WorldWideScience

Sample records for nontraditional experimental learning

  1. AUTONOMOUS LEARNING STRATEGY OF THE SUCCESSFUL NONTRADITIONAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zulaihah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most students of English Education Program in STKIP PGRI Ponorogo can be considered as nontraditional students with family, work, and other life responsibilities which have many influences on their educational goals. Autonomous learning is a customized way of learning applied by individual to find out his own learning needs and learning goals, decide the most appropriate way for his own learning, as well as to monitor and evaluate the learning progress. This research used qualitative descriptive method. The primary techniques in data collection were questionnaire, and interview. In general, the most influential motivation for the students was internal motivation. Advisor’s availability, text book, internet, supportive atmosphere, self discipline, cozy and quiet place, and early morning were among the students’ choices for their autonomous learning. They frequently used music, film, video, essay, and smart phone application in their study. In general, the nontraditional students with high achievement were often felt easy to understand the material especially when it was delivered in relatively “easy” language, expressed their opinion bravely, and patient in doing their tasks. They considered friends, best friends, and lecturer as people who were capable to help them in doing autonomous learning

  2. Transformative Learning Theory in Gerontology: Nontraditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Pamela Pitman; Brown, Candace S.

    2015-01-01

    Mezirow (1978) applied and used Transformative Learning Theoretical (TLT) processes while studying women who reentered academics during the 1970s. Similar to Mezirow's original 1975 work, we identify "factors that impeded or facilitated" participants' progress to obtain their undergraduate degree during the traditional student…

  3. Exploring Non-Traditional Learning Methods in Virtual and Real-World Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukman, Rebeka; Krajnc, Majda

    2012-01-01

    This paper identifies the commonalities and differences within non-traditional learning methods regarding virtual and real-world environments. The non-traditional learning methods in real-world have been introduced within the following courses: Process Balances, Process Calculation, and Process Synthesis, and within the virtual environment through…

  4. Conceptualisation of learning satisfaction experienced by non-traditional learners in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Khiat, Henry

    2013-01-01

    This study uncovered the different factors that make up the learning satisfaction of non-traditional learners in Singapore. Data was collected from a component of the student evaluation exercise in a Singapore university in 2011. A mixed-methods approach was adopted in the analysis. The study stated that non-traditional learners’ learning satisfaction can be generally grouped into four main categories: a) Desirable Learning Deliverables; b) Directed Learning Related Factors; c) Lecturer/Tutor...

  5. Student Media Usage Patterns and Non-Traditional Learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Zawacki-Richter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2,338 students at German universities participated in a survey, which investigated media usage patterns of so-called traditional and non-traditional students (Schuetze & Wolter, 2003. The students provided information on the digital devices that they own or have access to, and on their usage of media and e-learning tools and services for their learning. A distinction was made between external, formal and internal, informal tools and services. Based on the students’ responses, a typology of media usage patterns was established by means of a latent class analysis (LCA. Four types or profiles of media usage patterns were identified. These types were labeled entertainment users, peripheral users, advanced users and instrumental users. Among non-traditional students, the proportion of instrumental users was rather high. Based on the usage patterns of traditional and non-traditional students, implications for media selection in the instructional design process are outlined in the paper.

  6. Student Media Usage Patterns and Non-Traditional Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Müskens, Wolfgang; Krause, Ulrike; Alturki, Uthman; Aldraiweesh, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A total of 2,338 students at German universities participated in a survey, which investigated media usage patterns of so-called traditional and non-traditional students (Schuetze & Wolter, 2003). The students provided information on the digital devices that they own or have access to, and on their usage of media and e-learning tools and…

  7. Barriers to Blended Digital Distance Vocational Learning for Non-Traditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Kimberly; Stinton, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This research identifies and examines the challenges of blending digital distance and vocational learning for non-traditional and low-socio-economic status students who are new to university education. A survey of students in vocational primary education and early years qualifications in a distance university is illuminated by interviews with…

  8. Being Nontraditional and Learning Online: Assessing the Psychosocial Learning Environments, Self-Efficacy, and Affective Outcomes among College Student Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Roslyn La'Toya

    2014-01-01

    The study compared traditional and nontraditional students' attitudes about the psychosocial learning environment and their influence on self-efficacy, enjoyment of online learning, and student satisfaction by using Moos' (1979) Model of Environmental and Personal Variables and the three dimensions of social climate as its theoretical framework.…

  9. Measuring motivation and volition of nursing students in nontraditional learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelsmith, Laurie; Bryer, Jason; Yan, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the best fitting model to represent interrelationships between motivation, volition, and academic success for adult nursing students learning in nontraditional environments. Participants (N=297) completed a survey that incorporated two measures: the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) and the academic volitional strategies inventory (AVSI) as well as demographic information. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation modeling (SEM) were used for data analysis. In phase 1, EFA resulted in factors that generally aligned with previous theoretical factors as defined by the psychometrics used. In Phase 2 of the analysis, CFA validated the use of predefined factor structures. In Phase 3, SEM analysis revealed that motivation has a larger effect on grade point average (GPA; beta = .28, p motivation and volition (r = .42, p motivation, volition, and academic success for adult learners studying in nontraditional learning environments. These findings are consistent with and elaborate the relationship between motivation and volition with a population and setting underrepresented in the research.

  10. Student learning or the student experience: the shift from traditional to non-traditional faculty in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tasso Eira de Aquino

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Trends in higher education indicate transformations from teachers to facilitators, mentors, or coaches. New classroom management requires diverse teaching methods for a changing population. Non-traditional students require non-traditional faculty. Higher education operates similar to a traditional corporation, but competes for students, faculty, and funding to sustain daily operations and improve academic ranking among peers (Pak, 2013. This growing phenomenon suggests the need for faculty to transform the existing educational culture, ensuring the ability to attract and retain students. Transitions from student learning to the student experience and increasing student satisfaction scores are influencing facilitation in the classroom. On-line facilitation methods are transforming to include teamwork, interactive tutorials, media, and extending beyond group discussion. Faculty should be required to provide more facilitation, coaching, and mentoring with the shifting roles resulting in transitions from traditional faculty to faculty-coach and faculty mentor. The non-traditional adult student may require a more hands on guidance approach and may not be as self-directed as the adult learning theory proposes. This topic is important to individuals that support creation of new knowledge related to non-traditional adult learning models.

  11. The quest for knowledge transfer efficacy: blended teaching, online and in-class, with consideration of learning typologies for non-traditional and traditional students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorn, Judy R.; Van Doorn, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The pedagogical paradigm shift in higher education to 24-h learning environments composed of teaching delivery methods of online courses, blended/hybrid formats, and face-to-face (f2f) classes is increasing access to global, lifelong learning. Online degrees have been offered at 62.4% of 2800 colleges and universities. Students can now design flexible, life-balanced course schedules. Higher knowledge transfer rates may exist with blended course formats with online quizzes and valuable class time set for Socratic, quality discussions and creative team presentations. Research indicates that younger, traditional students exhibit heightened performance goal orientations and prefer entertaining professors who are funny, whereas non-traditional students exhibit mastery profiles and prefer courses taught by flexible, yet organized, professors. A 5-year study found that amongst 51,000 students taking both f2f and online courses, higher online failure rates occurred. Competing life roles for non-traditional students and reading and writing needs for at-risk students suggest that performance may be better if programs are started in f2f courses. Models on effective knowledge transfer consider the planning process, delivery methods, and workplace application, but a gap exists for identifying the diversity of learner needs. Higher education enrollments are being compromised with lower online retention rates. Therefore, the main purpose of this review is to delineate disparate learning styles and present a typology for the learning needs of traditional and non-traditional students. Secondly, psychology as a science may need more rigorous curriculum markers like mapping APA guidelines to knowledge objectives, critical assignments, and student learning outcomes (SLOs) (e.g., online rubric assessments for scoring APA style critical thinking essays on selected New York Times books). Efficacious knowledge transfer to diverse, 21st century students should be the Academy's focus. PMID

  12. The quest for knowledge transfer efficacy: blended teaching, online and in-class, with consideration of learning typologies for non-traditional and traditional students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Rouse Van Doorn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The pedagogical paradigm shift in higher education to 24-hour learning environments composed of teaching delivery methods of online courses, blended/hybrid formats, and face-to-face (f2f classes is increasing access to global, lifelong learning. Online degrees have been offered at 62.4% of 2,800 colleges and universities. Students can now design flexible, life-balanced course schedules. Higher knowledge transfer rates may exist with blended course formats with online quizzes and valuable class time set for Socratic, quality discussions and creative team presentations. Research indicates that younger, traditional students exhibit heightened performance goal orientations and prefer entertaining professors who are funny, whereas non-traditional students exhibit mastery profiles and prefer courses taught by flexible, yet organized, professors. A 5-year study found that amongst 51,000 students taking both f2f and online courses, higher online failure rates occurred. Competing life roles for non-traditional students and reading and writing needs for at-risk students suggest that performance may be better if programs are started in f2f courses. Models on effective knowledge transfer consider the planning process, delivery methods, and workplace application, but a gap exists for identifying the diversity of learner needs. Higher education enrollments are being compromised with lower online retention rates. Therefore, the main purpose of this review is to delineate disparate learning styles and present a typology for the learning needs of traditional and non-traditional students. Secondly, psychology as a science may need more rigorous curriculum markers like mapping APA guidelines to knowledge objectives, critical assignments, and student learning outcomes (SLOs (e.g. online rubric assessments for scoring APA style critical thinking essays on selected New York Times books. Efficacious knowledge transfer to diverse, 21st century students should be the

  13. The quest for knowledge transfer efficacy: blended teaching, online and in-class, with consideration of learning typologies for non-traditional and traditional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorn, Judy R; Van Doorn, John D

    2014-01-01

    The pedagogical paradigm shift in higher education to 24-h learning environments composed of teaching delivery methods of online courses, blended/hybrid formats, and face-to-face (f2f) classes is increasing access to global, lifelong learning. Online degrees have been offered at 62.4% of 2800 colleges and universities. Students can now design flexible, life-balanced course schedules. Higher knowledge transfer rates may exist with blended course formats with online quizzes and valuable class time set for Socratic, quality discussions and creative team presentations. Research indicates that younger, traditional students exhibit heightened performance goal orientations and prefer entertaining professors who are funny, whereas non-traditional students exhibit mastery profiles and prefer courses taught by flexible, yet organized, professors. A 5-year study found that amongst 51,000 students taking both f2f and online courses, higher online failure rates occurred. Competing life roles for non-traditional students and reading and writing needs for at-risk students suggest that performance may be better if programs are started in f2f courses. Models on effective knowledge transfer consider the planning process, delivery methods, and workplace application, but a gap exists for identifying the diversity of learner needs. Higher education enrollments are being compromised with lower online retention rates. Therefore, the main purpose of this review is to delineate disparate learning styles and present a typology for the learning needs of traditional and non-traditional students. Secondly, psychology as a science may need more rigorous curriculum markers like mapping APA guidelines to knowledge objectives, critical assignments, and student learning outcomes (SLOs) (e.g., online rubric assessments for scoring APA style critical thinking essays on selected New York Times books). Efficacious knowledge transfer to diverse, 21st century students should be the Academy's focus.

  14. Teachers' views of using e-learning for non-traditional students in higher education across three disciplines [nursing, chemistry and management] at a time of massification and increased diversity in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Helen T; O'Driscoll, Mike; Simpson, Vikki; Shawe, Jill

    2013-09-01

    The expansion of the higher educational sector in the United Kingdom over the last two decades to meet political aspirations of the successive governments and popular demand for participation in the sector (the Widening Participation Agenda) has overlapped with the introduction of e-learning. This paper describes teachers' views of using e-learning for non-traditional students in higher education across three disciplines [nursing, chemistry and management] at a time of massification and increased diversity in higher education. A three phase, mixed methods study; this paper reports findings from phase two of the study. One university in England. Higher education teachers teaching on the nursing, chemistry and management programmes. Focus groups with these teachers. Findings from these data show that teachers across the programmes have limited knowledge of whether students are non-traditional or what category of non-traditional status they might be in. Such knowledge as they have does not seem to influence the tailoring of teaching and learning for non-traditional students. Teachers in chemistry and nursing want more support from the university to improve their use of e-learning, as did teachers in management but to a lesser extent. Our conclusions confirm other studies in the field outside nursing which suggest that non-traditional students' learning needs have not been considered meaningfully in the development of e-learning strategies in universities. We suggest that this may be because teachers have been required to develop e-learning at the same time as they cope with the massification of, and widening participation in, higher education. The findings are of particular importance to nurse educators given the high number of non-traditional students on nursing programmes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tuition fees and funding – barriers for non-traditional students? First results from the international research project Opening Universities for Lifelong Learning (OPULL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moissidis, Sonja; Schwarz, Jochen; Yndigegn, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Project OPULL – Opening Universities for Lifelong Learning – is undertaking research into ways of opening up higher education to vocationally qualified and experienced target groups in four European countries. Open university models in Germany, Denmark, Finland and the United Kingdom are being...... investigated in three research phases between 2009 and 2012 with the aim of identifying critical success factors for building open universities for Europe. This paper presents the first phase, in which educational systems in the participant countries have been mapped and interviews with lifelong learning...... experts undertaken. The current situation and perspectives in each country together with critical issues on how fees and funding influence higher education access for non-traditional students in these countries are discussed and explored through the interview evidence. The initial findings of the first...

  16. Nontraditional renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpil'rajn, Eh.Eh.

    1997-01-01

    The paper considers the application possibilities of nontraditional renewable energy sources to generate electricity, estimates the potential of nontraditional sources using energy of Sun, wind, biomass, as well as, geothermal energy and presents the results of economical analysis of cost of electricity generated by solar electrical power plants, geothermal and electrical plants and facilities for power reprocessing of biomass. 1 tab

  17. Five years of lesson modification to implement non-traditional learning sessions in a traditional-delivery curriculum: A retrospective assessment using applied implementation variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Shaun E; McNair, Bryan; Kiser, Tyree H; Franson, Kari L

    Non-traditional learning (NTL), including aspects of self-directed learning (SDL), may address self-awareness development needs. Many factors can impact successful implementation of NTL. To share our multi-year experience with modifications that aim to improve NTL sessions in a traditional curriculum. To improve understanding of applied implementation variables (some of which were based on successful SDL implementation components) that impact NTL. We delivered a single lesson in a traditional-delivery curriculum once annually for five years, varying delivery annually in response to student learning and reaction-to-learning results. At year 5, we compared student learning and reaction-to-learning to applied implementation factors using logistic regression. Higher instructor involvement and overall NTL levels predicted correct exam responses (p=0.0007 and ptraditional and highest overall NTL deliveries. Students rated instructor presentation skills and teaching methods higher when greater instructor involvement (pmethods were most effective when lower student involvement and higher technology levels (ptraditional-delivery curriculum, instructor involvement appears essential, while the impact of student involvement and educational technology levels varies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Future Of Nontraditional Occupations For Women: A Comprehensive Review Of The Literature And Implications For Workplace Learning And Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth Zula

    2014-01-01

    The United States entrance into World War II in 1941 has been credited with beginning a large movement of women into the workforce and the commencement of governmental support for women working in nontraditional occupations. However, the beginning of the support for women in the workforce can be traced back to the 1920 federal mandate to create the Women’s Bureau within the United States Department of Labor. The United States Department of Labor Women’s Bureau is the only federal agency manda...

  19. Experimental Learning in Nursing Literature Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskandar Fathiazar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Experimental learning is a type of discovery learning. This method of learning appears to be suitable for nursing education, but there is not enough evidence about it. As a result, in this non-systematic review article, after explaining experimental learning, its application in nursing will be presented based on literature review and with functional examples. According to the results, in this kind of learning, students practice with experimental cases and learn by failure in. Participants should have the main role and teachers act as mentors or learning facilitators. According to the literature, it seems useful to use this new method in nursing education.

  20. Non-Traditional Wraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Buffy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a recipe for non-traditional wraps. In this article, the author describes how adults and children can help with the recipe and the skills involved with this recipe. The bigger role that children can play in the making of the item the more they are apt to try new things and appreciate the texture and taste.

  1. Experimental Learning Enhancing Improvisation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Christopoulos, Tania; Wilner, Adriana; Trindade Bestetti, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to present improvisation training and experimentation as an alternative method to deal with unexpected events in which structured processes do not seem to work. Design/Methodology/Approach: Based on the literature of sensemaking and improvisation, the study designs a framework and process model of experimental learning…

  2. Supporting Online, Non-Traditional Students through the Introduction of Effective E-Learning Tools in a Pre-University Tertiary Enabling Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinidis, George

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of external students enrolling at Charles Darwin University has led to the university investing in new technologies to provide better support for students studying online. Many students, however, come from non-traditional backgrounds and lack some of the skills and confidence to participate successfully in an e-learning…

  3. Nontraditional family romance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, K

    2001-07-01

    Family stories lie at the heart of psychoanalytic developmental theory and psychoanalytic clinical technique, but whose family? Increasingly, lesbian and gay families, multiparent families, and single-parent families are relying on modern reproductive technologies to form families. The contemplation of these nontraditional families and the vicissitudes of contemporary reproduction lead to an unknowing of what families are, including the ways in which psychoanalysts configure the family within developmental theory. This article focuses on the stories that families tell in order to account for their formation--stories that include narratives about parental union, parental sexuality, and conception. The author addresses three constructs that inform family stories and that require rethinking in light of the category crises posed by and for the nontraditional family: (1) normative logic, (2) family reverie and the construction of a family romance, and (3) the primal scene. These constructs are examined in tandem with detailed clinical material taken from the psychotherapy of a seven-year-old boy and his two mothers.

  4. Critical Thinking and the Use of Nontraditional Instructional Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orique, Sabrina B; McCarthy, Mary Ann

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between critical thinking and the use of concept mapping (CM) and problem-based learning (PBL) during care plan development. A quasi-experimental study with a pretest-posttest design was conducted using a convenience sample (n = 49) of first-semester undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students. Critical thinking was measured using the Holistic Critical Thinking Scoring Rubric. Data analysis consisted of a repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc mean comparison tests using the Bonferroni method. Findings indicated that mean critical thinking at phase 4 (CM and PBL) was significantly higher, compared with phase 1 (baseline), phase 2 (PBL), and phase 3 (CM [p < 0.001]). The results support the utilization of nontraditional instructional (CM and PBL) methodologies in undergraduate nursing curricula. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. An Investigation of the Perceptions of Business Students Regarding Non-Traditional Business Education Formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, John W.; Hadjimarcou, John

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 118 undergraduate business students at a major southwestern university found that most consider non-traditional education as a viable option to traditional education. However, respondents also identified disadvantages of non-traditional programs, such as cost, external validity of degrees, and impersonalized learning environment.…

  6. Andragogical Teaching Methods to Enhance Non-Traditional Student Classroom Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Pamela; Withey, Paul; Lawton, Deb; Aquino, Carlos Tasso

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a reflection of current trends in higher education, identify some of the changes in student behavior, and potential identification of non-traditional classroom facilitation with the purpose of strengthening active learning and use of technology in the classroom. Non-traditional teaching is emerging in the form…

  7. Non-traditional inheritance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    In the last few years, several non-traditional forms of inheritance have been recognized. These include mosaicism, cytoplasmic inheritance, uniparental disomy, imprinting, amplification/anticipation, and somatic recombination. Genomic imprinting (GI) is the dependence of the phenotype on the sex of the transmitting parent. GI in humans seems to involve growth, behaviour, and survival in utero. The detailed mechanism of genomic imprinting is not known, but it seems that some process is involved in turning a gene off; this probably involves two genes, one of which produces a product that turns a gene off, and the gene that is itself turned off. The process of imprinting (turning off) may be associated with methylation. Erasure of imprinting can occur, and seems to be associated with meiosis. 10 refs

  8. Nontraditional machining processes research advances

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Nontraditional machining employs processes that remove material by various methods involving thermal, electrical, chemical and mechanical energy or even combinations of these. Nontraditional Machining Processes covers recent research and development in techniques and processes which focus on achieving high accuracies and good surface finishes, parts machined without burrs or residual stresses especially with materials that cannot be machined by conventional methods. With applications to the automotive, aircraft and mould and die industries, Nontraditional Machining Processes explores different aspects and processes through dedicated chapters. The seven chapters explore recent research into a range of topics including laser assisted manufacturing, abrasive water jet milling and hybrid processes. Students and researchers will find the practical examples and new processes useful for both reference and for developing further processes. Industry professionals and materials engineers will also find Nontraditional M...

  9. Manifold Regularized Experimental Design for Active Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lining; Shum, Hubert P H; Shao, Ling

    2016-12-02

    Various machine learning and data mining tasks in classification require abundant data samples to be labeled for training. Conventional active learning methods aim at labeling the most informative samples for alleviating the labor of the user. Many previous studies in active learning select one sample after another in a greedy manner. However, this is not very effective because the classification models has to be retrained for each newly labeled sample. Moreover, many popular active learning approaches utilize the most uncertain samples by leveraging the classification hyperplane of the classifier, which is not appropriate since the classification hyperplane is inaccurate when the training data are small-sized. The problem of insufficient training data in real-world systems limits the potential applications of these approaches. This paper presents a novel method of active learning called manifold regularized experimental design (MRED), which can label multiple informative samples at one time for training. In addition, MRED gives an explicit geometric explanation for the selected samples to be labeled by the user. Different from existing active learning methods, our method avoids the intrinsic problems caused by insufficiently labeled samples in real-world applications. Various experiments on synthetic datasets, the Yale face database and the Corel image database have been carried out to show how MRED outperforms existing methods.

  10. Bridge to the future: nontraditional clinical settings, concepts and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, H S; Dowell, M A; Jackson, M A

    1995-11-01

    Healthcare restructuring in the wake of healthcare reform places greater emphasis on primary healthcare. Clinical education in acute care settings and existing community health agencies are not compatible with teaching basic concepts, principles and skills fundamental to nursing. Problems of clients in acute care settings are too complex and clients in the community are often too dispersed for necessary faculty support and supervision of beginning nursing students. Nontraditional learning settings offer the baccalaureate student the opportunity to practice fundamental skills of care and address professional skills of negotiation, assertiveness, organization, collaboration and leadership. An overview of faculty designed clinical learning experiences in nontraditional sites such as McDonald's restaurants, inner city churches, YWCA's, the campus community and homes are presented. The legal, ethical and academic issues associated with nontraditional learning settings are discussed in relation to individual empowerment, decision making and evaluation. Implications for the future address the role of the students and faculty as they interact with the community in which they live and practice.

  11. Affordable non-traditional source data mining for context assessment to improve distributed fusion system robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Christopher; Haith, Gary; Steinberg, Alan; Morefield, Charles; Morefield, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes methods to affordably improve the robustness of distributed fusion systems by opportunistically leveraging non-traditional data sources. Adaptive methods help find relevant data, create models, and characterize the model quality. These methods also can measure the conformity of this non-traditional data with fusion system products including situation modeling and mission impact prediction. Non-traditional data can improve the quantity, quality, availability, timeliness, and diversity of the baseline fusion system sources and therefore can improve prediction and estimation accuracy and robustness at all levels of fusion. Techniques are described that automatically learn to characterize and search non-traditional contextual data to enable operators integrate the data with the high-level fusion systems and ontologies. These techniques apply the extension of the Data Fusion & Resource Management Dual Node Network (DNN) technical architecture at Level 4. The DNN architecture supports effectively assessment and management of the expanded portfolio of data sources, entities of interest, models, and algorithms including data pattern discovery and context conformity. Affordable model-driven and data-driven data mining methods to discover unknown models from non-traditional and `big data' sources are used to automatically learn entity behaviors and correlations with fusion products, [14 and 15]. This paper describes our context assessment software development, and the demonstration of context assessment of non-traditional data to compare to an intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance fusion product based upon an IED POIs workflow.

  12. Physicochemical changes in nontraditional pasta during cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changes in biochemical components of non-traditional spaghetti during cooking were reflected in the quality of the cooked product. Spaghetti samples were made from traditional and non-traditional formulations including semolina 100%, whole wheat flour 100%, semolina-whole wheat flour (49:51), semol...

  13. Role Model Influencers of Nontraditional Professional Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunneborg, Patricia W.

    1982-01-01

    Tested the influence of a supportive family on 142 women employed in or studying for nontraditional careers. Results showed the importance of emotional support by parents, siblings, peers and teachers. Suggests counselors encourage women to locate role models and mentors if preparing for nontraditional careers. (Author/JAC)

  14. Factors Affecting Nontraditional African American Students' Participation in Online World Literature Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrills, J. Maria Sweeney

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how communication preferences, learning preferences, and perceptions about online learning affect nontraditional African American students' participation in online world literature courses at a historically Black university (HBCU) in the southeastern United States. An instrumental case study was…

  15. An experimental research on blended learning in the development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experimental research conducted for this study is based on a blended learning (BL) approach to the teaching of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in China. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a blended learning approach aimed at improving students' listening and speaking skills.

  16. Experimental Design: Utilizing Microsoft Mathematics in Teaching and Learning Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaviyanthi, Rina; Supriani, Yani

    2015-01-01

    The experimental design was conducted to investigate the use of Microsoft Mathematics, free software made by Microsoft Corporation, in teaching and learning Calculus. This paper reports results from experimental study details on implementation of Microsoft Mathematics in Calculus, students' achievement and the effects of the use of Microsoft…

  17. Effectiveness of student learning during experimental work in primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Logar, Ana; Peklaj, Cirila; Ferk Savec, Vesna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the research was to optimize the effectiveness of student learning based on experimental work in chemistry classes in Slovenian primary schools. To obtain evidence about how experimental work is implemented during regular chemistry classes, experimental work was videotaped during 19 units of chemistry lessons at 12 Slovenian primary schools from the pool of randomly selected schools. Altogether 332 eight-grade students were involved in the investigation, with an average...

  18. Danish nontraditional power - 10 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larin, V.

    2001-01-01

    The changes that took place in nontraditional energy generation in Denmark in the recent decade are described. Specifically, vegetable oil cars, wind mills and solar collectors are considered. Biogas is used extensively and interest to firewood is revived [ru

  19. Low demand for nontraditional cookstove technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq; Dwivedi, Puneet; Bailis, Robert; Hildemann, Lynn; Miller, Grant

    2012-07-03

    Biomass combustion with traditional cookstoves causes substantial environmental and health harm. Nontraditional cookstove technologies can be efficacious in reducing this adverse impact, but they are adopted and used at puzzlingly low rates. This study analyzes the determinants of low demand for nontraditional cookstoves in rural Bangladesh by using both stated preference (from a nationally representative survey of rural women) and revealed preference (assessed by conducting a cluster-randomized trial of cookstove prices) approaches. We find consistent evidence across both analyses suggesting that the women in rural Bangladesh do not perceive indoor air pollution as a significant health hazard, prioritize other basic developmental needs over nontraditional cookstoves, and overwhelmingly rely on a free traditional cookstove technology and are therefore not willing to pay much for a new nontraditional cookstove. Efforts to improve health and abate environmental harm by promoting nontraditional cookstoves may be more successful by designing and disseminating nontraditional cookstoves with features valued more highly by users, such as reduction of operating costs, even when those features are not directly related to the cookstoves' health and environmental impacts.

  20. Nontraditional work schedules for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, Lynnae; Sanborn, Michael; Alexander, Emily

    2008-11-15

    Nontraditional work schedules for pharmacists at three institutions are described. The demand for pharmacists and health care in general continues to increase, yet significant material changes are occurring in the pharmacy work force. These changing demographics, coupled with historical vacancy rates and turnover trends for pharmacy staff, require an increased emphasis on workplace changes that can improve staff recruitment and retention. At William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Affairs Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin, creative pharmacist work schedules and roles are now mainstays to the recruitment and retention of staff. The major challenge that such scheduling presents is the 8 hours needed to prepare a six-week schedule. Baylor Medical Center at Grapevine in Dallas, Texas, has a total of 45 pharmacy employees, and slightly less than half of the 24.5 full-time-equivalent staff work full-time, with most preferring to work one, two, or three days per week. As long as the coverage needs of the facility are met, Envision Telepharmacy in Alpine, Texas, allows almost any scheduling arrangement preferred by individual pharmacists or the pharmacist group covering the facility. Staffing involves a great variety of shift lengths and intervals, with shifts ranging from 2 to 10 hours. Pharmacy leaders must be increasingly aware of opportunities to provide staff with unique scheduling and operational enhancements that can provide for a better work-life balance. Compressed workweeks, job-sharing, and team scheduling were the most common types of alternative work schedules implemented at three different institutions.

  1. When Nontraditional Is Traditional: A Faculty Dialogue with Graduating Community College Students about Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional characteristics of community college students contribute to a sense of belonging and a sense of common struggle, uniting students in their uniqueness to persist. These diverse students, combined with faculty and peer encouragement, provide a learning environment conducive to completion. As community college educators, we have the…

  2. Non-Traditional Students and Critical Pedagogy: Transformative Practice and the Teaching of Criminal Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menis, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the practical implication of adopting critical pedagogy, and more specifically critical legal pedagogy, in the teaching of non-traditional students in higher education context. It is based on the teaching of criminal law at Birkbeck School of Law, addressing learning tasks which have been designed to enhance students'…

  3. Non-traditional approaches to teaching GPS online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, A.; Wolf, D. F., II

    2009-12-01

    Students are increasingly turning to the web for quality education that fits into their lives. Nonetheless, online learning brings challenges as well as a fresh opportunity for exploring pedagogical practices not present on traditional higher education programs, particularly in the sciences. A team of two dozen Empire State College-State University of New York instructional designers, faculty, and other staff are working on making science relevant to non-majors who may initially have anxiety about general education science courses. One of these courses, GPS and the New Geography, focuses on how Global Positioning System (GPS) technology provides a base for inquiry and scientific discovery from a range of environmental issues with local, regional, and global scope. GPS and the New Geography is an introductory level course developed under a grant supported by the Charitable Leadership Foundation. Taking advantage of the proliferation of tools currently available for online learning management systems, we explore current trends in Web 2.0 applications to aggregate and leverage data to create a nontraditional, interactive learning environment. Using our best practices to promote on-line discussion and interaction, these tools help engage students and foster deep learning. During the 15-week term students learn through case studies, problem-based exercises, and the use of scientific data; thus, expanding their spatial literacy and gain experience using real spatial technology tools to enhance their understanding of real-world issues. In particular, we present how the use of Mapblogs an in-house developed blogging platform that uses GIS interplaying with GPS units, interactive data presentations, intuitive visual working environments, harnessing RSS feeds, and other nontraditional Web 2.0 technology has successfully promoted active learning in the virtual learning environment.

  4. Experimentally Induced Learned Helplessness: How Far Does it Generalize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffin, Keith; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Assessed whether experimentally induced learned helplessness on a cognitive training task generalized to a situationally dissimilar social interaction test task. No significant differences were observed between groups on the subsequent test task, showing that helplessness failed to generalize. (Author/ABB)

  5. Enhancing Critical Thinking Skills and Writing Skills through the Variation in Non-Traditional Writing Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, Parlindungan; Feranie, Shelly

    2017-01-01

    The research aims to identify the impacts of embedding non-traditional writing tasks within the course of modern physics conducted to the students of Physics Education and Physics Study Programs. It employed a quasi-experimental method with the pretest-posttest control group design. The used instruments were tests on conceptual mastery, tests on…

  6. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  7. Learning and performance under alternative instructional manifestations of experimental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael J.

    Before we can understand how students learn "to do" science, we must make explicit our assumptions about what scientific practice is. This study compares the learning outcomes of two sixth-grade instructional units on experimentation, each based on a particular characterization of practice. In one unit, instruction focused on acquisition and application of the control of variables strategy (CVS; Chen & Klahr, 1999), which is consistent with a popular conception of science education, stemming from Piaget, as the mastery of logical forms. In the other unit, students designed experimental apparatus to answer a target question, and instruction emphasized practices of rendering and transforming the material world in ways that support scientific understanding. Students in both groups were assessed for CVS acquisition and subsequent experimental performance on a novel task, and group performances on these assessments different across instructional conditions. I will argue that student understandings of goals, norms of instructional expectation, and strategies explain these differences, in some cases by supporting performance and in other cases by hindering it. I will also argue that the results question the role typically attributed to logical method in learning to design experiments.

  8. Nontraditional Students and Postsecondary School Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammger, Dawne M.

    This study compared the satisfaction levels of 40 adult nontraditional students (N=40) attending one of three types of postsecondary institutions: (1) a proprietary school, (2) a community college, and (3) a university. A survey was administered to such students enrolled in the Travel and Tourism programs at Bryant and Stratton Business Institute…

  9. Implications of Nontraditional Work Schedules for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polit, Denise F.

    1978-01-01

    Issues, evidence, and arguments relating to the effects of alternative working arrangements on the lives of women are examined. Forms of nontraditional schedules which are analyzed include the shortened work week, flexible working hours, and part-time employment. (Author/GC)

  10. Attitudes toward Sexual Discrimination and Nontraditional Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Linda S.

    1986-01-01

    The author surveyed the attitudes of 1,551 North Carolinians toward sexual discrimination and nontraditional work roles. Sixty-three percent of all respondents thought that women had not been treated equally with men in being allowed to earn enough money to support themselves independently. Women were significantly different than men in their…

  11. Educational Game Design. Bridging the gab between computer based learning and experimental learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    Considering the rapidly growing amount of digital educational materials only few of them bridge the gab between experimental learning environments and computer based learning environments (Gardner, 1991). Observations from two cases in primary school and lower secondary school in the subject...... with a prototype of a MOO storyline. The aim of the MOO storyline is to challenge the potential of dialogue, user involvement, and learning responsibility and to use the children?s natural curiosity and motivation for game playing, especially when digital games involves other children. The paper proposes a model......, based on the narrative approach for experimental learning subjects, relying on ideas from Csikszentmihalyis notion of flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1991), storyline-pedagogy (Meldgaard, 1994) and ideas from Howard Gardner (Gardner, 1991). The model forms the basis for educational games to be used in home...

  12. Effectiveness of Student Learning during Experimental Work in Primary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logar, Ana; Peklaj, Cirila; Ferk Savec, Vesna

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the research was to optimize the effectiveness of student learning based on experimental work in chemistry classes in Slovenian primary schools. To obtain evidence about how experimental work is implemented during regular chemistry classes, experimental work was videotaped during 19 units of chemistry lessons at 12 Slovenian primary schools from the pool of randomly selected schools. Altogether 332 eight-grade students were involved in the investigation, with an average age of 14.2 years. Students were videotaped during chemistry lessons, and their worksheets were collected afterward. The 12 chemistry teachers, who conducted lessons in these schools, were interviewed before the lessons; their teaching plans were also collected. The collected data was analyzed using qualitative methods. The results indicate that many teachers in Slovenian primary schools are not fully aware of the potential of experimental work integrated into chemistry lessons for the development of students' experimental competence. Further research of the value of different kinds of training to support teachers for the use of experimental work in chemistry teaching is needed.

  13. Learning from complementary ways of developing experimental competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natércia Maria LIMA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Engineering education has solid needs of experimental competences development. Nowadays theses competences can be developed not only in traditional laboratories (hands on but also through the use of computer simulations and remote labs. The use of diversified methods in education and the exploration of new resources and techniques in classroom may allow teachers to motivate more students, and capture their attention due to their different learning styles.The main objective of this thesis project is to better understand the effects on the students’ learning outcomes in different contexts, when subject to similar design approaches using an enquiry-based teaching and learning methodology based on simultaneous use of experimental resources (hands on, simulation and remote labs together with calculus, in class and assessment. To accomplish this goal, several insights must be taken into consideration, including the teachers’ mediation in each case and the didactical implementations adaptations, but also external factors, such as socio-cultural and/or political factors.

  14. Optimal Learning for Efficient Experimentation in Nanotechnology and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0018 Optimal Learning for Efficient Experimentation in Nanotechnology, Biochemistry Warren Powell TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON... Biochemistry 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0200 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Warren Powell 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e...scientists. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Biochemistry 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF 19a.  NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Warren

  15. Learning in the WTO/DDA Negotiations?: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hankyoung Sung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to identify learning in games in experimental economic settings, and apply their results to real multilateral trade negotiations, such as the Doha Development Agenda (DDA in the World Trade Organizations (WTO. This paper argues that the structure of games including a veto player (Veto games is similar to the WTO/DDA negotiations in that the players do not possess identical power. This paper's main contribution to the literature involves showing that learning about power is dominant over learning from simple repetition in Veto games. Additionally, this paper shows that players are concerned about how much they have gained in previous games in Veto games, although their memories generally do not last beyond the next game, and thus they tend to be selfish as they have less shares. Based on these results, there is a possibility to be more generous in the distribution of benefits by allowing players without veto power to retain special rights so that they would not be totally powerless. It also shows the necessity of having "respite" in the process of negotiations and policy options for choosing partners for winning coalitions.

  16. Physics of Nontraditional Electrorheological and Magnetorheological Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, G. Q.; Tao, R.

    Nontraditional electrorheology (ER) and magnetorheology (MR) are new areas. It started with high demands, such as reducing the viscosity of crude oil and suppressing turbulence to improve crude oil flow in pipelines. Normally, these two goals conflict each other. When the viscosity is reduced, Reynolds number goes up, and the turbulence would get worse. The non-traditional ER and MR have provided unconventional technologies to solve such issues. Different from traditional ER and MR, where the strong electric field or magnetic field is applied in the direction perpendicular to the flow or shearing, the fluid can even be solidified as the viscosity increases dramatically. In nontraditional ER and MR, the electric field or magnetic field is applied in the direction parallel to the flow, the particles are aggregated into short chains along the flow direction by the field, and the fluid viscosity becomes anisotropic. Along the flow direction, the viscosity is reduced, while in the directions perpendicular to the flow, the viscosity is dramatically increased. Thus the turbulence is suppressed; the flow becomes laminar and is further improved by the reduced viscosity along the flow direction. The original conflicted two goals can now be accomplished simultaneously. The new physics began to produce big impacts on energy, food industry, and medical science.

  17. The experimental field work as practical learning method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Fernández Losa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a teaching experience about experimental field work as practical learning method implemented in the subject of Organizational Behaviour. With this teaching experience we pretend to change the practical training, as well as in its evaluation process, in order to favour the development of transversal skills of students. For this purpose, the use of a practice plan, tackled through an experimental field work and carried out with the collaboration of a business organization within a work team (as organic unity of learning, arises as an alternative to the traditional method of practical teachings and allows the approach of business reality into the classroom, as well as actively promote the use of transversal skills. In particular, we develop the experience in three phases. Initially, the students, after forming a working group and define a field work project, should get the collaboration of a nearby business organization in which to obtain data on one or more functional areas of organizational behaviour. Subsequently, students carry out the field work with the realization of the scheduled visits and elaboration of a memory to establish a diagnosis of the strategy followed by the company in these functional areas in order to propose and justify alternative actions that improve existing ones. Finally, teachers assess the different field work memories and their public presentations according to evaluation rubrics, which try to objectify and unify to the maximum the evaluation criteria and serve to guide the learning process of students. The results of implementation of this teaching experience, measured through a Likert questionnaire, are very satisfactory for students.

  18. A Perspective on the Accreditation of Nontraditional Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Grover; Harris, John

    1979-01-01

    The nontraditional education movement in postsecondary education has presented new problems for accreditation in terms of results vs process, governance, the rise of entrepreneurs, and territoriality. (JMF)

  19. Seeking Nontraditional Approaches to Collaborating and Partnering with Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Held, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    ...)) in January 2000, describing nontraditional approaches for the Army to follow to collaborate and partner with industry using the concepts of public- private partnerships, venture capital funding...

  20. Autonomous learning derived from experimental modeling of physical laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabec, Igor

    2013-05-01

    This article deals with experimental description of physical laws by probability density function of measured data. The Gaussian mixture model specified by representative data and related probabilities is utilized for this purpose. The information cost function of the model is described in terms of information entropy by the sum of the estimation error and redundancy. A new method is proposed for searching the minimum of the cost function. The number of the resulting prototype data depends on the accuracy of measurement. Their adaptation resembles a self-organized, highly non-linear cooperation between neurons in an artificial NN. A prototype datum corresponds to the memorized content, while the related probability corresponds to the excitability of the neuron. The method does not include any free parameters except objectively determined accuracy of the measurement system and is therefore convenient for autonomous execution. Since representative data are generally less numerous than the measured ones, the method is applicable for a rather general and objective compression of overwhelming experimental data in automatic data-acquisition systems. Such compression is demonstrated on analytically determined random noise and measured traffic flow data. The flow over a day is described by a vector of 24 components. The set of 365 vectors measured over one year is compressed by autonomous learning to just 4 representative vectors and related probabilities. These vectors represent the flow in normal working days and weekends or holidays, while the related probabilities correspond to relative frequencies of these days. This example reveals that autonomous learning yields a new basis for interpretation of representative data and the optimal model structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An exploration of on-line access by non-traditional students in higher education: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearnley, Chris; Dunn, Ginny; Watson, Sue

    2006-07-01

    The nature of Higher Education (HE) has seen many changes throughout the last decade. The agenda for widening participation in HE has led to an increase in the number of students with a broader range of educational backgrounds. At the same time there has been a surge in the development of digitalisation and the convergence of computing and telecommunications technologies available for use in education. This paper discusses the outcomes of a case study, conducted in a School of Health Studies within a northern English University, which identified the extent to which 'non-traditional' students access on-line learning facilities, such as virtual learning environments and library networks, and what factors enhanced or formed barriers to access. 'Non-traditional' students, for the purpose of this study, were defined as mature students who were returning to higher education after a considerable break. The outcomes indicated that skill deficit is a major obstacle for many 'non-traditional' students. The paper explores this issue in depth and suggests potential ways forward for the delivery of technology supported learning for 'non-traditional' students in Higher Education.

  2. Work-Family Interface for Men in Nontraditional Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Z. Vance; Wright, Stephen L.; Perrone-McGovern, Kristin M.

    2010-01-01

    Men are choosing to enter nontraditional careers with greater frequency. In this article, the authors examine nontraditional career choices made by men and review current empirical literature relevant to this topic. Gottfredson's (1981, 1996) theory of circumscription and compromise and Holland's (1997) career choice theory are used as frameworks…

  3. Nontraditional Student Withdrawal from Undergraduate Accounting Programmes: A Holistic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Anne; Sauvé, Louise; Viger, Chantal; Landry, France

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative project of several Quebec universities, this study investigates nontraditional student withdrawal from undergraduate accounting programmes. A nontraditional student is older than 24, or is a commuter or a part-time student, or combines some of these characteristics. Univariate and multivariate analyses of student dropout factors…

  4. Stressors of college: a comparison of traditional and nontraditional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, P L; Henley, T B

    1998-01-01

    Perceived stress and stressors of nontraditional (returning-adult) and traditional college students were compared. Forty-seven nontraditional students 24-54 years old and 47 traditional students, matched for demographics, completed the Adolescent Perceived Events Scale (Compas, Davis, Forsythe, & Wagner, 1987) for college students. They rated 210 life events according to the desirability, impact, and frequency of the events. Significant differences were found between the nontraditional and traditional students for events in the following categories: academics, peer and social relations, family and network, autonomy and responsibility, and intimacy. Nontraditional students enjoyed going to classes and doing homework more, whereas traditional students worried more about school performance. Peer events, including social activities, had much more impact on traditional students, whereas nontraditional students reported much more responsibility in the home. The results suggest that there are significant differences between the groups in their perceptions of stressors.

  5. Machine Learning and Experimental Design for Hydrogen Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapetti, David; Tauscher, Keith A.; Burns, Jack O.; Mirocha, Jordan; Switzer, Eric; Monsalve, Raul A.; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Bowman, Judd D.

    2018-06-01

    Based on two powerful innovations, we present a new pipeline to analyze the redshifted sky-averaged 21-cm spectrum (~10-200 MHz) of neutral hydrogen from the first stars, galaxies and black holes. First, we combine machine learning and model selection techniques to extract the global 21-cm signal from foreground and instrumental systematics. Second, we employ experimental designs to increase our ability to separate these two components in data sets. For measurements with foreground polarization induced by rotation about the anisotropic low-frequency radio sky on a large beam, we incorporate this information into the likelihood to distinguish the unpolarized 21-cm signal from the rest of the data. For experiments with a drift scan strategy, we take advantage of the varying foreground in time to identify the constant 21-cm signal. This pipeline can be applied to either lunar orbit/surface instruments shielded from terrestrial and solar radio contamination, or existing ground-based observations, such as those from the EDGES collaboration that recently observed an absorption trough potentially consistent with the global 21-cm signal of Cosmic Dawn. Finally, this pipeline allows us to constrain physical parameters for a given model of the first luminous objects plus exotic physics in the early universe, from e.g. dark matter, through an MCMC analysis that uses the extracted signal as a starting point, providing key efficiency for unexplored cosmologies.

  6. Non-Traditional Authorship Attribution Studies of William Shakespeare’s Canon: Some Caveats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Rudman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the problems in conducting non-traditional authorship attribution studies on the canon of William Shakespeare. After a short introduction, the case is put forth that these studies are ‘scientific’ and must adhere to the tenets of the scientific method. By showing that a complete and valid experimental plan is necessary and pointing out the many and varied pitfalls (e.g., the text, the control groups, the treatment of errors, it becomes clear what a valid study of Shakespearean non-traditional authorship attribution demands. I then come to the conclusion that such a valid study is not attainable with the limits of present-day knowledge.

  7. Experimental Device for Learning of Logical Circuit Design using Integrated Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    石橋, 孝昭

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental device for learning of logical circuit design using integrated circuits and breadboards. The experimental device can be made at a low cost and can be used for many subjects such as logical circuits, computer engineering, basic electricity, electrical circuits and electronic circuits. The proposed device is effective to learn the logical circuits than the usual lecture.

  8. 27 CFR 19.71 - Experimental or research operations by scientific institutions and colleges of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operations by scientific institutions and colleges of learning. 19.71 Section 19.71 Alcohol, Tobacco Products... Experimental or research operations by scientific institutions and colleges of learning. (a) General. The appropriate TTB officer may authorize any scientific university, college of learning, or institution of...

  9. Exam Success at Undergraduate and Graduate-Entry Medical Schools: Is Learning Style or Learning Approach More Important? A Critical Review Exploring Links Between Academic Success, Learning Styles, and Learning Approaches Among School-Leaver Entry ("Traditional") and Graduate-Entry ("Nontraditional") Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Anne-Marie; Biggerstaff, Deborah L

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: The literature on learning styles over many years has been replete with debate and disagreement. Researchers have yet to elucidate exactly which underlying constructs are measured by the many learning styles questionnaires available. Some academics question whether learning styles exist at all. When it comes to establishing the value of learning styles for medical students, a further issue emerges. The demographics of medical students in the United Kingdom have changed in recent years, so past studies may not be applicable to students today. We wanted to answer a very simple, practical question: what can the literature on learning styles tell us that we can use to help today's medical students succeed academically at medical school? We conducted a literature review to synthesise the available evidence on how two different aspects of learning-the way in which students like to receive information in a learning environment (termed learning "styles") and the motivations that drive their learning (termed learning "approaches")-can impact on medical students' academic achievement. Our review confirms that although learning "styles" do not correlate with exam performance, learning "approaches" do: those with "strategic" and "deep" approaches to learning (i.e., motivated to do well and motivated to learn deeply respectively) perform consistently better in medical school examinations. Changes in medical school entrant demographics in the past decade have not altered these correlations. Optimistically, our review reveals that students' learning approaches can change and more adaptive approaches may be learned. Insights: For educators wishing to help medical students succeed academically, current evidence demonstrates that helping students develop their own positive learning approach using "growth mind-set" is a more effective (and more feasible) than attempting to alter students' learning styles. This conclusion holds true for both "traditional" and graduate

  10. Why not serve an educational buffet for students? Blended learning in optics experimental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya; Hu, Yao; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin; Kong, Lingqin; Hao, Qun; Huang, Yifan

    2017-08-01

    When talking about higher education, it's hard not to run into a discussion on what's really better for student learning: online learning or traditional learning? Of course, the key is to offer both, and potentially emphasize blended learning as the less polarizing option. Online courses are much more flexible and less expensive, but powerless while hands-on practical capacity is involved. Traditional experimental course can maintain a fluid and solid learning process but is less productive due to its scheduled time and simplex access. In this paper, a buffet-style knowledge service mode applied in a 12-week-long project-based experimental course Optoelectronic Instrument Experiments (OIE) is discussed. Our purpose is to find a blended learning mode in experimental education.

  11. Adoption of agricultural innovations through non-traditional financial ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Adoption of agricultural innovations through non-traditional financial services ... donors, banks, and financial institutions to explore new kinds of financial services to ... enterprises, and others in the production process to connect with markets.

  12. Practice Location Characteristics of Non-Traditional Dental Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Eric S; Jones, Daniel L

    2016-04-01

    Current and future dental school graduates are increasingly likely to choose a non-traditional dental practice-a group practice managed by a dental service organization or a corporate practice with employed dentists-for their initial practice experience. In addition, the growth of non-traditional practices, which are located primarily in major urban areas, could accelerate the movement of dentists to those areas and contribute to geographic disparities in the distribution of dental services. To help the profession understand the implications of these developments, the aim of this study was to compare the location characteristics of non-traditional practices and traditional dental practices. After identifying non-traditional practices across the United States, the authors located those practices and traditional dental practices geographically by zip code. Non-traditional dental practices were found to represent about 3.1% of all dental practices, but they had a greater impact on the marketplace with almost twice the average number of staff and annual revenue. Virtually all non-traditional dental practices were located in zip codes that also had a traditional dental practice. Zip codes with non-traditional practices had significant differences from zip codes with only a traditional dental practice: the populations in areas with non-traditional practices had higher income levels and higher education and were slightly younger and proportionally more Hispanic; those practices also had a much higher likelihood of being located in a major metropolitan area. Dental educators and leaders need to understand the impact of these trends in the practice environment in order to both prepare graduates for practice and make decisions about planning for the workforce of the future.

  13. The Learning of Grammar: An Experimental Study. Experimental Studies on the Learning of Language, Progress Report II, Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Jane W.

    An experiment in language behavior comparing two methods of learning grammatical word order in a new language presents scientific evidence supporting the use of pattern drills in foreign language teaching. The experiment reviews the performance of three groups attempting to learn small segments of Russian "microlanguage": (1) a drill group learned…

  14. Social learning and the replication process: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derex, Maxime; Feron, Romain; Godelle, Bernard; Raymond, Michel

    2015-06-07

    Human cultural traits typically result from a gradual process that has been described as analogous to biological evolution. This observation has led pioneering scholars to draw inspiration from population genetics to develop a rigorous and successful theoretical framework of cultural evolution. Social learning, the mechanism allowing information to be transmitted between individuals, has thus been described as a simple replication mechanism. Although useful, the extent to which this idealization appropriately describes the actual social learning events has not been carefully assessed. Here, we used a specifically developed computer task to evaluate (i) the extent to which social learning leads to the replication of an observed behaviour and (ii) the consequences it has for fitness landscape exploration. Our results show that social learning does not lead to a dichotomous choice between disregarding and replicating social information. Rather, it appeared that individuals combine and transform information coming from multiple sources to produce new solutions. As a consequence, landscape exploration was promoted by the use of social information. These results invite us to rethink the way social learning is commonly modelled and could question the validity of predictions coming from models considering this process as replicative. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Learning about light and optics in on-line general education classes using at-home experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millspaw, Jacob; Wang, Gang; Masters, Mark F.

    2014-07-01

    College students are facing a constantly evolving educational system. Some still see mostly the traditional face to face lecture type classes where as others may never set foot on campus thanks to distance learning programs. In between they may enroll in a mix of face-to-face, two-way broadcasted interactive courses, streaming lecture courses, hybrid face-to-face/ on-line courses and the ominous MOOC! A large number of these non-traditional courses are general education courses and play an important role in developing non-science majors' understanding of science in general, and of physics in particular. We have been keeping pace with theses modern modes of instruction by offering several on-line courses such as Physics for Computer Graphics and Animation and Light and Color. These courses cover basic concepts in light, color and optics.

  16. Developing a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise to teach theories of visuomotor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Shoko; Ushiba, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a flexible motor ability to adapt their movements to changes in the internal/external environment. For example, using arm-reaching tasks, a number of studies experimentally showed that participants adapt to a novel visuomotor environment. These results helped develop computational models of motor learning implemented in the central nervous system. Despite the importance of such experimental paradigms for exploring the mechanisms of motor learning, because of the cost and preparation time, most students are unable to participate in such experiments. Therefore, in the current study, to help students better understand motor learning theories, we developed a simple finger-reaching experimental system using commonly used laptop PC components with an open-source programming language (Processing Motor Learning Toolkit: PMLT). We found that compared to a commercially available robotic arm-reaching device, our PMLT accomplished similar learning goals (difference in the error reduction between the devices, P = 0.10). In addition, consistent with previous reports from visuomotor learning studies, the participants showed after-effects indicating an adaptation of the motor learning system. The results suggest that PMLT can serve as a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise of motor learning theories with minimal time and cost for instructors.

  17. Learning Political Science with Prediction Markets: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Cali Mortenson; Sami, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Prediction markets are designed to aggregate the information of many individuals to forecast future events. These markets provide participants with an incentive to seek information and a forum for interaction, making markets a promising tool to motivate student learning. We carried out a quasi-experiment in an introductory political science class…

  18. Learning Words from Context and Dictionaries: An Experimental Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ute

    1994-01-01

    Investigated the independent and interactive effects of contextual and definitional information on vocabulary learning. German students of English received either a text with unfamiliar English words or their monolingual English dictionary entries. A third group received both. Information about word context is crucial to understanding meaning. (44…

  19. Implicit versus explicit associative learning and experimentally induced placebo hypoalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Martin-Pichora

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrea L Martin-Pichora1,2, Tsipora D. Mankovsky-Arnold3, Joel Katz11Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Centre for Student Development and Counseling, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CanadaAbstract: The present study examined whether 1 placebo hypoalgesia can be generated through implicit associative learning (ie, conditioning in the absence of conscious awareness and 2 the magnitude of placebo hypoalgesia changes when expectations about pain are made explicit. The temperature of heat pain stimuli was surreptitiously lowered during conditioning trials for the placebo cream and the magnitude of the placebo effect was assessed during a subsequent set of trials when the temperature was the same for both placebo and control conditions. To assess whether placebo hypoalgesia could be generated from an implicit tactile stimulus, a 2 × 2 design was used with direction of cream application as one factor and verbal information about which cream was being applied as the second factor. A significant placebo effect was observed when participants received verbal information about which cream was being applied but not following implicit conditioning alone. However, 87.5% of those who showed a placebo response as the result of implicit conditioning were able to accurately guess the order of cream application during the final trial, despite a lack of awareness about the sensory manipulation and low confidence in their ratings, suggesting implicit learning in some participants. In summary, implicit associative learning was evident in some participants but it was not sufficient to produce a placebo effect suggesting some level of explicit expectation or cognitive mediation may be necessary. Notably, the placebo response was abolished when expectations were made explicit, suggesting a delicate interplay between attention and expectation.Keywords: placebo hypoalgesia

  20. Experimental Activities in Primary School to Learn about Microbes in an Oral Health Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafra, Paulo; Lima, Nelson; Carvalho, Graça S.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental science activities in primary school enable important cross-curricular learning. In this study, experimental activities on microbiology were carried out by 16 pupils in a Portuguese grade-4 classroom (9-10?years old) and were focused on two problem-questions related to microbiology and health: (1) do your teeth carry microbes? (2) why…

  1. Active machine learning-driven experimentation to determine compound effects on protein patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Armaghan W; Kangas, Joshua D; Sullivan, Devin P; Murphy, Robert F

    2016-02-03

    High throughput screening determines the effects of many conditions on a given biological target. Currently, to estimate the effects of those conditions on other targets requires either strong modeling assumptions (e.g. similarities among targets) or separate screens. Ideally, data-driven experimentation could be used to learn accurate models for many conditions and targets without doing all possible experiments. We have previously described an active machine learning algorithm that can iteratively choose small sets of experiments to learn models of multiple effects. We now show that, with no prior knowledge and with liquid handling robotics and automated microscopy under its control, this learner accurately learned the effects of 48 chemical compounds on the subcellular localization of 48 proteins while performing only 29% of all possible experiments. The results represent the first practical demonstration of the utility of active learning-driven biological experimentation in which the set of possible phenotypes is unknown in advance.

  2. Teaching Climate Science in Non-traditional Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strybos, J.

    2015-12-01

    San Antonio College is the oldest, largest and centrally-located campus of Alamo Colleges, a network of five community colleges based around San Antonio, Texas with a headcount enrollment of approximately 20,000 students. The student population is diverse in ethnicity, age and income; and the Colleges understand that they play a salient role in educating its students on the foreseen impacts of climate change. This presentation will discuss the key investment Alamo Colleges has adopted to incorporate sustainability and climate science into non-traditional classrooms. The established courses that cover climate-related course material have historically had low enrollments. One of the most significant challenges is informing the student population of the value of this class both in their academic career and in their personal lives. By hosting these lessons in hands-on simulations and demonstrations that are accessible and understandable to students of any age, and pursuing any major, we have found an exciting way to teach all students about climate change and identify solutions. San Antonio College (SAC) hosts the Bill R. Sinkin Eco Centro Community Center, completed in early 2014, that serves as an environmental hub for Alamo Colleges' staff and students as well as the San Antonio community. The center actively engages staff and faculty during training days in sustainability by presenting information on Eco Centro, personal sustainability habits, and inviting faculty to bring their classes for a tour and sustainability primer for students. The Centro has hosted professors from diverse disciplines that include Architecture, Psychology, Engineering, Science, English, Fine Arts, and International Studies to bring their classes to center to learn about energy, water conservation, landscaping, and green building. Additionally, Eco Centro encourages and assists students with research projects, including a solar-hydroponic project currently under development with the support

  3. NON-TRADITIONAL SPORTS AT SCHOOL. BENEFITS FOR PHYSICAL AND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMADOR J. LARA-SÁNCHEZ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical Education teachers have been using some very classic team sports, like football, basketball, handball, volleyball, etc. for many years in order to develop their education work at school. As a consequence of this, the benefits of this kind of activities on Physical Education lessons have not been as notable as we mighthave expected, since, even if they are increasing, their development and application are still low. There are many and very varied new non-traditional sports that have emerged and extended across Spain in recent years. To mention an example, we could refer to a newly created non-traditional sport such as kin-ball. This sport wascreated for the purpose of achieving a way to combine several factors such as health, team-work and competitiveness. Three teams of four players each participate. This way, every player can participate to a great extent in all the moves of the match, for each of them must defend one area of their half in order to achieve a common objective. Besides, kin-ball helps to develop motor skills at school in an easy way; that is, coordination, balance and perception. There is a large variety of non-traditional games and sports that are similar to kin-ball, such as floorball, intercrosse, mazaball, tchoukball, ultimate, indiaca, shuttleball... All of them show many physical, psychic and social advantages, and can help us to make the Physical Education teaching-learning process more motivating, acquiring the recreational component that it showed some years ago and which hasnow disappeared

  4. The effect of interprofessional team-based learning among nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arkers Kwan Ching; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Chan, Lap Ki; Chan, Namkiu; Ganotice, Fraide A; Ho, Jacqueline

    2017-06-01

    Although interprofessional education has received attention in recent years as a means of providing opportunities for health-care professionals to learn with, from and about other disciplines and enhance the quality of patient care, evidence of its effectiveness is limited. Interprofessional team-based learning was introduced to make it possible for students in different healthcare disciplines to interact with each other, and to prepare them to function effectively within a team in their future career. To examine the effects of interprofessional team-based learning for undergraduate nursing students in terms of knowledge level, readiness for interprofessional learning, attitude towards various aspects of team learning, and perceived collective efficacy. The study employed a one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design. An interprofessional education program was given to students from two universities in Hong Kong who were in different healthcare disciplines including medicine, nursing, pharmacy, biomedical science, and Chinese medicine programs. The program was based on four phases of student learning- individual readiness assessment test, ice breaking session, team readiness assessment test, and application exercise. Nursing students involved in the program were invited to complete anonymous questionnaires to evaluate their interprofessional team experience. A total of 40 nursing students (9 male, 31 female) participated in the study. A statistically significant improvement was identified in their knowledge level (pteam learning, and perceived collective efficacy (pteam-based learning can enhance cross-disciplinary learning and outcomes resulting from team efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. New Paradigms for the Study of Ocular Alphaherpesvirus Infections: Insights into the Use of Non-Traditional Host Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Pennington

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ocular herpesviruses, most notably human alphaherpesvirus 1 (HSV-1, canid alphaherpesvirus 1 (CHV-1 and felid alphaherpesvirus 1 (FHV-1, infect and cause severe disease that may lead to blindness. CHV-1 and FHV-1 have a pathogenesis and induce clinical disease in their hosts that is similar to HSV-1 ocular infections in humans, suggesting that infection of dogs and cats with CHV-1 and FHV-1, respectively, can be used as a comparative natural host model of herpesvirus-induced ocular disease. In this review, we discuss both strengths and limitations of the various available model systems to study ocular herpesvirus infection, with a focus on the use of these non-traditional virus-natural host models. Recent work has demonstrated the robustness and reproducibility of experimental ocular herpesvirus infections in dogs and cats, and, therefore, these non-traditional models can provide additional insights into the pathogenesis of ocular herpesvirus infections.

  6. Women in Nontraditional Careers: Setting Them Up to Succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Laurie; Tuchscherer, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    Idaho's Nontraditional-by-Gender Scholarship Program includes the following elements of success: provision of realistic information to women about jobs, support groups and peer advisors, placement, career fairs and on-campus interviews, business-labor-education partnerships, and career guidance and counseling. (SK)

  7. Nontraditional Degree Options for Nurses: A Model Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Sydney C.

    1978-01-01

    The Institute for Personal and Career Development of Central Michigan University offers external degree programs for adult learners using nontraditional study. The competency-based programs described include credit given for the educational background and relevant career-life experiences of registered nurses in Michigan. (Author/LBH)

  8. Wider Opportunities for Women Nontraditional Work Programs: A Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider Opportunities for Women, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Since 1970, Wider Opportunities for Women (WOW), in Washington, D.C., has conducted programs to train and place disadvantaged women in nontraditional jobs. The results have been record-breaking: high placement rates, high job retention rates, good starting salaries, and upward mobility for women who seemed doomed to a life of poverty and…

  9. Reaching the Non-Traditional Stopout Population: A Segmentation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzel, Kim; Callahan, Thomas; Scott, Crystal J.; Davis, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 21% of 25-34-year-olds in the United States, about eight million individuals, have attended college and quit before completing a degree. These non-traditional students may or may not return to college. Those who return to college are referred to as stopouts, whereas those who do not return are referred to as stayouts. In the face of…

  10. Do Ghanaian non-traditional exporters understand the importance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Do Ghanaian non-traditional exporters understand the importance of sales ... The older the firm in export business, the more likely it was for management to put in ... taking into consideration other factors like internet use and planning of sales ...

  11. Developing Guidelines for the Use of Nontraditional Educational Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Frank

    The paper outlines guidelines for developing policy on use of nontraditional educational interventions (such as timeout, aversive stimulation, biofeedback, behavior modification, relaxation therapy, and group meetings) with behavior disordered students. A model policy statement on the use of isolation rooms is presented. Such a statement should…

  12. The Pleasures and Pitfalls of a Non-traditional Occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert E.

    Both men and women who engage in non-traditional occupations (occupations in which 80 percent or more of the participants are of the opposite sex) are generally happy with their occupational choice, according to interviews with seventy such women and ten men. The women, however, experienced more discrimination and sexual harassment, while the men…

  13. Academic Procrastination in Non-Traditional College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón-Umerenkova, Angélica; Gil-Flores, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Procrastination is the act of delaying necessary tasks to the extreme of experiencing discomfort and negative consequences for the individuals. The presence of nontraditional students at universities is a phenomenon which has increased remarkably over the last decades. This type of university students finds some difficulties during…

  14. Blended learning pedagogy designed for communication module among undergraduate nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Shefaly; Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Devi, M Kamala; Chen, Hui-Chen; Soong, Swee Kit Alan; Ang, Emily

    2018-02-01

    Effective communication is important for nurse and patient outcomes. Nursing students often feel unprepared to communicate effectively with patients and other healthcare workers within the clinical environment. Blended learning pedagogy-based communication skills training can provide an alternative to traditional methods of teaching to enhance students' satisfaction and self-efficacy levels in communicating with others. To examine the effectiveness of blended learning pedagogy in a redesigned communication module among nursing undergraduates in enhancing their satisfaction levels and attitudes towards learning communication module as well as self-efficacy in communication. A single group pre-test and post-test quasi-experimental design was adopted. Data were collected from August 2016 to November 2016 from 124 nursing undergraduates from a leading nursing school. Blended learning pedagogy was adopted to redesign a communication module that offered a wide array of learning opportunities via face-to-face classroom and online sessions. Validated and reliable instruments were used to measure satisfaction levels with blended learning pedagogy, attitudes towards learning communication, and communication self-efficacy. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Participants had enhanced satisfaction levels with blended learning pedagogy, better attitudes in learning communication skills, and improved communication self-efficacies at posttest (week 13 of the semester) when compared with their pre-test scores (week one of the semester). Participants scored higher in the Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale, the Communication Skills Attitude Scale, and the communication skills subscale of the Nursing Students Self-Efficacy Scale. Blended learning pedagogy can be effectively used in facilitating communication modules and enhancing student outcomes among nursing undergraduates. The long-term effectiveness of using blended learning pedagogy in

  15. Social Determinants and Teen Pregnancy Prevention: Exploring the Role of Nontraditional Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Taleria R; White, Carla P; Chu, Jocelyn; Dean, Deborah; Clemmons, Naomi; Chaparro, Carmen; Thames, Jessica L; Henderson, Anitra Belle; King, Pebbles

    2018-01-01

    Addressing the social determinants of health (SDOH) that influence teen pregnancy is paramount to eliminating disparities and achieving health equity. Expanding prevention efforts from purely individual behavior change to improving the social, political, economic, and built environments in which people live, learn, work, and play may better equip vulnerable youth to adopt and sustain healthy decisions. In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in partnership with the Office of Adolescent Health funded state- and community-based organizations to develop and implement the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Community-Wide Initiative. This effort approached teen pregnancy from an SDOH perspective, by identifying contextual factors that influence teen pregnancy and other adverse sexual health outcomes among vulnerable youth. Strategies included, but were not limited to, conducting a root cause analysis and establishing nontraditional partnerships to address determinants identified by community members. This article describes the value of an SDOH approach for achieving health equity, explains the integration of such an approach into community-level teen pregnancy prevention activities, and highlights two project partners' efforts to establish and nurture nontraditional partnerships to address specific SDOH.

  16. Virtual Learning Environment in Continuing Education for Nursing in Oncology: an Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Graças Silva Matsubara, Maria; De Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes

    2016-12-01

    Nurses working in oncology require continuing education and nowadays distance education is a possibility. To compare learning outcomes of the professionals participating in classroom learning versus distance learning; describing the sociodemographic characteristics and digital fluency of participants; comparing learning outcomes with independent variables; assessing the adequacy of educational practices in Virtual Environment Moodle Learning through the constructivist online learning environment survey. An experimental, randomized controlled study; conducted at the A C Camargo Cancer Center, located in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. The study included 97 nurses, with average training of 1 to 2 years. A control group (n = 44) had face to face training and the experiment group (n = 53) had training by distance learning, both with identical program content. The dependent variable was the result of learning, measured by applying a pre-assessment questionnaire and post-intervention for both groups. The sociodemographic and digital fluency data were uniform among the groups. The performance of both groups was statistically significant (p 0.005), and the control group had a greater advantage (40.4 %). Distance education has proven to be an effective alternative for training nurses, especially when they have more complex knowledge, more experience in the area and institutional time. Distance Education may be a possibility for the training of nurses for work in oncology. The association of age, training time and the institution, and the experience in Oncology interfered in the performance of both groups.

  17. Social learning solves the problem of narrow-peaked search landscapes: experimental evidence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, Alberto; Tennie, Claudio; Mesoudi, Alex

    2016-09-01

    The extensive use of social learning is considered a major reason for the ecological success of humans. Theoretical considerations, models and experiments have explored the evolutionary basis of social learning, showing the conditions under which learning from others is more adaptive than individual learning. Here we present an extension of a previous experimental set-up, in which individuals go on simulated 'hunts' and their success depends on the features of a 'virtual arrowhead' they design. Individuals can modify their arrowhead either by individual trial and error or by copying others. We study how, in a multimodal adaptive landscape, the smoothness of the peaks influences learning. We compare narrow peaks, in which solutions close to optima do not provide useful feedback to individuals, to wide peaks, where smooth landscapes allow an effective hill-climbing individual learning strategy. We show that individual learning is more difficult in narrow-peaked landscapes, but that social learners perform almost equally well in both narrow- and wide-peaked search spaces. There was a weak trend for more copying in the narrow than wide condition, although as in previous experiments social information was generally underutilized. Our results highlight the importance of tasks' design space when studying the adaptiveness of high-fidelity social learning.

  18. Learning How to Learn: Implications for Non Traditional Adult Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Lynn A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, learning how to learn for non traditional adult students is discussed with a focus on police officers and firefighters. Learning how to learn is particularly relevant for all returning non-traditional adults; however in the era of terrorism it is critical for the public safety officers returning to college after years of absence…

  19. LEARNING TO READ SCIENTIFIC RUSSIAN BY THE THREE QUESTION EXPERIMENTAL (3QX) METHOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALFORD, M.H.T.

    A NEW METHOD FOR LEARNING TO READ TECHNICAL LITERATURE IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IS BEING DEVELOPED AND TESTED AT THE LANGUAGE CENTRE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX, COLCHESTER, ENGLAND. THE METHOD IS CALLED "THREE QUESTION EXPERIMENTAL METHOD (3QX)," AND IT HAS BEEN USED IN THREE COURSES FOR TEACHING SCIENTIFIC RUSSIAN TO PHYSICISTS. THE THREE…

  20. Evaluating the Cooperative Component in Cooperative Learning: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Tisha L. N.; English, Linda K.; McGoldrick, KimMarie

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors employed a quasi-experimental research design to examine the efficacy of a cooperative learning pedagogy (i.e., think-pair-share exercises) integrated into sections of microeconomic principles. Materials, exercises, and assessment instruments for all study sections are identical except for the nature of the…

  1. Cathedral outreach: student-led workshops for school curriculum enhancement in non-traditional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Matthew T.; Jantzen, Alexander; van Putten, Lieke D.; Ravagli, Andrea; Donko, Andrei L.; Soper, Nathan; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; John, Pearl V.

    2017-08-01

    Universities in the United Kingdom have been driven to work with a larger pool of potential students than just the more traditional student (middle-class white male), in order to tackle the widely-accepted skills-shortage in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), whilst honoring their commitment to fair access to higher education. Student-led outreach programs have contributed significantly to this drive. Two such programs run by postgraduate students at the University of Southampton are the Lightwave Roadshow and Southampton Accelerate!, which focus on photonics and particle physics, respectively. The program ambassadors have developed activities to enhance areas of the national curriculum through presenting fundamental physical sciences and their applications to optics and photonics research. The activities have benefitted significantly from investment from international organizations, such as SPIE, OSA and the IEEE Photonics Society, and UK research councils, in conjunction with university recruitment and outreach strategies. New partnerships have been formed to expand outreach programs to work in non-traditional environments to challenge stereotypes of scientists. This paper presents two case studies of collaboration with education learning centers at Salisbury Cathedral and Winchester Cathedral. The paper outlines workshops and shows developed for pupils aged 6-14 years (UK key stages 2-4) on the electromagnetic spectrum, particle physics, telecommunications and the human eye using a combination of readily obtainable items, hand-built kits and elements from the EYEST Photonics Explorer kit. The activities are interactive to stimulate learning through active participation, complement the UK national curriculum and link the themes of science with the non-traditional setting of a cathedral. We present methods to evaluate the impact of the activity and tools to obtain qualitative feedback for continual program improvement. We also

  2. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rígel Licier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  3. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licier, Rígel; Miranda, Eric; Serrano, Horacio

    2016-10-17

    The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  4. LVN to ADN: Innovative, Non-Traditional Learning Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Community Coll., TX.

    This document contains the curriculum for the first nursing course in the Licensed Vocational Nurse Mobility Track Project. The project is designed to provide selected Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs) the opportunity to complete the nursing course requirements for an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing (ADN) in three semesters of…

  5. Examining Organizational Learning in Schools: The Role of Psychological Safety, Experimentation, and Leadership that Reinforces Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Monica; Ishimaru, Ann; Holcombe, Rebecca; Fowler, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This study draws upon theory and methods from the field of organizational behavior to examine organizational learning (OL) in the context of a large urban US school district. We build upon prior literature on OL from the field of organizational behavior to introduce and validate three subscales that assess key dimensions of organizational learning…

  6. Energy and non-traditional security (NTS) in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Anthony, Mely [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (SG). Centre for Non-Traditional Security (NTS) Studies; Chang, Youngho [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). Division of Economics; Putra, Nur Azha (eds.) [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Energy Security Division

    2012-07-01

    Traditional notions of security are premised on the primacy of state security. In relation to energy security, traditional policy thinking has focused on ensuring supply without much emphasis on socioeconomic and environmental impacts. Non-traditional security (NTS) scholars argue that threats to human security have become increasingly prominent since the end of the Cold War, and that it is thus critical to adopt a holistic and multidisciplinary approach in addressing rising energy needs. This volume represents the perspectives of scholars from across Asia, looking at diverse aspects of energy security through a non-traditional security lens. The issues covered include environmental and socioeconomic impacts, the role of the market, the role of civil society, energy sustainability and policy trends in the ASEAN region.

  7. Nontraditional teaching techniques and critical thinking in an introductory postsecondary environmental science course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerdsell, Sherri Lynn

    2009-12-01

    As an institution of higher education and as a Hispanic-serving institution, New Mexico State University has a responsibility to its students to provide the skills and experiences necessary for each and every student to become a responsible, reflective citizen, capable of making informed decisions. Postsecondary science has traditionally been taught through lectures. Traditional lecture classes simply do not meet the needs of diverse groups of students in the modern multicultural student body like New Mexico State University's. However, the implementation of nontraditional pedagogy without evaluation of the results is useless as a step to reform; it is necessary to evaluate the results of in situ nontraditional pedagogy to determine its worth. The purpose of this research is to analyze the development and change in students' critical thinking skills, and critical thinking dispositions in single semester in an introductory Environmental Science course. This study utilized a mixed methods approach. The California Critical Thinking Skills Test and the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory were administered in the beginning and at the end of the semester. The pretest was used to provide a baseline for each participant against which the posttest score was compared. In addition, student interviews, field notes, and a survey provided qualitative data, which generated themes regarding the development of student critical thinking in this course. The results indicated there were no significant differences in the critical thinking test scores. However, qualitative analysis indicated that students experienced significant changes in critical thinking. Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis pertaining to the amount of influence on student learning. These themes are active thinking and learning, dialogue, and professor's influence. Due to the conflict between the quantitative and the qualitative results, it is suggested that the critical thinking tests

  8. Lessons learned using HAMMLAB experimenter systems: Input for HAMMLAB 2000 functional requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebok, Angelia L.

    1998-02-01

    To design a usable HAMMLAB 2000, lessons learned from use of the existing HAMMLAB must be documented. User suggestions are important and must be taken into account. Different roles in HAMMLAB experimental sessions are identified, and major functions of each role were specified. A series of questionnaires were developed and administered to different users of HAMMLAB, each tailored to the individual job description. The results of those questionnaires are included in this report. Previous HAMMLAB modification recommendations were also reviewed, to provide input to this document. A trial experimental session was also conducted, to give an overview of the tasks in HAMMLAB. (author)

  9. Mixed reality learning spaces for collaborative experimentation: A challenge for engineering education and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Müller

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the vast majority of research in human-computer interaction involves only our senses of sight and hearing, with sporadic forays into touch, future laboratories used in engineering education will mostly benefit from developments beyond video and sound. Tangible and embedded interaction, augmented and mixed reality characterizes ultimate technologies for further applications in collaborative remote engineering and lab work. This paper presents our latest research to facilitate collaborative experimentation with such innovative technologies. Our vision is a collaborative learning space, which involves an amalgam of real, virtual and remote lab tools to support a wide spectrum of simple and complex, concrete and abstract, safe and dangerous experimentation settings. We will review related concepts and discuss lessons learned from our research and prototype development. Recent work involves the use of mixed reality (as opposed to ‘pure’ virtual reality techniques to support seamless collaborative work between remote sites. We describe this and identify areas for future research.

  10. Immersive Learning Environment Using 3D Virtual Worlds and Integrated Remote Experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderval Marcelino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This project seeks to demonstrate the use of remote experimentation and 3D virtual environments applied to the teaching-learning in the areas of exact sciences-physics. In proposing the combination of remote experimentation and 3D virtual worlds in teaching-learning process, we intend to achieve greater geographic coverage, contributing to the construction of new methodologies of teaching support, speed of access and foremost motivation for students to continue in scientific study of the technology areas. The proposed architecture is based on a model implemented fully featured open source and open hardware. The virtual world was built in OpenSim software and integrated it a remote physics experiment called "electrical panel". Accessing the virtual world the user has total control of the experiment within the 3D virtual world.

  11. PredPsych: A toolbox for predictive machine learning based approach in experimental psychology research

    OpenAIRE

    Cavallo, Andrea; Becchio, Cristina; Koul, Atesh

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increased interest in machine learning based predictive methods for analysing quantitative behavioural data in experimental psychology. While these methods can achieve relatively greater sensitivity compared to conventional univariate techniques, they still lack an established and accessible software framework. The goal of this work was to build an open-source toolbox – “PredPsych” – that could make these methods readily available to all psychologists. PredPsych is a...

  12. Journaling: A quasi-experimental study of student nurses’ reflective learning ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LP Fakude

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of journaling or journal writing in clinical education is one of the strategies used to develop critical thinking. Reflective journal writing, as it is commonly known, can nurture many qualities of a critical thinker and promote thoughtful nursing practice. Using a quasi-experimental design in this study, reflective journaling was introduced to a sample of first year Bridging Course student nurses at a Private Nursing Education Institution, to assess its effectiveness in reflective learning.

  13. The performance of cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus, in a reversal learning task varies across experimental paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gingins

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Testing performance in controlled laboratory experiments is a powerful tool for understanding the extent and evolution of cognitive abilities in non-human animals. However, cognitive testing is prone to a number of potential biases, which, if unnoticed or unaccounted for, may affect the conclusions drawn. We examined whether slight modifications to the experimental procedure and apparatus used in a spatial task and reversal learning task affected performance outcomes in the bluestreak cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus (hereafter “cleaners”. Using two-alternative forced-choice tests, fish had to learn to associate a food reward with a side (left or right in their holding aquarium. Individuals were tested in one of four experimental treatments that differed slightly in procedure and/or physical set-up. Cleaners from all four treatment groups were equally able to solve the initial spatial task. However, groups differed in their ability to solve the reversal learning task: no individuals solved the reversal task when tested in small tanks with a transparent partition separating the two options, whereas over 50% of individuals solved the task when performed in a larger tank, or with an opaque partition. These results clearly show that seemingly insignificant details to the experimental set-up matter when testing performance in a spatial task and might significantly influence the outcome of experiments. These results echo previous calls for researchers to exercise caution when designing methodologies for cognition tasks to avoid misinterpretations.

  14. Tools for Science Inquiry Learning: Tool Affordances, Experimentation Strategies, and Conceptual Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbacher, Engin; Salehi, Shima; Wieman, Carl; Blikstein, Paulo

    2017-12-01

    Manipulative environments play a fundamental role in inquiry-based science learning, yet how they impact learning is not fully understood. In a series of two studies, we develop the argument that manipulative environments (MEs) influence the kind of inquiry behaviors students engage in, and that this influence realizes through the affordances of MEs, independent of whether they are physical or virtual. In particular, we examine how MEs shape college students' experimentation strategies and conceptual understanding. In study 1, students engaged in two consecutive inquiry tasks, first on mass and spring systems and then on electric circuits. They either used virtual or physical MEs. We found that the use of experimentation strategies was strongly related to conceptual understanding across tasks, but that students engaged differently in those strategies depending on what ME they used. More students engaged in productive strategies using the virtual ME for electric circuits, and vice versa using the physical ME for mass and spring systems. In study 2, we isolated the affordance of measurement uncertainty by comparing two versions of the same virtual ME for electric circuits—one with and one without noise—and found that the conditions differed in terms of productive experimentation strategies. These findings indicate that measures of inquiry processes may resolve apparent ambiguities and inconsistencies between studies on MEs that are based on learning outcomes alone.

  15. The performance of cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus, in a reversal learning task varies across experimental paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingins, Simon; Marcadier, Fanny; Wismer, Sharon; Krattinger, Océane; Quattrini, Fausto; Bshary, Redouan; Binning, Sandra A

    2018-01-01

    Testing performance in controlled laboratory experiments is a powerful tool for understanding the extent and evolution of cognitive abilities in non-human animals. However, cognitive testing is prone to a number of potential biases, which, if unnoticed or unaccounted for, may affect the conclusions drawn. We examined whether slight modifications to the experimental procedure and apparatus used in a spatial task and reversal learning task affected performance outcomes in the bluestreak cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus (hereafter "cleaners"). Using two-alternative forced-choice tests, fish had to learn to associate a food reward with a side (left or right) in their holding aquarium. Individuals were tested in one of four experimental treatments that differed slightly in procedure and/or physical set-up. Cleaners from all four treatment groups were equally able to solve the initial spatial task. However, groups differed in their ability to solve the reversal learning task: no individuals solved the reversal task when tested in small tanks with a transparent partition separating the two options, whereas over 50% of individuals solved the task when performed in a larger tank, or with an opaque partition. These results clearly show that seemingly insignificant details to the experimental set-up matter when testing performance in a spatial task and might significantly influence the outcome of experiments. These results echo previous calls for researchers to exercise caution when designing methodologies for cognition tasks to avoid misinterpretations.

  16. Extraction and properties of starches from the non-traditional vegetables Yam and Taro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luan Alberto; Barbosa, Natalia Alves; Pereira, Joelma, E-mail: luandrade87@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA), Lavras, MG (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the chemical, physical, morphological, crystalline and thermal properties of starch from two non-traditional vegetables, yam and taro. The analyses included proximate composition percent, amylose and mineral content, water absorption capacity, absolute density, morphological properties, X-ray diffractometry, thermal properties, pasting properties and infrared spectrum. The extracted starch exhibited a high purity level with low lipid, fiber and ash contents. The electron micrographs suggested that the taro starch granules were smaller than the yam starch granules. The results for the experimental conditions used in this study indicated that the studied starches differed, especially the amylose content, granule size and crystallinity degree and the pattern of the starches. Due to the high amylose content of yam starch, this type of starch can be used for film preparation, whereas the taro starch can be used as a fat substitute due to its small granule size. (author)

  17. Measuring reinforcement learning and motivation constructs in experimental animals: relevance to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Athina; Salamone, John D.; Bussey, Timothy; Mar, Adam; Brunner, Daniela; Gilmour, Gary; Balsam, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The present review article summarizes and expands upon the discussions that were initiated during a meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS; http://cntrics.ucdavis.edu). A major goal of the CNTRICS meeting was to identify experimental procedures and measures that can be used in laboratory animals to assess psychological constructs that are related to the psychopathology of schizophrenia. The issues discussed in this review reflect the deliberations of the Motivation Working Group of the CNTRICS meeting, which included most of the authors of this article as well as additional participants. After receiving task nominations from the general research community, this working group was asked to identify experimental procedures in laboratory animals that can assess aspects of reinforcement learning and motivation that may be relevant for research on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as well as other disorders characterized by deficits in reinforcement learning and motivation. The tasks described here that assess reinforcement learning are the Autoshaping Task, Probabilistic Reward Learning Tasks, and the Response Bias Probabilistic Reward Task. The tasks described here that assess motivation are Outcome Devaluation and Contingency Degradation Tasks and Effort-Based Tasks. In addition to describing such methods and procedures, the present article provides a working vocabulary for research and theory in this field, as well as an industry perspective about how such tasks may be used in drug discovery. It is hoped that this review can aid investigators who are conducting research in this complex area, promote translational studies by highlighting shared research goals and fostering a common vocabulary across basic and clinical fields, and facilitate the development of medications for the treatment of symptoms mediated by reinforcement learning and motivational deficits. PMID:23994273

  18. Measuring reinforcement learning and motivation constructs in experimental animals: relevance to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Athina; Salamone, John D; Bussey, Timothy J; Mar, Adam C; Brunner, Daniela; Gilmour, Gary; Balsam, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The present review article summarizes and expands upon the discussions that were initiated during a meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS; http://cntrics.ucdavis.edu) meeting. A major goal of the CNTRICS meeting was to identify experimental procedures and measures that can be used in laboratory animals to assess psychological constructs that are related to the psychopathology of schizophrenia. The issues discussed in this review reflect the deliberations of the Motivation Working Group of the CNTRICS meeting, which included most of the authors of this article as well as additional participants. After receiving task nominations from the general research community, this working group was asked to identify experimental procedures in laboratory animals that can assess aspects of reinforcement learning and motivation that may be relevant for research on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as well as other disorders characterized by deficits in reinforcement learning and motivation. The tasks described here that assess reinforcement learning are the Autoshaping Task, Probabilistic Reward Learning Tasks, and the Response Bias Probabilistic Reward Task. The tasks described here that assess motivation are Outcome Devaluation and Contingency Degradation Tasks and Effort-Based Tasks. In addition to describing such methods and procedures, the present article provides a working vocabulary for research and theory in this field, as well as an industry perspective about how such tasks may be used in drug discovery. It is hoped that this review can aid investigators who are conducting research in this complex area, promote translational studies by highlighting shared research goals and fostering a common vocabulary across basic and clinical fields, and facilitate the development of medications for the treatment of symptoms mediated by reinforcement learning and motivational deficits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  19. Using Smartphones as Experimental Tools—Effects on Interest, Curiosity, and Learning in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Katrin; Kuhn, Jochen; Müller, Andreas

    2018-04-01

    Smartphones as experimental tools (SETs) offer inspiring possibilities for science education, as their built-in sensors allow many different measurements, but until now, there has been little research that studies this approach. Due to current interest in their development, it seems necessary to provide empirical evidence about potential effects of SETs by a well-controlled study. For the present investigation, experiments were developed that use the smartphones' acceleration sensors to investigate an important topic of classical mechanics (pendulum). A quasi-experimental repeated-measurement design, consisting of an experimental group using SETs (smartphone group, SG, N SG = 87) and a control group working with traditional experimental tools (CG, N CG = 67), was used to study the effects on interest, curiosity, and learning achievement. Moreover, various control variables were taken into account. With multiple-regression analyses and ANCOVA, we found significantly higher levels of interest in the SG (small to medium effect size). Pupils that were less interested at the beginning of the study profited most from implementing SETs. Moreover, the SG showed higher levels of topic-specific curiosity (small effect size). No differences were found for learning achievement. This means that the often-supposed cognitive disadvantage of distracting learners with technological devices did not lead to reduced learning, whereas interest and curiosity were apparently fostered. Moreover, the study contributes evidence that could reduce potential concerns related to classroom use of smartphones and similar devices (increased cognitive load, mere novelty effect). In sum, the study presents encouraging results for the under-researched topic of SET use in science classrooms.

  20. Nontraditional roles for certified pharmacy technicians in a pharmaceutical company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Stacey M; Gilmour, Christine; McCracken, David; Shane, Korban; Matsuura, Gary

    2006-01-01

    To describe nontraditional roles for Certified Pharmacy Technicians (CPhTs) within pharmaceutical industry. Drug information department within a large biotechnology/pharmaceutical organization. The Medical Communications department within Genentech uses a skills-mix staffing model in which employees with varying educational and training backgrounds work as a team on meeting the informational needs of consumers and health professionals who contact the company. One position within the department is that of Medical Communications Associate, responsible primarily for managing product inquiries. Medical Communications Associates have degrees in life sciences or an equivalent combination of education and experience, including a minimum of 2 years of related experience in the health care industry. Currently, four of the seven Medical Communications Associates in the department are CPhTs. Not applicable. Ability to recruit CPhTs for Medical Communications Associate positions, and job satisfaction of those hired into these positions. Critical basic skills needed for the Medical Communications Associate position include strong computer literacy, ability to multitask, and ability to work in an environment with frequent interruptions. Strong oral and written communications skills, customer service skills, ability to deal with stressful situations, product-specific knowledge, ability to work on a daily basis with Medical Communications Pharmacists, and knowledge of medical terminology are also important. The skills set of CPhTs matches these requirements, as evidenced by the experiences of the four staff members who have worked in the department for a total of 17 person-years. This nontraditional role for CPhTs can be rewarding and beneficial to all, affording an unique opportunity within the pharmaceutical industry. The skill set and experience of CPhTs can be used in the nontraditional pharmacy practice setting of drug information.

  1. Experimental Learning of Digital Power Controller for Photovoltaic Module Using Proteus VSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit V. Padgavhankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric power supplied by photovoltaic module depends on light intensity and temperature. It is necessary to control the operating point to draw the maximum power of photovoltaic module. This paper presents the design and implementation of digital power converters using Proteus software. Its aim is to enhance student’s learning for virtual system modeling and to simulate in software for PIC microcontroller along with the hardware design. The buck and boost converters are designed to interface with the renewable energy source that is PV module. PIC microcontroller is used as a digital controller, which senses the PV electric signal for maximum power using sensors and output voltage of the dc-dc converter and according to that switching pulse is generated for the switching of MOSFET. The implementation of proposed system is based on learning platform of Proteus virtual system modeling (VSM and the experimental results are presented.

  2. A Quasi-Experimental Examination: Cognitive Sequencing of Instruction Using Experiential Learning Theory for STEM Concepts in Agricultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kasee L.; Rayfield, John

    2017-01-01

    Understanding methods for effectively instructing STEM education concepts is essential in the current climate of education (Freeman, Marginson, & Tyler 2014). Kolb's experiential learning theory (ELT) outlines four specific modes of learning, based on preferences for grasping and transforming information. This quasi-experimental study was…

  3. Digital Storytelling for Enhancing Student Academic Achievement, Critical Thinking, and Learning Motivation: A Year-Long Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting C.; Wu, Wan-Chi I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of Digital storytelling (DST) on the academic achievement, critical thinking, and learning motivation of senior high school students learning English as a foreign language. The one-year study adopted a pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design involving 110 10th grade students in two English…

  4. Open Experimentation on Phenomena of Chemical Reactions via the Learning Company Approach in Early Secondary Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Katharina; Witteck, Torsten; Eilks, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    Presented is a case study on the implementation of open and inquiry-type experimentation in early German secondary chemistry education. The teaching strategy discussed follows the learning company approach. Originally adopted from vocational education, the learning company method is used to redirect lab-oriented classroom practice towards a more…

  5. The Coping Strategies of Nontraditional Female Students in Southwest Michigan and Northern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Desiree

    2017-01-01

    Problem: The purpose of this research study was to examine the coping strategies of nontraditional female students in a private university in Southwest Michigan, and a public university in Northern Indiana. According to Carney-Compton & Tan (2002), nontraditional female students characterize the leading emergent set of students beginning…

  6. Perceived constraints by non-traditional users on the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth A. Covelli; Robert C. Burns; Alan Graefe

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the constraints that non-traditional users face, along with the negotiation strategies that are employed in order to start, continue, or increase participation in recreation on a national forest. Non-traditional users were defined as respondents who were not Caucasian. Additionally, both constraints and negotiation...

  7. Attitudes toward School Preparation and Work Barriers of Nontraditional Vocational Education Completers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Elizabeth L.

    Nontraditional and traditional secondary vocational education program completers in West Virginia were surveyed to determine their attitudes toward their school preparation, work, and encountered work barriers. A questionnaire was mailed to 100 nontraditional and 100 traditional program completers, and a 10 percent sample was contacted by…

  8. Urban Extension's New Nontraditional Offering: Parent-Child Reading Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Dorothy P.; Tsamaase, Marea; Humphrey, Ronnie; Crenshaw, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Urbanization is causing a major shift in Extension's programming throughout the United States. We present results of a nontraditional urban program (the Parent-Child Reading Enhancement Program) that is being implemented by Alabama Cooperative Extension System's Urban Affairs and New Nontraditional Programs unit. Findings suggest that this…

  9. Applying Kolb's Model to a Nontraditional Preservice Teaching Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Amy; Danyluk, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the initial findings of an ongoing study that will see six preservice teachers placed in a nontraditional practicum placement as part of their bachelor of education program. Reported here is the examination of emergent professionalism of the initial two preservice teachers during their nontraditional practicum placement on…

  10. Demystifying Educational Resilience: Barriers of Bahamian Nontraditional Adult Learners in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Johnson, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Within the past 30 years, the number of nontraditional learners who pursue higher education has increased. This gravitation to higher education can be attributed to the changing value of the nontraditional learner regarding higher education as a direct link to improving the quality of employment, family, and financial stability. Despite the desire…

  11. Emerging Technologies as a Form of Student Engagement for Nontraditional California Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gina M.

    2011-01-01

    Technology usage is increasing important for community college students, but whether nontraditional students differ from traditional students in technology usage and support was unclear. Further, it was not known whether Nontraditional and Traditional community college students feel equally connected to the college when using social networking…

  12. Financial aspects of increasing the usage of nontraditional renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, G.S.; Molodtsov, S.D.

    2001-01-01

    The current situation on the market of equipment for facilities, operating on nontraditional renewable sources is considered. The basic factors, determining the demand therefore, as well as problems on the investment provision of the nontraditional power engineering and possibilities for attracting financial resources for its further development are considered [ru

  13. Information Systems for Nontraditional Study; The State-Of-The-Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Berry; Oakey, Joseph H.

    The information systems of nontraditional education are examined. Case studies illustrate the variation in nontraditional programs: Open University of Pennsylvania, British Open University, Prince George's County Library (Maryland), University Without Walls--Skidmore, Empire State College--Saratoga, Minnesota Metropolitan State College, and…

  14. The Clinical Practice of Traditional and Nontraditional Dental Hygienists. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, E. Marcia

    Information is presented on a study designed to gather details about the services provided by clinical dental hygienists in traditional and nontraditional settings. The 10 research topics addressed include: services provided by the clinical RDH in the traditional and nontraditional setting; time allocated for such services; how patients are…

  15. Evaluating Approaches to Teaching and Learning Chinese Vocabulary from the Learning Theories Perspective: An Experimental Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja SIMONČIČ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With Chinese language gaining more and more popularity among Slovenian students and with the growing numbers of learners of Chinese as a foreign language in Slovenia and elsewhere it is crucial to find an approach that will lead to high quality and long-term knowledge of Chinese and that will motivate learners to continue learning. We can speak of two basic approaches to teaching Chinese vocabulary: the approach that first introduces pronunciation and the approach that simultaneously introduces pronunciation and character. The key question that arises is which of the two approaches leads to high quality and long-term knowledge? To answer the question an experimental case study was carried out at Ljubljana’s Faculty of Arts in the academic year 2011/2012. The case study showed that the approach that simultaneously introduces pronunciation and character and is based on the key principles of constructivist learning theory had beneficial effects on the students in terms of motivation and quality of knowledge of Chinese vocabulary.

  16. CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING (CLIL: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON CLIL COMPATIBILITY WITH THE MODERN GREEK EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Georgopoulou Theodosiou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL method for (foreign language teaching. The CLIL approach is rapidly gaining momentum across Europe and all over the world. It is the result of recent European Union efforts to develop and apply innovative educational practices of interdisciplinary character in order to bridge the gap between foreign language education and optimum learning outcomes. In order to investigate the compatibility of CLIL with the contemporary Greek educational reality, a small-scale experimental research study was set up, including the development of original e-learning material, a pilot class instruction based on this material and the evaluation of the results. The class instruction was based on Project-Based Learning whereas Collaborative Learning was supported by the Edmodo e-learning platform. Information on the progress of the pilot class instruction and the learning outcomes achieved was disseminated through a wiki set up for this task.

  17. Influence of a nontraditional master's degree on graduates' career paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J P; Wen, L K

    2000-12-01

    Graduates' assessments of the University of Texas at Austin's nontraditional M.S. degree program in pharmacy administration were studied. A survey was constructed to assess the impact of the master's program on career advancement, to examine why pharmacists enrolled in the program, and to determine if the curriculum provided knowledge or developed skills that were practical or beneficial. The survey was mailed in April 1999 to all persons who had completed the program between 1990 and 1998. A total of 56 graduates responded, for a response rate of 90.3%. The three reasons for entering the program most frequently cited as most important were career advancement, personal development, and the desire to change job responsibilities. Thirty-four respondents (60.7%) reported receiving a promotion or changing jobs for a higher position while they were enrolled in the program or after completing it. Of these 34 respondents, 29 (85.3%) attributed their promotion or new job to the master's degree. On average, graduates reported that the knowledge and skills obtained through the program had been useful in their practice. The benefits of the program that were cited most frequently were management skills, competencies in areas of pharmacy business, opportunity to advance career, job satisfaction, and competitive advantage when applying for a job. A nontraditional master's degree program in pharmacy administration had a positive impact on the career paths of graduates.

  18. Data set on the bioprecipitation of sulfate and trivalent arsenic by acidophilic non-traditional sulfur reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Letícia Paiva; Costa, Patrícia Freitas; Moreira, Mariana; Gomes, Paula Cristine Silva; de Queiroz Silva, Silvana; Gurgel, Leandro Vinícius Alves; Teixeira, Mônica Cristina

    2018-04-01

    Data presented here are related to the original paper "Simultaneous removal of sulfate and arsenic using immobilized non-traditional sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) mixed culture and alternative low-cost carbon sources" published by same authors (Matos et al., 2018) [1]. The data set here presented aims to facilitate this paper comprehension by giving readers some additional information. Data set includes a brief description of experimental conditions and the results obtained during both batch and semi-continuous reactors experiments. Data confirmed arsenic and sulfate were simultaneously removed under acidic pH by using a biological treatment based on the activity of a non-traditional sulfur reducing bacteria consortium. This microbial consortium was able to utilize glycerol, powdered chicken feathers as carbon donors, and proved to be resistant to arsenite up to 8.0 mg L - 1 . Data related to sulfate and arsenic removal efficiencies, residual arsenite and sulfate contents, pH and Eh measurements obtained under different experimental conditions were depicted in graphical format. Refers to https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2017.11.035.

  19. Data set on the bioprecipitation of sulfate and trivalent arsenic by acidophilic non-traditional sulfur reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Paiva de Matos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Data presented here are related to the original paper “Simultaneous removal of sulfate and arsenic using immobilized non-traditional sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB mixed culture and alternative low-cost carbon sources” published by same authors (Matos et al., 2018 [1]. The data set here presented aims to facilitate this paper comprehension by giving readers some additional information. Data set includes a brief description of experimental conditions and the results obtained during both batch and semi-continuous reactors experiments. Data confirmed arsenic and sulfate were simultaneously removed under acidic pH by using a biological treatment based on the activity of a non-traditional sulfur reducing bacteria consortium. This microbial consortium was able to utilize glycerol, powdered chicken feathers as carbon donors, and proved to be resistant to arsenite up to 8.0 mg L−1. Data related to sulfate and arsenic removal efficiencies, residual arsenite and sulfate contents, pH and Eh measurements obtained under different experimental conditions were depicted in graphical format.Refers to https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2017.11.035 Keywords: Arsenite, Sulfate reduction, Bioremediation, Immobilized cells, Acid pH

  20. PredPsych: A toolbox for predictive machine learning-based approach in experimental psychology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Atesh; Becchio, Cristina; Cavallo, Andrea

    2017-12-12

    Recent years have seen an increased interest in machine learning-based predictive methods for analyzing quantitative behavioral data in experimental psychology. While these methods can achieve relatively greater sensitivity compared to conventional univariate techniques, they still lack an established and accessible implementation. The aim of current work was to build an open-source R toolbox - "PredPsych" - that could make these methods readily available to all psychologists. PredPsych is a user-friendly, R toolbox based on machine-learning predictive algorithms. In this paper, we present the framework of PredPsych via the analysis of a recently published multiple-subject motion capture dataset. In addition, we discuss examples of possible research questions that can be addressed with the machine-learning algorithms implemented in PredPsych and cannot be easily addressed with univariate statistical analysis. We anticipate that PredPsych will be of use to researchers with limited programming experience not only in the field of psychology, but also in that of clinical neuroscience, enabling computational assessment of putative bio-behavioral markers for both prognosis and diagnosis.

  1. Initial investigation of the effects of an experimentally learned schema on spatial associative memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buuren, Mariët; Kroes, Marijn C W; Wagner, Isabella C; Genzel, Lisa; Morris, Richard G M; Fernández, Guillén

    2014-12-10

    Networks of interconnected neocortical representations of prior knowledge, "schemas," facilitate memory for congruent information. This facilitation is thought to be mediated by augmented encoding and accelerated consolidation. However, it is less clear how schema affects retrieval. Rodent and human studies to date suggest that schema-related memories are differently retrieved. However, these studies differ substantially as most human studies implement pre-experimental world-knowledge as schemas and tested item or nonspatial associative memory, whereas animal studies have used intraexperimental schemas based on item-location associations within a complex spatial layout that, in humans, could engage more strategic retrieval processes. Here, we developed a paradigm conceptually linked to rodent studies to examine the effects of an experimentally learned spatial associative schema on learning and retrieval of new object-location associations and to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying schema-related retrieval. Extending previous findings, we show that retrieval of schema-defining associations is related to activity along anterior and posterior midline structures and angular gyrus. The existence of such spatial associative schema resulted in more accurate learning and retrieval of new, related associations, and increased time allocated to retrieve these associations. This retrieval was associated with right dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral parietal activity, as well as interactions between the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial and lateral parietal regions, and between the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior midline regions, supporting the hypothesis that retrieval of new, schema-related object-location associations in humans also involves augmented monitoring and systematic search processes. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416662-09$15.00/0.

  2. Experimental activities in the early years of elementary school: a methodological tool for construction of the teaching-learning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de Souza Lima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on the early years of elementary school, this study evaluated the impact of experimental activities based in the scientific method and preconceptions on the learning and memorization of concepts and phenomena associated with the fermentation process. The different activities were carried out through an experimental course (20hs, with students of elementary school from school municipal Diacono Joao Luiz Pozzobon, Santa Maria-RS. The research involved 20 students, with 6 and 7 old years. The evaluation was performed by comparing the interview responses made before the course (pre-test and after the course (post-test. The post-tests were applied at the end of the experimental course, and after 6 and 12 months. The experimental activities facilitated the acquisition and retention of new concepts. The data show that "experimental activities" can be used by teachers in early grades as a methodological tool to complement the teaching-learning process.

  3. Nuclear forensics of a non-traditional sample: Neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, Jamie L.; Schwartz, Daniel; Tandon, Lav

    2016-01-01

    Recent nuclear forensics cases have focused primarily on plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) materials. By definition however, nuclear forensics can apply to any diverted nuclear material. This includes neptunium (Np), an internationally safeguarded material like Pu and U, that could offer a nuclear security concern if significant quantities were found outside of regulatory control. This case study couples scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with quantitative analysis using newly developed specialized software, to evaluate a non-traditional nuclear forensic sample of Np. Here, the results of the morphological analyses were compared with another Np sample of known pedigree, as well as other traditional actinide materials in order to determine potential processing and point-of-origin

  4. Physicochemical Evaluation of Seeds and Oil of Nontraditional Oil Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ismail Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work was conducted in the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Food science department, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, University of Kordofan, in order to evaluate some nontraditional oil seeds these are i.e. Marula (Sclerocarya birrea, Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. seeds and Christ’s thorn (Zizyphus spina-christi seeds. The seeds of the roselle and Christ’s thorn fruits were procured from Elobeid local market, North Kordofan State, while marula fruits were obtained from Elnuhod, West Kordofan State. The proximate composition of the seeds, cake and christ’s thorn pulp was done. Some chemical and physical properties were performed for the extracted oil. The results revealed that proximate composition of the seeds and cake differ statistically among the studied materials. Significant differences were observed among the oil extracted from these species; moreover, these oils differ significantly in color and viscosity only.

  5. Journaling: a quasi-experimental study of student nurses' reflective learning ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakude, L P; Bruce, J C

    2003-08-01

    The use of journaling or journal writing in clinical education is one of the strategies used to develop critical thinking. Reflective journal writing, as it is commonly known, can nurture many qualities of a critical thinker and promote thoughtful nursing practice. Using a quasi-experimental design in this study, reflective journaling was introduced to a sample of first year Bridging Course student nurses at a Private Nursing Education Institution, to assess its effectiveness in reflective learning. The study design enabled comparisons between two groups: one group of students assigned to do journaling (experimental group) and another group of students (control group) who did not journal. The students in the experimental group were given a period of eight weeks to journal their clinical experiences. At the end of this period, both groups were given an exercise, based on a clinical situation, to analyse reflectively and a comparison made on their performance. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data and Fisher's Exact Test was used to determine the significance of differences observed within and between groups. The results showed that students in the experimental group performed better in exploring alternatives of action (p < 0.10) and formulating responses in similar future situations (p < 0.05) during the process of reflection. There was no significant difference between the groups' scores with regard to their ability to describe the clinical experience, to explore their related feelings, to evaluate the experience and to interpret/create meaning for themselves. Recommendations are made for continued student support and guidance during clinical education if reflection is considered to enhance reflective, thoughtful nursing practice.

  6. Nontraditional Therapies (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and Chiropractic) in Exotic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziani, Jessica A

    2018-05-01

    The nontraditional therapies of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and chiropractic care are adjunct treatments that can be used in conjunction with more conventional therapies to treat a variety of medical conditions. Nontraditional therapies do not need to be alternatives to Western medicine but, instead, can be used simultaneously. Exotic animal practitioners should have a basic understanding of nontraditional therapies for both client education and patient referral because they can enhance the quality of life, longevity, and positive outcomes for various cases across multiple taxa. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A non-traditional multinational approach to construction inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, Srinivasan; Smith, M.E.; Walker, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    The next generation of nuclear plants would be fabricated, constructed and licensed in markedly different ways than the present light water reactors. Non-traditional commercial nuclear industry suppliers, shipyards in Usa and international fabricators, would be a source to supply major components and subsystems. The codes of construction may vary depending upon the prevailing codes and standards used by the respective supplier. Such codes and standards need to be reconciled with the applicable regulations (e.g., 10 CFR 52). A Construction Inspection Program is an integral part of the Quality Assurance Measures required during the Construction Phase of the power plant. In order to achieve the stated cost and schedule goals of the new build plants, a nontraditional multi-national approach would be required. In lieu of the traditional approach of individual utility inspecting the quality of fabrication and construction, a multi-utility team approach is a method that will be discussed. Likewise, a multinational cooperative licensing approach is suggested taking advantage of inspectors of the regulatory authority where the component would be built. The multi-national approach proposed here is based on the principle of forming teaming agreements between the utilities, vendors and the regulators. For instance, rather than sending Country A's inspectors all over the world, inspectors of the regulator in Country B where a particular component is being fabricated would in fact be performing the required inspections for Country A's regulator. Similarly teaming arrangements could be set up between utilities and vendors in different countries. The required oversight for the utility or the vendor could be performed by their counterparts in the country where a particular item is being fabricated

  8. Developing Tele-Operated Laboratories for Manufacturing Engineering Education. Platform for E-Learning and Telemetric Experimentation (PeTEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Erman Tekkaya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the PeTEX-project is to establish an e-Learning platform for the development, implementation, and delivery of educational training programs in the field of manufacturing engineering. The PeTEX team designs both: a technical platform for eLearning based on “Moodle” including distributed tele-operated experimentation facilities, and didactic and socio-technical requirements for a successful online learning community. User interfaces are deployed for remote access to instruments, data analysis and multiplexed data access via network protocols. Hence, the platform provides complex tools in order to perform various activities to support the educational process, from telemetric experimentation to virtual project groups for an entire community to the purpose of domain specific learning. This paper describes important steps of interdisciplinary participatory design and development of a remote lab-prototype in the field of manufacturing engineering.

  9. Effect of Cistanche Desertica Polysaccharides on Learning and Memory Functions and Ultrastructure of Cerebral Neurons in Experimental Aging Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙云; 邓杨梅; 王德俊; 沈春锋; 刘晓梅; 张洪泉

    2001-01-01

    To observe the effects of Cistanche desertica polysaccharides (CDP) on the learning and memory functions and cerebral ultrastructure in experimental aging mice. Methods: CDP was administrated intragastrically 50 or 100 mg/kg per day for 64 successive days to experimental aging model mice induced by D-galactose, then the learning and memory functions of mice were estimated by step-down test and Y-maze test; organelles of brain tissue and cerebral ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscope and physical strength was determined by swimming test. Results: CDP could obviously enhance the learning and memory functions (P<0.01) and prolong the swimming time (P<0.05), decrease the number of lipofuscin and slow down the degeneration of mitochondria in neurons(P<0.05), and improve the degeneration of cerebral ultra-structure in aging mice. Conclusion: CDP could improve the impaired physiological function and alleviate cerebral morphological change in experimental aging mice.

  10. An experimental model for the study of cognitive disorders: the hippocampus and associative learning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-García, José M; Gruart, Agnès

    2008-12-01

    The availability of transgenic mice mimicking selective human neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders calls for new electrophysiological and microstimulation techniques capable of being applied in vivo in this species. In this article, we will concentrate on experiments and techniques developed in our laboratory during the past few years. Thus we have developed different techniques for the study of learning and memory capabilities of wild-type and transgenic mice with deficits in cognitive functions, using classical conditioning procedures. These techniques include different trace (tone/SHOCK and shock/SHOCK) conditioning procedures ? that is, a classical conditioning task involving the cerebral cortex, including the hippocampus. We have also developed implantation and recording techniques for evoking long-term potentiation (LTP) in behaving mice and for recording the evolution of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) evoked in the hippocampal CA1 area by the electrical stimulation of the commissural/Schaffer collateral pathway across conditioning sessions. Computer programs have also been developed to quantify the appearance and evolution of eyelid conditioned responses and the slope of evoked fEPSPs. According to the present results, the in vivo recording of the electrical activity of selected hippocampal sites during classical conditioning of eyelid responses appears to be a suitable experimental procedure for studying learning capabilities in genetically modified mice, and an excellent model for the study of selected neuropsychiatric disorders compromising cerebral cortex functioning.

  11. The active learning hypothesis of the job-demand-control model: an experimental examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusser, Jan Alexander; Schulz-Hardt, Stefan; Mojzisch, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The active learning hypothesis of the job-demand-control model [Karasek, R. A. 1979. "Job Demands, Job Decision Latitude, and Mental Strain: Implications for Job Redesign." Administration Science Quarterly 24: 285-307] proposes positive effects of high job demands and high job control on performance. We conducted a 2 (demands: high vs. low) × 2 (control: high vs. low) experimental office workplace simulation to examine this hypothesis. Since performance during a work simulation is confounded by the boundaries of the demands and control manipulations (e.g. time limits), we used a post-test, in which participants continued working at their task, but without any manipulation of demands and control. This post-test allowed for examining active learning (transfer) effects in an unconfounded fashion. Our results revealed that high demands had a positive effect on quantitative performance, without affecting task accuracy. In contrast, high control resulted in a speed-accuracy tradeoff, that is participants in the high control conditions worked slower but with greater accuracy than participants in the low control conditions.

  12. Learning by Doing versus Learning by Viewing: Three Experimental Comparisons of Learner-Generated versus Author-Provided Graphic Organizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Andrew T.; Mayer, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    Do students learn more deeply from a passage when they attempt to construct their own graphic organizers (i.e., learning by doing) than when graphic organizers are provided (i.e., learning by viewing)? In 3 experiments, learners were tested on retention and transfer after reading a passage with author-provided graphic organizers or when asked to…

  13. Nursing students learning the pharmacology of diabetes mellitus with complexity-based computerized models: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovi, Ilana; Dagan, Efrat; Sader Mazbar, Ola; Nassar, Laila; Levy, Sharona T

    2018-02-01

    Pharmacology is a crucial component of medications administration in nursing, yet nursing students generally find it difficult and self-rate their pharmacology skills as low. To evaluate nursing students learning pharmacology with the Pharmacology Inter-Leaved Learning-Cells environment, a novel approach to modeling biochemical interactions using a multiscale, computer-based model with a complexity perspective based on a small set of entities and simple rules. This environment represents molecules, organelles and cells to enhance the understanding of cellular processes, and combines these cells at a higher scale to obtain whole-body interactions. Sophomore nursing students who learned the pharmacology of diabetes mellitus with the Pharmacology Inter-Leaved Learning-Cells environment (experimental group; n=94) or via a lecture-based curriculum (comparison group; n=54). A quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design was conducted. The Pharmacology-Diabetes-Mellitus questionnaire and the course's final exam were used to evaluate students' knowledge of the pharmacology of diabetes mellitus. Conceptual learning was significantly higher for the experimental than for the comparison group for the course final exam scores (unpaired t=-3.8, pLearning with complexity-based computerized models is highly effective and enhances the understanding of moving between micro and macro levels of the biochemical phenomena, this is then related to better understanding of medication actions. Moreover, the Pharmacology Inter-Leaved Learning-Cells approach provides a more general reasoning scheme for biochemical processes, which enhances pharmacology learning beyond the specific topic learned. The present study implies that deeper understanding of pharmacology will support nursing students' clinical decisions and empower their proficiency in medications administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does extrinsic goal framing enhance extrinsic goal-oriented individuals' learning and performance? An experimental test of the match perspective versus self-determination theory

    OpenAIRE

    Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Timmermans, Tinneke; Lens, Willy; Soenens, Bart; Van den Broeck, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Previous work within self-determination theory has shown that experimentally framing a learning activity in terms of extrinsic rather than intrinsic goals results in poorer conceptual learning and performance, presumably because extrinsic goal framing detracts attention from the learning activity and is less directly satisfying of basic psychological needs. According to the match perspective, experimental extrinsic, compared to intrinsic, goal framing should enhance learning and performance f...

  15. Reaching Non-Traditional and Under-Served Communities through Global Astronomy Month Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Global Astronomy Month (GAM), organized each year by Astronomers Without Borders (AWB), has become the world's largest annual celebration of astronomy. Launched as a follow-up to the unprecedented success of the 100 Hours of Astronomy Cornerstone Project of IYA2009, GAM quickly attracted not only traditional partners in astronomy and space science outreach, but also unusual partners from very different fields. GAM's third annual edition, GAM2012, included worldwide programs for the sight-impaired, astronomy in the arts, and other non-traditional programs. The special planetarium program, OPTICKS, combined elements such as Moonbounce (sending images to the Moon and back) and artistic elements in a unique presentation of the heavens. Programs were developed to present the heavens to the sight-impaired as well. The Cosmic Concert, in which a new musical piece is composed each year, combined with background images of celestial objects, and presented during GAM, has become an annual event. Several astronomy themed art video projects were presented online. AWB's Astropoetry Blog held a very successful contest during GAM2012 that attracted more than 70 entries from 17 countries. Students were engaged by participation in special GAM campaigns of the International Asteroid Search Campaign. AWB and GAM have both developed into platforms where innovative programs can develop, and interdisciplinary collaborations can flourish. As AWB's largest program, GAM brings the audience and resources that provide a boost for these new types of programs. Examples, lessons learned, new projects, and plans for the future of AWB and GAM will be presented.

  16. How do medium naturalness and personality traits shape academic achievement and perceived learning? An experimental study of face-to-face and synchronous e-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Blau

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This controlled experiment examined how academic achievement and cognitive, emotional and social aspects of perceived learning are affected by the level of medium naturalness (face-to-face, one-way and two-way videoconferencing and by learners’ personality traits (extroversion–introversion and emotional stability–neuroticism. The Media Naturalness Theory explains the degree of medium naturalness by comparing its characteristics to face-to-face communication, considered to be the most natural form of communication. A total of 76 participants were randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: face-to-face, one-way and two-way videoconferencing. E-learning conditions were conducted through Zoom videoconferencing, which enables natural and spontaneous communication. Findings shed light on the trade-off involved in media naturalness: one-way videoconferencing, the less natural learning condition, enhanced the cognitive aspect of perceived learning but compromised the emotional and social aspects. Regarding the impact of personality, neurotic students tended to enjoy and succeed more in face-to-face learning, whereas emotionally stable students enjoyed and succeeded in all of the learning conditions. Extroverts tended to enjoy more natural learning environments but had lower achievements in these conditions. In accordance with the ‘poor get richer’ principle, introverts enjoyed environments with a low level of medium naturalness. However, they remained focused and had higher achievements in the face-to-face learning.

  17. Nontraditional Fog Seal for Asphalt Pavement : Performance on Shoulder Sections in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    The pavement engineering community has recently been introduced to a number of nontraditional products intended for uses as surface sealers for bituminous pavements. Many new products use agricultural-based components and little is known regarding th...

  18. A Comparison of Mental Health and Alcohol Use Between Traditional and Nontraditional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenz, Rebecca C; Ecklund-Flores, Lisa; Rapoza, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    To describe differences in life stress, anxiety, depression, and alcohol use between traditional and nontraditional college students. A targeted, stratified sample of college students (N = 1,187; Mage = 23.96, SD = 7.30; female, 67.2%) completed study surveys in Spring 2011. Participants completed demographic information, life stress (Crisis in Family Systems), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), and alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption) surveys during regularly scheduled class times. Fifty-three percent (n = 630) of study participants were nontraditional students. Nontraditional students scored significantly higher than traditional students on life stress (t[1182] = -3.05, p students did not differ on alcohol use. Interventions for nontraditional college students should address the mental health issues specific to this growing college subpopulation.

  19. Traditional and non-traditional educational outcomes : Trade-off or complementarity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Marieke; Waslander, Sietske

    2007-01-01

    Recently, schools have increasingly been charged with enhancing non-traditional academic competencies, in addition to traditional academic competencies. This article raises the question whether schools can implement these new educational goals in their curricula and simultaneously realise the

  20. Renewable energy sources. Non-traditional actors on the international market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Five of Sweden's technical attaches have investigated the non-traditional actors activity within the field of renewable energy sources. Countries studied are USA, Japan, France, Germany and Great Britain

  1. Experimental Model of Cerebral Hypoperfusion Produced Memory-learning Deficits, and Modifications in Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rilda LEÓN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia is a major cause of death, for this reason animal models of cerebral ischemia are widely used to study both the pathophysiology of ischemic phenomenon and the evaluation of possible therapeutic agents with protective or regenerative properties. The objectives of this study were to examine the presence of neuronal damage in different brain areas following the ischemic event, and assess consequences of such activities on the processes of memory and learning. The study group included an experimental group ischemic animals (30 rats with permanent bilateral occlusion of the carotids, and a control group. Was evaluated gene expression and inflammatory ischemic by qPCR techniques 24h post injury, brain tissue morphology in areas of cortex, striatum and hippocampus seven days post injury and processes of memory and learning, 12 days post injury. The morphological studies showed that the procedure induces death of cell populations in cortex, striatum and hippocampus, ischemia modified gfap gene expression and ho, il-6, il-17 and ifn-γ, which can be used as a marker of early ischemic process. Additionally, the ischemic injury caused spatial memory decline. This characterization gives us an experimental model to develop future studies on the pathophysiology of ischemic events and assessing therapeutic strategies. MODELO EXPERIMENTAL DE HIPOPERFUSIÓN CEREBRAL PRODUCE DÉFICIT DE LA MEMORIA Y APRENDIZAJE Y MODIFICACIONES EN LA EXPRESIÓN DE GENES. A escala mundial, la isquemia cerebral constituye una de las principales causas de muerte, por lo que los modelos animales de isquemia cerebral son extensamente usados tanto en el estudio de la pato-fisiología del fenómeno isquémico; como en la evaluación de agentes terapéuticos con posible efecto protector o regenerador.  Los objetivos de este estudio fueron examinar la presencia de daño neuronal en diferentes áreas cerebrales como consecuencia del evento isquémico; así como evaluar

  2. Effectiveness of interactive, online games in learning neuroscience and students' perception of the games as learning tools. A pre-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Marilyn E; Ford, Ruth; Webster, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Neurological concepts applicable to a doctorate in occupational therapy are often challenging to comprehend, and students are required to demonstrate critical reasoning skills beyond simply recalling the information. To achieve this, various learning and teaching strategies are used, including the use of technology in the classroom. The availability of technology in academic settings has allowed for diverse and active teaching approaches. This includes videos, web-based instruction, and interactive online games. In this quantitative pre-experimental analysis, the learning and retention of neuroscience concepts by 30 occupational therapy doctoral students, who participated in an interactive online learning experience, were assessed. The results suggest that student use of these tools may enhance their learning of neuroscience. Furthermore, the students felt that the sites were appropriate, beneficial to them, and easy to use. Thus, the use of online, interactive neuroscience games may be effective in reinforcing lecture materials. This needs to be further assessed in a larger sample size.

  3. The educational effects of mobile learning on students of medical sciences: A systematic review in experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohestani, Hamid Reza; Soltani Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran; Fata, Ladan; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2018-04-01

    The demand for mobile learning in the medical science educational program is increasing. The present review study gathers evidence highlighted by the experimental studies on the educational effects of mobile learning for medical science students. The study was carried out as a systematic literature search published from 2007 to July 2017 in the databases PubMed/Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Knowledge (Thomson Reuters) , Educational Resources and Information Center (ERIC), EMBASE (Elsevier), Cochrane library, PsycINFO and Google Scholar. To examine quality of the articles, a tool validated by the BEME Review was employed. Totally, 21 papers entered the study. Three main themes emerged from the content of papers: (1) improvement in student clinical competency and confidence, (2) acquisition and enhancing of students' theoretical knowledge, and (3) students' positive attitudes to and perception of mobile learning. Level 2B of Kirkpatrick hierarchy had been examined by all the papers and seven of them had reported two or more outcome levels, but level 4 was not reported in the papers. Our review showed that the students of medical sciences had positive response and attitudes to mobile learning. Moreover, implementation of mobile learning in medical sciences program might lead to valuable educational benefits and improve clinical competence and confidence along with theoretical knowledge, attitudes, and perception of mobile learning. The results indicated that mobile learning strategy in medical education can positively affect learning in all three domains of Bloom's Taxonomy.

  4. Enhancing (In)Formal Learning Ties in Interdisciplinary Management Courses: A Quasi-Experimental Social Network Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienties, Bart; Héliot, YingFei

    2018-01-01

    While interdisciplinary courses are regarded as a promising method for students to learn and apply knowledge from other disciplines, there is limited empirical evidence available whether interdisciplinary courses can effectively "create" interdisciplinary students. In this innovative quasi-experimental study amongst 377 Master's…

  5. For the Love of Statistics: Appreciating and Learning to Apply Experimental Analysis and Statistics through Computer Programming Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaró, Maite; Sacristán, Ana Isabel; Rufino, Marta M.

    2016-01-01

    For the past 4 years, we have been involved in a project that aims to enhance the teaching and learning of experimental analysis and statistics, of environmental and biological sciences students, through computational programming activities (using R code). In this project, through an iterative design, we have developed sequences of R-code-based…

  6. Learning Design of Problem Based Learning Model Based on Recommendations of Sintax Study and Contents Issues on Physics Impulse Materials with Experimental Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristia Agustina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to design learning Problem Based Learning Model based on syntax study recommendations and content issues on Physics Impulse materials through experiments. This research is a development research with Kemp model. The reference for making the learning design is the result of the syntax study and the content of existing PBL implementation problems from Agustina research. This instructional design is applied to the physics material about Impulse done through experimental activity. Limited trials were conducted on the SWCU Physics Education Study Program students group Salatiga, while the validity test was conducted by high school teachers and physics education lecturers. The results of the trial evaluation are limited and the validity test is used to improve the designs that have been made. The conclusion of this research is the design of learning by using PBL model on Impuls material by referring the result of syntax study and the problem content of existing PBL implementation can be produced by learning activity designed in laboratory experiment activity. The actual problem for Impuls material can be used car crash test video at factory. The results of validation tests and limited trials conducted by researchers assessed that the design of learning made by researchers can be used with small revisions. Suggestions from this research are in making learning design by using PBL model to get actual problem can by collecting news that come from newspaper, YouTube, internet, and television.

  7. TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF PRODUCTION OF THE CANDIED FRUITS FROM NON-TRADITIONAL RAW MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Belenkaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the candied fruit market in Ukraine and describes the main technological operations pertainingto processing of non-traditional candied products – celery and parsnip roots. Darkening of the roots surface caused bythe enzyme oxidation is one of the problems arising when processing white roots, which leads to worse marketable conditionof the product. To prevent darkening, the developed technology provides for soaking raw material in 1% citric acid solutionimmediately after peeling. To improve the diffusion and osmotic processes and to soften roots before boiling in sugar syrup,the steam blanching has been applied. The constructed Gantt diagram proves that the developed technology can shorten thecandied fruit cooking period. The biochemical indicators of the obtained new products have been studied. It was establishedthat the candied fruit possess the appropriate physical and chemical indicators and original organoleptic properties resulting ina demand by consumers. The results of the taste evaluation of the experimental specimen confirmed a high quality of the products.

  8. "Learn Young, Learn Fair", a Stress Management Program for Fifth and Sixth Graders: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Kok, Gerjo; Hosman, Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of a universal stress management program (Learn Young, Learn Fair) on stress, coping, anxiety and depression in fifth and sixth grade children. Methods: Fifty-two schools (1467 children) participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Data was collected in the fall of 2002, the spring of 2003,…

  9. The Experimental Research on E-Learning Instructional Design Model Based on Cognitive Flexibility Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xianzhong; Wang, Feng; Zheng, Zhongmei

    The paper reports an educational experiment on the e-Learning instructional design model based on Cognitive Flexibility Theory, the experiment were made to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of the model in promoting the learning quality in ill-structured domain. The study performed the experiment on two groups of students: one group learned through the system designed by the model and the other learned by the traditional method. The results of the experiment indicate that the e-Learning designed through the model is helpful to promote the intrinsic motivation, learning quality in ill-structured domains, ability to resolve ill-structured problem and creative thinking ability of the students.

  10. Phase transitions between lower and higher level management learning in times of crisis: an experimental study based on synergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liening, Andreas; Strunk, Guido; Mittelstadt, Ewald

    2013-10-01

    Much has been written about the differences between single- and double-loop learning, or more general between lower level and higher level learning. Especially in times of a fundamental crisis, a transition between lower and higher level learning would be an appropriate reaction to a challenge coming entirely out of the dark. However, so far there is no quantitative method to monitor such a transition. Therefore we introduce theory and methods of synergetics and present results from an experimental study based on the simulation of a crisis within a business simulation game. Hypothesized critical fluctuations - as a marker for so-called phase transitions - have been assessed with permutation entropy. Results show evidence for a phase transition during the crisis, which can be interpreted as a transition between lower and higher level learning.

  11. Approaches to nontraditional delivery of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaviya, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the faculty of the nuclear engineering and engineering physics department have, over the years, been involved in a variety of such approaches in response to the changing needs of nuclear industry personnel. A number of different types of short course and workshop programs have been developed and implemented both on and off campus in such areas as basic nuclear technology, reactor design computer codes and applications, nuclear power plant design and maintenance, reactor operations, health physics, modern developments in boiling heat transfer and two-phase flow, and probabilistic risk assessment. Customized coursed tailored to meet the particular needs of personnel in specialized areas can also be offered on specific industrial site locations, generally resulting in substantial savings of time as well as costs associated with tuition, travel, lodging. The Rensselaer Satellite Video Program (RSVP) brings the latest technological aids to the nontraditional delivery of courses and provides the facilities and opportunities for off-campus students and professional personnel to participate in regular academic programs and courses without leaving their industrial sites

  12. The Gritty: Grit and Non-traditional Doctoral Student Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted M. Cross

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As higher education is changing to reach larger numbers of students via online modalities, the issue of student attrition and other measures of student success become increasingly important. While research has focused largely on undergraduate online students, less has been done in the area of online non-traditional doctoral student success, particularly from the student trait perspective. The concept of grit, passion and persistence for long-term goals, has been identified as an important element of the successful attainment of long-term goals. As doctoral education is a long-term goal the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of doctoral student grit scores on student success. Success was measured by examining current student GPA and other factors. Significant relationships were found between grit and current student GPA, grit and the average number of hours students spent on their program of study weekly, and grit and age. The results of this research maybe important for informing how doctoral education is structured and how students might be better prepared for doctoral work.

  13. Perceptions of stakeholders about nontraditional cookstoves in Honduras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, Sebastian; Bailis, Robert; Ghilardi, Adrian; Dwivedi, Puneet

    2012-01-01

    We used SWOT-AHP (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats–analytical hierarchy process) technique to measure perceptions of four stakeholder groups: employees, local promoters, community leaders and end-users, about a nontraditional cookstove (NTCS) in Honduras. These stakeholder groups are part of an ongoing NTCS dissemination project led by Proyecto Mirador. We found that all stakeholder groups have a positive perception about the existing NTCS. Employees and local promoters stakeholder groups share similar perceptions. Smokeless cooking was selected as a prime strength, closely followed by reduction in forest logging and greenhouse gas emissions by all stakeholder groups. Availability of financial resources and responsible management were identified as crucial opportunities. Time spent in wood preparation and NTCS maintenance were identified as principal weaknesses. A long waiting time between a request and installation of NTCS and the risk of losing existing financial resources were acknowledged as major threats. Design improvements that can reduce maintenance and wood preparation time, a secure long-term source of funding through a market mechanism or direct/indirect government involvement, and early execution of pending orders will help in increasing adoption of NTCSs in rural Honduras. (letter)

  14. Perceptions of stakeholders about nontraditional cookstoves in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Sebastian; Dwivedi, Puneet; Bailis, Robert; Ghilardi, Adrian

    2012-12-01

    We used SWOT-AHP (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats-analytical hierarchy process) technique to measure perceptions of four stakeholder groups: employees, local promoters, community leaders and end-users, about a nontraditional cookstove (NTCS) in Honduras. These stakeholder groups are part of an ongoing NTCS dissemination project led by Proyecto Mirador. We found that all stakeholder groups have a positive perception about the existing NTCS. Employees and local promoters stakeholder groups share similar perceptions. Smokeless cooking was selected as a prime strength, closely followed by reduction in forest logging and greenhouse gas emissions by all stakeholder groups. Availability of financial resources and responsible management were identified as crucial opportunities. Time spent in wood preparation and NTCS maintenance were identified as principal weaknesses. A long waiting time between a request and installation of NTCS and the risk of losing existing financial resources were acknowledged as major threats. Design improvements that can reduce maintenance and wood preparation time, a secure long-term source of funding through a market mechanism or direct/indirect government involvement, and early execution of pending orders will help in increasing adoption of NTCSs in rural Honduras.

  15. Social Capital of Non-Traditional Students at a German University. Do Traditional and Non-Traditional Students Access Different Social Resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändle, Tobias; Häuberer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Social capital is of particular value for the acquisition of education. Not only does it prevent scholars from dropping out but it improves the educational achievement. The paper focuses on access to social resources by traditional and non-traditional students at a German university and asks if there are group differences considering this…

  16. Development and Experimental Evaluation of Machine-Learning Techniques for an Intelligent Hairy Scalp Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chien Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep learning has become the most popular research subject in the fields of artificial intelligence (AI and machine learning. In October 2013, MIT Technology Review commented that deep learning was a breakthrough technology. Deep learning has made progress in voice and image recognition, image classification, and natural language processing. Prior to deep learning, decision tree, linear discriminant analysis (LDA, support vector machines (SVM, k-nearest neighbors algorithm (K-NN, and ensemble learning were popular in solving classification problems. In this paper, we applied the previously mentioned and deep learning techniques to hairy scalp images. Hairy scalp problems are usually diagnosed by non-professionals in hair salons, and people with such problems may be advised by these non-professionals. Additionally, several common scalp problems are similar; therefore, non-experts may provide incorrect diagnoses. Hence, scalp problems have worsened. In this work, we implemented and compared the deep-learning method, the ImageNet-VGG-f model Bag of Words (BOW, with machine-learning classifiers, and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG/pyramid histogram of oriented gradients (PHOG with machine-learning classifiers. The tools from the classification learner apps were used for hairy scalp image classification. The results indicated that deep learning can achieve an accuracy of 89.77% when the learning rate is 1 × 10−4, and this accuracy is far higher than those achieved by BOW with SVM (80.50% and PHOG with SVM (53.0%.

  17. Social learning solves the problem of narrow-peaked search landscapes : experimental evidence in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acerbi, A.; Tennie, C.; Mesoudi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive use of social learning is considered a major reason for the ecological success of humans. Theoretical considerations, models and experiments have explored the evolutionary basis of social learning, showing the conditions under which learning from others is more adaptive than individual

  18. Does Extrinsic Goal Framing Enhance Extrinsic Goal-Oriented Individuals' Learning and Performance? An Experimental Test of the Match Perspective versus Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Timmermans, Tinneke; Lens, Willy; Soenens, Bart; Van den Broeck, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Previous work within self-determination theory has shown that experimentally framing a learning activity in terms of extrinsic rather than intrinsic goals results in poorer conceptual learning and performance, presumably because extrinsic goal framing detracts attention from the learning activity and is less directly satisfying of basic…

  19. Influence of undergraduate nursing student teaching methods on learning standard precautions and transmission-based precautions: Experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappes Ramirez, Maria Soledad

    2018-02-01

    An experimental study was performed with undergraduate nursing students in order to determine, between two methodologies, which is the best for learning standard precautions and precautions based on disease transmission mechanisms. Students in the sample are stratified by performance, with the experimental group (49 students) being exposed to self-instruction and clinical simulation on the topic of standard precautions and special precautions according to disease transmission mechanisms. Conventional classes on the same topics were provided to the control group (49 students). The experimental group showed the best performance in the multiple-choice post-test of knowledge (p=0.002) and in the assessment of essay questions (p=0.043), as well as in the evaluation of a simulated scenario, in relation to the control group. This study demonstrates that it is possible to transfer some teaching subjects on the prevention of Healthcare Associated Infections (HAIs) to self-learning by means of virtual teaching strategies with good results. This allows greater efficiency in the allocation of teachers to clinical simulation or learning situations in the laboratory, where students can apply what they have learned in the self-instruction module. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. ShapeShop: Towards Understanding Deep Learning Representations via Interactive Experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohman, Frederick M.; Hodas, Nathan O.; Chau, Duen Horng

    2017-05-30

    Deep learning is the driving force behind many recent technologies; however, deep neural networks are often viewed as “black-boxes” due to their internal complexity that is hard to understand. Little research focuses on helping people explore and understand the relationship between a user’s data and the learned representations in deep learning models. We present our ongoing work, ShapeShop, an interactive system for visualizing and understanding what semantics a neural network model has learned. Built using standard web technologies, ShapeShop allows users to experiment with and compare deep learning models to help explore the robustness of image classifiers.

  1. ShapeShop: Towards Understanding Deep Learning Representations via Interactive Experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Fred; Hodas, Nathan; Chau, Duen Horng

    2017-05-01

    Deep learning is the driving force behind many recent technologies; however, deep neural networks are often viewed as "black-boxes" due to their internal complexity that is hard to understand. Little research focuses on helping people explore and understand the relationship between a user's data and the learned representations in deep learning models. We present our ongoing work, ShapeShop, an interactive system for visualizing and understanding what semantics a neural network model has learned. Built using standard web technologies, ShapeShop allows users to experiment with and compare deep learning models to help explore the robustness of image classifiers.

  2. Impact of engaging middle management in practice interventions on staff support and learning culture: a quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Burmeister, Liz; Schoonbeek, Sue; Ossenberg, Christine; Gneilding, Julieanne

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the impact of different levels of engaging middle management in ward based strategies implemented by a project educator. The challenge for learning in practice is to develop effective teams where experienced staff engage and foster learning with students and other novice staff. A quasi-experimental pre- and post- intervention four group design was conducted from November 2009 to May 2010 across four general surgical and four general medical inpatient matched units in two settings in South East Queensland, Australia. Staff survey data was used to compare control and intervention groups (one actively engaging nurse managers) before and after 'practice learning' interventions. The survey comprised demographic data and data from two validated scales (support instrument for nurses facilitating learning and clinical learning organisational culture). Number of surveys returned pre- and post-intervention was 336 from 713 (47%). There were significant differences across many subscales pertaining to staff perception of support in the intervention groups, with only one change in the control group. The number of significant different subscales in the learning culture was also greater when middle management supported the intervention. Middle management should work closely with facilitators to assist embedding practice interventions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Non-traditional Stable Isotope Systematics of Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O. J.

    2009-05-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges is one of the fundamental processes controlling the chemistry of the oceans and the altered oceanic crust. Past studies have demonstrated the complexity and diversity of seafloor hydrothermal systems and have highlighted the importance of subsurface environments in controlling the composition of hydrothermal fluids and mineralization types. Traditionally, the behavior of metals in seafloor hydrothermal systems have been investigated by integrating results from laboratory studies, theoretical models, mineralogy and fluid and mineral chemistry. Isotope ratios of various metals and metalloids, such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Sb have recently provided new approaches for the study of seafloor hydrothermal systems. Despite these initial investigations, the cause of the isotopic variability of these elements remains poorly constrained. We have little understanding of the isotope variations between vent types (black or white smokers) as well as the influence of source rock composition (basalt, felsic or ultrabasic rocks) and alteration types. Here, I will review and present new results of metal isotope systematics of seafloor hydrothermal systems, in particular: (1) determination of empirical isotope fractionation factors for Zn, Fe and Cu-isotopes through isotopic analysis of mono-mineralic sulfide grains lining the internal chimney wall in contact with hydrothermal fluid; (2) comparison of Fe- and Cu-isotope signatures of vent fluids from mid- oceanic and back-arc hydrothermal fields, spanning wide ranges of pH, temperature, metal concentrations and contributions of magmatic fluids enriched in SO2. Ultimately, the use of complementary non-traditional stable isotope systems may help identify and constrain the complex interactions between fluids,minerals, and organisms in seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  4. Situated teaching improves empathy learning of the students in a BSN program: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwo-Chen; Yu, Chin-Ching; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Li, Chin-Ching; Chao, Yann-Fen C

    2018-05-01

    Empathy is an important clinical skill for nursing students, but it is a characteristic difficult to teach and assess. To evaluate the effect of situated teaching on empathy learning among undergraduate nursing students. A cohort study with pre-post-test quasi-experimental design. The 2nd-year students were enrolled from two BSN programs. The teaching program was completed over 4 months on the basis of experiential learning theory which integrated the following four elements: classroom-based role play, self-reflection, situated learning and acting. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Profession-Student version was administered before and after the program. Objective Structure Clinical Examination (OSCE) was administered at the end of program and a rubrics scale was used to measure empathy. A generalized estimation equation was used to identify the effect of subjective empathy, and an independent t-test was used for the objective assessment between two groups. A total of 103 students were enrolled. The results showed that subjective empathy increased significantly in experimental group. In the Objective Structured Clinical Examination, examiners and standard patients gave significantly higher empathy scores to the situated teaching group than the control group. The present study indicated that situated teaching can improve empathy learning of the nursing students. However different methods of assessment of empathy produce different results. We therefore recommend that multiple measurements from difference perspectives are preferable in the assessment of empathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Social Networks and the Building of Learning Communities: An Experimental Study of a Social MOOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Mariana; Zorrilla, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the student's behaviour in relation to their degree of commitment, participation, and contribution in a MOOC based on a social learning approach. Interaction data was collected on the learning platform and in social networks, both of which were used in the third edition of a social MOOC course. This data was then…

  6. The Impact of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation on the Academic Achievement of Non-Traditional Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, Alma Lorenia

    2017-01-01

    Non-traditional students have become a growing component of the student population in today's college systems. Research has shown that non-traditional students are less likely to achieve academically and complete their degree programs compared to traditional students. The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to investigate the…

  7. Enrollment in Distance Education Classes Is Associated with Fewer Enrollment Gaps among Nontraditional Undergraduate Students in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Manuel C. F.; Pontes, Nancy M. H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine whether nontraditional undergraduate students in the US who enroll in distance education classes are less likely to have an enrollment gap (enrollment gap=part year enrollment). Previous research has shown that preference for distance education classes is significantly greater among nontraditional than…

  8. Linkages between motivation, self-efficacy, self-regulated learning and preferences for traditional learning environments or those with an online component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Auld

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed 96 law school students’ preferences for online, hybrid, or traditional learning environments, and their reasons for these preferences, learning strategies, and motivational orientations. A discriminant analysis revealed that non-traditional learning environment familiarity, self-efficacy, and employment status were the strongest predictors of preferences for non-traditional learning environments. Preferences for traditional environments were attributed to students’ familiarity and ability to engage in and foster personal interaction. Preferences for hybrid and online environments were attributed to opportunities for enhanced learning given the convenience and flexible manner in which students with time and familial constraints could access these environments.

  9. Pain-Coping Traits of Nontraditional Women Athletes: Relevance to Optimal Treatment and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michael C.; Higgs, Robert; LeUnes, Arnold D.; Bourgeois, Anthony E.; Laurent, C. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Context The primary goal of traditional treatment and rehabilitation programs is to safely return athletes to full functional capacity. Nontraditional activities such as rock climbing or rodeo are typically less training structured and coach structured; individualism, self-determination, and autonomy are more prevalent than observed in athletes in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)-sponsored sports. The limited research available on nontraditional athletes has provided the athletic trainer little insight into the coping skills and adaptations to stressors that these athletes may bring into the clinical setting, especially among the growing number of women participating in these types of activities. A better understanding of the pain-coping traits of nontraditional competitors would enhance insight and triage procedures while heading off potential athlete-related risk factors in the clinical setting. Objective To quantify and compare pain-coping traits among individual-sport women athletes participating in nontraditional versus traditional NCAA-structured competition, with relevance to optimal treatment and rehabilitation. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Data collected during each participant's respective group meeting before seasonal activity. Participants or Other Participants A total of 298 athletes involved in either nontraditional, non-NCAA individual sports (n = 152; mean age = 20.2 ± 1.3 years; downhill skiing, martial arts, rock climbing, rodeo, skydiving, telemark skiing) or traditional NCAA sports (n = 146; mean age = 20.3 ± 1.4 years; equestrian, golf, swimming/diving, tennis, track). Main Outcome Measure(s) All participants completed the Sports Inventory for Pain, a sport-specific, self-report instrument that measures pain-coping traits relevant to competition, treatment, and rehabilitation. Trait measures were direct coping, cognitive, catastrophizing, avoidance, body awareness, and total coping response. Data were grouped for

  10. Pain-Coping Traits of Nontraditional Women Athletes: Relevance to Optimal Treatment and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michael C; Higgs, Robert; LeUnes, Arnold D; Bourgeois, Anthony E; Laurent, C Matthew

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of traditional treatment and rehabilitation programs is to safely return athletes to full functional capacity. Nontraditional activities such as rock climbing or rodeo are typically less training structured and coach structured; individualism, self-determination, and autonomy are more prevalent than observed in athletes in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)-sponsored sports. The limited research available on nontraditional athletes has provided the athletic trainer little insight into the coping skills and adaptations to stressors that these athletes may bring into the clinical setting, especially among the growing number of women participating in these types of activities. A better understanding of the pain-coping traits of nontraditional competitors would enhance insight and triage procedures while heading off potential athlete-related risk factors in the clinical setting. To quantify and compare pain-coping traits among individual-sport women athletes participating in nontraditional versus traditional NCAA-structured competition, with relevance to optimal treatment and rehabilitation. Cross-sectional study. Data collected during each participant's respective group meeting before seasonal activity. Participants or Other Participants : A total of 298 athletes involved in either nontraditional, non-NCAA individual sports (n = 152; mean age = 20.2 ± 1.3 years; downhill skiing, martial arts, rock climbing, rodeo, skydiving, telemark skiing) or traditional NCAA sports (n = 146; mean age = 20.3 ± 1.4 years; equestrian, golf, swimming/diving, tennis, track). All participants completed the Sports Inventory for Pain, a sport-specific, self-report instrument that measures pain-coping traits relevant to competition, treatment, and rehabilitation. Trait measures were direct coping, cognitive, catastrophizing, avoidance, body awareness, and total coping response. Data were grouped for analyses by type of athlete (nontraditional, traditional

  11. Developing an efficient decision support system for non-traditional machine selection: an application of MOORA and MOOSRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asis Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to find out an efficient decision support method for non-traditional machine selection. It seeks to analyze potential non-traditional machine selection attributes with a relatively new MCDM approach of MOORA and MOOSRA method. The use of MOORA and MOOSRA method has been adopted to tackle subjective evaluation of information collected from an expert group. An example case study is shown here for better understanding of the said selection module which can be effectively applied to any other decision-making scenario. The method is not only computationally very simple, easily comprehensible, and robust, but also believed to have numerous subjective attributes. The rankings are expected to provide good guidance to the managers of an organization to select a feasible non-traditional machine. It shall also provide a good insight for the non-traditional machine manufacturer who might encourage research work concerning non-traditional machine selection.

  12. The experimental learning method for environmental education (Tamet in students from the National University of Central Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Haydeé Zárate Quiñones

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in order to apply the experimental method of learning for Sustainable Development in students of the Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Sciences of the National University of Central Peru. For its development we worked with a sample of 1062 students and a quasi-experimental design was used. Were employed different methods of mathematical theoretical, empirical and statistical level that allowed data collection, analysis and interpretation of results. A test of knowledge in Environmental Education for Sustainable Development to students, a questionnaire of perception and opinion, as well as a questionnaire of teacher training was applied. The experimental method used allowed the development of knowledge, habits and environmental values for sustainable development in students, contributing to the protection and conservation of the environment.

  13. Solar energy e-learning laboratory - Remote experimentation over the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyvios C Eleftheriou

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the solar energy e-learning laboratory, developed at the Higher Technical Institute (HTI within the framework of the Leonardo da Vinci project MARVEL, focuses on the system architecture and its features, and elaborates on the learning platform employed. The laboratory focuses on experiential based learning-arrangements allowing remote and distributed training with the laboratory of solar energy. As a prototype working example the HTI solar energy laboratory comprises a remotely accessible pilot solar energy conversion plant employing the state of the art in software design.

  14. An experimental result of estimating an application volume by machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuhito; Koshino, Makoto; Kimura, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we improved the usability of smartphones by automating a user's operations. We developed an intelligent system using machine learning techniques that periodically detects a user's context on a smartphone. We selected the Android operating system because it has the largest market share and highest flexibility of its development environment. In this paper, we describe an application that automatically adjusts application volume. Adjusting the volume can be easily forgotten because users need to push the volume buttons to alter the volume depending on the given situation. Therefore, we developed an application that automatically adjusts the volume based on learned user settings. Application volume can be set differently from ringtone volume on Android devices, and these volume settings are associated with each specific application including games. Our application records a user's location, the volume setting, the foreground application name and other such attributes as learning data, thereby estimating whether the volume should be adjusted using machine learning techniques via Weka.

  15. Experimental analysis of the performance of machine learning algorithms in the classification of navigation accident records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REIS, M V. S. de A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the use of machine learning techniques in a database of marine accidents. We analyzed and evaluated the main causes and types of marine accidents in the Northern Fluminense region. For this, machine learning techniques were used. The study showed that the modeling can be done in a satisfactory manner using different configurations of classification algorithms, varying the activation functions and training parameters. The SMO (Sequential Minimal Optimization algorithm showed the best performance result.

  16. Non-traditional shape GFRP rebars for concrete reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claure, Guillermo G.

    The use of glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer (GFRP) composites as internal reinforcement (rebars) for concrete structures has proven to be an alternative to traditional steel reinforcement due to significant advantages such as magnetic transparency and, most importantly, corrosion resistance equating to durability and structural life extension. In recent years, the number of projects specifying GFRP reinforcement has increased dramatically leading the construction industry towards more sustainable practices. Typically, GFRP rebars are similar to their steel counterparts having external deformations or surface enhancements designed to develop bond to concrete, as well as having solid circular cross-sections; but lately, the worldwide composites industry has taken advantage of the pultrusion process developing GFRP rebars with non-traditional cross-sectional shapes destined to optimize their mechanical, physical, and environmental attributes. Recently, circular GFRP rebars with a hollow-core have also become available. They offer advantages such as a larger surface area for improved bond, and the use of the effective cross-sectional area that is engaged to carry load since fibers at the center of a solid cross-section are generally not fully engaged. For a complete understanding of GFRP rebar physical properties, a study on material characterization regarding a quantitative cross-sectional area analysis of different GFRP rebars was undertaken with a sample population of 190 GFRP specimens with rebar denomination ranging from #2 to #6 and with different cross-sectional shapes and surface deformations manufactured by five pultruders from around the world. The water displacement method was applied as a feasible and reliable way to conduct the investigation. In addition to developing a repeatable protocol for measuring cross-sectional area, the objectives of establishing critical statistical information related to the test methodology and recommending improvements to

  17. Expedition Zenith: Experiences of eighth grade girls in a non-traditional math/science program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulm, Barbara Jean

    2004-11-01

    This qualitative study describes the experiences of a group of sixteen, eighth grade girls participating in a single-sex, math/science program based on gender equity research and constructivist theory. This phenomenological case study highlights the individual changes each girl perceives in herself as a result of her involvement in this program which was based at a suburban middle school just north of New York City. Described in narrative form is what took place during this single-sex program. At the start of the program the girls worked cooperatively in groups to build canoes. The canoes were then used to study a wetland during the final days of the program. To further immerse the participants into nature, the girls also camped during these final days. Data were collected from a number of sources to uncover, as fully as possible, the true essence of the program and the girls' experiences in it. The data collection methods included direct observation; in-depth, open-ended interviews; and written documentation. As a result of data collection, the girls' perceived outcomes and assessment of the program, as well as their recommendations for future math/science programs are revealed. The researcher in this study also acted as teacher, directing the program, and as participant to better understand the experiences of the girls involved in the program. Thus, unique insights could be made. The findings in this study provide insight into the learning of the participants, as well as into the relationships they formed both inside and outside of the program. Their perceived experiences and assessment of the program were then used to develop a greater understanding as to the effectiveness of this non-traditional program. Although this study echoed much of what research says about the needs of girls in learning situations, and therefore, reinforces previously accepted beliefs, it also reveals significant findings in areas previously unaddressed by gender studies. For example

  18. The effectiveness of an e-learning course on medication calculation in nursing students: a clustered quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, Aurélie; Baldewijns, Katleen; Verhaeghe, Rik; Robays, Hugo; Buyle, Franky; Colman, Roos; Van Hecke, Ann

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an e-learning course compared with a face-to-face lecture on medication calculation. The current knowledge on medication calculation of nursing students and nurses is insufficient to provide safe care. A stratified-clustered quasi-experimental study. A random selection of nursing schools were allocated to the e-learning course (intervention group) (seven schools; 189 students) or face-to-face lecture (control group) (six schools, 222 students). Students in both groups completed a validated medication calculation test (maximum score: 16) prior to the course (T0), immediately after the course (T1) and 3 months later (T2). A linear mixed model was used for data analysis. Medication calculation skills improved significantly more by the face-to-face lecture than e-learning course. Students in both groups significantly improved in medication calculation skills immediately after the course (T1) and 3 months later. The results flattened at T2 with a significant decline in the intervention group between T1 and T2 and a non-significant decline in the control group. Based on a subgroup analysis, improvement in medication calculation skills at T2 could only be observed in vocational-level (sub degree) nursing students receiving a face-to-face course. Both medication calculation courses had a positive effect on medication calculation skills. Students receiving traditional face-to-face lecture improved significantly more than the students receiving the e-learning course. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Early Childhood Professional Development: An Experimental Study of Adult Teaching Practices Derived from Adult Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Mayrer, Melissa M.

    Research that describes how adults acquire and use new information, collectively called adult learning theory, has potentially important implications for facilitating such adult learning experiences as educator professional development. The purpose of this study was to examine whether integrating adult teaching practices derived from adult learning theories into early childhood educators professional development would result in better gains in educator engagement in professional development, phonological awareness abilities, phonological awareness knowledge, and language and literacy beliefs. The impact on educator engagement and educator proximal knowledge was analyzed using one way ANOVA. The impact on educator phonological awareness abilities, phonological awareness general knowledge, and beliefs was analyzed using a 3 X (2 X S) mixed analyses of variance to examine the pretest to posttest change between educators participating the three conditions. Results revealed significant findings for increased engagement in professional learning and gains in educators general knowledge. This study is a first step in understanding effective adult teaching practices that may or may not contribute to better educator outcomes and promoting more effective professional learning experiences for early childhood educators.

  20. Crossover learning of gestures in two ideomotor apraxia patients: A single case experimental design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Daisuke; Tanemura, Rumi

    2017-06-01

    Crossover learning may aid rehabilitation in patients with neurological disorders. Ideomotor apraxia (IMA) is a common sequela of left-brain damage that comprises a deficit in the ability to perform gestures to verbal commands or by imitation. This study elucidated whether crossover learning occurred in two post-stroke IMA patients without motor paralysis after gesture training approximately 2 months after stroke onset. We quantitatively analysed the therapeutic intervention history and investigated whether revised action occurred during gesture production. Treatment intervention was to examine how to influence improvement and generalisation of the ability to produce the gesture. This study used an alternating treatments single-subject design, and the intervention method was errorless learning. Results indicated crossover learning in both patients. Qualitative analysis indicated that revised action occurred during the gesture-production process in one patient and that there were two types of post-revised action gestures: correct and incorrect gestures. We also discovered that even when a comparably short time had elapsed since stroke onset, generalisation was difficult. Information transfer between the left and right hemispheres of the brain via commissural fibres is important in crossover learning. In conclusion, improvements in gesture-production skill should be made with reference to the left cerebral hemisphere disconnection hypothesis.

  1. Depression and Racial/Ethnic Variations within a Diverse Nontraditional College Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Richard; Towey, James; Shinar, Ori

    2008-01-01

    The study's objective was to ascertain whether rates of depression were significantly higher for Dominican, Puerto Rican, South and Central American and Jamaican/Haitian students than for African American and White students. The sample consisted of 987 predominantly nontraditional college students. The depression rate for Dominican students was…

  2. Lighting the Gym: A Guide to Illuminating Non-Traditional Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Jennifer; Nelson, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Covers all the steps needed to light an open, non-traditional performance space--everything from where to locate lights, support towers, and power sources, to cable and dimmer requirements. Covers safety issues, equipment costs, what students should and should not be allowed to do, and how to deal with electricians and rental companies. (SC)

  3. Women into Non-Traditional Sectors: Addressing Gender Segregation in the Northern Ireland Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Michael; Hill, Myrtle

    2009-01-01

    The horizontal segregation of the workforce along gender lines tends to assign women to lower paid, lower status employment. Consequently, schemes to address segregation have focused on preparing women to enter non-traditional occupations through training and development processes. This article examines models to encourage women into…

  4. Export diversification in Uganda : developments in non-traditional agricultural exports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, T.

    2001-01-01

    Over the last two decades agricultural export diversification has been pushed as an economic development strategy for sub-Saharan Africa. This paper looks at Uganda, where nontraditional agricultural export commodities have been (re)-introduced since Museveni came to power in 1986. The most

  5. The Revival of Non-Traditional State Actors' Interests in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    2012-01-01

    credit ratings make external finance available for African governments. This article examines how non-traditional state actors affect the possibility of African governments setting and funding their own development priorities. It argues that while the current situation may increase the policy autonomy...

  6. A Comparison of Motivational Factors and Barriers to Physical Activity among Traditional versus Nontraditional College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulavic, Kimberly; Hultquist, Cherilyn N.; McLester, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the motivational factors and the barriers to physical activity (PA) in traditional college students (TS) and nontraditional college students (NTS) and determine if differences exist between these 2 groups. Participants: A total of 746 college students; 628 were TS (19.1 [plus-minus] 1.2 years), and 118 were NTS (31.2…

  7. Traditional and Nontraditional Gender Roles and Work-Family Interface for Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Wright, Stephen L.; Jackson, Z. Vance

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we examine traditional and nontraditional gender roles and work-family interface for men and women. Recent empirical literature is reviewed and implications for career counselors are discussed. We discuss changing gender roles in career, marriage, and parenting and provide strategies for helping clients to cope with work-family…

  8. Differences Do Make a Difference: Recruitment Strategies for the Non-Traditional Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanou, Sonia

    Many colleges and universities lack a comprehensive, fully integrated marketing plan to combat high attrition rates in programs offered to non-traditional students. A clear understanding of the needs of the marketplace is crucial to an effective marketing program. Research suggests that life transitions are what motivate adults to pursue…

  9. Emerging Independence in Nursing Graduates: An Analysis of Traditional-Nontraditional Value Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Colleen Parton; Klein, Stephen

    1984-01-01

    Nursing graduates of 1980 had a significantly higher score on the political scale of the Allport Vernon Lindsey Scale of Values than did 1974 graduates, signifying that the recent group valued assertiveness, independence, and achievement to a greater degree. This increase in nontraditional values appeared to be closely tied to the socialization…

  10. Gender, Career and Technical Education (CTE) Nontraditional Coursetaking, and Wage Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluhr, Stephanie A.; Choi, Namok; Herd, Ann; Woo, Hongryun; Alagaraja, Meera

    2017-01-01

    The two main objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between high school student (9th-12th) gender and nontraditional career and technical education (CTE) course taking, and the combined effects of gender and program area on estimated future wage earnings for male and female CTE completers. A Midwestern state CTE database…

  11. Men in Traditional and Nontraditional Careers: Gender Role Attitudes, Gender Role Conflict, and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Thomas A.; Borders, L. DiAnne

    2006-01-01

    Men established in traditional (mechanical engineering, n = 100) and nontraditional (elementary school counseling, n = 100) careers were compared on their career compromise choices (sex type vs. prestige), adherence to masculinity ideology, gender role conflict, and job satisfaction. The engineers tended to choose sex type over prestige; the…

  12. Export contracts for non-traditional products: Chayote from Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saénz, F.; Ruben, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the determinants of market and contract choice for non-traditional crops and the possibilities for involving local producers in global agro-food chains through delivery relationships with packers and brokers. Main attention is given to the importance of quality for entering the

  13. Motivational Orientations of Non-Traditional Adult Students to Enroll in a Degree-Seeking Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Emmanuel Jean

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the motivational orientations of non-traditional adult students to enroll in a degree-seeking program based on their academic goal. The Education Participation Scale (EPS) was used to measure the motivational orientations of participants. Professional advancement, cognitive interest, and educational…

  14. Testing Algorithmic Skills in Traditional and Non-Traditional Programming Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernoch, Mária; Biró, Piroska; Máth, János; Abari, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    The Testing Algorithmic and Application Skills (TAaAS) project was launched in the 2011/2012 academic year to test first year students of Informatics, focusing on their algorithmic skills in traditional and non-traditional programming environments, and on the transference of their knowledge of Informatics from secondary to tertiary education. The…

  15. Using Virtual Reality for Task-Based Exercises in Teaching Non-Traditional Students of German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbon, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    Using task-based exercises that required web searches and online activities, this course introduced non-traditional students to the sights and sounds of the German culture and language and simultaneously to computer technology. Through partner work that required negotiation of the net as well as of the language, these adult beginning German…

  16. Gender Differences in School-Family Conflict and School-Family Enrichment in Nontraditional Portuguese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Cláudia; van Rhijn, Tricia; Coimbra, Susana

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, higher education institutions have made efforts to attract people who are either in the labor market or unemployed to the educational system. Accordingly, the participation of nontraditional students in postsecondary education has been increasing over the years in Portugal, including working students and working student parents.…

  17. A review of active learning approaches to experimental design for uncovering biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Various types of biological knowledge describe networks of interactions among elementary entities. For example, transcriptional regulatory networks consist of interactions among proteins and genes. Current knowledge about the exact structure of such networks is highly incomplete, and laboratory experiments that manipulate the entities involved are conducted to test hypotheses about these networks. In recent years, various automated approaches to experiment selection have been proposed. Many of these approaches can be characterized as active machine learning algorithms. Active learning is an iterative process in which a model is learned from data, hypotheses are generated from the model to propose informative experiments, and the experiments yield new data that is used to update the model. This review describes the various models, experiment selection strategies, validation techniques, and successful applications described in the literature; highlights common themes and notable distinctions among methods; and identifies likely directions of future research and open problems in the area. PMID:28570593

  18. Non-Deterministic, Non-Traditional Methods (NDNTM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The review effort identified research opportunities related to the use of nondeterministic, nontraditional methods to support aerospace design. The scope of the study was restricted to structural design rather than other areas such as control system design. Thus, the observations and conclusions are limited by that scope. The review identified a number of key results. The results include the potential for NASA/AF collaboration in the area of a design environment for advanced space access vehicles. The following key points set the context and delineate the key results. The Principal Investigator's (PI's) context for this study derived from participation as a Panel Member in the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (AF/SAB) Summer Study Panel on 'Whither Hypersonics?' A key message from the Summer Study effort was a perceived need for a national program for a space access vehicle whose operating characteristics of cost, availability, deployability, and reliability most closely match the NASA 3rd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The Panel urged the AF to make a significant joint commitment to such a program just as soon as the AF defined specific requirements for space access consistent with the AF Aerospace Vision 2020. The review brought home a concurrent need for a national vehicle design environment. Engineering design system technology is at a time point from which a revolution as significant as that brought about by the finite element method is possible, this one focusing on information integration on a scale that far surpasses current design environments. The study therefore fully supported the concept, if not some of the details of the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE). It became abundantly clear during this study that the government (AF, NASA) and industry are not moving in the same direction in this regard, in fact each is moving in its own direction. NASA/ISE is not yet in an effective leadership position in this regard. However, NASA does

  19. Bringing Emotions into Legal Education Through the Experimental Learning Model: A Proposal

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Rodak

    2017-01-01

    The paper calls for the integration of theory and practice in legal education through integrating emotions into learning process. The ideas it aims to put forward have their roots in the work of the American educational psychologist, David A. Kolb. Using the Experiential Learning Theory Model, he elaborated on, the paper demonstrates how it can be adapted to suit legal education and what the benefits are for legal education.Este artículo propone integrar la teoría y la prá...

  20. Can Personalized Nudges Improve Learning in Hybrid Classes? Experimental Evidence from an Introductory Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Stephen D.; Lang, Guido

    2018-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate whether personalized e-mail reminders can improve study consistency and learning outcomes in an introductory-level undergraduate course. By randomly assigning whether nearly 300 students would receive occasional e-mail messages encouraging out-of-class study, we find that these reminders increased…

  1. The Application of Montessori Method in Learning Mathematics: An Experimental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryadi, Qais

    2017-01-01

    The prime objective of this research was to investigate whether the Montessori method of learning helped kindergarten pupils improve their mathematical proficiency, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, besides training them to be responsible learners. Quantitative, qualitative, and observational methods were employed in the investigation.…

  2. An Experimental Study of Satisfaction Response: Evaluation of Online Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xusen; Wang, Xueyin; Huang, Jianqing; Zarifis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    On the one hand, a growing amount of research discusses support for improving online collaborative learning quality, and many indicators are focused to assess its success. On the other hand, thinkLets for designing reputable and valuable collaborative processes have been developed for more than ten years. However, few studies try to apply…

  3. Portfolio as a Means of Promoting Autonomous Learning in Teacher Education: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeus, Wil; Van Petegem, Peter; Meijer, Joost

    2008-01-01

    Background: The predominant dissertation model used in teacher education courses in Flanders is the "literature study with practical processing". Despite the practical supplement, this traditional model does not fit sufficiently well with autonomous learning as the objective of modern teacher education dissertations. This study reports on the…

  4. Problem Based Learning to enhance students’ reflexivity; theoretical framework and experimental design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuin, K.P.J.; Koppen, van C.S.A.

    2013-01-01

    A crucial skill for scientists involved in sustainability issues is the ability to reflect on knowledge and knowledge production in research projects with high levels of interaction between scientists and other stakeholders. Little is known about adequate teaching and learning strategies that allow

  5. Co-Production of Knowledge in Multi-Stakeholder Processes: Analyzing Joint Experimentation as Social Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpo, Essegbemon; Crane, Todd A.; Vissoh, Pierre V.; Tossou, Rigobert C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Changing research design and methodologies regarding how researchers articulate with end-users of technology is an important consideration in developing sustainable agricultural practices. This paper analyzes a joint experiment as a multi-stakeholder process and contributes to understand how the way of organizing social learning affects…

  6. Learning Business Practices from Peers : Experimental Evidence from Small-scale Retailers in an Emerging Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Patricio; Rüschenpöhler, Julius; Uras, Burak; Zia, Bilal

    This paper studies whether small-scale businesses can learn and adopt protable practices of their successful peers. We identify such practices through a detailed business survey in urban Indonesia and disseminate the information to a randomly selected sample of small retailers through a

  7. Experimental Study of Learning French in the Public Schools: Report #1, 1959-60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toronto Board of Education (Ontario). Research Dept.

    An experiment in language instruction undertaken in Canadian junior high schools during the 1960-61 school year is reported in this study. The pilot project: (1) examines the phenomena of learning to comprehend and speak French through two different but direct modes of instruction; (2) compares by achievement tests the results of the two modes of…

  8. Individual response technology to promote active learning within the caring sciences: An experimental research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedén, Lena; Ahlstrom, Linda

    2016-01-01

    One major challenge in delivering lectures to large and diverse classes is the maintenance of a high standard of lecturing in order to engage students and increase their participation and involvement. The lecturer's assignment is to arrange and prepare the lecture before teaching, hence enabling students' enhanced learning. Individual response technology could encourage students' active learning and activate higher cognitive levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate individual response technology as a complement during lectures for students in higher education, in terms of the students' experiences of participation, engagement, and active learning. Also of interest was whether this technology can be considered a supportive technical system. Data were collected through a questionnaire where levels of each condition were reported on a numeric rating scale (0-10) at baseline and after the introduction of individual response technology. To get a broader perspective, two types of lectures (pediatric and statistical) were included, giving a total of four assessment times. The participants comprised 59 students in Bachelor of Nursing program at a Swedish metropolitan university. Overall, when individual response technology was used, students reported increased experience of engagement (n=82, mean 6.1 vs. n=65, mean 7.3, pactive learning (n=92, mean 7.3 vs. n=79, mean 8.2 plearning within the caring sciences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reading to learn experimental practice: The role of text and firsthand experience in the acquisition of an abstract science principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Erica Kesin

    2008-10-01

    From the onset of schooling, texts are used as important educational tools. In the primary years, they are integral to learning how to decode and develop fluency. In the later elementary years, they are often essential to the acquisition of academic content. Unfortunately, many children experience difficulties with this process, which is due in large part to their unfamiliarity with the genre of academic texts. The articles presented in this dissertation share an underlying theme of how to develop children's ability to comprehend and learn from academic, and specifically, non-narrative texts. The first article reviews research on the development of non-narrative discourse to elucidate the linguistic precursors to non-narrative text comprehension. The second and third articles draw from an empirical study that investigated the best way to integrate text, manipulation, and first-hand experience for children's acquisition and application of an abstract scientific principle. The scientific principle introduced in the study was the Control of Variables Strategy (CVS), a fundamental idea underlying scientific reasoning and a strategy for designing unconfounded experiments. Eight grade 4 classes participated in the study (N = 129), in one of three conditions: (a) read procedural text and manipulate experimental materials, (b) listen to procedural text and manipulate experimental materials, or (c) read procedural text with no opportunity to manipulate experimental materials. Findings from the study indicate that children who had the opportunity to read and manipulate materials were most effective at applying the strategy to designing and justifying unconfounded experiments, and evaluating written and physical experimental designs; however, there was no effect of instructional condition on a written assessment of evaluating familiar and unfamiliar experimental designs one week after the intervention. These results suggest that the acquisition and application of an abstract

  10. [Critical care nurse learning of continuous renal replacement therapy: the efficacy of a self-learning manual].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Chen; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-02-01

    Many nurses have difficulty learning to use the complex, non-traditional, and regularly-updated critical care equipment. Failure to use such equipment properly can seriously compromise treatment and endanger patient health and lives. New self-learning materials for novice nurses are necessary to provide essential and effective guidance as a part of formal nursing training. Such materials can enhance the capabilities of critical care nurses and, thus, improve the general quality of critical care. The purpose of this research was to develop a continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT)-themed self-learning manual that would provide easily absorbed and understood knowledge in an easy-to-carry format for ICU nursing staff. This study also investigated CCRT skill learning efficacy. This study adopted a quasi-experimental design with pretests and posttests. Purposive sampling generated a sample of 66 critical care nurses currently working at one hospital in Taipei City. Participants submitted a completed self-assessment survey that rated their command of continuous renal replacement therapy before and after the self-learning manual intervention. Survey data were analyzed using SPSS Version 17.0 for Windows. The two major findings derived from the study included: (1) The mean response score from the self-assessment survey filled out after the intervention was 91.06 and 79.75 (SD = 9.49 and 11.65), respectively, for experimental and control groups. Such demonstrated significant difference. (2) The mean posttest score after the intervention for the experimental group was 91.06 ± 9.49. This represents a significant increase of 10.35 ± 10.35 over their mean pretest score (80.71 ± 11.82). The experimental group showed other significant differences in terms of the CRRT self-assessment survey posttest. Self-learning manuals may be introduced in nursing education as useful aids and catalysts to achieve more effective and satisfying learning experiences.

  11. Effects of Danggui-Shaoyao-San on the Influence of Spatial Learning and Memory Induced by Experimental Tooth Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Shi; Ke, Jie; Zhao, Gui-Zhi; Wu, Li-An; Kou, Jun-Ping; Liu, Hong-Chen

    2015-07-20

    The pain caused by orthodontic treatment has been considered as tough problems in orthodontic practice. There is substantial literature on pain which has exactly effected on learning and memory; orthodontic tooth movement affected the emotional status has been showed positive outcomes. Danggui-Shaoyao-San (DSS) is a Traditional Chinese Medicine prescription that has been used for pain treatment and analgesic effect for orthodontic pain via inhibiting the activations of neuron and glia. We raised the hypothesis that DSS could restore the impaired abilities of spatial learning and memory via regulating neuron or glia expression in the hippocampus. A total of 36 rats were randomly divided into three groups: (1) Sham group (n = 12), rats underwent all the operation procedure except for the placement of orthodontic forces and received saline treatment; (2) experimental tooth movement (ETM) group (n = 12), rats received saline treatment and ETM; (3) DSS + ETM (DETM) group (n = 12), rats received DSS treatment and ETM. All DETM group animals were administered with DSS at a dose of 150 mg/kg. Morris water maze test was evaluated; immunofluorescent histochemistry was used to identify astrocytes activation, and immunofluorescent dendritic spine analysis was used to identify the dendritic spines morphological characteristics expression levels in hippocampus. Maze training sessions during the 5 successive days revealed that ETM significantly deficits in progressive learning in rats, DSS that was given from day 5 prior to ETM enhanced progressive learning. The ETM group rats took longer to cross target quadrant during the probe trial and got less times to cross-platform than DETM group. The spine density in hippocampus in ETM group was significantly decreased compared to the sham group. In addition, thin and mature spine density were decreased too. However, the DSS administration could reverse the dendritic shrinkage and increase the spine density compared to the ETM group

  12. Effects of Danggui-Shaoyao-San on the Influence of Spatial Learning and Memory Induced by Experimental Tooth Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Shi Li; Jie Ke; Gui-Zhi Zhao; Li-An Wu; Jun-Ping Kou; Hong-Chen Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background:The pain caused by orthodontic treatment has been considered as tough problems in orthodontic practice.There is substantial literature on pain which has exactly effected on learning and memory;orthodontic tooth movement affected the emotional status has been showed positive outcomes.Danggui-Shaoyao-San (DSS) is a Traditional Chinese Medicine prescription that has been used for pain treatment and analgesic effect for orthodontic pain via inhibiting the activations of neuron and glia.We raised the hypothesis that DSS could restore the impaired abilities of spatial learning and memory via regulating neuron or glia expression in the hippocampus.Methods:A total of 36 rats were randomly divided into three groups:(1) Sham group (n =12),rats underwent all the operation procedure except for the placement of orthodontic forces and received saline treatment;(2) experimental tooth movement (ETM) group (n =12),rats received saline treatment and ETM;(3) DSS + ETM (DETM) group (n =12),rats received DSS treatment and ETM.All DETM group animals were administered with DSS at a dose of 150 mg/kg.Morris water maze test was evaluated;immunofluorescent histochemistry was used to identify astrocytes activation,and immunofluorescent dendritic spine analysis was used to identify the dendritic spines morphological characteristics expression levels in hippocampus.Results:Maze training sessions during the 5 successive days revealed that ETM significantly deficits in progressive learning in rats,DSS that was given from day 5 prior to ETM enhanced progressive learning.The ETM group rats took longer to cross target quadrant during the probe trial and got less times to cross-platform than DETM group.The spine density in hippocampus in ETM group was significantly decreased compared to the sham group.In addition,thin and mature spine density were decreased too.However,the DSS administration could reverse the dendritic shrinkage and increase the spine density compared to the ETM group

  13. Sixty-eight years of experimental occlusal interference studies: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G T; Tsukiyama, Y; Baba, K; Watanabe, T

    1999-12-01

    Understanding is needed regarding the effect that occlusal interferences have on the teeth, periodontium, and especially on jaw function. This article summarizes research in which experimental occlusal interferences have been placed on the teeth of animals and human volunteers. Data from 18 human and 10 animals studies were reviewed. Experimental occlusal interferences were grouped into those that alter intercuspal position and those contacting on lateral jaw movement only. The outcome of these interferences were analyzed according to their local pulpal-periodontal, jaw function, or bruxism effects. Experimental occlusal interferences in maximum intercuspation had a deleterious effect on periodontal and pulpal tissues of the affected tooth; sometimes this produces a disruption of smooth jaw function and occasionally jaw muscle pain and clicking. Experimental occlusal interferences that contact only in a lateral jaw movement are infrequently harmful to jaw function. Furthermore, no reliable evidence demonstrates that occlusal interferences can cause nocturnal bruxism, or stop it. Transient local tooth pain, loosening of the tooth, a slight change in postural muscle tension levels, chewing stroke patterns, and sometimes a clicking joint can be induced by an experimental occlusal interference. Because such findings are present in relatively asymptomatic patients, these data do not prove that occlusal interferences are causally related to a chronic jaw muscle pain or temporomandibular joint dysfunction problems.

  14. Experimentally-induced learned helplessness in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Elizabeth; Lefaivre, Marie-josée; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2010-05-01

    To determine whether adolescents with type 1 diabetes are more at risk for learned helplessness than their healthy peers. Twenty-three adolescents with diabetes and 25 controls completed a solvable or unsolvable concept formation task. All completed pre- and post-task performance and attribution ratings, and later completed an anagram-solving task to determine if perceived helplessness on the first task would negatively impact performance on the second. Participants in the unsolvable condition solved fewer anagrams; those with diabetes did not show weaker performance than controls. Participants in the solvable condition (diabetes and controls) showed an increase in internal attributions from before the concept formation task to after. In the unsolvable condition, only participants with diabetes made more external attributions for their failure. Contrary to the only other controlled study to use this paradigm in youth with chronic illness, adolescents with diabetes were not more susceptible to learned helplessness.

  15. Enhancing Foreign Language Learning through Listening Strategies Delivered in L1: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgian, Hossein; Pillay, Hitendra

    2013-01-01

    Listening used in language teaching refers to a complex process that allows us to understand spoken language. The current study, conducted in Iran with an experimental design, investigated the effectiveness of teaching listening strategies delivered in L1 (Persian) and its effect on listening comprehension in L2. Five listening strategies:…

  16. Digital learning material for experimental design and model building in molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Designing experimental approaches is a major cognitive skill in molecular biology research, and building models, including quantitative ones, is a cognitive skill which is rapidly gaining importance. Since molecular biology education at university level is aimed at educating future researchers, we

  17. The experimentation of LC7E learning model on the linear program material in terms of interpersonal intelligence on Wonogiri Vocational School students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinah; Kusmayadi, T. A.; Husodo, B.

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of learning model on student achievement in terms of interpersonal intelligence. The compared learning models are LC7E and Direct learning model. This type of research is a quasi-experimental with 2x3 factorial design. The population in this study is a Grade XI student of Wonogiri Vocational Schools. The sample selection had done by stratified cluster random sampling. Data collection technique used questionnaires, documentation and tests. The data analysis technique used two different unequal cell variance analysis which previously conducted prerequisite analysis for balance test, normality test and homogeneity test. he conclusions of this research are: 1) student learning achievement of mathematics given by LC7E learning model is better when compared with direct learning; 2) Mathematics learning achievement of students who have a high level of interpersonal intelligence is better than students with interpersonal intelligence in medium and low level. Students’ mathematics learning achievement with interpersonal level of intelligence is better than those with low interpersonal intelligence on linear programming; 3) LC7E learning model resulted better on mathematics learning achievement compared with direct learning model for each category of students’ interpersonal intelligence level on linear program material.

  18. The experimentation of LC7E learning model on the linear program material in terms of interpersonal intelligence on Wonogiri vocational school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinah; Kusmayadi, T. A.; Husodo, B.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of learning model on student achievement in terms of interpersonal intelligence. The compared learning models are LC7E and Direct learning model. This type of research is a quasi-experimental with 2x3 factorial design. The population in this study is a Grade XI student of Wonogiri Vocational Schools. The sample selection had done by stratified cluster random sampling. Data collection technique used questionnaires, documentation and tests. The data analysis technique used two different unequal cell variance analysis which previously conducted prerequisite analysis for balance test, normality test and homogeneity test. he conclusions of this research are: 1) student learning achievement of mathematics given by LC7E learning model is better when compared with direct learning; 2) Mathematics learning achievement of students who have a high level of interpersonal intelligence is better than students with interpersonal intelligence in medium and low level. Students' mathematics learning achievement with interpersonal level of intelligence is better than those with low interpersonal intelligence on linear programming; 3) LC7E learning model resulted better on mathematics learning achievement compared with direct learning model for each category of students’ interpersonal intelligence level on linear program material.

  19. New media simulation stories in nursing education: a quasi-experimental study exploring learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb-Corbett, Robin; Schwartz, Melissa Renee; Green, Bob; Sessoms, Andrea; Swanson, Melvin

    2013-04-01

    New media simulation stories are short multimedia presentations that combine simulation, digital technology, and story branching to depict a variety of healthcare-related scenarios. The purpose of this study was to explore whether learning outcomes were enhanced if students viewed the results of both correct and incorrect nursing actions demonstrated through new media simulation stories. A convenience sample of 109 undergraduate nursing students in a family-centered maternity course participated in the study. Study findings suggests that students who viewed both correct and incorrect depictions of maternity nursing actions scored better on tests than did those students who viewed only correct nursing actions.

  20. The impact of gender ideologies on men's and women's desire for a traditional or non-traditional partner

    OpenAIRE

    Thomae, M.; Houston, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Two studies examine preferences for a long-term partner who conforms to traditional or non- traditional gender\\ud roles. The studies both demonstrate a link between benevolent sexism and preference for a traditional partner.\\ud However, Study 1 also demonstrates a strong preference among women for a non-traditional partner. We measured\\ud ambivalent sexist ideologies before introducing participants to either a stereotypically traditional or stereotypically non-traditional character of the opp...

  1. Management of Ocular Diseases Using Lutein and Zeaxanthin: What Have We Learned from Experimental Animal Studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeaxanthin and lutein are two carotenoid pigments that concentrated in the retina, especially in the macula. The effects of lutein and zeaxanthin on the prevention and treatment of various eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and cataract, ischemic/hypoxia induced retinopathy, light damage of the retina, retinitis pigmentosa, retinal detachment, and uveitis, have been studied in different experimental animal models. In these animal models, lutein and zeaxanthin have been reported to have beneficial effects in protecting ocular tissues and cells (especially the retinal neurons against damage caused by different etiological factors. The mechanisms responsible for these effects of lutein and zeaxanthin include prevention of phototoxic damage by absorption of blue light, reduction of oxidative stress through antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging, and their anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties. The results of these experimental animal studies may provide new preventive and therapeutic procedures for clinical management of various vision-threatening diseases.

  2. Predicting novel substrates for enzymes with minimal experimental effort with active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertusi, Dante A; Moura, Matthew E; Jeffryes, James G; Prabhu, Siddhant; Walters Biggs, Bradley; Tyo, Keith E J

    2017-11-01

    Enzymatic substrate promiscuity is more ubiquitous than previously thought, with significant consequences for understanding metabolism and its application to biocatalysis. This realization has given rise to the need for efficient characterization of enzyme promiscuity. Enzyme promiscuity is currently characterized with a limited number of human-selected compounds that may not be representative of the enzyme's versatility. While testing large numbers of compounds may be impractical, computational approaches can exploit existing data to determine the most informative substrates to test next, thereby more thoroughly exploring an enzyme's versatility. To demonstrate this, we used existing studies and tested compounds for four different enzymes, developed support vector machine (SVM) models using these datasets, and selected additional compounds for experiments using an active learning approach. SVMs trained on a chemically diverse set of compounds were discovered to achieve maximum accuracies of ~80% using ~33% fewer compounds than datasets based on all compounds tested in existing studies. Active learning-selected compounds for testing resolved apparent conflicts in the existing training data, while adding diversity to the dataset. The application of these algorithms to wide arrays of metabolic enzymes would result in a library of SVMs that can predict high-probability promiscuous enzymatic reactions and could prove a valuable resource for the design of novel metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bringing Emotions into Legal Education Through the Experimental Learning Model: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Rodak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper calls for the integration of theory and practice in legal education through integrating emotions into learning process. The ideas it aims to put forward have their roots in the work of the American educational psychologist, David A. Kolb. Using the Experiential Learning Theory Model, he elaborated on, the paper demonstrates how it can be adapted to suit legal education and what the benefits are for legal education.Este artículo propone integrar la teoría y la práctica en la educación jurídica, a través de la integración de las emociones en el proceso de aprendizaje. La propuesta se sustenta en el pensamiento elaborado por el psicólogo de la educación norteamericano David A. Kolb. El artículo demuestra que se puede adaptar la Teoría del Modelo de Aprendizaje Experiencial que él construyó a la educación en Derecho, y las ventajas que implicaría. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3075147

  4. Learning and memory enhancing activity of Ficus carica (Fig: An experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Sumanth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study aimed to assess the learning and memory enhancing activity of the ethanolic fruit extract of Ficus carica in rats using elevated plus maze (EPM, Hebb-William maze (HWM and Morris water maze (MWM. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats (100-150 g of either sex, were divided into 5 groups (n = 6. Group I (control animals received vehicle, Group II (scopolamine control animals received scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg i.p, Groups III and IV animals received ethanolic fruit extract of F. carica (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg p.o and Group V animals received piracetam (400 mg/kg i.p for 27 days. The rats of Groups III-V were injected with a single dose of scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg i.p on 19 th and 27 th day. Assessment of transfer latency (TL, time taken to reach reward chamber (TRC and swim latency (SL was done on 19 th and 27 th day using EPM, HWM and MWM, respectively. The data was analyzed by one-way Analysis of Variance followed by Dunnett′s test. P ≤ 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: Ethanolic fruit extract of F. carica decreased TL, TRC and SL in comparison to scopolamine treated rats. Conclusion: The fruit of F. carica enhanced learning and memory activity.

  5. Predicting novel substrates for enzymes with minimal experimental effort with active learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertusi, Dante A.; Moura, Matthew E.; Jeffryes, James G.; Prabhu, Siddhant; Walters Biggs, Bradley; Tyo, Keith E. J.

    2017-11-01

    Enzymatic substrate promiscuity is more ubiquitous than previously thought, with significant consequences for understanding metabolism and its application to biocatalysis. This realization has given rise to the need for efficient characterization of enzyme promiscuity. Enzyme promiscuity is currently characterized with a limited number of human-selected compounds that may not be representative of the enzyme's versatility. While testing large numbers of compounds may be impractical, computational approaches can exploit existing data to determine the most informative substrates to test next, thereby more thoroughly exploring an enzyme's versatility. To demonstrate this, we used existing studies and tested compounds for four different enzymes, developed support vector machine (SVM) models using these datasets, and selected additional compounds for experiments using an active learning approach. SVMs trained on a chemically diverse set of compounds were discovered to achieve maximum accuracies of similar to 80% using similar to 33% fewer compounds than datasets based on all compounds tested in existing studies. Active learning-selected compounds for testing resolved apparent conflicts in the existing training data, while adding diversity to the dataset. The application of these algorithms to wide arrays of metabolic enzymes would result in a library of SVMs that can predict high-probability promiscuous enzymatic reactions and could prove a valuable resource for the design of novel metabolic pathways.

  6. Enhancing Foreign Language Learning through Listening Strategies Delivered in L1: An Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hitendra Pillay; Hossein Bozorgian

    2013-01-01

    Listening used in language teaching refers to a complex process that allows us to understand spoken language. The current study, conducted in Iran with an experimental design, investigated the effectiveness of teaching listening strategies delivered in L1 (Persian) and its effect on listening comprehension in L2. Five listening strategies: Guessing, making inferences, identifying topics, repetition, and note-taking were taught over 14 weeks during a semester. Sixty lower intermediate female p...

  7. Rethinking energy security in Asia. A non-traditional view of human security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Anthony, Mely [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (SG). Centre for Non-Traditional Security (NTS) Studies; Chang, Youngho [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). Division of Economics; Putra, Nur Azha (eds.) [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Energy Security Division

    2012-07-01

    Traditional notions of security are premised on the primacy of state security. In relation to energy security, traditional policy thinking has focused on ensuring supply without much emphasis on socioeconomic and environmental impacts. Non-traditional security (NTS) scholars argue that threats to human security have become increasingly prominent since the end of the Cold War, and that it is thus critical to adopt a holistic and multidisciplinary approach in addressing rising energy needs. This volume represents the perspectives of scholars from across Asia, looking at diverse aspects of energy security through a non-traditional security lens. The issues covered include environmental and socioeconomic impacts, the role of the market, the role of civil society, energy sustainability and policy trends in the ASEAN region.

  8. Experimentation of cooperative learning model Numbered Heads Together (NHT) type by concept maps and Teams Games Tournament (TGT) by concept maps in terms of students logical mathematics intellegences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, Adi; Mardiyana; Retno Sari Saputro, Dewi

    2017-06-01

    This research is aimed to find out the effect of learning model towards learning achievement in terms of students’ logical mathematics intelligences. The learning models that were compared were NHT by Concept Maps, TGT by Concept Maps, and Direct Learning model. This research was pseudo experimental by factorial design 3×3. The population of this research was all of the students of class XI Natural Sciences of Senior High School in all regency of Karanganyar in academic year 2016/2017. The conclusions of this research were: 1) the students’ achievements with NHT learning model by Concept Maps were better than students’ achievements with TGT model by Concept Maps and Direct Learning model. The students’ achievements with TGT model by Concept Maps were better than the students’ achievements with Direct Learning model. 2) The students’ achievements that exposed high logical mathematics intelligences were better than students’ medium and low logical mathematics intelligences. The students’ achievements that exposed medium logical mathematics intelligences were better than the students’ low logical mathematics intelligences. 3) Each of student logical mathematics intelligences with NHT learning model by Concept Maps has better achievement than students with TGT learning model by Concept Maps, students with NHT learning model by Concept Maps have better achievement than students with the direct learning model, and the students with TGT by Concept Maps learning model have better achievement than students with Direct Learning model. 4) Each of learning model, students who have logical mathematics intelligences have better achievement then students who have medium logical mathematics intelligences, and students who have medium logical mathematics intelligences have better achievement than students who have low logical mathematics intelligences.

  9. Higher education and spatial (im)mobility: nontraditional students and living at home

    OpenAIRE

    Hazel Christie

    2007-01-01

    I investigate the mobility decisions of students going into higher education in the UK, and look particularly at the circumstances under which students in one higher education market chose to live at home and their experiences of attending a local university. As more young people from nontraditional backgrounds are encouraged to participate in higher education, and as the financial costs of attending are increasingly borne by students and their families, more students are choosing to stay at ...

  10. CONSUMERS’ BRAND EQUITY PERCEPTIONS OF TRADITIONAL AND NON-TRADITIONAL BRANDS

    OpenAIRE

    Catli, Ozlem; Ermec Sertoglu, Aysegul; Ors, Husniye

    2017-01-01

    Thisstudy aims to compare consumers' brand perception of traditional brands withbrand perceptions of non-traditional brands.  Consumers livingin Ankara constitute the universe of work, and data were gathered in aface-to-face interview using the survey method. the demographic characteristicsof the participants was prepared with the aim of evaluating and comparing onetraditional brand and one non traditional brand of brand equity related to thebrand equity by the participants. According to...

  11. COMPARISON OF YOUNG CONSUMERS' BRAND EQUITY PERCEPTIONS FOR TRADITIONAL AND NONTRADITIONAL BRANDS ACROSS VARIOUS PRODUCT CATEGORIES

    OpenAIRE

    Catli, Ozlem; Ermec Sertoglu, Aysegul; Ors, Husniye

    2017-01-01

    Purpose - Thisstudy aims to compare consumers' brand perception of traditional andnon-traditional brands. Methodology -  Consumerswho live in Ankara constitute the universe of the study. The data werecollected using the face-to-face survey method. The questionnaire containsstatements measuring brand value of both traditional and non-traditional brandsfor soup and sport shoes . Findings- According to the results obtained in the study, brandperceptions of traditional brands were found high...

  12. Neurosteroid vitamin D system as a nontraditional drug target in neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Adam; Wong, Keith; Cachat, Jonathan; Elegante, Marco; Gilder, Tom; Mohnot, Sopan; Wu, Nadine; Minasyan, Anna; Tuohimaa, Pentti; Kalueff, Allan V

    2010-09-01

    Vitamin D is becoming increasingly recognized as a nontraditional drug target for different brain pathologies. Although widely known for their role in calcium metabolism, vitamin D and its receptor have been linked to several brain disorders, including cognitive decline, epilepsy, affective disorders, and schizophrenia. Here we discuss mounting evidence, and parallel recent clinical and animal behavioral, genetic and pharmacological data to emphasize the emerging role of the neurosteroid vitamin D system in brain function.

  13. Export contracts for non-traditional products: Chayote from Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Saénz, F.; Ruben, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the determinants of market and contract choice for non-traditional crops and the possibilities for involving local producers in global agro-food chains through delivery relationships with packers and brokers. Main attention is given to the importance of quality for entering the export market and the impact of contractual arrangements on loyal behaviour. Core stipulations in the contract regarding the frequency of delivery and the provision of technical assistance are med...

  14. Availability of healthier options in traditional and nontraditional rural fast-food outlets

    OpenAIRE

    Creel, Jennifer S; Sharkey, Joseph R; McIntosh, Alex; Anding, Jenna; Huber, J Charles

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Food prepared away from home has become increasingly popular to U.S. families, and may contribute to obesity. Sales have been dominated by fast food outlets, where meals are purchased for dining away from home or in the home. Although national chain affiliated fast-food outlets are considered the main source for fast food, fast foods are increasingly available in convenience stores and supermarkets/grocery stores. In rural areas, these nontraditional fast-food outlets may ...

  15. Enhancing Foreign Language Learning through Listening Strategies Delivered in L1: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitendra Pillay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Listening used in language teaching refers to a complex process that allows us to understand spoken language. The current study, conducted in Iran with an experimental design, investigated the effectiveness of teaching listening strategies delivered in L1 (Persian and its effect on listening comprehension in L2. Five listening strategies: Guessing, making inferences, identifying topics, repetition, and note-taking were taught over 14 weeks during a semester. Sixty lower intermediate female participants came from two EFL classrooms in an English language institute. The experimental class (n = 30 who listened to their classroom activities performed better (t value = 10.083 than the control class using a methodology that led learners through five listening strategies in Persian. The same teacher taught the students in the control class (n = 30, who listened to the same classroom listening activities without any of the above listening strategies. A pre and post listening test made by a group of experts in the language institute assessed the effect of teaching listening strategies delivered in L1. Results gathered on the post intervention listening test revealed that listening strategies delivered in L1 led to a statistically significant improvement in their discrete listening scores compared with the control group.

  16. A fast hybrid methodology based on machine learning, quantum methods, and experimental measurements for evaluating material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chang Sun; Haverty, Michael; Simka, Harsono; Shankar, Sadasivan; Rajan, Krishna

    2017-09-01

    We present a hybrid approach based on both machine learning and targeted ab-initio calculations to determine adhesion energies between dissimilar materials. The goals of this approach are to complement experimental and/or all ab-initio computational efforts, to identify promising materials rapidly and identify in a quantitative manner the relative contributions of the different material attributes affecting adhesion. Applications of the methodology to predict bulk modulus, yield strength, adhesion and wetting properties of copper (Cu) with other materials including metals, nitrides and oxides is discussed in this paper. In the machine learning component of this methodology, the parameters that were chosen can be roughly divided into four types: atomic and crystalline parameters (which are related to specific elements such as electronegativities, electron densities in Wigner-Seitz cells); bulk material properties (e.g. melting point), mechanical properties (e.g. modulus) and those representing atomic characteristics in ab-initio formalisms (e.g. pseudopotentials). The atomic parameters are defined over one dataset to determine property correlation with published experimental data. We then develop a semi-empirical model across multiple datasets to predict adhesion in material interfaces outside the original datasets. Since adhesion is between two materials, we appropriately use parameters which indicate differences between the elements that comprise the materials. These semi-empirical predictions agree reasonably with the trend in chemical work of adhesion predicted using ab-initio techniques and are used for fast materials screening. For the screened candidates, the ab-initio modeling component provides fundamental understanding of the chemical interactions at the interface, and explains the wetting thermodynamics of thin Cu layers on various substrates. Comparison against ultra-high vacuum (UHV) experiments for well-characterized Cu/Ta and Cu/α-Al2O3 interfaces is

  17. Adaptation Provisioning with Respect to Learning Styles in a Web-Based Educational System: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, E.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized instruction is seen as a desideratum of today's e-learning systems. The focus of this paper is on those platforms that use learning styles as personalization criterion called learning style-based adaptive educational systems. The paper presents an innovative approach based on an integrative set of learning preferences that alleviates…

  18. Effect of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) on Student Achievement, Attitude, and Self-Concept in College General Chemistry in Randomized and Quasi Experimental Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated exam achievement and affective characteristics of students in general chemistry in a fully-randomized experimental design, contrasting Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) participation with a control group balanced for time-on-task and study activity. This study population included two independent first-semester courses with…

  19. Mobile Resource Use in a Distance Learning Population: What Are They Really Doing on Those Devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebb, Billie Anne; Young, Zach

    2014-01-01

    Mobile device use has been soaring in recent years in all user groups. Mobile learning is no longer an optional activity for academic institutions, but a necessary endeavor. Developing a curriculum around mobile learning is essential, particularly for distance-based, non-traditional students. Understanding how students use their mobile devices is…

  20. Improvement of nursing students' critical thinking skills through problem-based learning in the People's Republic of China: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haobin; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Klunklin, Areewan; Williams, Beverly A

    2008-03-01

    A quasi-experimental, two-group pretest-post-test design was conducted to examine the effect of problem-based learning on the critical thinking skills of 46 Year 2 undergraduate nursing students in the People's Republic of China. The California Critical Thinking Skills Test Form A, Chinese-Taiwanese version was used as both a pretest and as a post-test for a semester-long nursing course. There was no significant difference in critical thinking skills at pretest, whereas, significant differences in critical thinking skills existed between the problem-based learning and lecture groups at post-test. The problem-based learning students had a significantly greater improvement on the overall California Critical Thinking Skills Test, analysis, and induction subscale scores compared with the lecture students. Problem-based learning fostered nursing students' critical thinking skills.

  1. Book review: OF OTHER THOUGHTS: NON-TRADITIONAL WAYS TO THE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verbeke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research paradigms in the fields of architecture and arts have been developing and changing during the last decade. Part of this development is a shift to include design work and artistic work into the knowledge processes of doctoral work. This work evidently also needs supervision. At the same time doctoral degrees have been developing in relation to indigenous ways of thinking. The book Other Thoughts: Non-Traditional Ways to the Doctorate discusses the challenges one is facing, either as a PhD student or as a supervisor, when doing or supervising a PhD in a less established field.

  2. Cardiometabolic Risks in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Non-Traditional Risk Factors and the Impact of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wei-Ling; Boyle, Jacqueline; Vincent, Amanda; Teede, Helena; Moran, Lisa J

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common and complex endocrinopathy with reproductive, metabolic, and psychological features and significantly increased cardiometabolic risks. PCOS is underpinned by inherent insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism. Obesity, more common in PCOS, plays an important role in the pathophysiology, exacerbating hyperinsulinaemia and hyperandrogenism, leading to recommended first-line lifestyle intervention. Significant traditional and non-traditional risk factors are implicated in PCOS in addition to obesity-exacerbated cardiometabolic risks and are explored in this review to promote the understanding of this common metabolic and reproductive condition. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Photography and Writing: Alternative Ways of Learning for ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Helen Lepp

    2012-01-01

    To writing, painting, drawing, and photography as artistic media, the author would like to add teaching as a creative endeavor as well. Especially in a classroom where English is not the first language for many students, the writing teacher needs to be creative with assignments and activities that address nontraditional ways of learning. Her…

  4. An Experimental Study of the Use of Design Thinking as a Requirements Elicitation Approach for Mobile Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile learning (m-learning is a research field that aims to analyze how mobile devices can contribute to learning. The development of software for mobile devices to support learning is essential for an effective implementation of m-learning or mobile learning environments (MLE. Requirements Engineering processes need to include activities that provoke creativity in the stakeholders to conceive MLEs that actually modify and improve the teaching and learning process. In this context, this paper presents a process for requirements elicitation and documentation of mobile learning environments. This process is based on the concepts of the Design Thinking process that provides a methodology to elicit customer needs, producing simple prototypes that eventually converge to innovative solutions. An experiment was conducted to evaluate if the proposed process contributes to create MLEs that present distinctive and interesting characteristics when compared to existing solutions for a specific problem.

  5. What Makes a Student Non-Traditional? A Comparison of Students over and under Age 25 in Online, Accelerated Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing proportion of non-traditional students, very commonly defined as students over the age of 25 (though other features vary from study to study) necessitates more studies with this increasingly relevant group participating. Recently, the growth of non-traditional universities such as those offering predominantly online, accelerated…

  6. Concept Mapping as an Innovative Tool for the Assessment of Learning: An Experimental Experience among Business Management Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Palomino, Pablo; Martinez-Canas, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    In the search to improve the quality of education at the university level, the use of concept mapping is becoming an important instructional technique for enhancing the teaching-learning process. This educational tool is based on cognitive theories by making a distinction between learning by rote (memorizing) and learning by meaning, where…

  7. Manufacturing of mortars and concretes non-traditionals, by Portland cement, metakaoline and gypsum (15.05%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talero, R.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In a thorough previous research (1, it appeared that creation, evolution and development of the values of compressive mechanical strength (CS and flexural strength (FS, measured in specimens 1x1x6cm of mortar type ASTM C 452-68 (2, manufactured by ordinary Portland cement P-1 (14.11% C3A or PY-6 (0.00% C3A, metakaolin and gypsum (CaSO4∙2H2O -or ternary cements, CT-, were similar to the ones commonly developed in mortars and concretes of OPC. This paper sets up the experimental results obtained from non-traditional mortars and concretes prepared with such ternary cements -TC-, being the portland cement/metakaolin mass ratio, as follows: 80/20, 70/30 and 60/40. Finally, the behaviour of these cements against gypsum attack, has been also determined, using the following parameters: increase in length (ΔL%, compressive, CS, and flexural, FS, strengths, and ultrasound energy, UE. Experimental results obtained from these non-traditional mortars and concretes, show an increase in length (ΔL, in CS and FS, and in UE values, when there is addition of metakaolin.

    En una exhaustiva investigación anterior (1, se pudo comprobar que la creación, evolución y desarrollo de los valores de resistencias mecánicas a compresión, RMC, y flexotracción, RMF, proporcionados por probetas de 1x1x6 cm, de mortero 1:2,75, selenitoso tipo ASTM C 452-68 (2 -que habían sido preparadas con arena de Ottawa, cemento portland, P-1 (14,11% C3A o PY- 6 (0,00% C3A, metacaolín y yeso (CaSO4∙2H2O-, fue semejante a la que, comúnmente, desarrollan los morteros y hormigones tradicionales de cemento portland. En el presente trabajo se exponen los resultados experimentales obtenidos de morteros y hormigones no tradicionales, preparados con dichos cementos ternarios, CT, siendo las proporciones porcentuales en masa ensayadas, cemento portland/metacaolín, las siguientes: 80/20, 70

  8. The Effectiveness of Concept Maps in Teaching Physics Concepts Applied to Engineering Education: Experimental Comparison of the Amount of Learning Achieved With and Without Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Guadalupe; Pérez, Ángel Luis; Suero, María Isabel; Pardo, Pedro J.

    2013-04-01

    A study was conducted to quantify the effectiveness of concept maps in learning physics in engineering degrees. The following research question was posed: What was the difference in learning results from the use of concept maps to study a particular topic in an engineering course? The study design was quasi-experimental and used a post-test as a measuring instrument. The sample included 114 university students from the School of Industrial Engineering who were divided into two equivalent homogeneous groups of 57 students each. The amount of learning attained by the students in each group was compared, with the independent variable being the teaching method; the experimental group (E.G.) used concept maps, while the control group (C.G.) did not. We performed a crossover study with the two groups of students, with one group acting as the E.G. for the topic of optical fibers and as the C.G. for the topic of the fundamental particles of matter and vice versa for the other group. For each of the two topics studied, the evaluation instrument was a test of 100 dichotomous items. The resulting data were subjected to a comparative statistical analysis, which revealed a significant difference in the amount of learning attained by the E.G. students as compared with the C.G. students. The results allow us to state that for the use of concept maps, the average increment in the E.G. students' learning was greater than 19 percentage points.

  9. Experimental quantum Hamiltonian learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Paesani, S.; Santagati, R.; Knauer, S.; Gentile, A.A.; Wiebe, N.; Petruzzella, M.; O’Brien, J.L.; Rarity, J.G.; Laing, A.; Thompson, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    The efficient characterization of quantum systems1, 2, 3, the verification of the operations of quantum devices4, 5, 6 and the validation of underpinning physical models7, 8, 9, are central challenges for quantum technologies10, 11, 12 and fundamental physics13, 14. The computational cost of such

  10. The Impact of Teacher Evaluation Reform on Student Learning: Success and Challenges in Replicating Experimental Findings with Non-Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jennie Y.; Sartain, Lauren; Sporte, Susan E.; Steinberg, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most persistent and urgent problems facing education policymakers is the provision of highly effective teachers in all of the nation's classrooms. Of all school-level factors related to student learning and achievement, the student's teacher is consistently the most important (Goldhaber 2002; Rockoff 2004; Rivkin, Hanushek, and Kain…

  11. New and non-traditional mineral raw materials deposits, perspectives of use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyseev, O.; Beyseev, A.; Baichigasov, I.; Sergev, E.; Shakirova, G.

    1996-01-01

    Deposits of new and non-traditional kinds of mineral raw material are revealed, explored and prepared to industrial recovery in Kazakstan, that can be used in frames of conversion process to create new materials with unique properties, to prepare base for new technologies elaboration, and to achieve appreciable economic benefit. These deposits are located mostly in geographic and economic conditions of advanced infrastructure and mining works network, favorable for recovery.On the tests results the following is of heaviest interest: RHODUCITE, NEMALITE-CONTAINING CHRYSOTILE-ASBESTOS, NICKEL-CONTAINING SILICATE-ASBOLAN ORES, MEDICINAL MINERALS, SHUNGITES, FULLERENES, RAW QUARTZ MINERALS - the group of deposits containing 5 min tons of high quality quartz good for manufacture of cut-glass and fibre-optical articles, is explored in details. There are also deposits of other kinds of non-traditional strategic mineral raw material in the Republic of Kazakstan - natural fillers, that can be used in the national economy of the country and bring considerable economic benefit: chrysotile-asbestos, amphibole-asbestos, talk, vollastonite, tremolite, actinolite, vermiculite, zeolite, etc

  12. The influence of nontraditional training modalities on physical performance: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Reginald B; Serres, Jennifer; Traver, Kyle L; Wright, Bruce; Vojta, Chris; Eveland, Ed

    2012-10-01

    The primary purpose of this effort was to review several forms of nontraditional (NT) training programs, including heavy lower extremity strength training, CrossFit training, kettlebell training, and agility training, and discuss the effects of these exercise regimens on physical performance. The secondary purpose was to evaluate NT fitness training programs for evidence that they may provide beneficial options to help airmen improve their fitness scores. A search of the literature for 1980-2010 was performed using the Franzello Aeromedical Library, Public Medicine, and Air Force Institute of Technology search engines. There were 50 articles located and the authors selected 29 articles that specifically addressed the primary and secondary purposes of this literature review. This review indicates that an NT training approach is warranted in the general Air Force population. Heavy leg strength training and agility training show promise in enhancing aerobic fitness and improving fitness scores, particularly among members who have difficulty passing a physical fitness test. Most of the nontraditional forms of physical training are not supported in the scientific literature, with the exception of heavy leg strength training and agility training. However, even these NT forms of training require further investigation.

  13. Defining the questions: a research agenda for nontraditional authentication in arms control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Danielle K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Many traditional authentication techniques have been based on hardware solutions. Thus authentication of measurement system hardware has been considered in terms of physical inspection and destructive analysis. Software authentication has implied hash function analysis or authentication tools such as Rose. Continuity of knowledge is maintained through TIDs and cameras. Although there is ongoing progress improving all of these authentication methods, there has been little discussion of the human factors involved in authentication. Issues of non-traditional authentication include sleight-of-hand substitutions, monitor perception vs. reality, and visual diversions. Since monitor confidence in a measurement system depends on the product of their confidences in each authentication element, it is important to investigate all authentication techniques, including the human factors. This paper will present an initial effort to identify the most important problems that traditional authentication approaches in safeguards have not addressed and are especially relevant to arms control verification. This will include a survey of the literature and direct engagement with nontraditional experts in areas like psychology and human factors. Based on the identification of problem areas, potential research areas will be identified and a possible research agenda will be developed.

  14. Non-traditional stable isotope behaviors in immiscible silica-melts in a mafic magma chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Bao, Huiming; Liu, Yun

    2015-12-01

    Non-traditional stable isotopes have increasingly been applied to studies of igneous processes including planetary differentiation. Equilibrium isotope fractionation of these elements in silicates is expected to be negligible at magmatic temperatures (δ(57)Fe difference often less than 0.2 per mil). However, an increasing number of data has revealed a puzzling observation, e.g., the δ(57)Fe for silicic magmas ranges from 0‰ up to 0.6‰, with the most positive δ(57)Fe almost exclusively found in A-type granitoids. Several interpretations have been proposed by different research groups, but these have so far failed to explain some aspects of the observations. Here we propose a dynamic, diffusion-induced isotope fractionation model that assumes Si-melts are growing and ascending immiscibly in a Fe-rich bulk magma chamber. Our model offers predictions on the behavior of non-traditional stable isotope such as Fe, Mg, Si, and Li that are consistent with observations from many A-type granitoids, especially those associated with layered intrusions. Diffusion-induced isotope fractionation may be more commonly preserved in magmatic rocks than was originally predicted.

  15. An Investigation of Women Engineers in Non-Traditional Occupations in the Thai Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuanthip Kaewsri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available For over a decade, the public and the private sectors have carried out research aimed at attracting women engineers to the construction industry and retaining them. However, studies on women engineers working in other types of construction-related businesses apart from contractor companies such as consultancies, developers, etc., have not been many. This paper aims to examine the experiences of women engineers in non-traditional careers and the implications for their turnover. A literature search on women’s careers in construction was performed in conjunction with semi-structured interviews with a sampling of 141 individuals. Results from three viewpoints, viz those of professional men and women engineers in contractor companies, and women engineers in non-contractor companies, were found to differ in many respects, including their opinions about career advancement, career path and the difficulties involved. It was also found that women engineers in contractor companies were much more affected by problems such as sexual harassment, work-life conflicts and equal opportunity than women engineers in non-contractor companies. Turnover rates of women engineers and their reasons for leaving were examined. Women engineers, particularly those in contractor companies, had to confront more barriers in non-traditional careers than their male counterparts.  Nonetheless, working in non-contractor companies provides a viable alternative for women engineers who want to have successful careers in the Thai construction industry.

  16. Injury survey of a non-traditional 'soft-edged' trampoline designed to lower equipment hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eager, David B; Scarrott, Carl; Nixon, Jim; Alexander, Keith

    2013-01-01

    In Australia trampolines contribute one quarter of all childhood play equipment injuries. The objective of this study was to gather and evaluate injury data from a non-traditional, 'soft-edged', consumer trampoline, where the design aimed to minimise injuries from the equipment and from falling off. The manufacturer of the non-traditional trampoline provided the University of Technology Sydney with their Australian customer database. The study involved surveys in Queensland and New South Wales, between May 2007 and March 2010. Initially injury data was gathered by a phone interview pilot study, then in the full study, through an email survey. The 3817 respondents were the carers of child users of the 'soft-edge' trampolines. Responses were compared with Australian and US emergency department data. In both countries the proportion of injuries caused by the equipment and falling off was compared with the proportion caused by the jumpers to themselves or each other. The comparisons showed a significantly lower proportion resulted from falling-off or hitting the equipment for this design when compared to traditional trampolines, both in Australia and the US. This research concludes that equipment-induced and falling-off injuries, the more severe injuries on traditional trampolines, can be significantly reduced with appropriate trampoline design.

  17. A meta-analysis of the effects of non-traditional teaching methods on the critical thinking abilities of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Lee, Yoonju; Gong, SaeLom; Bae, Juyeon; Choi, Moonki

    2016-09-15

    Scientific framework is important in designing curricula and evaluating students in the field of education and clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of non-traditional educational methods on critical thinking skills. A systematic review approach was applied. Studies published in peer-reviewed journals from January 2001 to December 2014 were searched using electronic databases and major education journals. A meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.2. Reviewing the included studies, the California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory (CCTDI) and California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) were used to assess the effectiveness of critical thinking in the meta-analysis. The eight CCTDI datasets showed that non- traditional teaching methods (i.e., no lectures) were more effective compared to control groups (standardized mean difference [SMD]: 0.42, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 0.26-0.57, p teaching and learning methods in these studies were also had significantly more effects when compared to the control groups (SMD: 0.29, 95 % CI: 0.10-0.48, p = 0.003). This research showed that new teaching and learning methods designed to improve critical thinking were generally effective at enhancing critical thinking dispositions.

  18. Online, Blended and Technology-Enhanced Learning: Tools to Facilitate Community College Student Success in the Digitally-Driven Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Dawn

    2017-01-01

    Community colleges have embraced distance education as a means to provide increased flexibility and access to their large numbers of non-traditional students. Retention rates and student achievement measures alone may not reflect all of the benefits and opportunities that online learning, blended or hybrid learning, and technology enhanced…

  19. Desk to the Desktop--Digital Reference Service Leveraging Educational Assistance in Distance Learning: Implications for Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Pauline

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and the World Wide Web have influenced the new approaches taken in teaching and learning at institutions of higher learning. The nature of the courses offered, the geographical spread of the teaching sites as well as the diverse and distributed student population are the catalysts for the changes. These non-traditional, or distant…

  20. A Phenomenological Study of the Lived Experiences of Non-Traditional Students in Higher Level Mathematics at a Midwest University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brian B.

    2017-01-01

    The current literature suggests that the use of Husserl's and Heidegger's approaches to phenomenology is still practiced. However, a clear gap exists on how these approaches are viewed in the context of constructivism, particularly with non-traditional female students' study of mathematics. The dissertation attempts to clarify the constructivist…

  1. The Long and Winding Road: Grades, Psychological Disengagement and Motivation among Female Students in (Non-)Traditional Career Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinfret, Natalie; Tougas, Francine; Beaton, Ann M.; Laplante, Joelle; Ngo Manguelle, Christiane; Lagacé, Marie Claude

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the links between grades, psychological disengagement mechanisms (discounting evaluative feedback and devaluing school), and motivation among female students in traditional and non-traditional career paths. We predicted that the association between grades and discounting is affected by the importance of…

  2. The Effects of Sex and Gender Role Identity on Perceived Stress and Coping among Traditional and Nontraditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kayla; Mendenhall, Sarah; Myers, Charlsie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study examined differences in perceived stress and coping strategies based on gender role identity (GRI) and sex among traditional and nontraditional college students. Participants and Methods: Online surveys that assessed demographic information, GRI, and perceived stress were completed between October 2013 and March 2014 by 197…

  3. The influence of out-of-institution environments on the university schooling project of non-traditional students in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumuheki, Peace Buhwamatsiko; Zeelen, Jacobus; Openjuru, George L.

    2018-01-01

    Participation and integration of non-traditional students (NTS) in university education is influenced by factors within the institution and those external to the institution, including participants’ self-perceptions and dispositions. The objective of this qualitative study is to draw from the

  4. Assessing Changes in Medical Student Attitudes toward Non-Traditional Human Sexual Behaviors Using a Confidential Audience Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Phebe; Candler, Chris; Hamm, Robert M.; Smith, E. Michael; Hudson, Joseph C.

    2010-01-01

    Medical students encountering patients with unfamiliar, unconventional sexual practices may have attitudes that can affect open communication during sexual history-taking. We measured changes in first-year US medical student attitudes toward 22 non-traditional sexual behaviors before and after exposure to human sexuality instruction. An…

  5. Voices from Caribbean Classrooms: The Academic and Lived Experience of Jamaican Nontraditional Female Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black-Chen, Marsha

    2013-01-01

    One of the most notable trends in the last two decades has been the dramatic increase in continuing education among nontraditional-aged females. This study examined the academic and lived experience of women in Jamaica, specifically women who returned to college to further their education. Emphasis was placed on investigating reasons for…

  6. Connecting Bourdieu, Winnicott, and Honneth: Understanding the Experiences of Non-Traditional Learners through an Interdisciplinary Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Linden; Fleming, Ted; Finnegan, Fergal

    2013-01-01

    This paper connects Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, dispositions and capital with a psychosocial analysis of how Winnicott's psychoanalysis and Honneth's recognition theory can be of importance in understanding how and why non-traditional students remain in higher education. Understanding power relations in an interdisciplinary way makes…

  7. The Ability of the Coping Competence Questionnaire to Predict Resilience against Learned Helplessness among Undergraduate College Students: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollis, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    The Coping Competence Questionnaire (CCQ), based on the reformulated learned helplessness theory, was designed to assess a general stress resistance versus a propensity towards learned helplessness with a brief, 12-item self-report questionnaire. In this study the CCQ was administered to 247 undergraduate students, who were then paired, in groups…

  8. Investigating Content Knowledge Gains in Academic Service-Learning: A Quasi-Experimental Study in an Educational Psychology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Anuradhaa

    Research on service learning spanning the last three decades has revealed that service learning facilitates the development of leadership skills, self esteem, teamwork, communication skills, and acceptance of cultural diversity. Perhaps the most difficult arena has been the area of intellectual, cognitive, and academic efforts. A study…

  9. Campus Community Involvement in an Experimental Food Research Project Increases Students' Motivation and Improves Perceived Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, K.; Bianco-Simeral, S.

    2009-01-01

    Although the effects of pedagogical strategies using collaborative learning on students' perceived learning outcomes have been studied, little has been examined about possible benefits and challenges in collaborating with the campus community in a food science research project conducted by nutrition majors. We examined the effects of involving…

  10. Factors across home, work, and school domains influence nutrition and physical activity behaviors of nontraditional college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, Lisa M; Bishop, Hillary L; Greaney, Mary L; Whiteley, Jessica A

    2012-10-01

    Nontraditional college students (older, part-time, and/or working) have less healthful nutrition and physical activity behaviors compared to traditional students, yet few health promotion efforts focus on nontraditional students. The purpose of this study was to use qualitative methods to explore factors affecting nutrition and physical activity behaviors of nontraditional students. Fourteen semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with nontraditional undergraduate students attending a large university. The sample had a median age of 25 (range, 21-64), 57% were men, 43% were racial/ethnic minorities, and 57% were employed (mean 22 hours/week). Data were coded using a systematic team-based approach. Consistent themes (mentioned by 4+ students) were identified and categorized into three domains: home, work, and school. Home (themes: neighborhood characteristics, family, partners), work (theme: work environment), and school (themes: cafeteria, vending machines) factors consistently influenced positive nutrition behaviors. Similarly, home (themes: neighborhood including safety, friends from home, partner,), work (theme: work environment), and school (themes: not having a car, campus structure, campus gym, friends at school) factors consistently influenced positive physical activity. Financial resources and perceptions of autonomy had influence across domains. Results indicate consistent influences on nutrition and physical activity behaviors across home, work, and school domains for nontraditional college students. Study findings suggest possible, and sometimes unconventional, intervention strategies to promote healthful eating and physical activity. For example, when cafeteria meal plans are not offered and financial constraints limit eating at the cafeteria, encouraging healthful choices from vending machines could be preferable to not eating at all. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Making ATLAS Data from CERN Accessible to the General Public: The Development and Evaluation of a Learning Resource in Experimental Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2243922; Ekelin, Svea Magdalena; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Christiansen, Iben

    2017-08-15

    In 2016, the ATLAS experiment at CERN released data from 100 trillion proton-proton collisions to the general public. In connection to this release the ATLAS Outreach group has developed several tools for visualizing and analyzing the data, one of which is a Histogram analyzer. The focus of this project is to bridge the gap between the general public's knowledge in physics and what is needed to use this Histogram analyzer. The project consists of both the development and an evaluation of a learning resource that explains experimental particle physics for a general public audience. The learning resource is a website making use of analogies and two perspectives on learning: Variation Theory and Cognitive Load Theory. The evaluation of the website was done using a survey with 10 respondents and it focused on whether analogies and the perspectives on learning helped their understanding. In general the respondents found the analogies to be helpful for their learning, and to some degree they found the explanations ...

  12. Oligosaccharins, brassinolides, and jasmonates: nontraditional regulators of plant growth, development, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1997-07-01

    Each of the nontraditional plant hormones reviewed in this article, oligosaccharins, brassinolides, and JA, can exert major effects on plant growth and development. However, in many cases, the mechanisms by which these compounds are involved in the endogenous regulation of morphogenesis remain to be established. Nevertheless, the use of mutant or transgenic plants with altered levels or perception of these hormones is leading to phenomenal increases in our understanding of the roles they play in the life cycle of plants. It is likely that in the future, novel modulators of plant growth and development will be identified; some will perhaps be related to the peptide encoded by ENOD40 (Van de Sande et al., 1996), which modifies the action of auxin.

  13. Forging New, Non-traditional Partnerships Among Physicists, Teachers and Students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie [Fermilab; Adams, Mark [Illinois U., Chicago; Wayne, Mitchell [Notre Dame U.; Karmgard, Dan [Notre Dame U.; Goussiou, Anna [Washington U., Seattle

    2017-05-02

    The QuarkNet collaboration has forged new, nontraditional relationships among particle physicists, high school teachers and their students. QuarkNet provides professional development for teachers and creates opportunities for teachers and students to engage in particle physics data investigations and join research teams. Embedded in the U.S. particle research community, QuarkNet leverages the nature of particle physics research—the long duration of the experiments with extensive lead times, construction periods, and data collection and analysis periods. QuarkNet is patterned after the large collaborations with a central management infrastructure and a distributed workload across university- and lab-based research groups. We describe the important benefits of the QuarkNet outreach program that flow to university faculty and present successful strategies that others can adapt for use in their countries.

  14. Non-Traditional Security: The Case of Water Security in the Mekong Subregion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haefner, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the first decade of the twenty-first century Non-Traditional Security (NTS challenges are of rising importance due to their increasing impact on daily life and broader national interests. This paper focuses on the Mekong Region as an important subregion due to its significance for more than 70 million people living directly on the river banks and its importance for the economic development of the six riparian countries. This paper investigates NTS challenges in the Mekong Subregion with a focus on environmental challenges and argues that NTS are of increasing importance in the region and will increase in the future. Whereas economic growth is crucial for the improvements of the livelihoods on the Mekong River and the overall economic performance of the riparian states, environmental protection cannot be disregarded as doing so would have devastating impact on the subregion and the wider region in the future.

  15. Non-Traditional Systemic Treatments for Diabetic Retinopathy: An
Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Rafael; Ballarini, Stefania; Cunha-Vaz, José; Ji, Linong; Haller, Hermann; Zimmet, Paul; Wong, Tien Y.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid escalation in the global prevalence diabetes, with more than 30% being afflicted with diabetic retinopathy (DR), means it is likely that associated vision-threatening conditions will also rise substantially. This means that new therapeutic approaches need to be found that go beyond the current standards of diabetic care, and which are effective in the early stages of the disease. In recent decades several new pharmacological agents have been investigated for their effectiveness in preventing the appearance and progression of DR or in reversing DR; some with limited success while others appear promising. This up-to-date critical review of non-traditional systemic treatments for DR is based on the published evidence in MEDLINE spanning 1980-December 2014. It discusses a number of therapeutic options, paying particular attention to the mechanisms of action and the clinical evidence for the use of renin-angiotensin system blockade, fenofibrate and calcium dobesilate monohydrate in DR. PMID:25989912

  16. Designing and implementing an undergraduate health administration program for nontraditional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Nancy; Gordon, Jean; Rushing, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of an undergraduate health administration program for nontraditional students at a Hispanic serving institution. The program had to meet the needs of a diverse, adult student population, the local community, and the future leadership requirements of the healthcare industry. As such, the program was designed as a "bridge" for full-time employed healthcare licensed professionals seeking to complete a baccalaureate degree and obtain positions in the healthcare management field. It answered the call of the local community to strengthen partnerships between business and education by offering the program at healthcare employer worksites. Furthermore, the program addressed three needs of the healthcare industry: (1) the recognized shortage of future healthcare leaders, (2) the under-representation of minorities in the industry, and (3) proposed changes in health administration programs' curricula to focus on competencies in the areas of communication skills, decision making, ethical leadership, and self-development.

  17. The type specimens of Calyptratae (Diptera) housed in non-traditional institutions in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patitucci, Luciano Damián; Mulieri, Pablo Ricardo; Domínguez, M Cecilia; Mariluis, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-14

    The type material of species of Calyptratae Diptera belonging to Anthomyiidae, Calliphoridae, Fanniidae, Muscidae, Sarcophagidae, and Tachinidae, housed in the collections of non-traditional institutions in Argentina were examined. These collections were included in the recently created "Sistema Nacional de Datos Biológicos" (National Biological Data System). We examined four collections: "Administración Nacional de Laboratorios e Institutos de Salud 'Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán'" (ANLIS), "Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria, Castelar, Buenos Aires" (INTA), "Instituto Argentino de Investigaciones de las Zonas Áridas" (IADIZA); and "Fundación Félix de Azara" (CFA). Comparison of the original descriptions of these species with the label information revealed the existence of 24 holotypes, 5 lectotypes, 11 syntypes, and 441 paratypes/paralectotypes. Complete information is given for each type, including reference to the original description, label data, and preservation condition. 

  18. The biological control as a strategy to support nontraditional agricultural exports in Peru: An empirical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Duarte Cueva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study is oriented to explore the general characteristics of agriculture, the biological control as a pest control mechanism and agro export industry. In this context, we try to promote the use of biological control as a strategy to support nontraditional exports related to products such as asparagus and fresh avocados grown in the La Libertad Department (Peru, through an agronomic and management approach. Biological control is the basis of integrated pest management (IPM and contributes to the conservation of agricultural ecosystems allowing to export companies reduce costs, fulfill international phytosanitary measures and supports the preservation of the environment and health. Thus, the Peruvian agro export companies could build a sustainable competitive advantage and seek a positioning as socially responsible firms. We analyze variables such as crop statistics, comparative costs between biological control and chemical control, main destination markets for asparagus and fresh avocados, international standards, among others.

  19. A bit of both science and economics: a non-traditional STEM identity narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Sheron L.

    2017-10-01

    Black males, as one non-dominant population, remain underrepresented and less successful in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Researchers focused on non-dominant populations are advised against generalizations and to examine cultural intersections (i.e. race, ethnicity, gender, and more) and also to explore cases of success, in addition to cases of under-achievement and underrepresentation. This study has focused on one African American male, Randy, who expressed high-achieving STEM career goals in computer science and engineering. Furthermore, recognizing that culture and identity development underlie STEM engagement and persistence, this long-term case study focused on how Randy developed a STEM identity during the course of the study and the implications of that process for his STEM career exploration. Étienne Wenger's (1999) communities-of-practice (CoP) was employed as a theoretical framework and, in doing so, (1) the informal STEM program in which Randy participated was characterized as a STEM-for-social-justice CoP and (2) Randy participated in ways that consistently utilized an "economics" lens from beyond the boundaries of the CoP. In doing so, Randy functioned as a broker within the CoP and developed a non-traditional STEM identity-in-practice which integrated STEM, "economics", and community engagement. Randy's STEM identity-in-practice is discussed in terms of the contextual factors that support scientific identity development (Hazari et al. in J Res Sci Teach 47:978-1003, 2010), the importance of recognizing and supporting the development of holistic and non-traditional STEM identities, especially for diverse populations in STEM, and the implications of this new understanding of Randy's STEM identity for his long-term STEM career exploration.

  20. Sex Differences in Learned Helplessness: IV. An Experimental and Naturalistic Study of Failure Generalization and Its Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Dweck, Carol S.

    1980-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the role of sex differences in learned helplessness in the generalization of failure experience. Subjects in experiment 1 were fifth graders and subjects in experiment 2 were fourth, fifth, and sixth graders. (MP)

  1. Are we having fun yet? Institutional resistance and the introduction of play and experimentation into learning innovation through social media

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Bryant; Antony Coombs; Monika Pazio

    2014-01-01

    Recognising and responding to behaviours and patterns of resistance is critical to the successful imple­mentation of technology-enhanced learning strategies at higher education institutions. At institutional, academic and student levels, resistance manifests itself in a variety of forms, at best supporting a critical culture and at worst creating inertia and active disquiet. Through the lens of an institution-wide strategic learning innovation vision at the University of Greenwich, designed t...

  2. Teacher Education Program Learning Technologies and Knowledge (Tac at the Pedagogical University Experimental Libertador Core Barinas (Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Antonio Martínez Molina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to propose a teacher training program of Learning Technologies and Knowledge (TAC at the Pedagogic University Libertador Barinas centre (Venezuela. This work is framed as a feasible project, supported by a descriptive field research. It was determined that teacher training programs Learning Technologies and Communication require an organizational structure, which should be under the figure of a coordination that is responsible for organizing everything related to the development of these projects.

  3. Problem-Based Learning and Assessment in Hydrology Courses: Can Non-Traditional Assessment Better Reflect Intended Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Steve W.; Teutschbein, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Hydrology has at its core a focus on real-world applications and problems stemming from the importance of water for society and natural systems. While hydrology is firmly founded in traditional "hard" sciences like physics and mathematics, much of the innovation and excitement in current and future research-oriented hydrology comes…

  4. The Effect of Teaching Methods and Learning Styles on Students’ English Achievement (An Experimental Study at Junior High School 1 Pasangkayu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahrul Munir

    2019-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research are to determine the effects of teaching methods (STAD and jigsaw and learning styles (visual, auditory, and kinesthetic on students’ English achievement. This research is an experimental study conducted at Junior High School Pasangkayu in 2014 with 213 sample which is selected stratified-randomly (n = 68. The results of the research are as follow: (1 English achievement of students taught with STAD is better than those of taught with jigsaw; (2 there is no significant difference in  English achievement among visual, auditory, and kinesthetic students; (3 there is any significant effect of interaction among teaching method and learning styles on students’ learning English achievement. The research also find out that for visual students, studying English achievement of students taught with STAD is better than that of students taught with jigsaw; for auditory students, learning English achievement  of students taught with jigsaw is better than that of students taught with STAD; and for kinesthetic students, English achievement of students taught with STAD is better than that of students taught with jigsaw. To sum up, STAD is more effective than jigsaw in improving students’ English achievement. STAD is suitable to improve English achievement of visual and kinesthetic students, and jigsaw is suitable to improve English achievement of auditory students.

  5. Information session proceedings of the National First Nations and Inuit Working Group on the Non-Traditional Use of Tobacco for Medical Services Branch, Health Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dumont-Smith, Claudette

    1995-01-01

    The publication covers topics ranging from the impact on the non-traditional use of tobacco among First Nations and Inuit Communities, current trends, opportunities and challenges, to current efforts...

  6. TIME-ON-TASK IN PRIMARY CLASSROOMS, DURING DIFFERENT TEACHING-LEARNING APPROACHES

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin Mohite; Meenal Dashputre

    2017-01-01

    The entire education system is moving from the teacher-centered teaching-learning approaches towards student-centered teaching-learning approaches, with anticipation that it would increase the learning outcomes. This empirical study was carried out to compare the traditional and non-traditional classrooms. It also tried to understand the effectiveness of the Alternate Instructions in the Mathematics and Primary Language (Marathi) classrooms. This study collected about 8000 snapshots from the ...

  7. Experimental studies of animal social learning in the wild: Trying to untangle the mystery of human culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kim

    2010-08-01

    Here I discuss how studies on animal social learning may help us understand human culture. It is an evolutionary truism that complex biological adaptations always evolve from less complex but related adaptations, but occasionally evolutionary transitions lead to major biological changes whose end products are difficult to anticipate. Language-based cumulative adaptive culture in humans may represent an evolutionary transition of this type. Most of the social learning observed in animals (and even plants) may be due to mechanisms that cannot produce cumulative cultural adaptations. Likewise, much of the critical content of socially transmitted human culture seems to show no parallel in nonhuman species. Thus, with regard to the uniquely human extent and quality of culture, we are forced to ask: Are other species only a few small steps away from this transition, or do they lack multiple critical features that make us the only truly cultural species? Only future research into animal social learning can answer these questions.

  8. A Further Characterization of Empirical Research Related to Learning Outcome Achievement in Remote and Virtual Science Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, James R.

    2017-10-01

    This paper further characterizes recently reviewed literature related to student learning outcome achievement in non-traditional (virtual and remote) versus traditional (hands-on) science labs, as well as factors to consider when evaluating the state and progress of research in this field as a whole. Current research is characterized according to (1) participant nationality and culture, (2) participant education level, (3) participant demography, (4) scientific discipline, and (5) research methodology, which could provide avenues for further research and useful dialog regarding the measurement and interpretation of data related to student learning outcome achievement in, and thus the efficacy of, non-traditional versus traditional science labs. Current research is also characterized by (6) research publication media and (7) availability of non-traditional labs used, which demonstrate some of the obstacles to progress and consensus in this research field.

  9. Trace elements and naturally occurring radioactive materials in 'Non-traditional fertilizers' used in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assibey, E. O.

    2013-07-01

    Fertilizers have been implicated for being contaminated with toxic trace elements and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) even though they are an indispensable component of our agriculture. This phenomenon of contamination has been investigated and established world-wide in various forms of fertilizers (i.e., granular or 'traditional' type and liquid/powder or 'non-traditional type'). In Ghana, the crop sub-sector has seen a gradual rise in the importation and use of 'non-traditional fertilizers' which are applied to both the foliar parts and roots of plants. This notwithstanding, research on fertilizers has been largely skewed towards the 'traditional' types, focusing principally on the subjects of yield, effects of application and their quality. This study was, therefore, undertaken to bridge the knowledge gap by investigating the levels of trace elements and NORMs found in the 'non-traditional' fertilizers used in Ghana. The principal objective of the study was to investigate the suitability of the 'non-traditional fertilizers' for agricultural purposes with respect to trace elements and NORMs contamination. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis were employed to determine the trace elements (Cu, Zn, Fe, Na, Al, Br, Ni, Cd, As, Hg, Co, Pb, La, Mn, Si, Ca, Cl, S, K, Ba and V) and NORMs ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) concentrations in thirty-nine (39) fertilizer samples taken from two major agro-input hubs in the country (Kumasi-Kejetia and Accra). Multivariate statistical analyses (cluster analysis, principal component analysis and pearson's correlation) were applied to the data obtained in order to identify possible sources of contamination, investigate sample/ parameter affinities and groupings and for fingerprinting. The toxic trace element concentrations determined in all samples were found to be in the order Fe>Cu>Co>Cd>Cr >Ni>Pb>As>Hg. The study found most of the trace elements determined to be within limits set

  10. Beyond Classroom Borders: Incorporating Collaborative Service Learning for the Adult Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Millicent J.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of collaborative service learning activities as they are incorporated into university curricula designed for the nontraditional student. The basic tenets of the concept of "andragogy" are briefly reviewed to emphasize the special considerations that need to be addressed to ensure the successful inclusion of…

  11. Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Laabidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays learning technologies transformed educational systems with impressive progress of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. Furthermore, when these technologies are available, affordable and accessible, they represent more than a transformation for people with disabilities. They represent real opportunities with access to an inclusive education and help to overcome the obstacles they met in classical educational systems. In this paper, we will cover basic concepts of e-accessibility, universal design and assistive technologies, with a special focus on accessible e-learning systems. Then, we will present recent research works conducted in our research Laboratory LaTICE toward the development of an accessible online learning environment for persons with disabilities from the design and specification step to the implementation. We will present, in particular, the accessible version “MoodleAcc+” of the well known e-learning platform Moodle as well as new elaborated generic models and a range of tools for authoring and evaluating accessible educational content.

  12. A proof-of-principle simulation for closed-loop control based on preexisting experimental thalamic DBS-enhanced instrumental learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Fu; Yang, Shih-Hung; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Chen, Po-Chuan; Lo, Yu-Chun; Pan, Han-Chi; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Hui-Ching; Chen, Hsu-Yan; Huang, Wei-Chen; Huang, Wun-Jhu; Chen, You-Yin

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been applied as an effective therapy for treating Parkinson's disease or essential tremor. Several open-loop DBS control strategies have been developed for clinical experiments, but they are limited by short battery life and inefficient therapy. Therefore, many closed-loop DBS control systems have been designed to tackle these problems by automatically adjusting the stimulation parameters via feedback from neural signals, which has been reported to reduce the power consumption. However, when the association between the biomarkers of the model and stimulation is unclear, it is difficult to develop an optimal control scheme for other DBS applications, i.e., DBS-enhanced instrumental learning. Furthermore, few studies have investigated the effect of closed-loop DBS control for cognition function, such as instrumental skill learning, and have been implemented in simulation environments. In this paper, we proposed a proof-of-principle design for a closed-loop DBS system, cognitive-enhancing DBS (ceDBS), which enhanced skill learning based on in vivo experimental data. The ceDBS acquired local field potential (LFP) signal from the thalamic central lateral (CL) nuclei of animals through a neural signal processing system. A strong coupling of the theta oscillation (4-7 Hz) and the learning period was found in the water reward-related lever-pressing learning task. Therefore, the theta-band power ratio, which was the averaged theta band to averaged total band (1-55 Hz) power ratio, could be used as a physiological marker for enhancement of instrumental skill learning. The on-line extraction of the theta-band power ratio was implemented on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). An autoregressive with exogenous inputs (ARX)-based predictor was designed to construct a CL-thalamic DBS model and forecast the future physiological marker according to the past physiological marker and applied DBS. The prediction could further assist the design of

  13. Analysis for Heat Transfer in a High Current-Passing Carbon Nanosphere Using Nontraditional Thermal Transport Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol C Y; Chen, B C; Tsai, Y H; Ma, C; Wen, M Y

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the thermal transport in hollow microscale and nanoscale spheres subject to electrical heat source using nontraditional thermal transport model. Working as supercapacitor electrodes, carbon hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres needs excellent heat transfer characteristics to maintain high specific capacitance, long cycle life, and high power density. In the nanoscale regime, the prediction of heat transfer from the traditional heat conduction equation based on Fourier's law deviates from the measured data. Consequently, the electrical heat source-induced heat transfer characteristics in hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are studied using nontraditional thermal transport model. The effects of parameters on heat transfer in the hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are discussed in this study. The results reveal that the heat transferred into the spherical interior, temperature and heat flux in the hollow sphere decrease with the increasing Knudsen number when the radius of sphere is comparable to the mean free path of heat carriers.

  14. Impact of tDCS on Performance and Learning of Target Detection: Interaction with Stimulus Characteristics and Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, B. A.; Trumbo, M. C.; Flores, R. A.; Garcia, C. M.; van der Merwe, A. J.; Wassermann, E. M.; Weisend, M. P.; Clark, V. P.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously found that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over right inferior frontal cortex (RIFC) enhances performance during learning of a difficult visual target detection task (Clark et al., 2012). In order to examine the cognitive mechanisms of tDCS that lead to enhanced performance, here we analyzed its differential…

  15. Are We Having Fun Yet? Institutional Resistance and the Introduction of Play and Experimentation into Learning Innovation through Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Peter; Coombs, Antony; Pazio, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Recognising and responding to behaviours and patterns of resistance is critical to the successful implementation of technology-enhanced learning strategies at higher education institutions. At institutional, academic and student levels, resistance manifests itself in a variety of forms, at best supporting a critical culture and at worst creating…

  16. Drawing-Based Simulation for Primary School Science Education: An Experimental Study of the GearSketch Learning Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, Frank; van Joolingen, Wouter; Gijlers, Aaltje H.; Bollen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Touch screen computers are rapidly becoming available to millions of students. These devices make the implementation of drawing-based simulation environments like Gear Sketch possible. This study shows that primary school students who received simulation-based support in a drawing-based learning

  17. The Effect of Mastery Learning Model with Reflective Thinking Activities on Medical Students' Academic Achievement: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaldi, Senel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of mastery learning model supported with reflective thinking activities on the fifth grade medical students' academic achievement. Mixed methods approach was applied in two samples (n = 64 and n = 6). Quantitative part of the study was based on a pre-test-post-test control group design with an experiment…

  18. Traditional and non-traditional treatments for autism spectrum disorder with seizures: an on-line survey

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Richard E; Sreenivasula, Swapna; Adams, James B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the high prevalence of seizure, epilepsy and abnormal electroencephalograms in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there is little information regarding the relative effectiveness of treatments for seizures in the ASD population. In order to determine the effectiveness of traditional and non-traditional treatments for improving seizures and influencing other clinical factor relevant to ASD, we developed a comprehensive on-line seizure survey. Methods A...

  19. "Too big to fail" or "Too non-traditional to fail"?: The determinants of banks' systemic importance

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Kyle; Zhou, Chen

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically analyzes the determinants of banks' systemic importance. In constructing a measure on the systemic importance of financial institutions we find that size is a leading determinant. This confirms the usual "Too big to fail'' argument. Nevertheless, banks with size above a sufficiently high level have equal systemic importance. In addition to size, we find that the extent to which banks engage in non-traditional banking activities is also positively related to ...

  20. Non-traditional neutron activation analysis by use of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhammedov, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Traditional reactor neutron activation analysis (NAA) based on (n, γ) - thermal neutron capture nuclear reaction has been developed into a reliable and powerful analytical method, for trace element analysis, allowing the determination of over 60 chemical elements, with good accuracy and low detection limits. Considering all possibilities of activation and a radiochemical separation of the indicator radionuclide, the majority of the elements of this group can be determined at the ppm concentration level and below. However, for solving a number of analytical problems NAA technique is not well suited or it cannot be used at all. An important limitation is that all light elements, some medium and heavy elements cannot be determined even at ppm concentration level by this method, for example, H, Be, Li, B, C, N, O, Ti, Nb, Pb, etc. Accurate determination of lithium, oxygen and other light elements in sub-microgram level is of importance in geochemical and material studies. Such examples are great many. On such instances, several non-traditional reactor activation analysis can be used which have increasingly been developed and applied to several fields of semiconductor industry, biology, geology in recent years. The purpose of this presentation is to review the modern status of non-traditional nuclear reactor activation analysis based on use of nuclear reactions excited by the flow of secondary charged particles which are produced by two methods. In first method the triton flow is produced by thermal neutrons flux which excites the nuclear reaction 6 Li(n, α)T on lithium. The neutron activation analysis associated with two consecutive reactions 6 Li(n, α)T + 16 O(T, n) 18 F is established to determine trace amounts either of lithium or of oxygen in different geological, ecological and technological samples. Besides, the triton flow can be used for the determination of other light elements, for instance, B, N, S, Mg. This nuclear reactor triton activation

  1. An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Rodgers; James Castle

    2008-08-31

    This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury

  2. Coping with the energy crisis: Impact assessment and potentials of non-traditional renewable energy in rural Kyrgyzstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Melisande F.M.; Pistorius, Till

    2012-01-01

    The Kyrgyz energy sector is characterised by a dramatic energy crisis that has deprived a substantial part of the population from access to energy. Non-traditional renewable energy sources have emerged as a promising alternative in providing basic energy services to the rural poor. Based on qualitative interview data from local households and project planners, this study sets out to assess impacts, limitations and barriers of non-traditional renewable energy projects in rural areas in Kyrgyzstan. This study argues that recent renewable energy efforts from multilateral international agencies, the private sector, and nongovernmental organisations exhibit great potential in creating tangible benefits and improving basic energy services, but have so far been inefficient in establishing and replicating sustainable and long-term energy solutions. Existing practices need to be improved by attaching greater importance to the capacities and real needs of the rural poor. The guidance of integrated programmes and policies along with alternative financing schemes and awareness-raising are urgently needed to leverage local success stories and to facilitate a sustainable energy development in rural Kyrgyzstan. - Highlights: ► We examine 11 rural households and 5 project planners in rural Kyrgyzstan. ► We assess impacts of non-traditional renewable energies compared with conventional fuels. ► Renewable energies exhibit a range of tangible benefits for rural users. ► Limitations concern performance, durability, repair, acceptance, finance and policy. ► Renewable energy is a promising alternative for rural households in Kyrgyzstan.

  3. PM10 standards and nontraditional particulate source controls: A summary of the A ampersand WMA/EPA international specialty conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, J.C.; Watson, J.G.; Ono, D.M.; Mathai, C.V.

    1993-01-01

    An international specialty conference, jointly sponsored by the Air ampersand Waste Management Association (A ampersand WMA) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), entitled open-quotes PM 10 Standards and Nontraditional Particulate Source Controls,close quotes was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 12-15, 1992. The conference included 92 presentations in 17 technical sessions. Eight-one peer-reviewed technical papers, two keynote addresses and one panel session summary describing novel applications, measurement processes, modeling techniques and control measures for nontraditional pollution sources are assembled in the Transactions. The technical issues addressed during the conference included: (1) measurement methods and data bases; (2) emissions source characterization; (3) source apportionment of nontraditional sources; (4) fugitive dust characterization and control technologies; (5) vegetative burning characterization and control technologies; (6) sources and controls of secondary aerosol and motor vehicle precursors; and (7) regulatory policies and State Implementation Plan (SIP) development. This paper gives an overview of the technical program. 105 refs., 1 tab

  4. Voices From The Field: Developing Employability Skills for Archaeological Students Through the Experimentation and the Pedagogy of Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaynor Wood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graduate employment statistics are receiving considerable attention in UK universities. This paper looks at how a wide range of employability attributes can be developed with students, through the innovative use of the Problem Based Learning (PBL approach. The case study discussed here involves a group of archaeology students from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN and their task of reconstructing and firing a small, early medieval clamp kiln. The employability skills and attributes that the students felt they had developed from this experience are discussed, with reference to Yorke’s USEM model of employability. Thanks are due to Get Your Wellies Outdoor Learning Centre, Preston, Lancashire for the use of their site, and to James Claydon, Bernard and Pat Fleming, Brian Joynes, Josh Pugh, Dan Scully, Mike Woods for their involvement in the experiment

  5. Education in Clinical Reasoning: An Experimental Study on Strategies to Foster Novice Medical Students’ Engagement in Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Linsen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical reasoning forms the interface between medical knowledge and medical practice. However, it is not clear how to organize education to foster the development of clinical reasoning. This study compared two strategies to teach clinical reasoning. Method: As part of a regular clinical reasoning course 333 students participated in a two-phase experiment. In the learning phase, participants were randomly assigned to either the conventional strategy (CS or the new strategy (NS. Participants in the CS solved a clinical case using a written description of a patient encounter and individual study. Participants assigned to the NS solved the same case using a video patient encounter and group discussion. One week later, all participants took the same diagnostic performance test. Performance on the diagnostic test and differences between the groups regarding their interest, cognitive engagement, appreciation of the educational activity, and time investment in self-study were analyzed. Results: There was no significant effect of teaching strategy on diagnostic performance (p = .23. Students in the NS condition showed more interest during the session (p = .003 and were more appreciative of the course when assigning an overall grade than the students in the CS condition (p<.001. The NS students reported having spent fewer hours studying the clinical case individually before the group session than the CS students (p<.001. Discussion: The NS resulted in more students’ involvement and higher appreciation of the learning activity compared to the CS. There was no difference in diagnostic accuracy, but the NS seems more efficient: to achieve the same performance, the NS students needed only half the preparation time before the learning session than the students working under the CS. This higher efficiency may be due to the benefits of small-group learning, but clarifying this finding requires further investigation. Keywords: Clinical reasoning

  6. How Do Peers Impact Learning? An Experimental Investigation of Peer-To-Peer Teaching and Ability Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Kimbrough, Erik O.; McGee, Andrew; Shigeoka, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Classroom peers are believed to influence learning by teaching each other, and the efficacy of this teaching likely depends on classroom composition in terms of peers' ability. Unfortunately, little is known about peer-to-peer teaching because it is never observed in field studies. Furthermore, identifying how peer-to-peer teaching is affected by ability tracking – grouping students of similar ability – is complicated by the fact that tracking is typically accompanied by changes in curriculum...

  7. The impact of simulation-based learning on students' English for Nursing Purposes (ENP) reading proficiency: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiao-Yun Annie; Chan, Luke; Siren, Betty

    2013-06-01

    This is a report of a study which evaluated simulation-based learning as a teaching strategy for improving participants' ENP reading proficiency in the senior college program of students whose first language is Chinese, not English. Simulation-based learning is known to be one of most effective teaching strategies in the healthcare professional curricula, which brings a clinical setting into the classroom. However, developing English reading skills for English written nursing journals through simulation-based learning in the nursing curricula, is largely unknown. We used a quasi-experimental approach with nonequivalent control group design to collect the causal connections between intervention and outcomes. 101 students were enrolled in this study (response rate 92.6%) of these 48 students volunteered for the intervention group, and 53 students for the control group. The findings indicated that the intervention group had significantly higher mean scores in ENP reading proficiency with unknown words in the article (p=.004), vocabulary (pdesigned research and a universal method of outcome measurement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF NONTRADITIONAL PLANT POLLEN AGAINST DIFFERENT SPECIES OF MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Kačániová

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect the antimicrobial activity of four plant pollen samples to pathogenic bacteria, microscopic fungi and yeasts. Pollens of dogwood common (Cornus mas, ray mountain (Secale strictum spp. strictum, pumpkin rape (Cucurbita pepo var. styriaca and grape vine (Vitis vinifera were collected in 2010 in Slovakia. The antimicrobial effects of the four nontraditional plant pollens were tested using the agar well diffusion method. For extraction, 70% ethanol (aqueous, v/v was applied. Antimicrobial susceptibility of five different strains of bacteria - three gram positive (Listeria monocytogenes CCM 4699, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Staphylococcus aureus CCM 3953 and gram negative (Salmonella enterica CCM 4420, Escherichia coli CCM 3988, as well as three different strains of microscopic fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, and three different strains of yeasts Candida albicans, Geotrichum candidum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, were examinated. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive among bacteria to the three ethanol extracts of plant pollen after 24 hours of inoculation, A. flavus and C. albicans were the most sensitive microscopic fungi and yeast species, respectively.

  9. Application of PROMETHEE-GAIA method for non-traditional machining processes selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Karande

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With ever increasing demand for manufactured products of hard alloys and metals with high surface finish and complex shape geometry, more interest is now being paid to non-traditional machining (NTM processes, where energy in its direct form is used to remove material from workpiece surface. Compared to conventional machining processes, NTM processes possess almost unlimited capabilities and there is a strong believe that use of NTM processes would go on increasing in diverse range of applications. Presence of a large number of NTM processes along with complex characteristics and capabilities, and lack of experts in NTM process selection domain compel for development of a structured approach for NTM process selection for a given machining application. Past researchers have already attempted to solve NTM process selection problems using various complex mathematical approaches which often require a profound knowledge in mathematics/artificial intelligence from the part of process engineers. In this paper, four NTM process selection problems are solved using an integrated PROMETHEE (preference ranking organization method for enrichment evaluation and GAIA (geometrical analysis for interactive aid method which would act as a visual decision aid to the process engineers. The observed results are quite satisfactory and exactly match with the expected solutions.

  10. Renal Pathology in a Nontraditional Aging Model: The Naked Mole-Rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, M A; Kinsel, M J; Treuting, P M

    2016-03-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR; Heterocephalus glaber) is growing in popularity as a model for aging research due to its extreme longevity (up to 30 years), highly adapted physiology, and resistance to cancer, particularly when compared with traditional aging models such as laboratory mice and rats. Despite the NMR's seemingly lengthy health span, several age-related lesions have been documented. During a 15-year retrospective evaluation of a zoo-housed population, histologic changes in the kidneys were reported in 127 of 138 (92%) adult NMRs. Of these, renal tubular mineralization was very common (115 of 127; 90.6%) and found in NMRs without concurrent renal lesions (36 of 127; 28.3%). Many of the other described lesions were considered progressive stages of a single process, generally referred to as chronic nephritis or nephropathy, and diagnosed in 73 of 127 (57.5%), while end-stage renal disease was reported in only 12 (9.4%) NMRs. Renal lesions of these NMRs were comparable to disease entities reported in laboratory rats and certain strains of inbred and noninbred mice. Although many lesions of NMR kidneys were similar to those found in aged laboratory rodents, some common urinary diseases were not represented in the examined colonies. The goal of this study was to describe renal lesions in NMRs from a zoologic setting to familiarize investigators and pathologists with an apparently common and presumably age-related disease in this nontraditional model. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Self-definition of women experiencing a nontraditional graduate fellowship program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gayle A.; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra L.; Lu, Yun; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; Creswell, John W.

    2006-10-01

    Women continue to be underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). One factor contributing to this underrepresentation is the graduate school experience. Graduate programs in STEM fields are constructed around assumptions that ignore the reality of women's lives; however, emerging opportunities may lead to experiences that are more compatible for women. One such opportunity is the Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) Program, which was introduced by the National Science Foundation in 1999. Although this nontraditional graduate program was not designed explicitly for women, it provided an unprecedented context in which to research how changing some of the basic assumptions upon which a graduate school operates may impact women in science. This exploratory case study examines the self-definition of 8 women graduate students who participated in a GK-12 program at a major research university. The findings from this case study contribute to higher education's understanding of the terrain women graduate students in the STEM areas must navigate as they participate in programs that are thought to be more conducive to their modes of self-definition while they continue to seek to be successful in the historically Eurocentric, masculine STEM fields.

  12. Hydrologic influences of forest vegetation in a changing world: Learning from Forest Service experimental forests, ranges, and watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Lisle; Mary Beth Adams; Leslie M. Reid; Kelly Elder

    2010-01-01

    The importance of forests in providing reliable sources of clean water cannot be underestimated. Therefore, there is a pressing need to understand how hydrologic systems function in forested ecosystems, in response to a variety of traditional and novel stressors and environments. Long-term watershed research on Experimental Forests and Ranges (EFRs) of the Forest...

  13. Experimental Research on How Instructing Students to Use Lecture Capture (Podcasting) Technology Affects Student Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Students' use of new technology is prevalent. Many of them own mobile phones, laptop computers, and various entertainment devices. However, they are seldom taught how to maximize these technologies for academic purposes. This experimental study examined whether students who received instructions on how to use podcasts for academic purposes…

  14. An experimental examination of catastrophizing-related interpretation bias for ambiguous facial expressions of pain using an incidental learning task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eKHATIBI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with pain-related concerns are likely to interpret ambiguous pain-related information in a threatening manner. It is unknown whether this interpretation bias also occurs for ambiguous pain-related facial expressions. This study examined whether individuals who habitually attach a catastrophic meaning to pain are characterized by negative interpretation bias for ambiguous pain-related facial expressions. Sixty-four female undergraduates completed an incidental learning task during which pictures of faces were presented, each followed by a visual target at one of two locations. Participants indicated target location by pressing one of two response keys. During the learning phase, happy and painful facial expressions predicted target location. During two test phases, morphed facial expressions of pain and happiness were added, equally often followed by a target at either location. Faster responses following morphs to targets at the location predicted by painful expressions compared to targets at the location predicted by happy expressions were taken to reflect pain-related interpretation bias. During one test phase, faces were preceded by either a safe or threatening context cue. High, but not low, pain-catastrophizers responded faster following morphs to targets at the location predicted by painful expressions than to targets at the other location (when participants were aware of the contingency between expression type and target location. When context cues were presented, there was no indication of interpretation bias. Participants were also asked to directly classify the facial expressions that were presented during the incidental learning task. Participants classified morphs more often as happy than as painful, independent of their level of pain catastrophizing. This observation is discussed in terms of differences between indirect and direct measures of interpretation bias.

  15. E-learning for students in their first year: a French experimentation at the medical school of Grenoble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Marie; Pagonis, Daniel; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Sele, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    A local study carried out in the Medical School of Grenoble shows that teaching in the first year in medicine studies satisfies neither the students, nor the teachers. The Faculty of Medicine of Grenoble decided to set up a reform in order to offer a high quality education. This reform leads to a complete reorganization of the curriculum and to the intensive use of new information and communication technologies of information, in particular, the use of multimedia documents. The communication and information technologies team of the Faculty of Medicine of Grenoble carried out an innovating and daring reform to start at the academic year 2006-2007. The new course is built on three activities: self learning on multi-media resources, meetings with teachers for questions-answers sessions and tutorials animated by older students. This article reports the first results for this successful project. In the academic year 2006-2007, are concerned 1290 students, 40 teachers and 8 disciplines.

  16. Availability of healthier options in traditional and nontraditional rural fast-food outlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntosh Alex

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food prepared away from home has become increasingly popular to U.S. families, and may contribute to obesity. Sales have been dominated by fast food outlets, where meals are purchased for dining away from home or in the home. Although national chain affiliated fast-food outlets are considered the main source for fast food, fast foods are increasingly available in convenience stores and supermarkets/grocery stores. In rural areas, these nontraditional fast-food outlets may provide most of the opportunities for procurement of fast foods. Methods Using all traditional and nontraditio nal fast-food outlets identified in six counties in rural Texas, the type and number of regular and healthiermenu options were surveyed using on-site observation in all food venues that were primarily fast food, supermarket/grocery store, and convenience store and compared with 2005 Dietary Guidelines. Results Traditional fast-food outlets represented 84 (41% of the 205 opportunities for procurement of fast food; 109 (53.2% were convenience stores and 12 (5.8% supermarkets/grocery stores. Although a s imilar variety of regular breakfast and lunch/dinner entrées were available in traditional fast-food outlets and convenience stores, the variety of healthier breakfast and lunch/dinner entrées was significantly greater in fast food outlets. Compared with convenience stores, supermarkets/grocery stores provided a greater variety of regular and healthier entrées and lunch/dinner side dishes. Conclusion Convenience stores and supermarkets/grocery stores more than double the potential access to fast foods in this rural area than traditional fast-food outlets alone; however, traditional fast food outlets offer greater opportunity for healthier fast food options than convenience stores. A complete picture of fast food environment and the availability of healthier fast food options are essential to understand environmental influences on diet and health

  17. Nontraditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease and visceral adiposity index among different body size phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, T; Zhang, J; Yuan, G; Zhang, M; Zhou, X; Liu, Z; Sun, X; Yu, X

    2015-01-01

    Increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk in metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals remain highly controversial. Several studies suggested risk while others do not. The traditional cardiovascular risk factors may be insufficient to demonstrate the complete range of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Hence, we aimed to compare the prevalence of elevated lipoprotein (a), apolipoprotein B, and uric acid (UA) levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio, and visceral adiposity index (VAI) scores, and low apolipoprotein A1 levels among 6 body size phenotypes (normal weight with and without metabolic abnormalities, overweight with and without metabolic abnormalities, and obese with or without metabolic abnormalities). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 7765 Chinese adults using data from the nationwide China Health and Nutrition Survey 2009. MHO persons had intermediate prevalence of elevated apolipoprotein B and UA levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio and VAI scores, and low apolipoprotein A1 levels between metabolically healthy normal-weight (MHNW) and metabolically abnormal obese individuals (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Elevated apolipoprotein B and UA concentrations, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio, and VAI scores were all strongly associated with the MHO phenotype (all P < 0.01). Prevalence of elevated apolipoprotein B and UA levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio and VAI scores, and low levels of apolipoprotein A1 was higher among MHO persons than among MHNW individuals. The elevated levels of the nontraditional risk factors and VAI scores in MHO persons could contribute to the increased cardiovascular disease risk observed in long-term studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Diffusion of non-traditional cookstoves across western Honduras: A social network analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, Sebastian; Dwivedi, Puneet; Ghilardi, Adrian; Bailis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A third of the world's population uses inefficient biomass stoves, contributing to severe health problems, forest degradation, and climate change. Clean burning, fuel-efficient, non-traditional cookstoves (NTCS) are a promising solution; however, numerous projects fail during the diffusion process. We use social network analysis to reveal patterns driving a successful stove intervention in western Honduras. The intervention lacks formal marketing, but has spread across a wide area in just a few years. To understand the process, we map the social network of active community members who drove diffusion across a large swath of the country. We find that most ACMs heard about stoves twice before sharing information about it with others and introducing the stove into their own communities. On average, the social distance between ACMs and the project team is 3 degrees of separation. Both men and women are critical to the diffusion process, but men tend to communicate over longer distances, while women principally communicate over shorter distances. Government officials are also crucial to diffusion. Understanding how information moves through social networks and across geographic space allows us to theorize how knowledge about beneficial technologies spreads in the absence of formal marketing and inform policies for NTCS deployment worldwide. - Highlights: • We build a chain of referrals to track spread of information about non traditional cookstoves. • We find differences among gender and occupations that should inform policy. • People hear about the stoves twice before becoming suppliers of information. • Government officials play a substantial role in the diffusion. • Males play leading role in diffusion over long distances, females in short distances

  19. Stuttering as a Symptom of Concussion: Confirmation of Association Using Nontraditional Information Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Jonathan C; Gordon, Kevin Eric

    2017-11-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented to our pediatric emergency department after a head injury with symptoms of concussion and acute stuttering. A PubMed search identified only 1 similar pediatric case. We investigated whether new-onset stuttering may be seen in the presence of acute concussive symptoms using an infodemiologic approach. We conducted a search with a metabrowser search engine (www.dogpile.com) using the free-text words "concussion" and "stuttering." The first 100 hits were scanned specifically for forum posts, extracting reports of concussions that were followed by new-onset stuttering. Duplicates were minimized by cross-referencing user name, location, date, and reported age and sex. Of the first 100 hits, we identified 17 unique posts that described an injury leading to a concussion followed within a short interval by new-onset stuttering. Posts were primarily by the affected individual (76%) and 64% involved female individuals. Sports and falls/injury accounted for most injuries (71%). Forty-one percent of posts explicitly stated that the concussion had been formally diagnosed. For those that reported the timing of stuttering onset (47%), the stuttering was documented within 1 hour of the injury (4/8) or between 1 and 24 hours (4/8). The ease with which we found so many reports of stuttering after head injury with concussive symptoms confirms that new-onset stuttering may be a symptom of concussion. Our experience highlights both a failure of using conventional medical literature and a success of using nontraditional information sources in identifying uncommonly associated symptoms of frequently encountered conditions.

  20. A Geoscience Workforce Model for Non-Geoscience and Non-Traditional STEM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou-Mark, J.; Blake, R.; Norouzi, H.; Vladutescu, D. V.; Yuen-Lau, L.

    2016-12-01

    The Summit on the Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education has recently identified key professional skills, competencies, and conceptual understanding necessary in the development of undergraduate geoscience students (American Geosciences Institute, 2015). Through a comprehensive study involving a diverse range of the geoscience academic and employer community, the following professional scientist skills were rated highly important: 1) critical thinking/problem solving skills; 2) effective communication; 3) ability to access and integrate information; 4) strong quantitative skills; and 5) ability to work in interdisciplinary/cross cultural teams. Based on the findings of the study above, the New York City College of Technology (City Tech) has created a one-year intensive training program that focusses on the development of technical and non-technical geoscience skills for non-geoscience, non-traditional STEM students. Although City Tech does not offer geoscience degrees, the primary goal of the program is to create an unconventional pathway for under-represented minority STEM students to enter, participate, and compete in the geoscience workforce. The selected cohort of STEM students engage in year-round activities that include a geoscience course, enrichment training workshops, networking sessions, leadership development, research experiences, and summer internships at federal, local, and private geoscience facilities. These carefully designed programmatic elements provide both the geoscience knowledge and the non-technical professional skills that are essential for the geoscience workforce. Moreover, by executing this alternate, robust geoscience workforce model that attracts and prepares underrepresented minorities for geoscience careers, this unique pathway opens another corridor that helps to ameliorate the dire plight of the geoscience workforce shortage. This project is supported by NSF IUSE GEOPATH Grant # 1540721.

  1. Three Nontraditional Approaches to Improving the Capacity, Accessibility, and Quality of Mental Health Services: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kiran L; Simmons, Magenta Bender; Davey, Christopher G

    2018-01-16

    To provide evidence for wider use of peer workers and other nonprofessionals, the authors examined three approaches to mental health service provision-peer support worker (PSW) programs, task shifting, and mental health first-aid and community advocacy organizations-summarizing their effectiveness, identifying similarities and differences, and highlighting opportunities for integration. Relevant articles obtained from PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar searches are discussed. Studies indicate that PSWs can achieve outcomes equal to or better than those achieved by nonpeer mental health professionals. PSWs can be particularly effective in reducing hospital admissions and inpatient days and engaging severely ill patients. When certain care tasks are given to individuals with less training than professionals (task shifting), these staff members can provide psychoeducation, engage service users in treatment, and help them achieve symptom reduction and manage risk of relapse. Mental health first-aid and community organizations can reduce stigma, increase awareness of mental health issues, and encourage help seeking. Most PSW programs have reported implementation challenges, whereas such challenges are fewer in task-shifting programs and minimal in mental health first-aid. Despite challenges in scaling and integrating these approaches into larger systems, they hold promise for improving access to and quality of care. Research is needed on how these approaches can be combined to expand a community's capacity to provide care. Because of the serious shortage of mental health providers globally and the rising prevalence of mental illness, utilizing nontraditional providers may be the only solution in both low- and high-resource settings, at least in the short term.

  2. The C1q family of proteins: insights into the emerging non-traditional functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane eGhebrehiwet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders—including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh and colleagues showing that pregnant C1q-/- mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q-/- mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al., which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. Recent evidence also shows that C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNFα-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the TNF family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral cytokine-like activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions.

  3. Creating a Social Wasteland? Non-Traditional Agricultural Exports and Rural Poverty in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Korovkin

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Neoliberal economic policies in Latin America  have resulted in the rapid growth of nontraditional agricultural exports (NTAE. This  growth is often seen as contributing to the alleviation of rural poverty. The paper examines this  view with the focus on Ecuador, using the World  Bank’s definition poverty as a reference. It is  argued that the flower export expansion has created employment opportunities but did not allow  the rural poor to raise themselves above the poverty line. Moreover, flower employment has undermined the pre-existing social networks and community organizations, increasing the levels of insecurity among rural families and undermining  their ability to influence the processes of decision  making.  Resumen: Creando un páramo social? Exportaciones agrícolas no-tradicionales y pobreza rural en EcuadorLas políticas económicas neo-liberales en América Latina han resultado en el rápido crecimiento  de las exportaciones agrícolas no tradicionales  (EANT, lo que es considerado a menudo como  un alivio de la pobreza rural. En este artículo se  estudia esta visión para el caso de Ecuador, utilizando como referencia la definición de pobreza  del Banco Mundial. Aunque se dice que la expansión en la exportación de flores ha creado oportunidades de empleo, no ha logrado que los pobres  rurales crucen la línea de la pobreza. Además, el empleo en este sector ha socavado las redes sociales y organizaciones comunitarias anteriores,  elevando los niveles de inseguridad entre las  familias rurales y minando su capacidad de intervención en el proceso de toma de decisiones.

  4. Sustaining Retention of Nontraditional Students in the Geosciences in 2YC; Practices and Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, J. I.; Doser, D. I.

    2012-12-01

    As the role of 2YC (two-year colleges/community colleges) changes in the academic pipeline of higher education new practices and ideas to engage and retain students in the geosciences at the 2YC level need to be explored. 2YC typically have a student body composed of non-traditional students ranging from second career students, single parents, students with disabilities, seniors, and minorities. Currently, 2YCs serve 44% of all undergraduate students and 45% of all of all first time freshmen in the US. These statistics show the potential community colleges hold to encourage entering students to the STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math) fields as a possible career choice. But the reality is the number of STEM degrees awarded at community colleges has not followed the same trends in student enrollment. Over the past four years El Paso Community College (EPCC) in conjunction with The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) has implemented several initiatives in our effort to increase the number of Geological Science majors at EPCC and to ensure a successful transition to UTEP. These efforts are aimed to decrease attrition rates of science majors by; articulating degree plans between institutions, introduce field-based research projects to allow hands on experience for students, develop a working relationship between students and university faculty, diversify geology courses offered at EPCC, and strengthening the educational-bridge between the geological science departments of EPCC and UTEP through the aid of federally funded programs. The success of the these efforts have been seen by; the increase in geology majors in our A.S. degree program, the number of degrees conferred at EPCC, the successful transition of students to UTEP, and graduation of students from UTEP with advanced degrees.

  5. Availability of more healthful food alternatives in traditional, convenience, and nontraditional types of food stores in two rural Texas counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustillos, Brenda; Sharkey, Joseph R; Anding, Jenna; McIntosh, Alex

    2009-05-01

    Limited research has focused on the availability of more healthful food alternatives in traditional food stores (supermarkets and grocery stores) in rural areas. Current market trends suggest that food items may be available for purchase in stores other than traditional food stores. An observational survey was developed and used on-site to document the availability and variety of fruit and vegetables (fresh, canned, and frozen), meats (meat, poultry, fish, and eggs), dairy (milk, yogurt, and cheese), and grains (whole grains and refined grains) in all traditional food stores, convenience stores, and nontraditional food stores (dollar stores and mass merchandisers) in two rural Texas counties. Descriptive statistics and t tests identified that although the widest selection of more healthful food items was available in supermarkets, not all supermarkets carried all items. Grocery stores carried less variety of fresh fruits (8+/-0.7 vs 4.7+/-0.3; Pconvenience or nontraditional food stores. Among convenience and nontraditional food stores, "dollar" stores offered the best variety of more healthful canned fruits and vegetables, whole-wheat bread, and whole-grain cereal. Mass merchandisers and dollar stores offered a greater variety of more healthful types of canned tuna and poultry, reduced-fat and skim milk, and low-fat tortillas. In these rural counties, traditional food stores offered greater availability of more healthful food choices across food groups. More healthful food choices in canned fruits and vegetables, canned meat and fish, milk, and grains were also available in dollar stores, mass merchandisers, and convenience stores. Results suggest that a complete understanding of the food environment, especially in rural areas, requires knowledge of the availability and variety of healthful food in all types of stores that are accessible to families.

  6. Comparative analysis of a nontraditional general chemistry textbook and selected traditional textbooks used in Texas community colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, Steven Walter

    The purpose of this study was to analyze questions within the chapters of a nontraditional general chemistry textbook and the four general chemistry textbooks most widely used by Texas community colleges in order to determine if the questions require higher- or lower-order thinking according to Bloom's taxonomy. The study employed quantitative methods. Bloom's taxonomy (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, & Krathwohl, 1956) was utilized as the main instrument in the study. Additional tools were used to help classify the questions into the proper category of the taxonomy (McBeath, 1992; Metfessel, Michael, & Kirsner, 1969). The top four general chemistry textbooks used in Texas community colleges and Chemistry: A Project of the American Chemical Society (Bell et al., 2005) were analyzed during the fall semester of 2010 in order to categorize the questions within the chapters into one of the six levels of Bloom's taxonomy. Two coders were used to assess reliability. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential methods. The descriptive method involved calculation of the frequencies and percentages of coded questions from the books as belonging to the six categories of the taxonomy. Questions were dichotomized into higher- and lower-order thinking questions. The inferential methods involved chi-square tests of association to determine if there were statistically significant differences among the four traditional college general chemistry textbooks in the proportions of higher- and lower-order questions and if there were statistically significant differences between the nontraditional chemistry textbook and the four traditional general chemistry textbooks. Findings indicated statistically significant differences among the four textbooks frequently used in Texas community colleges in the number of higher- and lower-level questions. Statistically significant differences were also found among the four textbooks and the nontraditional textbook. After the analysis of

  7. A Comparative Experimental Study on the Use of Machine Learning Approaches for Automated Valve Monitoring Based on Acoustic Emission Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Salah M.; Hui, K. H.; Hee, L. M.; Salman Leong, M.; Al-Obaidi, M. A.; Ali, Y. H.; Abdelrhman, Ahmed M.

    2018-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) analysis has become a vital tool for initiating the maintenance tasks in many industries. However, the analysis process and interpretation has been found to be highly dependent on the experts. Therefore, an automated monitoring method would be required to reduce the cost and time consumed in the interpretation of AE signal. This paper investigates the application of two of the most common machine learning approaches namely artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) to automate the diagnosis of valve faults in reciprocating compressor based on AE signal parameters. Since the accuracy is an essential factor in any automated diagnostic system, this paper also provides a comparative study based on predictive performance of ANN and SVM. AE parameters data was acquired from single stage reciprocating air compressor with different operational and valve conditions. ANN and SVM diagnosis models were subsequently devised by combining AE parameters of different conditions. Results demonstrate that ANN and SVM models have the same results in term of prediction accuracy. However, SVM model is recommended to automate diagnose the valve condition in due to the ability of handling a high number of input features with low sampling data sets.

  8. Traditional and non-traditional treatments for autism spectrum disorder with seizures: an on-line survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Richard E; Sreenivasula, Swapna; Adams, James B

    2011-05-18

    Despite the high prevalence of seizure, epilepsy and abnormal electroencephalograms in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there is little information regarding the relative effectiveness of treatments for seizures in the ASD population. In order to determine the effectiveness of traditional and non-traditional treatments for improving seizures and influencing other clinical factor relevant to ASD, we developed a comprehensive on-line seizure survey. Announcements (by email and websites) by ASD support groups asked parents of children with ASD to complete the on-line surveys. Survey responders choose one of two surveys to complete: a survey about treatments for individuals with ASD and clinical or subclinical seizures or abnormal electroencephalograms, or a control survey for individuals with ASD without clinical or subclinical seizures or abnormal electroencephalograms. Survey responders rated the perceived effect of traditional antiepileptic drug (AED), non-AED seizure treatments and non-traditional ASD treatments on seizures and other clinical factors (sleep, communication, behavior, attention and mood), and listed up to three treatment side effects. Responses were obtained concerning 733 children with seizures and 290 controls. In general, AEDs were perceived to improve seizures but worsened other clinical factors for children with clinical seizure. Valproic acid, lamotrigine, levetiracetam and ethosuximide were perceived to improve seizures the most and worsen other clinical factors the least out of all AEDs in children with clinical seizures. Traditional non-AED seizure and non-traditional treatments, as a group, were perceived to improve other clinical factors and seizures but the perceived improvement in seizures was significantly less than that reported for AEDs. Certain traditional non-AED treatments, particularly the ketogenic diet, were perceived to improve both seizures and other clinical factors.For ASD individuals with reported

  9. PROSPECTS OF INTRODUCTION OF NON-TRADITIONAL FRUIT BERRY AND VEGETABLE CROPS IN THE CONDITIONS OF DAGESTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Gins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available June 9-13, 2014 in Makhachkala hosted XI International scientific-methodical conference on the theme: «Introduction, conservation and use of biological diversity of cultivated plants», organized by FGBNU VNIISSOK, Dagestan Research Institute for Agriculture and GBS DSC RAS. The conference was attended by scientists from Russia, CIS and foreign countries. Due to the conference Dagestan turned out to be a prime location for the cultivation of both traditional and non-traditional plants with a high content of biologically active substances, as well as a training ground for resistance tests because of the combination of mountain and plain zones.

  10. Estimation of the Impacts of Non-Oil Traditional and NonTraditional Export Sectors on Non-Oil Export of Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicat Hagverdiyev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The significant share of oil sector of the Azerbaijan export portfolio necessitates promotion of non-oil exports. This study analyzes weather the commodities which contain the main share (more than 70% in non-oil export are traditional or non-traditional areas, using the so-called Commodity-specific cumulative export experience function, for the 1995-2015 time frame. Then, the impact of traditional and non-traditional exports on non-oil GDP investigated employing econometric model. The results of the study based on 16 non-oil commodities show that cotton, tobacco, and production of mechanic devices are traditional sectors in non-oil export. The estimation results of the model indicate that both, traditional and non-traditional non-oil export sectors have economically and statistically significant impact on non-oil GDP.

  11. Sensory modulation and sleep quality among adults with learning disabilities: a quasi-experimental case-control design study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kineret Sharfi

    Full Text Available Following the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF concepts, this study examines body functions such as sensory modulation and sleep quality among adults with learning disabilities (LD.One hundred and ten participants, 55 adults with LD and 55 matched controls (mean age 30 years filled in a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Adults/Adolescents Sensory Profile (AASP, and the Mini Sleep Questionnaire (MSQ. Chi-tests, Mann-Whitney tests, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were conducted to examine group differences related to socio-demographic characteristics and body functions. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between body functions.Significant differences were found between the groups in: (a unique socio-demographic variables: high-schools attended, family status and number of children; (b body functions: low registration and sensory sensitivity (p < .001, sensory avoiding (p = .002, sensory seeking (p = .021 and sleep quality (p < .001. Significant correlations were found between AASP subscale scores and the MSQ final score in each group. Regression analysis revealed that for the entire sample (N = 108, low registration accounted for 10.2% of the variance of sleep quality above group membership (p < .001, while in a separate examination of adults with LD (n = 53, low registration accounted for 19.9% of the variance of sleep quality (p < .001.Adults with LD need to be studied through a health-related perspective such as the ICF model to gain further understanding of their unique characteristics and daily needs. Sensory and sleep functions of adults with LD should be further studied in the context of health related quality of life.

  12. The Pay-What-You-Want game: What can be learned from the experimental evidence on Dictator and Trust Games?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiff Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the Pay-What-You-Want game which represents the interaction between a buyer and a seller in a Pay-What-You-Want (PWYW situation. The PWYW game embeds the dictator game and the trust game as subgames. This allows us to use previous experimental studies with the dictator and the trust game to identify three factors that can influence the success of PWYW pricing in business practice: (i social context, (ii social information, and (iii deservingness. Only few cases of PWYW pricing for a longer period of time have been documented. By addressing repeated games, we isolate two additional factors which are likely to contribute to successful implementations of PWYW as a long term pricing strategy. These are (iv communication and (v the reduction of goal conflicts. The central contribution of this study is an attempt to bridge the gap between laboratory experiments and the research on PWYW pricing, which relies largely on evidence from the field. By reviewing the relevant experiments, this study identifies factors crucial for the success of PWYW pricing and provides guidance to developing long-term applications of PWYW pricing.

  13. Incident factor as a learning aspect to enhance safety culture in the experimental fuel element installation of PTBN - BATAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heri Hardiyanti; Agus Sartono; Bambang Herutomo; AS Latief

    2013-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear facility depends not only on the fulfillment of all technical requirements, but also on the role of non-technical aspects. The primary causation of incidents or accidents in a nuclear facility is human error which is non-technical. Therefore, in order to enhance safety, efforts from the technical aspects are as important as efforts to deal with the human factor which can be done through the application of safety culture in the facility. Incidents that took place in the Experimental Fuel Element Installation (EFEI) of PTBN - BATAN from 2011 to 2012 were caused by aging instruments and human error. In order to prevent accidents and to enhance safety, non-technical efforts that were done in the EFEI were, interalia, the obligations on all personnel to attend the pre-lab briefing, to prepare a work proposal, to compose a HIRADC (hazard identification, risk assessment, and determining control) document, to utilize self protection devices, to perform a routine maintenance, and to practice safe behavior. All personnel were involved in all those efforts. Safety is the first priority and can always be improved in the facility. A strong commitment of and cooperation between the top management and the staff are needed. (author)

  14. Creatine synthesis and exchanges between brain cells: What can be learned from human creatine deficiencies and various experimental models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna-El-Daher, Layane; Braissant, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    While it has long been thought that most of cerebral creatine is of peripheral origin, the last 20 years has provided evidence that the creatine synthetic pathway (AGAT and GAMT enzymes) is expressed in the brain together with the creatine transporter (SLC6A8). It has also been shown that SLC6A8 is expressed by microcapillary endothelial cells at the blood-brain barrier, but is absent from surrounding astrocytes, raising the concept that the blood-brain barrier has a limited permeability for peripheral creatine. The first creatine deficiency syndrome in humans was also discovered 20 years ago (GAMT deficiency), followed later by AGAT and SLC6A8 deficiencies, all three diseases being characterized by creatine deficiency in the CNS and essentially affecting the brain. By reviewing the numerous and latest experimental studies addressing creatine transport and synthesis in the CNS, as well as the clinical and biochemical characteristics of creatine-deficient patients, our aim was to delineate a clearer view of the roles of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers in the transport of creatine and guanidinoacetate between periphery and CNS, and on the intracerebral synthesis and transport of creatine. This review also addresses the question of guanidinoacetate toxicity for brain cells, as probably found under GAMT deficiency.

  15. Brazil’s fight against narcotraffic in the border with Colombia. An approach to the restrains of non-traditional threats over foreign policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilse Calderón

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the post-Cold War international scenario, the non-traditional nature of security threats conditions the states’ foreign policies. An example of the above is the policy employed by Brazil regarding the border shared with Colombia regarding the development that narcotraffic has been having since the end of the 20th century. Therefore, this article proposes a brief analysis around the influence exercised by the non-traditional nature of the drug traffic threat over the design of Brazilian foreign policy between 1999 and 2010.

  16. Practical recommendations for the implementation of health technologies to enhance physical fitness of students in extracurricular classes during non-traditional gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Fomenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop practical recommendations for extracurricular classes nontraditional kinds of gymnastics to improve the organization of physical education teachers in schools. Material : in the experiment involved 358 students. Analyzed the available literature data. Results : a comparative analysis of physical fitness of students and practical recommendations for the non-traditional occupations gymnastics. Been a significant interest in physical education classes. Found that the main ways of improving physical education students may be the formation of the need for strengthening health facilities fitness aerobics, shaping, pilates. Conclusions : highlights the need to structure the problems they need and develop appropriate solutions.

  17. Experimental Design and Data Analysis in Receiver Operating Characteristic Studies: Lessons Learned from Reports in Radiology from 1997 to 20061

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Metz, Charles E.; Doi, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a broad perspective concerning the recent use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging by reviewing ROC studies published in Radiology between 1997 and 2006 for experimental design, imaging modality, medical condition, and ROC paradigm. Materials and Methods: Two hundred ninety-five studies were obtained by conducting a literature search with PubMed with two criteria: publication in Radiology between 1997 and 2006 and occurrence of the phrase “receiver operating characteristic.” Studies returned by the query that were not diagnostic imaging procedure performance evaluations were excluded. Characteristics of the remaining studies were tabulated. Results: Two hundred thirty-three (79.0%) of the 295 studies reported findings based on observers' diagnostic judgments or objective measurements. Forty-three (14.6%) did not include human observers, with most of these reporting an evaluation of a computer-aided diagnosis system or functional data obtained with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The remaining 19 (6.4%) studies were classified as reviews or meta-analyses and were excluded from our subsequent analysis. Among the various imaging modalities, MR imaging (46.0%) and CT (25.7%) were investigated most frequently. Approximately 60% (144 of 233) of ROC studies with human observers published in Radiology included three or fewer observers. Conclusion: ROC analysis is widely used in radiologic research, confirming its fundamental role in assessing diagnostic performance. However, the ROC studies reported in Radiology were not always adequate to support clear and clinically relevant conclusions. © RSNA, 2009 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.2533081632/-/DC1 PMID:19864510

  18. Uncertainty quantification and experimental design based on unsupervised machine learning identification of contaminant sources and groundwater types using hydrogeochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesselinov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    Identification of the original groundwater types present in geochemical mixtures observed in an aquifer is a challenging but very important task. Frequently, some of the groundwater types are related to different infiltration and/or contamination sources associated with various geochemical signatures and origins. The characterization of groundwater mixing processes typically requires solving complex inverse models representing groundwater flow and geochemical transport in the aquifer, where the inverse analysis accounts for available site data. Usually, the model is calibrated against the available data characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of the observed geochemical species. Numerous geochemical constituents and processes may need to be simulated in these models which further complicates the analyses. As a result, these types of model analyses are typically extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a new contaminant source identification approach that performs decomposition of the observation mixtures based on Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) method for Blind Source Separation (BSS), coupled with a custom semi-supervised clustering algorithm. Our methodology, called NMFk, is capable of identifying (a) the number of groundwater types and (b) the original geochemical concentration of the contaminant sources from measured geochemical mixtures with unknown mixing ratios without any additional site information. We also demonstrate how NMFk can be extended to perform uncertainty quantification and experimental design related to real-world site characterization. The NMFk algorithm works with geochemical data represented in the form of concentrations, ratios (of two constituents; for example, isotope ratios), and delta notations (standard normalized stable isotope ratios). The NMFk algorithm has been extensively tested on synthetic datasets; NMFk analyses have been actively performed on real-world data collected at the Los Alamos National

  19. Chemical dynamics simulations of X- + CH3Y → XCH3 + Y- gas-phase S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions. Nonstatistical dynamics and nontraditional reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Zhang, Jiaxu; Hase, William L

    2012-03-29

    Extensive classical chemical dynamics simulations of gas-phase X(-) + CH(3)Y → XCH(3) + Y(-) S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions are reviewed and discussed and compared with experimental measurements and predictions of theoretical models. The primary emphasis is on reactions for which X and Y are halogen atoms. Both reactions with the traditional potential energy surface (PES), which include pre- and postreaction potential energy minima and a central barrier, and reactions with nontraditional PESs are considered. These S(N)2 reactions exhibit important nonstatistical atomic-level dynamics. The X(-) + CH(3)Y → X(-)---CH(3)Y association rate constant is less than the capture model as a result of inefficient energy transfer from X(-)+ CH(3)Y relative translation to CH(3)Y rotation and vibration. There is weak coupling between the low-frequency intermolecular modes of the X(-)---CH(3)Y complex and higher frequency CH(3)Y intramolecular modes, resulting in non-RRKM kinetics for X(-)---CH(3)Y unimolecular decomposition. Recrossings of the [X--CH(3)--Y](-) central barrier is important. As a result of the above dynamics, the relative translational energy and temperature dependencies of the S(N)2 rate constants are not accurately given by statistical theory. The nonstatistical dynamics results in nonstatistical partitioning of the available energy to XCH(3) +Y(-) reaction products. Besides the indirect, complex forming atomic-level mechanism for the S(N)2 reaction, direct mechanisms promoted by X(-) + CH(3)Y relative translational or CH(3)Y vibrational excitation are possible, e.g., the roundabout mechanism.

  20. A case study of non-traditional students re-entry into college physics and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Stewart Gordon

    Two groups of students in introductory physics courses of an Access Program for engineering technologies were the subjects of this study. Students with a wide range of academic histories and abilities were enrolled in the program; many of the students were re-entry and academically unprepared for post-secondary education. Five years of historical data were evaluated to use as a benchmark for revised instruction. Data were gathered to describe the pre-course academic state of the students and their academic progress during two physics courses. Additional information was used to search for factors that might constrain academic success and as feedback for the instructional methods. The data were interpreted to regulate constructivist design features for the physics courses. The Engineering Technology Access Program was introduced to meet the demand from non-traditional students for admission to two-year engineering' technology programs, but who did not meet normal academic requirements. The duration of the Access Program was two terms for electronic and computer engineering students and three terms for civil and mechanical engineering students. The sequence of mathematics and physics courses was different for the two groups. The Civil/Mechanical students enrolled in their first mathematics course before undertaking their first physics course. The first mathematics and physics courses for the Electronics students were concurrent. Academic success in the two groups was affected by this difference. Over a five-year period the success rate of students graduating with a technology diploma was approximately twenty-five percent. Results from this study indicate that it was possible to reduce the very high attrition in the combined Access/Technology Programs. While the success rate for the Electronics students increased to 38% the rate for the Civil/Mechanical students increased dramatically to 77%. It is likely that several factors, related to the extra term in the Access

  1. Glycaemic indices and non-traditional biochemical cardiovascular disease markers in a diabetic population in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okeoghene, O.A.; Azenabor, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of hyperfibrinogenaemia, elevated C-reactive protein, hyperuricaemia and elevated lipoprotein A in a clinic population of patients with type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with healthy controls; and determine the interrelationship between fasting plasma glucose levels and indices of long-term glycaemic control (fructosamine and glycosylated haemoglobin) in DM. Study Design: Cross-sectional, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, from April to June 2009. Methodology: A total of 200 patients with type 2 DM and 100 age and gender matched healthy controls were recruited for the study. Glycaemic control was assessed using fasting blood glucose, fructosamine and glycosylated haemoglobin levels. The non-traditional risk factors studied included C-reactive protein (CRP), Lipoprotein a (Lpa), serum uric acid (SUA), microalbuminuria and fibrinogen. Mann-whitney, chi-square and Pearson's correlation tests were used for analysis as applicable. Results: Hyperfibrinoginaemia, elevated CRP, LPa, microalbuminuria and hyperuricaemia were present in 3.5%, 65%, 12%, 6% and 57% respectively in type 2 DM. The mean levels of these CV risk factors were significantly higher in subjects with type 2 DM than that of the control subject. There was a positive and significant correlation between HbA1c and FBS (r=0.46, p=0.0001) and HbA1c and fructosamine (r=0.49, p=0.0001). All studied CVS risk factors were related to indices of glycaemic control which were found to be interrelated. Fasting blood glucose significantly correlated with both HbA1c and fructosamine but HbA1c showed better correlation to FPG than fructosamine (r=0.51 vs. 0.32). Conclusion: Glycosylated haemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose but not fructosamine are significantly associated with microalbuminuria, fibrinogen SUA and CRP in type 2 DM. HbA1c was found to be better than fructosamine in

  2. Beyond HbA1c and glucose: the role of nontraditional glycemic markers in diabetes diagnosis, prognosis, and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Christina M.; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Fasting glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) are the standard measures for diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. There has been recent interest in nontraditional markers of hyperglycemia, including fructosamine, glycated albumin and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), as alternatives or adjuncts to standard measures. There is a growing literature linking these nontraditional markers with microvascular and macrovascular complications. Fructosamine and glycated albumin have also been shown to improve identification of persons with diabetes. However, long-term prospective studies with clinical outcomes are lacking. Some modern laboratory assays for fructosamine, glycated albumin and 1,5-AG have excellent performance. Expanded use of these tests has the potential to improve diabetes care as these measures may overcome limitations of HbA1c in certain patients, complement traditional measures by providing additional information on shorter-term glycemic control, and improve risk stratification for diabetes and its complications. Nonetheless, studies are needed to demonstrate if their routine use will benefit patients and improve outcomes. PMID:25249070

  3. Automated Sample Preparation for Radiogenic and Non-Traditional Metal Isotopes: Removing an Analytical Barrier for High Sample Throughput

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, M. Paul; Romaniello, Stephen; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Herrmann, Achim; Martinez-Boti, Miguel A.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Foster, Gavin L.

    2014-05-01

    MC-ICP-MS has dramatically improved the analytical throughput for high-precision radiogenic and non-traditional isotope ratio measurements, compared to TIMS. The generation of large data sets, however, remains hampered by tedious manual drip chromatography required for sample purification. A new, automated chromatography system reduces the laboratory bottle neck and expands the utility of high-precision isotope analyses in applications where large data sets are required: geochemistry, forensic anthropology, nuclear forensics, medical research and food authentication. We have developed protocols to automate ion exchange purification for several isotopic systems (B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb and U) using the new prepFAST-MC™ (ESI, Nebraska, Omaha). The system is not only inert (all-flouropolymer flow paths), but is also very flexible and can easily facilitate different resins, samples, and reagent types. When programmed, precise and accurate user defined volumes and flow rates are implemented to automatically load samples, wash the column, condition the column and elute fractions. Unattended, the automated, low-pressure ion exchange chromatography system can process up to 60 samples overnight. Excellent reproducibility, reliability, recovery, with low blank and carry over for samples in a variety of different matrices, have been demonstrated to give accurate and precise isotopic ratios within analytical error for several isotopic systems (B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb and U). This illustrates the potential of the new prepFAST-MC™ (ESI, Nebraska, Omaha) as a powerful tool in radiogenic and non-traditional isotope research.

  4. Learning in artistic gymnastics. An experimental study with children analysing some variables in that process Aprendizaje en gimnasia artística. Un estudio experimental con niños que analiza ciertas variables del proceso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. López

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Today the training of sports skills has lead to the conception of new approaches to attain maximum results. In practice, many teaching methods are used, yet most of the articles on motor learning or sports training refer to the total or global and the partial or analytic methods, both of interest in the field of gymnastics, offering a number of important combinations between either extreme.

    Opinions differ concerning effectiveness, and such differences also exist in gymnastics. Carrasco (1977, nevertheless, proposes "mini-circuits" as the ideal teaching method in gymnastics. In looking for a practical solution to global or analytical teaching, one experimental group study was undertaken with children participating in Sports Schools between the ages of 9 and 11. The aim was to compare the effect of three training sessions (analytical training, "mini-circuit" training, mixed training on the learning and recall of gymnastic skills.

    Interested in both final performance as well as the teaching process, the following variables were studied: motor activity time, waiting time, total number of global movements, total number of feedbacks emitted by the teacher (amount and direction, and total number of spot checks. A pre-test, post-test and re- test design was used with three groups to assess the three training sessions. Each group was trained to learn the same variable-dependent outcome.

    The results of the study showed that the "mini-circuit" training was the most effective learning and recall method. The most highly-influence process variables were both the type of aids and type of feedback provided. Overall, it is worth highlighting the importance of using the "mini-circuit" method with children. From a pedagogic perspective, this is an important finding to take into consideration, which could yield important results during schooling.
    KEY WORDS

  5. Drifting Apart or Converging? Grades among Non-Traditional and Traditional Students over the Course of Their Studies: A Case Study from Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändle, Tobias; Lengfeld, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Since 2009, German universities were opened by law to freshmen who do not possess the traditional graduation certificate required for entry into University, but who are rather vocationally qualified. In this article, we track the grades of these so-called non-traditional students and compare them to those of traditional students using a…

  6. Re-Entry Women Students in Higher Education: A Model for Non-Traditional Support Programs in Counseling and Career Advisement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    A model program of support for non-traditional women students has been developed at Texas Woman's University (TWU). Based on a pilot study, several steps were taken to assist these re-entry students at TWU. For example, in spring semester of 1983, a committee for re-entry students was established, with a student organization--Women in…

  7. Expanding Options. A Model to Attract Secondary Students into Nontraditional Vocational Programs. For Emphasis in: Building Trades, Electronics, Health Services, Machine Shop, Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, James D.; DeVore, Mary Ann

    This model has been designed for use by Missouri secondary schools in attracting females and males into nontraditional occupational programs. The research-based strategies are intended for implementation in the following areas: attracting females into building trades, electronics, machine shop, and welding; and males into secondary health…

  8. Comparison of a traditional and non-traditional residential care facility for persons living with dementia and the impact of the environment on occupational engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kieva; D'Cruz, Rachel; Harman, Suzanne; Stagnitti, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Dementia residential facilities can be described as traditional or non-traditional facilities. Non-traditional facilities aim to utilise principles of environmental design to create a milieu that supports persons experiencing cognitive decline. This study aimed to compare these two environments in rural Australia, and their influence on residents' occupational engagement. The Residential Environment Impact Survey (REIS) was used and consists of: a walk-through of the facility; activity observation; interviews with residents and employees. Thirteen residents were observed and four employees interviewed. Resident interviews did not occur given the population diagnosis of moderate to severe dementia. Descriptive data from the walk-through and activity observation were analysed for potential opportunities of occupational engagement. Interviews were thematically analysed to discern perception of occupational engagement of residents within their facility. Both facilities provided opportunities for occupational engagement. However, the non-traditional facility provided additional opportunities through employee interactions and features of the physical environment. Interviews revealed six themes: Comfortable environment; roles and responsibilities; getting to know the resident; more stimulation can elicit increased engagement; the home-like experience and environmental layout. These themes coupled with the features of the environment provided insight into the complexity of occupational engagement within this population. This study emphasises the influence of the physical and social environment on occupational engagement opportunities. A non-traditional dementia facility maximises these opportunities and can support development of best-practice guidelines within this population. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  9. Review of traditional and non-traditional medicinal genetic resources in the USDA, ARS, PGRCU collection evaluated for flavonoid concentrations and anthocyanin indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-traditional medicinal species include velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.), Desmodium species, Termanus labialis (L.f.) Spreng. and the traditional species consists of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.). There is a need to identify plant sources of flavonoids and anthocyanins since they have s...

  10. The Process in Completing a Nontraditional Group Dissertation in Practice for the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate, the Ed.D. Educational Leadership Program at Lynn University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on how a cohort of scholarly practitioners extended the traditional Doctorate in Education (Ed.D.) model at Lynn University by undertaking a nontraditional group Dissertation in Practice (DiP). The participants were a cohort of 11 scholarly practitioners known as Cohort 5 who became the first Lynn University doctoral students to…

  11. Thinking about Non-Traditional Careers. An Exploratory Workshop for Teenagers. Final Report from July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarasota County Vocational-Technical Center, Sarasota, FL.

    A two-week workshop was organized at which 10th- and 11th-grade girls actively explored for one full day six different nontraditional careers. The careers were auto mechanics, law enforcement, emergency medical technician/paramedic, livestock production, fire science, and hotel management. Shorter sessions were conducted in broadcasting and…

  12. Reflective Learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    The experimental group students used learning log on a weekly basis while the control group did not. ... The term “memory” in psychology usually denotes an interest in the retention ... activities that contribute to information being remembered.

  13. Effects of a case-based interactive e-learning course on knowledge and attitudes about patient safety: a quasi-experimental study with third-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaupp, Rainer; Körner, Mirjam; Fabry, Götz

    2016-07-11

    Patient safety (PS) is influenced by a set of factors on various levels of the healthcare system. Therefore, a systems-level approach and systems thinking is required to understand and improve PS. The use of e-learning may help to develop a systems thinking approach in medical students, as case studies featuring audiovisual media can be used to visualize systemic relationships in organizations. The goal of this quasi-experimental study was to determine if an e-learning can be utilized to improve systems thinking, knowledge, and attitudes towards PS. A quasi-experimental, longitudinal within- subjects design was employed. Participants were 321 third-year medical students who received online surveys before and after they participated in an e-learning course on PS. Primary outcome measures where levels of systems thinking and attitudes towards PS. Secondary outcome measures were the improvement of PS specific knowledge through the e-learning course. Levels of systems thinking showed significant improvement (58.72 vs. 61.27; p e-learning. Student's attitudes towards patient safety improved in several dimensions: After the course, students rated the influence of fatigue on safety higher (6.23 vs. 6.42, p e-learning (p e-learning can be used to teach PS. Attitudes towards PS improved on several dimensions. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate that a specifically designed e-learning program can foster the development of conceptual frameworks such as systems thinking, which facilitates the understanding of complex socio-technical systems within healthcare organisations.

  14. Clinical characteristics of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M; Almaguer, Miguel; Alfonso, Pedro; Bayarre, Héctor D; Leiva, Irma M; Smith, Magaly J; Cubias, Ricardo A; Torres, Carlos G; Almendárez, Walter O; Cubias, Francisco R; Morales, Fabrizio E; Magaña, Salvador; Amaya, Juan C; Perdomo, Edgard; Ventura, Mercedes C; Villatoro, Juan F; Vela, Xavier F; Zelaya, Susana M; Granados, Delmy V; Vela, Eduardo; Orellana, Patricia; Hevia, Reynaldo; Fuentes, E Jackeline; Mañalich, Reinaldo; Bacallao, Raymed; Ugarte, Mario; Arias, María I; Chávez, Jackelin; Flores, Nelson E; Aparicio, Claudia E

    2014-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a serious health problem in El Salvador. Since the 1990s, there has been an increase in cases unassociated with traditional risk factors. It is the second leading cause of death in men aged >18 years. In 2009, it was the first cause of in-hospital death for men and the fifth for women. The disease has not been thoroughly studied. Characterize clinical manifestations (including extrarenal) and pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities. A descriptive clinical study was carried out in 46 participants (36 men, 10 women), identified through chronic kidney disease population screening of 5018 persons. Inclusion criteria were age 18-59 years; chronic kidney disease at stages 2, 3a and 3b, or at 3a and 3b with diabetes or hypertension and without proteinuria; normal fundoscopic exam; no structural abnormalities on renal ultrasound; and HIV-negative. Examinations included social determinants; psychological assessment; clinical exam of organs and systems; hematological and biochemical parameters in blood and urine; urine sediment analysis; markers of renal damage; glomerular and tubular function; and liver, pancreas and lung functions. Renal, prostate and gynecological ultrasound; and Doppler echocardiography and peripheral vascular and renal Doppler ultrasound were performed. Patient distribution by chronic kidney disease stages: 2 (32.6%), 3a (23.9%), 3b (43.5%). Poverty was the leading social determinant observed. Risk factor prevalence: agrochemical exposure (95.7%), agricultural work (78.3%), male sex (78.3%), profuse sweating during work (76.3%), malaria (43.5%), NSAID use (41.3%), hypertension (36.9%), diabetes (4.3%). General symptoms: arthralgia (54.3%), asthenia (52.2%), cramps (45.7%), fainting (30.4). Renal symptoms: nycturia (65.2%), dysuria (39.1%), foamy urine (63%). Markers of renal damage: macroalbuminuria (80.4%), ß2 microglobulin (78.2%), NGAL (26.1%). Renal function

  15. Non-Traditional Security Threats in the Border Areas: Terrorism, Piracy, Environmental Degradation in Southeast Asian Maritime Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabova, E. L.

    2013-11-01

    In addition to facilitating peaceful trade and economic development, sovereign territory, territorial waters and international waters are being used by various criminal groups that pose threats to governments, businesses and civilian population in Southeast Asia. Nonstate criminal maritime activities were not receiving appropriate attention as they were overshadowed by traditional military security challenges. Yet more and more frequently, the non-traditional actors challenge lines of communication, jeopardize access to strategic resources, complicate traditional defence tasks, and harm the environment. Understanding the nature of non-traditional threats, and the ways to combat them, requires international legal, historical and political science analysis within a united problem-oriented approach. A fair critique to pure interest, power and knowledge -based theories of regime formation was developed by E.K. Leonard's1, who explained the evolution of the international system from the global governance perspective. The present study is based on the premise that pure nation-state approaches are incapable of providing a theoretical ground for addressing the growing influence of international criminal networks in South East Asia. From an international relations theory perspective, the author of this study agrees with D.Snidal2 that the hegemonic stability theory has "limits" and is insufficient in describing modern challenges to sustainable international security regime, including non-traditional threats, where collective action is more efficient from an interest and capability standpoint. At the same time the author of this study does not share the viewpoint on "marginalization"3 of international law in current international order due to its fragmentation and regionalization4 and "global power shifts"5 . The United Nations, as a global institution at the top of the vertical hierarchy of international legal order, and the EU as an example of "self-contained" regime along

  16. Transductive and matched-pair machine learning for difficult target detection problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, James

    2014-06-01

    This paper will describe the application of two non-traditional kinds of machine learning (transductive machine learning and the more recently proposed matched-pair machine learning) to the target detection problem. The approach combines explicit domain knowledge to model the target signal with a more agnostic machine-learning approach to characterize the background. The concept is illustrated with simulated data from an elliptically-contoured background distribution, on which a subpixel target of known spectral signature but unknown spatial extent has been implanted.

  17. Reflective Learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    The main intent of this study was to identify the impact of using learning log as a learning strategy on the academic performance of university students. Second year psychology students were included as subjects of this study. In the beginning of the study, the students were divided into two: experimental group (N = 60) and ...

  18. Crawling up the value chain: domestic institutions and non-traditional foreign direct investment in Brazil, 1990-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICK J. W. EGAN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brazil attracted relatively little innovation-intensive and export-oriented foreign investment during the liberalization period of 1990 to 2010, especially compared with competitors such as China and India. Adopting an institutionalist perspective, I argue that multinational firm investment profiles can be partly explained by the characteristics of investment promotion policies and bureaucracies charged with their implementation. Brazil's FDI policies were passive and non-discriminating in the second half of the 1990s, but became more selective under Lula. Investment promotion efforts have often been undercut by weakly coordinated and inconsistent institutions. The paper highlights the need for active, discriminating investment promotion policies if benefits from non-traditional FDI are to be realized.

  19. Experimenting with wires, batteries, bulbs and the induction coil: Narratives of teaching and learning physics in the electrical investigations of Laura, David, Jamie, myself and the nineteenth century experimenters. Our developments and instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth Mary

    Physics is conventionally taught as a fixed curriculum which students must master. This thesis changes that: curriculum emerges from what learners try and question in experiments they invent. The thesis narrates: three adult students exploring wires, batteries and bulbs with me as teacher; nineteenth century investigations of electromagnetism; my laboratory work replicating historic instruments. In each case, learning arose through activity with materials. Evidences of this are analyzed within narratives and reflections. I used teaching-research, a method developed by Duckworth from Piaget's clinical interviewing, to research and simultaneously extend students' evolving understandings. What I learned through questioning students informed my next interactions; what they learned extended their experimenting. Similarly, I researched historical accounts interactively: improvising experiments to develop my understandings. Studying my own learning deepened my interpretations of students' learning. My students Laura, David and Jamie experimented by: soldering bulbs to wires, making series and parallel circuits, inserting resistive wire that dimmed bulbs, conducting electricity through salt water They noticed bulb brightness and battery heat, compared electricity's paths, questioned how voltage and current relate. They inferred electricity's effects manifest magnitudes of material properties. They found their experiences while learning were inseparable from what they learned. I researched investigations connected with Cavendish's leather fish, Galvani's frogs, Schweigger's wire spiraled around a compass needle, Henry's electromagnets, Faraday's induction ring, induction devices of Page, Callan, Hearder. Experimentally, I made galvanometers, electromagnets, induction rings, induction coil. I observed effects of electromagnetism, internal resistance, induced sparking. Across these investigations, learning developed with instrumental innovations; confusions were productive

  20. Customer Characteristics and Shopping Patterns Associated with Healthy and Unhealthy Purchases at Small and Non-traditional Food Stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kathleen M; Caspi, Caitlin E; Harnack, Lisa; Laska, Melissa N

    2018-02-01

    Small and non-traditional food stores (e.g., corner stores) are often the most accessible source of food for residents of lower income urban neighborhoods in the U.S. Although healthy options are often limited at these stores, little is known about customers who purchase healthy, versus less healthy, foods/beverages in these venues. We conducted 661 customer intercept interviews at 105 stores (corner stores, gas marts, pharmacies, dollar stores) in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, assessing all food and beverage items purchased. We defined three categories of "healthy" and four categories of "unhealthy" purchases. Interviews assessed customer characteristics [e.g., demographics, body-mass index (BMI)]. We examined associations between healthy versus unhealthy purchases categories and customer characteristics. Overall, 11% of customers purchased ≥1 serving of healthy foods/beverages in one or more of the three categories: 8% purchased fruits/vegetables, 2% whole grains, and 1% non-/low-fat dairy. Seventy-one percent of customers purchased ≥1 serving of unhealthy foods/beverages in one or more of four categories: 46% purchased sugar-sweetened beverages, 17% savory snacks, 15% candy, and 13% sweet baked goods. Male (vs. female) customers, those with a lower education levels, and those who reported shopping at the store for convenience (vs. other reasons) were less likely to purchase fruits/vegetables. Unhealthy purchases were more common among customers with a BMI ≥30 kg/m 2 (vs. lower BMI). Results suggest intervention opportunities to increase healthy purchases at small and non-traditional food stores, particularly interventions aimed at male residents, those with lower education levels and residents living close to the store.

  1. Saliendo Adelante: Stressors and Coping Strategies Among Immigrant Latino Men Who Have Sex With Men in a Nontraditional Settlement State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Paul A; Barrington, Clare; Rhodes, Scott D; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-11-01

    Immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) are marginalized along multiple dimensions (e.g., ethnicity, sexual orientation, language use), which can negatively affect their health and well-being. As little is known about how this subgroup experiences the stress of marginalization and how, in turn, they cope with such stress, this study investigated stressors and coping strategies to better understand the factors shaping Latino MSM health. Assisted by a community advisory committee, we conducted in-depth interviews with 15 foreign-born Latino MSM in a nontraditional settlement state. Drawing on grounded theory methods, we analyzed transcripts iteratively to identify processes and characterize themes. Results were confirmed in member check interviews (n = 4) and findings were further contextualized through key informant interviews (n = 3). Participants reported ubiquitous, concurrent stressors due to being an immigrant, being a sexual minority, and being working poor. In particular, homophobia within families and local Latino communities was seen as pervasive. Some participants faced additional stressors due to being undocumented and not being Mexican. Participants drew on four types of coping strategies, with no dominant coping response: passive coping (i.e., not reacting to stressors); attempting to change stressors; seeking social support; and seeking distractions. Family ties, especially with mothers, provided key emotional support but could also generate stress related to participants' sexuality. This study lays a foundation for future work and is particularly relevant for Latino MSM in nontraditional settlement states. Findings may inform future interventions to reduce stressors and increase resiliency, which can positively affect multiple health outcomes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Millennial Students' Preferred Methods for Learning Concepts in Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Janet K

    2015-09-01

    The current longitudinal, descriptive, and correlational study explored which traditional teaching strategies can engage Millennial students and adequately prepare them for the ultimate test of nursing competence: the National Council Licensure Examination. The study comprised a convenience sample of 40 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a psychiatric nursing course. The students were exposed to a variety of traditional (e.g., PowerPoint(®)-guided lectures) and nontraditional (e.g., concept maps, group activities) teaching and learning strategies, and rated their effectiveness. The students' scores on the final examination demonstrated that student learning outcomes met or exceeded national benchmarks. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. A Case Study on the Implementation of a Positive Youth Development Program (Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong: Learning from the Experimental Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Yan Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation of the implementation of a positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S. was part of a large study undertaken comprehensively to explore how effective the Tier 1 Program was in practice and how the results can shed light on future developments. Utilizing a case study approach, individual and focus group interviews were conducted in 2007 to examine the factors that influence the process and quality of implementation of the Tier 1 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. The focus of this study was on how the implementers of a school made use of the experience gained in the Experimental Implementation Phase (EIP in 2005/06 to improve the program implementation quality in the Full Implementation Phase (FIP in 2006/07. Results showed that the program implementation in the FIP was generally high and the program was well received by the implementers. Factors that facilitated the implementation of the program were identified, including the adoption of an incremental change strategy, the incorporation of the program into both formal and informal curricula, positive perceptions of the program among staff and agency social workers, sufficient school administrative support, excellent cooperation between the school and the social work agency, presence of a dedicated school contact person and instructors who engaged themselves in continuous quality improvement of the implementation, and an emphasis on application of what had been learned. Difficulties encountered by the school in the process of implementation were also observed. Based on the present findings, key process variables that facilitate or impede the implementation of positive youth development programs are discussed. Implications for future program implementation are also discussed.

  4. Podcasting in Middle School Spanish Classes: A Non-Traditional Approach to Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Deborah C.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether podcasting, in conjunction with mobile MP3 technology used outside the classroom, affects student achievement. Additionally, data were collected and analyzed with regard to gender, selected family demographics, and learning styles. A pretest and posttest was administered to students. The results of the…

  5. The Effect of Enrollment Status on Plagiarism among Traditional and Non-Traditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has consistently shown that plagiarism in higher education exists. Most of the previous research had measured the number of incidents of plagiarism at different institutions of higher learning. Recently, research has tried to identify incidents of plagiarism in relation to student demographics or academic discipline. With the…

  6. Policy environments matters: Access to higher education of non-traditional students in Denmark. Paper presented at the 56th CIES conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 22-27 April

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    Despite the massification of higher education that has brought about an increase in the enrollment rates of non-traditional students, and the internationalization of higher education, which has led towards cross-national homogenization when it comes to the typology of educational programs run...... by universities, access of non-traditional students is still a much debated issue. The scope of this paper is to critically examine the policy environment, and related practice, which supports (or hampers) access to higher education of non-traditional students, with a special attention to adult and mature...... from a common ideal that results from cross-national cooperation implemented through the Bologna process. The data source includes relevant scientific literature, policy documents as well as interviews with policy makers, representatives of higher education institutions and non-traditional students...

  7. Towards the Construction of a Personal Professional Pathway: An Experimental Project for the Recognition of Non-Formal and Informal Learning in the University of Catania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    In Italy, accreditation of prior learning is a sensitive issue. Despite the lack of laws or qualification frameworks regulating the recognition of non-formal and informal learning, most Italian universities proceed with caution, allowing only a restricted number of credits in the university curriculum related to practical activities or to external…

  8. The Social Essentials of Learning: An Experimental Investigation of Collaborative Problem Solving and Knowledge Construction in Mathematics Classrooms in Australia and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Man Ching Esther; Clarke, David; Cao, Yiming

    2018-01-01

    Interactive problem solving and learning are priorities in contemporary education, but these complex processes have proved difficult to research. This project addresses the question "How do we optimise social interaction for the promotion of learning in a mathematics classroom?" Employing the logic of multi-theoretic research design,…

  9. The effectiveness of using non-traditional teaching methods to prepare student health care professionals for the delivery of mental state examination: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huiting; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jia; Joon, Kum Eng; Parasuram, Rajni; Gunasekaran, Jamuna; Poh, Chee Lien

    2015-08-14

    validity prior to inclusion in the review using the standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute's Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument embedded within the System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information. Any disagreements that arose between the reviewers were resolved through discussion between the reviewers. Data was extracted using data extraction tools developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute Quantitative data was extracted from papers using standardized data extraction tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute's Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument. The included studies were found to be heterogeneous in terms of participants and teaching methods. Moreover, a wide variety of instruments were used to determine impact and outcomes of the teaching methods. Hence, findings of the included articles were presented in a narrative summary. A total of 12 articles were included in this review with consensus from all reviewers. The evidence retrieved in this study suggests that non-traditional teaching methods, such as videotapes, virtual simulation, standardized patients and reflection, improve learners' understanding and skills of mental state examination as opposed to traditional teaching methods like lectures and provision of reading materials. However, studies that specifically compared the effectiveness of one method over another were limited to comparison between lectures with videotaped interviews and virtual simulations. It was shown that both videotaped interviews and virtual simulations were superior to lectures. In videotaped teaching, interactions between patients and learners performing mental state examination were shown for the learner’s discussion while virtual simulations mimicked patient symptoms in computer applications. Virtual simulation was notably a unique learning opportunity for the learners as it allowed learning to take place without the use of

  10. Association between proximity to and coverage of traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets and fast-food consumption among rural adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sharkey, Joseph R; Johnson, Cassandra M; Dean, Wesley R; Horel, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between residential exposure to fast-food entrées, using two measures of potential spatial access: proximity (distance to the nearest location) and coverage (number of different locations), and weekly consumption of fast-food meals. Methods Traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets, such as convenience stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores, from the 2006 Brazos Valley Food Environmen...

  11. The social essentials of learning: an experimental investigation of collaborative problem solving and knowledge construction in mathematics classrooms in Australia and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Man Ching Esther; Clarke, David; Cao, Yiming

    2018-03-01

    Interactive problem solving and learning are priorities in contemporary education, but these complex processes have proved difficult to research. This project addresses the question "How do we optimise social interaction for the promotion of learning in a mathematics classroom?" Employing the logic of multi-theoretic research design, this project uses the newly built Science of Learning Research Classroom (ARC-SR120300015) at The University of Melbourne and equivalent facilities in China to investigate classroom learning and social interactions, focusing on collaborative small group problem solving as a way to make the social aspects of learning visible. In Australia and China, intact classes of local year 7 students with their usual teacher will be brought into the research classroom facilities with built-in video cameras and audio recording equipment to participate in purposefully designed activities in mathematics. The students will undertake a sequence of tasks in the social units of individual, pair, small group (typically four students) and whole class. The conditions for student collaborative problem solving and learning will be manipulated so that student and teacher contributions to that learning process can be distinguished. Parallel and comparative analyses will identify culture-specific interactive patterns and provide the basis for hypotheses about the learning characteristics underlying collaborative problem solving performance documented in the research classrooms in each country. The ultimate goals of the project are to generate, develop and test more sophisticated hypotheses for the optimisation of social interaction in the mathematics classroom in the interest of improving learning and, particularly, student collaborative problem solving.

  12. Epidemiological characteristics of chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes in women of agricultural communities of El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orantes Navarro, Carlos M; Herrera Valdés, Raúl; López, Miguel Almaguer; Calero, Denis J; Fuentes de Morales, Jackeline; Alvarado Ascencio, Nelly P; Vela Parada, Xavier F; Zelaya Quezada, Susana M; Granados Castro, Delmy V; Orellana de Figueroa, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    In El Salvador end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was the first cause of hospital mortality overall, the first cause of hospital deaths in men, and the fifth cause of hospital mortality in women in 2013. In agricultural communities, chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs predominantly in male agricultural workers, but it also affects women to a lesser degree, even those who are not involved in agricultural work. Internationally, most epidemiological CKD studies emphasize men and no epidemiological studies focused exclusively on women. To describe the epidemiological characteristics of CKD in females in agricultural communities of El Salvador. A cross-sectional epidemiological study was carried out in 2009 - 2011 based on active screening for CKD and risk factors in women aged ≥ 18 years in 3 disadvantaged populations of El Salvador: Bajo Lempa (Usulután Department), Guayapa Abajo (Ahuachapán Department), and Las Brisas (San Miguel Department). Epidemiological and clinical data were gathered through personal history, as well as urinalysis for renal damage markers, determinations of serum creatinine and glucose, and estimation of glomerular filtration rates. CKD cases were confirmed at 3 months. Prevalence of CKD was 13.9% in 1,412 women from 1,306 families studied. Chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes (CKDu), not attributed to diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or proteinuric primary glomerulopathy (proteinuria > 1 g/L) was 6.6%. Prevalence of chronic renal failure was 6.8%. Prevalence of renal damage markers was 9.8% (microalbuminuria (30 - 300 mg/L) 5.7%; macroalbuminuria (> 300 mg/L) 2%; and hematuria, 2.1%. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease risk factors was: diabetes mellitus, 9.3%; hypertension, 23%; family history of CKD, 16%; family history of diabetes mellitus (DM), 18.7%; family history of hypertension (HT), 31.9%; obesity, 21%; central obesity, 30.7%; NSAID use, 84.3%; agricultural occupation, 15.2%; and contact with agrochemicals, 33.1%. CKD in

  13. Conserving agrobiodiversity amid global change, migration, and nontraditional livelihood networks: the dynamic uses of cultural landscape knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl S. Zimmerer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I examined agrobiodiversity in smallholder cultural landscapes with the goal of offering new insights into management and policy options for the resilience-based in situ conservation and social-ecological sustainability of local, food-producing crop types, i.e., landraces. I built a general, integrative approach to focus on both land use and livelihood functions of crop landraces in the context of nontraditional, migration-related livelihoods amid global change. The research involved a multimethod, case-study design focused on a cultural landscape of maize, i.e., corn, growing in the Andes of central Bolivia, which is a global hot spot for this crop's agrobiodiversity. Central questions included the following: (1 What are major agroecological functions and food-related services of the agrobiodiversity of Andean maize landraces, and how are they related to cultural landscapes and associated knowledge systems? (2 What are new migration-related livelihood groups, and how are their dynamic livelihoods propelled through global change, in particular international and national migration, linked to the use and cultural landscapes of agrobiodiversity? (3 What are management and policy options derived from the previous questions? Combined social-ecological services as both cultivation and food resources are found to function in relation to the cultural landscape. Results demonstrated major variations of maturation-based, phenologic traits and food-use properties that are cornerstones of the landrace-level agrobiodiversity of Andean maize. Knowledge of these parameters is widespread. Linkage of these production and consumption functions yields a major insight into dynamics of Andean maize agrobiodiversity. Concurrently, this smallholder cultural landscape has become increasingly dependent on new rural conditions, especially increased livelihood diversification and migration amid growing peri-urban influences. Viability of landrace-level maize

  14. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes in patients on hemodialysis in southwest Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S. Laux

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To document the prevalence of patients on hemodialysis in southwestern Guatemala who have chronic kidney disease (CKD of non-traditional causes (CKDnt. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study interviewed patients on hemodialysis at the Instituto Guatemalteco de Seguridad Social on their health and occupational history. Laboratory serum, urine and vital sign data at the initiation of hemodialysis were obtained from chart reviews. Patients were classified according to whether they had hypertension or obesity or neither. The proportion of patients with and without these traditional CKD risk factors was recorded and the association between demographic and occupational factors and a lack of traditional CKD risk factors analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Results Of 242 total patients (including 171 non-diabetics enrolled in hemodialysis in southwestern Guatemala, 45 (18.6% of total patients and 26.3% of non-diabetics lacked traditional CKD risk factors. While agricultural work history was common, only travel time greater than 30 minutes and age less than 50 years old were significantly associated with CKD in the absence of traditional risk factors. Individuals without such risk factors lived throughout southwestern Guatemala’s five departments. Conclusions The prevalence of CKDnT appears to be much lower in this sample of patients receiving hemodialysis in Southwestern Guatemala than in hospitalized patients in El Salvador. It has yet to be determined whether the prevalence is higher in the general population and in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  15. Chronic kidney disease of nontraditional etiology in Central America: a provisional epidemiologic case definition for surveillance and epidemiologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Matthew; Turcios-Ruiz, Reina Maria; Noonan, Gary; Ordunez, Pedro

    2016-11-01

    SYNOPSIS Over the last two decades, experts have reported a rising number of deaths caused by chronic kidney disease (CKD) along the Pacific coast of Central America, from southern Mexico to Costa Rica. However, this specific disease is not associated with traditional causes of CKD, such as aging, diabetes, or hypertension. Rather, this disease is a chronic interstitial nephritis termed chronic kidney disease of nontraditional etiology (CKDnT). According to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) mortality database, there are elevated rates of deaths related to kidney disease in many of these countries, with the highest rates being reported in El Salvador and Nicaragua. This condition has been identified in certain agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. Since CKD surveillance systems in Central America are under development or nonexistent, experts and governmental bodies have recommended creating standardized case definitions for surveillance purposes to monitor and characterize this epidemiological situation. A group of experts from Central American ministries of health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and PAHO held a workshop in Guatemala to discuss CKDnT epidemiologic case definitions. In this paper, we propose that CKD in general be identified by the standard definition internationally accepted and that a suspect case of CKDnT be defined as a person age CKDnT is defined as a suspect case with the same findings confirmed three or more months later.

  16. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes in patients on hemodialysis in southwest Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Timothy S; Barnoya, Joaquin; Cipriano, Ever; Herrera, Erick; Lopez, Noemi; Polo, Vicente Sanchez; Rothstein, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Objective To document the prevalence of patients on hemodialysis in southwestern Guatemala who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) of non-traditional causes (CKDnt). Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study interviewed patients on hemodialysis at the Instituto Guatemalteco de Seguridad Social on their health and occupational history. Laboratory serum, urine and vital sign data at the initiation of hemodialysis were obtained from chart reviews. Patients were classified according to whether they had hypertension or obesity or neither. The proportion of patients with and without these traditional CKD risk factors was recorded and the association between demographic and occupational factors and a lack of traditional CKD risk factors analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Results Of 242 total patients (including 171 non-diabetics) enrolled in hemodialysis in southwestern Guatemala, 45 (18.6% of total patients and 26.3% of non-diabetics) lacked traditional CKD risk factors. While agricultural work history was common, only travel time greater than 30 minutes and age less than 50 years old were significantly associated with CKD in the absence of traditional risk factors. Individuals without such risk factors lived throughout southwestern Guatemala's five departments. Conclusions The prevalence of CKDnT appears to be much lower in this sample of patients receiving hemodialysis in Southwestern Guatemala than in hospitalized patients in El Salvador. It has yet to be determined whether the prevalence is higher in the general population and in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  17. The perfect storm of information: combining traditional and non-traditional data sources for public health situational awareness during hurricane response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kelly J; Olsen, Jennifer M; Harris, Sara; Mekaru, Sumiko; Livinski, Alicia A; Brownstein, John S

    2013-12-16

    Hurricane Isaac made landfall in southeastern Louisiana in late August 2012, resulting in extensive storm surge and inland flooding. As the lead federal agency responsible for medical and public health response and recovery coordination, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) must have situational awareness to prepare for and address state and local requests for assistance following hurricanes. Both traditional and non-traditional data have been used to improve situational awareness in fields like disease surveillance and seismology. This study investigated whether non-traditional data (i.e., tweets and news reports) fill a void in traditional data reporting during hurricane response, as well as whether non-traditional data improve the timeliness for reporting identified HHS Essential Elements of Information (EEI). HHS EEIs provided the information collection guidance, and when the information indicated there was a potential public health threat, an event was identified and categorized within the larger scope of overall Hurricane Issac situational awareness. Tweets, news reports, press releases, and federal situation reports during Hurricane Isaac response were analyzed for information about EEIs. Data that pertained to the same EEI were linked together and given a unique event identification number to enable more detailed analysis of source content. Reports of sixteen unique events were examined for types of data sources reporting on the event and timeliness of the reports. Of these sixteen unique events identified, six were reported by only a single data source, four were reported by two data sources, four were reported by three data sources, and two were reported by four or more data sources. For five of the events where news tweets were one of multiple sources of information about an event, the tweet occurred prior to the news report, press release, local government\\emergency management tweet, and federal situation report. In all circumstances where

  18. PbS Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications Obtained by Non-Traditional Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-García Claudia Elena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize cost-efficiency relation for thin film solar cells, we explore the recently developed versions of chemical deposition of semiconductor films, together with classic CBD (Chemical Bath Deposition: SILAR (Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction and PCBD (Photo Chemical Bath Deposition, all of them ammonia-free and ecologically friendly. The films of CdS and PbS were made, and experimental solar cells with CdS window layer and PbS absorber elaborated. We found that band gap of PbS films can be monitored by deposition process due to porosity-induced quantum confinement which depends on the parameters of the process. We expect that the techniques employed can be successfully used for production of optoelectronic devices.

  19. A non-traditional fluid problem: transition between theoretical models from Stokes’ to turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Horacio D.; Olivieri, Néstor A.; Véliz, Maximiliano E.; Raviola, Lisandro A.

    2018-05-01

    In the context of fluid mechanics courses, it is customary to consider the problem of a sphere falling under the action of gravity inside a viscous fluid. Under suitable assumptions, this phenomenon can be modelled using Stokes’ law and is routinely reproduced in teaching laboratories to determine terminal velocities and fluid viscosities. In many cases, however, the measured physical quantities show important deviations with respect to the predictions deduced from the simple Stokes’ model, and the causes of these apparent ‘anomalies’ (for example, whether the flow is laminar or turbulent) are seldom discussed in the classroom. On the other hand, there are various variable-mass problems that students tackle during elementary mechanics courses and which are discussed in many textbooks. In this work, we combine both kinds of problems and analyse—both theoretically and experimentally—the evolution of a system composed of a sphere pulled by a chain of variable length inside a tube filled with water. We investigate the effects of different forces acting on the system such as weight, buoyancy, viscous friction and drag force. By means of a sequence of mathematical models of increasing complexity, we obtain a progressive fit that accounts for the experimental data. The contrast between the various models exposes the strengths and weaknessess of each one. The proposed experience can be useful for integrating concepts of elementary mechanics and fluids, and is suitable as laboratory practice, stressing the importance of the experimental validation of theoretical models and showing the model-building processes in a didactic framework.

  20. Grounding Vision through Experimental Manipulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fitzpatrick, Paul; Metta, Giorgio

    2002-01-01

    Experimentation is crucial to human progress at all scales, from society as a whole to a young infant in its cradle/ It allows us to elicit learning episodes suited to our own needs and limitations...

  1. A Three-Dimensional Approach and Open Source Structure for the Design and Experimentation of Teaching-Learning Sequences: The Case of Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Borghi, Lidia; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a teaching-learning sequence (TLS) on friction based on a preliminary study involving three dimensions: an analysis of didactic research on the topic, an overview of usual approaches, and a critical analysis of the subject, considered also in its historical development. We found that mostly the usual presentations do not take…

  2. Understanding of the Alphabetic Principle through Invented Spelling among Hearing-Impaired Children Learning to Read and Write: Experimentation with a Pedagogical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Pauline; Boisclair, Andree; Giasson, Jocelyne

    2008-01-01

    Given the problems experienced by hearing-impaired individuals in learning the written language, a pedagogical approach was tested. The study examined the links between the development of representations of alphabetic system and the results in reading and writing of first graders. In the study, there were 31 hearing-impaired children and 25…

  3. Effects on Training of Experimental Film Variables Study II. Verbalization, "How-It-Works," Nomenclature, Audience Participation, and Succinct Treatment. Rapid Mass Learning. Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspen, N.

    A study was conducted to ascertain which characteristics of instructional films affect learning. Fourteen versions of a film designed to teach the assembly of part of an anti-aircraft gun were prepared and shown to different groups of trainees. The study examined the following factors: 1) number of words of narration used to describe the action,…

  4. Investigating the Role of Context in Experimental Research Involving the Use of Digital Media for the Learning of Mathematics: Boundary Objects as Vehicles for Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynigos, Chronis; Psycharis, Giorgos

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a study of the contexts of six teams, expert in research and development of digital media for learning mathematics, who cross-experimented in classrooms with the use of each other's artefacts. Contextual issues regarding the designed tasks and technologies, the socio-systemic milieu and the ways in which the researchers worked…

  5. Non-spatial pre-training in the water maze as a clinically relevant model for evaluating learning and memory in experimental TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy K; Brayer, Samuel W; Hurwitz, Max; Niyonkuru, Christian; Zou, Huichao; Failla, Michelle; Arenth, Patricia; Manole, Mioara D; Skidmore, Elizabeth; Thiels, Edda

    2013-11-01

    Explicit and implicit learning and memory networks exist where each network can facilitate or inhibit cognition. Clinical evidence suggests that implicit networks are relatively preserved after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Non-spatial pre-training (NSPT) in the Morris Water Maze (MWM) provides the necessary behavioral components to complete the task, while limiting the formation of spatial maps. Our study utilized NSPT in the MWM to assess implicit and explicit learning and memory system deficits in the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of TBI. 76 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided: CCI vs. sham surgery, NSPT vs. No-NSPT, and cued vs. non-cued groups. NSPT occurred for 4d prior to surgery (dynamic hidden platform location, extra-maze cues covered, static pool entry point). Acquisition (d14-18), Probe/Visible Platform (d19), and Reversal (d20-21) trials were conducted with or without extra-maze cues. Novel time allocation and search strategy selection metrics were utilized. Results indicated implicit and explicit learning/memory networks are distinguishable in the MWM. In the cued condition, NSPT reduced thigmotaxis, improved place learning, and largely eliminated the apparent injury-induced deficits typically observed between untrained CCI and sham rats. However, among NSPT groups, incorporation of cues into search strategy selection for CCI rats was relatively impaired compared to shams. Non-cued condition performance showed sham/NSPT and CCI/NSPT rats perform similarly, suggesting implicit memory networks are largely intact 2weeks after CCI. Place learning differences between CCI/NSPT and sham/NSPT rats more accurately reflect spatial deficits in our CCI model compared to untrained controls. These data suggest NSPT as a clinically relevant construct for evaluating potential neurorestorative and neuroprotective therapies. These findings also support development of non-spatial cognitive training paradigms for evaluating rehabilitation relevant

  6. Clinical characteristics of chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes in women of agricultural communities in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Valdés, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M; Almaguer López, Miguel; López Marín, Laura; Arévalo, Pedro Alfonso; Smith González, Magaly J; Morales, Fabrizio E; Bacallao, Raymed; Bayarre, Héctor D; Vela Parada, Xavier F

    2015-01-01

    A chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes (CKDu) has emerged in Central America and elsewhere, predominantly affecting male farmworkers. In El Salvador (2009), it was the second cause of death in men > 18 years old. Causality has not been determined. Most available research focused on men and there is scarce data on women. Describe the clinical and histopathologic characteristics of CKDu in women of agricultural communities in El Salvador. A descriptive study was carried out in 10 women with CKDu stages 2, 3a, and 3b. Researchers studied demographics, clinical examination; hematological and biochemical analyses, urine sediment, renal injury markers, and assessed renal, cardiac, and peripheral arteries, liver, pancreas, and lung anatomy and functions. Kidney biopsy was performed in all. Data was collected on the Lime Survey platform and exported to SPSS 19.0. Patient distribution by stages: 2 (70%), 3a (10%), 3b (20%). Occupation: agricultural 7; non-agricultural 3. agrochemical exposure 100%; farmworkers 70%; incidental malaria 50%, NSAIDs use 40%; hypertension 40%. nocturia 50%; dysuria 50%; arthralgia 70%; asthenia 50%; cramps 30%, profuse sweating 20%. Renal markers: albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) > 300 mg/g 90%; β microglobulin and neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin (NGAL) presence in 40%. Kidney function: hypermagnesuria 100%; hyperphosphaturia 50%, hypercalciuria 40%; hypernatriuria 30%; hyponatremia 60%, hypocalcemia 50%. Doppler: tibial artery damage 40%. Neurological: reflex abnormalities 30%; Babinski and myoclonus 20%. Neurosensorial hypoacusis 70%. Histopathology: damage restricted mostly to the tubulo-interstitium, urine was essentially bland. CKDu in women is a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy with varied extrarenal symptoms.

  7. Dialysis enrollment patterns in Guatemala: evidence of the chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes epidemic in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Timothy S; Barnoya, Joaquin; Guerrero, Douglas R; Rothstein, Marcos

    2015-04-14

    In western Nicaragua and El Salvador, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent and generally affects young, male, agricultural (usually sugar cane) workers without the established CKD risk factors. It is yet unknown if the prevalence of this CKD of Non-Traditional causes (CKDnT) extends to the northernmost Central American country, Guatemala. Therefore, we sought to compare dialysis enrollment rates by region, municipality, sex, daily temperature, and agricultural production in Guatemala and assess if there is a similar CKDnT distribution pattern as in Nicaragua and El Salvador. The National Center for Chronic Kidney Disease Treatment (Unidad Nacional de Atención al Enfermo Renal Crónico) is the largest provider of dialysis in Guatemala. We used population, Human Development Index, literacy, and agricultural databases to assess the geographic, economic, and educational correlations with the National Center for Chronic Kidney Disease Treatment's hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis enrollment database. Enrollment rates (per 100 000) inhabitants were compared by region and mapped for comparison to regional agricultural and daytime temperature data. The distribution of men and women enrolled in dialysis were compared by region using Fisher's exact tests. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated. Dialysis enrollment is higher in the Southwest compared to the rest of the country where enrollees are more likely (p Guatemala. In Guatemala, CKDnT incidence may have a similar geographic distribution as Nicaragua and El Salvador (higher in the high temperature and sugar cane growing regions). Therefore, it is likely that the CKNnT epidemic extends throughout the Mesoamerican region.

  8. Chronic kidney disease of nontraditional etiology in Central America: a provisional epidemiologic case definition for surveillance and epidemiologic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lozier

    Full Text Available SYNOPSIS Over the last two decades, experts have reported a rising number of deaths caused by chronic kidney disease (CKD along the Pacific coast of Central America, from southern Mexico to Costa Rica. However, this specific disease is not associated with traditional causes of CKD, such as aging, diabetes, or hypertension. Rather, this disease is a chronic interstitial nephritis termed chronic kidney disease of nontraditional etiology (CKDnT. According to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO mortality database, there are elevated rates of deaths related to kidney disease in many of these countries, with the highest rates being reported in El Salvador and Nicaragua. This condition has been identified in certain agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. Since CKD surveillance systems in Central America are under development or nonexistent, experts and governmental bodies have recommended creating standardized case definitions for surveillance purposes to monitor and characterize this epidemiological situation. A group of experts from Central American ministries of health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, and PAHO held a workshop in Guatemala to discuss CKDnT epidemiologic case definitions. In this paper, we propose that CKD in general be identified by the standard definition internationally accepted and that a suspect case of CKDnT be defined as a person age < 60 years with CKD, without type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypertensive diseases, and other well-known causes of CKD. A probable case of CKDnT is defined as a suspect case with the same findings confirmed three or more months later.

  9. Preparing our Workforce: Discussing Traditional and Non-Traditional Geoscience Careers - Natural hazard risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Many young people interested in science think that their only professional opportunities lie within academia or in some government sponsored project. The private sector is often dismissed as not providing the opportunities to a natural scientist or at least an opportunity where they can make a difference. The threat of natural disasters and in the rise of economic losses caused by these disasters as well as the potential problems brought about by climate change have opened up a number of opportunities for the natural scientist. The insurance industry and reinsurance industry is one industry looking for natural scientists and structural engineers. The insurance industry's largest singular threat comes from the risks caused by geological or atmospheric hazards. Over the last decade more and more scientists have used their seismological, hydrological, or weather related knowledge to develop new tools and technology to identify and estimate the economic and social impact due to these natural events. The insurance and reinsurance industry were one of the first industries to call attention to the risk posed by climate change. Our goal is to reduce losses and the cost to insure these losses. Our work starts with the hazard. Hazard identification is one of the best methods for reducing loss nevertheless not all areas of the world have the ability to identify these hazards. Swiss Re transforms science into application. As an example most of the world does not have flood maps to help consumers and policymakers decide which locations are highly exposed and which are not. Swiss Re used a decade of learning to develop a global set of flood maps that identifies the 100 year and 500 year flood zones. To an emerging market these maps will add them in their zoning and building considerations. Academia is a noble profession and the work completed within the university walls is the basis for what we do. Nevertheless the private sector has the ability to use this knowledge and apply

  10. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Model and Kolb Learning Styles on Learning Result of the Basics of Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiharto

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this research were to determine the effect of cooperative learning model and learning styles on learning result. This quasi-experimental study employed a 2x2 treatment by level, involved independent variables, i.e. cooperative learning model and learning styles, and learning result as the dependent variable. Findings signify that: (1)…

  11. EFFECT OF NON-TRADITIONAL VEGETABLE RAW MATERIALS ON THE PROPERTIES AND BIOTECHNOLOGICAL STRUCTURE PASTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Kolomnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. An important task is the use of catering in the preparation of food products of new types of raw materials, which can solve the problem of nutrition. One way to improve the quality and range of flour culinary products is the use of technology in their enriching additives plant. Among them are a subgroup of additives derived from cereals, pulses, oilseeds, vegetables, fruit and other plant materials. As a result of researches the technology buns bakery products with the addition of oil and meal of wheat germ, pumpkin seed oil cake. Wheat germ oil cake is a source of complete protein and biologically active substances, is rich in essential amino acids, unsaturated ω-3, ω-6 fatty acids, vitamin E, D, B1, B2, B6, PP, pantothenic and folic acid, carotenoids. The composition of pumpkin seed oil cake include essential oils, phytosterols, resinous substances, organic acids, vitamins C and B, carotenoids, carbohydrate melen. In the composition of wheat germ oil contains: all essential, not synthesized by the human amino acid (tryptophan, methionine, leucine, valine, isoleucine, polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3, ω-6 and ω-9 acid, a large amount of vitamins, micro - and macronutrients. In the development of the experimental basis for the formulation chosen butter bakery products, in which part of the wheat flour (20 % was replaced by wheat germ oil cake (10 % and pumpkin seed oil cake (10 %. Margarine in the classical formulation was replaced by wheat germ oil, sugar - on natural honey. Insertion additives significantly improve the properties of biotech pastry. The proposed method of production of buns bakery products can reduce the duration of the production process, to intensify the process of gas formation in the test to increase gas-retaining capacity and lift test.

  12. Learning from Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Although error avoidance during learning appears to be the rule in American classrooms, laboratory studies suggest that it may be a counterproductive strategy, at least for neurologically typical students. Experimental investigations indicate that errorful learning followed by corrective feedback is beneficial to learning. Interestingly, the…

  13. Contribution of non-traditional lipid profiles to reduced glomerular filtration rate in H-type hypertension population of rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyu; Li, Zhao; Guo, Xiaofan; Chen, Yintao; Chen, Shuang; Tian, Yichen; Sun, Yingxian

    2018-05-01

    Despite current interest in the unfavourable impact of non-traditional lipid profiles on cardiovascular disease, information regarding its relations to reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in H-type hypertension population has not been systemically elucidated. Analyses were based upon a cross-sectional study of 3259 participants with H-type hypertension who underwent assessment of biochemical, anthropometric and blood pressure values. Reduced GFR was considered if meeting estimated GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 . A stepwise multivariate regression analysis indicated that non-traditional lipid parameters remained as independent determinants of estimated GFR (all p < .001). In multivariable models, we observed a 50%, 51%, 31%, and 24% higher risk for decreased GFR with each SD increment in TC/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratios and non-HDL-C levels, respectively. The highest quartile of TC/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios carried reduced GFR odds (confidence intervals) of 5.50 (2.50 to 12.09), 6.63 (2.58 to 17.05) and 2.22 (1.15 to 4.29), respectively. The relative independent contribution of non-traditional lipid profiles, as indexed by TC/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratios and non-HDL-C, towards reduced GFR putting research evidence at the very heart of lipoprotein-mediated renal injury set a vital example for applying a clinical and public health recommendation for reducing the burden of chronic kidney disease. KEY MESSAGES Non-traditional lipid profiles has been linked with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease, but none of the studies that address the effect of non-traditional lipid profiles on reduced GFR risk in H-type hypertension population has been specifically established. A greater emphasis of this study resided in the intrinsic value of TC/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratios and non-HDL-C that integrate atherogenic and anti-atherogenic lipid molecules to predict the risk of reduced GFR among H-type hypertension population and provide

  14. A quasi-experimental cross-disciplinary evaluation of the impacts of education outside the classroom on pupils' physical activity, well-being and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Glen; Mygind, Erik; Bølling, Mads

    2016-01-01

    in their parallel non-EOTC classes. Furthermore, the interdependencies between PA, social relations, well-being, motivation, and learning are explored using path analysis. To help describe and understand the processes that have led to the quantitative outcomes, qualitative case observations of children's practices...... and interactions in EOTC as well as classroom teaching were carried out and combined with qualitative interviews about children's perceptions of these practices. DISCUSSION: The TEACHOUT study represents a holistic multidisciplinary approach to educational and school health-promotion research through its study......BACKGROUND: Education Outside the Classroom (EOTC) is a teaching method that aims to promote schoolchildren's learning, physical activity (PA), social relations, motivation, and well-being. EOTC activities are characterized by teachers using the local environment in their teaching, and involve...

  15. Teaching and learning cinema and visual languages through economics-business studies and law in high school: An experimental interdisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Poli; Fulvio Benussi

    2016-01-01

    In Italy, little is being done to promote cinema studies and the ability to analyse films and/or multimedia works among high school students. Although Italian legislation provides guidelines on specific learning objectives, activities and content to be included in high school courses, film and media language is still not encouraged in schools. The pilot introduction of cinema at the C. Tenca High School in Milan had the aim of demonstrating the value of film as an educational and epistemologi...

  16. Carbon Nanotubes’ Effect on Mitochondrial Oxygen Flux Dynamics: Polarography Experimental Study and Machine Learning Models using Star Graph Trace Invariants of Raman Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael González-Durruthy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the impact of carbon nanotubes (CNTs on mitochondrial oxygen mass flux (Jm under three experimental conditions. New experimental results and a new methodology are reported for the first time and they are based on CNT Raman spectra star graph transform (spectral moments and perturbation theory. The experimental measures of Jm showed that no tested CNT family can inhibit the oxygen consumption profiles of mitochondria. The best model for the prediction of Jm for other CNTs was provided by random forest using eight features, obtaining test R-squared (R2 of 0.863 and test root-mean-square error (RMSE of 0.0461. The results demonstrate the capability of encoding CNT information into spectral moments of the Raman star graphs (SG transform with a potential applicability as predictive tools in nanotechnology and material risk assessments.

  17. Nontraditional inheritance: Genetics and the nature of science, now titled, The puzzle of inheritance: Genetics and the methods of science. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, J.D.

    1998-08-31

    This project led to the development of an instructional module designed for use in high school biology classes. The module contains two major components. The first is an overview for teachers, which introduces the module, describes the Human Genome Project, and addresses issues in the philosophy of science and some of the ethical, legal, and social implications of research in genetics. It provides a survey of fundamental genetics concepts and of new, nontraditional concepts of inheritance. The second component provides six instructional activities appropriate for high school or introductory college students.

  18. Is It Live or Is It Internet? Experimental Estimates of the Effects of Online Instruction on Student Learning. NBER Working Paper No. 16089

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figlio, David N.; Rush, Mark; Yin, Lu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first experimental evidence on the effects of live versus internet media of instruction. Students in a large introductory microeconomics course at a major research university were randomly assigned to live lectures versus watching these same lectures in an internet setting, where all other factors (e.g., instruction,…

  19. Access to Experimental Cancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experimental drug has been tested in the lab and with animals and approved for testing in people by the FDA, but can’t yet be advertised, sold, or prescribed. Experimental drugs may be available through clinical trials or expanded access programs - learn more about these programs and how to talk to your doctor.

  20. Online transfer learning with extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haibo; Yang, Yun-an

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new transfer learning algorithm for online training. The proposed algorithm, which is called Online Transfer Extreme Learning Machine (OTELM), is based on Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OSELM) while it introduces Semi-Supervised Extreme Learning Machine (SSELM) to transfer knowledge from the source to the target domain. With the manifold regularization, SSELM picks out instances from the source domain that are less relevant to those in the target domain to initialize the online training, so as to improve the classification performance. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed OTELM can effectively use instances in the source domain to enhance the learning performance.

  1. Simple and efficient machine learning frameworks for identifying protein-protein interaction relevant articles and experimental methods used to study the interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shashank; Liu, Feifan; Yu, Hong

    2011-10-03

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) is an important biomedical phenomenon. Automatically detecting PPI-relevant articles and identifying methods that are used to study PPI are important text mining tasks. In this study, we have explored domain independent features to develop two open source machine learning frameworks. One performs binary classification to determine whether the given article is PPI relevant or not, named "Simple Classifier", and the other one maps the PPI relevant articles with corresponding interaction method nodes in a standardized PSI-MI (Proteomics Standards Initiative-Molecular Interactions) ontology, named "OntoNorm". We evaluated our system in the context of BioCreative challenge competition using the standardized data set. Our systems are amongst the top systems reported by the organizers, attaining 60.8% F1-score for identifying relevant documents, and 52.3% F1-score for mapping articles to interaction method ontology. Our results show that domain-independent machine learning frameworks can perform competitively well at the tasks of detecting PPI relevant articles and identifying the methods that were used to study the interaction in such articles. Simple Classifier is available at http://sourceforge.net/p/simpleclassify/home/ and OntoNorm at http://sourceforge.net/p/ontonorm/home/.

  2. Growth and production of onion cultivars in organic system in a nontraditional planting periodCrescimento e produção de sete cultivares de cebola em sistema orgânico em plantio fora de época

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Michelotti Bettoni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted in the organic area of Canguiri experimental farm, in the metropolitan area of Curitiba-PR, aiming to evaluate the growth of open pollinated onion cultivars, in organic system, seeded in January – a nontraditional period. The experimental design was completely randomized, with three replications and seven cultivars: Franciscana IPA-10 (purple, Vale Ouro IPA-11 e Brisa IPA-12 (from Empresa Pernambucana de Pesquisa Agropecuária – IPA, Alfa Tropical (from Embrapa Hortaliças, Alfa São Francisco (VIII cycle e Alfa São Francisco-RT (thrips resistant – genotype under test; from Embrapa Semi-árido e BR-29 (Topseed- Agristar. Biometric linear and nonlinear evaluations and productive characteristics were undertaken. We verified that the organic production of onion established in a nontradicional period in metropolitan area of Curitiba is possible, mainly for the following cultivars of Embrapa: Alfa São Francisco, Alfa Tropical and Alfa São Francisco-RT that showed the best performance and productivity. O presente trabalho foi conduzido na área experimental de olericultura orgânica da estação do Canguiri-UFPR, região metropolitana de Curitiba, com o objetivo de avaliar o crescimento de cultivares de cebola de polinização aberta, em sistema orgânico, com semeadura em janeiro, fora da época tradicional. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com três repetições e sete cultivares: Franciscana IPA-10 (roxa, Vale Ouro IPA-11 e Brisa IPA-12, (Empresa Pernambucana de Pesquisa Agropecuária-IPA, Alfa Tropical (Embrapa Hortaliças, Alfa São Francisco (ciclo VIII e Alfa São Francisco-RT (resistente ao tripes- genótipo em teste da Embrapa Semi-árido e BR-29 (Topseed- Agristar. Foram realizadas avaliações biométricas lineares e não lineares e características produtivas. Verificou-se que a produção orgânica de cebola estabelecida fora do período tradicional da região metropolitana

  3. Perceptions of medical students and their mentors in a specialised programme designed to provide insight into non-traditional career paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Anna; Stenfors-Hayes, Terese

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This pilot study explores the perceptions of medical students and their individual mentors who advised them in a specialised programme where students gained insight into non-tradition career paths. Methods Twelve medical students in years 3-6 at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden were recruited to the Prominentia mentor programme where they were individually paired with mentors who met with them to discuss and advise them on non-traditional career paths. Application letters of students to join the programme as well as electronically distributed questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were used to assess the perceptions of mentors and students to the programme. Both the questionnaire and the interview transcripts were thematised using content analysis. Results In terms of expectations and requests, the application letters showed that all students specified their career goals and the type of mentor they desired. Whereas mentors in general had fewer requests and some had no specific demands. In light of perceived effects, all mentors felt they discussed future careers with their students and the majority of students responded the same way, with some interesting deviations. Most discussed topics during meetings were: future career, medical education, combinations of private life and work, and work environment. Conclusions This pilot study revealed that students appreciated receiving inspiration and seeing career path opportunities outside academic medicine as well as receiving support in personal and professional development and guidance about the students’ role as a doctor. However, discrepancies were found regarding how mentors and students respectively perceived the mentor programme.

  4. ARSIS AND THESIS: A REVIEW OF TWO ELEMENTS OF RHYTHM IN NON-TRADITIONAL MUSIC WRITTEN BY F. H. SMITH VAN WAESBERGHE D.J

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunarto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the comparative terms of arsis and thesis in the study of Western music. The purpose of the study is to study the forms of music from the terms of language and its application, because there are many elements of music that are not understandable. Method of this study uses classical literature and musicology approach in which the great phrase rhythm of Gregorian music was more appropriately take a literary term; arsis and thesis. The focus of this study is to discuss the terms of Arsis and Thesis used in the section of rhythm elements of non-traditional music. This study reveals several musical terms in which there are similarities and differences between the rhythm and bars of music. The similarities and differences in the analysis are based on the history of Western music from Gregorian music. Gregorian was monophonic music that still existed in Europe until the 19th century. There were only two phrases in Gregorian music; when the melody moved up and when it moved down. In this case, there were two main elements in Gregorian music; they were different in rhythmic and they were in one rhythm of music. Arsis is a hard melody while thesis is a soft melody. It could be said that arsis and thesis are also parts of the dynamics form of music work. Keywords: arsis; Thesis; music rhythm; non-traditional music.

  5. Temporal stability of growth and yield among Hevea genotypes introduced to a non-traditional rubber growing region of peninsular India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Vinod

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive cultivation of Hevea brasiliensis in India now focus on non-traditional regions for rubber cultivation. As a prelude for selection of genotypes for commercial cultivation, many introduced genotypes are being tested in genotype adaptation experiments in these regions. Present study, reports for the first time, growth and yield adaptation of 28 genotypes in a non-traditional rubber growing region of peninsular India viz., the coastal Karnataka region. Agroclimate of this region was found favoring growth and establishment of all the genotypes evaluated. However, not all the genotypes grew and yielded well. Only four genotypes, RRII 203, KRS 25, PB 260 and PB 235 showed good growth and yield. On grouping, the genotypes fell into categories of moderate high yielders, moderate low yielders and low yielders. The most popular variety of the traditional region, RRII 105 did not perform well in this region. Biological stability in growth and yield of RRII 203 and PB 260 was identified as stable and these genotypes were the best adapted. KRS 25 and PB 235 had unstable yielding pattern. The best identified genotypes can be considered for extensive culture as single clone plantations or as major constituent of clone blends as well as parents in future breeding programmes. Other moderate stable yielders may be used for clone blending in smaller proportions and may be subjected to yield improvement.

  6. Synthesis, Structure, and Magnetism of Tris(amide) {Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3}1- Complexes of the Non-Traditional +2 Lanthanide Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Austin Jack; Darago, Lucy E; Balasubramini, Sree Ganesh; Chen, Guo P; Ziller, Joseph W; Furche, Filipp; Long, Jeffrey R; Evans, William J

    2018-02-28

    A new series of Ln2+ complexes has been synthesized that overturns two previous generalizations in rare-earth metal reduction chemistry: that amide ligands do not form isolable complexes of the highly-reducing non-traditional Ln2+ ions and that yttrium is a good model for the late lanthanides in these reductive reactions. Reduction of Ln(NR2)3 (R = SiMe3) complexes in THF under Ar with M = K or Rb in the presence of 2.2.2-cryptand (crypt) forms crystallographically-characterizable [M(crypt)][Ln(NR2)3] complexes not only for the traditional Tm2+ ion and the configurational crossover ions, Nd2+ and Dy2+, but also for the non-traditional Gd2+, Tb2+, Ho2+, and Er2+ ions. Crystallographic data as well as UV-visible, magnetic susceptibility, and density functional theory studies are consistent with the accessibility of 4fn5d1 configurations for Ln2+ ions in this tris(silylamide) ligand environment. The Dy2+ complex, [K(crypt)][Dy(NR2)3], has a higher magnetic moment than previously observed for any monometallic complex: 11.67 µB. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. 'Just a pinch of salt'. An experimental comparison of the effect of repeated exposure and flavor-flavor learning with salt or spice on vegetable acceptance in toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlal, Sofia; Issanchou, Sylvie; Chabanet, Claire; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    Children's vegetable intake is below the recommended amounts. No studies to date have tested the relevance of using salt or spices to increase children's vegetable acceptance. Our objective was to compare the effect of repeated exposure (RE) and of flavor-flavor learning (FFL) on toddlers' acceptance of a non-familiar vegetable. Two unconditioned stimuli were used: salt and a salt-associated spice. Toddlers attending six nurseries were assigned to 3 groups in a between subject design. Groups were exposed 8 times to a basic salsify puree (0.2% salt w/w; RE group; n = 47), a salty salsify puree (0.5% salt w/w; FFL-Salt group; n = 54) or a spiced salsify puree (0.2% salt and 0.02% nutmeg w/w; FFL-Nutmeg group; n = 50). Acceptance (intake and liking) of the target vegetable (basic salsify puree) and of a control vegetable (carrot puree) was evaluated at pre-exposure, at each exposure of the learning period, at post-exposure, and at 1, 3 and 6 months after exposure. In all groups, intake of the target vegetable increased from pre- to post-exposure. This increase was significantly higher in the RE group (64 ± 11 g) than in the FFL-Salt group (23 ± 11 g) and marginally higher than in the FFL-Nutmeg group (36 ± 11 g). No difference between groups was observed on the increase in liking of the target vegetable from pre- to post-exposure. The increase of the target vegetable intake was still observed after 6 months for all groups. Thus, repeated exposure appears to be the simplest choice to increase vegetable intake on the short and long term in toddlers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cooperative Learning as a Democratic Learning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, Deniz Gökçe; Kocabas, Ayfer

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the effects of applying the cooperative learning method on the students' attitude toward democracy in an elementary 3rd-grade life studies course was examined. Over the course of 8 weeks, the cooperative learning method was applied with an experimental group, and traditional methods of teaching life studies in 2009, which was still…

  9. A quasi-experimental cross-disciplinary evaluation of the impacts of education outside the classroom on pupils’ physical activity, well-being and learning: the TEACHOUT study protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Glen; Mygind, Erik; Bølling, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Background: Education Outside the Classroom (EOTC) is a teaching method that aims to promote schoolchildren’s learning, physical activity (PA), social relations, motivation, and well-being. EOTC activities are characterized by teachers using the local environment in their teaching, and involve...... innovative teaching methods, child-led approaches to problem-solving, experimentation, cooperation, PA, and play. EOTC has become common practice for many teachers in Scandinavia; however, only case studies have evaluated its impacts. The TEACHOUT study aims to evaluate the impacts of EOTC on Danish...... in both EOTC and nonEOTC classes were monitored day-to-day throughout the school year, using an online teacher survey platform. The effects of EOTC are mainly analysed by comparing EOTC pupils to non-EOTC (i.e. control) pupils based on their scores on the outcome variables (i.e. school performance, well...

  10. Teaching and learning cinema and visual languages through economics-business studies and law in high school: An experimental interdisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Poli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, little is being done to promote cinema studies and the ability to analyse films and/or multimedia works among high school students. Although Italian legislation provides guidelines on specific learning objectives, activities and content to be included in high school courses, film and media language is still not encouraged in schools. The pilot introduction of cinema at the C. Tenca High School in Milan had the aim of demonstrating the value of film as an educational and epistemological resource and fostering the development of innovative interdisciplinary teaching strategies. Themes related to cinematographic language, Economics-Business Studies and law were introduced and analysed via the exploration of early films (late 1800s and early 1900s. The students investigated the topics of advertising, building a brand name, online marketing and the role of the media in shaping public opinion. In order to enhance students’ skills in analysing interactive communications, we introduced the themes of data journalism and fact-checking. The results are discussed in terms of a possible role for Cinema in the study of Economics-Business Studies and Law and of how cinema might become an interdisciplinary resource for other school subjects.

  11. EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING LEARNING MODEL BASED MULTIMEDIA AND MOTIVATION OF PHYSICS STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    OpenAIRE

    Hayati .; Retno Dwi Suyanti

    2013-01-01

    The objective in this research: (1) Determine a better learning model to improve learning outcomes physics students among learning model Inquiry Training based multimedia and Inquiry Training learning model. (2) Determine the level of motivation to learn in affects physics student learning outcomes. (3) Knowing the interactions between the model of learning and motivation in influencing student learning outcomes. This research is a quasi experimental. The population in this research was all s...

  12. 网上商店经营管理实践教学的研究与分析%A Research on Online Shop Operation Management Experimental Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 梁春晶

    2012-01-01

    Along with e-commerce's entering in people's life,online operation has become a key link and measure of business marketing.Through experiments of operating online shops,students could participate in enterprise management as practitioners,thus enhance their understanding to the theoretical knowledge of e-commerce.With teachers' guidance,students could learn to select online shop projects;apply innovation theory into the practice of online shop operation,taking full use of online marketing and their professional superiority;make flexible use of a variety of online marketing strategies;get to knowthe special pioneering work model given by this peculiar development period of network time,so as to accumulate valuable experience for their future job.This also helps lay a solid,theoretical and practical foundation for the exploration of e-commerce teachingmodel.%随着电子商务走进人们的生活,网络经营已成为企业营销管理中的一个重要环节和手段。学生通过网上商店经营管理的实践,可以以一个从业者的角度参与企业的运营,从而增强对电子商务专业的理论知识的理解。通过指导学生网店经营项目的选择,充分利用网络营销并结合专业的优势,把创新理论应用于网店经营的实践,让学生能够根据经营实际灵活地运用各种网络营销策略,认识到网络时代发展的特殊时期所赋予的特殊创业模式,为学生就业、创业提供宝贵经验,并为电子商务教学探讨新的模式打下坚实的理论和实践基础。

  13. New small molecule inhibitors of histone methyl transferase DOT1L with a nitrile as a non-traditional replacement for heavy halogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Sophie S; Bayle, Elliott D; Yu, Wenyu; Li, Fengling; Tempel, Wolfram; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu; Fish, Paul V

    2016-09-15

    A number of new nucleoside derivatives are disclosed as inhibitors of DOT1L activity. SARs established that DOT1L inhibition could be achieved through incorporation of polar groups and small heterocycles at the 5-position (5, 6, 12) or by the application of alternative nitrogenous bases (18). Based on these results, CN-SAH (19) was identified as a potent and selective inhibitor of DOT1L activity where the polar 5-nitrile group was shown by crystallography to bind in the hydrophobic pocket of DOT1L. In addition, we show that a polar nitrile group can be used as a non-traditional replacement for heavy halogen atoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Learning How to Learn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.; Lauridsen, Ole

    Ole Lauridsen, Aarhus School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University, Denmark Karen M. Lauridsen, Aarhus School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University, Denmark Learning Styles in Higher Education – Learning How to Learn Applying learning styles (LS) in higher education...... by Constructivist learning theory and current basic knowledge of how the brain learns. The LS concept will thus be placed in a broader learning theoretical context as a strong learning and teaching tool. Participants will be offered the opportunity to have their own LS preferences established before...... teaching leads to positive results and enhanced student learning. However, learning styles should not only be considered a didactic matter for the teacher, but also a tool for the individual students to improve their learning capabilities – not least in contexts where information is not necessarily...

  15. Association between proximity to and coverage of traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets and fast-food consumption among rural adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horel Scott A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between residential exposure to fast-food entrées, using two measures of potential spatial access: proximity (distance to the nearest location and coverage (number of different locations, and weekly consumption of fast-food meals. Methods Traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets, such as convenience stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores, from the 2006 Brazos Valley Food Environment Project were linked with individual participants (n = 1409 who completed the nutrition module in the 2006 Brazos Valley Community Health Assessment. Results Increased age, poverty, increased distance to the nearest fast food, and increased number of different traditional fast-food restaurants, non-traditional fast-food outlets, or fast-food opportunities were associated with less frequent weekly consumption of fast-food meals. The interaction of gender and proximity (distance or coverage (number indicated that the association of proximity to or coverage of fast-food locations on fast-food consumption was greater among women and opposite of independent effects. Conclusions Results provide impetus for identifying and understanding the complex relationship between access to all fast-food opportunities, rather than to traditional fast-food restaurants alone, and fast-food consumption. The results indicate the importance of further examining the complex interaction of gender and distance in rural areas and particularly in fast-food consumption. Furthermore, this study emphasizes the need for health promotion and policy efforts to consider all sources of fast-food as part of promoting healthful food choices.

  16. Opportunities for development of non-traditional hydrocarbon resources in the Timan-North Ural region, taking into account ecosystem services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Burtseva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors formulate the definition of non-traditional resources from geological-genetic, technological and economic viewpoints. The authors present a detailed assessment of the resource potential of non-traditional hydrocarbon raw material in the Timan-Severouralsk region, including hydrocarbons in the deposits of the domanic type, methane of coal seams, liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons potentially extracted from black, brown coal and combustible shales. The authors also show the main directions of industrial use of coal and oil shales. The assessment of the resource potential of hydrocarbon raw materials in the deposits of the domanic type varies widely; the recoverable resources may amount to about 1 billion tons. Bituminous coals with a high volatile yield have the highest degree of conversion to liquid hydrocarbons, and brown and black coals of with a low degree of metamorphism usually serve for the production of combustible gas and primary resin. The paper describes the option of developing oil shale deposits as a possible investment project. The determined components and overall values of the economic effect from the implementation of the projects under consideration allow us to estimate that the payback period of investments does not exceed seven years. There is also a social effect: the creation of an additional 550 jobs in the operation of the quarry and about 700 jobs – in the enrichment and processing of oil shales. The estimated annual volume of output is 25–30 billion rubles, and the volume of tax revenues – up to 100 billion rubles. The authors evaluated ecosystem services in the territories of potential industrial development of coal and oil shale deposits; identified the beneficiaries of the benefits from the use of environmental services and the possibility of calculating payments.

  17. Postgraduates' perceptions of preparedness for work as a doctor and making future career decisions: support for rural, non-traditional medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, D S

    2010-08-01

    The intern year is a critical time for making career decisions and gaining confidence in clinical skills, communication and teamwork practices; this justifies an interest in junior doctors' perceptions of their level of preparedness for hospital work. This study explored Australian junior doctors' perspectives regarding the transition from student to doctor roles, their preparation as medical undergraduates within either traditional metropolitan schools or smaller, outer metropolitan-based (rural) programs such as Rural Clinical Schools (RCS), and the educational environment they experienced in their internship. A qualitative cross-sectional design used semi-structured interviews with postgraduate year one and two junior doctors (9 females and 11 males) within teaching hospitals in Queensland Australia. Interview questions focussed on four major content areas: preparedness for hospital work, undergraduate training, building confidence and career advice. Data were analyzed using a framework method to identify and explore major themes. Junior doctors who spent undergraduate years training at smaller, non-traditional medical schools felt more confident and better prepared at internship. More hands-on experience as students, more patient contact and a better grounding in basic sciences were felt by interns to be ideal for building confidence. Junior doctors perceived a general lack of career guidance in both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching environments to help them with the transition from the student to junior doctor roles. Findings are congruent with studies that have confirmed student opinion on the higher quality of undergraduate medical training outside a traditional metropolitan-based program, such as a RCS. The serious shortage of doctors in rural and remote Australia makes these findings particularly relevant. It will be important to gain a better understanding of how smaller non-traditional medical programs build confidence and feelings of work

  18. Association between proximity to and coverage of traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets and fast-food consumption among rural adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between residential exposure to fast-food entrées, using two measures of potential spatial access: proximity (distance to the nearest location) and coverage (number of different locations), and weekly consumption of fast-food meals. Methods Traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets, such as convenience stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores, from the 2006 Brazos Valley Food Environment Project were linked with individual participants (n = 1409) who completed the nutrition module in the 2006 Brazos Valley Community Health Assessment. Results Increased age, poverty, increased distance to the nearest fast food, and increased number of different traditional fast-food restaurants, non-traditional fast-food outlets, or fast-food opportunities were associated with less frequent weekly consumption of fast-food meals. The interaction of gender and proximity (distance) or coverage (number) indicated that the association of proximity to or coverage of fast-food locations on fast-food consumption was greater among women and opposite of independent effects. Conclusions Results provide impetus for identifying and understanding the complex relationship between access to all fast-food opportunities, rather than to traditional fast-food restaurants alone, and fast-food consumption. The results indicate the importance of further examining the complex interaction of gender and distance in rural areas and particularly in fast-food consumption. Furthermore, this study emphasizes the need for health promotion and policy efforts to consider all sources of fast-food as part of promoting healthful food choices. PMID:21599955

  19. A quasi-experimental cross-disciplinary evaluation of the impacts of education outside the classroom on pupils' physical activity, well-being and learning: the TEACHOUT study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Glen; Mygind, Erik; Bølling, Mads; Otte, Camilla Roed; Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Schipperijn, Jasper; Ejbye-Ernst, Niels; Bentsen, Peter

    2016-10-24

    Education Outside the Classroom (EOTC) is a teaching method that aims to promote schoolchildren's learning, physical activity (PA), social relations, motivation, and well-being. EOTC activities are characterized by teachers using the local environment in their teaching, and involve innovative teaching methods, child-led approaches to problem-solving, experimentation, cooperation, PA, and play. EOTC has become common practice for many teachers in Scandinavia; however, only case studies have evaluated its impacts. The TEACHOUT study aims to evaluate the impacts of EOTC on Danish schoolchildren's PA, social relations, motivation, well-being, and learning. TEACHOUT is a quasi-experimental, cross-disciplinary study. Sixteen schools participated, containing 19 EOTC school classes and 19 parallel non-EOTC classes, with a total of 834 children aged 9 to 13 years. Measures of the children's social relations, motivation for school, well-being, and academic performance were collected at the beginning and end of the school year. Data on PA levels were collected over ten-day periods during the school year using accelerometers. The amount and characteristics of the actual EOTC provided in both EOTC and non-EOTC classes were monitored day-to-day throughout the school year, using an online teacher survey platform. The effects of EOTC are mainly analysed by comparing EOTC pupils to non-EOTC (i.e. control) pupils based on their scores on the outcome variables (i.e. school performance, well-being, motivation, and social relations) at the end of the school year, adjusting for the baseline values (from the beginning of the year). The impacts of EOTC on PA are evaluated by comparing the total as well as context-specific amounts of PA of children participating in EOTC to those of children in their parallel non-EOTC classes. Furthermore, the interdependencies between PA, social relations, well-being, motivation, and learning are explored using path analysis. To help describe and

  20. A quasi-experimental cross-disciplinary evaluation of the impacts of education outside the classroom on pupils’ physical activity, well-being and learning: the TEACHOUT study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Nielsen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Education Outside the Classroom (EOTC is a teaching method that aims to promote schoolchildren’s learning, physical activity (PA, social relations, motivation, and well-being. EOTC activities are characterized by teachers using the local environment in their teaching, and involve innovative teaching methods, child-led approaches to problem-solving, experimentation, cooperation, PA, and play. EOTC has become common practice for many teachers in Scandinavia; however, only case studies have evaluated its impacts. The TEACHOUT study aims to evaluate the impacts of EOTC on Danish schoolchildren’s PA, social relations, motivation, well-being, and learning. Methods TEACHOUT is a quasi-experimental, cross-disciplinary study. Sixteen schools participated, containing 19 EOTC school classes and 19 parallel non-EOTC classes, with a total of 834 children aged 9 to 13 years. Measures of the children’s social relations, motivation for school, well-being, and academic performance were collected at the beginning and end of the school year. Data on PA levels were collected over ten-day periods during the school year using accelerometers. The amount and characteristics of the actual EOTC provided in both EOTC and non-EOTC classes were monitored day-to-day throughout the school year, using an online teacher survey platform. The effects of EOTC are mainly analysed by comparing EOTC pupils to non-EOTC (i.e. control pupils based on their scores on the outcome variables (i.e. school performance, well-being, motivation, and social relations at the end of the school year, adjusting for the baseline values (from the beginning of the year. The impacts of EOTC on PA are evaluated by comparing the total as well as context-specific amounts of PA of children participating in EOTC to those of children in their parallel non-EOTC classes. Furthermore, the interdependencies between PA, social relations, well-being, motivation, and learning are explored

  1. Learning to Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Helen; Weiss, Martin

    1988-01-01

    The article reviews theories of learning (e.g., stimulus-response, trial and error, operant conditioning, cognitive), considers the role of motivation, and summarizes nine research-supported rules of effective learning. Suggestions are applied to teaching learning strategies to learning-disabled students. (DB)

  2. HIPPOCAMPAL ADULT NEUROGENESIS: ITS REGULATION AND POTENTIAL ROLE IN SPATIAL LEARNING AND MEMORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Pan, Yongliang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, defined here as progenitor cell division generating functionally integrated neurons in the adult brain, occurs within the hippocampus of numerous mammalian species including humans. The present review details various endogenous (e.g., neurotransmitters) and environmental (e.g., physical exercise) factors that have been shown to influence hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In addition, the potential involvement of adult-generated neurons in naturally-occurring spatial learning behavior is discussed by summarizing the literature focusing on traditional animal models (e.g., rats and mice), non-traditional animal models (e.g., tree shrews), as well as natural populations (e.g., chickadees and Siberian chipmunk). PMID:27174001

  3. The Comparison of Learning Radiographic Extraoral Anatomic Landmarks through Lecture and blended method(Computer-Assisted teaching and Lecture:An interventional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T ahmine Razi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the main problems in learning extraoral radiographic anatomic indexes is the long interval between presentation of radiology and human anatomy courses, resulting in forgetting anatomic regions. Therefore, radiographic indexes are formed as complete abstract and transient images in students’ minds; as a result, their learning and retention decrease. The aim of this study was to compare lecture with combination of computer-assisted learning and lecture of extra-oral radiographic landmarks among dental students. Methods: This interventional study was carried out in 2009 on 51 dental students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Students were randomly allocated into two groups. The first group was taught through a teaching method which involved lectures in the classroom. In the second group, a CD was given to the students. The teaching was accomplished through presentation using skull. Six months after finishing the teaching, both groups took a similar test for evaluation of long term learning. The data was analyzed by SPSS 16 using U Mann-Whitney test. Results: There was no significant differences in the mean scores between the two groups in the first exam after teaching (P=0.13, yet it was significant in the second exam (regarding retention (P=0.006, and average of non-traditional teaching method group (20.89±10.23 was higher than that of lecture group (13.48±6.39. Conclusion: Based on the results, non-traditional technique of teaching was not more effective than the lecture in short-term learning but in longterm learning, non-traditional technique was more effective than the lecture.

  4. Modern Higher Education Students within a Non-Traditional Higher Education Space: Not Fitting In, Often Falling Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Taggart, Breda

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies are focusing on the "fit" between the higher education student and the educational institution. These studies show that a lack of fit between the two generates anxiety, ultimately acting as a barrier to student learning. Research involving 23 higher education students attending a dual-sector further and higher…

  5. Convenience experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohs, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Systems biology aims at explaining life processes by means of detailed models of molecular networks, mainly on the whole-cell scale. The whole cell perspective distinguishes the new field of systems biology from earlier approaches within molecular cell biology. The shift was made possible by the high throughput methods that were developed for gathering 'omic' (genomic, proteomic, etc.) data. These new techniques are made commercially available as semi-automatic analytic equipment, ready-made analytic kits and probe arrays. There is a whole industry of supplies for what may be called convenience experimentation. My paper inquires some epistemic consequences of strong reliance on convenience experimentation in systems biology. In times when experimentation was automated to a lesser degree, modeling and in part even experimentation could be understood fairly well as either being driven by hypotheses, and thus proceed by the testing of hypothesis, or as being performed in an exploratory mode, intended to sharpen concepts or initially vague phenomena. In systems biology, the situation is dramatically different. Data collection became so easy (though not cheap) that experimentation is, to a high degree, driven by convenience equipment, and model building is driven by the vast amount of data that is produced by convenience experimentation. This results in a shift in the mode of science. The paper shows that convenience driven science is not primarily hypothesis-testing, nor is it in an exploratory mode. It rather proceeds in a gathering mode. This shift demands another shift in the mode of evaluation, which now becomes an exploratory endeavor, in response to the superabundance of gathered data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effect of Situated Learning on Students Vocational English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özüdogru, Melike; Özüdogru, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    The current study aimed to find out the effect of situated learning on students' Vocational English learning. This research employed a mixed method research design. In the quantitative part of the study, pre-tests and post-tests were implemented to investigate the differences in students' vocational English learning between the experimental and…

  7. Experimental philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  8. Experimental guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The paper proposes a model experimental design to study the effects of pesticides on particular ecosystem. It takes maize as a model crop and an alternative crop while studying the adverse effects on untargeted arthropods, residues in the soil and other plants. 5 refs, 7 figs

  9. Experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowser, K.E.; Stansbury, P.S.; Poston, J.W.; Deus, S.F.; Chen, W.L.; Roswell, R.L.; Goans, R.E.; Cantrell, J.H. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral fluence measurements in an adult phantom are reported. A NaI(Tl) probe was used in various locations within the phantom and pulse-height spectra were obtained for seven beam configurations and three generating potentials. Some typical spectra results are presented. A comparison of calculated dose to experimental measurements is presented

  10. SMALL GROUP LEARNING METHODS AND THEIR EFFECT ON LEARNERS’ RELATIONSHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Borůvková

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Building relationships in the classroom is an essential part of any teacher's career. Having healthy teacher-to-learner and learner-to-learner relationships is an effective way to help prevent pedagogical failure, social conflict and quarrelsome behavior. Many strategies are available that can be used to achieve good long-lasting relationships in the classroom setting. Successful teachers’ pedagogical work in the classroom requires detailed knowledge of learners’ relationships. Good understanding of the relationships is necessary, especially in the case of teenagers’ class. This sensitive period of adolescence demands attention of all teachers who should deal with the problems of their learners. Special care should be focused on children that are out of their classmates’ interest (so called isolated learners or isolates in such class and on possibilities to integrate them into the class. Natural idea how to do it is that of using some modern non-traditional teaching/learning methods, especially the methods based on work in small groups involving learners’ cooperation. Small group education (especially problem-based learning, project-based learning, cooperative learning, collaborative learning or inquire-based learning as one of these methods involves a high degree of interaction. The effectiveness of learning groups is determined by the extent to which the interaction enables members to clarify their own understanding, build upon each other's contributions, sift out meanings, ask and answer questions. An influence of this kind of methods (especially cooperative learning (CL on learners’ relationships was a subject of the further described research. Within the small group education, students work with their classmates to solve complex and authentic problems that help develop content knowledge as well as problem-solving, reasoning, communication, and self-assessment skills. The aim of the research was to answer the question: Can the

  11. Empirical evidence of the effectiveness of concept mapping as a learning intervention for nuclear medicine technology students in a distance learning radiation protection and biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Gregory G; Owen, Mary Anne; Prabakaran, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    Metacognitive learning strategies are based on instructional learning theory, which promotes deep, meaningful learning. Educators in a baccalaureate-level nuclear medicine technology program demonstrated that students enrolled in an online, distance learning section of an introductory radiation protection and radiobiology course performed better when traditional instruction was supplemented with nontraditional metacognitive learning strategies. The metacognitive learning strategy that was used is best known as concept mapping. The concept map, in addition to the standard homework problem assignment and opportunity for question-answer sessions, became the template for misconception identification and remediation interactions between the instructor and the student. The control group relied on traditional homework problems and question-answer sessions alone. Because students in both the "treatment" groups (i.e., students who used concept mapping) and the control group were distance learning students, all personal communications were conducted via e-mail or telephone. The final examination of the course was used to facilitate a quantitative comparison of the performance of students who used concept mapping and the performance of students who did not use concept mapping. The results demonstrated a significantly higher median final examination score for the concept mapping group than for the non-concept mapping group (z = -2.0381, P = 0.0415), with an appropriately large effect size (2.65). Concept mapping is a cognitive learning intervention that effectively enables meaningful learning and is suitable for use in the independent learner-oriented distance learning environments used by some nuclear medicine technology programs.

  12. Online Experimentation in Education and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of emergent technologies in industry, medicine, research, training and education attests to the relevance of their integration in teaching/learning approaches. Online experimentation comprises remote and virtual experimentation also supported and complemented by other online tools that incorporate necessarily the use of emergent technologies. The present work synthesizes the final outcomes of a project aiming to develop, use and disseminate Online Experimentation, funded by the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. Some application examples are given to illustrate the use of online experimentation on different contexts, such as secondary and higher education (STEM, lifelong learning or industrial training.

  13. Design of Learning Objects for Concept Learning: Effects of Multimedia Learning Principles and an Instructional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Thomas K. F.; Churchill, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests using multimedia learning principles in the design of instructional material. However, these principles may not be sufficient for the design of learning objects for concept learning in mathematics. This paper reports on an experimental study that investigated the effects of an instructional approach, which includes two teaching…

  14. Effect of Methods of Learning and Self Regulated Learning toward Outcomes of Learning Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjalla, Awaluddin; Sofiah, Evi

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to reveal the influence of learning methods and self-regulated learning on students learning scores for Social Studies object. The research was done in Islamic Junior High School (MTs Manba'ul Ulum), Batuceper City Tangerang using quasi-experimental method. The research employed simple random technique to 28 students. Data were…

  15. Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Coll. of Education.

    Information is provided regarding major learning styles and other factors important to student learning. Several typically asked questions are presented regarding different learning styles (visual, auditory, tactile and kinesthetic, and multisensory learning), associated considerations, determining individuals' learning styles, and appropriate…

  16. Student Involvement in Learning and School Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between selected student characteristics, student involvement in learning, and achievement. Both naturalistic (n = 28, 27) and experimental studies were conducted. In the experimental study, two classes (n = 29, 26) learned a sequence of matrix arithmetic by mastery learning strategies.…

  17. Experimental insertions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandweiss, J.; Kycia, T.F.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is given of the eight identical experimental insertions for the planned ISABELLE storage rings. Four sets of quadrupole doublets are used to match the β functions in the insertions to the values in the cells, and the total free space available at the crossing point is 40 meters. An asymmetric beam energy operation is planned, which will be useful in a number of experiments

  18. Animal experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Laz, Alak; Cholakova, Tanya Stefanova; Vrablova, Sofia; Arshad, Naverawaheed

    2016-01-01

    Animal experimentation is a crucial part of medical science. One of the ways to define it is any scientific experiment conducted for research purposes that cause any kind of pain or suffering to animals. Over the years, the new discovered drugs or treatments are first applied on animals to test their positive outcomes to be later used by humans. There is a debate about violating ethical considerations by exploiting animals for human benefits. However, different ethical theories have been made...

  19. Animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  20. Learning Networks, Networked Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter; Berlanga, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Sloep, P. B., & Berlanga, A. J. (2011). Learning Networks, Networked Learning [Redes de Aprendizaje, Aprendizaje en Red]. Comunicar, XIX(37), 55-63. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-02-05

  1. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides. (PSB)

  2. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides

  3. Logic Learning in Hopfield Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sathasivam, Saratha; Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan

    2008-01-01

    Synaptic weights for neurons in logic programming can be calculated either by using Hebbian learning or by Wan Abdullah's method. In other words, Hebbian learning for governing events corresponding to some respective program clauses is equivalent with learning using Wan Abdullah's method for the same respective program clauses. In this paper we will evaluate experimentally the equivalence between these two types of learning through computer simulations.

  4. Students’ Perception about Learning Assessment in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Rodríguez-Espinosa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to know university students’ perception about learning assessment carried out by their teachers, their level of objectivity and skill, among other aspects. The study was conducted in Medellin, Colombia, between January and July 2015. A final sample size of 400 university students from public and private institutions, randomly selected, was used. The data analysis was carried out by using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA with orthogonal-type canonical contrast, factor analysis, and one-dimensional type frequency analysis. It was found that university students have a good perception about the assessment practices of their teachers. Likewise, highly significant differences between men and women in their perception of learning assessment were identified. Students consider that learning assessment practices have contributed to improve their learning and are in accordance with the learning objectives. Nevertheless, most students have felt that their teachers are not objective in evaluation and they often use questions that confuse students, and very theoretical questions without application to practice. A lack of non-traditional assessment practices, such as peer assessment, self-assessment as well as virtual platforms use for assessments, was found. These findings imply the need to improve teacher training on assessment skills to allow them to plan evaluation as a strategy to improve learning, involving students in an active way.

  5. Non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ regulatory T cells are correlated to leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-su; Wang, Xu-hua; Zhao, Xiang-yu; Chang, Ying-jun; Xu, Lan-ping; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Huang, Xiao-jun

    2014-07-01

    Non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells were found to be involved in disease progression in tumor-bearing mouse models and cancer patients recently. We attempted to define whether this subset of T cells were related to leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells among the CD4+ T cell population from the bone marrow of relapsed patients, patients with positive minimal residual disease (MRD+) and healthy donors was examined by flow cytometry. The CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells were also stained with the intracellular markers to determine the cytokine (TGF-β, IL-2 and IL-10) secretion. The results showed that the frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69 + T cells was markedly increased in patients in the relapsed group and the MRD + group compared to the healthy donor group. The percentage of this subset of T cells was significantly decreased after effective intervention treatment. We also analyzed the reconstitution of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells at various time points after allo-HSCT, and the results showed that this subset of T cells reconstituted rapidly and reached a relatively higher level at +60 d in patients compared to controls. The incidence of either MRD+ or relapse in patients with a high frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells (>7%) was significantly higher than that of patients with a low frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells at +60 d, +90 d and +270 d after transplant. However, our preliminary data indicated that CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells may not exert immunoregulatory function via cytokine secretion. This study provides the first clinical evidence of a correlation between non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ Tregs and leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT and suggests that exploration of new methods of adoptive immunotherapy may be beneficial. Further research related to regulatory mechanism behind this phenomenon would be necessary.

  6. The impact of computer-based versus "traditional" textbook science instruction on selected student learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan H.

    This study reports the results of research designed to examine the impact of computer-based science instruction on elementary school level students' science content achievement, their attitude about science learning, their level of critical thinking-inquiry skills, and their level of cognitive and English language development. The study compared these learning outcomes resulting from a computer-based approach compared to the learning outcomes from a traditional, textbook-based approach to science instruction. The computer-based approach was inherent in a curriculum titled The Voyage of the Mimi , published by The Bank Street College Project in Science and Mathematics (1984). The study sample included 209 fifth-grade students enrolled in three schools in a suburban school district. This sample was divided into three groups, each receiving one of the following instructional treatments: (a) Mixed-instruction primarily based on the use of a hardcopy textbook in conjunction with computer-based instructional materials as one component of the science course; (b) Non-Traditional, Technology-Based -instruction fully utilizing computer-based material; and (c) Traditional, Textbook-Based-instruction utilizing only the textbook as the basis for instruction. Pre-test, or pre-treatment, data related to each of the student learning outcomes was collected at the beginning of the school year and post-test data was collected at the end of the school year. Statistical analyses of pre-test data were used as a covariate to account for possible pre-existing differences with regard to the variables examined among the three student groups. This study concluded that non-traditional, computer-based instruction in science significantly improved students' attitudes toward science learning and their level of English language development. Non-significant, positive trends were found for the following student learning outcomes: overall science achievement and development of critical thinking

  7. Experimental Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, D.; Serin, L.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental techniques to be used in the new generation of high energy physics are presented. The emphasis is put on the new ATLAS and CMS detectors for the CERN LHC. For the most important elements of these detectors, a description of the underlying physics processes is given, sometimes with reference to comparable detectors used in the past. Some comparative global performances of the two detectors are also given, with reference to benchmark physics processes (detection of the Higgs boson in various mass regions, etc). (author)

  8. Introduction to the Symposium "Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Lindsay D; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    The broad aim of this symposium and set of associated papers is to motivate the use of inquiry-based, active-learning teaching techniques in undergraduate quantitative biology courses. Practical information, resources, and ready-to-use classroom exercises relevant to physicists, mathematicians, biologists, and engineers are presented. These resources can be used to address the lack of preparation of college students in STEM fields entering the workforce by providing experience working on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary problems in mathematical biology in a group setting. Such approaches can also indirectly help attract and retain under-represented students who benefit the most from "non-traditional" learning styles and strategies, including inquiry-based, collaborative, and active learning. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Experimental overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    1992-01-01

    Five years ago the first heavy-ion beams were accelerated at both the BNL-AGS and the CERN-SPS. This conference is the 5th anniversary in the experimental field. Currently, four experimental groups (E802/E859, E810, E814, E858) are taking data at BNL and eight groups (NA34-3, NA44, NA45, NA35, NA36, NA38, WA80/WA93, WA85) at CERN. Au and Pb beams are about to come, and a lot of activities are going on for RHIC and LHC. The purpose of this talk is to overview where we are, in particular, by looking at the past data. In this talk, the data of proton rapidity distributions are reviewed first to study nuclear transparency, then, the data of energy spectra and slopes, HBT and anti d production are discussed in connection with the evolution of the collision. Third, the data of strangeness production are described. Finally, the status of J/ψ and that of soft photons and electron pairs are briefly overviewed. (orig.)

  10. Combined Teaching Method: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, Iryna V.

    2016-01-01

    The search for the best approach to business education has led educators and researchers to seek many different teaching strategies, ranging from the traditional teaching methods to various experimental approaches such as active learning techniques. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effects of the traditional and combined…

  11. 27 CFR 24.77 - Experimental wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Experimental wine. 24.77... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Tax Exempt Wine § 24.77 Experimental wine. (a) General. Any scientific university, college of learning, or institution of scientific...

  12. Experimental techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel-Chomaz, P.

    2007-01-01

    This lecture presents the experimental techniques, developed in the last 10 or 15 years, in order to perform a new class of experiments with exotic nuclei, where the reactions induced by these nuclei allow to get information on their structure. A brief review of the secondary beams production methods will be given, with some examples of facilities in operation or under project. The important developments performed recently on cryogenic targets will be presented. The different detection systems will be reviewed, both the beam detectors before the targets, and the many kind of detectors necessary to detect all outgoing particles after the reaction: magnetic spectrometer for the heavy fragment, detection systems for the target recoil nucleus, γ detectors. Finally, several typical examples of experiments will be detailed, in order to illustrate the use of each detector either alone, or in coincidence with others. (author)

  13. Children's adjustment in non-traditional families in Israel: the effect of parental sexual orientation and the number of parents on children's development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechner, T; Slone, M; Lobel, T E; Shechter, R

    2013-03-01

    This study examined differences in children's psychological and social indicators in non-traditional families in Israel, focusing on fatherless families headed by lesbian mothers and single mothers by choice. Although Israel is considered an industrialized westernized country, centrality of the traditional nuclear family predominates this country. This factorial design study included four family types: lesbian and heterosexual mothers, each in both single and coupled parenthood. Children's measures included the Child Behavior Checklist, perception of peer relations and perceived self-competence. Children from single parent as opposed to two-parent families exhibited more externalizing behaviour problems and aggressiveness. Children of lesbian mothers reported more prosocial behaviours and less loneliness than children from heterosexual families. No differences emerged for perceived self-competence across family types. Mother's sexual orientation did not affect children's adjustment negatively, whereas single parenthood placed children at greater risk for some difficulties. Implications include the need for apprising health professionals of effects of family types on children's development. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Temporal stability of growth and yield among Hevea genotypes introduced to a non-traditional rubber growing region of peninsular India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Vinod

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Extensive cultivation of Hevea brasiliensis in India now focus onnon-traditional regions for rubber cultivation. As a prelude for selection of genotypes for commercial cultivation, many introduced genotypes are being tested in genotype adaptation experiments in these regions. Present study,reports for the first time, growth and yield adaptation of 28 genotypes in a non-traditional rubber growing region of peninsular India viz., the coastal Karnataka region. Agroclimate of this region was found favoring growth andestablishment of all the genotypes evaluated. However, not all the genotypes grew and yielded well. Only four genotypes, RRII 203, KRS 25, PB 260 and PB 235 showed good growth and yield. On grouping, the genotypes fell into categories of moderate high yielders, moderate low yielders and low yielders. The most popular variety of the traditional region, RRII 105 did not perform well in this region. Biological stability in growth and yield of RRII 203 and PB 260 was identified as stable and these genotypes were the best adapted. KRS 25 and PB 235 had unstable yielding pattern. The best identifiedgenotypes can be considered for extensive culture as single clone plantations or as major constituent of clone blends as well as parents in future breeding programmes. Other moderate stable yielders may be used for clone blending in smaller proportions and may be subjected to yield improvement.

  15. Utility of Lithium in Rare-Earth Metal Reduction Reactions to Form Nontraditional Ln2+ Complexes and Unusual [Li(2.2.2-cryptand)]1+ Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Daniel N; Darago, Lucy E; Ziller, Joseph W; Evans, William J

    2018-02-19

    The utility of lithium compared to other alkali metals in generating Ln 2+ rare-earth metal complexes via reduction of Ln 3+ precursors in reactions abbreviated as LnA 3 /M (Ln = rare-earth metal; A = anionic ligand; M = alkali metal) is described. Lithium reduction of Cp' 3 Ln (Cp' = C 5 H 4 SiMe 3 ; Ln = Y, Tb, Dy, Ho) under Ar in the presence of 2.2.2-cryptand (crypt) forms new examples of crystallographically characterizable Ln 2+ complexes of these metals, [Li(crypt)][Cp' 3 Ln]. In each complex, lithium is found in an N 2 O 4 donor atom coordination geometry that is unusual for the cryptand ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data on these new examples of nontraditional divalent lanthanide complexes are consistent with 4f n 5d 1 electronic configurations. The Dy and Ho complexes have exceptionally high single-ion magnetic moments, 11.35 and 11.67 μ B , respectively. Lithium reduction of Cp' 3 Y under N 2 at -35 °C forms the Y 2+ complex (Cp' 3 Y) 1- , which reduces dinitrogen upon warming to room temperature to generate the (N 2 ) 2- complex [Cp' 2 Y(THF)] 2 (μ-η 2 :η 2 -N 2 ). These results provide insight on the factors that lead to reduced dinitrogen complexes and/or stable divalent lanthanide complexes as a function of the specific reducing agent and conditions.

  16. Lot quality assurance sampling for monitoring coverage and quality of a targeted condom social marketing programme in traditional and non-traditional outlets in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piot, Bram; Mukherjee, Amajit; Navin, Deepa; Krishnan, Nattu; Bhardwaj, Ashish; Sharma, Vivek; Marjara, Pritpal

    2010-02-01

    This study reports on the results of a large-scale targeted condom social marketing campaign in and around areas where female sex workers are present. The paper also describes the method that was used for the routine monitoring of condom availability in these sites. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) method was used for the assessment of the geographical coverage and quality of coverage of condoms in target areas in four states and along selected national highways in India, as part of Avahan, the India AIDS initiative. A significant general increase in condom availability was observed in the intervention area between 2005 and 2008. High coverage rates were gradually achieved through an extensive network of pharmacies and particularly of non-traditional outlets, whereas traditional outlets were instrumental in providing large volumes of condoms. LQAS is seen as a valuable tool for the routine monitoring of the geographical coverage and of the quality of delivery systems of condoms and of health products and services in general. With a relatively small sample size, easy data collection procedures and simple analytical methods, it was possible to inform decision-makers regularly on progress towards coverage targets.

  17. How Instructional Strategies Impact Students' Learning, Motivation, and Learning Strategies in Introductory Geology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D.; Budd, D. A.; Stempien, J. A.; Kraft, K.; Matheney, R. K.; McConnell, D.; Wirth, K. R.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2010-12-01

    learning strategies at the end of a term (less value on memorization strategies; more value on help seeking strategies). The data indicate that using constructivist teaching strategies and interactive engagement promotes learning in introductory physical geology, but also result in students’ becoming less motivated to learn and believing they have less control over their learning. We hypothesize that this contrast arises from students not understanding how to regulate their learning in non-traditional classrooms. Students, particularly those who perform poorly relative to their expectations, lose confidence in their abilities, lose motivation, and believe they are not in control of their learning.

  18. Learning: from association to cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, David R

    2010-01-01

    Since the very earliest experimental investigations of learning, tension has existed between association-based and cognitive theories. Associationism accounts for the phenomena of both conditioning and "higher" forms of learning via concepts such as excitation, inhibition, and reinforcement, whereas cognitive theories assume that learning depends on hypothesis testing, cognitive models, and propositional reasoning. Cognitive theories have received considerable impetus in regard to both human and animal learning from recent research suggesting that the key illustration of cue selection in learning, blocking, often arises from inferential reasoning. At the same time, a dichotomous view that separates noncognitive, unconscious (implicit) learning from cognitive, conscious (explicit) learning has gained favor. This review selectively describes key findings from this research, evaluates evidence for and against associative and cognitive explanatory constructs, and critically examines both the dichotomous view of learning as well as the claim that learning can occur unconsciously.

  19. Learning Performance Enhancement Using Computer-Assisted Language Learning by Collaborative Learning Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-huei Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to test whether the use of computer-assisted language learning (CALL and innovative collaborative learning could be more effective than the use of traditional collaborative learning in improving students’ English proficiencies. A true experimental design was used in the study. Four randomly-assigned groups participated in the study: a traditional collaborative learning group (TCLG, 34 students, an innovative collaborative learning group (ICLG, 31 students, a CALL traditional collaborative learning group (CALLTCLG, 32 students, and a CALL innovative collaborative learning group (CALLICLG, 31 students. TOEIC (Test of English for International Communication listening, reading, speaking, and writing pre-test and post-test assessments were given to all students at an interval of sixteen weeks. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA, and analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to analyze the data. The results revealed that students who used CALL had significantly better learning performance than those who did not. Students in innovative collaborative learning had significantly better learning performances than those in traditional collaborative learning. Additionally, students using CALL innovative collaborative learning had better learning performances than those in CALL collaborative learning, those in innovative collaborative learning, and those in traditional collaborative learning.

  20. Nontraditional protein sources and their effect on growth and survival, during masculinization, of the fish Cichlasoma urophthalmus (Perciformes: Cichlidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Cuenca-Soria, Carlos A.; Navarro Angulo, Leonardo I.; Castillo-Domínguez, Alfonso; Melgar Valdes, Carolina E.; Pérez-Palafox, Xchel A.; Ortiz-Hernández, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    In Southeastern Mexico, aquaculture has been seriously affected by the high costs of commercial food. As part of the search for alternative foods we tested the freshwater fish Astyanax aeneus and the snail Pomacea flagellata as possible protein sources for Cichlasoma urophthalmus. We applied fluoxymesterone androgenic hormone for 45 days. One kilogram of experimental food (P. flagellate/A. aeneus) and one of commercial food were sprayed with solution of fluoxymesterone/absolute ethanol, at 5m...

  1. Machine learning an artificial intelligence approach

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, R; Bradshaw, Gary; Carbonell, Jaime Guillermo; Mitchell, Tom Michael; Michalski, Ryszard Spencer

    1983-01-01

    Machine Learning: An Artificial Intelligence Approach contains tutorial overviews and research papers representative of trends in the area of machine learning as viewed from an artificial intelligence perspective. The book is organized into six parts. Part I provides an overview of machine learning and explains why machines should learn. Part II covers important issues affecting the design of learning programs-particularly programs that learn from examples. It also describes inductive learning systems. Part III deals with learning by analogy, by experimentation, and from experience. Parts IV a

  2. Learning Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Learning Problems KidsHealth / For Kids / Learning Problems What's in ... for how to make it better. What Are Learning Disabilities? Learning disabilities aren't contagious, but they ...

  3. What can health care marketing learn from bank marketing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindak, W A

    1988-01-01

    A useful technique in assessing opportunities for international marketers is called "lead lag" analysis. It suggests that one can predict developments, such as demand patterns, in one country by looking at an analogous country. Applying such a technique to the domestic scene, what could we predict about the development and application of marketing to the health care sector if we looked at an analogous service such as banking? Many experts believe that health care is following in the footsteps of banking and point to environmental similarities such as changes in government regulation, new forms of nontraditional competition, increased concern about retail sectors, and pressures on scarce resources. Are there lessons that health care marketers can learn from bankers that might help them avoid some false starts or expensive mistakes?

  4. Experimental music for experimental physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    Using the sonification technique, physicist and composer Domenico Vicinanza paid homage to CERN at its 60th anniversary ceremony. After months of hard work, he turned the CERN Convention and LHC data into music.   Click here to download the full score of the "LHChamber music". Every birthday deserves gifts and CERN’s 60th anniversary was no exception. Two gifts were very special, thanks to the hard work of Domenico Vicinanza, a physicist and composer. He created two experimental pieces by applying the sonification technique to the CERN Convention and to data recorded by the four LHC detectors during Run 1. “This technique allows us to ‘hear’ data using an algorithm that translates numbers or letters into notes. It keeps the same information enclosed in a graph or a document, but has a more aesthetic exposition,” explains Domenico Vicinanza. “The result is meant to be a metaphor for scientific cooperation, in which d...

  5. 數位學習實驗研究品質評估與現況分析:以行動學習為例 Quality Assessment and Situational Analysis of Experimental E-Learning Designs: A Case Study of Mobile Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    李漢岳 Han-Yueh Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available 由於近年來行動裝置與教育應用軟體的快速發展,探討行動裝置輔助學習效果的實驗研 究大量增加。然而,目前尚缺乏以評估實驗研究品質為主題所進行的回顧性研究。因此,本 研究的目的即為廣泛蒐集 ERIC 和 SSCI 資料庫自 2003 年至 2013 年間,197 篇以行動裝置輔 助學習的實驗研究,並探討其在實驗設計嚴謹度、統計考驗之過程與結果的正確性,以及成 效評估工具的品質等議題。研究結果顯示,實驗設計以準實驗研究占最多數(61%),但有四 分之一的準實驗研究未考量實驗組與控制組之起點能力均等性問題。統計結果效度部分則發 現,半數以上研究未符合統計基本假設,七成研究所採用之樣本數偏低,使其統計考驗力低 落,效果值估計情形未臻精準。成效評估工具品質部分,則發現半數研究者未提供相關的測 驗信度與效度資訊。最後,本研究根據研究結果與討論,對未來研究者提出相關建議。 Because of the substantial development of mobile devices and educational software in recent years, the results of mobile learning–based interventions represent a popular research topic for investigation. Although experiment quality is the basis of empirical research, few studies have explored this issue. Thus, the present study investigated the shortfalls in existing experimental research designs related to mobile learning over the past decade and offers suggestions in this paper. The researchers collected data from all 197 experimental studies on mobile learning published in the Education Resources Information Center and Institute of Science Index from 2003 to 2013. The findings of the present study are described as follows: (1 Quasi-experimental designs represent the most frequently used design type (61%; however, among the quasi-experimental studies, 25% did not consider baseline equivalence

  6. Cooperative Learning and Learning Achievement in Social Science Subjects for Sociable Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpratiwi; Darsono; Sasmiati; Pujiyatli

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The research objective was to compare students' learning achievement for sociable learning motivation students in social science (IPS) using cooperative learning. Research Methods: This research used a quasi-experimental method with a pre-test/post-test design involving 35 fifth-grade students. The learning process was conducted four…

  7. Moessbauer effect in lattice dynamics. Experimental techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi-Long; Yang, De-Ping

    2007-01-01

    This up-to-date review closes an important gap in the existing literature by providing a comprehensive description of the applications of Moessbauer effect in lattice dynamics, along with a collection of applications in metals, alloys, amorphous solids, molecular crystals, thin films, and nanocrystals. It is the first book to systematically compare Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation to conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy, discussing in detail its advantages and capabilities, backed by the latest theoretical developments and experimental examples. Intended as a self-contained volume that may be used as a complete reference or textbook, 'Moessbauer Effect in Lattice Dynamics' adopts new pedagogical approaches with several non-traditional and refreshing theoretical expositions, while all quantitative relations are derived with the necessary details so as to be easily followed by the reader. Two entire chapters are devoted to the study of the dynamics of impurity atoms in solids, while a thorough description of the Mannheim model as a theoretical method is presented and its predictions compared to experimental results. Finally, an in-depth analysis of absorption of Moessbauer radiation is presented, based on recent research by one of the authors, resulting in an exact expression of fractional absorption and a method to determine the optimal thickness of an absorber. Supplemented by elaborate appendices containing constants and parameters. (orig.)

  8. Learning about Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    The field of children's learning was thriving when the Merrill-Palmer Quarterly was launched; the field later went into eclipse and now is in the midst of a resurgence. This commentary examines reasons for these trends, and describes the emerging field of children's learning. In particular, the new field is seen as differing from the old in its…

  9. Learning to Learn Differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Trude Høgvold; Glad, Tone; Filstad, Cathrine

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate whether the formal and informal learning patterns of community health-care nurses changed in the wake of a reform that altered their work by introducing new patient groups, and to explore whether conditions in the new workplaces facilitated or impeded shifts in learning patterns. Design/methodology/approach:…

  10. Skill development in experimental courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Bagán

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental courses offer a good opportunity to work with competences, promoting the incorporation of strategies oriented towards motivating students to actively involve in the learning process, promoting reflexive learning and developing generic skills. This study presents different ways of developing and evaluating some important general skills, settle on four specific objectives: 1. To increase student motivation using samples of potential interest to students and explaining real-live application of their samples analyses; 2. To assist students’ self-regulation and learning autonomy by using the portfolio; 3. To promote group work through experiments in pairs and small-group discussions; 4. To develop communication skills through small-group discussions and oral presentations. Results show that the type of sample used and real-life application has important influence on motivation. The portfolio is a good tool to promote reflection and to evaluate both specific and generic skills in experimental courses, the dynamics of a laboratory course permit students to develop their group-work and communicative skills, and peer evaluations both improve students’ communication skills and promote metacognitive reflection. Finally, the project demonstrates that it is possible to train students in general skills using the specific course content and that the incorporation of participatory methodologies encourages students to become actively involved in the teaching-learning process.

  11. Comparative Study of Learning Using E-Learning and Printed Materials on Independent Learning and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyu Utami, Niken; Aziz Saefudin, Abdul

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to determine: 1) differences in students taking independent learning by using e-learning and the students who attend the learning by using the print instructional materials ; 2) differences in the creativity of students who follow learning with e-learning and the students who attend the learning by using the print instructional materials ; 3) differences in learning independence and creativity of students attend learning with e-learning and the students who attend lessons using printed teaching materials in the subject of Mathematics Instructional Media Development. This study was a quasi-experimental research design using only posttest control design. The study population was all students who take courses in Learning Mathematics Media Development, Academic Year 2014/2015 100 students and used a random sample (random sampling) is 60 students. To test the hypothesis used multivariate analysis of variance or multivariable analysis of variance (MANOVA) of the track. The results of this study indicate that 1) There is a difference in student learning independence following study using the e-learning and the students who attend lessons using printed teaching materials in the lecture PMPM ( F = 4.177, p = 0.046 0.05) ; No difference learning independence and creativity of students attend learning by using e-learning and the students who attend the learning using printed teaching materials in the lecture PMPM (F = 2.452, p = 0.095 > 0.05). Based on these studies suggested that the learning using e -learning can be used to develop student creativity, while learning to use e -learning and teaching materials can be printed to use to develop students’ independence.

  12. Active Learning Using Hint Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Liang; Ferng, Chun-Sung; Lin, Hsuan-Tien

    2015-08-01

    The abundance of real-world data and limited labeling budget calls for active learning, an important learning paradigm for reducing human labeling efforts. Many recently developed active learning algorithms consider both uncertainty and representativeness when making querying decisions. However, exploiting representativeness with uncertainty concurrently usually requires tackling sophisticated and challenging learning tasks, such as clustering. In this letter, we propose a new active learning framework, called hinted sampling, which takes both uncertainty and representativeness into account in a simpler way. We design a novel active learning algorithm within the hinted sampling framework with an extended support vector machine. Experimental results validate that the novel active learning algorithm can result in a better and more stable performance than that achieved by state-of-the-art algorithms. We also show that the hinted sampling framework allows improving another active learning algorithm designed from the transductive support vector machine.

  13. Confirmed clinical case of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in agricultural communities in Central America: a case definition for surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ferreiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Over the last 20 years, many reports have described an excess of cases of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the Pacific coastal area of Central America, mainly affecting male farmworkers and signaling a serious public health problem. Most of these cases are not associated with traditional risk factors for CKD, such as aging, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. This CKD of nontraditional causes (CKDnT might be linked to environmental and/or occupational exposure or working conditions, limited access to health services, and poverty. In response to a resolution approved by the Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO in 2013, PAHO, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH organized a consultation process in order to expand knowledge on the epidemic of CKDnT and to develop appropriate surveillance instruments. The Clinical Working Group from SLANH was put in charge of finding a consensus definition of a confirmed clinical case of CKDnT. The resulting definition establishes mandatory criteria and exclusion criteria necessary for classifying a case of CKDnT. The definition includes a combination of universally accepted definitions of CKD and the main clinical manifestations of CKDnT. Based on the best available evidence, the Clinical Working Group also formulated general recommendations about clinical management that apply to any patient with CKDnT. Adhering to the definition of a confirmed clinical case of CKDnT and implementing it appropriately is expected to be a powerful instrument for understanding the prevalence of the epidemic, evaluating the results of interventions, and promoting appropriate advocacy and planning efforts.

  14. Confirmed clinical case of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in agricultural communities in Central America: a case definition for surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Alejandro; Álvarez-Estévez, Guillermo; Cerdas-Calderón, Manuel; Cruz-Trujillo, Zulma; Mena, Elio; Reyes, Marina; Sandoval-Diaz, Mabel; Sánchez-Polo, Vicente; Valdés, Régulo; Ordúnez, Pedro

    2016-11-01

    Over the last 20 years, many reports have described an excess of cases of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the Pacific coastal area of Central America, mainly affecting male farmworkers and signaling a serious public health problem. Most of these cases are not associated with traditional risk factors for CKD, such as aging, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. This CKD of nontraditional causes (CKDnT) might be linked to environmental and/or occupational exposure or working conditions, limited access to health services, and poverty. In response to a resolution approved by the Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in 2013, PAHO, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH) organized a consultation process in order to expand knowledge on the epidemic of CKDnT and to develop appropriate surveillance instruments. The Clinical Working Group from SLANH was put in charge of finding a consensus definition of a confirmed clinical case of CKDnT. The resulting definition establishes mandatory criteria and exclusion criteria necessary for classifying a case of CKDnT. The definition includes a combination of universally accepted definitions of CKD and the main clinical manifestations of CKDnT. Based on the best available evidence, the Clinical Working Group also formulated general recommendations about clinical management that apply to any patient with CKDnT. Adhering to the definition of a confirmed clinical case of CKDnT and implementing it appropriately is expected to be a powerful instrument for understanding the prevalence of the epidemic, evaluating the results of interventions, and promoting appropriate advocacy and planning efforts.

  15. Eating habits of a population undergoing a rapid dietary transition: portion sizes of traditional and non-traditional foods and beverages consumed by Inuit adults in Nunavut, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the portion sizes of traditional and non-traditional foods being consumed by Inuit adults in three remote communities in Nunavut, Canada. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between June and October, 2008. Trained field workers collected dietary data using a culturally appropriate, validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ) developed specifically for the study population. Results Caribou, muktuk (whale blubber and skin) and Arctic char (salmon family), were the most commonly consumed traditional foods; mean portion sizes for traditional foods ranged from 10 g for fermented seal fat to 424 g for fried caribou. Fried bannock and white bread were consumed by >85% of participants; mean portion sizes for these foods were 189 g and 70 g, respectively. Sugar-sweetened beverages and energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods were also widely consumed. Mean portion sizes for regular pop and sweetened juices with added sugar were 663 g and 572 g, respectively. Mean portion sizes for potato chips, pilot biscuits, cakes, chocolate and cookies were 59 g, 59 g, 106 g, 59 g, and 46 g, respectively. Conclusions The present study provides further evidence of the nutrition transition that is occurring among Inuit in the Canadian Arctic. It also highlights a number of foods and beverages that could be targeted in future nutritional intervention programs aimed at obesity and diet-related chronic disease prevention in these and other Inuit communities. PMID:23724920

  16. Utility of Nontraditional Risk Markers in Individuals Ineligible for Statin Therapy According to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Joseph; Polonsky, Tamar S; Young, Rebekah; McClelland, Robyn L; Delaney, Joseph C; Dawood, Farah; Blaha, Michael J; Miedema, Michael D; Sibley, Christopher T; Carr, J Jeffrey; Burke, Gregory L; Goff, David C; Psaty, Bruce M; Greenland, Philip; Herrington, David M

    2015-09-08

    In the general population, the majority of cardiovascular events occur in people at the low to moderate end of population risk distribution. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol recommends consideration of statin therapy for adults with an estimated 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk ≥7.5% based on traditional risk factors. Whether use of nontraditional risk markers can improve risk assessment in those below this threshold for statin therapy is unclear. Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population sample free of clinical CVD at baseline, we calibrated the Pooled Cohort Equations (cPCE). ASCVD was defined as myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, or fatal or nonfatal stroke. Adults with an initial cPCE statin eligible: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥160 mg/dL; family history of ASCVD; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥2 mg/dL; coronary artery calcium score ≥300 Agatston units or ≥75th percentile for age, sex, and ethnicity; and ankle-brachial index statin eligible. Of 5185 participants not taking statins with complete data (age, 45-84 years), 4185 had a cPCE risk statin eligible) by at least 1 of the additional risk marker criteria. In this generally low-risk population sample, a large proportion of ASCVD events occurred among adults with a 10-year cPCE risk 7.5% who may warrant statin therapy considerations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Lessons Learned from Applying Design Thinking in a NASA Rapid Design Study in Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria; Bakula, Casey; Castner, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    In late 2015, NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) funded an experiment in rapid design and rapid teaming to explore new approaches to solving challenging design problems in aeronautics in an effort to cultivate and foster innovation. This report summarizes several lessons learned from the rapid design portion of the study. This effort entailed learning and applying design thinking, a human-centered design approach, to complete the conceptual design for an open-ended design challenge within six months. The design challenge focused on creating a capability to advance experimental testing of autonomous aeronautics systems, an area of great interest to NASA, the US government as a whole, and an entire ecosystem of users and developers around the globe. A team of nine civil servant researchers from three of NASA's aeronautics field centers with backgrounds in several disciplines was assembled and rapidly trained in design thinking under the guidance of the innovation and design firm IDEO. The design thinking process, while used extensively outside the aerospace industry, is less common and even counter to many practices within the aerospace industry. In this report, several contrasts between common aerospace research and development practices and design thinking are discussed, drawing upon the lessons learned from the NASA rapid design study. The lessons discussed included working towards a design solution without a set of detailed design requirements, which may not be practical or even feasible for management to ascertain for complex, challenging problems. This approach allowed for the possibility of redesigning the original problem statement to better meet the needs of the users. Another lesson learned was to approach problems holistically from the perspective of the needs of individuals that may be affected by advances in topic area instead of purely from a technological feasibility viewpoint. The interdisciplinary nature of the design team also

  18. Sizing optimization of skeletal structures using teaching-learning based optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Toğan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Learning Based Optimization (TLBO is one of the non-traditional techniques to simulate natural phenomena into a numerical algorithm. TLBO mimics teaching learning process occurring between a teacher and students in a classroom. A parameter named as teaching factor, TF, seems to be the only tuning parameter in TLBO. Although the value of the teaching factor, TF, is determined by an equation, the value of 1 or 2 has been used by the researchers for TF. This study intends to explore the effect of the variation of teaching factor TF on the performances of TLBO. This effect is demonstrated in solving structural optimization problems including truss and frame structures under the stress and displacement constraints. The results indicate that the variation of TF in the TLBO process does not change the results obtained at the end of the optimization procedure when the computational cost of TLBO is ignored.

  19. A global learning-centered approach to higher education: workplace development in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tasso Eira de Aquino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Competition in the 21st century economy requires corporations, organizations, and professionals to face a common challenge: diverse individuals need consistent motivation towards building competences that increase personal marketability using a combination of higher education and professional development. This article represents an evolving report summary and non-traditional learning-centered approach focusing on adult competences necessary for succeeding in the competitive global marketplace of the 21st century. The purpose of this article is to understand the needs of constantly changing employer demands in the work environment. Exploring contemporary approaches related to skill development, adult education, and learning processes, will be the path towards higher levels of professional success. This article will provide readers with an enlightening discussion focusing on the necessary adult skills and competencies professionals need to succeed in the global marketplace.

  20. Multiple intelligences and underachievement: lessons from individuals with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearne, D; Stone, S

    1995-01-01

    The field of learning disabilities, like education in the main, is undergoing calls for reform and restructuring, an upheaval brought on in great part by the forces of opposing paradigms--reductionism and constructivism. In reexamining our past, we must begin to address the failures of traditional deficit models and their abysmally low "cure" rate. Several new theories have arisen that challenge traditional practices in both general and special education classrooms. Particularly influential has been the work of Howard Gardner, whose theory of multiple intelligences calls for a restructuring of our schools to accommodate modes of learning and inquiry with something other than deficit approaches. At least some current research in the field of learning disabilities has begun to focus on creativity and nontraditional strengths and talents that have not been well understood or highly valued by the schools. In this article, we briefly summarize the findings in our search for the talents of students labeled learning disabled, evidence of their abilities, implications of these for the schools, and a beginning set of practical recommendations.