. Summer colonies increased the amount of food collected as the p:c ratio of their food became increasingly imbalanced, but fall colonies collected similar amounts of food regardless of the p:c ratio of their food. Choice experiments revealed that feeding was non-random, and that both fall and summer ants preferred carbohydrate-biased food. However, ants rarely ate all the food they collected, and their cached or discarded food always contained little carbohydrate relative to protein. From a nutrient regulation strategy, ants consumed most of the carbohydrate they collected, but regulated protein consumption to a similar level, regardless of season. We suggest that varied seasonal food collection behaviors and nutrient regulation strategies may be an adaptation that allows long-lived animals to meet current and future nutrient demands when nutrient-rich foods are abundant (e.g. spring and summer, and to conserve energy and be metabolically more efficient when nutritionally balanced foods are less abundant.

  16. Seasonality directs contrasting food collection behavior and nutrient regulation strategies in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Steven C; Eubanks, Micky D; Gold, Roger E; Behmer, Spencer T

    2011-01-01

    Long-lived animals, including social insects, often display seasonal shifts in foraging behavior. Foraging is ultimately a nutrient consumption exercise, but the effect of seasonality per se on changes in foraging behavior, particularly as it relates to nutrient regulation, is poorly understood. Here, we show that field-collected fire ant colonies, returned to the laboratory and maintained under identical photoperiod, temperature, and humidity regimes, and presented with experimental foods that had different protein (p) to carbohydrate (c) ratios, practice summer- and fall-specific foraging behaviors with respect to protein-carbohydrate regulation. Summer colonies increased the amount of food collected as the p:c ratio of their food became increasingly imbalanced, but fall colonies collected similar amounts of food regardless of the p:c ratio of their food. Choice experiments revealed that feeding was non-random, and that both fall and summer ants preferred carbohydrate-biased food. However, ants rarely ate all the food they collected, and their cached or discarded food always contained little carbohydrate relative to protein. From a nutrient regulation strategy, ants consumed most of the carbohydrate they collected, but regulated protein consumption to a similar level, regardless of season. We suggest that varied seasonal food collection behaviors and nutrient regulation strategies may be an adaptation that allows long-lived animals to meet current and future nutrient demands when nutrient-rich foods are abundant (e.g. spring and summer), and to conserve energy and be metabolically more efficient when nutritionally balanced foods are less abundant.

  17. Integrating simultaneous prosocial and antisocial behavior into theories of collective action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basurto, Xavier; Blanco, Esther; Nenadovic, Mateja; Vollan, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Trust and cooperation constitute cornerstones of common-pool resource theory, showing that "prosocial" strategies among resource users can overcome collective action problems and lead to sustainable resource governance. Yet, antisocial behavior and especially the coexistence of prosocial and antisocial behaviors have received less attention. We broaden the analysis to include the effects of both "prosocial" and "antisocial" interactions. We do so in the context of marine protected areas (MPAs), the most prominent form of biodiversity conservation intervention worldwide. Our multimethod approach relied on lab-in-the-field economic experiments (n = 127) in two MPA and two non-MPA communities in Baja California, Mexico. In addition, we deployed a standardized fishers' survey (n = 544) to verify the external validity of our findings and expert informant interviews (n = 77) to develop potential explanatory mechanisms. In MPA sites, prosocial and antisocial behavior is significantly higher, and the presence of antisocial behavior does not seem to have a negative effect on prosocial behavior. We suggest that market integration, economic diversification, and strengthened group identity in MPAs are the main potential mechanisms for the simultaneity of prosocial and antisocial behavior we observed. This study constitutes a first step in better understanding the interaction between prosociality and antisociality as related to natural resources governance and conservation science, integrating literatures from social psychology, evolutionary anthropology, behavioral economics, and ecology.

  18. Array-Enhanced Coherence Resonance: Nontrivial Effects of Heterogeneity and Spatial Independence of Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Juergen; Hu, Bambi

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the effect of coherence resonance in a heterogeneous array of coupled Fitz Hugh--Nagumo neurons. It is shown that coupling of such elements leads to a significantly stronger coherence compared to that of a single element. We report nontrivial effects of parameter heterogeneity and spatial independence of noise on array-enhanced coherence resonance; especially, we find that (i) the coherence increases as spatial correlation of the noise decreases, and (ii) inhomogeneity in the parameters of the array enhances the coherence. Our results have the implication that generic heterogeneity and background noise can play a constructive role to enhance the time precision of firing in neural systems

  19. Replication of Non-Trivial Directional Motion in Multi-Scales Observed by the Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Yamada, Kenta; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    Non-trivial autocorrelation in up-down statistics in financial market price fluctuation is revealed by a multi-scale runs test(Wald-Wolfowitz test). We apply two models, a stochastic price model and dealer model to understand this property. In both approaches we successfully reproduce the non-stationary directional price motions consistent with the runs test by tuning parameters in the models. We find that two types of dealers exist in the markets, a short-time-scale trend-follower and an extended-time-scale contrarian who are active in different time periods.

  20. Renormalization group improved computation of correlation functions in theories with nontrivial phase diagram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Tonero, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple and consistent way to compute correlation functions in interacting theories with nontrivial phase diagram. As an example we show how to consistently compute the four-point function in three dimensional Z2-scalar theories. The idea is to perform the path integral by weighting...... the momentum modes that contribute to it according to their renormalization group (RG) relevance, i.e. we weight each mode according to the value of the running couplings at that scale. In this way, we are able to encode in a loop computation the information regarding the RG trajectory along which we...

  1. Grand unified theory precursors and nontrivial fixed points in higher-dimensional gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Dudas, Emilian; Gherghetta, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Within the context of traditional logarithmic grand unification at M GUT ≅10 16 GeV, we show that it is nevertheless possible to observe certain GUT states such as X and Y gauge bosons at lower scales, perhaps even in the TeV range. We refer to such states as 'GUT precursors'. These states offer an interesting alternative possibility for new physics at the TeV scale, and could be used to directly probe GUT physics even though the scale of gauge coupling unification remains high. Our results also give rise to a Kaluza-Klein realization of nontrivial fixed points in higher-dimensional gauge theories

  2. Radiative seesaw-type mechanism of fermion masses and non-trivial quark mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelaez, Carolina; Hernandez, A.E.C.; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso-CCTVal, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    We propose a predictive inert two-Higgs doublet model, where the standard model (SM) symmetry is extended by S{sub 3} x Z{sub 2} x Z{sub 12} and the field content is enlarged by extra scalar fields, charged exotic fermions and two heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos. The charged exotic fermions generate a non-trivial quark mixing and provide one-loop-level masses for the first- and second-generation charged fermions. The masses of the light active neutrinos are generated from a one-loop-level radiative seesaw mechanism. Our model successfully explains the observed SM fermion mass and mixing pattern. (orig.)

  3. Computing a Non-trivial Lower Bound on the Joint Entropy between Two Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumalla, Kalyan S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    In this report, a non-trivial lower bound on the joint entropy of two non-identical images is developed, which is greater than the individual entropies of the images. The lower bound is the least joint entropy possible among all pairs of images that have the same histograms as those of the given images. New algorithms are presented to compute the joint entropy lower bound with a computation time proportional to S log S where S is the number of histogram bins of the images. This is faster than the traditional methods of computing the exact joint entropy with a computation time that is quadratic in S .

  4. Manipulation resolves non-trivial structure of corrole monolayer on Ag(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebi, Stefano; Serrano, Giulia; Koch, Reinhold; Müllegger, Stefan; Aldahhak, Hazem; Rauls, Eva; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Schöfberger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Non-trivial arrangement of molecules within a molecular network complicates structure determination due to interdigitation, partial overlap, or stacking. We demonstrate that combined imaging and lateral manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope resolves the intricate structure of a molecular network in two-dimensions in a straightforward manner. The network, formed by a monolayer of 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)-corrole molecules on Ag(111), is manipulated for the first time with single-molecule precision. Our results reveal a shingle-like packing of partially overlapping corrole molecules. Density functional theory calculations support our findings. (paper)

  5. Connecting single cell to collective cell behavior in a unified theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mishel; Bullo, Francesco; Campàs, Otger

    Collective cell behavior is an essential part of tissue and organ morphogenesis during embryonic development, as well as of various disease processes, such as cancer. In contrast to many in vitro studies of collective cell migration, most cases of in vivo collective cell migration involve rather small groups of cells, with large sheets of migrating cells being less common. The vast majority of theoretical descriptions of collective cell behavior focus on large numbers of cells, but fail to accurately capture the dynamics of small groups of cells. Here we introduce a low-dimensional theoretical description that successfully captures single cell migration, cell collisions, collective dynamics in small groups of cells, and force propagation during sheet expansion, all within a common theoretical framework. Our description is derived from first principles and also includes key phenomenological aspects of cell migration that control the dynamics of traction forces. Among other results, we explain the counter-intuitive observations that pairs of cells repel each other upon collision while they behave in a coordinated manner within larger clusters.

  6. From one to many: dynamic assembly and collective behavior of self-propelled colloidal motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Duan, Wentao; Ahmed, Suzanne; Sen, Ayusman; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2015-07-21

    The assembly of complex structures from simpler, individual units is a hallmark of biology. Examples include the pairing of DNA strands, the assembly of protein chains into quaternary structures, the formation of tissues and organs from cells, and the self-organization of bacterial colonies, flocks of birds, and human beings in cities. While the individual behaviors of biomolecules, bacteria, birds, and humans are governed by relatively simple rules, groups assembled from many individuals exhibit complex collective behaviors and functions that do not exist in the absence of the hierarchically organized structure. Self-assembly is a familiar concept to chemists who study the formation and properties of monolayers, crystals, and supramolecular structures. In chemical self-assembly, disorder evolves to order as the system approaches equilibrium. In contrast, living assemblies are typically characterized by two additional features: (1) the system constantly dissipates energy and is not at thermodynamic equilibrium; (2) the structure is dynamic and can transform or disassemble in response to stimuli or changing conditions. To distinguish them from equilibrium self-assembled structures, living (or nonliving) assemblies of objects with these characteristics are referred to as active matter. In this Account, we focus on the powered assembly and collective behavior of self-propelled colloids. These nano- and microparticles, also called nano- and micromotors or microswimmers, autonomously convert energy available in the environment (in the form of chemical, electromagnetic, acoustic, or thermal energy) into mechanical motion. Collections of these colloids are a form of synthetic active matter. Because of the analogy to living swimmers of similar size such as bacteria, the dynamic interactions and collective behavior of self-propelled colloids are interesting in the context of understanding biological active matter and in the development of new applications. The progression

  7. NMR Evidence for the Topologically Nontrivial Nature in a Family of Half-Heusler Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-03-16

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is expected to partly determine the topologically nontrivial electronic structure of heavy half-Heusler ternary compounds. However, to date, attempts to experimentally observe either the strength of SOC or how it modifies the bulk band structure have been unsuccessful. By using bulk-sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations, we reveal that 209Bi NMR isotropic shifts scale with relativity in terms of the strength of SOC and average atomic numbers, indicating strong relativistic effects on NMR parameters. According to first-principles calculations, we further claim that nuclear magnetic shieldings from relativistic p1/2 states and paramagnetic contributions from low-lying unoccupied p3/2 states are both sensitive to the details of band structures tuned by relativity, which explains why the hidden relativistic effects on band structure can be revealed by 209Bi NMR isotropic shifts in topologically nontrivial half-Heusler compounds. Used in complement to surface-sensitive methods, such as angle resolved photon electron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, NMR can provide valuable information on bulk electronic states.

  8. NMR Evidence for the Topologically Nontrivial Nature in a Family of Half-Heusler Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Hou, Zhipeng; Wang, Yue; Xu, Guizhou; Shi, Chenglong; Liu, EnKe; Xi, Xuekui; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng; Zhang, Xixiang

    2016-01-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is expected to partly determine the topologically nontrivial electronic structure of heavy half-Heusler ternary compounds. However, to date, attempts to experimentally observe either the strength of SOC or how it modifies the bulk band structure have been unsuccessful. By using bulk-sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations, we reveal that 209Bi NMR isotropic shifts scale with relativity in terms of the strength of SOC and average atomic numbers, indicating strong relativistic effects on NMR parameters. According to first-principles calculations, we further claim that nuclear magnetic shieldings from relativistic p1/2 states and paramagnetic contributions from low-lying unoccupied p3/2 states are both sensitive to the details of band structures tuned by relativity, which explains why the hidden relativistic effects on band structure can be revealed by 209Bi NMR isotropic shifts in topologically nontrivial half-Heusler compounds. Used in complement to surface-sensitive methods, such as angle resolved photon electron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, NMR can provide valuable information on bulk electronic states.

  9. Nontrivial Berry phase in magnetic BaMnSb2 semimetal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Silu; Kim, Jisun; Shelton, W. A.; Plummer, E. W.; Jin, Rongying

    2017-06-01

    The subject of topological materials has attracted immense attention in condensed-matter physics because they host new quantum states of matter containing Dirac, Majorana, or Weyl fermions. Although Majorana fermions can only exist on the surface of topological superconductors, Dirac and Weyl fermions can be realized in both 2D and 3D materials. The latter are semimetals with Dirac/Weyl cones either not tilted (type I) or tilted (type II). Although both Dirac and Weyl fermions have massless nature with the nontrivial Berry phase, the formation of Weyl fermions in 3D semimetals require either time-reversal or inversion symmetry breaking to lift degeneracy at Dirac points. Here we demonstrate experimentally that canted antiferromagnetic BaMnSb2 is a 3D Weyl semimetal with a 2D electronic structure. The Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations of the magnetoresistance give nearly zero effective mass with high mobility and the nontrivial Berry phase. The ordered magnetic arrangement (ferromagnetic ordering in the ab plane and antiferromagnetic ordering along the c axis below 286 K) breaks the time-reversal symmetry, thus offering us an ideal platform to study magnetic Weyl fermions in a centrosymmetric material.

  10. Energy-Neutral Data Collection Rate Control for IoT Animal Behavior Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Wilhelm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy-neutral operation (ENO is a major concern for Internet of things (IoT sensor systems. Animals can be tagged with IoT sensors to monitor their movement and behavior. These sensors wirelessly upload collected data and can receive parameters to change their operation. Typically, the behavior monitors are powered by a battery where the system relies upon harvesting solar radiation for sustainable operation. Solar panels typically are used as the harvesting mechanism and can have a level of uncertainty regarding consistent energy delivery due to factors such as adverse weather, foliage, time of day, and individual animal behavior. The variability of available energy inevitably creates a trade-off in the rate at which data can be collected with respect to incoming and stored energy. The objective of this research was to investigate and simulate methods and parameters that can control the data collection rate of an IoT behavior monitor to achieve sustained operation with unknown and random energy harvesting. Analysis and development of a control system were performed by creating a software model of energy consumption and then simulating using different initial conditions and random energy harvesting rates for evaluation. The contribution of this effort was the exploration into the usage of a discrete-time gain scheduled Proportional–Integral–Derivative (PID that was tuned to a specific device configuration, using battery state of charge as an input, and found to maintain a battery level set-point, reject small solar harvesting energy disturbances, and maintain a consistent data collection rate throughout the day.

  11. Consistent Individual Differences Drive Collective Behavior and Group Functioning of Schooling Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolles, Jolle W; Boogert, Neeltje J; Sridhar, Vivek H; Couzin, Iain D; Manica, Andrea

    2017-09-25

    The ubiquity of consistent inter-individual differences in behavior ("animal personalities") [1, 2] suggests that they might play a fundamental role in driving the movements and functioning of animal groups [3, 4], including their collective decision-making, foraging performance, and predator avoidance. Despite increasing evidence that highlights their importance [5-16], we still lack a unified mechanistic framework to explain and to predict how consistent inter-individual differences may drive collective behavior. Here we investigate how the structure, leadership, movement dynamics, and foraging performance of groups can emerge from inter-individual differences by high-resolution tracking of known behavioral types in free-swimming stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) shoals. We show that individual's propensity to stay near others, measured by a classic "sociability" assay, was negatively linked to swim speed across a range of contexts, and predicted spatial positioning and leadership within groups as well as differences in structure and movement dynamics between groups. In turn, this trait, together with individual's exploratory tendency, measured by a classic "boldness" assay, explained individual and group foraging performance. These effects of consistent individual differences on group-level states emerged naturally from a generic model of self-organizing groups composed of individuals differing in speed and goal-orientedness. Our study provides experimental and theoretical evidence for a simple mechanism to explain the emergence of collective behavior from consistent individual differences, including variation in the structure, leadership, movement dynamics, and functional capabilities of groups, across social and ecological scales. In addition, we demonstrate individual performance is conditional on group composition, indicating how social selection may drive behavioral differentiation between individuals. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by

  12. Wireless Visual Sensor Network Robots- Based for the Emulation of Collective Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy Hernán Martinez Sarmiento

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of bacterial quorum sensing emulate on small mobile robots. Robots that reflect the behavior of bacteria are designed as mobile wireless camera nodes. They are able to structure a dynamic wireless sensor network. Emulated behavior corresponds to a simplification of bacterial quorum sensing, where the action of a network node is conditioned by the population density of robots(nodes in a given area. The population density reading is done visually using a camera. The robot makes an estimate of the population density of the images, and acts according to this information. The operation of the camera is done with a custom firmware, reducing the complexity of the node without loss of performance. It was noted the route planning and the collective behavior of robots without the use of any other external or local communication. Neither was it necessary to develop a model system, precise state estimation or state feedback.

  13. Change the Collective Behaviors of Colloidal Motors by Tuning Electrohydrodynamic Flow at the Subparticle Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingfu; Wu, Ning

    2018-01-23

    As demonstrated in biological systems, breaking the symmetry of surrounding hydrodynamic flow is the key to achieve autonomous locomotion of microscopic objects. In recent years, a variety of synthetic motors have been developed based on different propulsion mechanisms. Most work, however, focuses on the propulsion of individual motors. Here, we study the collective behaviors of colloidal dimers actuated by a perpendicularly applied AC electric field, which controls the electrohydrodynamic flow at subparticle levels. Although these motors experience strong dipolar repulsion from each other and are highly active, surprisingly, they assemble into a family of stable planar clusters with handedness. We show that this type of unusual structure arises from the contractile hydrodynamic flow around small lobes but extensile flow around the large lobes. We further reveal that the collective behavior, assembled structure, and assembly dynamics of these motors all depend on the specific directions of electrohydrodynamic flow surrounding each lobe of the dimers. By fine-tuning the surface charge asymmetry on particles and salt concentration in solution, we demonstrate the ability to control their collective behaviors on demand. This novel type of active assembly via hydrodynamic interactions has the potential to grow monodisperse clusters in a self-limiting fashion. The underlying concept revealed in this work should also apply to other types of active and asymmetric particles.

  14. Responsive survey design, demographic data collection, and models of demographic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axinn, William G; Link, Cynthia F; Groves, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    To address declining response rates and rising data-collection costs, survey methodologists have devised new techniques for using process data ("paradata") to address nonresponse by altering the survey design dynamically during data collection. We investigate the substantive consequences of responsive survey design-tools that use paradata to improve the representative qualities of surveys and control costs. By improving representation of reluctant respondents, responsive design can change our understanding of the topic being studied. Using the National Survey of Family Growth Cycle 6, we illustrate how responsive survey design can shape both demographic estimates and models of demographic behaviors based on survey data. By juxtaposing measures from regular and responsive data collection phases, we document how special efforts to interview reluctant respondents may affect demographic estimates. Results demonstrate the potential of responsive survey design to change the quality of demographic research based on survey data.

  15. Yang-Lee zeros for a Potts model of helix-coil transition with nontrivial topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananikian, N.; Ananikyan, L.; Artuso, R.; Sargsyan, K.

    2007-07-01

    The Yang-Lee partition function zeros of the Q-state Potts model on a zigzag ladder are studied by a transfer-matrix approach. This Q-state model has a non-trivial topology induced by three-site interactions on a zigzag ladder and is proposed as a description of helix-coil transition in homo-polymers. The Yang-Lee zeros are associated to complex values of the solvent-related coupling constant K (magnetic field) and they are exactly derived for arbitrary values of the system parameters: Q, J (coupling constant of hydrogen binding) and temperature. It is shown that there is only a quasi-phase transition for all temperatures. The densities of the Yang-Lee zeros are singular at the edge singularity points and the critical exponent σ = -1/2. (author)

  16. Quantum oscillation and nontrivial transport in the Dirac semimetal Cd_3As_2 nanodevice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Haiyang; Wei, Zhongxia; Zhao, Bo; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Baigeng; Zhang, Kang; Gao, Ming; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jue; Han, Min; Pi, Li

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report on the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillation in high-quality Cd_3As_2 nanowires grown by a chemical vapor deposition approach. The dominant transport of topological Dirac fermions is evident by the nontrivial Berry phase in the Landau Fan diagram. The quantum oscillations rise at a small field of 2 T and preserves up to 100 K, revealing a sizeable Landau level gap and a device mobility of 2138 cm"2" V"−"1" s"−"1. The angle-variable oscillations indicate the isotropy of the bulk Dirac transport. The large estimated mean free path makes the Cd_3As_2 nanowire a promising platform for the one-dimensional transport of Dirac semimetals.

  17. Effective action of heterotic compactification on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schasny, Martin

    2012-10-01

    In this thesis we study the heterotic string compactified on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles. We focus on two backgrounds, the well-known standard embedding and abelian line bundles. Using a Kaluza-Klein reduction, the six-dimensional effective action is computed up to terms of order α' 2 with special attention on the hypermultiplet sector. We compute the moduli dependent couplings of the matter fields and analyze the geometry of the hyperscalar sigma model. Moreover, we prove the consistency with six-dimensional supergravity and derive the appropriate D-term scalar potential. For the line bundle backgrounds we show that the gauge flux stabilizes some geometrical moduli and renders some abelian vector multiplets massive.

  18. Topologically non-trivial electronic and magnetic states in doped copper Kagome lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valenti, Roser

    We present a theoretical investigation of doped copper kagome materials based on natural minerals Herbertsmithite [ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2] and Barlowite[Cu4(OH)6FBr]. Using ab-initio density functional theory calculations we estimate the stability of the hypothetical compounds against structural distortions and analyze their electronic and magnetic properties. We find that materials based on Herbertsmithite present an ideal playground for investigating the interplay of non-trivial band-topology and strong electronic correlation effects. In particular, we propose candidates for the Quantum Spin Hall effect at filling 4/3 and the Quantum Anomalous Hall effect at filling 2/3. For the Barlowite system we point out a route to realize a Quantum Spin Liquid. This work was supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under Grant No. SFB/TR 49 and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-25915.

  19. Effective action of heterotic compactification on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schasny, Martin

    2012-10-15

    In this thesis we study the heterotic string compactified on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles. We focus on two backgrounds, the well-known standard embedding and abelian line bundles. Using a Kaluza-Klein reduction, the six-dimensional effective action is computed up to terms of order {alpha}'{sup 2} with special attention on the hypermultiplet sector. We compute the moduli dependent couplings of the matter fields and analyze the geometry of the hyperscalar sigma model. Moreover, we prove the consistency with six-dimensional supergravity and derive the appropriate D-term scalar potential. For the line bundle backgrounds we show that the gauge flux stabilizes some geometrical moduli and renders some abelian vector multiplets massive.

  20. The Path Resistance Method for Bounding the Smallest Nontrivial Eigenvalue of a Laplacian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guattery, Stephen; Leighton, Tom; Miller, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    We introduce the path resistance method for lower bounds on the smallest nontrivial eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix of a graph. The method is based on viewing the graph in terms of electrical circuits; it uses clique embeddings to produce lower bounds on lambda(sub 2) and star embeddings to produce lower bounds on the smallest Rayleigh quotient when there is a zero Dirichlet boundary condition. The method assigns priorities to the paths in the embedding; we show that, for an unweighted tree T, using uniform priorities for a clique embedding produces a lower bound on lambda(sub 2) that is off by at most an 0(log diameter(T)) factor. We show that the best bounds this method can produce for clique embeddings are the same as for a related method that uses clique embeddings and edge lengths to produce bounds.

  1. Quantum theories on noncommutative spaces with nontrivial topology: Aharonov-Bohm and Casimir effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaichian, M.; Tureanu, A.; Demichev, A.; Presnajder, P.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M.M.

    2001-02-01

    After discussing the peculiarities of quantum systems on noncommutative (NC) spaces with nontrivial topology and the operator representation of the *-product on them, we consider the Aharonov-Bohm and Casimir effects for such spaces. For the case of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, we have obtained an explicit expression for the shift of the phase, which is gauge invariant in the NC sense. The Casimir energy of a field theory on a NC cylinder is divergent, while it becomes finite on a torus, when the dimensionless parameter of noncommutativity is a rational number. The latter corresponds to a well-defined physical picture. Certain distinctions from other treatments based on a different way of taking the noncommutativity into account are also discussed. (author)

  2. [Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy for semen collection from infertile males in whom masturbation fails].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Hao; Jiang, Hui; Ma, Lu-Lin; Hong, Kai; Zhao, Lian-Ming; Liu, De-Feng; Mao, Jia-Ming; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ju; Gao, Ling; Qiao, Jie

    2013-05-01

    To study the effect of Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy in helping obtain semen from infertile men in whom masturbation has failed. Sixty male infertile patients from whom masturbation had failed to obtain semen were equally assigned to receive Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy (combination group) or Tadalafil only (control group). All the patients took Tadalafil 20 mg orally the night before the day of semen collection by masturbation. Before this procedure, the patients of the combination group practiced masturbation 16 - 24 times at home. The average ages of the patients were (37.0 +/- 5.1) yr and (37.5 +/- 5.2) yr and their IIEF-5 scores were 16.50 +/- 1.25 and 16.90 +/- 1.09 in the combination and the control group, respectively, neither with statistically significant difference between the two groups. Semen was successfully obtained from 9 patients (30.0%) of the combination group and 1 patient (3.33%) of the control group, with statistically significant difference between the two groups (chi2 = 7.680, P masturbation, Tadalafil combined with behavior therapy can significantly increase the success rate of semen collection from the male infertile patients in whom masturbation fails.

  3. Collective behaviors of suprachiasm nucleus neurons under different light—dark cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Chang-Gui; Liu Zong-Hua; Zhang Xin-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The principal circadian clock in the suprachiasm nucleus (SCN) regulates the circadian rhythm of physiological and behavioral activities of mammals. Except for the normal function of the circadian rhythm, the ensemble of SCN neurons may show two collective behaviors, i.e., a free running period in the absence of a light—dark cycle and an entrainment ability to an external T cycle. Experiments show that both the free running periods and the entrainment ranges may vary from one species to another and can be seriously influenced by the coupling among the SCN neurons. We here review the recent progress on how the heterogeneous couplings influence these two collective behaviors. We will show that in the case of homogeneous coupling, the free running period increases monotonically while the entrainment range decreases monotonically with the increase of the coupling strength. While in the case of heterogenous coupling, the dispersion of the coupling strength plays a crucial role. It has been found that the free running period decreases with the increase of the dispersion while the entrainment ability is enhanced by the dispersion. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of the circadian clock in the SCN. (topical review - statistical physics and complex systems)

  4. Residential Cooking Behavior in the United States: Data Collected from a Web-Based Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y. W; Andrew, E. E; Hu, T. C; Singer, B. C; Ding, L.; Logue, J. M

    2014-08-01

    Cooking has a significant impact on indoor air quality. When cooking occurs, how foods are cooked, and the types of food that are cooked have all been shown to impact the rate at which occupants are exposed to pollutants. Home occupancy characteristics impact how concentrations in the home translate into exposures for the occupants. With the intent of expanding our understanding of cooking behavior in the U.S., we developed and advertised an online survey to collect household cooking behavior for the 24 hrs prior to taking the survey. The survey questions were designed to address gaps in knowledge needed to predict the impact of cooking on indoor concentrations of PM2.5 and other pollutants. The survey included the following questions: 1) which meals households ate at home; 2) number of household members at home during cooking; 3) the type of oil used for cooking; 4) the type of foods cooked at each meal; 5) the type of cooking devices used; and 6) the methods selected for food preparation. We also collected information on household characteristics such as their location (zip code), ethnicity, and ages of family members. We analyzed the variability in home cooking characteristics for households in different climate zones and with four different types of family compositions: 1 senior living alone, 1 adult living alone, 2 or more adults/seniors, and families with children. We used simple statistical tests to determine if the probability of certain cooking behaviors differed between these subgroups.

  5. Self-ordering of nontrivial topological polarization structures in nanoporous ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lich, Le; Shimada, Takahiro; Wang, Jie; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2017-10-19

    Topological field structures, such as skyrmions, merons, and vortices, are important features found in ordered systems with spontaneously broken symmetry. A plethora of topological field structures have been discovered in magnetic and ordered soft matter systems due to the presence of inherent chiral interactions, and this has provided a fruitful platform for unearthing additional groundbreaking functionalities. However, despite being one of the most important classes of ordered systems, ferroelectrics scarcely form topological polarization structures due to their lack of intrinsic chiral interactions. In the present study, we demonstrate using multiphysics phase-field modelling based on the Ginzburg-Landau theory that a rich assortment of nontrivial topological polarization structures, including hedgehogs, antivortices, multidirectional vortices, and vortex arrays, can be spontaneously formed in three-dimensional nanoporous ferroelectric structures. We realize that confining ferroelectrics to trivial geometries that are incompatible with the orientation symmetry may impose extrinsic frustration to the polarization field through the enhancement of depolarization fields at free porous surfaces. This frustration gives rise to symmetry breaking, resulting in the formation of nontrivial topological polarization structures as the ground state. We further topologically characterize the local accommodation of polarization structures by viewing them in a new perspective, in which polarization ordering can be mapped on the order parameter space, according to the topological theory of defects and homotopy theory. The results indicate that the nanoporous structures contain composite topological objects composed of two or more elementary topological polarization structures. The present study therefore offers a playground for exploring novel physical phenomena in ferroelectric systems as well as a novel nanoelectronics characterization platform for future topology

  6. Using Smartphones to Collect Behavioral Data in Psychological Science: Opportunities, Practical Considerations, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Gabriella M; Lane, Nicholas D; Wang, Rui; Crosier, Benjamin S; Campbell, Andrew T; Gosling, Samuel D

    2016-11-01

    Smartphones now offer the promise of collecting behavioral data unobtrusively, in situ, as it unfolds in the course of daily life. Data can be collected from the onboard sensors and other phone logs embedded in today's off-the-shelf smartphone devices. These data permit fine-grained, continuous collection of people's social interactions (e.g., speaking rates in conversation, size of social groups, calls, and text messages), daily activities (e.g., physical activity and sleep), and mobility patterns (e.g., frequency and duration of time spent at various locations). In this article, we have drawn on the lessons from the first wave of smartphone-sensing research to highlight areas of opportunity for psychological research, present practical considerations for designing smartphone studies, and discuss the ongoing methodological and ethical challenges associated with research in this domain. It is our hope that these practical guidelines will facilitate the use of smartphones as a behavioral observation tool in psychological science. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Turnover, account value and diversification of real traders: evidence of collective portfolio optimizing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton de Lachapelle, David; Challet, Damien

    2010-07-01

    Despite the availability of very detailed data on financial markets, agent-based modeling is hindered by the lack of information about real trader behavior. This makes it impossible to validate agent-based models, which are thus reverse-engineering attempts. This work is a contribution towards building a set of stylized facts about the traders themselves. Using the client database of Swissquote Bank SA, the largest online Swiss broker, we find empirical relationships between turnover, account values and the number of assets in which a trader is invested. A theory based on simple mean-variance portfolio optimization that crucially includes variable transaction costs is able to reproduce faithfully the observed behaviors. We finally argue that our results bring to light the collective ability of a population to construct a mean-variance portfolio that takes into account the structure of transaction costs.

  8. Collective Behavior of Chiral Active Matter: Pattern Formation and Enhanced Flocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebchen, Benno; Levis, Demian

    2017-08-01

    We generalize the Vicsek model to describe the collective behavior of polar circle swimmers with local alignment interactions. While the phase transition leading to collective motion in 2D (flocking) occurs at the same interaction to noise ratio as for linear swimmers, as we show, circular motion enhances the polarization in the ordered phase (enhanced flocking) and induces secondary instabilities leading to structure formation. Slow rotations promote macroscopic droplets with late time sizes proportional to the system size (indicating phase separation) whereas fast rotations generate patterns consisting of phase synchronized microflocks with a controllable characteristic size proportional to the average single-particle swimming radius. Our results defy the viewpoint that monofrequent rotations form a vapid extension of the Vicsek model and establish a generic route to pattern formation in chiral active matter with possible applications for understanding and designing rotating microflocks.

  9. Collective fluctuations in networks of noisy components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Kawamura, Yoji; Kori, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Collective dynamics result from interactions among noisy dynamical components. Examples include heartbeats, circadian rhythms and various pattern formations. Because of noise in each component, collective dynamics inevitably involve fluctuations, which may crucially affect the functioning of the system. However, the relation between the fluctuations in isolated individual components and those in collective dynamics is not clear. Here, we study a linear dynamical system of networked components subjected to independent Gaussian noise and analytically show that the connectivity of networks determines the intensity of fluctuations in the collective dynamics. Remarkably, in general directed networks including scale-free networks, the fluctuations decrease more slowly with system size than the standard law stated by the central limit theorem. They even remain finite for a large system size when global directionality of the network exists. Moreover, such non-trivial behavior appears even in undirected networks when nonlinear dynamical systems are considered. We demonstrate it with a coupled oscillator system.

  10. Physics of microswimmers—single particle motion and collective behavior: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgeti, J; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2015-01-01

    Locomotion and transport of microorganisms in fluids is an essential aspect of life. Search for food, orientation toward light, spreading of off-spring, and the formation of colonies are only possible due to locomotion. Swimming at the microscale occurs at low Reynolds numbers, where fluid friction and viscosity dominates over inertia. Here, evolution achieved propulsion mechanisms, which overcome and even exploit drag. Prominent propulsion mechanisms are rotating helical flagella, exploited by many bacteria, and snake-like or whip-like motion of eukaryotic flagella, utilized by sperm and algae. For artificial microswimmers, alternative concepts to convert chemical energy or heat into directed motion can be employed, which are potentially more efficient. The dynamics of microswimmers comprises many facets, which are all required to achieve locomotion. In this article, we review the physics of locomotion of biological and synthetic microswimmers, and the collective behavior of their assemblies. Starting from individual microswimmers, we describe the various propulsion mechanism of biological and synthetic systems and address the hydrodynamic aspects of swimming. This comprises synchronization and the concerted beating of flagella and cilia. In addition, the swimming behavior next to surfaces is examined. Finally, collective and cooperate phenomena of various types of isotropic and anisotropic swimmers with and without hydrodynamic interactions are discussed. (report on progress)

  11. Collective Behaviors of Mobile Robots Beyond the Nearest Neighbor Rules With Switching Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Boda; Han, Qing-Long; Zuo, Zongyu; Jin, Jiong; Zheng, Jinchuan

    2018-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the collective behaviors of robots beyond the nearest neighbor rules, i.e., dispersion and flocking, when robots interact with others by applying an acute angle test (AAT)-based interaction rule. Different from a conventional nearest neighbor rule or its variations, the AAT-based interaction rule allows interactions with some far-neighbors and excludes unnecessary nearest neighbors. The resulting dispersion and flocking hold the advantages of scalability, connectivity, robustness, and effective area coverage. For the dispersion, a spring-like controller is proposed to achieve collision-free coordination. With switching topology, a new fixed-time consensus-based energy function is developed to guarantee the system stability. An upper bound of settling time for energy consensus is obtained, and a uniform time interval is accordingly set so that energy distribution is conducted in a fair manner. For the flocking, based on a class of generalized potential functions taking nonsmooth switching into account, a new controller is proposed to ensure that the same velocity for all robots is eventually reached. A co-optimizing problem is further investigated to accomplish additional tasks, such as enhancing communication performance, while maintaining the collective behaviors of mobile robots. Simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  12. A portable platform to collect and review behavioral data simultaneously with neurophysiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianxiao Jiang; Siddiqui, Hasan; Ray, Shruti; Asman, Priscella; Ozturk, Musa; Ince, Nuri F

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a portable platform to collect and review behavioral data simultaneously with neurophysiological signals. The whole system is comprised of four parts: a sensor data acquisition interface, a socket server for real-time data streaming, a Simulink system for real-time processing and an offline data review and analysis toolbox. A low-cost microcontroller is used to acquire data from external sensors such as accelerometer and hand dynamometer. The micro-controller transfers the data either directly through USB or wirelessly through a bluetooth module to a data server written in C++ for MS Windows OS. The data server also interfaces with the digital glove and captures HD video from webcam. The acquired sensor data are streamed under User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to other applications such as Simulink/Matlab for real-time analysis and recording. Neurophysiological signals such as electroencephalography (EEG), electrocorticography (ECoG) and local field potential (LFP) recordings can be collected simultaneously in Simulink and fused with behavioral data. In addition, we developed a customized Matlab Graphical User Interface (GUI) software to review, annotate and analyze the data offline. The software provides a fast, user-friendly data visualization environment with synchronized video playback feature. The software is also capable of reviewing long-term neural recordings. Other featured functions such as fast preprocessing with multithreaded filters, annotation, montage selection, power-spectral density (PSD) estimate, time-frequency map and spatial spectral map are also implemented.

  13. Tree resin composition, collection behavior and selective filters shape chemical profiles of tropical bees (Apidae: Meliponini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara D Leonhardt

    Full Text Available The diversity of species is striking, but can be far exceeded by the chemical diversity of compounds collected, produced or used by them. Here, we relate the specificity of plant-consumer interactions to chemical diversity applying a comparative network analysis to both levels. Chemical diversity was explored for interactions between tropical stingless bees and plant resins, which bees collect for nest construction and to deter predators and microbes. Resins also function as an environmental source for terpenes that serve as appeasement allomones and protection against predators when accumulated on the bees' body surfaces. To unravel the origin of the bees' complex chemical profiles, we investigated resin collection and the processing of resin-derived terpenes. We therefore analyzed chemical networks of tree resins, foraging networks of resin collecting bees, and their acquired chemical networks. We revealed that 113 terpenes in nests of six bee species and 83 on their body surfaces comprised a subset of the 1,117 compounds found in resins from seven tree species. Sesquiterpenes were the most variable class of terpenes. Albeit widely present in tree resins, they were only found on the body surface of some species, but entirely lacking in others. Moreover, whereas the nest profile of Tetragonula melanocephala contained sesquiterpenes, its surface profile did not. Stingless bees showed a generalized collecting behavior among resin sources, and only a hitherto undescribed species-specific "filtering" of resin-derived terpenes can explain the variation in chemical profiles of nests and body surfaces from different species. The tight relationship between bees and tree resins of a large variety of species elucidates why the bees' surfaces contain a much higher chemodiversity than other hymenopterans.

  14. Communication and the Emergence of Collective Behavior in Living Organisms: A Quantum Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Marco; Del Giudice, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions within living organisms have been found to occur not as individual independent events but as a part of a collective array of interconnected events. The problem of the emergence of this collective dynamics and of the correlated biocommunication therefore arises. In the present paper we review the proposals given within the paradigm of modern molecular biology and those given by some holistic approaches to biology. In recent times, the collective behavior of ensembles of microscopic units (atoms/molecules) has been addressed in the conceptual framework of Quantum Field Theory. The possibility of producing physical states where all the components of the ensemble move in unison has been recognized. In such cases, electromagnetic fields trapped within the ensemble appear. In the present paper we present a scheme based on Quantum Field Theory where molecules are able to move in phase-correlated unison among them and with a self-produced electromagnetic field. Experimental corroboration of this scheme is presented. Some consequences for future biological developments are discussed. PMID:24288611

  15. Weak antilocalization effect and noncentrosymmetric superconductivity in a topologically nontrivial semimetal LuPdBi

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Guizhou; Wang, Wenhong; Zhang, Xiaoming; Du, Yin; Liu, Enke; Wang, Shouguo; Wu, Guangheng; Liu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Xixiang

    2014-01-01

    A large number of half-Heusler compounds have been recently proposed as three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) with tunable physical properties. However, no transport measurements associated with the topological surface states have been observed in these half-Heusler candidates due to the dominating contribution from bulk electrical conductance. Here we show that, by reducing the mobility of bulk carriers, a two-dimensional (2D) weak antilocalization (WAL) effect, one of the hallmarks of topological surface states, was experimentally revealed from the tilted magnetic field dependence of magnetoconductance in a topologically nontrivial semimetal LuPdBi. Besides the observation of a 2D WAL effect, a superconducting transition was revealed at T c ∼ 1.7â.K in the same bulk LuPdBi. Quantitative analysis within the framework of a generalized BCS theory leads to the conclusion that the noncentrosymmetric superconductivity of LuPdBi is fully gapped with a possibly unconventional pairing character. The co-existence of superconductivity and the transport signature of topological surface states in the same bulk alloy suggests that LuPdBi represents a very promising candidate as a topological superconductor.

  16. Weak antilocalization effect and noncentrosymmetric superconductivity in a topologically nontrivial semimetal LuPdBi

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Guizhou

    2014-07-21

    A large number of half-Heusler compounds have been recently proposed as three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) with tunable physical properties. However, no transport measurements associated with the topological surface states have been observed in these half-Heusler candidates due to the dominating contribution from bulk electrical conductance. Here we show that, by reducing the mobility of bulk carriers, a two-dimensional (2D) weak antilocalization (WAL) effect, one of the hallmarks of topological surface states, was experimentally revealed from the tilted magnetic field dependence of magnetoconductance in a topologically nontrivial semimetal LuPdBi. Besides the observation of a 2D WAL effect, a superconducting transition was revealed at T c ∼ 1.7â.K in the same bulk LuPdBi. Quantitative analysis within the framework of a generalized BCS theory leads to the conclusion that the noncentrosymmetric superconductivity of LuPdBi is fully gapped with a possibly unconventional pairing character. The co-existence of superconductivity and the transport signature of topological surface states in the same bulk alloy suggests that LuPdBi represents a very promising candidate as a topological superconductor.

  17. Layer-by-layer assembly of patchy particles as a route to nontrivial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Niladri; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2017-08-01

    We propose a strategy for robust high-quality self-assembly of nontrivial periodic structures out of patchy particles and investigate it with Brownian dynamics simulations. Its first element is the use of specific patch-patch and shell-shell interactions between the particles, which can be implemented through differential functionalization of patched and shell regions with specific DNA strands. The other key element of our approach is the use of a layer-by-layer protocol that allows one to avoid the formation of undesired random aggregates. As an example, we design and self-assemble in silico a version of a double diamond lattice in which four particle types are arranged into bcc crystal made of four fcc sublattices. The lattice can be further converted to cubic diamond by selective removal of the particles of certain types. Our results demonstrate that by combining the directionality, selectivity of interactions, and the layer-by-layer protocol, a high-quality robust self-assembly can be achieved.

  18. The salience of social referents: a field experiment on collective norms and harassment behavior in a school social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluck, Elizabeth Levy; Shepherd, Hana

    2012-12-01

    Persistent, widespread harassment in schools can be understood as a product of collective school norms that deem harassment, and behavior allowing harassment to escalate, as typical and even desirable. Thus, one approach to reducing harassment is to change students' perceptions of these collective norms. Theory suggests that the public behavior of highly connected and chronically salient actors in a group, called social referents, may provide influential cues for individuals' perception of collective norms. Using repeated, complete social network surveys of a public high school, we demonstrate that changing the public behavior of a randomly assigned subset of student social referents changes their peers' perceptions of school collective norms and their harassment behavior. Social referents exert their influence over peers' perceptions of collective norms through the mechanism of everyday social interaction, particularly interaction that is frequent and personally motivated, in contrast to interaction shaped by institutional channels like shared classes. These findings clarify the development of collective social norms: They depend on certain patterns of and motivations for social interactions within groups across time, and are not static but constantly reshaped and reproduced through these interactions. Understanding this process creates opportunities for changing collective norms and behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Identify Predictors of Oral Hygiene: A Collection of Unique Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brein, Daniel J; Fleenor, Thomas J; Kim, Soo-Woo; Krupat, Edward

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to identify predictors of performed oral hygiene behaviors (OHBs) based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), oral health knowledge, and demographic factors. Using a questionnaire, 381 participants in three general dental offices and one hospital dental department in York, Pennsylvania, were surveyed regarding performed OHB, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, oral health knowledge, income, age, and sex. Three unique elements of OHB were identified for analysis: brushing, interdental cleaning, and tongue cleaning. Regression analysis revealed that attitude was the strongest predictor of brushing behavior, followed by oral health knowledge, perceived behavior control, subjective norms, and income. Perceived behavior control was the strongest predictor of interdental cleaning, followed by increased age and attitude. Female sex was the strongest predictor of tongue cleaning, followed by subjective norms, decreased age, and perceived behavior control. Respectively, these three groups of predictive variables explained 22.5% of brushing behavior, 22.7% of interdental cleaning behavior, and 9.5% of tongue cleaning behavior. The present findings highlight the utility of viewing OHB as a set of unique behaviors with unique predictive variables and provide additional support for use of TPB in predicting OHB. Periodontal practitioners should consider the strong associations of attitude and perceived behavioral control with brushing and interdental cleaning behaviors when designing interventional efforts to improve patient home care.

  20. Behavior of secondary particles in particulate matter collected at eastern Kanagawa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Tomohiro; Kikawada, Yoshikazu; Oi, Takao; Honda, Teruyuki

    2008-01-01

    The suspended particulate matters collected in 100 periods from 2002/10/28 to 2004/10/29 were separated into the water soluble and insoluble components and their main components were analyzed. The characteristics of atmosphere in the east part of Kagawa prefecture and of the secondary particulates were presumed. Therefore, it was considered that in the samples other than Mn the origins of water soluble and insoluble components are different each other from their behavior. The water-soluble part may be mostly ammonium salt (secondary particulate) from the measurement of NH 4 + . Furthermore, it became clear that the evolution of secondary particulate varies largely with season. Then, the variation with season was presumed by the main component analysis using the statistical software, SPSS adding to the correlation coefficient. This method has proved to be effective. (M.H.)

  1. The simplest maximum entropy model for collective behavior in a neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkačik, Gašper; Marre, Olivier; Mora, Thierry; Amodei, Dario; Bialek, William; Berry II, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Recent work emphasizes that the maximum entropy principle provides a bridge between statistical mechanics models for collective behavior in neural networks and experiments on networks of real neurons. Most of this work has focused on capturing the measured correlations among pairs of neurons. Here we suggest an alternative, constructing models that are consistent with the distribution of global network activity, i.e. the probability that K out of N cells in the network generate action potentials in the same small time bin. The inverse problem that we need to solve in constructing the model is analytically tractable, and provides a natural ‘thermodynamics’ for the network in the limit of large N. We analyze the responses of neurons in a small patch of the retina to naturalistic stimuli, and find that the implied thermodynamics is very close to an unusual critical point, in which the entropy (in proper units) is exactly equal to the energy. (paper)

  2. The State of Collective Intelligence Behavior and Practices of Danish Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Carina Antonia

    , quality in creativity and innovation, and the ability to predict new market trends and operational changes better than the competition. The purpose of this research is to map the state of collective intelligence behavior and related crowdsourcing methods applied by CEOs, directors and managers of Denmark......Danish corporations face challenges in adapting to the fourth industrial revolution resulting from the evolution in information technology and digitalization. Overall, the fourth industrial revolution has led to new requirements for Danish companies that are challenged in terms of efficiency, cost...... of creative and innovative solutions), prediction markets, and crowd predictions without markets. In addition, we examine various factors that can determine the usage of crowdsourcing within the individual company....

  3. Cesium and strontium behaviors in wastewater collected by different sewer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Nao K.; Hatanaka, Takuma; Umita, Teruyuki [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Iwate University, 020-8551, Ueda 4-3-5, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Ito, Ayumi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Iwate University, 020-8551, Ueda 4-3-5, Morioka, Iwate (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant resulted in the release of radionuclides such as {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 90}Sr into the environment. Some of these radionuclides have been entering sewage treatment plants through sewer systems and then being transferred to sewage sludge. There are two types of sewer systems, e.g. a combined sewer system (CSS) and a separated sewer system (SSS). The CSS transfers rainwater runoff and domestic wastewater to the treatment plants in a single pipe. The SSS has independent pipes; one pipe transfers domestic wastewater to the treatment plant and the other pipe transfers rainwater runoff to river or sea. Since most of the radionuclides released into the atmosphere by the nuclear accident fell onto the land surface by precipitation, the CSS should collect more radionuclides than the SSS. However, there is little information about behavior differences of radionuclides in wastewater between the two types of sewer systems. The objective of the present study was to clarify the differences of radionuclide behavior in wastewater between the CSS and SSS. Behaviors of stable Cs and Sr in wastewater were observed as a means to predict radiocesium and radiostrontium. Two types of wastewater were collected in Morioka city, Japan: wastewater in a CSS in a rain event (WC) and wastewater in a SSS (WS). The WC was taken at a high rate filtration plant every 20 minutes from the beginning of the rain event for several hours in 2013. The WS was collected at a sewage treatment plant once a month from June to October 2013; sometimes the collection was at the time of a rain event. Suspended solid (SS) in each sample was measured as a physicochemical property. The element concentrations in total, dissolved, and particulate fractions were determined. While the SS in the WS taken on rainy day was 0.11 g/L, the SS in the WC was 0.36 g/L in the beginning of the rainfall and then decreased with time. Total Cs concentration

  4. Collective behaviors of mammalian cells on amine-coated silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2013-01-01

    Intensive studies with vertical nanowire (NW) arrays have illustrated broad implications for manipulating mammalian cells in vitro, but how cellular responses are influenced by the presence of NWs has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we address collective cellular behaviors, including surface area of cells, membrane trafficking, focal adhesion distribution and dynamics, and cytoskeletal protein distribution on amine-coated silicon (Si) NWs with different physical properties. The degree of HeLa cell spreading was inversely proportional to the surface area occupied by the NWs, which was not affected by manipulation of membrane trafficking dynamics. In the presence of a diffusive focal complex around the NWs, strong, well organized focal adhesion was hardly visible on the NWs, implying that the cells were interacting weakly with the NW-embedded surface. Furthermore, we found that actin filament formation of the cells on long NWs was not favorable, and this could explain our observation of reduced cell spreading, as well as the decreased number of focal adhesion complexes. Taken together, our results suggest that cells can survive on silicon NWs by adjusting their morphology and adhesion behavior through actively organizing these molecules. (paper)

  5. Role Breadth Self-Efficacy and Foci of Proactive Behavior: Moderating Role of Collective, Relational, and Individual Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Pin-Chyuan; Han, Ming-Chuan; Chiu, Su-Fen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the interactive effect of role breadth self-efficacy (RBSE) and the three levels of self-concept (collective, relational, and individual) in predicting of different foci of proactive behaviors. Results from 259 matched responses from an airline company in Taiwan showed that RBSE had a positive effect on (1) pro-organizational proactive behavior among those with higher collective self-concept, (2) pro-supervisor proactive behavior among those with higher relational self-concept, and (3) pro-self proactive behavior among those with higher individual self-concept. Our findings provide insights into the moderating role of different levels of self-concept on RBSE-proactive behavior process in terms of specific targets or beneficiaries. Further implications for organizational research and practice are discussed.

  6. Collective impurity effects in the Heisenberg triangular antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maryasin, V S; Zhitomirsky, M E

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice doped with nonmagnetic impurities. Two nontrivial effects resulting from collective impurity behavior are predicted. The first one is related to presence of uncompensated magnetic moments localized near vacancies as revealed by the low-temperature Curie tail in the magnetic susceptibility. These moments exhibit an anomalous growth with the impurity concentration, which we attribute to the clustering mechanism. In an external magnetic field, impurities lead to an even more peculiar phenomenon lifting the classical ground-state degeneracy in favor of the conical state. We analytically demonstrate that vacancies spontaneously generate a positive biquadratic exchange, which is responsible for the above degeneracy lifting

  7. Yukawa multipole electrostatics and nontrivial coupling between electrostatic and dispersion interactions in electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellander, Roland; Ramirez, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    An exact treatment of screened electrostatics in electrolyte solutions is presented. In electrolytes the anisotropy of the exponentially decaying electrostatic potential from a molecule extends to the far field region. The full directional dependence of the electrostatic potential from a charged or uncharged molecule remains in the longest range tail (i.e. from all multipole moments). In particular, the range of the potential from an ion and that from an electroneutral polar particle is generally exactly the same. This is in contrast to the case in vacuum or pure polar liquids, where the potential from a single charge is longer ranged than that from a dipole, which is, itself, longer ranged than the one from a quadrupole etc. The orientational dependence of the exponentially screened electrostatic interaction between two molecules in electrolytes is therefore rather complex even at long distances. These facts are formalized in Yukawa multipole expansions of the electrostatic potential and the pair interaction free energy based on the Yukawa function family exp(-κr)/r m , where r is the distance, κ is a decay parameter and m is a positive integer. The expansion is formally exact for electrolytes with molecular solvent and in the primitive model, provided the non-Coulombic interactions between the particles are sufficiently short ranged. The results can also be applied in the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Differences and similarities to the ordinary multipole expansion of electrostatics are pointed out. On the other hand, when the non-Coulombic interactions between the constituent particles of the electrolyte solution contain a dispersion 1/r 6 potential, the electrostatic potential from a molecule decays like a power law for long distances rather than as a Yukawa function. This is due to nontrivial coupling between the electrostatic and dispersion interactions. There remains an exponentially decaying component in the electrostatic potential, but it becomes

  8. Contractions without non-trivial invariant subspaces satisfying a positivity condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaggy Duggal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An operator A ∈ B ( H $A\\in B(\\mathcal{H}$ , the algebra of bounded linear transformations on a complex infinite dimensional Hilbert space H $\\mathcal{H}$ , belongs to class A ( n $\\mathcal{A}(n$ (resp., A ( ∗ − n $\\mathcal{A}(*-n$ if | A | 2 ≤ | A n + 1 | 2 n + 1 $\\vert A\\vert^{2}\\leq\\vert A^{n+1}\\vert^{\\frac{2}{n+1}}$ (resp., | A ∗ | 2 ≤ | A n + 1 | 2 n + 1 $\\vert A^{*}\\vert^{2}\\leq \\vert A^{n+1}\\vert^{\\frac{2}{n+1}}$ for some integer n ≥ 1 $n\\geq1$ , and an operator A ∈ B ( H $A\\in B(\\mathcal{H}$ is called n-paranormal, denoted A ∈ P ( n $A\\in \\mathcal{P}(n$ (resp., ∗ − n $*-n$ -paranormal, denoted A ∈ P ( ∗ − n $A\\in \\mathcal{P}(*-n$ if ∥ A x ∥ n + 1 ≤ ∥ A n + 1 x ∥ ∥ x ∥ n $\\Vert Ax\\Vert ^{n+1}\\leq \\Vert A^{n+1}x\\Vert \\Vert x\\Vert ^{n}$ (resp., ∥ A ∗ x ∥ n + 1 ≤ ∥ A n + 1 x ∥ ∥ x ∥ n $\\Vert A^{*}x\\Vert ^{n+1}\\leq \\Vert A^{n+1}x\\Vert \\Vert x\\Vert ^{n}$ for some integer n ≥ 1 $n\\geq 1$ and all x ∈ H $x \\in\\mathcal{H}$ . In this paper, we prove that if A ∈ { A ( n ∪ P ( n } $A\\in\\{\\mathcal{A}(n\\cup \\mathcal{P}(n\\}$ (resp., A ∈ { A ( ∗ − n ∪ P ( ∗ − n } $A\\in\\{\\mathcal{A}(*-n\\cup \\mathcal{P}(*-n\\}$ is a contraction without a non-trivial invariant subspace, then A, | A n + 1 | 2 n + 1 − | A | 2 $\\vert A^{n+1}\\vert^{\\frac{2}{n+1}}-\\vert A\\vert^{2}$ and | A n + 1 | 2 − n + 1 n | A | 2 + 1 $\\vert A^{n+1}\\vert^{2}- {\\frac{n+1}{n}}\\vert A\\vert^{2}+ 1$ (resp., A, | A n + 1 | 2 n + 1 − | A ∗ | 2 $\\vert A^{n+1}\\vert^{\\frac{2}{n+1}}-\\vert A^{*}\\vert^{2}$ and | A n + 2 | 2 − n + 1 n | A | 2 + 1 ≥ 0 $\\vert A^{n+2}\\vert^{2}- {\\frac{n+1}{n}}\\vert A\\vert^{2}+ 1\\geq0$ are proper contractions.

  9. From kinetic to collective behavior in thermal transport on semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomas, C. de; Lopeandia, A. F.; Alvarez, F. X.; Cantarero, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a model which deepens into the role that normal scattering has on the thermal conductivity in semiconductor bulk, micro, and nanoscale samples. Thermal conductivity as a function of the temperature undergoes a smooth transition from a kinetic to a collective regime that depends on the importance of normal scattering events. We demonstrate that in this transition, the key point to fit experimental data is changing the way to perform the average on the scattering rates. We apply the model to bulk Si with different isotopic compositions obtaining an accurate fit. Then we calculate the thermal conductivity of Si thin films and nanowires by only introducing the effective size as additional parameter. The model provides a better prediction of the thermal conductivity behavior valid for all temperatures and sizes above 30 nm with a single expression. Avoiding the introduction of confinement or quantum effects, the model permits to establish the limit of classical theories in the study of the thermal conductivity in nanoscopic systems

  10. From kinetic to collective behavior in thermal transport on semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomas, C. de; Lopeandia, A. F.; Alvarez, F. X., E-mail: xavier.alvarez@uab.cat [Department of Physics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Cantarero, A. [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, P. O. Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2014-04-28

    We present a model which deepens into the role that normal scattering has on the thermal conductivity in semiconductor bulk, micro, and nanoscale samples. Thermal conductivity as a function of the temperature undergoes a smooth transition from a kinetic to a collective regime that depends on the importance of normal scattering events. We demonstrate that in this transition, the key point to fit experimental data is changing the way to perform the average on the scattering rates. We apply the model to bulk Si with different isotopic compositions obtaining an accurate fit. Then we calculate the thermal conductivity of Si thin films and nanowires by only introducing the effective size as additional parameter. The model provides a better prediction of the thermal conductivity behavior valid for all temperatures and sizes above 30 nm with a single expression. Avoiding the introduction of confinement or quantum effects, the model permits to establish the limit of classical theories in the study of the thermal conductivity in nanoscopic systems.

  11. From kinetic to collective behavior in thermal transport on semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tomas, C.; Cantarero, A.; Lopeandia, A. F.; Alvarez, F. X.

    2014-04-01

    We present a model which deepens into the role that normal scattering has on the thermal conductivity in semiconductor bulk, micro, and nanoscale samples. Thermal conductivity as a function of the temperature undergoes a smooth transition from a kinetic to a collective regime that depends on the importance of normal scattering events. We demonstrate that in this transition, the key point to fit experimental data is changing the way to perform the average on the scattering rates. We apply the model to bulk Si with different isotopic compositions obtaining an accurate fit. Then we calculate the thermal conductivity of Si thin films and nanowires by only introducing the effective size as additional parameter. The model provides a better prediction of the thermal conductivity behavior valid for all temperatures and sizes above 30 nm with a single expression. Avoiding the introduction of confinement or quantum effects, the model permits to establish the limit of classical theories in the study of the thermal conductivity in nanoscopic systems.

  12. Chemical Characterization and Behavior of Respirable Fractions of Indoor Dusts Collected Near a Landfill Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheo B. Lamorena-Lim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to determine the inorganic and organic phases in airborne particulate matter (PM collected near a landf ill facility. The establishments within the vicinity of the landfill considered in the study were a junk shop, a school, and a money changer shop. From the elemental analysis using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, lead and cadmium were discovered to be more abundant in the total suspended particulate (TSP fraction, whereas copper was more abundant in the smaller PM2.5. Manganese, arsenic, strontium, cadmium, and lead were more abundant in the PM10 fraction than in PM2.5. The results of the chemical characterization were compiled and evaluated in a geochemical modelling code (PHREEQC to determine the potential speciation of these chemical constituents. Solution complexes of As, Pb, Cd and phthalates, and metal species, such as H2AsO3- , Cd2OH3+, Pb(OH3-, were predicted to form by the PHREEQC simulation runs once the endmember components interact with water. The results contribute to the background information on the potential impacts from exposure to airborne PM at workplaces around landfill facilities. Moreover, the data gathered provide a baseline for the chemical characterization and behavior of chemical constituents of PM possibly present in this specific type of environment.

  13. Nonlinear perturbations of differential operators with nontrivial kernel and applications to third order periodic boundary value problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afuwape, A.U.; Omari, P.

    1987-11-01

    This paper deals with the solvability of the nonlinear operator equations in normed spaces Lx=EGx+f, where L is a linear map with possible nontrivial kernel. Applications are given to the existence of periodic solutions for the third order scalar differential equation x'''+ax''+bx'+cx+g(t,x)=p(t), under various conditions on the interaction of g(t,x)/x with spectral configurations of a, b and c. (author). 48 refs

  14. Collectively Facilitated Behavior of the Neonate Caterpillars of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence D. Fitzgerald

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral biology of the first instar larva of Cactoblastis cactorum was studied from the time of eclosion until the colony penetrated and initiated excavation of the host plant. Hatching from an egg stick was asynchronous, requiring 20 h for the entire cohort to eclose at 50%–70% RH and significantly longer at a lower range of RHs. On eclosion, neonates aggregated in an arena at the base of their egg stick and did not attempt to excavate the cladode until an average of 25 caterpillars had collected, approximately 15 h after the onset of egg hatch. Typically only a single entrance hole was formed, limiting the active process of excavating to one or a few individuals at-a-time until the host was fully penetrated and enlarged internally. Olfactometer tests showed that the neonates are strongly attracted to volatile chemicals released when caterpillars chewed into the cladode, accounting for the strong fidelity of the whole cohort to the initial site of penetration. In one instance, the caterpillars were observed to deal with an explosive release of mucilage by imbibing the liquid until the flooded zone was drained and the caterpillars could reenter the plant through the original entrance hole. Once inside the cladode, marked individuals adopted a regular cycle of defecating at the surface at a mean interval of approximately 10 min when followed for 35 successive cycles. Blanket spraying cladodes with a mandibular gland extract prior to hatching led to the independent dispersal of neonates and a failure to form an arena. When the cladode was impenetrable at the site of eclosion, the active cohort of unfed neonates set off together in search of a new site, marking and following a persistent trail that allowed late-to-eclose caterpillars to join their departed siblings. The adaptive significance of these observations is discussed in the context of the life history of the caterpillar.

  15. The Effects of Data Collection Method and Monitoring of Workers’ Behavior on the Generation of Demolition Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi-Wook Cha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The roles of both the data collection method (including proper classification and the behavior of workers on the generation of demolition waste (DW are important. By analyzing the effect of the data collection method used to estimate DW, and by investigating how workers’ behavior can affect the total amount of DW generated during an actual demolition process, it was possible to identify strategies that could improve the prediction of DW. Therefore, this study surveyed demolition waste generation rates (DWGRs for different types of building by conducting on-site surveys immediately before demolition in order to collect adequate and reliable data. In addition, the effects of DW management strategies and of monitoring the behavior of workers on the actual generation of DW were analyzed. The results showed that when monitoring was implemented, the estimates of DW obtained from the DWGRs that were surveyed immediately before demolition and the actual quantities of DW reported by the demolition contractors had an error rate of 0.63% when the results were compared. Therefore, this study has shown that the proper data collection method (i.e., data were collected immediately before demolition applied in this paper and monitoring on the demolition site have a significant impact on waste generation.

  16. Principles and strategies for monitoring data collection integrity in a multi-site randomized clinical trial of a behavioral intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Salimi, Celeste R; Donovan Stickler, Molly A; Stegenga, Kristin; Lee, Melissa; Haase, Joan E

    2011-08-01

    Although treatment fidelity strategies for enhancing the integrity of behavioral interventions have been well described, little has been written about monitoring data collection integrity. This article describes the principles and strategies developed to monitor data collection integrity of the "Stories and Music for Adolescent/Young Adult Resilience During Transplant" study (R01NR008583, U10CA098543, and U10CA095861)-a multi-site Children's Oncology Group randomized clinical trial of a music therapy intervention for adolescents and young adults undergoing stem cell transplant. The principles and strategies outlined in this article provide one model for development and evaluation of a data collection integrity monitoring plan for behavioral interventions that may be adapted by investigators and may be useful to funding agencies and grant application reviewers in evaluating proposals. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Longitudinal Associations of Neighborhood Collective Efficacy and Maternal Corporal Punishment with Behavior Problems in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Julie; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Neighborhood and parenting influences on early behavioral outcomes are strongly dependent upon a child's stage of development. However, little research has jointly considered the longitudinal associations of neighborhood and parenting processes with behavior problems in early childhood. To address this limitation, this study explores the…

  18. Remarks on surfaces with $c_1^2 =2\\chi -1$ having non-trivial 2-torsion

    OpenAIRE

    MURAKAMI, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    We shall show that any complex minimal surface of general type with $c_1^2 = 2\\chi -1$ having non-trivial 2-torsion divisors, where $c_1^2$ and $\\chi$ are the first Chern number of a surface and the Euler characteristic of the structure sheaf respectively, has the Euler characteristic $\\chi$ not exceeding 4. Moreover, we shall give a complete description for the surfaces of the case $\\chi =4$, and prove that the coarse moduli space for surfaces of this case is a unirational variety of dimensi...

  19. Explaining Radical Group Behavior : Developing Emotion and Efficacy Routes to Normative and Nonnormative Collective Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tausch, Nicole; Becker, Julia C.; Spears, Russell; Christ, Oliver; Saab, Rim; Singh, Purnima; Siddiqui, Roomana N.

    A recent model of collective action distinguishes 2 distinct pathways: an emotional pathway whereby anger in response to injustice motivates action and an efficacy pathway where the belief that issues can be solved collectively increases the likelihood that group members take action (van Zomeren,

  20. What Does It Take for Practitioners to Use Data to Change Behavior in Collective Impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raderstrong, Jeff; Nazaire, JaNay Queen

    2017-01-01

    The use of data to track and manage progress is critical to a collective impact initiative achieving results or understanding impact. Yet, little research has been done to determine how collective impact practitioners can effectively use data. This article--including a literature review, semistructured interviews with experts on performance…

  1. New measures of mental state and behavior based on data collected from sensors, smartphones, and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Tasha; Monteith, Scott

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid and ubiquitous acceptance of new technologies, algorithms will be used to estimate new measures of mental state and behavior based on digital data. The algorithms will analyze data collected from sensors in smartphones and wearable technology, and data collected from Internet and smartphone usage and activities. In the future, new medical measures that assist with the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of psychiatric disorders will be available despite unresolved reliability, usability, and privacy issues. At the same time, similar non-medical commercial measures of mental state are being developed primarily for targeted advertising. There are societal and ethical implications related to the use of these measures of mental state and behavior for both medical and non-medical purposes.

  2. Behavior of Collective Cooperation Yielded by Two Update Rules in Social Dilemmas: Combining Fermi and Moran Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Chengyi; Wang Lei; Wang Jinsong; Wang Juan

    2012-01-01

    We combine the Fermi and Moran update rules in the spatial prisoner's dilemma and snowdrift games to investigate the behavior of collective cooperation among agents on the regular lattice. Large-scale simulations indicate that, compared to the model with only one update rule, the cooperation behavior exhibits the richer phenomena, and the role of update dynamics should be paid more attention in the evolutionary game theory. Meanwhile, we also observe that the introduction of Moran rule, which needs to consider all neighbor's information, can markedly promote the aggregate cooperation level, that is, randomly selecting the neighbor proportional to its payoff to imitate will facilitate the cooperation among agents. Current results will contribute to further understand the cooperation dynamics and evolutionary behaviors within many biological, economic and social systems.

  3. Behavior of Collective Cooperation Yielded by Two Update Rules in Social Dilemmas: Combining Fermi and Moran Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Cheng-Yi; Wang, Lei; Wang, Juan; Wang, Jin-Song

    2012-09-01

    We combine the Fermi and Moran update rules in the spatial prisoner's dilemma and snowdrift games to investigate the behavior of collective cooperation among agents on the regular lattice. Large-scale simulations indicate that, compared to the model with only one update rule, the cooperation behavior exhibits the richer phenomena, and the role of update dynamics should be paid more attention in the evolutionary game theory. Meanwhile, we also observe that the introduction of Moran rule, which needs to consider all neighbor's information, can markedly promote the aggregate cooperation level, that is, randomly selecting the neighbor proportional to its payoff to imitate will facilitate the cooperation among agents. Current results will contribute to further understand the cooperation dynamics and evolutionary behaviors within many biological, economic and social systems.

  4. Role of space--time topology in quantum phenomena: Superselection of charge and emergence of nontrivial vacua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtekar, A.; Sen, A.

    1980-01-01

    Schwarzschild--Kruskal space--time admits a two-parameter family of everywhere regular, static, source-free Maxwell fields. It is shown that there exists a corresponding two-parameter family of unitarily inequivalent representations of the canonical commutation relations. Elements of the underlying Hilbert space may be interpreted as ''quantum fluctuations of the Maxwell field off nontrivial classical vacua.'' The representation corresponding to the ''trivial'' sector: i.e., the zero classical solution: is the usual Fock representation. All others are ''non-Fock.'' In particular, in all other sectors, the Maxwell field develops a nonzero vacuum expectation value. The parameters labelling the family can be interpreted as electric and magnetic charges. Therefore, unitary inequivalence naturally leads to superselection rules for these charges. These features arise in spite of the linearity of field equations only because the space--time topology is ''nontrivial.'' Also, because of linearity, an exact analysis is possible at the quantum level; recourse to perturbation theory is unnecessary

  5. Driving simulator validation of driver behavior with limited safe vantage points for data collection in work zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bham, Ghulam H; Leu, Ming C; Vallati, Manoj; Mathur, Durga R

    2014-06-01

    This study is aimed at validating a driving simulator (DS) for the study of driver behavior in work zones. A validation study requires field data collection. For studies conducted in highway work zones, the availability of safe vantage points for data collection at critical locations can be a significant challenge. A validation framework is therefore proposed in this paper, demonstrated using a fixed-based DS that addresses the issue by using a global positioning system (GPS). The validation of the DS was conducted using objective and subjective evaluations. The objective validation was divided into qualitative and quantitative evaluations. The DS was validated by comparing the results of simulation with the field data, which were collected using a GPS along the highway and video recordings at specific locations in a work zone. The constructed work zone scenario in the DS was subjectively evaluated with 46 participants. The objective evaluation established the absolute and relative validity of the DS. The mean speeds from the DS data showed excellent agreement with the field data. The subjective evaluation indicated realistic driving experience by the participants. The use of GPS showed that continuous data collected along the highway can overcome the challenges of unavailability of safe vantage points especially at critical locations. Further, a validated DS can be used for examining driver behavior in complex situations by replicating realistic scenarios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nontrivial transition of transmission in a highly open quantum point contact in the quantum Hall regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Changki; Park, Jinhong; Chung, Yunchul; Choi, Hyungkook; Umansky, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    Transmission through a quantum point contact (QPC) in the quantum Hall regime usually exhibits multiple resonances as a function of gate voltage and high nonlinearity in bias. Such behavior is unpredictable and changes sample by sample. Here, we report the observation of a sharp transition of the transmission through an open QPC at finite bias, which was observed consistently for all the tested QPCs. It is found that the bias dependence of the transition can be fitted to the Fermi-Dirac distribution function through universal scaling. The fitted temperature matches quite nicely to the electron temperature measured via shot-noise thermometry. While the origin of the transition is unclear, we propose a phenomenological model based on our experimental results that may help to understand such a sharp transition. Similar transitions are observed in the fractional quantum Hall regime, and it is found that the temperature of the system can be measured by rescaling the quasiparticle energy with the effective charge (e*=e /3 ). We believe that the observed phenomena can be exploited as a tool for measuring the electron temperature of the system and for studying the quasiparticle charges of the fractional quantum Hall states.

  7. Living bacteria rheology: Population growth, aggregation patterns, and collective behavior under different shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrício, P.; Almeida, P. L.; Portela, R.; Sobral, R. G.; Grilo, I. R.; Cidade, T.; Leal, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    The activity of growing living bacteria was investigated using real-time and in situ rheology—in stationary and oscillatory shear. Two different strains of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus—strain COL and its isogenic cell wall autolysis mutant, RUSAL9—were considered in this work. For low bacteria density, strain COL forms small clusters, while the mutant, presenting deficient cell separation, forms irregular larger aggregates. In the early stages of growth, when subjected to a stationary shear, the viscosity of the cultures of both strains increases with the population of cells. As the bacteria reach the exponential phase of growth, the viscosity of the cultures of the two strains follows different and rich behaviors, with no counterpart in the optical density or in the population's colony-forming units measurements. While the viscosity of strain COL culture keeps increasing during the exponential phase and returns close to its initial value for the late phase of growth, where the population stabilizes, the viscosity of the mutant strain culture decreases steeply, still in the exponential phase, remains constant for some time, and increases again, reaching a constant plateau at a maximum value for the late phase of growth. These complex viscoelastic behaviors, which were observed to be shear-stress-dependent, are a consequence of two coupled effects: the cell density continuous increase and its changing interacting properties. The viscous and elastic moduli of strain COL culture, obtained with oscillatory shear, exhibit power-law behaviors whose exponents are dependent on the bacteria growth stage. The viscous and elastic moduli of the mutant culture have complex behaviors, emerging from the different relaxation times that are associated with the large molecules of the medium and the self-organized structures of bacteria. Nevertheless, these behaviors reflect the bacteria growth stage.

  8. Class Collective Efficacy and Class Size as Moderators of the Relationship between Junior Middle School Students’ Externalizing Behavior and Academic Engagement: A Multilevel Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between externalizing behavior and academic engagement, and tested the possibility of class collective efficacy and class size moderating this relationship. Data were collected from 28 Chinese classrooms (N = 1034 students; grades 7, 8, and 9 with student reports. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to test all hypotheses and results revealed a negative relationship between externalizing behavior and academic engagement; class collective efficacy was also significantly related to academic engagement. Additionally, class collective efficacy and class size moderated the relationship between externalizing behavior and academic engagement: For students in a class with high collective efficacy or small size (≤30 students, the relationship between externalizing behavior and academic engagement was weaker than for those in a class with low collective efficacy or large size (≥43 students. Results are discussed considering self-regulatory mechanisms and social environment theory, with possible implications for teachers of students’ learning provided.

  9. Electromagnetic response of non-trivially shaped superconductors in external magnetic fields and with applied currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Leonardo Ribeiro Eulalio; Aguiar, Jose Albino Oliveira de

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The study of the electromagnetic response of high-T c superconductors is essential for future technological applications. Such materials are hard type II superconductors, where the mixed state (a state characterized by quantized normal flux tubes - also called vortices - immersed in a superconductor phase) occupies most of the phase diagram. Therefore, the electromagnetic properties are dictated by the vortex dynamics in these materials. One has also to consider the presence of structural defects and thermal effects, which turn the vortex dynamics very complex. These difficulties may be overcome throughout a macroscopic description, also known as continuum approximation, of the electromagnetic fields in superconductors, obtained from critical state models and constitutive relations E = E(j) and H = H(B) (where E is the electric field generated by moving vortices, j the current density, B the induction - related to the local density of vortices - and H the reversible magnetic field that is in equilibrium with B). In superconductors with negligible demagnetization factors, such as long cylinders and bars with applied magnetic fields and/or currents along their longer dimensions, the Meissner state and the flux penetration is quite well understood. However, the actual specimen shape plays an important role on the electromagnetic behavior of superconductors. Numerical methods are often employed, since such cases are hard to treat analytically. In this work we studied the electromagnetic response of superconductors with various shapes. The Meissner state is obtained for thin curved strips and long cylinders with arbitrary cross-section, in perpendicular field and with applied currents. The flux penetration is numerically calculated for thin curved strips for the Bean (j c =const.) and the Kim (j c (B) = j c0 /(1 + βB)) models. (author)

  10. individual vs. collective behavior: an experimental. investigation of risk and time preferences in couples

    OpenAIRE

    Abdellaoui, Mohammed; l'Haridon, Olivier; Paraschiv, Corina

    2010-01-01

    Author's abstract. This paper study decision-making under risk and decision-making over time made by couples. We performed a joint experimental elicitation of risk and time preferences both for couples and for their individual members. We used general behavioral models of decision under risk and over time and measured utility, probability weighting, and discounting. Under risk, our main result is that probabilistic risk attitude for couples lay within the boundaries of individual attitudes: c...

  11. Interplay of differential cell mechanical properties, motility, and proliferation in emergent collective behavior of cell co-cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Leo; Kolbman, Dan; Wu, Mingming; Ma, Minglin; Das, Moumita

    The biophysics of cell co-cultures, i.e. binary systems of cell populations, is of great interest in many biological processes including formation of embryos, and tumor progression. During these processes, different types of cells with different physical properties are mixed with each other, with important consequences for cell-cell interaction, aggregation, and migration. The role of the differences in their physical properties in their collective behavior remains poorly understood. Furthermore, until recently most theoretical studies of collective cell migration have focused on two dimensional systems. Under physiological conditions, however, cells often have to navigate three dimensional and confined micro-environments. We study a confined, three-dimensional binary system of interacting, active, and deformable particles with different physical properties such as deformability, motility, adhesion, and division rates using Langevin Dynamics simulations. Our findings may provide insights into how the differences in and interplay between cell mechanical properties, division, and motility influence emergent collective behavior such as cell aggregation and segregation experimentally observed in co-cultures of breast cancer cells and healthy breast epithelial cells. This work was partially supported by a Cottrell College Science Award.

  12. Collective Schema, As a New Concept Suggesting and a View to Proverbs from Cognitive Behavioral Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat SANLI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Behavioral Tharapy doctrine and clinical accumulation have shown that there is a causal link between moods, paradigms, and assessments. These cognitive contents are named as automatic thoughts and schemas. Rational- adaptive automatic thoughts and schemas while bring to person good mood, irrational-maladaptive automatic thoughts and schemas bring to patology. On the other hand this cognitive structures have fed by accepted culture by society and components of this culture such as songs and proverbs which possess necessity and rules. The basic aim of this study is put forth concept of “collective schema” which will be assessable content in Cognitive Behavioral Approach , and clarifying bases of this concept deal with proverbs. In this sense, adaptive and maladaptive aspects of collective shema concept, have been commented, cognitive disortions which fed by maladaptive schemas deal with collective aspect, have been categorised and illustrated with proverbs. With this study we aimed create a groundwork for previous studies. [JCBPR 2016; 5(2.000: 85-93

  13. Applications of Canonical transformations and nontrivial vacuum solutions to flavor mixing and critical phenomena in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2004-01-01

    MISHCHENKO, YURIY. Applications of Canonical Transformations and Nontrivial Vacuum Solutions to flavor mixing and critical phenomena in Quantum Field Theory. (Under the direction of Chueng-Ryong Ji.) In this dissertation we consider two recent applications of Bogoliubov Transformation to the phenomenology of quantum mixing and the theory of critical phenomena. In recent years quantum mixing got in the focus of the searches for New Physics due to its unparalleled sensitivity to SM parameters and indications of neutrino mixing. It was recently suggested that Bogoliubov Transformation may be important in proper definition of the flavor states that otherwise results in problems in perturbative treatment. As first part of this dissertation we investigate this conjecture and develop a complete formulation of such a mixing field theory involving introduction of general formalism, analysis of space-time conversion and phenomenological implications. As second part of this dissertati

  14. Applications of Canonical transformations and nontrivial vacuum solutions to flavor mixing and critical phenomena in quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2004-12-01

    MISHCHENKO, YURIY. Applications of Canonical Transformations and Nontrivial Vacuum Solutions to flavor mixing and critical phenomena in Quantum Field Theory. (Under the direction of Chueng-Ryong Ji.) In this dissertation we consider two recent applications of Bogoliubov Transformation to the phenomenology of quantum mixing and the theory of critical phenomena. In recent years quantum mixing got in the focus of the searches for New Physics due to its unparalleled sensitivity to SM parameters and indications of neutrino mixing. It was recently suggested that Bogoliubov Transformation may be important in proper definition of the flavor states that otherwise results in problems in perturbative treatment. As first part of this dissertation we investigate this conjecture and develop a complete formulation of such a mixing field theory involving introduction of general formalism, analysis of space-time conversion and phenomenological implications. As second part of this dissertati

  15. A Systematic Review of Published Respondent-Driven Sampling Surveys Collecting Behavioral and Biologic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lisa G; Hakim, Avi J; Dittrich, Samantha; Burnett, Janet; Kim, Evelyn; White, Richard G

    2016-08-01

    Reporting key details of respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey implementation and analysis is essential for assessing the quality of RDS surveys. RDS is both a recruitment and analytic method and, as such, it is important to adequately describe both aspects in publications. We extracted data from peer-reviewed literature published through September, 2013 that reported collected biological specimens using RDS. We identified 151 eligible peer-reviewed articles describing 222 surveys conducted in seven regions throughout the world. Most published surveys reported basic implementation information such as survey city, country, year, population sampled, interview method, and final sample size. However, many surveys did not report essential methodological and analytical information for assessing RDS survey quality, including number of recruitment sites, seeds at start and end, maximum number of waves, and whether data were adjusted for network size. Understanding the quality of data collection and analysis in RDS is useful for effectively planning public health service delivery and funding priorities.

  16. The rules of information aggregation and emergence of collective intelligent behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Information is a peculiar quantity. Unlike matter or energy, the aggregation of knowledge from many individuals can in fact produce more (or less) information than the sum of its parts. We use the formalism of information theory to derive general principles of information aggregation and collective organization under which information pooling can be synergetic or to identify when it will be redundant. We then show how several problems of collective cognition and coordination can be understood in terms of the conditions that allow for the minimization of uncertainty (maximization of predictability) under information pooling over many individuals. We discuss in some detail how collective coordination in swarms, markets, language processing and collaborative filtering may be guided by the optimal aggregation of information over many sources and identify circumstances when these processes fail, leading e.g. to inefficient markets. The contrast to approaches to understand coordination and collaboration via traditional decision and game theory is discussed as well as the incentives to individuals and groups to find optimal information aggregation mechanisms.

  17. Collective magnetic behaviors of Fe-Ag nanostructured thin films above the percolation limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.; Barandiaran, J. M.; Svalov, A.; Sarmiento, G.; Fernandez Barquin, L.; Pedro, I. de; Orue, I.

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic behavior of sputtered and pulsed laser deposited (PLD) Fe x Ag 100-x thin films with 27≤x≤55 has been studied by means of ac and dc magnetic measurements. Sputtered samples present a continuous decrease in the magnetization, down to 310 K for x=30, where a magnetic transition into a superparamagnetic state with the presence of dipolar interactions is observed. The ac susceptibility measurements indicate that this transition resembles that of three dimensional glassy systems. Sputtered samples with higher concentration of Fe present a similar but slower thermal evolution of magnetization. PLD samples with x≥50 show a Curie-Weiss-type transition above ∼200 K triggered by direct exchange interactions. As the temperature decreases, the system behaves like a ferromagnet and below ∼75 K, a transition into a cluster-glass state appears. As the composition decreases, these phenomena vanish

  18. Explaining radical group behavior: Developing emotion and efficacy routes to normative and nonnormative collective action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, Nicole; Becker, Julia C; Spears, Russell; Christ, Oliver; Saab, Rim; Singh, Purnima; Siddiqui, Roomana N

    2011-07-01

    A recent model of collective action distinguishes 2 distinct pathways: an emotional pathway whereby anger in response to injustice motivates action and an efficacy pathway where the belief that issues can be solved collectively increases the likelihood that group members take action (van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach, 2004). Research supporting this model has, however, focused entirely on relatively normative actions such as participating in demonstrations. We argue that the relations between emotions, efficacy, and action differ for more extreme, nonnormative actions and propose (a) that nonnormative actions are often driven by a sense of low efficacy and (b) that contempt, which, unlike anger, entails psychological distancing and a lack of reconciliatory intentions, predicts nonnormative action. These ideas were tested in 3 survey studies examining student protests against tuition fees in Germany (N = 332), Indian Muslims' action support in relation to ingroup disadvantage (N = 156), and British Muslims' responses to British foreign policy (N = 466). Results were generally supportive of predictions and indicated that (a) anger was strongly related to normative action but overall unrelated or less strongly related to nonnormative action, (b) contempt was either unrelated or negatively related to normative action but significantly positively predicted nonnormative action, and (c) efficacy was positively related to normative action and negatively related to nonnormative action. The implications of these findings for understanding and dealing with extreme intergroup phenomena such as terrorism are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Hybrid Societies: Challenges and Perspectives in the Design of Collective Behavior in Self-organizing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko eHamann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid societies are self-organizing, collective systems composed of different components, for example, natural and artificial parts (bio-hybrid or human beings interacting with and through technical systems (socio-technical. Many different disciplines investigate methods and systems closely related to the design of hybrid societies. A~stronger collaboration between these disciplines could allow for re-use of methods and create significant synergies. We identify three main areas of challenges in the design of self-organizing hybrid societies. First, we identify the formalization challenge. There is an urgent need for a generic model that allows a description and comparison of collective hybrid societies. Second, we identify the system design challenge. Starting from the formal specification of the system, we need to develop an integrated design process. Third, we identify the challenge of interdisciplinarity. Current research on self-organizing hybrid societies stretches over many different fields and hence requires the re-use and synthesis of methods at intersections between disciplines. We then conclude by presenting our perspective for future approaches with high potential in this area.

  20. From Individual to Collective Behavior of Unicellular Organisms: Recent Results and Open Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Chuan; Othmer, Hans G.; Erban, Radek

    2009-01-01

    The collective movements of unicellular organisms such as bacteria or amoeboid (crawling) cells are often modeled by partial differential equations (PDEs) that describe the time evolution of cell density. In particular, chemotaxis equations have been used to model the movement towards various kinds of extracellular cues. Well‐developed analytical and numerical methods for analyzing the time‐dependent and time‐independent properties of solutions make this approach attractive. However, these models are often based on phenomenological descriptions of cell fluxes with no direct correspondence to individual cell processes such signal transduction and cell movement. This leads to the question of how to justify these macroscopic PDEs from microscopic descriptions of cells, and how to relate the macroscopic quantities in these PDEs to individual‐level parameters. Here we summarize recent progress on this question in the context of bacterial and amoeboid chemotaxis, and formulate several open problems.

  1. Designing collective behavior in a termite-inspired robot construction team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Justin; Petersen, Kirstin; Nagpal, Radhika

    2014-02-14

    Complex systems are characterized by many independent components whose low-level actions produce collective high-level results. Predicting high-level results given low-level rules is a key open challenge; the inverse problem, finding low-level rules that give specific outcomes, is in general still less understood. We present a multi-agent construction system inspired by mound-building termites, solving such an inverse problem. A user specifies a desired structure, and the system automatically generates low-level rules for independent climbing robots that guarantee production of that structure. Robots use only local sensing and coordinate their activity via the shared environment. We demonstrate the approach via a physical realization with three autonomous climbing robots limited to onboard sensing. This work advances the aim of engineering complex systems that achieve specific human-designed goals.

  2. From Individual to Collective Behavior of Unicellular Organisms: Recent Results and Open Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Chuan

    2009-09-23

    The collective movements of unicellular organisms such as bacteria or amoeboid (crawling) cells are often modeled by partial differential equations (PDEs) that describe the time evolution of cell density. In particular, chemotaxis equations have been used to model the movement towards various kinds of extracellular cues. Well‐developed analytical and numerical methods for analyzing the time‐dependent and time‐independent properties of solutions make this approach attractive. However, these models are often based on phenomenological descriptions of cell fluxes with no direct correspondence to individual cell processes such signal transduction and cell movement. This leads to the question of how to justify these macroscopic PDEs from microscopic descriptions of cells, and how to relate the macroscopic quantities in these PDEs to individual‐level parameters. Here we summarize recent progress on this question in the context of bacterial and amoeboid chemotaxis, and formulate several open problems.

  3. Evolution of Collective Behaviors for a Real Swarm of Aquatic Surface Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Miguel; Costa, Vasco; Gomes, Jorge; Rodrigues, Tiago; Silva, Fernando; Oliveira, Sancho Moura; Christensen, Anders Lyhne

    2016-01-01

    Swarm robotics is a promising approach for the coordination of large numbers of robots. While previous studies have shown that evolutionary robotics techniques can be applied to obtain robust and efficient self-organized behaviors for robot swarms, most studies have been conducted in simulation, and the few that have been conducted on real robots have been confined to laboratory environments. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a swarm robotics system with evolved control successfully operating in a real and uncontrolled environment. We evolve neural network-based controllers in simulation for canonical swarm robotics tasks, namely homing, dispersion, clustering, and monitoring. We then assess the performance of the controllers on a real swarm of up to ten aquatic surface robots. Our results show that the evolved controllers transfer successfully to real robots and achieve a performance similar to the performance obtained in simulation. We validate that the evolved controllers display key properties of swarm intelligence-based control, namely scalability, flexibility, and robustness on the real swarm. We conclude with a proof-of-concept experiment in which the swarm performs a complete environmental monitoring task by combining multiple evolved controllers.

  4. Topologically nontrivial quantum layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, G.; Exner, P.; Krejcirik, D.

    2004-01-01

    Given a complete noncompact surface Σ embedded in R 3 , we consider the Dirichlet Laplacian in the layer Ω that is defined as a tubular neighborhood of constant width about Σ. Using an intrinsic approach to the geometry of Ω, we generalize the spectral results of the original paper by Duclos et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 223, 13 (2001)] to the situation when Σ does not possess poles. This enables us to consider topologically more complicated layers and state new spectral results. In particular, we are interested in layers built over surfaces with handles or several cylindrically symmetric ends. We also discuss more general regions obtained by compact deformations of certain Ω

  5. Collective chasing behavior between cooperators and defectors in the spatial prisoner's dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genki Ichinose

    Full Text Available Cooperation is one of the essential factors for all biological organisms in major evolutionary transitions. Recent studies have investigated the effect of migration for the evolution of cooperation. However, little is known about whether and how an individuals' cooperativeness coevolves with mobility. One possibility is that mobility enhances cooperation by enabling cooperators to escape from defectors and form clusters; the other possibility is that mobility inhibits cooperation by helping the defectors to catch and exploit the groups of cooperators. In this study we investigate the coevolutionary dynamics by using the prisoner's dilemma game model on a lattice structure. The computer simulations demonstrate that natural selection maintains cooperation in the form of evolutionary chasing between the cooperators and defectors. First, cooperative groups grow and collectively move in the same direction. Then, mutant defectors emerge and invade the cooperative groups, after which the defectors exploit the cooperators. Then other cooperative groups emerge due to mutation and the cycle is repeated. Here, it is worth noting that, as a result of natural selection, the mobility evolves towards directional migration, but not to random or completely fixed migration. Furthermore, with directional migration, the rate of global population extinction is lower when compared with other cases without the evolution of mobility (i.e., when mobility is preset to random or fixed. These findings illustrate the coevolutionary dynamics of cooperation and mobility through the directional chasing between cooperators and defectors.

  6. Searching for collective behavior in a large network of sensory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašper Tkačik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximum entropy models are the least structured probability distributions that exactly reproduce a chosen set of statistics measured in an interacting network. Here we use this principle to construct probabilistic models which describe the correlated spiking activity of populations of up to 120 neurons in the salamander retina as it responds to natural movies. Already in groups as small as 10 neurons, interactions between spikes can no longer be regarded as small perturbations in an otherwise independent system; for 40 or more neurons pairwise interactions need to be supplemented by a global interaction that controls the distribution of synchrony in the population. Here we show that such "K-pairwise" models--being systematic extensions of the previously used pairwise Ising models--provide an excellent account of the data. We explore the properties of the neural vocabulary by: 1 estimating its entropy, which constrains the population's capacity to represent visual information; 2 classifying activity patterns into a small set of metastable collective modes; 3 showing that the neural codeword ensembles are extremely inhomogenous; 4 demonstrating that the state of individual neurons is highly predictable from the rest of the population, allowing the capacity for error correction.

  7. Collective excitations and supersolid behavior of bosonic atoms inside two crossed optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J.; Piazza, F.; Zwerger, W.

    2017-12-01

    We discuss the nature of symmetry breaking and the associated collective excitations for a system of bosons coupled to the electromagnetic field of two optical cavities. For the specific configuration realized in a recent experiment at ETH [1, 2], we show that, in absence of direct intercavity scattering and for parameters chosen such that the atoms couple symmetrically to both cavities, the system possesses an approximate U(1) symmetry which holds asymptotically for vanishing cavity field intensity. It corresponds to the invariance with respect to redistributing the total intensity I={I}1+{I}2 between the two cavities. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry gives rise to a broken continuous translation-invariance for the atoms, creating a supersolid-like order in the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In particular, we show that atom-mediated scattering between the two cavities, which favors the state with equal light intensities {I}1={I}2 and reduces the symmetry to {{Z}}2\\otimes {{Z}}2, gives rise to a finite value ˜ \\sqrt{I} of the effective Goldstone mass. For strong atom driving, this low energy mode is clearly separated from an effective Higgs excitation associated with changes of the total intensity I. In addition, we compute the spectral distribution of the cavity light field and show that both the Higgs and Goldstone mode acquire a finite lifetime due to Landau damping at non-zero temperature.

  8. Collective behavior of minus-ended motors in mitotic microtubule asters gliding toward DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athale, Chaitanya A; Dinarina, Ana; Nedelec, Francois; Karsenti, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) nucleated by centrosomes form star-shaped structures referred to as asters. Aster motility and dynamics is vital for genome stability, cell division, polarization and differentiation. Asters move either toward the cell center or away from it. Here, we focus on the centering mechanism in a membrane independent system of Xenopus cytoplasmic egg extracts. Using live microscopy and single particle tracking, we find that asters move toward chromatinized DNA structures. The velocity and directionality profiles suggest a random-walk with drift directed toward DNA. We have developed a theoretical model that can explain this movement as a result of a gradient of MT length dynamics and MT gliding on immobilized dynein motors. In simulations, the antagonistic action of the motor species on the radial array of MTs leads to a tug-of-war purely due to geometric considerations and aster motility resembles a directed random-walk. Additionally, our model predicts that aster velocities do not change greatly with varying initial distance from DNA. The movement of asymmetric asters becomes increasingly super-diffusive with increasing motor density, but for symmetric asters it becomes less super-diffusive. The transition of symmetric asters from superdiffusive to diffusive mobility is the result of number fluctuations in bound motors in the tug-of-war. Overall, our model is in good agreement with experimental data in Xenopus cytoplasmic extracts and predicts novel features of the collective effects of motor-MT interactions. (paper)

  9. Development of a System to Collect Social Network Data from College Students for Future Studies in Health Behavior and Academic Performance /

    OpenAIRE

    Lah, Mike Myoungwhan

    2013-01-01

    Researchers study social networks to understand how individuals with similar behavior form clusters, and what causes them to do so. Universities are interested in learning more about influential factors of student behavior, including the impact that their social networks have on these behaviors. We have done foundational work to collect a dataset about UCSD student social network data gathered from Facebook and academic data from the UCSD Registrar. Once complete, the social network portion o...

  10. Dirac Cones, Topological Edge States, and Nontrivial Flat Bands in Two-Dimensional Semiconductors with a Honeycomb Nanogeometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kalesaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study theoretically two-dimensional single-crystalline sheets of semiconductors that form a honeycomb lattice with a period below 10 nm. These systems could combine the usual semiconductor properties with Dirac bands. Using atomistic tight-binding calculations, we show that both the atomic lattice and the overall geometry influence the band structure, revealing materials with unusual electronic properties. In rocksalt Pb chalcogenides, the expected Dirac-type features are clouded by a complex band structure. However, in the case of zinc-blende Cd-chalcogenide semiconductors, the honeycomb nanogeometry leads to rich band structures, including, in the conduction band, Dirac cones at two distinct energies and nontrivial flat bands and, in the valence band, topological edge states. These edge states are present in several electronic gaps opened in the valence band by the spin-orbit coupling and the quantum confinement in the honeycomb geometry. The lowest Dirac conduction band has S-orbital character and is equivalent to the π-π^{⋆} band of graphene but with renormalized couplings. The conduction bands higher in energy have no counterpart in graphene; they combine a Dirac cone and flat bands because of their P-orbital character. We show that the width of the Dirac bands varies between tens and hundreds of meV. These systems emerge as remarkable platforms for studying complex electronic phases starting from conventional semiconductors. Recent advancements in colloidal chemistry indicate that these materials can be synthesized from semiconductor nanocrystals.

  11. [Behavioral response of Anopheles albimanus to volatile compounds collected inside houses from the south of Chiapas, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Delgado, Silvany Mayoly; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Américo David; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Escobar-Pérez, Luis Alonso; Aburto-Juárez, Ma de Lourdes; Torres-Estrada, José Luis

    2008-01-01

    To determine effects of volatile compounds in homes on the behavioral response of Anopheles albimanus. The study was conducted in January 2006, in the village of Nueva Independencia village, Suchiate, Chiapas. Volatile compounds were collected inside homes and the extracts were tested on unfed females in a Y-olfactometer. Extracts were analyzed in a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system (GC-MS). Twenty eight extracts were obtained, twelve presented attraction and two repellency responses. GC-MS analyses of the extracts indicated variation in the volatile compound present in the extracts, but could not associated specific compounds with any particular effect. Within homes, volatiles presented attraction and repellency responses to An. albimanus. A definate pattern concerning the presence of a characteristic chemical compound and the observed response was not found.

  12. When do business units benefit more from collective citizenship behavior of management teams? An upper echelons perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu; Gong, Yaping; Liu, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Drawing upon the notion of managerial discretion from upper echelons theory, we theorize which external contingencies moderate the relationship between collective organizational citizenship behavior (COCB) and unit performance. Focusing on business unit (BU) management teams, we hypothesize that COCB of BU management teams enhances BU performance and that this impact depends on environmental uncertainty and BU management-team decision latitude, 2 determinants of managerial discretion. In particular, the positive effect of COCB is stronger when environmental uncertainty or the BU management-team decision latitude is greater. Time-lagged data from 109 BUs of a telecommunications company support the hypotheses. Additional exploratory analysis shows that the positive moderating effect of environmental uncertainty is further amplified at higher levels of BU management-team decision latitude. Overall, this study extends the internally focused view in the micro OCB literature by introducing external contingencies for the COCB-unit-performance relationship. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Chaotic behavior, collective modes, and self-trapping in the dynamics of three coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzosi, Roberto; Penna, Vittorio

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the three coupled bosonic wells (trimer) containing N bosons is investigated within a standard (mean-field) semiclassical picture based on the coherent-state method. Various periodic solutions (configured as π-like, dimerlike, and vortex states) representing collective modes are obtained analytically when the fixed points of trimer dynamics are identified on the N=const submanifold in the phase space. Hyperbolic, maximum and minimum points are recognized in the fixed-point set by studying the Hessian signature of the trimer Hamiltonian. The system dynamics in the neighborhood of periodic orbits (associated with fixed points) is studied via numeric integration of trimer motion equations, thus revealing a diffused chaotic behavior (not excluding the presence of regular orbits), macroscopic effects of population inversion, and self-trapping. In particular, the behavior of orbits with initial conditions close to the dimerlike periodic orbits shows how the self-trapping effect of dimerlike integrable subregimes is destroyed by the presence of chaos

  14. Collective-Intelligence Recommender Systems: Advancing Computer Tailoring for Health Behavior Change Into the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivam, Rajani Shankar; Cutrona, Sarah L; Kinney, Rebecca L; Marlin, Benjamin M; Mazor, Kathleen M; Lemon, Stephenie C; Houston, Thomas K

    2016-03-07

    What is the next frontier for computer-tailored health communication (CTHC) research? In current CTHC systems, study designers who have expertise in behavioral theory and mapping theory into CTHC systems select the variables and develop the rules that specify how the content should be tailored, based on their knowledge of the targeted population, the literature, and health behavior theories. In collective-intelligence recommender systems (hereafter recommender systems) used by Web 2.0 companies (eg, Netflix and Amazon), machine learning algorithms combine user profiles and continuous feedback ratings of content (from themselves and other users) to empirically tailor content. Augmenting current theory-based CTHC with empirical recommender systems could be evaluated as the next frontier for CTHC. The objective of our study was to uncover barriers and challenges to using recommender systems in health promotion. We conducted a focused literature review, interviewed subject experts (n=8), and synthesized the results. We describe (1) limitations of current CTHC systems, (2) advantages of incorporating recommender systems to move CTHC forward, and (3) challenges to incorporating recommender systems into CTHC. Based on the evidence presented, we propose a future research agenda for CTHC systems. We promote discussion of ways to move CTHC into the 21st century by incorporation of recommender systems.

  15. Collective effect of personal behavior induced preventive measures and differential rate of transmission on spread of epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Vikram; Zhao, Yi

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the effect of personal behavior induced preventive measures is studied on the spread of epidemics over scale free networks that are characterized by the differential rate of disease transmission. The role of personal behavior induced preventive measures is parameterized in terms of variable λ, which modulates the number of concurrent contacts a node makes with the fraction of its neighboring nodes. The dynamics of the disease is described by a non-linear Susceptible Infected Susceptible model based upon the discrete time Markov Chain method. The network mean field approach is generalized to account for the effect of non-linear coupling between the aforementioned factors on the collective dynamics of nodes. The upper bound estimates of the disease outbreak threshold obtained from the mean field theory are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding non-linear stochastic model. From the results of parametric study, it is shown that the epidemic size has inverse dependence on the preventive measures (λ). It has also been shown that the increase in the average degree of the nodes lowers the time of spread and enhances the size of epidemics.

  16. An Empirical Analysis on Individuals’ DepositWithdrawal Behaviors Using Data Collected through a Web-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko TAKEMURA

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between individual depositor behaviors, as to whether they will withdraw all of their deposits, and factors behind them such as the degree of trust in information sources, frequency of communication, individuals' transaction with banks, and individuals’ attributes. By doing so, we suggest possible countermeasures whereby depositors will not excessively withdraw their deposits after receiving uncertain information on the financial environment. In this paper, we analyze the relationships by using data collected through a Web-based survey. The results were as follows: First, individuals who trust in information sources such as weekly/monthly magazines, the Internet, and conversations with people at workplace would be more likely to withdraw their deposits. Second, increases in phone calls with friends and in communication frequency at neighborhood and workplaces also make depositors to withdraw funds. Third, their tendency to withdraw deposits is affected by the individuals’ attributes such as gender and education. As the recognition of the deposit insurance scheme among people seems to affect their behavior according to our analysis, we suggest that it is better that authorities advertise the function of deposit insurance schemes to prevent depositors from getting into a panic situation like bank run.

  17. A Review of Research on Direct-Care Staff Data Collection Regarding the Severity and Function of Challenging Behavior in Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Emily K.; Peck, Janelle A.; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    In working with individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs), it is direct care staff who are often required to collect data on individuals' behavior which is used as the basis for implementation of empirically based approaches for intervention and treatment. Due to limited resources, indirect and descriptive measures of…

  18. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  19. The Feasibility of Using Video Journaling to Collect Ecological Momentary Assessment Data: Application to Health Behavior Change Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Bridget F.; Bigham, Lauren E.; Bland, Helen W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) technique in a health behavior change intervention offered within university general health courses. A six-week health behavior change project was used with two groups: video journaling and traditional (pencil and paper) group. Research…

  20. Evaluation of tritium release behavior from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} during DT neutron irradiation by use of an improved tritium collection method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edao, Yuki, E-mail: edao.yuki@jaea.go.jp [Tritium Technology Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kawamura, Yoshinori [Blanket Technology Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Hoshino, Tsuyoshi [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [BA Project Coordination Group, Department of Fusion Power Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Behavior of tritium released from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} under neutron irradiation was measured. • Tritium collection method with hydrophobic catalyst was demonstrated successfully. • Temperature of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} was dominant to control the chemical form of tritium release. - Abstract: The accurate measurement of behavior of bred tritium released from a tritium breeder is indispensable to understand the behavior for a design of a tritium extraction system. The tritium collection method combined a CuO bed and water bubbles was not suitable to measure transient behavior of tritium released from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} during neutron irradiation because tritium released behavior was changed to be delayed due to adsorption of oxidized tritium on the CuO. Hence, the tritium collection method with hydrophobic catalyst instead of the CuO was demonstrated and succeeded the accurate release measurement of tritium from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}. With the method, we assessed the behavior of tritium release under the various conditions since tritium should be released from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} as the form of HT as much as possible from the view point of the fuel cycle. Our results indicated; promotion of isotopic exchange reaction on the surface of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} by addition of hydrogen in sweep gas is mandatory in order to release tritium smoothly from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} irradiated with neutrons; the favorable sweep gas to release as the form of HT was hydrogen added inert gas; and the temperature of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} was the dominant parameter to control the chemical form of tritium released from the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}.

  1. The role of attitudinal motivations and collective efficacy on Chinese consumers' intentions to engage in personal behaviors to mitigate climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao

    2018-01-01

    The Chinese government has recently pledged to reduce its CO 2 emissions by 2030. Industrial use of energy, however, is just one source of greenhouse gas emissions. Chinese consumers' more affluent lifestyles also lead to increased consumption of energy, which can result in greenhouse gas emissions. Based on a survey of 516 Chinese consumers, the present investigation examined whether their attitudinal motivations and collective efficacy are related to their intentions to engage in personal actions that may help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Results show that the utilitarian motivation related to the effectiveness of personal actions to alleviate climate change, motivation to express their moral values, self-esteem maintenance motivation, and collective efficacy predicted their attitudes toward these personal actions. Collective efficacy was in turn predicted by future orientation, norms, and the utilitarian motivation. Finally, attitudes and collective efficacy were two major considerations that predicted behavioral intentions. Implications for programs to promote low-carbon actions and lifestyles among Chinese consumers are discussed.

  2. Behavior and Particularities of Academic Production on “Management Accounting” Published in the Database ISI WEB of Science Core Collection Between 1985 and 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Henrique César Melo Ribeiro; Vanessa Carvalho Miranda Tavares

    2017-01-01

    The objective in this study was to analyze the behavior and the particularities of the academic production on the theme Management Accounting published in the ISI Web of Science Core Collection from 1985 to 2014. Methodologically, this research used the bibliometric and sociometric analysis techniques. The main results were: evolution of the theme as from 2007; Accounting, Organizations and Society and Management Accounting Research, which were the journals that most published on the subject ...

  3. Selection and estimation of the heritability of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pollen collection behavior in Apis mellifera colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basualdo, M; Rodríguez, E M; Bedascarrasbure, E; De Jong, D

    2007-06-20

    We selected honey bee colonies (Apis mellifera L.) with a high tendency to collect sunflower pollen and estimated the heritability of this trait. The percentage of sunflower pollen collected by 74 colonies was evaluated. Five colonies that collected the highest percentages of sunflower pollen were selected. Nineteen colonies headed by daughters of these selected queens were evaluated for this characteristic in comparison with 20 control (unselected) colonies. The variation for the proportion of sunflower pollen was greater among colonies of the control group than among these selected daughter colonies. The estimated heritability was 0.26 +/- 0.23, demonstrating that selection to increase sunflower pollen collection is feasible. Such selected colonies could be used to improve sunflower pollination in commercial fields.

  4. The new electromagnetic tetrads, infinite tetrad nesting and the non-trivial emergence of complex numbers in real theories of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garat, Alcides

    How complex numbers get into play in a non-trivial way in real theories of gravitation is relevant since in a unified structure they should be able to relate in a natural way with quantum theories. For a long time this issue has been lingering on both relativistic formulations and quantum theories. We will analyze this fundamental subject under the light of new group isomorphism theorems linking local internal groups of transformations and local groups of spacetime transformations. The bridge between these two kinds of transformations is represented by new tetrads introduced previously. It is precisely through these local tetrad structures that we will provide a non-trivial answer to this old issue. These new tetrads have two fundamental building components, the skeletons and the gauge vectors. It is these constructive elements that provide the mathematical support that allows to prove group isomorphism theorems. In addition to this, we will prove a unique new property, the infinite tetrad nesting, alternating the nesting with non-Abelian tetrads in the construction of the tetrad gauge vectors. As an application we will demonstrate an alternative proof of a new group isomorphism theorem.

  5. Modeling individual and collective opinion in online social networks: drivers of choice behavior and effects of marketing interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, S.E.; Langley, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate factors influencing choice behavior in online social networks. We use twitter data from a Dutch television talent show. In study one, we implement a nested conditional logit model with latent classes. We find heterogeneous effects. For two latent classes, cognitive factors most

  6. 75 FR 8367 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; REDS-II-Does Pre-Donation Behavioral Deferral Increase the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... per Response: 0.33 (including administration of the informed consent form and questionnaire completion... complete an audio computer assisted self interview (ACASI) questionnaire that measures two content areas (1... appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of...

  7. Human Y Chromosome Haplogroup N: A Non-trivial Time-Resolved Phylogeography that Cuts across Language Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilumäe, Anne-Mai; Reidla, Maere; Chukhryaeva, Marina; Järve, Mari; Post, Helen; Karmin, Monika; Saag, Lauri; Agdzhoyan, Anastasiya; Kushniarevich, Alena; Litvinov, Sergey; Ekomasova, Natalya; Tambets, Kristiina; Metspalu, Ene; Khusainova, Rita; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Osipova, Ludmila P; Fedorova, Sardana; Utevska, Olga; Koshel, Sergey; Balanovska, Elena; Behar, Doron M; Balanovsky, Oleg; Kivisild, Toomas; Underhill, Peter A; Villems, Richard; Rootsi, Siiri

    2016-07-07

    The paternal haplogroup (hg) N is distributed from southeast Asia to eastern Europe. The demographic processes that have shaped the vast extent of this major Y chromosome lineage across numerous linguistically and autosomally divergent populations have previously been unresolved. On the basis of 94 high-coverage re-sequenced Y chromosomes, we establish and date a detailed hg N phylogeny. We evaluate geographic structure by using 16 distinguishing binary markers in 1,631 hg N Y chromosomes from a collection of 6,521 samples from 56 populations. The more southerly distributed sub-clade N4 emerged before N2a1 and N3, found mostly in the north, but the latter two display more elaborate branching patterns, indicative of regional contrasts in recent expansions. In particular, a number of prominent and well-defined clades with common N3a3'6 ancestry occur in regionally dissimilar northern Eurasian populations, indicating almost simultaneous regional diversification and expansion within the last 5,000 years. This patrilineal genetic affinity is decoupled from the associated higher degree of language diversity. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fabrication and in situ compression testing of Mg micropillars with a nontrivial cross section: Influence of micropillar geometry on mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bočan, Jiří [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 1999/2, CZ-12821 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Tsurekawa, Sadahiro [Division of Materials Science, Faculty of Advanced Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Jäger, Aleš, E-mail: aljag@seznam.cz [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 1999/2, CZ-12821 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-27

    Micropillars with a nontrivial cross-sectional shape but constant cross-sectional area were fabricated from a pure magnesium single crystal with (0001) orientation by a focused gallium ion beam using a modified annular milling method. The basic mechanical properties (compressive modulus, strength at different plastic strain levels and hardening exponent) of those structures were determined under compression by means of in situ nanoindentation in scanning electron microscope and correlated by the micropillar cross-sectional circumference. It was observed that the modulus and strength increased with increasing circumference. The values of the modulus for the complex cross sectional shapes are on average higher by 5%, and the yield strength, ranging between 274 MPa and 342 MPa, is on average higher by 20% relative to micropillars with a simple circular or polygonal cross section. Surprisingly, the hardening exponent remains nearly constant regardless of the micropillar cross section.

  9. Leaching Behavior of Selected Trace and Toxic Metals in Coal Fly Ash Samples Collected from Two Thermal Power Plants, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, P; Sahu, S K; Kothai, P; Pandit, G G

    2016-09-01

    Studies on leaching behavior of metals associated with coal fly ash (FA) are of great concern because of possible contamination of the aquatic environment. In the present study, leaching behavior of metals (As, Se, Cr, Pb, V, Zn, etc.) in two different FA samples (FA1 and FA2) was investigated at various pH (2-12), temperatures of leachate solution and using TCLP. At pH 2, the highest leaching was observed for Fe (21.6 and 32.8 µg/g), whereas at pH 12, Arsenic was found to have the highest leaching (1.5 and 2.4 µg/g) in FA1 and FA2. Leachate solution temperature showed a positive effect on the metal's leachability. In TCLP, most of the metal's leachability was observed to be higher than that of batch leaching tests. The present study suggests that, leaching of As and Se from FA samples can moderately affect ground/surface water quality at the study locations.

  10. The collective benefits of feeling good and letting go: positive emotion and (dis)inhibition interact to predict cooperative behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, David G; Kraft-Todd, Gordon; Gruber, June

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation is central to human existence, forming the bedrock of everyday social relationships and larger societal structures. Thus, understanding the psychological underpinnings of cooperation is of both scientific and practical importance. Recent work using a dual-process framework suggests that intuitive processing can promote cooperation while deliberative processing can undermine it. Here we add to this line of research by more specifically identifying deliberative and intuitive processes that affect cooperation. To do so, we applied automated text analysis using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) software to investigate the association between behavior in one-shot anonymous economic cooperation games and the presence inhibition (a deliberative process) and positive emotion (an intuitive process) in free-response narratives written after (Study 1, N = 4,218) or during (Study 2, N = 236) the decision-making process. Consistent with previous results, across both studies inhibition predicted reduced cooperation while positive emotion predicted increased cooperation (even when controlling for negative emotion). Importantly, there was a significant interaction between positive emotion and inhibition, such that the most cooperative individuals had high positive emotion and low inhibition. This suggests that inhibition (i.e., reflective or deliberative processing) may undermine cooperative behavior by suppressing the prosocial effects of positive emotion.

  11. The collective benefits of feeling good and letting go: positive emotion and (disinhibition interact to predict cooperative behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Rand

    Full Text Available Cooperation is central to human existence, forming the bedrock of everyday social relationships and larger societal structures. Thus, understanding the psychological underpinnings of cooperation is of both scientific and practical importance. Recent work using a dual-process framework suggests that intuitive processing can promote cooperation while deliberative processing can undermine it. Here we add to this line of research by more specifically identifying deliberative and intuitive processes that affect cooperation. To do so, we applied automated text analysis using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC software to investigate the association between behavior in one-shot anonymous economic cooperation games and the presence inhibition (a deliberative process and positive emotion (an intuitive process in free-response narratives written after (Study 1, N = 4,218 or during (Study 2, N = 236 the decision-making process. Consistent with previous results, across both studies inhibition predicted reduced cooperation while positive emotion predicted increased cooperation (even when controlling for negative emotion. Importantly, there was a significant interaction between positive emotion and inhibition, such that the most cooperative individuals had high positive emotion and low inhibition. This suggests that inhibition (i.e., reflective or deliberative processing may undermine cooperative behavior by suppressing the prosocial effects of positive emotion.

  12. Collection Directions: The Evolution of Library Collections and Collecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Lorcan; Malpas, Constance; Lavoie, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This article takes a broad view of the evolution of collecting behaviors in a network environment and suggests some future directions based on various simple models. The authors look at the changing dynamics of print collections, at the greater engagement with research and learning behaviors, and at trends in scholarly communication. The goal is…

  13. Influence of vertex weight on cooperative behavior in a spatial snowdrift game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, C Y; Zhao, J; Zhang, H; Wang, J; Wang, Y L

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the vertex weight is introduced into a snowdrift game to study the evolution of cooperative behavior. Compared with the snowdrift game in a traditional square lattice without any weight, cooperation can be promoted under three types of weight distribution: uniform, exponential and power-law distribution. For an intermediate cost-to-benefit ratio (r), in particular, the facilitation effect of cooperation is obvious. Moreover, the influence of undulation amplitude of weight distribution and the noise strength of strategy selection on cooperative behavior are also investigated. They exhibit a nontrivial phenomenon as a function of r. The results are helpful in analyzing and understanding the emergence of collective cooperation that is found widely in many natural and social systems.

  14. Influence of vertex weight on cooperative behavior in a spatial snowdrift game

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, C Y; Zhao, J; Zhang, H [Laboratory of Computer Vision and Systems, Tianjin University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300191 (China); Wang, J [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Control Theory and Applications in Complicated Industry Systems, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300191 (China); Wang, Y L, E-mail: xialooking@163.com, E-mail: juanwang75@163.com, E-mail: hzhang@tjut.edu.cn [School of Life Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen, Shanxi 041000 (China)

    2011-08-01

    In this paper the vertex weight is introduced into a snowdrift game to study the evolution of cooperative behavior. Compared with the snowdrift game in a traditional square lattice without any weight, cooperation can be promoted under three types of weight distribution: uniform, exponential and power-law distribution. For an intermediate cost-to-benefit ratio (r), in particular, the facilitation effect of cooperation is obvious. Moreover, the influence of undulation amplitude of weight distribution and the noise strength of strategy selection on cooperative behavior are also investigated. They exhibit a nontrivial phenomenon as a function of r. The results are helpful in analyzing and understanding the emergence of collective cooperation that is found widely in many natural and social systems.

  15. Who takes precautionary action in the face of the new H1N1 influenza? Prediction of who collects a free hand sanitizer using a health behavior model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabea Reuter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to fight the spread of the novel H1N1 influenza, health authorities worldwide called for a change in hygiene behavior. Within a longitudinal study, we examined who collected a free bottle of hand sanitizer towards the end of the first swine flu pandemic wave in December 2009. METHODS: 629 participants took part in a longitudinal study assessing perceived likelihood and severity of an H1N1 infection, and H1N1 influenza related negative affect (i.e., feelings of threat, concern, and worry at T1 (October 2009, week 43-44 and T2 (December 2009, week 51-52. Importantly, all participants received a voucher for a bottle of hand sanitizer at T2 which could be redeemed in a university office newly established for this occasion at T3 (ranging between 1-4 days after T2. RESULTS: Both a sequential longitudinal model (M2 as well as a change score model (M3 showed that greater perceived likelihood and severity at T1 (M2 or changes in perceived likelihood and severity between T1 and T2 (M3 did not directly drive protective behavior (T3, but showed a significant indirect impact on behavior through H1N1 influenza related negative affect. Specifically, increases in perceived likelihood (β = .12, severity (β = .24 and their interaction (β = .13 were associated with a more pronounced change in negative affect (M3. The more threatened, concerned and worried people felt (T2, the more likely they were to redeem the voucher at T3 (OR = 1.20. CONCLUSIONS: Affective components need to be considered in health behavior models. Perceived likelihood and severity of an influenza infection represent necessary but not sufficient self-referential knowledge for paving the way for preventive behaviors.

  16. Who takes precautionary action in the face of the new H1N1 influenza? Prediction of who collects a free hand sanitizer using a health behavior model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Tabea; Renner, Britta

    2011-01-01

    In order to fight the spread of the novel H1N1 influenza, health authorities worldwide called for a change in hygiene behavior. Within a longitudinal study, we examined who collected a free bottle of hand sanitizer towards the end of the first swine flu pandemic wave in December 2009. 629 participants took part in a longitudinal study assessing perceived likelihood and severity of an H1N1 infection, and H1N1 influenza related negative affect (i.e., feelings of threat, concern, and worry) at T1 (October 2009, week 43-44) and T2 (December 2009, week 51-52). Importantly, all participants received a voucher for a bottle of hand sanitizer at T2 which could be redeemed in a university office newly established for this occasion at T3 (ranging between 1-4 days after T2). Both a sequential longitudinal model (M2) as well as a change score model (M3) showed that greater perceived likelihood and severity at T1 (M2) or changes in perceived likelihood and severity between T1 and T2 (M3) did not directly drive protective behavior (T3), but showed a significant indirect impact on behavior through H1N1 influenza related negative affect. Specifically, increases in perceived likelihood (β = .12), severity (β = .24) and their interaction (β = .13) were associated with a more pronounced change in negative affect (M3). The more threatened, concerned and worried people felt (T2), the more likely they were to redeem the voucher at T3 (OR = 1.20). Affective components need to be considered in health behavior models. Perceived likelihood and severity of an influenza infection represent necessary but not sufficient self-referential knowledge for paving the way for preventive behaviors.

  17. Behavior and Particularities of Academic Production on “Management Accounting” Published in the Database ISI WEB of Science Core Collection Between 1985 and 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique César Melo Ribeiro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective in this study was to analyze the behavior and the particularities of the academic production on the theme Management Accounting published in the ISI Web of Science Core Collection from 1985 to 2014. Methodologically, this research used the bibliometric and sociometric analysis techniques. The main results were: evolution of the theme as from 2007; Accounting, Organizations and Society and Management Accounting Research, which were the journals that most published on the subject “Management Accounting”; Lukka, K. was the most prolific author; the University of Turku was the institution that stood out; and the United States of America was emphasized in the production on that theme. In relation to the co-authorship networks, their low degree density was observed, leading to a high degree centrality and betweenness. And the themes that were highlighted in this study were: education; accounting teaching and research; Cost management; Management control; strategic management; and management accounting system. It is concluded in a macro way that this study evidenced inherent and contemporary information on the subject “Management Accounting”, focusing on its nuances in the behavior and particularities of its academic production, published in ISI Web of Science Core Collection from 1985 till 2014.

  18. A Web-Based Data Collection Platform for Multisite Randomized Behavioral Intervention Trials: Development, Key Software Features, and Results of a User Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Riddhi A; Mugavero, Michael J; Amico, Rivet K; Keruly, Jeanne; Quinlivan, Evelyn Byrd; Crane, Heidi M; Guzman, Alfredo; Zinski, Anne; Montue, Solange; Roytburd, Katya; Church, Anna; Willig, James H

    2017-06-16

    Meticulous tracking of study data must begin early in the study recruitment phase and must account for regulatory compliance, minimize missing data, and provide high information integrity and/or reduction of errors. In behavioral intervention trials, participants typically complete several study procedures at different time points. Among HIV-infected patients, behavioral interventions can favorably affect health outcomes. In order to empower newly diagnosed HIV positive individuals to learn skills to enhance retention in HIV care, we developed the behavioral health intervention Integrating ENGagement and Adherence Goals upon Entry (iENGAGE) funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), where we deployed an in-clinic behavioral health intervention in 4 urban HIV outpatient clinics in the United States. To scale our intervention strategy homogenously across sites, we developed software that would function as a behavioral sciences research platform. This manuscript aimed to: (1) describe the design and implementation of a Web-based software application to facilitate deployment of a multisite behavioral science intervention; and (2) report on results of a survey to capture end-user perspectives of the impact of this platform on the conduct of a behavioral intervention trial. In order to support the implementation of the NIAID-funded trial iENGAGE, we developed software to deploy a 4-site behavioral intervention for new clinic patients with HIV/AIDS. We integrated the study coordinator into the informatics team to participate in the software development process. Here, we report the key software features and the results of the 25-item survey to evaluate user perspectives on research and intervention activities specific to the iENGAGE trial (N=13). The key features addressed are study enrollment, participant randomization, real-time data collection, facilitation of longitudinal workflow, reporting, and reusability. We found 100% user

  19. Study of the Behavior and Distribution of Mercury in Soil Samples Collected on the Banks of the Valdeazogues River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lominchar, M. A.; Sierra, M. J.; Rodiriguez, J.; Millam, R.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine the behavior of mercury in the soil of the Valdeazogues river (Almaden, Ciudad Real, Spain) by using a six-step sequential extraction procedure (CIEMAT) and checking the relationship between the percentage of organic matter in soil and the percentage of mercury associated with the exchangeable and oxidizable fractions. The results show that total mercury concentrations in soil range from 116.7 ±24.3 to 245.5 ±59.6 mg kg - 1 of Hg even to concentrations of 350.9 ±68.6 mg kg -1 . However, the available mercury concentration is a smaller percentage of 0.15% of total mercury measured in the samples. Also, the soluble mercury is less than 0,037 mg kg - 1, so that, the leaching process and transport of mercury to surface water and groundwater are very slow. With regard to the distribution of mercury between the different fractions of soil, the metal is associated with more resistant soil fractions, these are: crystalline Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, organic matter absorbed and the fi nal residue. (Author9) 50 refs.

  20. Nontrivial Pfaffian forms in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.; Paal, G.

    1989-01-01

    The compatibility of possible continuous cosmological particle production with thermodynamics was studied. It was found that with the usual K=2 Pfaffian (dQ=TdS) the compatibility held only in very special cases. K≥3 Pfaffians could easily be reconciled with continuous production. Since in this case the full thermodynamic state space was accessible by quasistatic adiabatic processes, such systems showed local rather than global irreversibility. This fact may prevent Heat Death even in indefinitely old model Universes. (author) 36 refs

  1. Collection and use of individual behavioral and consumption rate data to improve reconstruction of thyroid doses from nuclear weapons tests in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Schonfeld, Sara; Bouville, Andre; Land, Charles; Luckyanov, Nick; Simon, Steven L.; Schwerin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Historical behavioral and consumption rate data were collected from residents of Kazakhstan exposed to nuclear weapons testing fallout using a focus group data collection strategy. These data will enable improved thyroid dose estimation in a radiation epidemiological study being carried out the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The study on the relationship of radiation exposure from weapons testing fallout and thyroid disease in a cohort of 2,994 subjects is now in a stage of improving earlier dose estimates based on individual information collected from a basic questionnaire administered to the study population in 1998. The study subjects of both Kazakh and Russian origin were exposed during childhood to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons tests conducted at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site between 1949 and 1962. Due to the long time since exposure, a well developed strategy is necessary to encourage accurate memory recall. Limitations of the data collected in 1998 suggested the need to obtain reliable information that is tailored specific to the requirements of the dose reconstruction algorithm and to the evaluation of individual dose uncertainties. Focus group data collection in Kazakhstan in 2007 involved four 8-person focus groups (three of women and one of men) in each of four exposed settlements where thyroid disease screening was conducted in 1998. Age-specific data on relevant childhood behaviour, including time spent indoors and consumption of milk and other dairy products from cows, goats, horses, and sheep, were collected from women's groups. Men's focus groups were interviewed about construction materials of houses and schools as well as animal grazing patterns and supplemental feed to animals. Information obtained from the focus groups are being used to derive the settlement-, ethnicity-, age-, and gender-specific (where appropriate) probability density distributions on individual consumption rates of milk and dairy products

  2. Assessing the impact of safety monitoring on the efficacy analysis in large Phase III group sequential trials with non-trivial safety event rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yanqiu; Palesch, Yuko Y; DeSantis, Stacia M; Zhao, Wenle

    2016-01-01

    In Phase III clinical trials for life-threatening conditions, some serious but expected adverse events, such as early deaths or congestive heart failure, are often treated as the secondary or co-primary endpoint, and are closely monitored by the Data and Safety Monitoring Committee (DSMC). A naïve group sequential design (GSD) for such a study is to specify univariate statistical boundaries for the efficacy and safety endpoints separately, and then implement the two boundaries during the study, even though the two endpoints are typically correlated. One problem with this naïve design, which has been noted in the statistical literature, is the potential loss of power. In this article, we develop an analytical tool to evaluate this negative impact for trials with non-trivial safety event rates, particularly when the safety monitoring is informal. Using a bivariate binary power function for the GSD with a random-effect component to account for subjective decision-making in safety monitoring, we demonstrate how, under common conditions, the power loss in the naïve design can be substantial. This tool may be helpful to entities such as the DSMCs when they wish to deviate from the prespecified stopping boundaries based on safety measures.

  3. Observational learning and workplace safety: the effects of viewing the collective behavior of multiple social models on the use of personal protective equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ryan; Grosshuesch, Ariel; Schmidt, Sara; Gray, Mary; Wipfli, Bradley

    2009-10-01

    The current project evaluated the effects of the collective behavior of multiple social models on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Prior to completing a simulated baggage-screening task, participants (N=64) watched a scripted training video that included three confederate trainees. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four manipulations, where different proportions of confederates were shown putting on over-ear sound mufflers before starting the task (0, 1, 2, or 3). White noise played at 70 decibels in the test room, and PPE use was observed unobtrusively through a lab window at five time intervals. The mean intervals of PPE use generally increased as the number of positive social models increased (0=0.63, 1=0.50, 2=1.25, 3=3.06), and differences between groups were significant [chi(2) (3, N=64)=14.92, preinforcement for compliance.

  4. Behavior and movement of adult summer steelhead following collection and release, lower Cowlitz River, Washington, 2012--2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Tobias J.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Gleizes, Chris; Dammers, Wolf; Gibson, Scott; Murphy, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    radio-tags from recycled steelhead were detected near popular fishing areas, and 2 percent of the radio-tagged steelhead were never detected during the study period. We suspect that a large proportion of these fish may have been harvested and not reported, or died.Detection patterns of radio-tagged steelhead showed that most fish (82 percent) moved upstream from the release site and were detected at the Trout Hatchery and the Barrier Dam sites. The median time from release to detection at these sites was 3.7 d and many of these fish made multiple trips between the two sites. Nearly one-third (29 percent) of the recycled steelhead that were detected at the Trout Hatchery and the Barrier Dam made at least two trips between the sites and some fish made as many as six trips. Radio-tagged fish that remained in the lower Cowlitz River during the spawning period (December 2012–January 2013) were observed in the river reach between the mouth of Ostrander Creek (river mile 10) and the Trout Hatchery (river mile 44).During this study, we collected data on opercle punch regrowth rates to understand the temporal effectiveness of this marking technique. We took opercle measurements for a total of 190 fish during the study. Fresh opercle punches were measured for 63 fish at the time of marking, and the remaining 127 fish were measured when fish returned to the hatchery. We determined that opercle punches remained open for about 30 d. The holes appeared to regrow slowly in the first 20 d after marking, but regrowth accelerated during the 20–30 d post-marking period. After 30 d, all opercle punches that we observed had completely closed due to tissue regrowth.Our study showed that a large proportion (68 percent) of the recycled steelhead were removed from the lower Cowlitz River. These fish primarily entered the hatchery or were caught by anglers within 14 d of release, which suggests that they present minimal risk to wild fish in the system. However, the remaining fish (32 percent

  5. Variation in Sexual Identification Among Behaviorally Bisexual Women in the Midwestern United States: Challenging the Established Methods for Collecting Data on Sexual Identity and Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Aleta; Schick, Vanessa R; Dodge, Brian; van Der Pol, Barbara; Herbenick, Debby; Sanders, Stephanie A; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2017-07-01

    Collecting information on sexual identity is critical to ensuring the visibility of minority populations who face stigmatization and discrimination related to sexual identities. However, it is challenging to capture the nuances of sexual identity with traditional survey research methods. Using a mixed-methods approach, we gathered data on the sexual identities of 80 behaviorally bisexual women in the Midwestern United States through an online survey. When provided different types of measures (e.g., open ended and fixed response) and different contexts in which to identify (e.g., private and public), participants varied in how they reported their sexual identities. Qualitative analysis of participant narratives around identity change finds partitioning and ranking of attraction is a key component in understanding behaviorally bisexual women's identities. We further identify a division regarding the desired outcomes of identity development processes. Given the multiple ways in which participants identified depending upon the type of measure and the context specified, and the variation in identification over time, results support reconsidering the capability of typical measures and methods used in survey research to capture sexual identity information. Additionally, findings highlight the utility of including multiple, context-specific measures of sexual identities in future research.

  6. A multilevel study on the relationships between work characteristics, self-efficacy, collective efficacy, and organizational citizenship behavior: the case of Taiwanese police duty-executing organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Hsi Vivian; Kao, Rui-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Public security, traffic management, and service for the people are the 3 major functions of policing in Taiwan. This definition encompasses not only the traditional job characteristics, but also the level of contextual characteristics and social characteristics because of police work's characteristics and its frequent interaction with the public. Thus, the present study conducted a multilevel model analysis by taking self-efficacy and collective efficacy as the mediating variables. The purpose was to investigate the influences of motivational work characteristics (knowledge-oriented) and social work characteristics (socially and contextually oriented) of work-design model on the police officers' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), by using first-line police officers in Taiwan as the research objects. The study showed not only that knowledge characteristics will influence the self-efficacy of a police officer and that self-efficacy can in turn influence individual police officers' OCB, but also the contextual effect of social characteristics, contextual characteristics, and collective efficacy on self-efficacy and individuals' OCB. Additionally, there was a crosslevel moderating effect from contextual characteristics on the relationship between knowledge characteristics and self-efficacy and the relationship between self-efficacy and the individuals' OCB. The authors conclude the article with research implications.

  7. Defective quorum sensing of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells: evidence of collective behavior of leukemic populations as semi-autonomous aberrant ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sapan J; Dao, Su; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a generic term used to describe cell-cell communication and collective decision making by bacterial and social insects to regulate the expression of specific genes in controlling cell density and other properties of the populations in response to nutrient supply or changes in the environment. QS mechanisms also have a role in higher organisms in maintaining homeostasis, regulation of the immune system and collective behavior of cancer cell populations. In the present study, we used a p190BCR-ABL driven pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL3) cell line derived from the pleural fluid of a terminally ill patient with ALL to test the QS hypothesis in leukemia. ALL3 cells don’t grow at low density (LD) in liquid media but grow progressively faster at increasingly high cell densities (HD) in contrast to other established leukemic cell lines that grow well at very low starting cell densities. The ALL3 cells at LD are poised to grow but shortly die without additional stimulation. Supernates of ALL3 cells (HDSN) and some other primary cells grown at HD stimulate the growth of the LD ALL3 cells without which they won’t survive. To get further insight into the activation processes we performed microarray analysis of the LD ALL3 cells after stimulation with ALL3 HDSN at days 1, 3, and 6. This screen identified several candidate genes, and we linked them to signaling networks and their functions. We observed that genes involved in lipid, cholesterol, fatty acid metabolism, and B cell activation are most up- or down-regulated upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells using HDSN. We also discuss other pathways that are differentially expressed upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells. Our findings suggest that the Ph+ ALL population achieves dominance by functioning as a collective aberrant ecosystem subject to defective quorum-sensing regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27429840

  8. Multi-scale analysis of collective behavior in 2D self-propelled particle models of swarms: An Advection-Diffusion with Memory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghib, Michael; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Ioannis

    2010-05-01

    Self-propelled particle models (SPP's) are a class of agent-based simulations that have been successfully used to explore questions related to various flavors of collective motion, including flocking, swarming, and milling. These models typically consist of particle configurations, where each particle moves with constant speed, but changes its orientation in response to local averages of the positions and orientations of its neighbors found within some interaction region. These local averages are based on `social interactions', which include avoidance of collisions, attraction, and polarization, that are designed to generate configurations that move as a single object. Errors made by the individuals in the estimates of the state of the local configuration are modeled as a random rotation of the updated orientation resulting from the social rules. More recently, SPP's have been introduced in the context of collective decision-making, where the main innovation consists of dividing the population into naïve and `informed' individuals. Whereas naïve individuals follow the classical collective motion rules, members of the informed sub-population update their orientations according to a weighted average of the social rules and a fixed `preferred' direction, shared by all the informed individuals. Collective decision-making is then understood in terms of the ability of the informed sub-population to steer the whole group along the preferred direction. Summary statistics of collective decision-making are defined in terms of the stochastic properties of the random walk followed by the centroid of the configuration as the particles move about, in particular the scaling behavior of the mean squared displacement (msd). For the region of parameters where the group remains coherent , we note that there are two characteristic time scales, first there is an anomalous transient shared by both purely naïve and informed configurations, i.e. the scaling exponent lies between 1 and

  9. Computational Paradigm to Elucidate the Effects of Arts-Based Approaches and Interventions: Individual and Collective Emerging Behaviors in Artwork Construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billie Sandak

    Full Text Available Art therapy, as well as other arts-based therapies and interventions, is used to reduce pain, stress, depression, breathlessness and other symptoms in a wide variety of serious and chronic diseases, such as cancer, Alzheimer and schizophrenia. Arts-based approaches are also known to contribute to one's well-being and quality of life. However, much research is required, since the mechanisms by which these non-pharmacological treatments exert their therapeutic and psychosocial effects are not adequately understood. A typical clinical setting utilizing the arts consists of the creation work itself, such as the artwork, as well as the therapist and the patient, all of which constitute a rich and dynamic environment of occurrences. The underlying complex, simultaneous and interwoven processes of this setting are often considered intractable to human observers, and as a consequence are usually interpreted subjectively and described verbally, which affect their subsequent analyses and understanding. We introduce a computational research method for elucidating and analyzing emergent expressive and social behaviors, aiming to understand how arts-based approaches operate. Our methodology, which centers on the visual language of Statecharts and tools for its execution, enables rigorous qualitative and quantitative tracking, analysis and documentation of the underlying creation and interaction processes. Also, it enables one to carry out exploratory, hypotheses-generating and knowledge discovery investigations, which are empirical-based. Furthermore, we illustrate our method's use in a proof-of-principle study, applying it to a real-world artwork investigation with human participants. We explore individual and collective emergent behaviors impacted by diverse drawing tasks, yielding significant gender and age hypotheses, which may account for variation factors in response to art use. We also discuss how to gear our research method to systematic and

  10. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Grenada: A cross-sectional approach used to measure response variation regarding sexual behavior and health depending on the method of data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Muhammad Reza; Husain, Faisal; Armstrong, Elan G; Ferguson, James A

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between high-risk sexual behavior in relation to HIV transmission and prevalence among different groups of people in Grenada. In addition, this study intends to increase the involvement and improved services by Grenadian chapter of the Caribbean HIV/AIDS Partnership (GrenCHAP).A cross-sectional study was conducted over a 2-month period in Grenada, West Indies, to measure the responsive nature of different populations to an inquiry about HIV and sexual behavior. The 2 methods used to collect the data were online (via social media) and through an in-person interaction with local NGO GrenCHAP personnel. Survey responses were recorded via SurveyMonkey ending on April 11, 2014.The findings of the study were that there was an increased degree of frankness and demographic diversity in participants who responded online as opposed to in-person.People who responded online were more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behavior. GrenCHAP has the opportunity to contribute in the collection of invaluable data concerning HIV and other STIs because of its NGO status and anonymity.

  11. Natural analogue of nuclear waste glass in a geologic formation. Study on long-term behavior of volcanic glass shards collected from drill cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yui, Mikazu; Futakuchi, Katsuhito; Hiroki, Minenari

    2005-01-01

    Alteration of the volcanic glass in geologic formation was investigated as one of the natural analog for a glass of high-level nuclear waste in geological disposal. We analyzed some volcanic glasses included in the core sample of the bore hole and estimated the history of its burying and observed its alteration using the polarizing microscope. Some information at the piling up temperature and the piling up time was collected. (author)

  12. Development of an Ecological Momentary Assessment Mobile App for a Low-Literacy, Mexican American Population to Collect Disordered Eating Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Connelly, Kay; Stein, Karen F; Chaudry, Beenish; Trabold, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Background Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is a popular method for understanding population health in which participants report their experiences while in naturally occurring contexts in order to increase the reliability and ecological validity of the collected data (as compared to retrospective recall). EMA studies, however, have relied primarily on text-based questionnaires, effectively eliminating low-literacy populations from the samples. Objective To provide a case study of design ...

  13. Infrared behavior of the Reggeon field theory for the pomeron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.; Dash, J.W.; Pinsky, S.S.; Rabl, V.

    1975-01-01

    The infrared structure of Reggeon field theory is investigated using renormalization group methods. The infrared fixed point where only the phi 3 interaction is nontrivial is shown to be stable with respect to all higher order interactions within the context of perturbation theory both at D = 2 and in the epsilon-expansion. This may imply that the asymptotic behavior of the total cross section is model independent

  14. Algebraic formulas for some nontrivial U/sub n/ 6j symbols and U/sub m/n contains U/sub m/ x U/sub n/ 3jm symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, R.W.; Butler, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    We give tables of algebraic formulas for some nontrivial 6j symbols and 3jm symbols of the unitary groups. The tables demonstrate that the building-up method can be used successfully to obtain the rank dependence of unitary group j and jm symbols. To emphasize the rank-dependent nature of this calculation, we have employed the composite Young tableaux notation (or back-to-back notation) to label the unitary group irreps. In using this notation, the transpose conjugate symmetry of the corresponding composite Young diagram leads to a new symmetry of the unitary group 6j and 3jm symbols. The transposition of the groups U/sub m/ and U/sub n/ gives rise to a further symmetry of the 3jm symbols of U/sub m/n contains U/sub m/ x U/sub n/

  15. Collective Improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Collective improvisation as a creative practice is intensely social, trusting, unpopular, anti-hierarchical and, for these reasons, political. Cooper describes the risks and rich rewards of improvising with fellow artists and identifies the parallels between improvising ensembles of musicians in Australia with the collectively painted protest banners of the Taring Padi Collective in Indonesia after a brief visit to Jogjakarta.

  16. Emergence of good conduct, scaling and zipf laws in human behavioral sequences in an online world.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Thurner

    Full Text Available We study behavioral action sequences of players in a massive multiplayer online game. In their virtual life players use eight basic actions which allow them to interact with each other. These actions are communication, trade, establishing or breaking friendships and enmities, attack, and punishment. We measure the probabilities for these actions conditional on previous taken and received actions and find a dramatic increase of negative behavior immediately after receiving negative actions. Similarly, positive behavior is intensified by receiving positive actions. We observe a tendency towards antipersistence in communication sequences. Classifying actions as positive (good and negative (bad allows us to define binary 'world lines' of lives of individuals. Positive and negative actions are persistent and occur in clusters, indicated by large scaling exponents α ~ 0.87 of the mean square displacement of the world lines. For all eight action types we find strong signs for high levels of repetitiveness, especially for negative actions. We partition behavioral sequences into segments of length n (behavioral 'words' and 'motifs' and study their statistical properties. We find two approximate power laws in the word ranking distribution, one with an exponent of κ ~ -1 for the ranks up to 100, and another with a lower exponent for higher ranks. The Shannon n-tuple redundancy yields large values and increases in terms of word length, further underscoring the non-trivial statistical properties of behavioral sequences. On the collective, societal level the timeseries of particular actions per day can be understood by a simple mean-reverting log-normal model.

  17. Vapor-liquid phase behavior of a size-asymmetric model of ionic fluids confined in a disordered matrix: The collective-variables-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsahan, O. V.; Patsahan, T. M.; Holovko, M. F.

    2018-02-01

    We develop a theory based on the method of collective variables to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium of asymmetric ionic fluids confined in a disordered porous matrix. The approach allows us to formulate the perturbation theory using an extension of the scaled particle theory for a description of a reference system presented as a two-component hard-sphere fluid confined in a hard-sphere matrix. Treating an ionic fluid as a size- and charge-asymmetric primitive model (PM) we derive an explicit expression for the relevant chemical potential of a confined ionic system which takes into account the third-order correlations between ions. Using this expression, the phase diagrams for a size-asymmetric PM are calculated for different matrix porosities as well as for different sizes of matrix and fluid particles. It is observed that general trends of the coexistence curves with the matrix porosity are similar to those of simple fluids under disordered confinement, i.e., the coexistence region gets narrower with a decrease of porosity and, simultaneously, the reduced critical temperature Tc* and the critical density ρi,c * become lower. At the same time, our results suggest that an increase in size asymmetry of oppositely charged ions considerably affects the vapor-liquid diagrams leading to a faster decrease of Tc* and ρi,c * and even to a disappearance of the phase transition, especially for the case of small matrix particles.

  18. Zn2+ in-situ substitution behavior during the formation of BaTiO3 coatings from plasma-sprayed powders collected in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Xing, Zhiguo; Wang, Haidou; Xue, Zifan; Chen, Shuying; Cui, Xiufang; Jin, Guo

    2018-04-01

    The dielectric performance of BaTiO3 ceramic coatings is enhanced significantly by the addition of ZnO. In this study, the maximum relative permittivity value (εr ≈ 923) was measured in BaTiO3 coatings with ZnO added at 6 wt%. The Curie temperature (Tc) was in the range of 111 °C-121 °C for all of the ZnO-modified BaTiO3 coatings. Tc shifted to low temperatures as the ZnO content increased. Detailed analyses were performed to determine the phase composition and optical band gaps of powders collected in liquid nitrogen, which showed that the Zn2+ ions were incorporated into the BaTiO3 lattice where they substituted into the Ti4+ sites, and the composite powders (BaTiO3 + 6 wt% ZnO) tolerated high temperatures in the plasma beam. In addition, some residual Zn accumulated in the grain boundary in the form of ZnO. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed that the substitution led to changes in the compositional and structural properties. The red shift in the optical band gap of BaTiO3 indicated that the ZnTi'' defects caused by the dopants acted as carriers in the doped BaTiO3 coatings.

  19. Low energy scattering with a nontrivial pion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fariborz, Amir H.; Jora, Renata; Schechter, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    An earlier calculation in a generalized linear sigma model showed that the well-known current algebra formula for low energy pion-pion scattering held even though the massless Nambu Goldstone pion contained a small admixture of a two-quark two-antiquark field. Here we turn on the pion mass and note that the current algebra formula no longer holds exactly. We discuss this small deviation and also study the effects of a SU(3) symmetric quark mass type term on the masses and mixings of the eight SU(3) multiplets in the model. We calculate the s-wave scattering lengths, including the beyond current algebra theorem corrections due to the scalar mesons, and observe that the effect of the scalar mesons is to improve the agreement with experiment. In the process, we uncover the way in which linear sigma models give controlled corrections (due to the presence of scalar mesons) to the current algebra scattering formula. Such a feature is commonly thought to exist only in the nonlinear sigma model approach

  20. Analyzing wind turbine directional behavior: SCADA data mining techniques for efficiency and power assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Sdringola, Paolo; Proietti, Stefania; Terzi, Ludovico

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The directional behavior of four turbines of an onshore wind farm is investigated. • The positions of the nacelles are discretized to highlight clusterization effects. • The recurrent alignment patterns of the cluster are individuated and analyzed. • The patterns are studied by the point of view of efficiency and power output. • Significative performance deviations arise among the most frequent configurations. - Abstract: SCADA control systems are the keystone for reliable performance optimization of wind farms. Processing into knowledge the amount of information they spread is a challenging task, involving engineering, physics, statistics and computer science skills. This work deals with SCADA data analysis methods for assessing the importance of how wind turbines align in patterns to the wind direction. In particular it deals with the most common collective phenomenon causing clusters of turbines behaving as a whole, rather than as a collection of individuality: wake effects. The approach is based on the discretization of nacelle position measurements and subsequent post-processing through simple statistical methods. A cluster, severely affected by wakes, from an onshore wind farm, is selected as test case. The dominant alignment patterns of the cluster are identified and analyzed by the point of view of power output and efficiency. It is shown that non-trivial alignments with respect to the wind direction arise and important performance deviations occur among the most frequent configurations.

  1. A Survey of Collectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumer, Kagan; Wolpert, David

    2004-01-01

    Due to the increasing sophistication and miniaturization of computational components, complex, distributed systems of interacting agents are becoming ubiquitous. Such systems, where each agent aims to optimize its own performance, but where there is a well-defined set of system-level performance criteria, are called collectives. The fundamental problem in analyzing/designing such systems is in determining how the combined actions of self-interested agents leads to 'coordinated' behavior on a iarge scale. Examples of artificial systems which exhibit such behavior include packet routing across a data network, control of an array of communication satellites, coordination of multiple deployables, and dynamic job scheduling across a distributed computer grid. Examples of natural systems include ecosystems, economies, and the organelles within a living cell. No current scientific discipline provides a thorough understanding of the relation between the structure of collectives and how well they meet their overall performance criteria. Although still very young, research on collectives has resulted in successes both in understanding and designing such systems. It is eqected that as it matures and draws upon other disciplines related to collectives, this field will greatly expand the range of computationally addressable tasks. Moreover, in addition to drawing on them, such a fully developed field of collective intelligence may provide insight into already established scientific fields, such as mechanism design, economics, game theory, and population biology. This chapter provides a survey to the emerging science of collectives.

  2. Culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the behavior and movement of adult summer steelhead in the lower Cowlitz River, Washington, following collection and release, 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Tobias J.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Gleizes, Chris; Dammers, Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) produced by a hatchery on the lower Cowlitz River, Washington, support a popular sport fishery during June–September each year. Many of these fish return to the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery and are held until they are spawned in December. In the past, fishery managers have released some of the steelhead that return to the hatchery at downstream release sites (hereafter referred to as “recycled steelhead”) to increase angling opportunity. The recycling of summer steelhead is a potential use of hatchery fish that can benefit anglers in the lower Cowlitz River, provided these fish are harvested or return to the hatchery. However, recycled steelhead that are not removed from the river could compete against or spawn with wild winter steelhead, which would be a negative consequence of recycling. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) conducted an evaluation during 1998 and recycled 632 summer steelhead. They determined that 55 percent of the recycled steelhead returned to the hatchery and 15 percent of the fish were harvested by anglers. The remaining 30 percent of recycled fish were not known to have been removed from the river. Recycling has not occurred in recent years because definitive studies have not been conducted to determine the fate of the fish that remain in the lower Cowlitz River after being recycled. The U.S. Geological Survey and WDFW conducted a 2-year study during 2012–2014 to quantify recycled steelhead that (1) returned to the hatchery, (2) were captured by anglers, or (3) remained in the river. All recycled steelhead were marked with a Floy® tag and opercle punch, and 20 percent of the recycled fish were radio-tagged to determine post-release behavior and movement patterns, and to describe locations of tagged fish that remained in the river during the spawning period. During 2012–2013, we recycled 549 steelhead and determined that 50 percent of the fish returned to the hatchery, 18 percent

  4. Collective Efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ying; Zhou, Xiaohu; Klyver, Kim

    2018-01-01

    at manufacturing companies show that benevolent leadership and moral leadership, both components of paternalistic leadership, are positively related to organizational commitment and further that collective efficacy mediates the moral leadership–organizational commitment relationship. We did not find a relationship...... between authoritarian leadership and organizational commitment. Besides, it was found that team cohesion negatively moderates the relationship between moral leadership and collective efficacy and positively moderates the relationship between collective efficacy and organizational commitment. Explanations......Based on social cognitive theory, we theorize that collective efficacy plays a mediating role in the relationship between paternalistic leadership and organizational commitment and that this mediating role depends on team cohesion. The empirical results from a study of 238 employees from 52 teams...

  5. Fire Behavior (FB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Fire Behavior (FB) method is used to describe the behavior of the fire and the ambient weather and fuel conditions that influence the fire behavior. Fire behavior methods are not plot based and are collected by fire event and time-date. In general, the fire behavior data are used to interpret the fire effects documented in the plot-level sampling. Unlike the other...

  6. Rapid assessment of sexual behavior, drug use, human immunodeficiency virus, and sexually transmitted diseases in northern thai youth using audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing and noninvasive specimen collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griensven, F; Supawitkul, S; Kilmarx, P H; Limpakarnjanarat, K; Young, N L; Manopaiboon, C; Mock, P A; Korattana, S; Mastro, T D

    2001-07-01

    Drug use, unwanted pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and sexually transmitted diseases are serious health problems among Thai youth. The gravity of these problems demands high-quality data to direct public health policy and prevention programs. Previous studies of stigmatized behaviors have been hampered by participation bias and underreporting. To evaluate sexual behavior, disease, and drug use, we used audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) and noninvasive specimen collection methods. We also evaluated effectiveness of these methods in minimizing participation bias and underreporting. In late 1999, students aged 15 to 21 years attending 3 vocational schools were invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey. Consenting students completed a classroom-based ACASI interview using a confidential code number system. Oral fluid specimens were tested for HIV antibodies, and urine was tested for chlamydial and gonococcal nucleic acids, methamphetamines, and opiates. Of 1736 invited students, 1725 (99%) agreed to participate. Of these, 48% of the male students and 43% of the female students reported ever having had sexual intercourse. Overall, the mean number of lifetime sexual partners was 4.6 among male participants (median: 2) and 2.8 among female participants (median: 1). Consistent use of condoms with steady partners was reported by 16% of male participants and 11% of female participants who had such partners. Of all male participants, 7% had ever paid for sex, 3% had ever sold sex, and 7% had ever been coerced to have sex. Of all female participants, 3% had ever sold sex and 21% had ever been coerced to have sex. Among women with a history of sexual intercourse, 27% reported at least 1 pregnancy. Of these pregnancies, 83% were terminated. Among those with sexual intercourse experience, the prevalence of HIV infection was 0.5%; of infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 0.4%; and of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, 5%. Twenty

  7. Collective Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    in worldwide market conditions left perceptible ripples in Danish economy, budget discussions grew in importance over this period. The pacifist stance entailed disinclination to accept that the collective security concept and international treaties and accords signed by Denmark should necessitate credible...... and other international treaties provided arguments for adjusting the foreign and security policy ambitions, and since the general flux in worldwide market conditions left perceptible ripples in Danish economy, budget discussions grew in importance over this period. The pacifist stance entailed......Collective Security: National Egotism (Abstract) In Danish pre-World War I defence debate the notion of collective security is missing. During the early years of the 19th century, the political work is influenced by a pervasive feeling of rising tension and danger on the continent of Europe...

  8. Locals Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Hastings-King

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A locals collection is a set of parameters that are used to delimit data-mining operations. This piece uses a collection of locals from around Essex Massachusetts to shape and delimit an interrogation of post-reality in contemporary America. It explores the notion of crisis, the possibility of a crisis of empire that may or may not emerge in a media-space that does not allow crisis of empire to be mentioned and relations this maybe-crisis to the various levels of economic dysfunction that have become evident since late 2008. But mostly this piece explores ways in which particular stories about particular people do and do not link/link to these larger-scale narratives. This is the first of a potential series of locals collections that will mine the American post-real.

  9. Concurrent Collections

    OpenAIRE

    Budimlić, Zoran; Burke, Michael; Cavé, Vincent; Knobe, Kathleen; Lowney, Geoff; Newton, Ryan; Palsberg, Jens; Peixotto, David; Sarkar, Vivek; Schlimbach, Frank; Taşırlar, Sağnak

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the Concurrent Collections (CnC) programming model. CnC supports flexible combinations of task and data parallelism while retaining determinism. CnC is implicitly parallel, with the user providing high-level operations along with semantic ordering constraints that together form a CnC graph. We formally describe the execution semantics of CnC and prove that the model guarantees deterministic computation. We evaluate the performance of CnC implementations on several applications an...

  10. Quantum Probabilities as Behavioral Probabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav I. Yukalov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that behavioral probabilities of human decision makers share many common features with quantum probabilities. This does not imply that humans are some quantum objects, but just shows that the mathematics of quantum theory is applicable to the description of human decision making. The applicability of quantum rules for describing decision making is connected with the nontrivial process of making decisions in the case of composite prospects under uncertainty. Such a process involves deliberations of a decision maker when making a choice. In addition to the evaluation of the utilities of considered prospects, real decision makers also appreciate their respective attractiveness. Therefore, human choice is not based solely on the utility of prospects, but includes the necessity of resolving the utility-attraction duality. In order to justify that human consciousness really functions similarly to the rules of quantum theory, we develop an approach defining human behavioral probabilities as the probabilities determined by quantum rules. We show that quantum behavioral probabilities of humans do not merely explain qualitatively how human decisions are made, but they predict quantitative values of the behavioral probabilities. Analyzing a large set of empirical data, we find good quantitative agreement between theoretical predictions and observed experimental data.

  11. Collective Success or Collective Failure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fayyaz, Anjum

    study of soccer village project to learn how various attempts at facilitating joint CSR action in the Pakistani football manufacturing have consistently failed in addressing international CSR compliance demands. I conclude that this form of collective failure – along with technological changes, lack...... of innovation, and government failure - can partly explain why Sialkot has been marginalized in terms of its overall share of world football manufacturing in the last decade....

  12. Inelastic behavior of materials and structures under monotonic and cyclic loading

    CERN Document Server

    Brünig, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book presents studies on the inelastic behavior of materials and structures under monotonic and cyclic loads. It focuses on the description of new effects like purely thermal cycles or cases of non-trivial damages. The various models are based on different approaches and methods and scaling aspects are taken into account. In addition to purely phenomenological models, the book also presents mechanisms-based approaches. It includes contributions written by leading authors from a host of different countries.

  13. 78 FR 2682 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... center follow-up on readmissions to the emergency department for suicidal behavior. The data collected... from patient data include: Demographic data, historical data, and subsequent suicidal behavioral and...

  14. 75 FR 54143 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; The SunWise...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... information collection activity or ICR does this apply to? Affected entities: Entities potentially affected by... behaviors, and will help guide the program's further improvement. Additionally, information is collected... information, processing and maintaining information, and disclosing and providing information; adjust the...

  15. 75 FR 32161 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Consumer Focus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... staff relies on its expert judgment about consumer behavior, perceptions, and similar information... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION [Docket No. CPSC-2010-0046] Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Consumer Focus Groups AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety...

  16. Spherically symmetric random walks. II. Dimensionally dependent critical behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, C.M.; Boettcher, S.; Meisinger, P.N.

    1996-01-01

    A recently developed model of random walks on a D-dimensional hyperspherical lattice, where D is not restricted to integer values, is extended to include the possibility of creating and annihilating random walkers. Steady-state distributions of random walkers are obtained for all dimensions D approx-gt 0 by solving a discrete eigenvalue problem. These distributions exhibit dimensionally dependent critical behavior as a function of the birth rate. This remarkably simple model exhibits a second-order phase transition with a universal, nontrivial critical exponent for all dimensions D approx-gt 0. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Symmetry pattern transition in cellular automata with complex behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Juan R.; Lopez-Ruiz, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    A transition from asymmetric to symmetric patterns in time-dependent extended systems is described. It is shown that one dimensional cellular automata, started from fully random initial conditions, can be forced to evolve into complex symmetrical patterns by stochastically coupling a proportion p of pairs of sites located at equal distance from the center of the lattice. A nontrivial critical value of p must be surpassed in order to obtain symmetrical patterns during the evolution. This strategy is able to classify the cellular automata rules - with complex behavior - between those that support time-dependent symmetric patterns and those which do not support such kind of patterns

  18. The Neurobiology of Collective Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Joseph Zak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay introduces a neurologically-informed mathematical model of collective action that reveals the role for empathy and distress in motivating costly helping behaviors. We report three direct tests of model with a key focus on the neuropeptide oxytocin as well as a variety of indirect tests. These studies, from our lab and other researchers, show support for the model. Our findings indicate that empathic concern, via the brain's release of oxytocin, is a trigger for collective action. We discuss the implications from this model for our understanding why human beings engage in costly collective action.

  19. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  20. Sound-like collective mode excitation with pion absorption in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Xijiun; Shen Jianguo; Huang Lingfang

    1985-01-01

    The relativistic mean field theory consistent with bulk properties of nuclear matter is extended to study the excitations of the sound-like collective modes in nuclear matter. Corresponding relativistic mean field equations are solved numerically and self-consistently. The effective mass of nucleon, the speed of the sound and the amplitude of the sound-like solution are calculated. When the nuclear density is near or greater than the saturation density, the sound-like non-trivial solution could be found

  1. Respuesta de Anopheles albimanus a compuestos volátiles de casas del sur de Chiapas, México Behavioral response of Anopheles albimanus to volatile compounds collected inside houses from the south of Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvany Mayoly Ríos-Delgado

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar el efecto de los compuestos volátiles en las casas sobre la respuesta conductual del vector del paludismo Anopheles albimanus. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: El estudio se realizó en enero de 2006 en el ejido Nueva Independencia, municipio de Suchiate, Chiapas. Se colectaron compuestos volátiles dentro de casas y los extractos se probaron sobre hembras sin alimentar en un olfatómetro en "Y". Los extractos se analizaron mediante cromatografía de gases-espectrometría de masas (CG-EM. RESULTADOS: Se obtuvieron 28 extractos, 12 presentaron respuesta de atracción y dos de repelencia. Los análisis por CG-EM indicaron variación en la presencia de compuestos volátiles y no se vincularon con compuestos específicos indicativos de algún efecto. CONCLUSIONES: Los volátiles en casas presentaron efecto de atracción y repelencia para An. albimanus. No se reconoció un patrón definido en cuanto a la presencia de compuestos químicos característicos y la respuesta obtenida.OBJECTIVE: To determine effects of volatile compounds in homes on the behavioral response of Anopheles albimanus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted in January 2006, in the village of Nueva Independencia village, Suchiate, Chiapas. Volatile compounds were collected inside homes and the extracts were tested on unfed females in a Y-olfactometer. Extracts were analyzed in a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system (GC-MS. RESULTS: Twenty eight extracts were obtained, twelve presented attraction and two repellency responses. GC-MS analyses of the extracts indicated variation in the volatile compound present in the extracts, but could not associated specific compounds with any particular effect. CONCLUSIONS: Within homes, volatiles presented attraction and repellency responses to An. albimanus. A definate pattern concerning the presence of a characteristic chemical compound and the observed response was not found.

  2. Updating biological bases of social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas G

    2014-09-01

    This month's collation of papers deals with social behaviors that operationalize key constructs in fields covered by the journal, including attachment theory and parenting; emotional regulation; psychopathology of several forms; general and specific cognitive abilities. Notably, many examples are offered of how these social behaviors link with biology. That is an obvious and important direction for clinical research insofar as it helps to erase a perceptual chasm and artificial duality between 'behavior' and 'biology'. But, although it must be the case that social behavior has biological connections of one sort or other, identifying reliable connections with practical application has proved to be a non-trivial challenge. In particular, the challenge seems to be in measuring social behavior meaningfully enough that it could be expected to have a biological pulse, and in measuring biological markers systematically enough that emergent-downstream effects would surface. Associations are not especially uncommon, but it has been a frustrating task in constructing a practically broad model from a bricolage of scattered and disconnected parts and findings in the literature. Several reports in this issue offer contrasts that may help move along this line of study. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  3. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic…

  4. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of mathbb {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius mathcal {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  5. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, Matthew J. [Naresuan University, The Institute for Fundamental Study, ' ' The Tah Poe Academia Institute' ' , Phitsanulok (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Ministry of Education, Bangkok (Thailand); Harko, Tiberiu [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of R{sup 2}, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S{sup 2} of constant radius R. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods. (orig.)

  6. 78 FR 44097 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Submission to OMB for Review and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... purpose of collecting, validating and verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and... containing privacy information and will not ask questions of a sensitive nature, such as sexual behavior and... estimates: Current Actions: New collection of information. Type of Review: New collection. Affected Public...

  7. Collective systems:physical and information exergies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Wilson, David Gerald

    2007-04-01

    Collective systems are typically defined as a group of agents (physical and/or cyber) that work together to produce a collective behavior with a value greater than the sum of the individual parts. This amplification or synergy can be harnessed by solving an inverse problem via an information-flow/communications grid: given a desired macroscopic/collective behavior find the required microscopic/individual behavior of each agent and the required communications grid. The goal of this report is to describe the fundamental nature of the Hamiltonian function in the design of collective systems (solve the inverse problem) and the connections between and values of physical and information exergies intrinsic to collective systems. In particular, physical and information exergies are shown to be equivalent based on thermodynamics and Hamiltonian mechanics.

  8. Control of collective network chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Barreto, Ernest; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; So, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Under certain conditions, the collective behavior of a large globally-coupled heterogeneous network of coupled oscillators, as quantified by the macroscopic mean field or order parameter, can exhibit low-dimensional chaotic behavior. Recent advances describe how a small set of "reduced" ordinary differential equations can be derived that captures this mean field behavior. Here, we show that chaos control algorithms designed using the reduced equations can be successfully applied to imperfect realizations of the full network. To systematically study the effectiveness of this technique, we measure the quality of control as we relax conditions that are required for the strict accuracy of the reduced equations, and hence, the controller. Although the effects are network-dependent, we show that the method is effective for surprisingly small networks, for modest departures from global coupling, and even with mild inaccuracy in the estimate of network heterogeneity.

  9. Consumer Buying Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Vida; Mojca Maher Pirc

    2006-01-01

    The study examines the phenomenon of national identity and economic ethnocentrism in consumer buying behavior. Analysis of data collected from a representative sample of adult Slovenian consumers reveals only moderately expressed ethnocentric tendencies. Similar moderation was revealed in the preferences of Slovenian consumers for patriotic purchasing behavior, whereby the domestic origin of products was more important in the case of nondurable goods and services than in the case of durable g...

  10. Consumer Behavior Research Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysochou, Polymeros

    2017-01-01

    This chapter starts by distinguishing consumer behavior research methods based on the type of data used, being either secondary or primary. Most consumer behavior research studies phenomena that require researchers to enter the field and collect data on their own, and therefore the chapter...... emphasizes the discussion of primary research methods. Based on the nature of the data primary research methods are further distinguished into qualitative and quantitative. The chapter describes the most important and popular qualitative and quantitative methods. It concludes with an overall evaluation...... of the methods and how to improve quality in consumer behavior research methods....

  11. Collective focusing ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldin, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The principal subject of this dissertation is the trapping confinement of pure electron plasmas in bumpy toroidal magnetic fields, with particular attention given to the trapping procedure and the behavior of the plasma during the final equilibrium. The most important aspects of the equilibrium studied were the qualitative nature of the plasma configuration and motion and its density, distribution and stability. The motivation for this study was that an unneutralized cloud of electrons contained in a toroidal system, sufficiently dense and stable, may serve to electrostatically focus ions (against centrifugal and self space charge forces) in a cyclic ion accelerator. Such an accelerator, known as a Collective Focusing Ion Accelerator (CFIA) could be far smaller than conventional designs (which use external magnetic fields directly to focus the ions) due to the smaller gyro-radium of an electron in a magnetic field of given strength. The electron cloud generally drifted poloidally at a finite radius from the toroidal minor axis. As this would preclude focusing ions with such clouds, damping this motion was investigated. Finite resistance in the normally perfectly conductive vessel wall did this. In further preparation for a working CFIA, additional experiments studied the effect of ions on the stability of the electron cloud

  12. CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on health risk behaviors, preventive...

  13. Behavioral economics

    OpenAIRE

    Camerer, Colin F.

    2014-01-01

    Economics, like behavioral psychology, is a science of behavior, albeit highly organized human behavior. The value of economic concepts for behavioral psychology rests on (1) their empirical validity when tested in the laboratory with individual subjects and (2) their uniqueness when compared to established behavioral concepts. Several fundamental concepts are introduced and illustrated by reference to experimental data: open and closed economies, elastic and inelastic demand, and substitutio...

  14. Trust-based collective view prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Tiejian; Xu, Guandong; Zhou, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Collective view prediction is to judge the opinions of an active web user based on unknown elements by referring to the collective mind of the whole community. Content-based recommendation and collaborative filtering are two mainstream collective view prediction techniques. They generate predictions by analyzing the text features of the target object or the similarity of users' past behaviors. Still, these techniques are vulnerable to the artificially-injected noise data, because they are not able to judge the reliability and credibility of the information sources. Trust-based Collective View

  15. Measurements of Multiparticle Correlations in d +Au Collisions at 200, 62.4, 39, and 19.6 GeV and p +Au Collisions at 200 GeV and Implications for Collective Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidala, C.; Akiba, Y.; Alfred, M.; Andrieux, V.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Asano, H.; Ayuso, C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bagoly, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Blau, D. S.; Boer, M.; Bok, J. S.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butler, C.; Campbell, S.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cervantes, R.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Citron, Z.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dion, A.; Dixit, D.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dumancic, M.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Elder, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fan, W.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukuda, Y.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, K.; Hodges, A.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ito, Y.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Ji, Z.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Jorjadze, V.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapukchyan, D.; Karthas, S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M. H.; Kincses, D.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kotov, D.; Kudo, S.; Kurita, K.; Kwon, Y.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lallow, E. O.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leung, Y. H.; Lewis, N. A.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, M. X.; Loggins, V.-R.; Lökös, S.; Lovasz, K.; Lynch, D.; Majoros, T.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malaev, M.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masuda, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Mendoza, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mihalik, D. E.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Morrow, S. I. M.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagashima, K.; Nagashima, T.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Novotny, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ottino, G. J.; Ozawa, K.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Peng, W.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perezlara, C. E.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Phipps, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Pun, A.; Purschke, M. L.; Radzevich, P. V.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richford, D.; Rinn, T.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Runchey, J.; Safonov, A. S.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shioya, T.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skoby, M. J.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, K. L.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Syed, S.; Sziklai, J.; Takeda, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnai, G.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Ueda, Y.; Ujvari, B.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Carson, S.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vukman, N.; Wang, X. R.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wong, C. P.; Woody, C. L.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamamoto, H.; Yanovich, A.; Yin, P.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zharko, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    Recently, multiparticle-correlation measurements of relativistic p /d /He 3 +Au , p +Pb , and even p +p collisions show surprising collective signatures. Here, we present beam-energy-scan measurements of two-, four-, and six-particle angular correlations in d +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 , 62.4, 39, and 19.6 GeV. We also present measurements of two- and four-particle angular correlations in p +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV . We find the four-particle cumulant to be real valued for d +Au collisions at all four energies. We also find that the four-particle cumulant in p +Au has the opposite sign as that in d +Au . Further, we find that the six-particle cumulant agrees with the four-particle cumulant in d +Au collisions at 200 GeV, indicating that nonflow effects are subdominant. These observations provide strong evidence that the correlations originate from the initial geometric configuration, which is then translated into the momentum distribution for all particles, commonly referred to as collectivity.

  16. Behavioral analysis of differential Hebbian learning in closed-loop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulvicius, Tomas; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Tamosiunaite, Minija

    2010-01-01

    Understanding closed loop behavioral systems is a non-trivial problem, especially when they change during learning. Descriptions of closed loop systems in terms of information theory date back to the 1950s, however, there have been only a few attempts which take into account learning, mostly...... measuring information of inputs. In this study we analyze a specific type of closed loop system by looking at the input as well as the output space. For this, we investigate simulated agents that perform differential Hebbian learning (STDP). In the first part we show that analytical solutions can be found...

  17. 78 FR 29731 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; CPSC National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... communications efforts to achieve a greater impact on consumer behavior. The CPSC's activities aim to serve a... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION [Docket No. CPSC-2013-0020] Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; CPSC National Awareness Survey AGENCY: Consumer Product...

  18. Oblate collectivity in 197,198Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnert, A.; Wang, T.F.; Stoyer, M.A.; Becker, J.A.; Henry, E.A.; Brinkman, M.J.; Yates, S.W.; Draper, J.E.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M.; Stephens, F.S.; Machiavelli, A.O.; Kelly, W.H.; Korten, W.; Azaiez, F.; Cizewski, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Evidence for collective behavior in the high-spin region of neutron deficient lead nuclei is provided by the observation of four collective structures in 197,198 Pb. These bands consist of strong dipole (M1) transitions with a few E2 crossover transitions observed. The transition energies of three of these bands show a rather regular behavior while those of one of them show an irregular behavior. We interpret the regular bands as oblate collective bands built on oblate proton and neutron states, whereas the irregular band might either be built on a state with very small oblate deformation, or be a triaxial rotational band. A lifetime measurement (DSAM) has been done for the regular bands in 198 Pb. Neutron and proton configurations for the bands are suggested from the results of quasi particle Routhians and total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations. (orig.)

  19. Oblate collectivity in 197,198Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnert, A.; Wang, T.F.; Stoyer, M.A.; Becker, J.A.; Henry, E.A.; Brinkman, M.J.; Yates, S.W.; Draper, J.E.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M.; Stephens, F.S.; Machiavelli, A.O.; Kelly, W.H.; Korten, W.; Azaiez, F.

    1992-07-01

    Evidence for collective behavior in the high-spin region of neutron deficient lead nuclei is provided by the observation of four collective structures in 197,198 Pb. These bands consist of strong dipole (M1) transitions with a few E2 crossover transitions observed. The transition energies of three of these bands show a rather regular behavior while those of one of them show an irregular behavior. We interpret the regular bands as oblate collective bands built on oblate proton and neutron states, whereas the irregular band might either be built on a state with very small oblate deformation, or be a triaxial rotational band. A lifetime measurement (DSAM) has been done for the regular bands in 198 Pb. Neutron and proton configurations for the bands are suggested from the results of quasi particle Routhians and total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations

  20. Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is always more effective to positively reinforce desired behaviors and to teach children alternative behaviors rather ... he is angry, but instead to express his feelings through words. It’s important for him to learn ...

  1. Behaviorally inadequate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2014-01-01

    According to situationism in psychology, behavior is primarily influenced by external situational factors rather than internal traits or motivations such as virtues. Environmental ethicists wish to promote pro-environmental behaviors capable of providing adequate protection for the environment...

  2. Understanding user behavior in Spotify

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, B.; Kreitz, G.; Isaksson, M.; Ubillos, J.; Urdaneta, G.; Pouwelse, J.A.; Epema, D.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Spotify is a peer-assisted music streaming service that has gained worldwide popularity in the past few years. Until now, little has been published about user behavior in such services. In this paper, we study the user behavior in Spotify by analyzing a massive dataset collected between 2010 and

  3. Information collection styles of wilderness users: a market segmentation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Ramthun; Lynda Kersey; Jim Rogers

    2000-01-01

    Attempts to influence the behavior of wilderness visitors through the use of information are limited by the visitors’ reception of that information. This study examined the information gathering behavior of wilderness visitors and the effect of different information collection styles on visitors’ knowledge of low-impact behavior and attitudes toward wilderness...

  4. Verbal behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, Jack

    1984-01-01

    The recent history and current status of the area of verbal behavior are considered in terms of three major thematic lines: the operant conditioning of adult verbal behavior, learning to be an effective speaker and listener, and developments directly related to Skinner's Verbal Behavior. Other topics not directly related to the main themes are also considered: the work of Kurt Salzinger, ape-language research, and human operant research related to rule-governed behavior.

  5. Behavioral synthesis of asynchronous circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a method for behavioral synthesis of asynchronous circuits, which aims at providing a synthesis flow which uses and tranfers methods from synchronous circuits to asynchronous circuits. We move the synchronous behavioral synthesis abstraction into the asynchronous handshake...... is idle. This reduces unnecessary switching activity in the individual functional units and therefore the energy consumption of the entire circuit. A collection of behavioral synthesis algorithms have been developed allowing the designer to perform time and power constrained design space exploration...

  6. Study of the Behavior and Distribution of Mercury in Soil Samples Collected on the Banks of the Valdeazogues River; Estudio del Comportamiento y Distribucion del Mercurio Presente en Muestras de Suelo Recogidas en la Ribera del Rio Valdeazogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lominchar, M A; Sierra, M J; Rodiriguez, J; Millam, R

    2010-12-22

    The main objective of this study is to determine the behavior of mercury in the soil of the Valdeazogues river (Almaden, Ciudad Real, Spain) by using a six-step sequential extraction procedure (CIEMAT) and checking the relationship between the percentage of organic matter in soil and the percentage of mercury associated with the exchangeable and oxidizable fractions. The results show that total mercury concentrations in soil range from 116.7 {+-}24.3 to 245.5 {+-}59.6 mg kg{sup -}1 of Hg even to concentrations of 350.9 {+-}68.6 mg kg{sup -}1. However, the available mercury concentration is a smaller percentage of 0.15% of total mercury measured in the samples. Also, the soluble mercury is less than 0,037 mg kg{sup -}1, so that, the leaching process and transport of mercury to surface water and groundwater are very slow. With regard to the distribution of mercury between the different fractions of soil, the metal is associated with more resistant soil fractions, these are: crystalline Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, organic matter absorbed and the fi nal residue. (Author9) 50 refs.

  7. Behaviorally Speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Elias H.; Dutton, Darell W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Consists of two articles focusing on (1) a modern behavioral model that takes cues from Hippocrates' Four Temperaments and (2) use of a behavioral approach to improve the effectiveness of meetings. Lists positive and negative behaviors within the meeting context. (CH)

  8. The power of collective ambition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready, Douglas A; Truelove, Emily

    2011-12-01

    In the past few years, some companies have not just weathered the economic storm: They've emerged stronger than ever. How did such players as Four Seasons, Sephora, and Standard Chartered Bank defy conventional logic? Instead of pursuing a single ambition, such as profits, employees defined a collective ambition. As a result, those organizations deepened their engagement with employees and other stakeholders and became sustainably profitable. Purpose, a company's reason for existence, is the central element of collective ambition. The other elements--vision, targets and milestones, strategic and operational priorities, brand promise, core values, and leader behaviors--must be aligned to serve the company's purpose. Articulating the elements of collective ambition can give everyone in the organization a better sense of the company's purpose and how they can contribute to it. Purpose does not have to be about saving the world; providing excellent entertainment or banking services is just as meaningful a purpose as improving health care in emerging economies--as long as it is an authentic representation of why the company exists. To shape and then achieve a collective ambition, companies must strengthen their organizational glue (the collaborative engagement that creates a unified culture) and grease (the disciplined execution that enterprisewide change initiatives require).

  9. Towards modern petrological collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriegsman, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Petrological collections result from sampling for academic research, for aesthetic or commercial reasons, and to document natural diversity. Selection criteria for reducing and enhancing collections include adequate documentation, potential for future use, information density, time and money

  10. Old tropical botanical collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2017-01-01

    The early history of botanical collections is reviewed, with particular emphasis on old collections from the tropics. The information available about older and newer botanical collections from the tropics was much improved after World War Two, including better lists of validly published names, more...

  11. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Arthur W.

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism. PMID:22478175

  12. Satellite image collection optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William

    2002-09-01

    Imaging satellite systems represent a high capital cost. Optimizing the collection of images is critical for both satisfying customer orders and building a sustainable satellite operations business. We describe the functions of an operational, multivariable, time dynamic optimization system that maximizes the daily collection of satellite images. A graphical user interface allows the operator to quickly see the results of what if adjustments to an image collection plan. Used for both long range planning and daily collection scheduling of Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite, the satellite control and tasking (SCT) software allows collection commands to be altered up to 10 min before upload to the satellite.

  13. Collection time again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, D L

    1984-01-01

    Looking forward to your next round of collection calls? Few of us do, yet collections play a vital role in every group practice, large or small. This crop of practical collection tips is guaranteed to boost the morale of everyone involved in the collection process. Not only are the basics of a good collection call set down, but result-getting responses to frequent debtor excuses are provided. Telephoning the debtor patient need not be a dreaded task. Just have confidence, keep in mind that the patient does owe you for services rendered in good faith, and pick up the phone--it's a snap!

  14. Collective Lyapunov modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Kazumasa A; Chaté, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    We show, using covariant Lyapunov vectors in addition to standard Lyapunov analysis, that there exists a set of collective Lyapunov modes in large chaotic systems exhibiting collective dynamics. Associated with delocalized Lyapunov vectors, they act collectively on the trajectory and hence characterize the instability of its collective dynamics. We further develop, for globally coupled systems, a connection between these collective modes and the Lyapunov modes in the corresponding Perron–Frobenius equation. We thereby address the fundamental question of the effective dimension of collective dynamics and discuss the extensivity of chaos in the presence of collective dynamics. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’. (paper)

  15. Universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobos Collaboration; Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  16. Unconventional spin texture of a topologically nontrivial semimetal Sb(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strózecka, A.; Eiguren, A.; Bianchi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The surfaces of antimony are characterized by the presence of spin-split states within the projected bulk band gap and the Fermi contour is thus expected to exhibit a spin texture. Using spin-resolved density functional theory calculations, we determine the spin polarization of the surface bands...... signal.We identify the allowed scattering vectors and analyze their bias evolution in relation to the surface-state dispersion....

  17. Non-trivial pursuit - new approaches to Nordic deliciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Joshua David

    2012-01-01

    Nordic Food Lab was founded in 2008 as a research and development lab with the purpose of exploring food in the Nordic region. Chef René Redzepi and gastronomic entrepreneur Claus Meyer, co-owners of the restaurant Noma in Copenhagen, realised this investigation could not be undertaken...... in the restaurant kitchen alone. What they needed was a space where chefs, scientists, and other researchers could come together to investigate raw materials, traditional processes, and modern techniques more deeply than the pressure of daily service would allow....

  18. Multiplicity of nontrivial solutions for elliptic equations with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Department of Mathematics, National Technical University, Zografou Campus, ... For concrete applications we refer to the book of Naniewicz and ...... [24] Lebourg G, Valeur mayenne pour gradient gén`eralisé, CRAS Paris 281 (1975) 795– ...

  19. Non-Euclidean Geometry, Nontrivial Topology and Quantum Vacuum Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii A. Sitenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Space out of a topological defect of the Abrikosov–Nielsen–Olesen (ANO vortex type is locally flat but non-Euclidean. If a spinor field is quantized in such a space, then a variety of quantum effects are induced in the vacuum. On the basis of the continuum model for long-wavelength electronic excitations originating in the tight-binding approximation for the nearest-neighbor interaction of atoms in the crystal lattice, we consider quantum ground-state effects in Dirac materials with two-dimensional monolayer structures warped into nanocones by a disclination; the nonzero size of the disclination is taken into account, and a boundary condition at the edge of the disclination is chosen to ensure self-adjointness of the Dirac–Weyl Hamiltonian operator. We show that the quantum ground-state effects are independent of the disclination size, and we find circumstances in which they are independent of parameters of the boundary condition.

  20. High-order noise filtering in nontrivial quantum logic gates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available composed of arbitrary control sequences. We present a general method to calculate the ensemble-averaged entanglement fidelity to arbitrary order in terms of noise filter functions, and provide explicit expressions to fourth order in the noise strength...

  1. The Cherenkov Radiation for Non-Trivial Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.

    2002-01-01

    The charge pathways and the dielectric properties of the medium are two essential aspects to be considered in the study of the emission of Cherenkov radiation. We described the evolution of the Cherenkov wavefront when the charges follow circular or helical pathways. Also we derive expressions for the refractive Index in different transparent media (solid, liquid or gas), focusing our attention on optically active plasmas. The optical analogies between the plasma and the birefringent crystals is studied in detail. Finally, we list some examples of plasmas, which can be considered emitters of Cherenkov radiation. (Author) 52 refs

  2. Nontrivial topological states on a Möbius band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beugeling, W.; Quelle, A.; Morais Smith, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the field of topological insulators, the topological properties of quantum states in samples with simple geometries, such as a cylinder or a ribbon, have been classified and understood during the past decade. Here we extend these studies to a Möbius band and argue that its lack of orientability

  3. Selecting and Using Mathematics Methods Texts: Nontrivial Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Shelly Sheats; Brass, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Mathematics methods textbooks/texts are important components of many courses for preservice teachers. Researchers should explore how these texts are selected and used. Within this paper we report the findings of a survey administered electronically to 132 members of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) in order to answer the…

  4. Evolution and Collective Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoite, Fred H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Examines behavioral and intellectual conformity as major attitudes in shaping political behavior. Manifestations of coercion within human and animal social units are presented, including religious intolerance, prohibition of artistic activity and literary expression, and rejection of outsiders. Available from: Managing Editor, Department of…

  5. Behavioral targeting: a European legal perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderveen Borgesius, F.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral targeting, or online profiling, is a hotly debated topic. Much of the collection of personal information on the Internet is related to behavioral targeting, although research suggests that most people don't want to receive behaviorally targeted advertising. The World Wide Web Consortium

  6. Reflections on collectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feshbach, H.

    1983-01-01

    Comments are made on papers presented to the International School of Nuclear Physics, Erice (1982) concerning collective bands and collectivity in nuclei. The importance of these collective modes of motion, the role of the Bohr-Mottelson model and the Interacting Boson Models (IBM-1 and IBM-2), and experimental evidence presented by a number of workers, are examined. The extensions of the models to take into account additional degrees of freedom both collective and non-collective, the discovery of new collective modes such as those corresponding to tri-axial shapes, and the possible existence of additional symmetries reported at the meeting, are discussed. Finally the importance is examined of relating the phenomenological models to a more fundamental underlying theory, which has been taken to be the nuclear shell model. (U.K.)

  7. Nonlinearities in Behavioral Macroeconomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Orlando

    2017-07-01

    This article undertakes a journey across the literature on behavioral macroeconomics, with attention concentrated on the nonlinearities that the behavioral approach typically suggests or implies. The emphasis is placed on thinking the macro economy as a living organism, composed of many interacting parts, each one having a will of its own, which is in sharp contrast with the mechanism of the orthodox view (well represented by the neoclassical or new Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium - DSGE - model). The paper advocates that a thorough understanding of individual behavior in collective contexts is the only possible avenue to further explore macroeconomic phenomena and the often observed 'anomalies' that the benchmark DSGE macro framework is unable to explain or justify. After a reflection on the role of behavioral traits as a fundamental component of a new way of thinking the economy, the article proceeds with a debate on some of the most relevant frameworks in the literature that somehow link macro behavior and nonlinearities; covered subjects include macro models with disequilibrium rules, agent-based models that highlight interaction and complexity, evolutionary switching frameworks, and inattention based decision problems. These subjects have, as a fundamental point in common, the use of behavioral elements to transform existing interpretations of the economic reality, making it more evident how irregular fluctuations emerge and unfold on the aggregate.

  8. Collecting Taxes Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Collecting Taxes Database contains performance and structural indicators about national tax systems. The database contains quantitative revenue performance...

  9. Evolutionary Dynamics of Collective Action in Structured Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marta Daniela de Almeida

    The pervasiveness of cooperation in Nature is not easily explained. If evolution is characterized by competition and survival of the fittest, why should selfish individuals cooperate with each other? Evolutionary Game Theory (EGT) provides a suitable mathematical framework to study this problem, central to many areas of science. Conventionally, interactions between individuals are modeled in terms of one-shot, symmetric 2-Person Dilemmas of Cooperation, but many real-life situations involve decisions within groups with more than 2 individuals, which are best-dealt in the framework of N-Person games. In this Thesis, we investigate the evolutionary dynamics of two paradigmatic collective social dilemmas - the N-Person Prisoner's Dilemma (NPD) and the N-Person Snowdrift Game (NSG) on structured populations, modeled by networks with diverse topological properties. Cooperative strategies are just one example of the many traits that can be transmitted on social networks. Several recent studies based on empirical evidence from a medical database have suggested the existence of a 3 degrees of influence rule, according to which not only our "friends", but also our friends' friends, and our friends' friends' friends, have a non-trivial influence on our decisions. We investigate the degree of peer influence that emerges from the spread of cooperative strategies, opinions and diseases on populations with distinct underlying networks of contacts. Our results show that networks naturally entangle individuals into interactions of many-body nature and that for each network class considered different processes lead to identical degrees of influence. None

  10. Aggressive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, H.C.M.; Lindsay, W.R.; Lang, R.B.; Sigafoos, J.; Deb, S.; Wiersma, J.; Peters-Scheffer, N.C.; Marschik, P.B.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lancioni, G.E.; Singh, N.N.

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is common in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs), and it is most often targeted for intervention. Psychological, contextual, and biological risk factors may contribute to the risk of aggressive behavior. Risk factors are gender (males), level of

  11. Modeling and simulation of blood collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Edgar; Xie, Xiaolan; Augusto, Vincent; Garraud, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    This paper addresses the modeling and simulation of blood collection systems in France for both fixed site and mobile blood collection with walk in whole blood donors and scheduled plasma and platelet donors. Petri net models are first proposed to precisely describe different blood collection processes, donor behaviors, their material/human resource requirements and relevant regulations. Petri net models are then enriched with quantitative modeling of donor arrivals, donor behaviors, activity times and resource capacity. Relevant performance indicators are defined. The resulting simulation models can be straightforwardly implemented with any simulation language. Numerical experiments are performed to show how the simulation models can be used to select, for different walk in donor arrival patterns, appropriate human resource planning and donor appointment strategies.

  12. Efficient Immutable Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steindorfer, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis proposes novel and efficient data structures, suitable for immutable collection libraries, that carefully balance memory footprint and runtime performance of operations, and are aware of constraints and platform co-design challenges on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). Collection data

  13. Profiling a Periodicals Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolgiano, Christina E.; King, Mary Kathryn

    1978-01-01

    Libraries need solid information upon which to base collection development decisions. Specific evaluative methods for determining scope, access, and usefullness are described. Approaches used for data collection include analysis of interlibrary loan requests, comparison with major bibliographies, and analysis of accessibility through available…

  14. Preparing collections for digitization

    CERN Document Server

    Bulow, Anna E

    2010-01-01

    Most libraries, archives and museums are confronting the challenges of providing digital access to their collections. This guide offers guidance covering the end-to-end process of digitizing collections, from selecting records for digitization to choosing suppliers and equipment and dealing with documents that present individual problems.

  15. High Collection Nonimaging Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Roland

    1989-07-01

    Nonimaging optics departs from the methods of traditional optical design to develop instead techniques for maximizing the collecting power of concentrating elements and systems. Designs which exceed the concentration attainable with focusing techniques by factors of four or more and approach the theoretical limit are possible (ideal concentrators). The methodology for designing high collection nonirnaging systems is described.

  16. Collective Responsibility for Oppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, Titus

    2017-01-01

    Many contemporary forms of oppression are not primarily the result of formally organized collective action nor are they an unintended outcome of a combination of individual actions. This raises the question of collective responsibility. I argue that we can only determine who is responsible for

  17. Bloody Fast Blood Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brummelen, Samuel Pieter Josephus

    2017-01-01

    This thesis consists of four parts: The first part contains an introduction, the second presents approaches for the evaluation of waiting times at blood collection sites, the third uses these to present approaches that improve waiting times at blood collection sites. The final part shows the

  18. UNO's Afghanistan Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, M. D.

    This paper explores the background history and sources of the Afghanistan collection at the University Library, University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO). Credit for the impetus behind the development of the collection is given to Chris Jung, a former UNO geography/geology faculty member; Ronald Roskens, then UNO chancellor; and the Afghanistan…

  19. Instructions for collecting Bamboos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corner, E.J.H.

    1962-01-01

    Although our knowledge of reproductive parts of bamboos is still very defective, an adequately collected vegetative specimen is valuable and sufficient for identification. Like in tree ferns (see p. 567) and in rattans, a well-collected specimen does not need to be excessively bulky, provided the

  20. Botanical Collections of Brass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brass, L.J.

    1966-01-01

    Earliest collections, made in southeastern parts of Queensland, were not numbered in sequence, and probably no duplicates were kept. Serious collecting began in 1919, when a start was made in sending specimens to C.T. White at the Queensland Herbarium.

  1. Behavior genetics: Bees as model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nates Parra, Guiomar

    2011-01-01

    The honeybee Apis mellifera (Apidae) is a model widely used in behavior because of its elaborate social life requiring coordinate actions among the members of the society. Within a colony, division of labor, the performance of tasks by different individuals, follows genetically determined physiological changes that go along with aging. Modern advances in tools of molecular biology and genomics, as well as the sequentiation of A. mellifera genome, have enabled a better understanding of honeybee behavior, in particular social behavior. Numerous studies show that aspects of worker behavior are genetically determined, including defensive, hygienic, reproductive and foraging behavior. For example, genetic diversity is associated with specialization to collect water, nectar and pollen. Also, control of worker reproduction is associated with genetic differences. In this paper, I review the methods and the main results from the study of the genetic and genomic basis of some behaviors in bees.

  2. Behavioral finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapor Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuss some general principles of behavioral finance Behavioral finance is the dynamic and promising field of research that mergers concepts from financial economics and cognitive psychology in attempt to better understand systematic biases in decision-making process of financial agents. While the standard academic finance emphasizes theories such as modern portfolio theory and the efficient market hypothesis, the behavioral finance investigates the psychological and sociological issues that impact the decision-making process of individuals, groups and organizations. Most of the research behind behavioral finance has been empirical in nature, concentrating on what people do and why. The research has shown that people do not always act rationally, nor they fully utilise all information available to them.

  3. Behavior change

    Science.gov (United States)

    This brief entry presents the mediating-moderating variable model as a conceptual framework for understanding behavior change in regard to physical activity/exercise and adiposity. The ideas are applied to real world situations....

  4. Collective and planetary motion in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of the conception of electron correlation is sketched, particularly the ideas that emerged in the late 1970s. Those ideas have led to a deep reexamination of the behavior of electrons sharing a valence shell. Doubly-excited helium was the first case in which it could be clearly established that the electronic states exhibit collective rotations and vibrations, rather than predominantly independent-particle-like behavior. More recently, it has appeared that the ground states and most but not all of the low-lying excited states of the alkaline-earth atoms are also much more like collective rotor-vibrators than like quantum analogues of solar systems. The appearance of such molecule-like characteristics for the electrons in atoms leads to a search for independent-particle-like behavior for atoms in highly excited vibrational states of small molecules such as H 2 O, NH 3 and CH 4 . Together, the two kinds of systems potentially exhibiting characteristics traditionally associated with the other suggest trying to find a more unified formulation of few-body problems that makes collective and independent-particle behavior into related but complementary manifestations of some more general characterization of the states of few-body systems. (Auth.)

  5. Collective Behavior of Hair, and Ponytail Shape and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Robin

    I will discuss how we can build a mathematical model of the behaviour of a bundle of hair, comparing the results with experimental studies of the shape and dynamics of human ponytails. We treat the individual fibers as elastic filaments with random intrinsic curvature, in which the balance of bending elasticity, gravity, orientational disorder and inertia is recast as a differential equation for the envelope of the fibre bundle. The static elements of this work were first reported in R.E. Goldstein, P.B. Warren and R.C. Ball, Physical Review Letters 108, 078101 (2012). The compressibility of the bundle enters through an ``equation of state'' whose empirical form is shown to arise from a Confined Helix Model, in which the constraint of the surrounding hair is on a given fibre is represented as a confining cylinder. Using this model we find the ponytail shape is well fit with only one adjustable parameter, which is the degree to which the confining cylinders over fill space. The dynamics of driven vertical ponytail motion is well reproduced provided we introduce some damping, and we find the level of damping required is consistent with that arising from viscous drag of the lateral motion of the hair fibres through the interstitial air. Most of our match with experiment is achieved by approximating the fibre density of the ponytail to to be uniform across its cross-section, and to vary only length-wise. However we show that detail near the exit from a confining clamp (aka hairband) is only captured by computing the full cross-sectional variation. The work reported is joint with RE Goldstein (Cambridge UK) and PB Warren (Unilever Research).

  6. Information Processing and Collective Behavior in a Model Neuronal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-28

    were invited to visit the 711th Human Performance Wing at Wright Patterson AFB to give a briefing on our work. We also presented our work at AFRL in...for an AFOSR project headed by Steve Reppert on Monarch Butterfly navigation. We visited the Reppert lab at the UMASS Medical School and have had many...the requested briefing at the 711th Human Performance Wing . It is a natural extension of the original aims of the grant, as the suprachiasmatic

  7. Collaborative Gaming: Teaching Children about Complex Systems and Collective Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppler, Kylie; Danish, Joshua A.; Phelps, David

    2013-01-01

    Although games--including board games, video games, and Massive Multiplayer Online Games--have garnered significant attention in recent years for their impact on educational outcomes, a primary focus of this interest is the transfer of knowledge from game to nongame settings. Building on this literature, our research explores how game designs that…

  8. Endogenous Crisis Waves: Stochastic Model with Synchronized Collective Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, Stanislao; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Cencetti, Giulia; Tarzia, Marco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    We propose a simple framework to understand commonly observed crisis waves in macroeconomic agent-based models, which is also relevant to a variety of other physical or biological situations where synchronization occurs. We compute exactly the phase diagram of the model and the location of the synchronization transition in parameter space. Many modifications and extensions can be studied, confirming that the synchronization transition is extremely robust against various sources of noise or imperfections.

  9. Measuring and Modeling Behavioral Decision Dynamics in Collective Evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-10

    1303.4629. 15. Leskovec J, Backstrom L, Kleinberg J (2009) Meme -tracking and the dynamics of the news cycle. Proc 15th ACM SIGKDD : 497505. 16. Leskovec J...2011) Memes online: Extracted, subtracted, injected, and recollected. Proc 5th Int AAAI Conf on Weblogs and Social Media : 353–360. 21. Watts DJ (2002) A

  10. Herd Clustering: A synergistic data clustering approach using collective intelligence

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Kachun; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Chan, Takming

    2014-01-01

    , this principle is used to develop a new clustering algorithm. Inspired by herd behavior, the clustering method is a synergistic approach using collective intelligence called Herd Clustering (HC). The novel part is laid in its first stage where data instances

  11. DTIC Review: Human, Social, Cultural and Behavior Modeling. Volume 9, Number 1 (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    ...: Human, Social, Cultural and Behavior (HSCB) models are designed to help understand the structure, interconnections, dependencies, behavior, and trends associated with any collection of individuals...

  12. Behavior Tracking Software Enhancement and Integration of a Feedback Module, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Horizon Performance designed a Behavior Tracking Software System to collect crew member behavior throughout a mission, giving NASA the capability to monitor...

  13. Microalgal Culture Collection Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Milford Microalgal culture Collection holds over 200 live cultures representing 13 classes of of algae. The cultures are maintained in three different growing...

  14. Third Party Collection Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Shelton

    1993-01-01

    United States Code, title 10, sec. 1095, allows DoD to collect from health insurance plans reasonable inpatient hospital costs incurred on behalf of insured military retirees and military dependants...

  15. Freedom and the Collective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straume, Ingerid S.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Isaiah Berlin’s epitomizing Cold War-essay, "Two Concepts of Liberty, " thinkers who emphasize collective concepts of social life have carried the burden of proof against charges of totalitarian tendencies. The background is a ground figure in contemporary political thought that sets notions of collectivity against individual freedom, in a zero sum game: Either one is in favour of the individual, or one is in favour of the collective, and hence, so the bias has it, willing to sacrifice the rights and liberties of individuals. Since it is impossible to favour the latter position and remain liberal, in the wide sense of the term, this dichotomy serves to rob contemporary political thought of both its classical and revolutionary connotations, leaving only individual initiatives like lobbying and voting. Cornelius Castoriadis offers a way around this – arguably false – dichotomy, by regarding individual and collective freedom as two sides of the same coin.

  16. Online Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Neal W.; Pawloski, Bob

    2002-01-01

    Describes the eventful history of online data collection and presents a review of current literature following by a list of pros and cons to be considered when stepping into online surveying. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  17. Long-term collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Collectes à long terme

    2007-01-01

    The Committee of the Long Term Collections (CLT) asks for your attention for the following message from a young Peruvian scientist, following the earthquake which devastated part of her country a month ago.

  18. Turtle Photograph Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photos collected in marine turtle research programs are diverse, ranging from isolated observations of incidental encounters with turtles on the high-seas to...

  19. Glacier Photograph Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Glacier Photograph Collection is a database of photographs of glaciers from around the world, some dating back to the mid-1850's, that provide an historical...

  20. NOS Hydrographic Surveys Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  1. Shared collections collaborative stewardship

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    With practical advice on issues such as governance and business models, demand driven acquisition, rare works, and access, this monograph is a valuable resource for academic library directors, administrators, and collection development leaders.

  2. NLM Digital Collections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Digital Collections offers a search-based Web service that provides access to the Dublin Core metadata and full-text OCR of...

  3. 75 FR 66165 - Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... additional information should be collected to further the aims of government transparency. DATES: Comments... OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment... are warranted. We are particularly interested in comments on whether the information collected in the...

  4. Rehabilitating the Stroke Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grimmond

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this project was to complete an analysis of monograph and audiovisual items held in the Central Coast Health Service (CCHS Libraries and containing information relevant to the treatment of acute stroke. Acute stroke is treated by multidisciplinary teams of clinicians based at two hospitals within the CCHS. The adequacy of the library collection was measured by subject coverage and age. Methods The methodology used consisted of three main steps: a literature review; design, administration, and analysis of a questionnaire to members of the CCHS Acute Stroke Team; and an analysis of the libraries’ collections. The research project utilised project management methodology and an evidence based librarianship framework. Results The questionnaire revealed that electronic resources were by far the most frequently used by participants, followed in order by print journals, books, interlibrary loan articles, and audiovisual items. Collection analysis demonstrated that the monograph and audiovisual collections were adequate in both scope and currency to support the information needs of Acute Stroke Team members, with the exception of resources to support patient education. Conclusion The researchers developed recommendations for future collection development in the area of acute stroke resources. Conducting this project within the evidence based librarianship framework helped to develop library staff members’ confidence in their ability to make future collection development decisions, informed by the target group’s information needs and preferences. The collection analysis methodology was designed to be replicated, and new specialist groups within the client base of the library will be targeted to repeat the collection analysis process.

  5. Collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors)

  6. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors) 304 refs., 53 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Collective field accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a ν/γ of approx. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam

  8. Sparse matrix test collections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, I.

    1996-12-31

    This workshop will discuss plans for coordinating and developing sets of test matrices for the comparison and testing of sparse linear algebra software. We will talk of plans for the next release (Release 2) of the Harwell-Boeing Collection and recent work on improving the accessibility of this Collection and others through the World Wide Web. There will only be three talks of about 15 to 20 minutes followed by a discussion from the floor.

  9. Theory of collective Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qingying

    1982-02-01

    Starting from the cranking model, we derive the nuclear collective Hamiltonian. We expand the total energy of the collective motion of the ground state of even--even nuclei in powers of the deformation parameter ..beta... In the first approximation, we only take the lowest-order non-vanished terms in the expansion. The collective Hamiltonian thus obtained rather differs from the A. Bohr's Hamiltonian obtained by the irrotational incompressible liquid drop model. If we neglect the coupling term between ..beta..-and ..gamma..-vibration, our Hamiltonian then has the same form as that of A. Bohr. But there is a difference between these collective parameters. Our collective parameters are determined by the state of motion of the nucleous in the nuclei. They are the microscopic expressions. On the contrary, A. Bohr's collective parameters are only the simple functions of the microscopic physical quantities (such as nuclear radius and surface tension, etc.), and independent of the state of motion of the nucleons in the nuclei. Furthermore, there exist the coupling term between ..beta..-and ..gamma..-vibration and the higher-order terms in our expansion. They can be treated as the perturbations. There are no such terms in A. Bohr's Hamiltonian. These perturbation terms will influence the rotational, vibrational spectra and the ..gamma..-transition process, etc.

  10. Embodied Evolution in Collective Robotics: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bredeche

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of evolutionary robotics techniques applied to online distributed evolution for robot collectives, namely, embodied evolution. It provides a definition of embodied evolution as well as a thorough description of the underlying concepts and mechanisms. This article also presents a comprehensive summary of research published in the field since its inception around the year 2000, providing various perspectives to identify the major trends. In particular, we identify a shift from considering embodied evolution as a parallel search method within small robot collectives (fewer than 10 robots to embodied evolution as an online distributed learning method for designing collective behaviors in swarm-like collectives. This article concludes with a discussion of applications and open questions, providing a milestone for past and an inspiration for future research.

  11. Collective Psychological Ownership and Intergroup Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Martinovic, Borja

    2017-11-01

    Whereas much social psychological research has studied the in-group and out-group implications of social categorization and collective identity ("we"), little research has examined the nature and relevance of collective psychological ownership ("ours") for intergroup relations. We make a case for considering collective psychological ownership as an important source of intergroup tensions. We do so by integrating theory and research from various social sciences, and we draw out implications for future social psychological research on intergroup relations. We discuss collective psychological ownership in relation to the psychology of possessions, marking behavior, intergroup threats, outgroup exclusion, and in-group responsibility. We suggest that the social psychological processes discussed apply to a range of ownership objects (territory, buildings, cultural artifacts) and various intergroup settings, including international, national, and local contexts, and in organizations and communities. We conclude by providing directions for future research in different intergroup contexts.

  12. Quantifying collective attention from tweet stream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Sasahara

    Full Text Available Online social media are increasingly facilitating our social interactions, thereby making available a massive "digital fossil" of human behavior. Discovering and quantifying distinct patterns using these data is important for studying social behavior, although the rapid time-variant nature and large volumes of these data make this task difficult and challenging. In this study, we focused on the emergence of "collective attention" on Twitter, a popular social networking service. We propose a simple method for detecting and measuring the collective attention evoked by various types of events. This method exploits the fact that tweeting activity exhibits a burst-like increase and an irregular oscillation when a particular real-world event occurs; otherwise, it follows regular circadian rhythms. The difference between regular and irregular states in the tweet stream was measured using the Jensen-Shannon divergence, which corresponds to the intensity of collective attention. We then associated irregular incidents with their corresponding events that attracted the attention and elicited responses from large numbers of people, based on the popularity and the enhancement of key terms in posted messages or "tweets." Next, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this method using a large dataset that contained approximately 490 million Japanese tweets by over 400,000 users, in which we identified 60 cases of collective attentions, including one related to the Tohoku-oki earthquake. "Retweet" networks were also investigated to understand collective attention in terms of social interactions. This simple method provides a retrospective summary of collective attention, thereby contributing to the fundamental understanding of social behavior in the digital era.

  13. Terrorism and the behavioral sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Terrorism has existed for millennia and is a phenomenon well-known to many parts of the world. Americans were forced to recognize this phenomenon, and our vulnerability to it, by two sets of events in 2001: the attacks on New York City and Washington, DC, and the anthrax mailings that followed shortly thereafter. Psychiatry, psychology, and other behavioral and social sciences have been looked to for assistance in collecting and analyzing intelligence data, understanding terrorism, and developing strategies to combat terrorism. In addition to reviewing areas in which the behavioral sciences have made contributions in addressing this problem, this article discusses the developing roles for behavioral scientists in this field.

  14. The algebraic collective model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, D.J.; Turner, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed computationally tractable version of the Bohr collective model is developed to the extent that we are now justified in describing it as an algebraic collective model. The model has an SU(1,1)xSO(5) algebraic structure and a continuous set of exactly solvable limits. Moreover, it provides bases for mixed symmetry collective model calculations. However, unlike the standard realization of SU(1,1), used for computing beta wave functions and their matrix elements in a spherical basis, the algebraic collective model makes use of an SU(1,1) algebra that generates wave functions appropriate for deformed nuclei with intrinsic quadrupole moments ranging from zero to any large value. A previous paper focused on the SO(5) wave functions, as SO(5) (hyper-)spherical harmonics, and computation of their matrix elements. This paper gives analytical expressions for the beta matrix elements needed in applications of the model and illustrative results to show the remarkable gain in efficiency that is achieved by using such a basis in collective model calculations for deformed nuclei

  15. Life Cycle Collection Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Shenton

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Life cycle collection management is a way of taking a long-term approach to the responsible stewardship of the British Library's collections and is one of the Library's strategic strands. It defines the different stages in a collection item's existence over time. These stages range from selection and acquisitions processing, cataloguing and press marking, through to preventive conservation, storage and retrieval. Life cycle collection management seeks to identify the costs of each stage in order to show the economic interdependencies between the phases over time. It thereby aims to demonstrate the long-term consequences of what the library takes into its collections, by making explicit the financial and other implications of decisions made at the beginning of the life cycle for the next 100 plus years. This paper describes the work over the past year at the British Library on this complex and complicated subject. It presents the emerging findings and suggests how it can be used for practical reasons (by individual curators and selectors and for economic, governance and political purposes. The paper describes the next steps in the project, for example, on a predictive data model. The British Library is seeking to benchmark itself against comparable organisations in this area. It intends to work with others on specific comparison for example, of life cycle costing of electronic and paper journals, as a prelude to eliding digital and 'traditional' formats.

  16. Behavioral addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, T W; Clark, L

    2015-02-01

    Behavioral addictions are slowly becoming recognized as a valid category of psychiatric disorder as shown by the recent allocation of pathological gambling to this category in DSM-5. However, several other types of psychiatric disorder proposed to be examples of behavioral addictions have yet to be accorded this formal acknowledgment and are dispersed across other sections of the DSM-5. This brief review marks this important point in the evolution of this concept and looks to future investigation of behavioral addictions with the theoretical frameworks currently being used successfully to investigate substance addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder, in a potentially new spectrum of impulsive-compulsive disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...... to facilitate resource planning and earnings forecasting. As such, this dissertation relates to the topic of firm profitability and the interpretation of cost variability. The dissertation consists of three parts that are written in the form of separate academic papers. The following section briefly summarizes...

  18. 78 FR 16518 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... center follow-up on readmissions to the emergency department for suicidal behavior. The data collected... from patient data include: Demographic data, historical data, and subsequent suicidal behavioral and...

  19. 75 FR 69671 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... behavior. All 147 networked crisis centers will complete the Web-based Crisis Center Survey annually. The Survey requests information about organizational structure, staffing, scope of services, call center operations, quality assurance, community outreach/marketing, telephone equipment, data collection, and...

  20. 78 FR 5780 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comment Request: Generic Clearance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... developing an outreach and communications campaign designed to change consumer behavior. Since these systems... comment on a proposed collection of certain information by the Commission's Office of Consumer Outreach... Reform and Consumer Protection Act, Public Law 111-2-3 (``Dodd-Frank Act''), found in Section 748 of the...

  1. 78 FR 1214 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... OMB approval of the information collections contained in regulations found at 45 CFR Part 60 governing... the HIPDB was delegated by the HHS Office of the Inspector General to HRSA. This rule [[Page 1215..., to identify and discipline those who engage in unprofessional behavior; and to restrict the ability...

  2. The simplest problem in the collective dynamics of neural networks: is synchrony stable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timme, Marc; Wolf, Fred

    2008-01-01

    For spiking neural networks we consider the stability problem of global synchrony, arguably the simplest non-trivial collective dynamics in such networks. We find that even this simplest dynamical problem—local stability of synchrony—is non-trivial to solve and requires novel methods for its solution. In particular, the discrete mode of pulsed communication together with the complicated connectivity of neural interaction networks requires a non-standard approach. The dynamics in the vicinity of the synchronous state is determined by a multitude of linear operators, in contrast to a single stability matrix in conventional linear stability theory. This unusual property qualitatively depends on network topology and may be neglected for globally coupled homogeneous networks. For generic networks, however, the number of operators increases exponentially with the size of the network. We present methods to treat this multi-operator problem exactly. First, based on the Gershgorin and Perron–Frobenius theorems, we derive bounds on the eigenvalues that provide important information about the synchronization process but are not sufficient to establish the asymptotic stability or instability of the synchronous state. We then present a complete analysis of asymptotic stability for topologically strongly connected networks using simple graph-theoretical considerations. For inhibitory interactions between dissipative (leaky) oscillatory neurons the synchronous state is stable, independent of the parameters and the network connectivity. These results indicate that pulse-like interactions play a profound role in network dynamical systems, and in particular in the dynamics of biological synchronization, unless the coupling is homogeneous and all-to-all. The concepts introduced here are expected to also facilitate the exact analysis of more complicated dynamical network states, for instance the irregular balanced activity in cortical neural networks

  3. Collection for Ecuador

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    After the violent earthquake that caused the death of hundreds of people, and left thousands wounded and homeless in Ecuador, we appeal to your generosity. We are starting a collection today to help the victims, and the funds will be donated to the INEPE Institute in Quito. This organization, known at CERN for many years as it has been supported by the Long Term Collections of the Staff Association, will be responsible for sending the proceeds of the collection directly to the victims in the field. On behalf of the CERN Management and the CERN Staff Association Fabiola Gianotti, Director General, and Alessandro Raimondo, President of the Staff Association =========================== Bank account details for donations: Bank account holder: Staff Association CERN - 1211 GENEVA 23 Account number: 279-HU106832.1 IBAN: CH85 0027 9279 HU10 6832 1 BIC: UBSWCHZH80A Please mention: Ecuador

  4. Curating Virtual Data Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris; Leon, Amanda; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Tsontos, Vardis; Shie, Chung-Lin; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NASAs Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) contains a rich set of datasets and related services throughout its many elements. As a result, locating all the EOSDIS data and related resources relevant to particular science theme can be daunting. This is largely because EOSDIS data's organizing principle is affected more by the way they are produced than around the expected end use. Virtual collections oriented around science themes can overcome this by presenting collections of data and related resources that are organized around the user's interest, not around the way the data were produced. Virtual collections consist of annotated web addresses (URLs) that point to data and related resource addresses, thus avoiding the need to copy all of the relevant data to a single place. These URL addresses can be consumed by a variety of clients, ranging from basic URL downloaders (wget, curl) and web browsers to sophisticated data analysis programs such as the Integrated Data Viewer.

  5. Fostering collective intelligence education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Meza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available New educational models are necessary to update learning environments to the digitally shared communication and information. Collective intelligence is an emerging field that already has a significant impact in many areas and will have great implications in education, not only from the side of new methodologies but also as a challenge for education. This paper proposes an approach to a collective intelligence model of teaching using Internet to combine two strategies: idea management and real time assessment in the class. A digital tool named Fabricius has been created supporting these two elements to foster the collaboration and engagement of students in the learning process. As a result of the research we propose a list of KPI trying to measure individual and collective performance. We are conscious that this is just a first approach to define which aspects of a class following a course can be qualified and quantified.

  6. Collective search by ants in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M. Countryman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of collective search is a tradeoff between searching thoroughly and covering as much area as possible. This tradeoff depends on the density of searchers. Solutions to the problem of collective search are currently of much interest in robotics and in the study of distributed algorithms, for example to design ways that without central control robots can use local information to perform search and rescue operations. Ant colonies operate without central control. Because they can perceive only local, mostly chemical and tactile cues, they must search collectively to find resources and to monitor the colony's environment. Examining how ants in diverse environments solve the problem of collective search can elucidate how evolution has led to diverse forms of collective behavior. An experiment on the International Space Station in January 2014 examined how ants (Tetramorium caespitum perform collective search in microgravity. In the ISS experiment, the ants explored a small arena in which a barrier was lowered to increase the area and thus lower ant density. In microgravity, relative to ground controls, ants explored the area less thoroughly and took more convoluted paths. It appears that the difficulty of holding on to the surface interfered with the ants’ ability to search collectively. Ants frequently lost contact with the surface, but showed a remarkable ability to regain contact with the surface.

  7. Collective Intelligence in Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büscher, Monika; Liegl, Michael; Thomas, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    New practices of social media use in emergency response seem to enable broader `situation awareness' and new forms of crisis management. The scale and speed of innovation in this field engenders disruptive innovation or a reordering of social, political, economic practices of emergency response....... By examining these dynamics with the concept of social collective intelligence, important opportunities and challenges can be examined. In this chapter we focus on socio-technical aspects of social collective intelligence in crises to discuss positive and negative frictions and avenues for innovation...

  8. Collection for Nepal

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Following the violent earthquake in Nepal and neighbouring countries, a collection of money to help the victims was organized at CERN. A sum of 34 800 CHF was collected, and transferred to the NGO Live to Love. On July 22, the NGO sent a letter to CERN thanking for the support (see below). You can also find more information concerning this NGO and how they use their funds on our website: http://staff-association.web.cern.ch/sites/staff-association.web.cern.ch/files/Docs/Live_to_Love.pdf

  9. Collective nuclear dynamics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyuk, F.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Fourth International school on nuclear physics was help on 29 Aug - 7 Sep, 1994 in Ukraine. The specialists discussed following subjects:liquid drop and the shell correction method; nuclear deformation energy and fission; nuclear structure at high spins, superdeformed states, structure of excited and exotic nuclei; nuclear fluid dynamics and large scale collective motion; order and chaos as they relate to the collective motion; quantum and interference phenomena in nuclear collisions; quasi-fission and multinucleon fragmentation effects; shell effects in non-nuclear systems; new nuclear facilities

  10. Impedance and Collective Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, E; Rumolo, R; Herr, W

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '4 Impedance and Collective Effects' with the content: 4 Impedance and Collective Effects Introduction 4.1 Space Charge 4.2 Wake Fields and Impedances 4.3 Coherent Instabilities 4.4 Landau Damping 4.5 Two-Stream Effects (Electron Cloud and Ions) 4.6 Beam-Beam Effects 4.7 Numerical Modelling

  11. Collective nuclear dynamics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrosimov, V.I.; Kolomietz, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    The fourth International school on nuclear physics was help on 29 Aug - 7 Sep, 1994 in Ukraine. The specialists discussed following subjects: liquid drop and the shell correction method; nuclear deformation energy and fission; nuclear structure at high spins, superdeformed states, structure of excited and exotic nuclei; nuclear fluid dynamics and large scale collective motion; order and chaos as they relate to the collective motion; quantum and interference phenomena in nuclear collisions; quasi-fission and multinucleon fragmentation effects; shell effects in non-nuclear systems; new nuclear facilities

  12. Husserl on Collective Intentionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szanto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    , respectively. On this background, I will concentrate on Husserl’s alternative construal and demonstrate how it entails a robust anti-individualism regarding both the form and the subject of we-intentions. I will suggest that, contrary to appearances, Husserl does not fall prey to committing a content/vehicle...... type of fallacy, by inferring from the jointness of the contents of collective intentionality that there is one joint vehicle or, worse, some collectively conscious bearer of such. Rather, the Husserlian alternative yields a robust formal-cum-subject anti-individualism and undercuts the need...

  13. Collective nuclear dynamics. Proceedings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyuk, F A [eds.

    1994-12-31

    The Fourth International school on nuclear physics was help on 29 Aug - 7 Sep, 1994 in Ukraine. The specialists discussed following subjects:liquid drop and the shell correction method; nuclear deformation energy and fission; nuclear structure at high spins, superdeformed states, structure of excited and exotic nuclei; nuclear fluid dynamics and large scale collective motion; order and chaos as they relate to the collective motion; quantum and interference phenomena in nuclear collisions; quasi-fission and multinucleon fragmentation effects; shell effects in non-nuclear systems; new nuclear facilities.

  14. Collective academic supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Supervision of students is a core activity in higher education. Previous research on student supervision in higher education focus on individual and relational aspects in the supervisory relationship rather than collective, pedagogical and methodical aspects of the planning of the supervision...... process. This article fills these gaps by discussing potentials and challenges in “Collective Academic Supervision”, a model for supervision at the Master of Education in Guidance at Aarhus University in Denmark. The pedagogical rationale behind the model is that students’ participation and learning...

  15. Online Behavioral Advertising: A Literature Review and Research Agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.C.; Kruikemeier, S.; Zuiderveen Borgesius, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    Advertisers are increasingly monitoring people's online behavior and using the information collected to show people individually targeted advertisements. This phenomenon is called online behavioral advertising (OBA). Although advertisers can benefit from OBA, the practice also raises concerns about

  16. Heterogeneous motives and the collective creation of value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridoux, F.; Coeurderoy, R.; Durand, R.

    2011-01-01

    The collective creation of value has remained underexplored in management research. Drawing on social psychology and behavioral economics, we analyze the impact of the mix of employee motives to cooperate and compare the collective value generated by three motivational systems: individual monetary

  17. Discounting Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten

    2014-01-01

    We re-evaluate the theory, experimental design and econometrics behind claims that individuals exhibit non-constant discounting behavior. Theory points to the importance of controlling for the non-linearity of the utility function of individuals, since the discount rate is defined over time-dated...

  18. Consumer Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyer, W.D.; MacInnis, D.J.; Pieters, R.

    2013-01-01

    CONSUMER BEHAVIOR combines a foundation in key concepts from marketing, psychology, sociology, and anthropology with a highly practical focus on real-world applications for today's business environment. The new edition of this popular, pioneering text incorporates the latest cutting-edge research

  19. Behavior Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Randolph M.

    2010-01-01

    In a perfect world, students would never talk back to school staff and never argue or fight with each other. They would complete all their assigned tasks, and disciplinary actions never would be needed. Unfortunately, people don't live in a perfect world. Student behavior is a daily concern. Teachers continue to refer students to the office as a…

  20. Collective cell motion in endothelial monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabó, A; Ünnep, R; Méhes, E; Czirók, A; Twal, W O; Argraves, W S; Cao, Y

    2010-01-01

    Collective cell motility is an important aspect of several developmental and pathophysiological processes. Despite its importance, the mechanisms that allow cells to be both motile and adhere to one another are poorly understood. In this study we establish statistical properties of the random streaming behavior of endothelial monolayer cultures. To understand the reported empirical findings, we expand the widely used cellular Potts model to include active cell motility. For spontaneous directed motility we assume a positive feedback between cell displacements and cell polarity. The resulting model is studied with computer simulations and is shown to exhibit behavior compatible with experimental findings. In particular, in monolayer cultures both the speed and persistence of cell motion decreases, transient cell chains move together as groups and velocity correlations extend over several cell diameters. As active cell motility is ubiquitous both in vitro and in vivo, our model is expected to be a generally applicable representation of cellular behavior

  1. Long-Term Collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Comité des collectes à long terme

    2011-01-01

    It is the time of the year when our fireman colleagues go around the laboratory for their traditional calendars sale. A part of the money of the sales will be donated in favour of the long-term collections. We hope that you will welcome them warmly.

  2. Collection for SOS animaux

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Pays de Gex animal shelter is collecting funds. There will be things to buy. You will be able to make a donation and/or become a member of the association or simply get information. SOS Animaux stall (Hall, Build. 60, next to restaurant 1) On Wednesday 23 November 2005 (from 9h - 17h non-stop)

  3. Generating process model collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Dijkman, R.M.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Business process management plays an important role in the management of organizations. More and more organizations describe their operations as business processes. It is common for organizations to have collections of thousands of business processes, but for reasons of confidentiality these

  4. Collection for Italy

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabiola Gianotti, Director-General, and Ghislain Roy, President of the Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Following the earthquake of 24 August in central Italy, many of you have expressed your solidarity. The collection to support the victims raised a total of 10 000 CHF, which was transferred in its entirety to Italy’s civil protection through the Italian delegation to the CERN Council. The CERN Directorate and the CERN Staff Association sincerely thank you for your generosity.

  5. Pollen reference collection digitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, F.E.Z.; Donders, T.H.; Bijl, P.K.; Wagner, F.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive Utrecht University pollen reference collection holds thousands of pollen samples of many species and genera from all over the world and has been a basis for the widely-used North West European Pollen Flora. These samples are fixed on glass slides for microscopy use, but the aging

  6. Collective variables and dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.

    1984-09-01

    This is an introduction to some basic concepts of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We emphasize in particular the relevant entropy relative to a given set of collective variables, the meaning of the projection method in the Liouville space, its use to establish the generalized transport equations for these variables, and the interpretation of dissipation in the framework of information theory

  7. Collective Action under Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    Collective action in the form of industrial conflict has declined dramatically since the high tide in the 1970s in Europe. This article argues that this decline is the result of significant changes in both economic and institutional factors, influencing the calculations of employees and of their ...

  8. Developing the Collection Graph

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanke, Tobias; Bryant, Michael; Speck, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Library Hi Tech, Volume 33, Issue 4, November 2015. Purpose In 2010 the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) was funded to support research into the Holocaust. The project follows on from significant efforts in the past to develop and record the collections of the Holocaust in several

  9. Fully electric waste collection

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    Since 15 June, Transvoirie, which provides waste collection services throughout French-speaking Switzerland, has been using a fully electric lorry for its collections on the CERN site – a first for the region!   Featuring a motor powered by electric batteries that charge up when the brakes are used, the new lorry that roams the CERN site is as green as can be. And it’s not only the motor that’s electric: its waste compactor and lifting mechanism are also electrically powered*, making it the first 100% electric waste collection vehicle in French-speaking Switzerland. Considering that a total of 15.5 tonnes of household waste and paper/cardboard are collected each week from the Meyrin and Prévessin sites, the benefits for the environment are clear. This improvement comes as part of CERN’s contract with Transvoirie, which stipulates that the firm must propose ways of becoming more environmentally friendly (at no extra cost to CERN). *The was...

  10. Collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author)

  11. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph

    1997-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author) 270 refs.

  12. Innovation and collective entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spear, Roger

    2012-01-01

    different perspectives on innovation and social innovation and the dynamic interaction through collective entrepreneurship in the the social and solidarity economy; bringing out process and outcome dimensions of innovation. And it will develop an understanding of the drivers and barriers to innovation...

  13. The STARLINK software collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, A. J.; Wallace, P. T.; Sherman, J. C.; Terret, D. L.

    1993-12-01

    A demonstration will be given of some recent Starlink software. STARLINK is: a network of computers used by UK astronomers; a collection of programs for the calibration and analysis of astronomical data; a team of people giving hardware, software and administrative support. The Starlink Project has been in operation since 1980 to provide UK astronomers with interactive image processing and data reduction facilities. There are now Starlink computer systems at 25 UK locations, serving about 1500 registered users. The Starlink software collection now has about 25 major packages covering a wide range of astronomical data reduction and analysis techniques, as well as many smaller programs and utilities. At the core of most of the packages is a common `software environment', which provides many of the functions which applications need and offers standardized methods of structuring and accessing data. The software environment simplifies programming and support, and makes it easy to use different packages for different stages of the data reduction. Users see a consistent style, and can mix applications without hitting problems of differing data formats. The Project group coordinates the writing and distribution of this software collection, which is Unix based. Outside the UK, Starlink is used at a large number of places, which range from installations at major UK telescopes, which are Starlink-compatible and managed like Starlink sites, to individuals who run only small parts of the Starlink software collection.

  14. Sample collection and documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullings, Harry M.; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Yamashita, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hasai, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    Beginning within a few weeks after the bombings and periodically during the intervening decades, investigators in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have collected samples of materials that were in the cities at the time of the bombings. Although some early efforts were not driven by specific measurement objectives, many others were. Even some of the very earliest samples collected in 1945 were based on carefully conceived research plans and detailed specifications for samples appropriate to particular retrospective measurements, i.e., of particular residual quantities remaining from exposure to the neutrons and gamma rays from the bombs. This chapter focuses mainly on the work of groups at two institutions that have actively collaborated since the 1980s in major collection efforts and have shared samples among themselves and with other investigators: the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) and its predecessor the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC), and Hiroshima University. In addition, a number of others are listed, who also contributed to the literature by their collection of samples. (J.P.N.)

  15. Using Videoconferencing to Conduct Functional Analysis of Challenging Behavior and Develop Classroom Behavioral Support Plans for Students with Autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machalicek, W.A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Chan, J.M.; Lang, R.B.; Rispoli, M.; Davis, T.; Shogren, K.; Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; Antonuzzi, M.; Langthorne, P.; Andrews, A.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a functional analysis of challenging behavior for two students with autism using widely available videoconferencing equipment (laptop computers equipped with web cameras). Observers used the videoconferencing facilities to collect data on challenging behavior and to instruct the

  16. 76 FR 81983 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cognitive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... psychological and cognitive aspects of BLS's data collection procedures, including questionnaire design...' Behavioral Science Research Laboratory (BSRL) conducts psychological research focusing on the design and.... BSRL conducts research aimed at improving data collection quality by assessing questionnaire/form...

  17. Business unusual: collective action against bribery in international business

    OpenAIRE

    Dávid-Barrett, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Collective action initiatives in which governments and companies make anti-corruption commitments have proliferated in recent years. This apparently prosocial behavior defies the logic of collective action and, given that bribery often goes undetected and unpunished, is not easily explained by principal-agent theory. Club theory suggests that the answer lies in the institutional design of anti-corruption clubs: collective action can work as long as membership has high entry costs, members rec...

  18. Leadership Behaviors In Project Design Offices

    OpenAIRE

    Kasapoğlu, Esin

    2011-01-01

    Leadership may be defined as the ability to collect a group of people around definite objectives and the achievement of said objectives. An architectural design team needs a leader, and in this paper, the owner of the office is the formal leader. Leadership behaviors of employer architects are directly related to the performance of the design team; therefore, effective leadership is key to a successful design process. Data were collected through a questionnaire on leadership behaviors that wa...

  19. Sniffing behavior communicates social hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Daniel W

    2013-04-08

    Sniffing is a specialized respiratory behavior that is essential for the acquisition of odors [1-4]. Perhaps not independent of this, sniffing is commonly displayed during motivated [5-7] and social behaviors [8, 9]. No measures of sniffing among interacting animals are available, however, calling into question the utility of this behavior in the social context. From radiotelemetry recordings of nasal respiration, I found that investigation by one rat toward the facial region of a conspecific often elicits a decrease in sniffing frequency in the conspecific. This reciprocal display of sniffing was found to be dependent upon the rat's social status in two separate paradigms, with subordinates reliably decreasing their sniffing frequency upon being investigated in the face by dominant rats. Failure of subordinates to decrease their sniffing frequency shortened the latency for agonistic behavior by dominant rats, reflecting that decreases in sniffing serve as appeasement signals during social interactions. Rats rendered unable to smell persisted in displaying reciprocal sniffing behavior, demonstrating the independence of this behavior from olfaction. Oxytocin treatment in rats with established social hierarchies abolished agonistic behaviors and reciprocal sniffing displays. Together, these findings demonstrate that rodents utilize sniffing behaviors communicatively, not only to collect [6, 10-14] but also to convey information. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Balslev, Henrik

    that involved Germany, Britain and France, until independence, which was brightened by exemplary collaboration. Muasya focussed on South Africa, which is the most developed country in sub-Saharan Africa with a well-functioning network of herbaria that covers widely different biota. Sanjappa outlined the history...... crisis. Friis gave a broad overview of the history of herbaria and botanical gardens and the changing conceptual frameworks behind their existence. Baldini talked about early Italian botanical collectors and the fate of their collections. Baas accounted for the Golden Age of Dutch botany during pre......-colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants...

  1. Collective network routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenicke, Dirk

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a unified method and apparatus to classify, route, and process injected data packets into a network so as to belong to a plurality of logical networks, each implementing a specific flow of data on top of a common physical network. The method allows to locally identify collectives of packets for local processing, such as the computation of the sum, difference, maximum, minimum, or other logical operations among the identified packet collective. Packets are injected together with a class-attribute and an opcode attribute. Network routers, employing the described method, use the packet attributes to look-up the class-specific route information from a local route table, which contains the local incoming and outgoing directions as part of the specifically implemented global data flow of the particular virtual network.

  2. Modeling collective cell migration in geometric confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarle, Victoria; Gauquelin, Estelle; Vedula, S. R. K.; D'Alessandro, Joseph; Lim, C. T.; Ladoux, Benoit; Gov, Nir S.

    2017-06-01

    Monolayer expansion has generated great interest as a model system to study collective cell migration. During such an expansion the culture front often develops ‘fingers’, which we have recently modeled using a proposed feedback between the curvature of the monolayer’s leading edge and the outward motility of the edge cells. We show that this model is able to explain the puzzling observed increase of collective cellular migration speed of a monolayer expanding into thin stripes, as well as describe the behavior within different confining geometries that were recently observed in experiments. These comparisons give support to the model and emphasize the role played by the edge cells and the edge shape during collective cell motion.

  3. Behavioral Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Richard H. Thaler

    2000-01-01

    Behavioral Economics is the combination of psychology and economics that investigates what happens in markets in which some of the agents display human limitations and complications. We begin with a preliminary question about relevance. Does some combination of market forces, learning and evolution render these human qualities irrelevant? No. Because of limits of arbitrage less than perfect agents survive and influence market outcomes. We then discuss three important ways in which humans devi...

  4. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Ilie BUDICA; Silvia PUIU; Bogdan Andrei BUDICA

    2010-01-01

    The study of consumers helps firms and organizations improve their marketing strategies by understanding issues such as: the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives; the psychology of how the consumer is influenced by his or her environment; the behavior of consumers while shopping or making other marketing decisions; limitations in consumer knowledge or information processing abilities influence decisions and marke...

  5. Digital collections and exhibits

    CERN Document Server

    Denzer, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Today's libraries are taking advantage of cutting-edge technologies such as flat panel displays using touch, sound, and hands-free motions to design amazing exhibits using everything from simple computer hardware to advanced technologies such as the Microsoft Kinect. Libraries of all types are striving to add new interactive experiences for their patrons through exciting digital exhibits, both online and off. Digital Collections and Exhibits takes away the mystery of designing stunning digital exhibits to spotlight library trea

  6. Ferroelectricity the fundamentals collection

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Basilio

    2008-01-01

    This indispensable collection of seminal papers on ferroelectricity provides an overview over almost a hundred years of basic and applied research. Containing historic contributions from renowned authors, this book presents developments in an area of science that is still rapidly growing. Although primarily aimed at scientists and academics involved in research, this will also be of use to students as well as newcomers to the field.

  7. Learning and knowing collectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgaard, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Scholars from multiple epistemic communities using a variety of models and approaches are working together to understand climate change, biodiversity loss, and other large-scale phenomena stemming from how people interact with the environment. No single model is adequate, no single mind can grasp the multiple models and their numerous implications. Yet collectively, scientists are putting the parts together and reaching a shared understanding. How is this happening, how can it be done better, and what are the implications for ecological economics?

  8. Investigating the Relationship between Coupon Collecting and Top-of-Mind Brand Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrywczynski, Jim

    To determine if coupon collecting has any influence on product information processing like brand awareness, and to understand better the coupon collecting process, an exploratory study examined the relationship between coupon-collecting behavior and brand awareness for the coupons collected. Subjects, 152 randomly chosen respondents from a Midwest…

  9. The generalized collective model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troltenier, D.

    1992-07-01

    In this thesis a new way of proceeding, basing on the method of the finite elements, for the solution of the collective Schroedinger equation in the framework of the Generalized Collective Model was presented. The numerically reachable accuracy was illustrated by the comparison to analytically known solutions by means of numerous examples. Furthermore the potential-energy surfaces of the 182-196 Hg, 242-248 Cm, and 242-246 Pu isotopes were determined by the fitting of the parameters of the Gneuss-Greiner potential to the experimental data. In the Hg isotopes a shape consistency of nearly spherical and oblate deformations is shown, while the Cm and Pu isotopes possess an essentially equal remaining prolate deformation. By means of the pseudo-symplectic model the potential-energy surfaces of 24 Mg, 190 Pt, and 238 U were microscopically calculated. Using a deformation-independent kinetic energy so the collective excitation spectra and the electrical properties (B(E2), B(E4) values, quadrupole moments) of these nuclei were calculated and compared with the experiment. Finally an analytic relation between the (g R -Z/A) value and the quadrupole moment was derived. The study of the experimental data of the 166-170 Er isotopes shows an in the framework of the measurement accuracy a sufficient agreement with this relation. Furthermore it is by this relation possible to determine the effective magnetic dipole moment parameter-freely. (orig./HSI) [de

  10. OPEC behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo

    This thesis aims to contribute to a further understanding of the real dynamics of OPEC production behavior and its impacts on the world oil market. A literature review in this area shows that the existing studies on OPEC still have some major deficiencies in theoretical interpretation and empirical estimation technique. After a brief background review in chapter 1, chapter 2 tests Griffin's market-sharing cartel model on the post-Griffin time horizon with a simultaneous system of equations, and an innovative hypothesis of OPEC's behavior (Saudi Arabia in particular) is then proposed based on the estimation results. Chapter 3 first provides a conceptual analysis of OPEC behavior under the framework of non-cooperative collusion with imperfect information. An empirical model is then constructed and estimated. The results of the empirical studies in this thesis strongly support the hypothesis that OPEC has operated as a market-sharing cartel since the early 1980s. In addition, the results also provide some support of the theory of non-cooperative collusion under imperfect information. OPEC members collude under normal circumstances and behave competitively at times in response to imperfect market signals of cartel compliance and some internal attributes. Periodic joint competition conduct plays an important role in sustaining the collusion in the long run. Saudi Arabia acts as the leader of the cartel, accommodating intermediate unfavorable market development and punishing others with a tit-for-tat strategy in extreme circumstances.

  11. Behavioral epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David S

    2017-01-01

    Why do we grow up to have the traits we do? Most 20th century scientists answered this question by referring only to our genes and our environments. But recent discoveries in the emerging field of behavioral epigenetics have revealed factors at the interface between genes and environments that also play crucial roles in development. These factors affect how genes work; scientists now know that what matters as much as which genes you have (and what environments you encounter) is how your genes are affected by their contexts. The discovery that what our genes do depends in part on our experiences has shed light on how Nature and Nurture interact at the molecular level inside of our bodies. Data emerging from the world's behavioral epigenetics laboratories support the idea that a person's genes alone cannot determine if, for example, he or she will end up shy, suffering from cardiovascular disease, or extremely smart. Among the environmental factors that can influence genetic activity are parenting styles, diets, and social statuses. In addition to influencing how doctors treat diseases, discoveries about behavioral epigenetics are likely to alter how biologists think about evolution, because some epigenetic effects of experience appear to be transmissible from generation to generation. This domain of research will likely change how we think about the origins of human nature. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1333. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1333 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Health behavior change: can genomics improve behavioral adherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Colleen M; Bryan, Angela D; Bray, Molly S; Swan, Gary E; Green, Eric D

    2012-03-01

    The National Human Genome Research Institute recommends pursuing "genomic information to improve behavior change interventions" as part of its strategic vision for genomics. The limited effectiveness of current behavior change strategies may be explained, in part, by their insensitivity to individual variation in adherence responses. The first step in evaluating whether genomics can inform customization of behavioral recommendations is evidence reviews to identify adherence macrophenotypes common across behaviors and individuals that have genetic underpinnings. Conceptual models of how biological, psychological, and environmental factors influence adherence also are needed. Researchers could routinely collect biospecimens and standardized adherence measurements of intervention participants to enable understanding of genetic and environmental influences on adherence, to guide intervention customization and prospective comparative effectiveness studies.

  13. Enterprising Behavior in an Integral Competence Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loredana Orhei; S. Nandram; Marise Born

    2013-01-01

    We present insights from literature on enterprising behavior and competence followed by an application of the competence perspective. Data collection is based on the Critical Incident Technique among 205 entrepreneurs. The study shows how entrepreneurial behavior benefits from an Integral competence

  14. Work Zone Data Collection Trailer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Work Zone Data Collection Trailer was designed and constructed to enhance data collection and analysis capabilities for the "Evaluating Roadway Construction Work...

  15. Pollen Processing Behavior of Heliconius Butterflies: A Derived Grooming Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikl, Anna-Laetitia; Krenn, Harald W.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen feeding behaviors Heliconius and Laparus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) represent a key innovation that has shaped other life history traits of these neotropical butterflies. Although all flower visiting Lepidoptera regularly come in contact with pollen, only Heliconius and Laparus butterflies actively collect pollen with the proboscis and subsequently take up nutrients from the pollen grains. This study focused on the behavior of pollen processing and compared the movement patterns with proboscis grooming behavior in various nymphalid butterflies using video analysis. The proboscis movements of pollen processing behavior consisted of a lengthy series of repeated coiling and uncoiling movements in a loosely coiled proboscis position combined with up and down movements and the release of saliva. The proboscis-grooming behavior was triggered by contamination of the proboscis in both pollen feeding and non-pollen feeding nymphalid butterflies. Proboscis grooming movements included interrupted series of coiling and uncoiling movements, characteristic sideways movements, proboscis lifting, and occasionally full extension of the proboscis. Discharge of saliva was more pronounced in pollen feeding species than in non-pollen feeding butterfly species. We conclude that the pollen processing behavior of Heliconius and Laparus is a modified proboscis grooming behavior that originally served to clean the proboscis after contamination with particles. PMID:22208893

  16. Collection for Refugiees

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You are wonderful, thank you! In response to the refugee and migration crisis, we organised a collection in October and November which called on your generosity. We are now pleased to announce that the amount raised is CHF 14'710. These funds will be forwarded to the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies to respond to the humanitarian needs of the refugees and migrants, providing immediate and longer-term relief, including emergency medical care and basic health services, psychological support, temporary shelter, distribution of food & water and other urgently needed items. We thank everyone who contributed to this important cause.

  17. Collection for Philippines

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Following the devastating Typhoon Haiyan that hit the Philippines in autumn 2013, a collection of funds to help the victims was organised at CERN. An amount of 16 950 CHF had been contributed and was forwarded to Caritas Switzerland. Tuesday 14 July, we received a message from Caritas in order to thank all the contributors for their generosity and to share with you their project’s progress and the results obtained so far. You can find the report on our website: http://staff-association.web.cern.ch/sites/staff-association.web.cern.ch/files/Docs/Rapport_Philippines.pdf

  18. Adsorption and collective paramagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Selwood, Pierce W

    1962-01-01

    Adsorption and Collective Paramagnetism describes a novel method for studying chemisorption. The method is based on the change in the number of unpaired electrons in the adsorbent as chemisorption occurs. The method is applicable to almost all adsorbates, but it is restricted to ferromagnetic adsorbents such as nickel, which may be obtained in the form of very small particles, that is to say, to ferromagnetic adsorbents with a high specific surface. While almost all the data used illustratively have been published elsewhere this is the first complete review of the subject. The book is addresse

  19. Collection of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frew, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus and a method for collecting particles formed by vaporisation during a high temperature treatment of steel (eg cutting or welding) are described in which gas is drawn from the area in which the treatment is taking place through a collector in which the particles are separated magnetically. The air may be drawn by an air ejector from a hood around the treatment area. The invention has particular application where the high temperature treatment is the laser cutting of the stainless steel wrapper around a nuclear fuel sub-assembly. (author)

  20. LONG TERM COLLECTIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Committee would like to thank all those, from near and far, who kindly gave donations to the collection organized at the time of the sudden death of our friend and colleague Stephen O'NEALE The sum of 3,615 francs will be sent to the INEPE Association for the education of children in Quito, Ecuador. We are deeply grateful for this gesture from Steve's family and hope that they find comfort in knowing that Steve's memory will live on through the children whose daily lives will be improved by this gift.

  1. Imagine A Collective Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Silvia Campanini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Iceland plays a key role in the circumpolar context. The research investigates the fields of both the icelandic cultural landscape perception and the icelandic cultural identity. It considers the book Ultima thule; or, a summer in Iceland and Ólafur Elíasson art works as two sides of a same medal: the Iceland on the brain concept (F. Burton. The transition from a cultural identity to a collective landscape identity is investigated analysing Imagine J. Lennon's song which inspired Yõko Ono's work art titled Imagine Peace Tower.

  2. Institutionalized Employer Collective Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Christian Lyhne; Navrbjerg, Steen Erik

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show that employer associations continue to exist in new ways despite internationalisation of the economy, liberalisation of markets and the decline of trade unions. This paradox raises two questions regarding EOs in today’s labour markets: Which employers join employer associations...... and what kind of services do EOs offer employers? This article explores these questions using two comprehensive surveys on EOs in Denmark – a prominent case of coordinated market economies. The main finding of the analyses is that collective activities vis-à-vis trade unions and government are still...

  3. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilie BUDICA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of consumers helps firms and organizations improve their marketing strategies by understanding issues such as: the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives; the psychology of how the consumer is influenced by his or her environment; the behavior of consumers while shopping or making other marketing decisions; limitations in consumer knowledge or information processing abilities influence decisions and marketing outcome; how consumer motivation and decision strategies differ between products that differ in their level of importance or interest that they entail for the consumer; and how marketers can adapt and improve their marketing campaigns and marketing strategies to more effectively reach the consumer.

  4. DataCollection Prototyping

    CERN Multimedia

    Beck, H.P.

    DataCollection is a subsystem of the Trigger, DAQ & DCS project responsible for the movement of event data from the ROS to the High Level Triggers. This includes data from Regions of Interest (RoIs) for Level 2, building complete events for the Event Filter and finally transferring accepted events to Mass Storage. It also handles passing the LVL1 RoI pointers and the allocation of Level 2 processors and load balancing of Event Building. During the last 18 months DataCollection has developed a common architecture for the hardware and software required. This involved a radical redesign integrating ideas from separate parts of earlier TDAQ work. An important milestone for this work, now achieved, has been to demonstrate this subsystem in the so-called Phase 2A Integrated Prototype. This prototype comprises the various TDAQ hardware and software components (ROSs, LVL2, etc.) under the control of the TDAQ Online software. The basic functionality has been demonstrated on small testbeds (~8-10 processing nodes)...

  5. Long-Term Collections

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    45 years helping in developing countries! CERN personnel have been helping the least fortunate people on the planet since 1971. How? With the Long-Term Collections! Dear Colleagues, The Staff Association’s Long-Term Collections (LTC) Committee is delighted to share this important milestone in the life of our Laboratory with you. Indeed, whilst the name of CERN is known worldwide for scientific discoveries, it also shines in the many humanitarian projects which have been supported by the LTC since 1971. Several schools and clinics, far and wide, carry its logo... Over the past 45 years, 74 projects have been supported (9 of which are still ongoing). This all came from a group of colleagues who wanted to share a little of what life offered them here at CERN, in this haven of mutual understanding, peace and security, with those who were less fortunate elsewhere. Thus, the LTC were born... Since then, we have worked as a team to maintain the dream of these visionaries, with the help of regular donat...

  6. Collective ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, B.B.; Faehl, R.J.; Newberger, B.S.; Shanahan, W.R.; Thode, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress achieved in the understanding and development of collective ion acceleration is presented. Extensive analytic and computational studies of slow cyclotron wave growth on an electron beam in a helix amplifier were performed. Research included precise determination of linear coupling between beam and helix, suppression of undesired transients and end effects, and two-dimensional simulations of wave growth in physically realizable systems. Electrostatic well depths produced exceed requirements for the Autoresonant Ion Acceleration feasibility experiment. Acceleration of test ions to modest energies in the troughs of such waves was also demonstrated. Smaller efforts were devoted to alternative acceleration mechanisms. Langmuir wave phase velocity in Converging Guide Acceleration was calculated as a function of the ratio of electron beam current to space-charge limiting current. A new collective acceleration approach, in which cyclotron wave phase velocity is varied by modulation of electron beam voltage, is proposed. Acceleration by traveling Virtual Cathode or Localized Pinch was considered, but appears less promising. In support of this research, fundamental investigations of beam propagation in evacuated waveguides, of nonneutral beam linear eigenmodes, and of beam stability were carried out. Several computer programs were developed or enhanced. Plans for future work are discussed

  7. Phase behavior of charged colloids on spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Colm; Guerra, Rodrigo; Chaikin, Paul

    For a broad class of 2D materials, the transition from isotropic fluid to crystalline solid is described by the theory of melting due to Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson and Young. According to this theory, long-range order is achieved via elimination of the topological defects which proliferate in the fluid phase. However, many natural and man-made 2D systems posses spatial curvature and/or non-trivial topology, which require the presence of defects, even at T = 0 . In principle, the presence of these defects could profoundly affect the phase behavior of such a system. In this presentation, we describe experiments and simulations we have performed on repulsive particles which are bound to the surface of a sphere. We observe spatial structures and inhomogeneous dynamics that cannot be captured by the measures traditionally used to describe flat-space phase behavior. We show that ordering is achieved by a novel mechanism: sequestration of topological defects into freely-terminating grain boundaries (``scars''), and simultaneous spatial organization of the scars themselves on the vertices of an icosahedron. The emergence of icosahedral order coincides with the localization of mobility into isolated ``lakes'' of fluid or glassy particles, situated at the icosahedron vertices.

  8. Creating an iPhone Application for Collecting Continuous ABC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Seth W.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and task analysis for creating a continuous ABC data- collection application using Xcode on a Mac computer. Behavior analysts can program an ABC data collection system, complete with a customized list of target clients, antecedents, behaviors, and consequences to be recorded, and have the data automatically sent to…

  9. New futures for old collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Mille

    2016-01-01

    In recognition of altered global relations since colonial times, the Ethnographic Collections at the National Museum of Denmark have identified a need to redefine their role in society. The Ethnographic Collections explore new ways of activating old collections – ways, which include contemporary...... collecting, co-curation and dialogue with the communities from where the collections derive. Through three recent projects, this paper revolves around questions such as: How can we make associations between the old collections and contemporary society? How do we prioritize, when collecting the contemporary...

  10. Markets for Collective Concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Ossandón, José; Pallesen, Trine

    Despite the recent fall-out of finance, confidence in the market does not seem to be diminishing, but, on the contrary, market mechanisms are becoming key instruments to deal with core contemporary collective concerns, including global warming, education, environmental pollution, supply of energy......, quality of education, poverty and health care (Mirowski 2013). Recent research within STS has started to focus on such kind of arrangements and in this presentation we will critically engage with this literature. Our main results are twofold. On the one hand, we recognize there are important conceptual...... tools already available - such as 'matters of public concern' (Marres 2007) and 'hybrid forums' (Callon et al. 2001; Callon 2009)- that help in framing the particularity of these arrangements. On the other hand, previous STS-market research notions developed mostly in the field of finance studies cannot...

  11. Fission products collecting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fission products trap with no contamination to coolants and cover gas by the provision of a fission products trap above the upper part of a nuclear power plant. Constitution: Upon fuel failures in a reactor core, nuclear fission products leak into coolants and move along the flow of the coolants to the coolants above the reactor core. The fission products are collected in a trap container and guided along a pipeline into fission products detector. The fission products detector monitors the concentration of the fission products and opens the downstream valve of the detector when a predetermined concentration of the fission products is detected to introduce the fission products into a waste gas processing device and release them through the exhaust pipe. (Seki, T.)

  12. JINR Rapid Communications. Collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The present collection of rapid communications from JINR, Dubna, contains nine separate reports on quasi-classical description of one-nucleon transfer reactions with heavy ions, elastic and inelastic scattering in the high energy approximation, experimental study of fission and evaporation cross sections for 6 He + 209 Bi reaction, d ↑ + 12 C → p + X at Θ p = 0 o in the region of high internal momenta in the deuteron, the Nuclotron internal targets, actively screened superconducting magnets, using of polarized target in backward elastic dp scattering, application of transputers in the data acquisition system of the INESS-ALPHA spectrometer, narrow dibaryon resonances with isotopic spin I=2. 93 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs

  13. JINR Rapid Communications. Collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The present collection of rapid communications from JINR, Dubna, contains eight separate reports on Lorentz transformations with superluminal velocities, photo chromic effect in HTSC films, the investigation of hypernuclei in the Nuclotron accelerator, a new hadron jets finding algorithm in the four-dimensional velocity space, investigations of neutral particle production by relativistic nuclei on the LHE 90-channel γ-spectrometer (results and perspectives), coherent meson production in the dp → 3 HeX reaction, the relativistic projectile nuclei fragmentation and A-dependence of nucleon Fermi-momenta, energy spectra of γ-quanta from d-propane interactions at momentum P d = 1.25 GeV/c per nucleon. 86 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Collective symplectic integrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, Robert I; Modin, Klas; Verdier, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We construct symplectic integrators for Lie–Poisson systems. The integrators are standard symplectic (partitioned) Runge–Kutta methods. Their phase space is a symplectic vector space equipped with a Hamiltonian action with momentum map J whose range is the target Lie–Poisson manifold, and their Hamiltonian is collective, that is, it is the target Hamiltonian pulled back by J. The method yields, for example, a symplectic midpoint rule expressed in 4 variables for arbitrary Hamiltonians on so(3) ∗ . The method specializes in the case that a sufficiently large symmetry group acts on the fibres of J, and generalizes to the case that the vector space carries a bifoliation. Examples involving many classical groups are presented. (paper)

  15. Collective biogas plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers contributed to the European seminar on collective biogas plants held at Herning, Denmark on October 22-23 under the auspices of the Commission of the European Communities, Directorate-General for Energy (DG XVII) are presented. Within the framework of the THERMIE programme, a network of OPETs (Organizations for the Promotion of Energy Technologies) was set up in order to disseminate information on new energy technologies throughout the European communities. The potential for further implementation of centralized capacity for the conversion of animal manures and other organic wastes to bio-fuels, not only in central and eastern Europe but also in the developing countries, is discussed in addition to the relevant technologies. Actual biomass conversion plants are described and details are given on operational experience and plant management. Agricultural, economic and policy aspects are also dealt with. (AB)

  16. Chaos in collective nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, N.D.

    1993-01-01

    Random Matrix Theory successfully describes the statistics of the low-lying spectra of some nuclei but not of others. It is currently believed that this theory applies to systems in which the corresponding classical motion is chaotic. This conjecture is tested for collective nuclei by studying the Interacting Boson Model. Quantum and classical measures of chaos are proposed and found to be in agreement throughout the parameter space of the model. For some parameter values the measures indicate the presence of a previously unknown approximate symmetry. A phenomenon called partial dynamical symmetry is explored and shown to lead to a suppression of chaos. A time dependent function calculated from the quantum spectrum is discussed. This function is sensitive to the extent of chaos and provides a robust method of analyzing experimental spectra

  17. Collective and non-collective structures in nuclei of mass region A ≈ 125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Generation of angular momentum in nuclei is a key question in nuclear structure studies. In single particle model, it is due to alignment of spin of individual nucleon available in the valence space, whereas coherent motion of nucleons are assumed in the collective model. The nuclei near the closed shell at Z = 50 with mass number A ≈ 120-125 represent ideal cases to explore the interplay between these competing mechanisms and the transition from non-collective to collective behavior or vice versa. Recent spectroscopic studies of nuclei in this region reveal several non-collective maximally aligned states representing the first kind of excitation mechanism, where 8-12 particles above the 114 Sn align their spins to generate these states. Deformed rotational bands feeding the non-collective states in the spin range I=20-25 and excitation energies around 10 MeV have also been observed. Structure of the collective and non-collective states are discussed in the framework of Cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky model

  18. Educational Behavior Apps and Wearable Devices: Current Research and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Dartmouth and MIT have developed educational behavior apps and wearable devices that collect contiguous streams of data from student users. Given the consent of the user, the app collects information about a student's physical activity, sleep patterns, and location to form conjectures about social and academic behavior. These apps have the…

  19. Variables That Influence the Environmental Behavior of Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Anat; Orion, Nir; Leshem, Yossi

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding the factors that encourage adults' environmental behavior. This mixed approach methodology study used 10 Likert type questionnaires to collect data about nine cognitive and affective components that might influence environmental behavior. The qualitative data was collected through open questions and interviews.…

  20. An evolutionary game model for behavioral gambit of loyalists: Global awareness and risk-aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfinito, E.; Barra, A.; Beccaria, M.; Fachechi, A.; Macorini, G.

    2018-02-01

    We study the phase diagram of a minority game where three classes of agents are present. Two types of agents play a risk-loving game that we model by the standard Snowdrift Game. The behaviour of the third type of agents is coded by indifference with respect to the game at all: their dynamics is designed to account for risk-aversion as an innovative behavioral gambit. From this point of view, the choice of this solitary strategy is enhanced when innovation starts, while is depressed when it becomes the majority option. This implies that the payoff matrix of the game becomes dependent on the global awareness of the agents measured by the relevance of the population of the indifferent players. The resulting dynamics is nontrivial with different kinds of phase transition depending on a few model parameters. The phase diagram is studied on regular as well as complex networks.

  1. Study of the critical behavior of the O(N) linear and nonlinear sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graziani, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the large N behavior of both the O(N) linear and nonlinear sigma models is presented. The purpose is to investigate the relationship between the disordered (ordered) phase of the linear and nonlinear sigma models. Utilizing operator product expansions and stability analyses, it is shown that for 2 - (lambda/sub R/(M) is the dimensionless renormalized quartic coupling and lambda* is the IR fixed point) limit of the linear sigma model which yields the nonlinear sigma model. It is also shown that stable large N linear sigma models with lambda 0) and nonlinear models are trivial. This result (i.e., triviality) is well known but only for one and two component models. Interestingly enough, the lambda< d = 4 linear sigma model remains nontrivial and tachyonic free

  2. Boundary-layer theory, strong-coupling series, and large-order behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Pelster, Axel; Weissbach, Florian

    2002-01-01

    The introduction of a lattice converts a singular boundary-layer problem in the continuum into a regular perturbation problem. However, the continuum limit of the discrete problem is extremely nontrivial and is not completely understood. This article examines two singular boundary-layer problems taken from mathematical physics, the instanton problem and the Blasius equation, and in each case examines two strategies, Pade resummation and variational perturbation theory, to recover the solution to the continuum problem from the solution to the associated discrete problem. Both resummation procedures produce good and interesting results for the two cases, but the results still deviate from the exact solutions. To understand the discrepancy a comprehensive large-order behavior analysis of the strong-coupling lattice expansions for each of the two problems is done

  3. Universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Phobos Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/ overlinepp and e +e - data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with √ s in a similar way as Nch in e +e - collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  4. Probing collective effects in hadronisation with the extremes of the underlying event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, T.; Farrington, S. [University of Warwick, Department of Physics, Coventry (United Kingdom); Skands, P. [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton, VIC (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    We define a new set of observables to probe the structure of the underlying event in hadron collisions. We use the conventional definition of the ''transverse region'' in jet events and, for a fixed window in jet p {sub perpendicular} {sub to}, propose to measure several discriminating quantities as a function of the level of activity in the transverse region. The measurement of these observables in LHC data would reveal whether, e.g., the properties of ''low-UE'' events are compatible with equivalent measurements in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions (jet universality), and whether the scaling behaviour towards ''high-UE'' events exhibits properties of non-trivial soft-QCD dynamics, such as colour reconnections or other collective phenomena. We illustrate at √(s) = 13 TeV that significant discriminatory power is obtained in comparisons between MC models with varying treatments of collective effects, including Pythia 8, epos, and Dipsy. (orig.)

  5. Catalytic conversion reactions mediated by single-file diffusion in linear nanopores: hydrodynamic versus stochastic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David M; Wang, Jing; Wendel, Joseph H; Liu, Da-Jiang; Pruski, Marek; Evans, James W

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. Diffusion within the pores is subject to a strict single-file (no passing) constraint. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice-gas model for this reaction-diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction-diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction-diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion in this multispecies system. The h-RDE successfully describe nontrivial aspects of transient behavior, in contrast to the mf-RDE, and also correctly capture unreactive steady-state behavior in the pore interior. However, steady-state reactivity, which is localized near the pore ends when those regions are catalytic, is controlled by fluctuations not incorporated into the hydrodynamic treatment. The mf-RDE partly capture these fluctuation effects, but cannot describe scaling behavior of the reactivity.

  6. 78 FR 48135 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    .... ADDRESSES: Comments should be sent to Richard Lucas, Office of Policy Support, Food and Nutrition Service, U... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request--Enhancing Completion Rates for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance...

  7. 76 FR 72446 - Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... recipient cash management policies and procedures identified issues concerning the methods that recipients... OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Office of Federal Financial Management, Office of Management and Budget. ACTION: Notice...

  8. Understanding Eating Behaviors through Parental Communication and the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeld, Emily; Shim, Minsun

    2017-05-01

    Emerging adulthood (EA) is an important yet overlooked period for developing long-term health behaviors. During these years, emerging adults adopt health behaviors that persist throughout life. This study applies the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction (IMBP) to examine the role of childhood parental communication in predicting engagement in healthful eating during EA. Participants included 239 college students, ages 18 to 25, from a large university in the southern United States. Participants were recruited and data collection occurred spring 2012. Participants responded to measures to assess perceived parental communication, eating behaviors, attitudes, subjective norms, and behavioral control over healthful eating. SEM and mediation analyses were used to address the hypotheses posited. Data demonstrated that perceived parent-child communication - specifically, its quality and target-specific content - significantly predicted emerging adults' eating behaviors, mediated through subjective norm and perceived behavioral control. This study sets the stage for further exploration and understanding of different ways parental communication influences emerging adults' healthy behavior enactment.

  9. Individual welfare analysis for collective households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchye, Laurens; Cosaert, Sam; de Rock, Bram

    We propose novel tools for the analysis of individual welfare on the basis of aggregate household demand behavior. The method assumes a collective model of household consumption with the public and private nature of goods specified by the empirical analyst. A main distinguishing feature of our......-to-pay for public consumption (i.e. Lindahl prices). The method is easy to use in practice and yields informative empirical results, which we demonstrate through a simulation analysis and an empirical application to labor supply data....

  10. Collection for Ecuador

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Following the terrible earthquake in Ecuador on April 16th, 2016, a collection was organized at CERN and sent to the INEPE Institute in Quito to help the victims. CERN has received the following two letters that we want to share with you. We wish our Ecuadorian friends a prompt recovery and keep them in our thoughts! Dear Fabiola and Alessandro, […] As the CERN contact person in Ecuador, and as the Country Representative for Ecuador in the CMS Experiment, I would like to thank you, the offices you precede and, through you, the whole CERN community, for all the concern and generosity after the terrible earthquake in the coast of Ecuador.  Rather slowly, but full of hope, our people are overcoming this difficult situation.  Contributions from different sources abroad, like CERN's, combined with the rapid and generous local intervention, have greatly helped the affected communities cope with the most urgent needs in order to restart their lives. Once again, I express my ...

  11. Long-Term Collection

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, As previously announced in Echo (No. 254), your delegates took action to draw attention to the projects of the Long-Term Collections (LTC), the humanitarian body of the CERN Staff Association. On Tuesday, 11 October, at noon, small Z-Cards were widely distributed at the entrances of CERN restaurants and we thank you all for your interest. We hope to have achieved an important part of our goal, which was to inform you, convince you and find new supporters among you. We will find out in the next few days! An exhibition of the LTC was also set up in the Main Building for the entire week. The Staff Association wants to celebrate the occasion of the Long-Term Collection’s 45th anniversary at CERN because, ever since 1971, CERN personnel have showed great support in helping the least fortunate people on the planet in a variety of ways according to their needs. On a regular basis, joint fundraising appeals are made with the Directorate to help the victims of natural disasters around th...

  12. Collectes à long terme

    CERN Multimedia

    Collectes à long terme

    2014-01-01

    En cette fin d’année 2014 qui approche à grands pas, le Comité des Collectes à Long Terme remercie chaleureusement ses fidèles donatrices et donateurs réguliers pour leurs contributions à nos actions en faveur des plus démunis de notre planète. C’est très important, pour notre Comité, de pouvoir compter sur l’appui assidu que vous nous apportez. Depuis plus de 40 ans maintenant, le modèle des CLT est basé principalement sur des actions à long terme (soit une aide pendant 4-5 ans par projet, mais plus parfois selon les circonstances), et sa planification demande une grande régularité de ses soutiens financiers. Grand MERCI à vous ! D’autres dons nous parviennent au cours de l’année, et ils sont aussi les bienvenus. En particulier, nous tenons à remercier...

  13. Peripheral blood collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franken, Carmen; Remy, Sylvie; Lambrechts, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    A crucial challenge for gene expression analysis in human biomonitoring studies on whole blood samples is rapid sample handling and mRNA stabilization. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of short bench times (less than 30 min) on yield, quality and gene expression of mRNA in the prese......A crucial challenge for gene expression analysis in human biomonitoring studies on whole blood samples is rapid sample handling and mRNA stabilization. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of short bench times (less than 30 min) on yield, quality and gene expression of m......RNA in the presence of different stabilization buffers (TempusTM Blood RNA tube and RNAlater® Stabilization Reagent). Microarray analyzes showed significant changes over short periods of time in expression of a considerate part of the transcriptome (2356 genes) with a prominent role for NFкB-, cancer......- and glucocorticoid-mediated networks, and specifically interleukin-8 (IL-8). These findings suggest that even short bench times affect gene expression, requiring to carry out blood collection in a strictly standardized way. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group....

  14. Collective spatial keyword querying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xin; Cong, Gao; Jensen, Christian S.

    2011-01-01

    With the proliferation of geo-positioning and geo-tagging, spatial web objects that possess both a geographical location and a textual description are gaining in prevalence, and spatial keyword queries that exploit both location and textual description are gaining in prominence. However, the quer......With the proliferation of geo-positioning and geo-tagging, spatial web objects that possess both a geographical location and a textual description are gaining in prevalence, and spatial keyword queries that exploit both location and textual description are gaining in prominence. However......, the queries studied so far generally focus on finding individual objects that each satisfy a query rather than finding groups of objects where the objects in a group collectively satisfy a query. We define the problem of retrieving a group of spatial web objects such that the group's keywords cover the query......'s keywords and such that objects are nearest to the query location and have the lowest inter-object distances. Specifically, we study two variants of this problem, both of which are NP-complete. We devise exact solutions as well as approximate solutions with provable approximation bounds to the problems. We...

  15. LONG TERM COLLECTIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Long-Term Collections (CLT) committee would like to warmly thank its faithful donors who, year after year, support our actions all over the world. Without you, all this would not be possible. We would like to thank, in particular, the CERN Firemen’s Association who donated 5000 CHF in the spring thanks to the sale of their traditional calendar, and the generosity of the CERN community. A huge thank you to the firemen for their devotion to our cause. And thank you to all those who have opened their door, their heart, and their purses! Similarly, we warmly thank the CERN Yoga Club once again for its wonderful donation of 2000 CHF we recently received. We would also like to tell you that all our projects are running well. Just to remind you, we are currently supporting the activities of the «Réflexe-Partage» Association in Mali; the training centre of «Education et Développement» in Abomey, Benin; and the orphanage and ...

  16. Disposable Collection Kit for Rapid and Reliable Collection of Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Tezuka, Yuki; Takeda, Kazunori; Shetty, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe and evaluate disposable saliva collection kit for rapid, reliable, and reproducible collection of saliva samples. Methods The saliva collection kit comprised of a saliva absorbent swab and an extractor unit was used to retrieve whole saliva samples from 10 subjects. The accuracy and precision of the extracted volumes (3, 10, and 30 ?l) were compared to similar volumes drawn from control samples obtained by passive drool. Additionally, the impact of kit collection method...

  17. Behavioral Targeting—Consumer Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, P. K.; Srinivas, A.

    2011-12-01

    Behavioral targeting is an online marketing method that collects data on the browsing activities of consumers, in order to `target' more relevant online advertising. Behavioral targeting enables marketers to reach in-market consumers and increases the value of publisher inventory. At the heart of behavioral targeting is a learning-based investigation of consumer behaviors. It helps marketers understand consumers' purchase patterns over time, mapping out a customer's activities based not only on a single purchase but also on an annual or even lifetime basis. As marketers increasingly appreciate the importance of customer lifetime value, behavioral targeting can be a foundation for creating a continuous analytical study of consumer trends and patterns. But as behavioural-targeting systems become more sophisticated and invasive, it is vital that the companies behind them are open with users about what is going on, and give them control over their personal information. The aim of this paper is to explore the various tools and techniques of behavioral targeting and its benefits to online marketing. A multiple—case study approach was used for exploring the effectiveness and acceptance of online marketing in the area of the online marketing.

  18. Assessment of Behavior Management and Behavioral Interventions in State Child Welfare Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    Official state program reviews of 204 substitute care facilities were assessed for the types of behavior management and behavioral interventions used and the extent to which agency practices were consistent with learning theory principles. Data were also collected on the type and number of professional staff available to implement and oversee…

  19. Risk perception and intended behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mushkatel, A.; Nigg, J.; Pijawka, D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the approach taken to assess the social impacts of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada on residents in the closest metropolitan area, Las Vegas. The purpose of this portion of the assessment is to investigate the effects of the repository on the future well-being and behavior of Las Vegas residents under different operational futures of the repository. To investigate these effects, a research design and conceptual framework were developed to collect data from a random sample of Las Vegas metropolitan area residents. The design allows for the collection of both baseline data (to determine current risk perceptions and behaviors) and projected effects of the repository under four different operational futures

  20. Behavioral economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2009-01-01

    It is human nature to overestimate how rational we are, both in general and even when we are trying to be. Such irrationality is not random, and the search for and explanation of patterns of fuzzy thinking is the basis for a new academic discipline known as behavioral economics. Examples are given of some of the best understood of our foibles, including prospect theory, framing, anchoring, salience, confirmation bias, superstition, and ownership. Humans have two cognitive systems: one conscious, deliberate, slow, and rational; the other fast, pattern-based, emotionally tinged, and intuitive. Each is subject to its own kind of error. In the case of rational thought, we tend to exaggerate our capacity; for intuition, we fail to train it or recognize contexts where it is inappropriate. Humans are especially poor at estimating probabilities, or even understanding what they are. It is a common human failing to reason backwards from random outcomes that are favorable to beliefs about our power to predict the future. Five suggestions are offered for thinking within our means.

  1. Gesammelte Werke / Collected Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzschild, Karl; Voigt, Hans-Heinrich

    Der bekannte Astronom Karl Schwarzschild (1873-1916) gilt als der Begründer der Astrophysik und als hervorragender Forscher mit einer erstaunlichen Bandbreite seiner Interessen. Arbeiten zur Himmelsmechanik, Elektrodynamik und Relativitätstheorie weisen ihn als vorzüglichen Mathematiker und Physiker auf der Höhe seiner Zeit aus. Untersuchungen zur Photographischen Photometrie, Optik und Spektroskopie zeigen den versierten Beobachter, der sein Meßinstrumentarium beherrscht, und schließlich arbeitete Schwarzschild als Astrophysiker an Sternatmosphären, Kometen, Struktur und Dynamik von Sternsystemen. Die in seinem kurzen Leben entstandene Fülle an wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten ist in drei Bänden der Gesamtausgabe gesammelt, ergänzt durch biographisches Material, Annotationen von Fachleuten und einen Essay des Nobelpreisträgers S. Chandrasekhar. The well-known astronomer Karl Schwarzschild (1873-1916) is regarded as the founder of astrophysics and as an exceptionally talented researcher whose interests spanned a remarkably broad spectrum. His work on celestial mechanics, electrodynamics, and relativity theory demonstrates his great abilities as a mathematician and physicist who significantly influenced the science of his times. His investigations of photographic photometry, optics, and spectroscopy display his strengths as an observer who knew his instruments. But above all Schwarzschild pursued questions of astrophysics, addressing in particular stellar atmospheres, comets, and the structure and dynamics of stellar systems. The host of scientific works that he authored in his short life is now collected in the form of this three-volume complete works; it is supplemented by biographical material, notes from some of todays experts, and an essay by the Nobel Laureate S. Chandrasekhar.

  2. Behaviorism Makes Its Debut: A Review of Lattal and Chase's Behavior Theory and Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Zuriff, G.E

    2005-01-01

    Behavior Theory and Philosophy, masterfully edited by Lattal and Chase, is a collection of 21 papers by major behaviorists, presented and discussed at a conference on the intersection of philosophy and behavior analysis held at West Virginia University in 2000. The chapters in Part I are devoted to philosophy of science (causality, constructs, theory, explanation, reductionism) and the relations among behavior analysis and several contemporary philosophical movements (humanism, empiricism, pr...

  3. Collect method of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, S.C.; Bustillos, O.W.V.

    1991-01-01

    A collect method of uranium hexafluoride was designed, constructed and assembled in Analytical Laboratory from Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo, Brazil. This method of collect is main for quality control of uranium hexafluoride. (author)

  4. Earthworm Collections of the World

    OpenAIRE

    Sherlock, Emma; Livermore, Laurence; Scott, Ben

    2013-01-01

    A poster presenting "Earthworm Collections of the World" This site provides a central hub for researchers and students to locate earthworm collections and specimens, along with useful information on the various earthworm families and species.

  5. Travel time data collection handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This Travel Time Data Collection Handbook provides guidance to transportation : professionals and practitioners for the collection, reduction, and presentation : of travel time data. The handbook should be a useful reference for designing : travel ti...

  6. Collective inertia in paired systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arve, P.O.; Bertsch, G.F.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing

    1988-01-01

    Two definitions of the collective inertia are examined. One of them was recently proposed and applied in a calculation of exotic radioactivity. The other expression is the Inglis cranking formula. It is shown that the new formula corresponds to rapid collective motion while the cranking corresponds to slow collective motion. It is also seen that the two forms of the inertia differ only in the choice of the collective momentum. (orig.)

  7. Collection assessment and acquisitions budgets

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sul H

    2013-01-01

    This invaluable new book contains timely information about the assessment of academic library collections and the relationship of collection assessment to acquisition budgets. The rising cost of information significantly influences academic libraries'abilities to acquire the necessary materials for students and faculty, and public libraries'abilities to acquire material for their clientele. Collection Assessment and Acquisitions Budgets examines different aspects of the relationship between the assessment of academic library collections and the management of library acquisition budgets. Librar

  8. Managing University Research Microdata Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfrey, Lynn; Fry, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the management of microdata collections in a university context. It is a cross-country analysis: Collection management at data services in Canada and South Africa are considered. The case studies are of two university sub-contexts: One collection is located in a library; the other at a Faculty-based Data Service. Stages in…

  9. Hierarchy and predictability in spontaneous behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Gordon; Bialek, William; Shaevitz, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Animals perform a complex array of behaviors, from changes in body posture to vocalizations to other dynamic outputs. Far from being a disordered collection of actions, however, there is thought to be an intrinsic structure to the set of behaviors and their temporal organization. This structure has often been hypothesized to be hierarchical, with certain behaviors grouped together into modules that interact with other modules at time scales that are long with respect to that of an individual behavior. There have been few measurements, however, showing that a particular animal's behavioral repertoire is organized hierarchically. This has largely resulted from an inability to measure the entirety of an animal's behavioral repertoire or even to definite precisely what a ``behavior'' is. In this talk, I will apply our novel method for mapping the behavioral space of animals to videos of freely-behaving fruit flies (D. melanogaster), showing that the organisms' behavioral repertoire consists of a hierarchically-organized set of stereotyped behaviors. This hierarchical patterning results in the emergence of long time scales of memory in the system, providing insight into the mechanisms of behavioral control and patterning.

  10. Microscopic collective models of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, Rezsoe

    1985-01-01

    Microscopic Rosensteel-Rowe theory of the nuclear collective motion is described. The theoretical insufficiency of the usual microscopic establishment of the collective model is pointed. The new model treating exactly the degrees of freedom separates the coordinates describing the collective motion and the internal coordinates by a consistent way. Group theoretical methods analyzing the symmetry properties of the total Hamiltonian are used defining the collective subspaces transforming as irreducible representations of the group formed by the collective operators. Recent calculations show that although the results of the usual collective model are approximately correct and similar to those of the new microscopic collective model, the underlying philosophy of the old model is essentially erroneous. (D.Gy.)

  11. 77 FR 6573 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Collection of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... qualitative customer and stakeholder feedback in an efficient, timely manner, in accordance with the... Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Collection of Qualitative Feedback Through Focus... part of a Federal Government-wide effort to streamline the process to seek feedback from the public on...

  12. From Behaviorism to Selectionism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ernest A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses behaviorism and the gradual shift to a theory of selectionism. Highlights include the development of behaviorism as a part of psychology, including Skinner's theories; varieties of behaviorism, including behavioral analysis; behaviorology in other disciplinary settings; effects of contingencies upon behavior; and the prospects for…

  13. Scaling behavior of online human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Cai, Shi-Min; Huang, Junming; Fu, Yan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-11-01

    The rapid development of the Internet technology enables humans to explore the web and record the traces of online activities. From the analysis of these large-scale data sets (i.e., traces), we can get insights about the dynamic behavior of human activity. In this letter, the scaling behavior and complexity of human activity in the e-commerce, such as music, books, and movies rating, are comprehensively investigated by using the detrended fluctuation analysis technique and the multiscale entropy method. Firstly, the interevent time series of rating behaviors of these three types of media show similar scaling properties with exponents ranging from 0.53 to 0.58, which implies that the collective behaviors of rating media follow a process embodying self-similarity and long-range correlation. Meanwhile, by dividing the users into three groups based on their activities (i.e., rating per unit time), we find that the scaling exponents of the interevent time series in the three groups are different. Hence, these results suggest that a stronger long-range correlations exist in these collective behaviors. Furthermore, their information complexities vary in the three groups. To explain the differences of the collective behaviors restricted to the three groups, we study the dynamic behavior of human activity at the individual level, and find that the dynamic behaviors of a few users have extremely small scaling exponents associated with long-range anticorrelations. By comparing the interevent time distributions of four representative users, we can find that the bimodal distributions may bring forth the extraordinary scaling behaviors. These results of the analysis of the online human activity in the e-commerce may not only provide insight into its dynamic behaviors but may also be applied to acquire potential economic interest.

  14. Behaviorism Makes Its Debut: A Review of Lattal and Chase's Behavior Theory and Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriff, G.E

    2005-01-01

    Behavior Theory and Philosophy, masterfully edited by Lattal and Chase, is a collection of 21 papers by major behaviorists, presented and discussed at a conference on the intersection of philosophy and behavior analysis held at West Virginia University in 2000. The chapters in Part I are devoted to philosophy of science (causality, constructs, theory, explanation, reductionism) and the relations among behavior analysis and several contemporary philosophical movements (humanism, empiricism, pragmatism, selectionism, analytic philosophy). Part II examines behavior-analytic interpretations of mentalistic concepts (intention, imagination, ethics, cognition). Part III presents extensions and applications of basic research in behavior analysis (verbal behavior, creativity, development, education, disability, and corporate culture). The publication of this book signals that behaviorism has developed mature philosophical foundations.

  15. Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J. M.; Foxx, R. M.; Jacobson, J. W.; Green, G.; Mulick, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the origins and characteristics of the positive behavior support (PBS) movement and examines those features in the context of the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA). We raise a number of concerns about PBS as an approach to delivery of behavioral services and its impact on how ABA is viewed by those in human services. We…

  16. Applying a behavioural simulation for the collection of data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristina Risom

    2005-01-01

    To collect real-time data as opposed to retrospective data requires new methodological traits. One possibility is the use of behavioral simulations that synthesize the self-administered questionnaire, experimental designs, role-playing and scenarios. Supported by Web technology this new data...

  17. Collective (Team) Learning Process Models: A Conceptual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Randall

    2010-01-01

    Teams have become a key resource for learning and accomplishing work in organizations. The development of collective learning in specific contexts is not well understood, yet has become critical to organizational success. The purpose of this conceptual review is to inform human resource development (HRD) practice about specific team behaviors and…

  18. Webdatanet: Innovation and quality in web-based data collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinmetz, S.; Slavec, A.; Tijdens, K.; Reips, U.-D.; de Pedraza, P.; Popescu, A.; Belchior, A.; Birgegard, A.; Bianchi, A.; Ayalon, A.; Selkala, A.; Villacampa, A.; Winer, B.; Mlacic, B.; Vogel, C.; Gravem, D.; Gayo Avello, D.; Constantin, D.; Toninelli, D.; Troitino, D.; Horvath, D.; de Leeuw, E.; Oren, E.; Fernandez-Macias, E.; Thorsdottir, F.; Ortega, F.; Funke, F.; Campagnolo, G.M.; Milas, G.; Grünwald, C.; Jonsdottir, G.; Haraldsen, G.; Doron, G.; Margetts, H.; Miklousic, I.; Andreadis, I.; Berzelak, J.; Angelovska, J.; Schrittwieser, K.; Kissau, K.; Lozar Manfreda, K.; Kolsrud, K.; Kalgraff Skjak, K.; Tsagarakis, K.; Kaczmirek, L.; Lesnard, L.; Moga, L.M.; Lopes Teixeira, L.; Plate, M.; Kozak, M.; Fuchs, M.; Callegaro, M.; Cantijoch, M.; Kahanec, M.; Stopa, M.; Ernst Staehli, M.; Neculita, M.; Ivanovic, M.; Foulonneau, M.; Cheikhrouhou, N.; Fornara, N.; Finnemann, N.O.; Zajc, N.; Nyirå, N.; Louca, P.; Osse, P.; Mavrikiou, P.; Gibson, R.; Vatrapu, R.; Dar, R.; Pinter, R.; Martinez Torres, R.; Douhou, S.; Biffignandi, S.; Grceva, S.; David, S.; Ronkainen, T.; Csordas, T.; Lenzner, T.; Vesteinsdottir, V.; Vehovar, V.; Markov, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In light of the growing importance of web-based data in the social and behavioral sciences, WEBDATANET was established in 2011 as a COST Action (IS 1004) to create a multidisciplinary network of web-based data collection experts: (web) survey methodologists, psychologists, sociologists, linguists,

  19. Supporting smartphone-based behavioral activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Rohani, Darius A.; Tuxen, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral activation has shown to be a simple yet efective therapy for depressive patients. The method relies on extensive collection of patient reported activity data on an hourly basis. We are currently in the process of designing a smartphone-based behavioral activation system for depressive...... disorders. However, it is an open question to what degree patients would use this approach given the high demand for user input. In order to investigate this question, we collected paper-based behavioral activation forms from 5 patients, covering in total 18 weeks, 115 days, and 1,614 hours of self......-reported activity data. In this paper we present an analysis of this data and discuss the implications for the design of a smartphone-based system for behavioral activation....

  20. Learning and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... List About PPMD Events News Login By Area Learning & Behavior Attention, Listening & Learning Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) ... Care Guidelines ❯ By Area ❯ Learning & Behavior Share Print Learning & Behavior Facts to Remember People with Duchenne may ...

  1. How behavioral science can advance digital health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry; Bennett, Gary G

    2013-09-01

    The field of behavioral science has produced myriad data on health behavior change strategies and leveraged such data into effective human-delivered interventions to improve health. Unfortunately, the impact of traditional health behavior change interventions has been heavily constrained by patient and provider burden, limited ability to measure and intervene upon behavior in real time, variable adherence, low rates of implementation, and poor third-party coverage. Digital health technologies, including mobile phones, sensors, and online social networks, by being available in real time, are being explored as tools to increase our understanding of health behavior and to enhance the impact of behavioral interventions. The recent explosion of industry attention to the development of novel health technologies is exciting but has far outpaced research. This Special Section of Translational Behavioral Medicine, Smartphones, Sensors, and Social Networks: A New Age of Health Behavior Change features a collection of studies that leverage health technologies to measure, change, and/or understand health behavior. We propose five key areas in which behavioral science can improve the impact of digital health technologies on public health. First, research is needed to identify which health technologies actually impact behavior and health outcomes. Second, we need to understand how online social networks can be leveraged to impact health behavior on a large scale. Third, a team science approach is needed in the developmental process of health technologies. Fourth, behavioral scientists should identify how a balance can be struck between the fast pace of innovation and the much slower pace of research. Fifth, behavioral scientists have an integral role in informing the development of health technologies and facilitating the movement of health technologies into the healthcare system.

  2. The Emergence of Individual and Collective Leadership in Task Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paunova, Minna

    2015-01-01

    leader emergence in task groups as influenced by individual traits, states, and behaviors. However, current approaches to leadership in groups rely on functional achievement explanations of how collective leadership emerges, influenced by positive states and behaviors. Attention to ascription......This review synthesizes conceptual and empirical research on the emergence of individual and collective leadership in task groups, and proposes avenues for leadership research. To advance multilevel study of leadership emergence, including emergence of distributed and shared leadership, the paper...... reviews research on individual leader emergence, structured around two identified theoretical mechanisms—one of leadership achievement (i.e., based on functional behaviors) and another of leadership ascription (i.e., based on nominal characteristics). These approaches compete to elucidate individual...

  3. Active learning and decision making: an introduction to the collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Jacqueline; Lopes, Manuel; Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The importance of exploratory behaviors by which agents actively sample information has been long appreciated in a wide range of disciplines ranging from machine and robot learning to neuroscience and psychology.  Given the complexity of these behaviors, progress in understanding them will require a confluence of ideas from these multiple fields.  This collection of articles in F1000Research aims to provide a home for a broad range of studies addressing this topic, including full length research articles, brief communications, single figure studies, and review/opinion articles, and studies using computational, behavioral or neural approaches.  Here, we provide an introduction to the collection which we hope will grow and become a valuable resource for the researchers exploring this topic.

  4. Perceived enjoyment, concentration, intention, and speed violation behavior: Using flow theory and theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atombo, Charles; Wu, Chaozhong; Zhang, Hui; Wemegah, Tina D

    2017-10-03

    Road accidents are an important public health concern, and speeding is a major contributor. Although flow theory (FLT) is a valid model for understanding behavior, currently the nature of the roles and interplay of FLT constructs within the theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework when attempting to explain the determinants of motivations for intention to speed and speeding behavior of car drivers is not yet known. The study aims to synthesize TPB and FLT in explaining drivers of advanced vehicles intentions to speed and speed violation behaviors and evaluate factors that are critical for explaining intention and behavior. The hypothesized model was validated using a sample collected from 354 fully licensed drivers of advanced vehicles, involving 278 males and 76 females on 2 occasions separated by a 3-month interval. During the first of the 2 occasions, participants completed questionnaire measures of TPB and FLT variables. Three months later, participants' speed violation behaviors were assessed. The study observed a significant positive relationship between the constructs. The proposed model accounted for 51 and 45% of the variance in intention to speed and speed violation behavior, respectively. The independent predictors of intention were enjoyment, attitude, and subjective norm. The independent predictors of speed violation behavior were enjoyment, concentration, intention, and perceived behavioral control. The findings suggest that safety interventions for preventing speed violation behaviors should be aimed at underlying beliefs influencing the speeding behaviors of drivers of advanced vehicles. Furthermore, perceived enjoyment is of equal importance to driver's intention, influencing speed violation behavior.

  5. A Web Browsing Behavior Recording System

    OpenAIRE

    Ohmura, Hayato; Kitasuka, Teruaki; Aritsugi, Masayoshi; オオムラ, ハヤト; キタスカ, テルアキ; アリツギ, マサヨシ; 大村, 勇人; 北須賀, 輝明; 有次, 正義

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Web browsing behavior recording system for research. Web browsing behavior data can help us to providesophisticated services for human activities, because the data must indicate characteristics ofWeb users.We discuss the necessity of the data with potential benefits, and develop a system for collecting the data as an add-on for Firefox. We also report some results of preliminary experiments to test its usefulness in analyses on human activities in this paper.

  6. Cyberbullying: Student's Behavior In Virtual Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Wangid, Muhammad Nur

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Concerning about student’s negative behaviors in using of the internet encouraged the survey to describe the behavior of students in the virtual world. The sample consisted of 497 students, consisting of 336 women and 161 men, taken by proportional random sampling. Instruments of data collection using questionnaire. The results showed that mobile phones become the primary tool in the move to the internet is more widely used to send the message. Using internet lasting for more two h...

  7. Managing Documentary Collections Through Digitization

    OpenAIRE

    Deegan, Marylin

    2001-01-01

    Digital collection development is part of a broader perspective on collection development, and generally needs to be assessed using the same criteria. However, there is a difference between reviewing collections already held by the institution with digitization in mind, and choosing to acquire digital materials from elsewhere. In-house holdings have been initially acquired or retained because they are perceived to have some value to the community served by the library, and therefore theoretic...

  8. The Psyche as Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTURO CLAVIJO A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Behaviorism has argued that behavior is the Psyche and the subject matter of psychology. Although, some scientists had done empirical work with objective methods before 1913, the year in which John B. Watson published his manifesto, he was the first one to attempt a systematization of behavior as the Psyche, that is, as psychology’s subject matter. In this text, I outline Watson’s notion of behavior to compare it with two other forms of behaviorism: Skinner’s radical behaviorism and molar behaviorism. The purpose of the paper is to illustrate how the concept of behavior has been and is changing.

  9. Increasing Access to Special Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricky Erway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In an environment where we increasingly have access to a collective collection of digitized books, special collections will become increasingly invisible if they are not accessible online. In an era of increasing expectations and decreasing budgets, finding ways to streamline some of our processes is the best way to enable us to do more with less. This report details a number of investigations into how access to special collections can be increased. It includes guidance running the gamut from digitization and rights management to policies and procedures.

  10. Exploring quantum mechanics a collection of 700+ solved problems for students, lecturers, and researchers

    CERN Document Server

    Galitski, Victor; Kogan, Vladimir; Galitski, Victor Jr

    2013-01-01

    A series of seminal technological revolutions has led to a new generation of electronic devices miniaturized to such tiny scales where the strange laws of quantum physics come into play. There is no doubt that, unlike scientists and engineers of the past, technology leaders of the future will have to rely on quantum mechanics in their everyday work. This makes teaching and learning the subject of paramount importance for further progress. Mastering quantum physics is a very non-trivial task and its deep understanding can only be achieved through working out real-life problems and examples. It is notoriously difficult to come up with new quantum-mechanical problems that would be solvable with a pencil and paper, and within a finite amount of time. This book remarkably presents some 700+ original problems in quantum mechanics together with detailed solutions covering nearly 1000 pages on all aspects of quantum science. The material is largely new to the English-speaking audience. The problems have been collect...

  11. Collective spin waves on a nanowire array with step-modulated thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubbiotti, G; Tacchi, S; Kostylev, M; Ivanov, E; Samarin, S; Madami, M; Carlotti, G; Ding, J; Adeyeye, A O; Zighem, F; Stashkevich, A A

    2014-01-01

    It is shown experimentally that collective Bloch spin waves are able to propagate in a dense periodic array of nanowires with step-modulated thickness along the periodicity direction. The spin wave dispersion (frequency versus wave vector k) was measured using the Brillouin light scattering technique by sweeping the wave vector perpendicularly to the wire length. Remarkably, the mode measured at the lowest frequency exhibits an oscillating dispersion and its frequency is up-shifted with respect to the homogeneous-thickness wires of the same width. The modes located at higher frequencies have negligible dependencies on the wave number, i.e. are practically dispersionless. Complementary ferromagnetic resonance measurements enabled us to independently measure the whole set of modes at k = 0, showing a good agreement with the Brillouin light scattering data. These results have been successfully reproduced in a numerical simulation employing a two-dimensional Green's function description of the dynamic dipole field of the precessing magnetization. The theory also allowed visualizing the non-trivial distribution of dynamic magnetization across the wire cross-section and estimating the Brillouin light scattering cross-section. The analysis of these intensities suggests complicated magneto-optical coupling between the light and the dynamic magnetization in the arrays of nanowires with step-modulated thickness. This work can stimulate the design, tailoring, and characterization of three-dimensional magnonic crystals. (paper)

  12. An Integrated Open Approach to Capturing Systematic Knowledge for Manufacturing Process Innovation Based on Collective Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangfeng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Process innovation plays a vital role in the manufacture realization of increasingly complex new products, especially in the context of sustainable development and cleaner production. Knowledge-based innovation design can inspire designers’ creative thinking; however, the existing scattered knowledge has not yet been properly captured and organized according to Computer-Aided Process Innovation (CAPI. Therefore, this paper proposes an integrated approach to tackle this non-trivial issue. By analyzing the design process of CAPI and technical features of open innovation, a novel holistic paradigm of process innovation knowledge capture based on collective intelligence (PIKC-CI is constructed from the perspective of the knowledge life cycle. Then, a multi-source innovation knowledge fusion algorithm based on semantic elements reconfiguration is applied to form new public knowledge. To ensure the credibility and orderliness of innovation knowledge refinement, a collaborative editing strategy based on knowledge lock and knowledge–social trust degree is explored. Finally, a knowledge management system MPI-OKCS integrating the proposed techniques is implemented into the pre-built CAPI general platform, and a welding process innovation example is provided to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. It is expected that our work would lay the foundation for the future knowledge-inspired CAPI and smart process planning.

  13. Performance of language-coordinated collective systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubek, Julian; Denkiewicz, Michał; Dębska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    of complex sensory stimuli: that of red wine. Participants were asked to taste, remember and successively recognize samples of wines within a larger set in a two-by-two experimental design: 1) either individually or in pairs, and 2) with or without the support of a sommelier card – a cultural linguistic tool...... designed for wine description. Both effectiveness of recognition and the kinds of errors in the four conditions were analyzed. While our experimental manipulations did not impact recognition accuracy, bias-variance decomposition of error reveals non-trivial differences in how participants solved the task....... Pairs generally displayed reduced bias and increased variance compared to individuals, however the variance dropped significantly when they used the sommelier card. The effect of card reducing the variance was observed only in pairs, individuals did not seem to benefit from the cultural linguistic tool...

  14. Tritium monitor and collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, G.L.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Wickham, K.L.; Maltrud, H.R.; Baker, J.D.

    1992-01-14

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter. 7 figs.

  15. The Fate of Anatomical Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoeff, Rina; Zwijnenberg, Robert

    Almost every medical faculty possesses anatomical and/or pathological collections: human and animal preparations, wax- and other models, as well as drawings, photographs, documents and archives relating to them. In many institutions these collections are well-preserved, but in others they are poorly

  16. Fundamentals of Managing Reference Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Whether a library's reference collection is large or small, it needs constant attention. Singer's book offers information and insight on best practices for reference collection management, no matter the size, and shows why managing without a plan is a recipe for clutter and confusion. In this very practical guide, reference librarians will learn:…

  17. Rethinking collection development and management

    CERN Document Server

    Albitz, Rebecca; Zabel, Diane

    2014-01-01

    This collection of thought-provoking essays by visionary and innovative library practitioners covers theory, research, and best practices in collection development, examining how it has evolved, identifying how some librarians are creatively responding to these changes, and predicting what is coming next.

  18. Collective Bargaining: An Educational Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Gavin W.

    Collective bargaining is a technology and not a philosophy or set of moral values. There seems to be an almost irresistible urge among authors of educational bargaining statutes to adopt the basic tenets of private-sector labor law. However, employment and collective bargaining are different in the public sector than in the private sector, and one…

  19. Self-regulatory processes mediate the intention-behavior relation for adherence and exercise behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Marijn; Sheeran, Paschal; Kok, Gerjo; Hiemstra, Anneke; Prins, Jan M; Hospers, Harm J; van Breukelen, Gerard J P

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the gap between people's intentions and actual health behavior is an important issue in health psychology. Our aim in this study was to investigate whether self-regulatory processes (monitoring goal progress and responding to discrepancies) mediate the intention-behavior relation in relation to HIV medication adherence (Study 1) and intensive exercise behavior (Study 2). In Study 1, questionnaire and electronically monitored adherence data were collected at baseline and 3 months later from patients in the control arm of an HIV-adherence intervention study. In Study 2, questionnaire data was collected at 3 time points 6-weeks apart in a cohort study of physical activity. Complete data at all time points were obtained from 51 HIV-infected patients and 499 intensive exercise participants. Intentions were good predictors of behavior and explained 25 to 30% of the variance. Self-regulatory processes explained an additional 11% (Study 1) and 6% (Study 2) of variance in behavior on top of intentions. Regression and bootstrap analyses revealed at least partial, and possibly full, mediation of the intention-behavior relation by self-regulatory processes. The present studies indicate that self-regulatory processes may explain how intentions drive behavior. Future tests, using different health behaviors and experimental designs, could firmly establish whether self-regulatory processes complement current health behavior theories and should become routine targets for intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Collective action and its interpreters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alfredo Costa de Campos Melo Júnior

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article intention is to give the theorical and intellectual map production regarding collective actions. For such, we will analyze the propositions of five thinkers who have work for the better understanding of this question. We will discuss the contributions of the Chicago School, especially psic-sociology, and Herbert Blumer symbolic interactionism; the classical Marxists approaches on collective actions; Claus Offe and the Marxist point of view on the new models of collective actions; Charles Tilly and his social-historic perspective analysis about social movements; and finally Mancur Olson and collective action from a rational perspective. What we intend is to present comparatively the theorical and practical similarities and exclusions of these contemporary authors who contribute with collective actions today.