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Sample records for nonthermal desorption involving

  1. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, R. T.; Wakelam, V.; Herbst, E.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely constrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results show that the chemistry of dark clouds is altered slightly at times up to 106 yr, mainly by the enhancement in the gas-phase abundances of hydrogen-rich species such as methanol that are formed on grain surfaces. At later times, however, there is a rather strong change. Instead of the continuing accretion of most gas-phase species onto dust particles, a steady-state is reached for both gas-phase and grain-surface species, with significant abundances for the former. Nevertheless, most of the carbon is contained in an undetermined assortment of heavy surface hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The desorption mechanism discussed here will be better constrained by observational data on pre-stellar cores, where a significant accretion of species such as CO has already occurred.

  2. Photon-induced Processing of Interstellar Ices in the Laboratory. Focus on Their Non-thermal Desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Domenech, Rafael; Munoz Caro, Guillermo; Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo A.; Oberg, Karin I.

    2018-06-01

    Some of the processes that take place in the interstellar medium (ISM)can be simulated in laboratories on Earth under astrophysically relevant conditions. For example, the energetic processing of the ice mantles that accrete on top of dust grains in the coldest regions of the ISM, leading to the production of new species and their desorption to the gas phase. In particular, observation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in cold interstellar environments stress the need for not only a solid state formation but also for non-thermal desorption mechanisms that can account for the observed abundances in regions where thermal desorption is inhibited. Laboratory Astrophysics can be used to test different non-thermal desorption processes and extract yields than can be extrapolated to the astrophysical scenario with theoretical models. 0th generation COMs like CH3OH and H2CO can be formed at very low temperatures. In this talk, we present laboratory simulations of the UV photoprocessing of a binary ice mixture composed by water (the main component of astrophysical ices) and methane. Formation of CO, CO2, CH3OH and H2CO was confirmed by IR spectroscopy and subsequent TPD. At the same time, photodesorption of CO and H2CO was detected by means of a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, with yields on the order of 10-4 and 10-5 molecules per incident photon, respectively. In general, photodesorption can take place through a direct mechanism, where the absorbing molecule (or its photofragments) are desorbed; or through an indirect mechanism where the absorbed energy is transferred to a surface molecule which is the one finally desorbing. In the case of photoproducts, the evolution of the photodesorption yield gives information on the photodesorption mechanism: a constant photodesorption yield is observed when the photoproducts are desorbed right after their formation; while an increasing yield is measured when the photoproducts are desorbed later after energy transfer from another

  3. Non-thermal desorption/ablation of molecular solids induced by ultra-short soft x-ray pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chalupský, Jaromír; Juha, Libor; Hájková, Věra; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Vyšín, Luděk; Gautier, J.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Jurek, M.; Krzywinski, J.; London, R.A.; Papalazarou, E.; Pelka, J. B.; Rey, G.; Sebban, S.; Sobierajski, R.; Stojanovic, N.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Valentin, C.; Wabnitz, H.; Zeitoun, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2009), s. 208-217 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAA400100701 Grant - others:EU FP6 NEST-Adventure(XE) 012843 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : x-ray laser * high-order harmonics * free-electron laser * desorption * ablation * organic polymer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.278, year: 2009

  4. Exciton-Promoted Desorption From Solid Water Surfaces A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCoustra, M.R.S.; Thrower, J.D.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Desorption from solid water surfaces resulting from interaction with electromagnetic and particle radiation is reviewed in the context of the role of nonthermal desorption in astrophysical environments. Experimental observations are interpreted in terms of mechanisms sharing a common basis...

  5. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

  6. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J.; Quapp, W.J.; Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W.; Swartz, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs

  7. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  8. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  9. Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer

  10. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  11. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.J.; Chung, D.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Kolb, E.W.; Riotto, A.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may be elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should not be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  12. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may be elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should not be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  13. Sneutrino hybrid inflation and nonthermal leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Baumann, Jochen P.; Domcke, Valerie F.; Kostka, Philipp M.

    2010-01-01

    In sneutrino hybrid inflation the superpartner of one of the right-handed neutrinos involved in the seesaw mechanism plays the role of the inflaton field. It obtains its large mass after the ''waterfall'' phase transition which ends hybrid inflation. After this phase transition the oscillations of the sneutrino inflaton field may dominate the universe and efficiently produce the baryon asymmetry of the universe via nonthermal leptogenesis. We investigate the conditions under which inflation, with primordial perturbations in accordance with the latest WMAP results, as well as successful nonthermal leptogenesis can be realized simultaneously within the sneutrino hybrid inflation scenario. We point out which requirements successful inflation and leptogenesis impose on the seesaw parameters, i.e. on the Yukawa couplings and the mass of the right-handed (s)neutrino, and derive the predictions for the CMB observables in terms of the right-handed (s)neutrino mass and the other relevant model parameters

  14. Sneutrino hybrid inflation and nonthermal leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan; Baumann, Jochen P.; Domcke, Valerie F.; Kostka, Philipp M., E-mail: antusch@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: jbaumann@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: domcke@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: kostka@mppmu.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    In sneutrino hybrid inflation the superpartner of one of the right-handed neutrinos involved in the seesaw mechanism plays the role of the inflaton field. It obtains its large mass after the ''waterfall'' phase transition which ends hybrid inflation. After this phase transition the oscillations of the sneutrino inflaton field may dominate the universe and efficiently produce the baryon asymmetry of the universe via nonthermal leptogenesis. We investigate the conditions under which inflation, with primordial perturbations in accordance with the latest WMAP results, as well as successful nonthermal leptogenesis can be realized simultaneously within the sneutrino hybrid inflation scenario. We point out which requirements successful inflation and leptogenesis impose on the seesaw parameters, i.e. on the Yukawa couplings and the mass of the right-handed (s)neutrino, and derive the predictions for the CMB observables in terms of the right-handed (s)neutrino mass and the other relevant model parameters.

  15. Photon- and electron-stimulated desorption from laboratory models of interstellar ice grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, J. D.; Abdulgalil, A. G. M.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.; Burke, D. J.; Brown, W. A.; Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. J.; Kendall, P.; Mason, N. J.; Jamme, F.; Fraser, H. J.; Rutten, F. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The nonthermal desorption of water from ice films induced by photon and low energy electron irradiation has been studied under conditions mimicking those found in dense interstellar clouds. Water desorption following photon irradiation at 250 nm relies on the presence of an absorbing species within the H 2 O ice, in this case benzene. Desorption cross sections are obtained and used to derive first order rate coefficients for the desorption processes. Kinetic modeling has been used to compare the efficiencies of these desorption mechanisms with others known to be in operation in dense clouds.

  16. Nonthermal gravitino production in tribrid inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antusch, Stefan; Dutta, Koushik

    2015-10-01

    We investigate nonthermal gravitino production after tribrid inflation in supergravity, which is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation where three fields are involved in the inflationary model and where the inflaton field resides in the matter sector of the theory. In contrast to conventional supersymmetric hybrid inflation, where nonthermal gravitino production imposes severe constraints on the inflationary model, we find that the "nonthermal gravitino problem" is generically absent in models of tribrid inflation, mainly due to two effects: (i) With the inflaton in tribrid inflation (after inflation) being lighter than the waterfall field, the latter has a second decay channel with a much larger rate than for the decay into gravitinos. This reduces the branching ratio for the decay of the waterfall field into gravitinos. (ii) The inflaton generically decays later than the waterfall field, and it does not produce gravitinos when it decays. This leads to a dilution of the gravitino population from the decays of the waterfall field. The combination of both effects generically leads to a strongly reduced gravitino production in tribrid inflation.

  17. Non-thermally activated chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1987-01-01

    The subject is covered under the following headings: state-of-the art of non-thermally activated chemical processes; basic phenomena in non-thermal chemistry including mechanochemistry, photochemistry, laser chemistry, electrochemistry, photo-electro chemistry, high-field chemistry, magneto chemistry, plasma chemistry, radiation chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, and positronium and muonium chemistry; elementary processes in non-thermal chemistry including nuclear chemistry, interactions of electromagnetic radiations, electrons and heavy particles with matter, ionic elementary processes, elementary processes with excited species, radicalic elementary processes, and energy-induced elementary processes on surfaces and interfaces; and comparative considerations. An appendix with historical data and a subject index is given. 44 figs., 41 tabs., and 544 refs

  18. Combining nonthermal technologies to control foodborne microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexander I V; Griffiths, Mansel W; Mittal, Gauri S; Deeth, Hilton C

    2003-12-31

    Novel nonthermal processes, such as high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), pulsed electric fields (PEFs), ionizing radiation and ultrasonication, are able to inactivate microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures. Many of these processes require very high treatment intensities, however, to achieve adequate microbial destruction in low-acid foods. Combining nonthermal processes with conventional preservation methods enhances their antimicrobial effect so that lower process intensities can be used. Combining two or more nonthermal processes can also enhance microbial inactivation and allow the use of lower individual treatment intensities. For conventional preservation treatments, optimal microbial control is achieved through the hurdle concept, with synergistic effects resulting from different components of the microbial cell being targeted simultaneously. The mechanisms of inactivation by nonthermal processes are still unclear; thus, the bases of synergistic combinations remain speculative. This paper reviews literature on the antimicrobial efficiencies of nonthermal processes combined with conventional and novel nonthermal technologies. Where possible, the proposed mechanisms of synergy is mentioned.

  19. Toward a Philosophy and Theory of Volumetric Nonthermal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal processes for food preservation have been under intensive investigation for about the past quarter century, with varying degrees of success. We focus this discussion on two volumetrically acting nonthermal processes, high pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric fields (PEF), with emphasis on scientific understanding of each, and the research questions that need to be addressed for each to be more successful in the future. We discuss the character or "philosophy" of food preservation, with a question about the nature of the kill step(s), and the sensing challenges that need to be addressed. For HPP, key questions and needs center around whether its nonthermal effectiveness can be increased by increased pressures or pulsing, the theoretical treatment of rates of reaction as influenced by pressure, the assumption of uniform pressure distribution, and the need for (and difficulties involved in) in-situ measurement. For PEF, the questions include the rationale for pulsing, difficulties involved in continuous flow treatment chambers, the difference between electroporation theory and experimental observations, and the difficulties involved in in-situ measurement and monitoring of electric field distribution. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and electrochemistry of external field-assisted nonthermal food technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, N N; Martynenko, Alex; Chemat, Farid; Paniwnyk, Larysa; Barba, Francisco J; Jambrak, Anet Režek

    2018-07-24

    Interest in the development and adoption of nonthermal technologies is burgeoning within the food and bioprocess industry, the associated research community, and among the consumers. This is evident from not only the success of some innovative nonthermal technologies at industrial scale, but also from the increasing number of publications dealing with these topics, a growing demand for foods processed by nonthermal technologies and use of natural ingredients. A notable feature of the nonthermal technologies such as cold plasma, electrohydrodynamic processing, pulsed electric fields, and ultrasound is the involvement of external fields, either electric or sound. Therefore, it merits to study the fundamentals of these technologies and the associated phenomenon with a unified approach. In this review, we revisit the fundamental physical and chemical phenomena governing the selected technologies, highlight similarities, and contrasts, describe few successful applications, and finally, identify the gaps in research.

  1. Non-thermal AGN models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    The infrared, optical and x-ray continua from radio quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN) are explained by a compact non-thermal source surrounding a thermal ultraviolet emitter, presumably the accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The ultraviolet source is observed as the ''big blue bump.'' The flat (..cap alpha.. approx. = .7) hard x-ray spectrum results from the scattering of thermal ultraviolet photons by the flat, low energy end of an electron distribution ''broken'' by Compton losses; the infrared through soft x-ray continuum is the synchrotron radiation of the steep, high energy end of the electron distribution. Quantitative fits to specific AGN result in models which satisfy the variability constraints but require electron (re)acceleration throughout the source. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Identification and Quantification of N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones Involved in Bacterial Communication by Small-Scale Synthesis of Internal Standards and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipert, Jan; Treitz, Christian; Leippe, Matthias; Tholey, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) are small signal molecules involved in the quorum sensing of many gram-negative bacteria, and play an important role in biofilm formation and pathogenesis. Present analytical methods for identification and quantification of AHL require time-consuming sample preparation steps and are hampered by the lack of appropriate standards. By aiming at a fast and straightforward method for AHL analytics, we investigated the applicability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Suitable MALDI matrices, including crystalline and ionic liquid matrices, were tested and the fragmentation of different AHL in collision-induced dissociation MS/MS was studied, providing information about characteristic marker fragments ions. Employing small-scale synthesis protocols, we established a versatile and cost-efficient procedure for fast generation of isotope-labeled AHL standards, which can be used without extensive purification and yielded accurate standard curves. Quantitative analysis was possible in the low pico-molar range, with lower limits of quantification reaching from 1 to 5 pmol for different AHL. The developed methodology was successfully applied in a quantitative MALDI MS analysis of low-volume culture supernatants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Smooth hybrid inflation and non-thermal Type II leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sil, Arunansu

    2013-01-01

    We consider a smooth hybrid inflation scenario based on a supersymmetricSU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R ⊗ U(1) B-L model. The Higgs triplets involved in the model play a key role in inflation as well as in explaining the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe. We show that the baryon asymmetry can originate via non-thermal triplet leptogenesis from the decay of SU(2) B-L triplets, whose tiny vacuum expectation values also provide masses for the light neutrinos. (author)

  4. Nonthermal plasmas around black holes, relevant collective modes, new configurations, and magnetic field amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppi, B., E-mail: coppi@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The radiation emission from Shining Black Holes is most frequently observed to have nonthermal features. It is therefore appropriate to consider relevant collective processes in plasmas surrounding black holes that contain high energy particles with nonthermal distributions in momentum space. A fluid description with significant temperature anisotropies is the simplest relevant approach. These anisotropies are shown to have a critical influence on: (a) the existence and characteristics of stationary plasma and field ring configurations, (b) the excitation of “thermo-gravitational modes” driven by temperature anisotropies and gradients that involve gravity and rotation, (c) the generation of magnetic fields over macroscopic scale distances, and (d) the transport of angular momentum.

  5. Ion Streaming Instabilities in Pair Ion Plasma and Localized Structure with Non-Thermal Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir Khattak, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A qausi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted.

  6. Ion streaming instabilities in pair ion plasma and localized structure with non-thermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattak, M. Nasir; Qamar, A., E-mail: mnnasirphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, National Center for Physics, Mardan (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A quasi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted. (author)

  7. Bacterial decontamination using ambient pressure nonthermal discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birmingham, J.G.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    2000-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasmas can efficiently deactivate bacteria in gases, liquids, and on surfaces, as well as can decompose hazardous chemicals. This paper focuses on the changes to bacterial spores and toxic biochemical compounds, such as mycotoxins, after their treatment in ambient pressure discharges. The ability of nonthermal plasmas to decompose toxic chemicals and deactivate hazardous biological materials has been applied to sterilizing medical instruments, ozonating water, and purifying air. In addition, the fast lysis of bacterial spores and other cells has led us to include plasma devices within pathogen detection instruments, where nucleic acids must be accessed. Decontaminating chemical and biological warfare materials from large, high value targets such as building surfaces, after a terrorist attack, are especially challenging. A large area plasma decontamination technology is described.

  8. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  9. FOREWORD: The 12th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET XII) (Pine Mountain, Georgia, USA, 19-23 April 2009) The 12th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET XII) (Pine Mountain, Georgia, USA, 19-23 April 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Thomas M.; Diebold, Ulrike

    2010-03-01

    The 12th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET XII) took place from 19-23 April 2009 in Pine Mountain, Georgia, USA. This was the 12th conference in a strong and vibrant series, which dates back to the early 1980s. DIET XII continued the tradition of exceptional interdisciplinary science and focused on the study of desorption and dynamics induced by electronic excitations of surfaces and interfaces. The format involved invited lectures, contributed talks and a poster session on the most recent developments and advances in this area of surface physics. The Workshop International Steering Committee and attendees wish to dedicate DIET XII to the memory of the late Professor Theodore (Ted) Madey. Ted was one of the main pioneers of this field and was one of the primary individuals working to keep this area of science exciting and adventurous. His overall contributions to surface science were countless and his contributions to the DIET field and community were enormous. He is missed and remembered by many friends and colleagues throughout the world. The papers collected in this issue cover many of the highlights of DIET XII. Topics include ultrafast electron transfer at surfaces and interfaces, quantum and spatially resolved mapping of surface dynamics and desorption, photon-, electron- and ion-beam induced processes at complex interfaces, the role of non-thermal desorption in astrochemistry and astrophysics and laser-/ion-based methods of examining soft matter and biological media. Although the workshop attracted many scientists active in the general area of non-thermal surface processes, DIET XII also attracted many younger scientists (i.e., postdoctoral fellows, advanced graduate students, and a select number of advanced undergraduate students). This field has had an impact in a number of areas including nanoscience, device physics, astrophysics, and now biophysics. We believe that this special issue of Journal of Physics

  10. Secondary ion shadow-cone enhanced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechen Chang (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-02-01

    The incident angle dependence of the secondary particle emission process under keV ion bombardment has been investigated. The results from the full molecular dynamics calculations indicate that the flux anisotropy of the incident beam, resulting from the non-uniform impact parameters for the surface atom of a single crystal, affects the particle desorption in a systematic fashion. The enhanced desorption at certain angles of incidence corresponds to the intensive focusing of the incident beam to the near-surface atom and the extended dissipation of momentum by large-angle scattering. This observation has let us to develop a new theoretical model in which the enhanced desorption is described by the distance of closest encounter along the trajectory of the incident particle to the surface atom. The computer time for the simulation of the incident-angle-dependent emission process is significantly reduced. The results from the calculation based on this model are in good agreement both with the results from the full dynamics calculation and with the experimental results. The new model also allows a complementary evaluation of the microscopic dynamics involved in the shadow-cone enhanced desorption. (author).

  11. Nonthermal plasma technology for organic destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, W.O.; Birmingham, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of nonthermal, electrically driven plasmas for destroying organic contaminants near ambient temperatures and pressures. Three different plasma systems have been developed to treat organics in air, water, and soil. These systems are the gas-phase corona reactor (GPCR) for treating air, the liquid phase corona reactor for treating water, and the in-situ corona for treating soils. This paper focuses on the GPCR as an alternative to other air purification technologies for treating off-gasses from remedial action efforts and industrial emissions

  12. Lead sorption-desorption from organic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Zaragoza, Victor M; Carrillo, Rogelio; Gutierrez Castorena, Carmen M

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption are mechanisms involved in the reduction of metal mobility and bioavailability in organic materials. Metal release from substrates is controlled by desorption. The capacity of coffee husk and pulp residues, vermicompost and cow manure to adsorb Pb2+ was evaluated. The mechanisms involved in the sorption process were also studied. Organic materials retained high concentrations of lead (up to 36,000 mg L(-1)); however, the mechanisms of sorption varied according to the characteristics of each material: degree of decomposition, pH, cation exchange capacity and percentage of organic matter. Vermicompost and manure removed 98% of the Pb from solution. Lead precipitated in manure and vermicompost, forming lead oxide (PbO) and lead ferrite (PbFe4O7). Adsorption isotherms did not fit to the typical Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Not only specific and non-specific adsorption was observed, but also precipitation and coprecipitation. Lead desorption from vermicompost and cow manure was less than 2%. For remediation of Pb-polluted sites, the application of vermicompost and manure is recommended in places with alkaline soils because Pb precipitation can be induced, whereas coffee pulp residue is recommended for acidic soils where Pb is adsorbed.

  13. Moderate pressure plasma source of nonthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, S.; Raitses, Y.

    2018-06-01

    Plasma sources of electrons offer control of gas and surface chemistry without the need for complex vacuum systems. The plasma electron source presented here is based on a cold cathode glow discharge (GD) operating in a dc steady state mode in a moderate pressure range of 2–10 torr. Ion-induced secondary electron emission is the source of electrons accelerated to high energies in the cathode sheath potential. The source geometry is a key to the availability and the extraction of the nonthermal portion of the electron population. The source consists of a flat and a cylindrical electrode, 1 mm apart. Our estimates show that the length of the cathode sheath in the plasma source is commensurate (~0.5–1 mm) with the inter-electrode distance so the GD operates in an obstructed regime without a positive column. Estimations of the electron energy relaxation confirm the non-local nature of this GD, hence the nonthermal portion of the electron population is available for extraction outside of the source. The use of a cylindrical anode presents a simple and promising method of extracting the high energy portion of the electron population. Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy confirm the presence of electrons with energies ~15 eV outside of the source. These electrons become available for surface modification and radical production outside of the source. The extraction of the electrons of specific energies by varying the anode geometry opens exciting opportunities for future exploration.

  14. Nonthermal Quantum Channels as a Thermodynamical Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navascués, Miguel; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro

    2015-07-01

    Quantum thermodynamics can be understood as a resource theory, whereby thermal states are free and the only allowed operations are unitary transformations commuting with the total Hamiltonian of the system. Previous literature on the subject has just focused on transformations between different state resources, overlooking the fact that quantum operations which do not commute with the total energy also constitute a potentially valuable resource. In this Letter, given a number of nonthermal quantum channels, we study the problem of how to integrate them in a thermal engine so as to distill a maximum amount of work. We find that, in the limit of asymptotically many uses of each channel, the distillable work is an additive function of the considered channels, computable for both finite dimensional quantum operations and bosonic channels. We apply our results to bound the amount of distillable work due to the natural nonthermal processes postulated in the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. We find that, although GRW theory predicts the possibility of extracting work from the vacuum at no cost, the power which a collapse engine could, in principle, generate is extremely low.

  15. Nonthermal Radiation from Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyesung Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of high energy cosmic rays (CRs are thought to be produced by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA at supernova remnants (SNRs within the Galaxy. Fortunately, nonthermal emissions from CR protons and electrons can provide direct observational evidence for such a model and place strong constraints on the complex nonlinear plasma processes in DSA theory. In this study we calculate the energy spectra of CR protons and electrons in Type Ia SNRs, using time-dependent DSA simulations that incorporate phenomenological models for some wave-particle interactions. We demonstrate that the timedependent evolution of the self-amplified magnetic fields, Alfvénic drift, and escape of the highest energy particles affect the energy spectra of accelerated protons and electrons, and so resulting nonthermal radiation spectrum. Especially, the spectral cutoffs in X-ray and γ-ray emission spectra are regulated by the evolution of the highest energy particles, which are injected at the early phase of SNRs. Thus detailed understandings of nonlinear wave-particle interactions and time-dependent DSA simulations of SNRs are crucial in testing the SNR hypothesis for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  16. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO{sub x} in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, Takuya [Department of Products Engineering and Environmental Management, Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro-machi, Minamisaitama, Saitama 345-8501 (Japan); Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Okubo, Masaaki, E-mail: mokubo@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • High-efficiency continuous diesel NO{sub x} reduction method is proposed. • Characteristics of diesel NO{sub x} adsorption and desorption on adsorbent is provided. • Efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction with nonthermal plasma is evaluated. • Efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction with exhaust gas component recirculation is evaluated. • High NO{sub x} removal efficiency equal to only 1.0% penalty of engine power is achieved. - Abstract: Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO{sub x} emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO{sub x} in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NO{sub x} adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO{sub x} in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO{sub x} in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO{sub x} in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components’ recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO{sub x} reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO{sub x} removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO{sub 2})/kWh for NO{sub x} removal and continuous NO{sub x} reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5–7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power.

  17. Nonthermal Radiation Processes in Interplanetary Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, A. C. L.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la interacci6n de haces de electrones energeticos con plasmas interplanetarios, se excitan ondas intensas de Langmuir debido a inestabilidad del haz de plasma. Las ondas Langmuir a su vez interaccio nan con fluctuaciones de densidad de baja frecuencia para producir radiaciones. Si la longitud de las ondas de Langmujr exceden las condicio nes del umbral, se puede efectuar la conversi5n de modo no lineal a on- das electromagneticas a traves de inestabilidades parametricas. As se puede excitar en un plasma inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas impulsadas por ondas intensas de Langmuir: (1) inestabilidades de decaimiento/fusi5n electromagnetica impulsadas por una bomba de Lang- muir que viaja; (2) inestabilidades dobles electromagneticas de decai- miento/fusi5n impulsadas por dos bombas de Langrnuir directamente opues- tas; y (3) inestabilidades de dos corrientes oscilatorias electromagne- ticas impulsadas por dos bombas de Langmuir de corrientes contrarias. Se concluye que las inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas in- ducidas por las ondas de Langmuir son las fuentes posibles de radiacio- nes no termicas en plasmas interplanetarios. ABSTRACT: Nonthermal radio emissions near the local electron plasma frequency have been detected in various regions of interplanetary plasmas: solar wind, upstream of planetary bow shock, and heliopause. Energetic electron beams accelerated by solar flares, planetary bow shocks, and the terminal shock of heliosphere provide the energy source for these radio emissions. Thus, it is expected that similar nonthermal radiation processes may be responsible for the generation of these radio emissions. As energetic electron beams interact with interplanetary plasmas, intense Langmuir waves are excited due to a beam-plasma instability. The Langmuir waves then interact with low-frequency density fluctuations to produce radiations near the local electron plasma frequency. If Langmuir waves are of sufficiently large

  18. 5th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Jennison, Dwight R; Stechel, Ellen B; DIET V; Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    1993-01-01

    This volume in the Springer Series on Surface Sciences presents a recent account of advances in the ever-broadening field of electron-and photon-stimulated sur­ face processes. As in previous volumes, these advances are presented as the proceedings of the International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; the fifth workshop (DIET V) was held in Taos, New Mexico, April 1-4, 1992. It will be abundantly clear to the reader that "DIET" is not restricted to desorption, but has for several years included photochemistry, non-thermal surface modification, exciton self-trapping, and many other phenomena that are induced by electron or photon bombardment. However, most stimulated surface processes do share a common physics: initial electronic excitation, localization of the excitation, and conversion of electronic energy into nuclear kinetic energy. It is the rich variation of this theme which makes the field so interesting and fruitful. We have divided the book into eleven parts in orde...

  19. Nonthermal plasma technology for organic destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, W.O.; Birmingham, J.G.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of nonthermal, electrically driven plasmas for destroying organic contaminants near ambient temperatures and pressures. Three different plasma systems have been developed to treat organics in air, water, and soil. These systems are the Gas-Phase Corona Reactor (GPCR)III for treating air, the Liquid-Phase Corona Reactor for treating water, and In Situ Corona for treating soils. This presentation focuses on recent technical developments, commercial status, and project costs of OPCR as a cost-effective alternative to other air-purification technologies that are now in use to treat off-gases from site-remediation efforts as well as industrial emissions

  20. Nonthermal and screening effects on photoionizations in Lorentzian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong-Soo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2009-01-01

    The nonthermal and plasma screening effects on the x-ray photoionization process are investigated in astrophysical Lorentzian plasmas. The screened atomic wave function and energy eigenvalue of the target ion in Lorentzian plasmas are obtained by the Rayleigh-Ritz variational method. The x-ray retardation and screened Coulomb corrections are considered to obtain a photoionization cross section as a function of the spectral index and plasma parameters. It is shown that the nonthermal character of the Lorentzian plasma suppresses the photoionization cross section. Hence, the photoionization cross sections in nonthermal plasmas are found to be always smaller than those in thermal plasmas. It is also shown that the plasma screening effect is more significant for small spectral indices. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the photoionization cross section is found to be decreased with an increase in the Debye length.

  1. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a non-thermal technology based on atmospheric-pressure (AP) cold plasma to sanitize foods, food packaging materials, and other hardware...

  2. Nonthermal emission from clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We show that the spectral and radial distribution of the nonthermal emission of massive, M ∼> 10 14.5 M ☉ , galaxy clusters may be approximately described by simple analytic expressions, which depend on the cluster thermal X-ray properties and on two model parameter, β core and η e . β core is the ratio of the cosmic-ray (CR) energy density (within a logarithmic CR energy interval) and the thermal energy density at the cluster core, and η e(p) is the fraction of the thermal energy generated in strong collisionless shocks, which is deposited in CR electrons (protons). Using a simple analytic model for the evolution of intra-cluster medium CRs, which are produced by accretion shocks, we find that β core ≅ η p /200, nearly independent of cluster mass and with a scatter Δln β core ≅ 1 between clusters of given mass. We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) and γ-ray luminosities produced by inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by electrons accelerated in accretion shocks (primary electrons) exceed the luminosities produced by secondary particles (generated in hadronic interactions within the cluster) by factors ≅ 500(η e /η p )(T/10 keV) −1/2 and ≅ 150(η e /η p )(T/10 keV) −1/2 respectively, where T is the cluster temperature. Secondary particle emission may dominate at the radio and very high energy (∼> 1 TeV) γ-ray bands. Our model predicts, in contrast with some earlier work, that the HXR and γ-ray emission from clusters of galaxies are extended, since the emission is dominated at these energies by primary (rather than by secondary) electrons. Our predictions are consistent with the observed nonthermal emission of the Coma cluster for η p ∼ η e ∼ 0.1. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed. In particular, we identify the clusters which are the best candidates for detection in

  3. Nonthermal emission from clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli, E-mail: doron.kushnir@weizmann.ac.il, E-mail: eli.waxman@weizmann.ac.il [Physics Faculty, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-08-01

    We show that the spectral and radial distribution of the nonthermal emission of massive, M ∼> 10{sup 14.5}M{sub ☉}, galaxy clusters may be approximately described by simple analytic expressions, which depend on the cluster thermal X-ray properties and on two model parameter, β{sub core} and η{sub e}. β{sub core} is the ratio of the cosmic-ray (CR) energy density (within a logarithmic CR energy interval) and the thermal energy density at the cluster core, and η{sub e(p)} is the fraction of the thermal energy generated in strong collisionless shocks, which is deposited in CR electrons (protons). Using a simple analytic model for the evolution of intra-cluster medium CRs, which are produced by accretion shocks, we find that β{sub core} ≅ η{sub p}/200, nearly independent of cluster mass and with a scatter Δln β{sub core} ≅ 1 between clusters of given mass. We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) and γ-ray luminosities produced by inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by electrons accelerated in accretion shocks (primary electrons) exceed the luminosities produced by secondary particles (generated in hadronic interactions within the cluster) by factors ≅ 500(η{sub e}/η{sub p})(T/10 keV){sup −1/2} and ≅ 150(η{sub e}/η{sub p})(T/10 keV){sup −1/2} respectively, where T is the cluster temperature. Secondary particle emission may dominate at the radio and very high energy (∼> 1 TeV) γ-ray bands. Our model predicts, in contrast with some earlier work, that the HXR and γ-ray emission from clusters of galaxies are extended, since the emission is dominated at these energies by primary (rather than by secondary) electrons. Our predictions are consistent with the observed nonthermal emission of the Coma cluster for η{sub p} ∼ η{sub e} ∼ 0.1. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed. In particular

  4. Nonthermal emission from clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli

    2009-08-01

    We show that the spectral and radial distribution of the nonthermal emission of massive, M gtrsim 1014.5Msun, galaxy clusters may be approximately described by simple analytic expressions, which depend on the cluster thermal X-ray properties and on two model parameter, βcore and ηe. βcore is the ratio of the cosmic-ray (CR) energy density (within a logarithmic CR energy interval) and the thermal energy density at the cluster core, and ηe(p) is the fraction of the thermal energy generated in strong collisionless shocks, which is deposited in CR electrons (protons). Using a simple analytic model for the evolution of intra-cluster medium CRs, which are produced by accretion shocks, we find that βcore simeq ηp/200, nearly independent of cluster mass and with a scatter Δln βcore simeq 1 between clusters of given mass. We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) and γ-ray luminosities produced by inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by electrons accelerated in accretion shocks (primary electrons) exceed the luminosities produced by secondary particles (generated in hadronic interactions within the cluster) by factors simeq 500(ηe/ηp)(T/10 keV)-1/2 and simeq 150(ηe/ηp)(T/10 keV)-1/2 respectively, where T is the cluster temperature. Secondary particle emission may dominate at the radio and very high energy (gtrsim 1 TeV) γ-ray bands. Our model predicts, in contrast with some earlier work, that the HXR and γ-ray emission from clusters of galaxies are extended, since the emission is dominated at these energies by primary (rather than by secondary) electrons. Our predictions are consistent with the observed nonthermal emission of the Coma cluster for ηp ~ ηe ~ 0.1. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed. In particular, we identify the clusters which are the best candidates for detection in γ-rays. Finally, we show

  5. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

  6. Absorption/desorption in sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimpally, A.

    1987-01-01

    This survey paper shall seek to present the present state of knowledge concerning absorption and desorption in spray chambers. The first part of the paper presents the theories and formulas for the atomization and break-up of sprays in nozzles. Formulas for the average (sauter-mean) diameters are then presented. For the case of absorption processes, the formulas for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients is in drops. The total; mass transfer is the total of the transfer in individual drops. For the case of desorption of sparingly soluble gases from liquids in a spray chamber, the mass transfer occurs in the spray just at the point of break-up of the jet. Formulas for the desorption of gases are presented

  7. Search for Nonthermal X-Rays from Supernova Remnant Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, R.; Keohane, J.; Hwang, U.; Allen, G.; Gotthelf, E.

    The demonstration by ASCA that the nonthermal X-ray emission from the rim of SN1006 is synchrotron emission from TeV electrons, produced in the same environment responsible for cosmic ray protons and nuclei (Koyama et al. 1995, Nature 378, 255), has stimulated a search for nonthermal X-rays from other remnants. Nonthermal emission has subsequently been found to arise in the shells of at least two other remnants, Cas A and IC 443. In Cas A, a hard tail is detected using ASCA, XTE, and OSSE to energies exceeding 100 keV; the shape of the spectrum rules out all mechanisms except synchrotron radiation. In IC 443, the previously known hard emission has been shown using ASCA to be isolated to a small region along the rim of the remnant, where the shock is interacting most strongly with a molecular cloud. Nonthermal X-ray emission is thought to arise here by enhanced cosmic ray production associated with the shock/cloud interaction (Keohane et al. 1997, ApJ in press). We describe the properties of the nonthermal emission in SN1006, Cas A, and IC 443, and discuss the status of our search for nonthermal emission associated with the shocks of other Galactic and LMC SNR's.

  8. On the Non-Thermal Energy Content of Cosmic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Vazza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: the budget of non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is not well constrained, owing to the observational and theoretical difficulties in studying these diluted plasmas on large scales; (2 Method: we use recent cosmological simulations with complex physics in order to connect the emergence of non-thermal energy to the underlying evolution of gas and dark matter; (3 Results: the impact of non-thermal energy (e.g., cosmic rays, magnetic fields and turbulent motions is found to increase in the outer region of galaxy clusters. Within numerical and theoretical uncertainties, turbulent motions dominate the budget of non-thermal energy in most of the cosmic volume; (4 Conclusion: assessing the distribution non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is crucial to perform high-precision cosmology in the future. Constraining the level of non-thermal energy in cluster outskirts will improve our understanding of the acceleration of relativistic particles and of the origin of extragalactic magnetic fields.

  9. Data compilation for particle impact desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiyama, Takashi; Nagai, Siro; Ozawa, Kunio; Takeuchi, Fujio.

    1984-05-01

    The desorption of gases from solid surfaces by incident electrons, ions and photons is one of the important processes of hydrogen recycling in the controlled thermonuclear reactors. We have surveyed the literature concerning the particle impact desorption published through 1983 and compiled the data on the desorption cross sections and desorption yields with the aid of a computer. This report presents the results obtained for electron stimulated desorption, the desorption cross sections and yields being given in graphs and tables as functions of incident electron energy, surface temperature and gas exposure. (author)

  10. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  11. Evolution of streamer groups in nonthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, M., E-mail: mokubo@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) induced by atmospheric nanosecond pulsed corona discharge have been studied for controlling pollution from combustors, such as boilers, incinerators, and diesel engines. In high-speed short-width high-voltage pulsed corona discharge-induced plasmas, primary streamer evolution is followed by secondary streamer evolution. Though this phenomenon is known experimentally, the details of the structures of the streamers and their evolution mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this letter, we perform quasi two-dimensional numerical analysis of nonequilibrium NTP induced by a nanosecond positive pulsed corona discharge. The continuum fluid equations for two-temperature nonequilibrium NTP are used as governing equations. In this study, 197 gas phase reactions for 25 chemical species and 21 surface reactions on the inner glass wall surface are considered in an air plasma under atmospheric pressure. The simulated behavior of the streamer groups agrees with experimental observations. Soon after the voltage increases on the reactor, primary streamers are formed, which may transit the complete gap, disappearing near the peak voltage. Next, second streamers appear, disappearing at the end of the applied voltage pulse. The streamer wavelength and the distance between the streamers in the axial direction are determined. Moreover, ozone generation is shown to be more significant in the secondary streamer. This simulation will allow better predictions for nanosecond positive pulsed plasma systems.

  12. Evolution of streamer groups in nonthermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) induced by atmospheric nanosecond pulsed corona discharge have been studied for controlling pollution from combustors, such as boilers, incinerators, and diesel engines. In high-speed short-width high-voltage pulsed corona discharge-induced plasmas, primary streamer evolution is followed by secondary streamer evolution. Though this phenomenon is known experimentally, the details of the structures of the streamers and their evolution mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this letter, we perform quasi two-dimensional numerical analysis of nonequilibrium NTP induced by a nanosecond positive pulsed corona discharge. The continuum fluid equations for two-temperature nonequilibrium NTP are used as governing equations. In this study, 197 gas phase reactions for 25 chemical species and 21 surface reactions on the inner glass wall surface are considered in an air plasma under atmospheric pressure. The simulated behavior of the streamer groups agrees with experimental observations. Soon after the voltage increases on the reactor, primary streamers are formed, which may transit the complete gap, disappearing near the peak voltage. Next, second streamers appear, disappearing at the end of the applied voltage pulse. The streamer wavelength and the distance between the streamers in the axial direction are determined. Moreover, ozone generation is shown to be more significant in the secondary streamer. This simulation will allow better predictions for nanosecond positive pulsed plasma systems.

  13. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  14. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  15. Integrated CO{sub 2} Capture and Utilization Using Non-Thermal Plasmolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Matthew, E-mail: mmoss1@sheffield.ac.uk; Reed, Daniel G.; Allen, Ray W. K.; Styring, Peter [UK Centre for Carbon Dioxide Utilisation, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-02

    In this work, two simple processes for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) such as capture and utilization have been combined to form a whole systems approach to carbon capture and utilization (CCU). The first stage utilizes a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system, which offers many benefits over current amine technologies. It was found that high selectivity can be achieved with rapid adsorption/desorption times while employing a cheap, durable sorbent that exhibits no sorbent losses and is easily regenerated by simple pressure drops. The PSA system is capable of capturing and upgrading the CO{sub 2} concentration of a waste gas stream from 12.5% to a range of higher purities. As many CCU end processes have some tolerance toward impurities in the feed, in the form of nitrogen (N{sub 2}), for example, this is highly advantageous for this PSA system since CO{sub 2} purities in excess of 80% can be achieved with only a few steps and minimal energy input. Non-thermal plasma is one such technology that can tolerate, and even benefit from, small N{sub 2} impurities in the feed, therefore a 100% pure CO{sub 2} stream is not required. The second stage of this process deploys a nanosecond pulsed corona discharge reactor to split the captured CO{sub 2} into carbon monoxide (CO), which can then be used as a chemical feedstock for other syntheses. Corona discharge has proven industrial applications for gas cleaning and the benefit of pulsed power reduces the energy consumption of the system. The wire-in-cylinder geometry concentrates the volume of gas treated into the area of high electric field. Previous work has suggested that moderate conversions can be achieved (9%), compared to other non-thermal plasma methods, but with higher energy efficiencies (>60%).

  16. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  17. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  18. Carbon tetrachloride desorption from activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, L.A.; Sansone, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride was desorbed from a granular activated carbon subsequent to its adsorption under various vapor exposure periods. The varied conditions of exposure resulted in a range of partially saturated carbon beds which, when followed by a constant flow rate for desorption, generated different forms of the desorbing concentration versus time curve. A method of analyzing the desorption curves is presented which permits extraction of the various desorbing rates from the different desorption and to relate this to the time required for such regeneration. The Wheeler desorption kinetic equation was used to calculate the pseudo first order desorption rate constant for the carbon. The desorption rate constant was found to increase monotonically with increasing saturation of the bed, permitting the calculation of the maximum desorption rate constant for the carbon at 100% saturation. The Retentivity Index of the carbon, defined as the dimensionless ratio of the adsorption to the desorption rate constant, was found to be 681

  19. Nonthermal effects of therapeutic ultrasound: the frequency resonance hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Lennart D

    2002-07-01

    To present the frequency resonance hypothesis, a possible mechanical mechanism by which treatment with non-thermal levels of ultrasound stimulates therapeutic effects. The review encompasses a 4-decade history but focuses on recent reports describing the effects of nonthermal therapeutic levels of ultrasound at the cellular and molecular levels. A search of MEDLINE from 1965 through 2000 using the terms ultrasound and therapeutic ultrasound. The literature provides a number of examples in which exposure of cells to therapeutic ultrasound under nonthermal conditions modified cellular functions. Nonthermal levels of ultrasound are reported to modulate membrane properties, alter cellular proliferation, and produce increases in proteins associated with inflammation and injury repair. Combined, these data suggest that nonthermal effects of therapeutic ultrasound can modify the inflammatory response. The concept of the absorption of ultrasonic energy by enzymatic proteins leading to changes in the enzymes activity is not novel. However, recent reports demonstrating that ultrasound affects enzyme activity and possibly gene regulation provide sufficient data to present a probable molecular mechanism of ultrasound's nonthermal therapeutic action. The frequency resonance hypothesis describes 2 possible biological mechanisms that may alter protein function as a result of the absorption of ultrasonic energy. First, absorption of mechanical energy by a protein may produce a transient conformational shift (modifying the 3-dimensional structure) and alter the protein's functional activity. Second, the resonance or shearing properties of the wave (or both) may dissociate a multimolecular complex, thereby disrupting the complex's function. This review focuses on recent studies that have reported cellular and molecular effects of therapeutic ultrasound and presents a mechanical mechanism that may lead to a better understanding of how the nonthermal effects of ultrasound may be

  20. Sorption-desorption dynamics of radiocaesium in organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcke, E.; Cremers, A.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic study has been carried out on the radiocaesium sorption properties of 25 soils (forest, peat) covering organic matter (OM) contents in the range of 10-97%. Predictions are made for radiocaesium partitioning between micaceous Frayed Edge Sites (FES) and regular exchange sites (RES) on the basis of specific radiocaesium interception potentials of the soil and overall exchange capacity. It is shown that for soils with a very high OM content (>80%), significant fractions are present in a readily reversible form in the OM phase. In soils of low-medium OM content (<40%), only a very minor fraction is present in the OM exchange complex. Experimental findings, based on a desorption screening with a variety of desorption agents are in agreement with these predictions. On the basis of a study of sorption kinetics, some additional tools are available for identifying problem soils. In cases of very high OM content, radiocaesium adsorption is completed within hours demonstrating the involvement of the OM sites. In soils for which interception occurs in the FES, sorption continues to proceed for periods of 2-3 weeks. In conclusion, some examples are presented on radiocaesium desorption using ion exchangers as radiocaesium sinks in promoting desorption. For a peaty soil, near quantitative desorption is accomplished. For forest soils with OM contents in a range of 10-40%, fixation levels of 30-50% are demonstrated

  1. Electron stimulated desorption of gases at technological surfaces of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, M.Q.; Williams, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release of gas by electron bombardment at aluminium alloy surfaces in vacuum -9 torr has been investigated for a range of treatments including bakeout and glow discharge cleaning. Particular attention has been given to the role of continuous electron bombardment, with current densities and electron energies of up to 1.5 mA cm -2 and 2.0 keV, respectively, over the 10 cm 2 of surface area under irradiation. The observations of desorption efficiency, defined as the number of desorbed molecules per incident electron, conform to a model involving a dynamic balance between adsorption and desorption, with contributions to adsorption from both surface and sub-surface gas. Continuous electron bombardment promotes a surface with low desorption efficiency, -5 mol/electron, however, the conditioning cycle is accelerated significantly by glow discharge treatment. There is evidence of some short-term memory when the samples are exposed to air. (author)

  2. High-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE for non-thermal ablation without muscle contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arena Christopher B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic irreversible electroporation (IRE is an emerging technology for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. The technique involves delivering a series of unipolar electric pulses to permanently destabilize the plasma membrane of cancer cells through an increase in transmembrane potential, which leads to the development of a tissue lesion. Clinically, IRE requires the administration of paralytic agents to prevent muscle contractions during treatment that are associated with the delivery of electric pulses. This study shows that by applying high-frequency, bipolar bursts, muscle contractions can be eliminated during IRE without compromising the non-thermal mechanism of cell death. Methods A combination of analytical, numerical, and experimental techniques were performed to investigate high-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE. A theoretical model for determining transmembrane potential in response to arbitrary electric fields was used to identify optimal burst frequencies and amplitudes for in vivo treatments. A finite element model for predicting thermal damage based on the electric field distribution was used to design non-thermal protocols for in vivo experiments. H-FIRE was applied to the brain of rats, and muscle contractions were quantified via accelerometers placed at the cervicothoracic junction. MRI and histological evaluation was performed post-operatively to assess ablation. Results No visual or tactile evidence of muscle contraction was seen during H-FIRE at 250 kHz or 500 kHz, while all IRE protocols resulted in detectable muscle contractions at the cervicothoracic junction. H-FIRE produced ablative lesions in brain tissue that were characteristic in cellular morphology of non-thermal IRE treatments. Specifically, there was complete uniformity of tissue death within targeted areas, and a sharp transition zone was present between lesioned and normal brain. Conclusions H-FIRE is a feasible technique for

  3. Non-thermal escape of molecular hydrogen from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, M.; Zhang, P.; Kharchenko, V.

    2012-05-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of non-thermal escape of molecular hydrogen from Mars induced by collisions with hot atomic oxygen from the Martian corona. To accurately describe the energy transfer in O + H2(v, j) collisions, we performed extensive quantum-mechanical calculations of state-to-state elastic, inelastic, and reactive cross sections. The escape flux of H2 molecules was evaluated using a simplified 1D column model of the Martian atmosphere with realistic densities of atmospheric gases and hot oxygen production rates for low solar activity conditions. An average intensity of the non-thermal escape flux of H2 of 1.9 × 105 cm-2s-1 was obtained considering energetic O atoms produced in dissociative recombinations of O2+ ions. Predicted ro-vibrational distribution of the escaping H2 was found to contain a significant fraction of higher rotational states. While the non-thermal escape rate was found to be lower than Jeans rate for H2 molecules, the non-thermal escape rates of HD and D2 are significantly higher than their respective Jeans rates. The accurate evaluation of the collisional escape flux of H2 and its isotopes is important for understanding non-thermal escape of molecules from Mars, as well as for the formation of hot H2 Martian corona. The described molecular ejection mechanism is general and expected to contribute to atmospheric escape of H2 and other light molecules from planets, satellites, and exoplanetary bodies.

  4. Monitoring non-thermal plasma processes for nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Process characterization tools have played a crucial role in the investigation of dusty plasmas. The presence of dust in certain non-thermal plasma processes was first detected by laser light scattering measurements. Techniques like laser induced particle explosive evaporation and ion mass spectrometry have provided the experimental evidence necessary for the development of the theory of particle nucleation in silane-containing non-thermal plasmas. This review provides first a summary of these early efforts, and then discusses recent investigations using in situ characterization techniques to understand the interaction between nanoparticles and plasmas. The advancement of such monitoring techniques is necessary to fully develop the potential of non-thermal plasmas as unique materials synthesis and processing platforms. At the same time, the strong coupling between materials and plasma properties suggest that it is also necessary to advance techniques for the measurement of plasma properties while in presence of dust. Recent progress in this area will be discussed.

  5. Saturated Resin Ectopic Regeneration by Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjing Hao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyes are some of the most refractory organic compounds in the environment due to their complex and various structure. An integrated resin adsorption/Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD plasma regeneration was proposed to treat the indigo carmine solution. It is the first time to report ectopic regeneration of the saturated resins by non-thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The adsorption/desorption efficiency, surface functional groups, structural properties, regeneration efficiency, and the intermediate products between gas and liquid phase before and after treatment were investigated. The results showed that DBD plasma could maintain the efficient adsorption performance of resins while degrading the indigo carmine adsorbed by resins. The degradation rate of indigo carmine reached 88% and the regeneration efficiency (RE can be maintained above 85% after multi-successive regeneration cycles. The indigo carmine contaminants were decomposed by a variety of reactive radicals leading to fracture of exocyclic C=C bond, which could cause decoloration of dye solution. Based on above results, a possible degradation pathway for the indigo carmine by resin adsorption/DBD plasma treatment was proposed.

  6. Cold plasma as a nonthermal food processing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of meats, seafood, poultry, eggs, and fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables is an ongoing concern. Although well-established in non-food applications for surface treatment and modification, cold plasma is a relatively new food safety intervention. As a nonthermal food processing te...

  7. Applying chemical engineering concepts to non-thermal plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro AFFONSO, NOBREGA; Alain, GAUNAND; Vandad, ROHANI; François, CAUNEAU; Laurent, FULCHERI

    2018-06-01

    Process scale-up remains a considerable challenge for environmental applications of non-thermal plasmas. Undersanding the impact of reactor hydrodynamics in the performance of the process is a key step to overcome this challenge. In this work, we apply chemical engineering concepts to analyse the impact that different non-thermal plasma reactor configurations and regimes, such as laminar or plug flow, may have on the reactor performance. We do this in the particular context of the removal of pollutants by non-thermal plasmas, for which a simplified model is available. We generalise this model to different reactor configurations and, under certain hypotheses, we show that a reactor in the laminar regime may have a behaviour significantly different from one in the plug flow regime, often assumed in the non-thermal plasma literature. On the other hand, we show that a packed-bed reactor behaves very similarly to one in the plug flow regime. Beyond those results, the reader will find in this work a quick introduction to chemical reaction engineering concepts.

  8. Nonthermal effects in thermal treatment applications of nonionizing irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Sharon

    2005-04-01

    Several non-thermal factors influence the primary and secondary effects of interstitial thermal treatments using various types of non-ionizing irradiation. Recognition and understanding of the influences of these various factors are important in choice of energy source, the configuration of the application instrument and the design of treatments.

  9. Thermal and nonthermal particle production without event horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, N.

    1979-01-01

    Usually, particle production in accelerated frames is discussed in connection with the presence of event horizons and with a planckian spectrum. Accelerated frames without event horizons, where particle production takes place with thermal as well as nonthermal distributions, are constructed. (Auth.)

  10. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  11. Modeling of hydrogen desorption from tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guterl, J., E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Smirnov, R.D. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Uberuaga, B.; Voter, A.F.; Perez, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 8754 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen retention in metallic plasma-facing components is among key-issues for future fusion devices. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, hydrogen desorption parameters experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions show large discrepancies. In this paper, we therefore investigate hydrogen recombination and desorption on tungsten surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to analyze adsorption states, diffusion, hydrogen recombination into molecules, and clustering of hydrogen on tungsten surfaces. The quality of tungsten hydrogen interatomic potential is discussed in the light of MD simulations results, showing that three body interactions in current interatomic potential do not allow to reproduce hydrogen molecular recombination and desorption. Effects of surface hydrogen clustering on hydrogen desorption are analyzed by introducing a kinetic model describing the competition between surface diffusion, clustering and recombination. Different desorption regimes are identified and reproduce some aspects of desorption regimes experimentally observed.

  12. Evaluation of the differential energy distribution of systems of non-thermally activated molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    A non-thermally activated molecule may undergo pressure dependent deactivation or energy dependent decomposition. It should be possible to use the pressure dependent stabilization/decomposition yields to determine the energy distribution in non-thermal systems. The numerical technique of regularization has been applied to this chemical problem to evaluate this distribution. The resulting method has been tested with a number of simulated distributions and kinetic models. Application was then made to several real chemical systems to determine the energy distribution resulting from the primary excitation process. Testing showed the method to be quite effective in reproducing input distributions from simulated data in all test cases. The effect of experimental error proved to be negligible when the error-filled data were first smoothed with a parabolic spline. This method has been applied to three different hot atom activated systems. Application to 18 F-for-F substituted CH 3 CF 3 generated a broad distribution extending from 62 to 318 kcal/mol, with a median energy of 138 kcal/mol. The shape of this distribution (and those from the other applications) indicated the involvement of two mechanisms in the excitation process. Analysis of the T-for-H substituted CH 3 CH 2 F system showed a more narrow distribution (56-218 kcal/mol) with a median energy of 79.8 kcal/mol. The distribution of the T-for-H substituted CH 3 CH 2 Cl system, extending from 54.5 to 199 kcal/mol was seen to be quite similar. It was concluded that this method is a valid approach to evaluating differential energy distributions in non-thermal systems, specifically those activated by hot atom substitution

  13. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gonçalves Alonso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption and desorption are important processes as they regulate the movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involving their metabolites in soil are scarce. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam metabolites (indaziflam-triazinediamine (FDAT, indaziflam-triazine-indanone (ITI and indaziflam-carboxilic acid (ICA were investigated in six Brazilian (BRA soils and three United States (USA soils with different physicochemical properties. The Freundlich equation described sorption of the metabolites for all soils (R2 > 0.98; 1/n ~ 1. Sorption order (Kf was ITI > ICA > FDAT. Mean values of Kf,oc were 453, 289, and 81 (BRA and 444, 48, and 48 (USA for metabolites ITI, ICA, and FDAT respectively. Desorption was hysteretic for all metabolites in all soils. These results suggest that these metabolites fall in the classification range of mobile to moderately mobile in soils.

  14. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H 2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 o C at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  15. Investigations into ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, Theodore W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) is a technique for converting large biomolecules into gas phase ions. Some characteristics of the commonly used uv matrices are determined. Solubilities in methanol range from 0.1 to 0.5 M. Solid phase absorption spectra are found to be similar to solution, but slightly red-shifted. Acoustic and quartz crystal microbalance signals are investigated as possible means of uv-MALD quantitation. Evidence for the existence of desorption thresholds is presented. Threshold values are determined to be in the range of 2 to 3 MW/cm2. A transient imaging technique based on laser-excited fluorescence for monitoring MALD plumes is described. Sensitivity is well within the levels required for studying matrix-assisted laser desorption, where analyte concentrations are significantly lower than those in conventional laser desorption. Results showing the effect of film morphology, particularly film thickness, on plume dynamics are presented. In particular, MALD plumes from thicker films tend to exhibit higher axial velocities. Fluorescent labeling of protein and of DNA is used to allow imaging of their uv-MALD generated plumes. Integrated concentrations are available with respect to time, making it possible to assess the rate of fragmentation. The spatial and temporal distributions are important for the design of secondary ionization schemes to enhance ion yields and for the optimization of ion collection in time-of-flight MS instruments to maximize resolution. Such information could also provide insight into whether ionization is closely associated with the desorption step or whether it is a result of subsequent collisions with the matrix gas (e.g., proton transfer). Although the present study involves plumes in a normal atmosphere, adaptation to measurements in vacuum (e.g., inside a mass spectrometer) should be straightforward.

  16. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  17. Optimization of nonthermal fusion power consistent with energy channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, P.B.; Herrmann, M.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1995-02-01

    If the energy of charged fusion products can be diverted directly to fuel ions, non-Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between species will result. To determine the importance of these nonthermal effects, the fusion power density is optimized at constant-β for nonthermal distributions that are self-consistently maintained by channeling of energy from charged fusion products. For D-T and D- 3 He reactors, with 75% of charged fusion product power diverted to fuel ions, temperature differences between electrons and ions increase the reactivity by 40-70%, while non- Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between ionic species increase the reactivity by an additional 3-15%

  18. Some non-thermal microbial inactivation methods in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yangilar, F.; Kabil, E.

    2013-01-01

    During the production of dairy products, some thermal processes such as pasteurization and sterilization are used commonly to inactive microorganisms. But as a result of thermal processes, loss of nutrient and aroma, non-enzymatic browning and organoleptic differentiation especially in dairy products are seen. Because of this, alternative methods are needed to provide microbial inactivation and as major problems are caused by high temperatures, non-thermal processes are focused on. For this purpose, some methods such as high pressure (HP), pulsed light (PL), ultraviolet radiation (UV), supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) or pulsed electric field (PEF) are used in food. These methods products are processed in ambient temperature and so not only mentioned losses are minimized but also freshness and naturality of products can be preserved. In this work, we will try to be given information about methods of non-thermal microbial inactivation of dairy products. (author) [tr

  19. Process modeling for the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.W.

    1997-04-01

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. This study was performed to supplement the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study and comprises five conceptual treatment systems that treat DOE contract-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) at temperatures of less than 350{degrees}F. ASPEN PLUS, a chemical process simulator, was used to model the systems. Nonthermal treatment systems were developed as part of the INTS study and include sufficient processing steps to treat the entire inventory of MLLW. The final result of the modeling is a process flowsheet with a detailed mass and energy balance. In contrast to the ITTS study, which modeled only the main treatment system, the INTS study modeled each of the various processing steps with ASPEN PLUS, release 9.1-1. Trace constituents, such as radionuclides and minor pollutant species, were not included in the calculations.

  20. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering

  1. Non-thermal leptogenesis after Majoron hilltop inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antusch, Stefan; Marschall, Kenneth

    2018-05-01

    We analyse non-thermal leptogenesis after models of Majoron hilltop inflation, where the scalar field that provides masses for the right-handed neutrinos and sneutrinos via its vacuum expectation value acts as the inflaton. We discuss different realisations of Majoron inflation models with different hilltop shapes and couplings to the right-handed (s)neutrinos. To study the non-thermally produced baryon asymmetry in these models, we numerically solve the relevant Boltzmann equations. In contrast to previous studies, we include the effects from resonant sneutrino particle production during preheating. We find that these effects can result in an enhancement of the produced baryon asymmetry by more than an order of magnitude. This can significantly change the favoured parameter regions of these models.

  2. Possibilities of implementing nonthermal processing methods in the dairy industry

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Jeličić

    2010-01-01

    In the past two decades a lot of research in the field of food science has focused on new, non-thermal processing methods. This article describes the most intensively investigated new processing methodsfor implementation in the dairy industry, like microfiltration, high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasound and pulsed electric fields. For each method an overview is given for the principle of microbial inactivation, the obtained results regarding reduction of microorganisms as well as the positive ...

  3. Non-thermal pressure in the outskirts of Abell 2142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco-Femiano, Roberto; Lapi, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Clumping and turbulence are expected to affect the matter accreted on to the outskirts of galaxy clusters. To determine their impact on the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142, we perform an analysis of the X-ray temperature data from XMM-Newton via our SuperModel, a state-of-the-art tool for investigating the astrophysics of the intracluster medium already tested on many individual clusters (since Cavaliere, Lapi & Fusco-Femiano 2009). Using the gas density profile corrected for clumpiness derived by Tchernin et al. (2016), we find evidence for the presence of a non-thermal pressure component required to sustain gravity in the cluster outskirts of Abell 2142, that amounts to about 30 per cent of the total pressure at the virial radius. The presence of the non-thermal component implies the gas fraction to be consistent with the universal value at the virial radius and the electron thermal pressure profile to be in good agreement with that inferred from the SZ data. Our results indicate that the presence of gas clumping and of a non-thermal pressure component are both necessary to recover the observed physical properties in the cluster outskirts. Moreover, we stress that an alternative method often exploited in the literature (included Abell 2142) to determine the temperature profile kBT = Pe/ne basing on a combination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) pressure Pe and of the X-ray electron density ne does not allow us to highlight the presence of non-thermal pressure support in the cluster outskirts.

  4. Nonthermal fixed points and the functional renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berges, Juergen; Hoffmeister, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal fixed points represent basic properties of quantum field theories, in addition to vacuum or thermal equilibrium fixed points. The functional renormalization group on a closed real-time path provides a common framework for their description. For the example of an O(N) symmetric scalar theory it reveals a hierarchy of fixed point solutions, with increasing complexity from vacuum and thermal equilibrium to nonequilibrium

  5. Constraining Non-thermal and Thermal properties of Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupal eDev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the evolution of Dark Matter (DM abundance from the very onset of its creation from inflaton decay under the assumption of an instantaneous reheating. Based on the initial conditions such as the inflaton mass and its decay branching ratio to the DM species, the reheating temperature, and the mass and interaction rate of the DM with the thermal bath, the DM particles can either thermalize (fully/partially with the primordial bath or remain non-thermal throughout their evolution history. In the thermal case, the final abundance is set by the standard freeze-out mechanism for large annihilation rates, irrespective of the initial conditions. For smaller annihilation rates, it can be set by the freeze-in mechanism which also does not depend on the initial abundance, provided it is small to begin with. For even smaller interaction rates, the DM decouples while being non-thermal, and the relic abundance will be essentially set by the initial conditions. We put model-independent constraints on the DM mass and annihilation rate from over-abundance by exactly solving the relevant Boltzmann equations, and identify the thermal freeze-out, freeze-in and non-thermal regions of the allowed parameter space. We highlight a generic fact that inflaton decay to DM inevitably leads to an overclosure of the Universe for a large range of DM parameter space, and thus poses a stringent constraint that must be taken into account while constructing models of DM. For the thermal DM region, we also show the complementary constraints from indirect DM search experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background, Planck measurements, and theoretical limits due to the unitarity of S-matrix. For the non-thermal DM scenario, we show the allowed parameter space in terms of the inflaton and DM masses for a given reheating temperature, and compute the comoving free-streaming length to identify the hot, warm and cold DM regimes.

  6. Nonthermal Particles and Radiation Produced by Cluster Merger Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-10

    NONTHERMAL PARTICLES AND RADIATION PRODUCED BY CLUSTER MERGER SHOCKS Robert C. Berrington and Charles D. Dermer Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653...of the merging cluster and is assumed to be constant as the shock propagates outward from the cluster center. In this paper , we model the cluster ...emission in the60–250 eV band for a number of clus- ters. These clusters include Virgo , Coma, Fornax, A2199, A1795, and A4059 (Lieu et al. 1996a, 1996b

  7. Hydrogen desorption kinetics from zirconium hydride and zirconium metal in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride is important in many nuclear design and safety applications. In this paper, a coordinated experimental and modeling study has been used to explicitly demonstrate the applicability of existing kinetic theories for hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride and α-zirconium. A static synthesis method was used to produce δ-zirconium hydride, and the crystallographic phases of the zirconium hydride were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Three obvious stages, involving δ-zirconium hydride, a two-phase region, and α-zirconium, were observed in the hydrogen desorption spectra of two zirconium hydride specimens with H/Zr ratios of 1.62 and 1.64, respectively, which were obtained using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A continuous, one-dimensional, two-phase moving boundary model, coupled with the zero- and second-order kinetics of hydrogen desorption from δ-zirconium hydride and α-zirconium, respectively, has been developed to reproduce the TDS experimental results. A comparison of the modeling predictions with the experimental results indicates that a zero-order kinetic model is valid for description of hydrogen flux away from the δ-hydride phase, and that a second-order kinetic model works well for hydrogen desorption from α-Zr if the activation energy of desorption is optimized to be 70% of the value reported in the literature

  8. Adsorption/desorption of biomacromolecules involved in catalytic hydrogen evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strmečki, S.; Paleček, Emil

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 120, APR2018 (2018), s. 87-93 ISSN 1567-5394 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15479S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : surface-active substances * free electrochemical analysis * mercury-electrodes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 3.346, year: 2016

  9. Evolutionary pulsational mode dynamics in nonthermal turbulent viscous astrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Pralay Kumar; Dutta, Pranamika

    2017-11-01

    The pulsational mode of gravitational collapse in a partially ionized self-gravitating inhomogeneous viscous nonthermal nonextensive astrofluid in the presence of turbulence pressure is illustratively analyzed. The constitutive thermal species, lighter electrons and ions, are thermostatistically treated with the nonthermal κ-distribution laws. The inertial species, such as identical heavier neutral and charged dust microspheres, are modelled in the turbulent fluid framework. All the possible linear processes responsible for dust-dust collisions are accounted. The Larson logatropic equations of state relating the dust thermal (linear) and turbulence (nonlinear) pressures with dust densities are included. A regular linear normal perturbation analysis (local) over the complex astrocloud ensues in a generalized quartic dispersion relation with unique nature of plasma-dependent multi-parametric coefficients. A numerical standpoint is provided to showcase the basic mode features in a judicious astronomical paradigm. It is shown that both the kinematic viscosity of the dust fluids and nonthermality parameter (kappa, the power-law tail index) of the thermal species act as stabilizing (damping) agent against the gravity; and so forth. The underlying evolutionary microphysics is explored. The significance of redistributing astrofluid material via waveinduced accretion in dynamic nonhomologic structureless cloud collapse leading to hierarchical astrostructure formation is actualized.

  10. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  11. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, H.A.; Schmidt, L.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Sondreal, E.A.; Erjavec, J.; Steadman, E.N.; Fabrycky, W.J.; Wilson, J.S.; Musich, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    This report analyzes three systems engineering (SE) studies performed on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech (VT). The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions taken in the studies might bias the resulting economic evaluations of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to produce sound SE applications.

  12. Landau damping of dust acoustic solitary waves in nonthermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Yashika; Saini, N. S.; Eliasson, B.

    2018-01-01

    Dust acoustic (DA) solitary and shock structures have been investigated under the influence of Landau damping in a dusty plasma containing two temperature nonthermal ions. Motivated by the observations of Geotail spacecraft that reported two-temperature ion population in the Earth's magnetosphere, we have investigated the effect of resonant wave-particle interactions on DA nonlinear structures. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with an additional Landau damping term is derived and its analytical solution is presented. The solution has the form of a soliton whose amplitude decreases with time. Further, we have illustrated the influence of Landau damping and nonthermality of the ions on DA shock structures by a numerical solution of the Landau damping modified KdV equation. The study of the time evolution of shock waves suggests that an initial shock-like pulse forms an oscillatory shock at later times due to the balance of nonlinearity, dispersion, and dissipation due to Landau damping. The findings of the present investigation may be useful in understanding the properties of nonlinear structures in the presence of Landau damping in dusty plasmas containing two temperature ions obeying nonthermal distribution such as in the Earth's magnetotail.

  13. Light higgsino dark matter from non-thermal cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aparicio, Luis [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Cicoli, Michele [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Dutta, Bhaskar [Department of Physics and Astronomy,Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Muia, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Quevedo, Fernando [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-08

    We study the scenario of higgsino dark matter in the context of a non-standard cosmology with a period of matter domination prior to Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Matter domination changes the dark matter relic abundance if it ends via reheating to a temperature below the higgsino thermal freeze-out temperature. We perform a model independent analysis of the higgsino dark matter production in such scenario. We show that light higgsino-type dark matter is possible for reheating temperatures close to 1 GeV. We study the impact of dark matter indirect detection and collider physics in this context. We show that Fermi-LAT data rule out non-thermal higgsinos with masses below 300 GeV. Future indirect dark matter searches from Fermi-LAT and CTA will be able to cover essentially the full parameter space. Contrary to the thermal case, collider signals from a 100 TeV collider could fully test the non-thermal higgsino scenario. In the second part of the paper we discuss the motivation of such non-thermal cosmology from the perspective of string theory with late-time decaying moduli for both KKLT and LVS moduli stabilisation mechanisms. We finally describe the impact of embedding higgsino dark matter in these scenarios.

  14. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy

  15. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering

  16. ON THE ROLE AND ORIGIN OF NONTHERMAL ELECTRONS IN HOT ACCRETION FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedźwiecki, Andrzej; Stȩpnik, Agnieszka [Department of Astrophysics, University of Łódź, Pomorska 149/153, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Xie, Fu-Guo, E-mail: niedzwiecki@uni.lodz.pl, E-mail: agajer@o2.pl, E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We study the X-ray spectra of tenuous, two-temperature accretion flows using a model involving an exact, Monte Carlo computation of the global Comptonization effect as well as a general relativistic description of both the flow structure and radiative processes. In our previous work, we found that in flows surrounding supermassive black holes, thermal synchrotron radiation is not capable of providing a sufficient seed photon flux to explain the X-ray spectral indices as well as the cut-off energies measured in several best-studied active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In this work, we complete the model by including seed photons provided by nonthermal synchrotron radiation and we find that it allows us to reconcile the hot flow model with the AGN data. We take into account two possible sources of nonthermal electrons. First, we consider e {sup ±} produced by charged-pion decay, which should always be present in the innermost part of a two-temperature flow due to proton-proton interactions. We find that for a weak heating of thermal electrons (small δ) the synchrotron emission of pion-decay e {sup ±} is much stronger than the thermal synchrotron emission in the considered range of bolometric luminosities, L ∼ (10{sup –4}-10{sup –2}) L {sub Edd}. The small-δ model including hadronic effects, in general, agrees with the AGN data, except for the case of a slowly rotating black hole and a thermal distribution of protons. For large δ, the pion-decay e {sup ±} have a negligible effect and, in this model, we consider nonthermal electrons produced by direct acceleration. We find an approximate agreement with the AGN data for the fraction of the heating power of electrons, which is used for the nonthermal acceleration η ∼ 0.1. However, for constant η and δ, the model predicts a positive correlation of the X-ray spectral index with the Eddington ratio, and hence a fine tuning of η and/or δ with the accretion rate is required to explain the negative correlation

  17. Thermal treatment and non-thermal technologies for remediation of manufactured gas plant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, T.F.; Greer, B.A.; Lawless, M.

    1996-01-01

    More than 1,500 manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites exist throughout the US. Many are contaminated with coal tar from coal-fueled gas works which produced town gas from the mid-1800s through the 1950s. Virtually all old US cities have such sites. Most are in downtown areas as they were installed for central distribution of manufactured gas. While a few sites are CERCLA/Superfund, most are not. However, the contaminants and methods used for remediation are similar to those used for Superfund clean-ups of coal tar contamination from wood-treating and coke oven facilities. Clean-up of sites is triggered by regulatory pressure, property transfers and re-development as well as releases to the environment--in particular, via groundwater migration. Due to utility de-regulation, site clean-ups may also be triggered by sale of a utility or of a specific utility site to other utilities. Utilities have used two approaches in dealing with their MGP sites. The first is do nothing and hope for the best. History suggests that, sooner or later, these sites become a bigger problem via a release, citizen lawsuit or regulatory/public service commission intervention. The second, far better approach is to define the problem now and make plans /for waste treatment or immobilization. This paper describes recent experience with a high capacity/low cost thermal desorption process for this waste and reviews non-thermal technology, such as bio-treatment, capping, recycling, and dig and haul. Cost data are provided for all technologies, and a case study for thermal treatment is also presented

  18. Probing light nonthermal dark matter at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Gao, Yu; Kamon, Teruki

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the collider phenomenology of a minimal nonthermal dark matter model with a 1-GeV dark matter candidate, which naturally explains baryogenesis. Since the light dark matter is not parity protected, it can be singly produced at the LHC. This leads to large missing energy associated with an energetic jet whose transverse momentum distribution is featured by a Jacobian-like shape. The monojet, dijet, paired dijet, and two jets + missing energy channels are studied. Currently existing data at the Tevatron and LHC offer significant bounds on our model.

  19. Nonthermal Effects of Photon Illumination on Surface Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchfield, R.; Llera-Rodriguez, D.; Seebauer, E.G.

    1998-01-01

    Nonthermal influences of photon illumination on surface diffusion at high temperatures have been measured experimentally for the first time. Activation energies and preexponential factors for diffusion of germanium and indium on silicon change substantially in response to illumination by photons having energies greater than the substrate band gap. Results depend on doping type. Ionization of surface vacancies by photogenerated charge carriers seems to play a key role. The results have significant implications for aspects of microelectronics fabrication governed by surface mobility. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  20. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: scanning electron microscopy observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Churpita, Olexandr; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Deyneka, I.G.; Meshkovskii, I.K.; Jäger, Aleš; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 5 (2015), "053703-1"-"053703-5" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219; SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * plasma medicine * bacteria * cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  1. Thermal-nonthermal relationships in active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waard, G.J. de.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation reports on optical and radio observations of active galactic nuclei, selected on the basis of the presence of dominant narrow (narrow line radio galaxies, Seyfert II galaxies, QSOs) and/or broad (broad line radio galaxies, Seyfert I galaxies, QSOs) optical emission lines in their spectra. Special attention is drawn to possible relationships and physical links between the two regimes responsible for the optical (thermal) and radio (non-thermal) emission. Several projects, each studying such relationships on different angular (and thus linear) scales and at different observational frequencies were conceived with a variety of detection devices. (Auth.)

  2. Description of recommended non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document contains description of the technologies selected for inclusions in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Study. The purpose of these descriptions is to provide a more complete description of the INTS technologies. It supplements the summary descriptions of candidate nonthermal technologies that were considered for the INTS

  3. Description of recommended non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document contains description of the technologies selected for inclusions in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Study. The purpose of these descriptions is to provide a more complete description of the INTS technologies. It supplements the summary descriptions of candidate nonthermal technologies that were considered for the INTS.

  4. Hard x ray imaging and the relative contribution of thermal and nonthermal emission in flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    The question of whether the impulsive 25 to 100 keV x ray emission from solar flares is thermal or nonthermal has been a long-standing controversy. Both thermal and nonthermal (beam) models have been developed and applied to the hard x ray data. It now seems likely that both thermal and nonthermal emission have been observed at hard x ray energies. The Hinotori classification scheme, for example, is an attempt to associate the thermal-nonthermal characteristics of flare hard x ray emission with other flare properties. From a theoretical point of view, it is difficult to generate energetic, nonthermal electrons without dumping an equal or greater amount of energy into plasma heating. On the other hand, any impulsive heating process will invariably generate at least some nonthermal particles. Hence, strictly speaking, although thermal or nonthermal emission may dominate the hard x ray emission in a given energy range for a given flare, there is no such thing as a purely thermal or nonthermal flare mechanism

  5. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.; Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Arias, Paul G.; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Im, Hong G.; Chen, Jyh Yuan

    2016-01-01

    neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported

  6. A dc non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, WeiDong; Lopez, Jose L.

    2012-06-01

    A direct current (dc), non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet is generated with helium/oxygen gas mixture as working gas. The electrical property is characterized as a function of the oxygen concentration and show distinctive regions of operation. Side-on images of the jet were taken to analyze the mode of operation as well as the jet length. A self-pulsed mode is observed before the transition of the discharge to normal glow mode. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed from both end-on and side-on along the jet to analyze the reactive species generated in the plasma. Line emissions from atomic oxygen (at 777.4 nm) and helium (at 706.5 nm) were studied with respect to the oxygen volume percentage in the working gas, flow rate and discharge current. Optical emission intensities of Cu and OH are found to depend heavily on the oxygen concentration in the working gas. Ozone concentration measured in a semi-confined zone in front of the plasma jet is found to be from tens to ˜120 ppm. The results presented here demonstrate potential pathways for the adjustment and tuning of various plasma parameters such as reactive species selectivity and quantities or even ultraviolet emission intensities manipulation in an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma source. The possibilities of fine tuning these plasma species allows for enhanced applications in health and medical related areas.

  7. A dc non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Weidong; Lopez, Jose L

    2012-01-01

    A direct current (dc), non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet is generated with helium/oxygen gas mixture as working gas. The electrical property is characterized as a function of the oxygen concentration and show distinctive regions of operation. Side-on images of the jet were taken to analyze the mode of operation as well as the jet length. A self-pulsed mode is observed before the transition of the discharge to normal glow mode. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed from both end-on and side-on along the jet to analyze the reactive species generated in the plasma. Line emissions from atomic oxygen (at 777.4 nm) and helium (at 706.5 nm) were studied with respect to the oxygen volume percentage in the working gas, flow rate and discharge current. Optical emission intensities of Cu and OH are found to depend heavily on the oxygen concentration in the working gas. Ozone concentration measured in a semi-confined zone in front of the plasma jet is found to be from tens to ∼120 ppm. The results presented here demonstrate potential pathways for the adjustment and tuning of various plasma parameters such as reactive species selectivity and quantities or even ultraviolet emission intensities manipulation in an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma source. The possibilities of fine tuning these plasma species allows for enhanced applications in health and medical related areas. (paper)

  8. Application of non-thermal plasmas to pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Bardsley, J.N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wallman, P.H.

    1993-06-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques can be used to destroy many types of hazardous molecules. They are particularly efficient when the toxic materials are present in very small concentrations. This paper discusses three particular applications of non-thermal plasmas: (1) decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), (2) removal of trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) removal of nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Emphasis is placed on the energy cost for implementing the decomposition or removal of these pollutants. Some of the factors affecting the energy cost are discussed. The authors discuss in detail their work at LLNL on pulsed plasma processing for the treatment of NO x in diesel engine exhaust. The results suggest that their plasma reactor can remove up to 70% of NO with relatively high initial concentrations (up to 500 ppM) at a power consumption cost of 2.5% for an engine with an output of 14 kW and an exhaust gas flow rate of 1,200 liters per minute

  9. Application of non-thermal plasmas to pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Bardsley, J.N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wallman, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques can be used to destroy many types of hazardous molecules. They are particularly efficient when the toxic materials are present in very small concentrations. This paper discusses three particular applications of non-thermal plasmas: (1) decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), (2) removal of trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) removal of nitric oxides (NO x ) Emphasis is placed on the energy cost for implementing the decomposition or removal of these pollutants. Some of the factors affecting the energy cost are discussed. We discuss in detail our work at LLNL on pulsed plasma processing for the treatment of NO x in diesel engine exhaust. Our results suggest that our plasma reactor can remove up to 70% of NO x with relatively high initial concentrations (up to 500 ppM) at a power consumption cost of 2.5% for an engine with an output of 14 kill and an exhaust gas flow rate of 1200 liters per minute

  10. Summary of comparative results integrated nonthermal treatment and integrated thermal treatment systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    In July 1994, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), under a contract from U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Environment Management Office of Science and Technology (OST, EM-50) published a report entitled open-quotes Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study - Phase 1 Resultsclose quotes (EGG-MS-11211). This report was the culmination of over a year of analysis involving scientists and engineers within the DOE complex and from private industry. The purpose of that study was open-quotes to conduct a systematic engineering evaluation of a variety of mixed low level waste (MLLW) treatment system alternatives.close quotes The study also open-quotes identified the research and development, demonstrations, and testing and evaluation needed to assure unit operability in the most promising alternative system.close quotes This study evaluated ten primary thermal treatment technologies, organized into complete open-quotes cradle-to-graveclose quotes systems (including complete engineering flow sheets), to treat DOE MLLW and calculated mass balances and 20-year total life cycle costs (TLCC) for all systems. The waste input used was a representative heterogenous mixture of typical DOE MLLW. An additional study was conducted, and then, based on response to these studies, additional work was started to investigate and evaluate non-thermal treatment options on a footing comparable to the effort devoted to thermal options. This report attempts to present a summary overview of the thermal and non-thermal treatment technologies which were examined in detail in the process of the above mentioned reviews

  11. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  12. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jun Shang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment.

  13. H2S absorption and desorption system for a heavy water production plant (Gird ler-Sulphide method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, F.; Duran, O.

    1987-01-01

    A computational design for the principal equipment involved in the absorption and desorption sections of a heavy water production plant (Girdler-sulphide method) is described. the programs were developed in FORTRAN. A detailled description of transport equations for the desorption tower, which are applicable for the absorption one is included. The optimization criteria used for the equipment design were mainly economic; the results were obtained under the optimal conditions for the towers. The programs may be used in the long term, for the simulation of the absorption and desorption sections together with the isotopic exchange sectionts (author)

  14. STM-Induced Hydrogen Desorption via a Hole Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report STM-induced desorption of H from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) at negative sample bias. The desorption rate exhibits a power-law dependence on current and a maximum desorption rate at -7 V. The desorption is explained by vibrational heating of H due to inelastic scattering of tunneling holes...... with the Si-H 5 sigma hole resonance. The dependence of desorption rate on current and bias is analyzed using a novel approach for calculating inelastic scattering, which includes the effect of the electric field between tip and sample. We show that the maximum desorption rate at -7 V is due to a maximum...

  15. Nonthermal plasma--A tool for decontamination and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Vladimir; Pazlarova, Jarmila; Souskova, Hana; Khun, Josef; Julak, Jaroslav

    2015-11-01

    By definition, the nonthermal plasma (NTP) is partially ionized gas where the energy is stored mostly in the free electrons and the overall temperature remains low. NTP is widely used for many years in various applications such as low-temperature plasma chemistry, removal of gaseous pollutants, in gas-discharge lamps or surface modification. However, during the last ten years, NTP usage expanded to new biological areas of application like plasma microorganisms' inactivation, ready-to-eat food preparation, biofilm degradation or in healthcare, where it seems to be important for the treatment of cancer cells and in the initiation of apoptosis, prion inactivation, prevention of nosocomial infections or in the therapy of infected wounds. These areas are presented and documented in this paper as a review of representative publications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Paracetamol degradation in aqueous solution by non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloul, Yasmine; Aubry, Olivier; Rabat, Hervé; Colas, Cyril; Maunit, Benoît; Hong, Dunpin

    2017-08-01

    This study deals with paracetamol degradation in water using a non-thermal plasma (NTP) created by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The effects of the NTP operating conditions on the degradation were studied, showing that the treatment efficiency of the process was highly dependent on the electrical parameters and working gas composition in the reactor containing the aqueous solution. A conversion rate higher than 99% was reached with an energy yield of 12 g/kWh. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) measurements showed that the main species produced in water during the process were nitrogen compounds, carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  17. Nonthermal production of dark matter from primordial black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Dent, James; Osinski, Jacek

    2018-03-01

    We present a scenario for nonthermal production of dark matter from evaporation of primordial black holes. A period of very early matter domination leads to formation of black holes with a maximum mass of ≃2 ×108 g , whose subsequent evaporation prior to big bang nucleosynthesis can produce all of the dark matter in the Universe. We show that the correct relic abundance can be obtained in this way for thermally underproduced dark matter in the 100 GeV-10 TeV mass range. To achieve this, the scalar power spectrum at small scales relevant for black hole formation should be enhanced by a factor of O (105) relative to the scales accessible by the cosmic microwave background experiments.

  18. Semiconductor surface diffusion: Nonthermal effects of photon illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchfield, R.; Llera-Rodriguez, D.; Seebauer, E. G.

    2000-01-01

    Nonthermal influences of photon illumination on surface diffusion at high temperatures have been measured experimentally. Activation energies and pre-exponential factors for diffusion of germanium, indium, and antimony on silicon change by up to 0.3 eV and two orders of magnitude, respectively, in response to illumination by photons having energies greater than the substrate band gap. The parameters decrease for n-type material and increase for p-type material. Aided by results from photoreflectance spectroscopy, we suggest that motion of the surface quasi-Fermi-level for minority carriers accounts for much of the effect by changing the charge states of surface vacancies. An additional adatom-vacancy complexation mechanism appears to operate on p-type substrates. The results have significant implications for aspects of microelectronics fabrication by rapid thermal processing that are governed by surface mobility. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  19. Pre-treating water with non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Cho, Daniel J.

    2017-07-04

    The present invention consists of a method of pre-treatment of adulterated water for distillation, including adulterated water produced during hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") of shale rock during natural gas drilling. In particular, the invention is directed to a method of treating adulterated water, said adulterated water having an initial level of bicarbonate ion in a range of about 250 ppm to about 5000 ppm and an initial level of calcium ion in a range of about 500 ppm to about 50,000 ppm, said method comprising contacting the adulterated water with a non-thermal arc discharge plasma to produce plasma treated water having a level of bicarbonate ion of less than about 100 ppm. Optionally, the plasma treated water may be further distilled.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Non-Thermal Food Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, C.; Krauss, J.; Ertunc, Ö.; Delgado, a.

    2010-09-01

    Food preservation is an important process step in food technology regarding product safety and product quality. Novel preservation techniques are currently developed, that aim at improved sensory and nutritional value but comparable safety than in conventional thermal preservation techniques. These novel non-thermal food preservation techniques are based for example on high pressures up to one GPa or pulsed electric fields. in literature studies the high potential of high pressures (HP) and of pulsed electric fields (PEF) is shown due to their high retention of valuable food components as vitamins and flavour and selective inactivation of spoiling enzymes and microorganisms. for the design of preservation processes based on the non-thermal techniques it is crucial to predict the effect of high pressure and pulsed electric fields on the food components and on the spoiling enzymes and microorganisms locally and time-dependent in the treated product. Homogenous process conditions (especially of temperature fields in HP and PEF processing and of electric fields in PEF) are aimed at to avoid the need of over-processing and the connected quality loss and to minimize safety risks due to under-processing. the present contribution presents numerical simulations of thermofluiddynamical phenomena inside of high pressure autoclaves and pulsed electric field treatment chambers. in PEF processing additionally the electric fields are considered. Implementing kinetics of occurring (bio-) chemical reactions in the numerical simulations of the temperature, flow and electric fields enables the evaluation of the process homogeneity and efficiency connected to different process parameters of the preservation techniques. Suggestions to achieve safe and high quality products are concluded out of the numerical results.

  1. Reactive Desorption of CO Hydrogenation Products under Cold Pre-stellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2018-02-01

    The astronomical gas-phase detection of simple species and small organic molecules in cold pre-stellar cores, with abundances as high as ∼10‑8–10‑9 n H, contradicts the generally accepted idea that at 10 K, such species should be fully frozen out on grain surfaces. A physical or chemical mechanism that results in a net transfer from solid-state species into the gas phase offers a possible explanation. Reactive desorption, i.e., desorption following the exothermic formation of a species, is one of the options that has been proposed. In astronomical models, the fraction of molecules desorbed through this process is handled as a free parameter, as experimental studies quantifying the impact of exothermicity on desorption efficiencies are largely lacking. In this work, we present a detailed laboratory study with the goal of deriving an upper limit for the reactive desorption efficiency of species involved in the CO–H2CO–CH3OH solid-state hydrogenation reaction chain. The limit for the overall reactive desorption fraction is derived by precisely investigating the solid-state elemental carbon budget, using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and the calibrated solid-state band-strength values for CO, H2CO and CH3OH. We find that for temperatures in the range of 10 to 14 K, an upper limit of 0.24 ± 0.02 for the overall elemental carbon loss upon CO conversion into CH3OH. This corresponds with an effective reaction desorption fraction of ≤0.07 per hydrogenation step, or ≤0.02 per H-atom induced reaction, assuming that H-atom addition and abstraction reactions equally contribute to the overall reactive desorption fraction along the hydrogenation sequence. The astronomical relevance of this finding is discussed.

  2. Spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis in high-scale inflation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F.; Yanagida, T.T.; Tokyo Univ.

    2006-11-01

    We argue that a non-thermal leptogenesis occurs spontaneously, without direct couplings of the inflation with right-handed neutrinos, in a wide class of high-scale inflation models such as the chaotic and hybrid inflation. It is only a finite vacuum expectation value of the inflaton, of more precisely, a linear term in the Kaehler potential, that is a prerequisite for the spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis. To exemplify how it works, we show that a chaotic inflation model in supergravity naturally produces a right amount of baryon asymmetry via the spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis. We also discuss the gravitino production from the inflation. (orig.)

  3. Data compilation for particle-impact desorption, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiyama, Takashi; Nagai, Siro; Ozawa, Kunio; Takeutchi, Fujio.

    1985-07-01

    The particle impact desorption is one of the elementary processes of hydrogen recycling in controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors. We have surveyed the literature concerning the ion impact desorption and photon stimulated desorption published through the end of 1984 and compiled the data on the desorption cross sections and yields with the aid of a computer. This report presents the results of the compilation in graphs and tables as functions of incident energy, surface temperature and surface coverage. (author)

  4. Desorption of intrinsic cesium from smectite: inhibitive effects of clay particle organization on cesium desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Sakai, Haruka; Itono, Taeko; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2014-09-16

    Fine clay particles have functioned as transport media for radiocesium in terrestrial environments after nuclear accidents. Because radiocesium is expected to be retained in clay minerals by a cation-exchange reaction, ascertaining trace cesium desorption behavior in response to changing solution conditions is crucially important. This study systematically investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs (13 nmol/g) in well-characterized Na-montmorillonite in electrolyte solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) under widely differing cation concentrations (0.2 mM to 0.2 M). Batch desorption experiments demonstrated that Cs(+) desorption was inhibited significantly in the presence of the environmental relevant concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (>0.5 mM) and high concentrations of K(+). The order of ability for Cs desorption was Na(+) = K(+) > Ca(2+) = Mg(2+) at the highest cation concentration (0.2 M), which is opposite to the theoretical prediction based on the cation-exchange selectivity. Laser diffraction grain-size analyses revealed that the inhibition of Cs(+) desorption coincided with the increase of the clay tactoid size. Results suggest that radiocesium in the dispersed fine clay particles adheres on the solid phase when the organization of swelling clay particles occurs because of changes in solution conditions caused by both natural processes and artificial treatments.

  5. On the Formation of Nanobubbles in Vycor Porous Glass during the Desorption of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, A. C.; Stefanopoulos, K. L.; Favvas, E. P.; Vansant, E.; Hankins, N. P.

    2015-06-01

    Vycor porous glass has long served as a model mesoporous material. During the physical adsorption of halogenated hydrocarbon vapours, such as dibromomethane, the adsorption isotherm exhibits an hysteresis loop; a gradual ascent is observed at higher pressures during adsorption, and a sharp drop is observed at lower pressures during desorption. For fully wetting fluids, an early hypothesis attributed the hysteresis to mechanistic differences between capillary condensation (adsorption) and evaporation (desorption) processes occurring in the wide bodies and narrow necks, respectively, of ‘ink-bottle’ pores. This was later recognized as oversimplified when the role of network percolation was included. For the first time, we present in-situ small angle x-ray scattering measurements on the hysteresis effect which indicate nanobubble formation during desorption, and support an extended picture of network percolation. The desorption pattern can indeed result from network percolation; but this can sometimes be initiated by a local cavitation process without pore blocking, which is preceded by the temporary, heterogeneous formation of nanobubbles involving a change in wetting states. The capacity of the system to sustain such metastable states is governed by the steepness of the desorption boundary.

  6. Desorption of Furfural from Bimetallic Pt-Fe Oxides/Alumina Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lourdes Dimas-Rivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the desorption of furfural, which is a competitive intermediate during the production of biofuel and valuable aromatic compounds, was studied using pure alumina, as well as alumina impregnated with iron and platinum oxides both individually and in combination, using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The bimetallic sample exhibited the lowest desorption percentage for furfural. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM imaging revealed the intimate connection between the iron and platinum oxide species on the alumina support. The mechanism of furfural desorption from the Pt-Fe/Al2O3 0.5%-0.5% sample was determined using physisorbed furfural instead of chemisorbed furfural; this mechanism involved the oxidation of the C=O group on furfural by the catalyst. The oxide nanoparticles on γ-Al2O3 support helped to stabilize the furfural molecule on the surface.

  7. Amended Results for Hard X-Ray Emission by Non-thermal Thick Target Recombination in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reep, J. W.; Brown, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    Brown & Mallik and the corresponding corrigendum Brown et al. presented expressions for non-thermal recombination (NTR) in the collisionally thin- and thick-target regimes, claiming that the process could account for a substantial part of the hard X-ray continuum in solar flares usually attributed entirely to thermal and non-thermal bremsstrahlung (NTB). However, we have found the thick-target expression to become unphysical for low cut-offs in the injected electron energy spectrum. We trace this to an error in the derivation, derive a corrected version that is real-valued and continuous for all photon energies and cut-offs, and show that, for thick targets, Brown et al. overestimated NTR emission at small photon energies. The regime of small cut-offs and large spectral indices involve large (reducing) correction factors but in some other thick-target parameter regimes NTR/NTB can still be of the order of unity. We comment on the importance of these results to flare and microflare modeling and spectral fitting. An empirical fit to our results shows that the peak NTR contribution comprises over half of the hard X-ray signal if δ ≳ 6{≤ft(\\tfrac{{E}0c}{4{keV}}\\right)}0.4.

  8. Effects of vortex-like and non-thermal ion distributions on non-linear dust-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamun, A.A.; Cairns, R.A.; Shukla, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of vortex-like and non-thermal ion distributions are incorporated in the study of nonlinear dust-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma. It is found that owing to the departure from the Boltzmann ion distribution to a vortex-like phase space distribution, the dynamics of small but finite amplitude dust-acoustic waves is governed by a modified Kortweg endash de Vries equation. The latter admits a stationary dust-acoustic solitary wave solution, which has larger amplitude, smaller width, and higher propagation velocity than that involving adiabatic ions. On the other hand, consideration of a non-thermal ion distribution provides the possibility of coexistence of large amplitude rarefactive as well as compressive dust-acoustic solitary waves, whereas these structures appear independently when the wave amplitudes become infinitely small. The present investigation should help us to understand the salient features of the non-linear dust-acoustic waves that have been observed in a recent numerical simulation study. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Jean’s instability in a complex plasma in presence of secondary electrons and nonthermal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Susmita; Maity Saumyen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the effect of secondary electron emission and nonthermality of ion velocity distribution simultaneously on Jean’s instability in a complex plasma in presence of negatively charged dust grains. Primary and secondary electron temperatures are assumed to be equal. Thus plasma under consideration consists of Boltzmann distributed electrons, nonthermal ions and negatively charged dust grains. The dust grain component is modeled by continuity and momentum equations. From the linear dispersion relation we have calculated the real frequency and growth rate of the Jean’s mode. Numerically it is found that for lower values of the nonthermal parameter Jean’s instability is higher for higher secondary electron emission whereas the effect of secondary electron emission on Jean’s instability becomes insignificant for higher values of the nonthermal parameter. (author)

  10. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  11. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  12. Electron-stimulated desorption from condensed branched alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, J.A.; Knotek, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Desorption of H + , CH 3+ , H 2+ , and D + have been measured as a function of electron excitation energy for solid neopentane, tetramethylsilane and two deuterated isomers of isobutane. The evidence shows that C-C (or Si-C) and C-H bonds are broken by electronic excitations localized on methyl groups, in contrast to CH 3+ production in gas-phase neopentane, and that these excitations are the final states of decay processes initiated by creation of a hole in the C2s level, or, in tetramethylsilane, the C2s/Si3s level. This is in accord with other evidence which shows that localized multi-valence hole states result in C-H, C-C, Si-C and Si-H dissociation, and that such states may be excited either directly or by shakeup, by decay from a C2s hole, or by decay for a C1s core hole. It is apparent then, that dissociation and desorption of ions from covalent materials is a multi (electron) hole mechanism, and that the means of localizing the excitation energy in such systems involves multi-hole correlation

  13. A new non-thermal galactic radio source with a possible binary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, E.; Reich, W.; Reich, P.; Sofue, Y.; Handa, T.

    1985-01-01

    A galactic object [G18.95-1.1], detected recently in a galactic plane survey, may belong to a new class of non-thermal radio sources that originate in accreting binary systems. The data on integrated flux density spectral index and the polarization, proves the non-thermal nature of the source. The morphology defies any classification as a supernova remnant. The authors suggest that the object is a binary system containing a compact component. (U.K.)

  14. Nonlinear localized dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Amour, Rabia

    2007-01-01

    A numerical investigation is presented to show the existence, formation, and possible realization of large-amplitude dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions. These nonlinear localized structures are self-consistent solutions of the collisionless Vlasov equation with a population of fast particles. The spatial patterns of the variable charge DA solitary wave are significantly modified by the nonthermal effects. The results complement and provide new insights into previously published results on this problem

  15. Thermal and Nonthermal Emissions of a Composite Flare Derived from NoRH and SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; White, Stephen M.; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Masuda, Satoshi; Chae, Jongchul

    2017-12-01

    Differential emission measure (DEM) derived from the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory is used in the analysis of a solar flare observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). The target was a composite event consisting of an impulsive flare, SOL2015-06-21T01:42 (GOES class M2.0), and a gradual flare, SOL2015-06-21T02:36 (M2.6), for which separation of thermal plasma heating from nonthermal particle acceleration was of major interest. We have calculated the thermal free-free intensity maps with the AIA-derived DEM and compared them against the observed NoRH maps to attribute the difference to the nonthermal component. In this way, we were able to locate three distinct sources: the major source with thermal and nonthermal components mixed, a nonthermal source devoid of thermal particles, and a thermal source lacking microwave emission. Both the first and the second nonthermal sources produced impulsively rising 17 GHz intensities and moved away from the local magnetic polarization inversion lines in correlation with the flare radiation. In contrast, the thermal sources stay in fixed locations and show temporal variations of the temperature and emission measure uncorrelated with the flare radiation. We interpret these distinct properties as indicating that nonthermal sources are powered by magnetic reconnection and thermal sources passively receive energy from the nonthermal donor. The finding of these distinct properties between thermal and nonthermal sources demonstrates the microwave and EUV emission measure combined diagnostics.

  16. Optimization of Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in an In Vivo Model Organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lee

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma is increasingly being recognized for a wide range of medical and biological applications. However, the effect of non-thermal plasma on physiological functions is not well characterized in in vivo model systems. Here we use a genetically amenable, widely used model system, Drosophila melanogaster, to develop an in vivo system, and investigate the role of non-thermal plasma in blood cell differentiation. Although the blood system in Drosophila is primitive, it is an efficient system with three types of hemocytes, functioning during different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Blood cell differentiation in Drosophila plays an essential role in tissue modeling during embryogenesis, morphogenesis and also in innate immunity. In this study, we optimized distance and frequency for a direct non-thermal plasma application, and standardized doses to treat larvae and adult flies so that there is no effect on the viability, fertility or locomotion of the organism. We discovered that at optimal distance, time and frequency, application of plasma induced blood cell differentiation in the Drosophila larval lymph gland. We articulate that the augmented differentiation could be due to an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS upon non-thermal plasma application. Our studies open avenues to use Drosophila as a model system in plasma medicine to study various genetic disorders and biological processes where non-thermal plasma has a possible therapeutic application.

  17. On the Absence of Non-thermal X-Ray Emission around Runaway O Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toalá, J. A. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Oskinova, L. M. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical models predict that the compressed interstellar medium around runaway O stars can produce high-energy non-thermal diffuse emission, in particular, non-thermal X-ray and γ -ray emission. So far, detection of non-thermal X-ray emission was claimed for only one runaway star, AE Aur. We present a search for non-thermal diffuse X-ray emission from bow shocks using archived XMM-Newton observations for a clean sample of six well-determined runaway O stars. We find that none of these objects present diffuse X-ray emission associated with their bow shocks, similarly to previous X-ray studies toward ζ Oph and BD+43°3654. We carefully investigated multi-wavelength observations of AE Aur and could not confirm previous findings of non-thermal X-rays. We conclude that so far there is no clear evidence of non-thermal extended emission in bow shocks around runaway O stars.

  18. Thermal desorption study of physical forces at the PTFE surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface was successfully employed to study the possible role of physical forces in the enhancement of metal-PTFE adhesion by radiation. The thermal desorption spectra were analyzed without assumptions to yield the activation energy for desorption over a range of xenon coverage from less than 0.1 monolayer to more than 100 monolayers. For multilayer coverage, the desorption is zero-order with an activation energy equal to the sublimation energy of xenon. For submonolayer coverages, the order for desorption from the unirradiated PTFE surface is 0.73 and the activation energy for desorption is between 3.32 and 3.36 kcal/mol; less than the xenon sublimation energy. The effect of irradiation is to increase the activation energy for desorption to as high as 4 kcal/mol at low coverage.

  19. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250–1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  20. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, Φ, from 1x10 20 D/m 2 to 1x10 21 D/m 2 proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at Φ ≥ 1.2x10 21 D/m 2 one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A 1 and A 2 at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A 1 is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak A 2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences

  1. High power RF heating and nonthermal distributions in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, A.G.

    1994-12-13

    This thesis discusses the nonthermal effects in the electron population of a tokamak, that are generated by the inductive electric field and electron cyclotron resonant heating. The kinetic description of the plasma is given by a Boltzmann equation for the electron velocity distribution, in which the many small angle scattering Coulomb collisions that occur in the plasma are modelled by a Fokker-Planck collision term. These collisions drive the distribution towards the Maxwellian distribution of thermodynamic equilibrium. The energy absorption from the electron cyclotron waves and the acceleration by the toroidal electric field lead to deviations from the Maxwellian destribution. The interaction of the electron cyclotron waves with the plasma is treated within quasilinear theory. Resonant interaction occurs when the wave frequency matches one of the harmonics of the gyration frequency of the electrons in the static magnetic field. The waves generate a diffusion of resonant electrons in velocity space. The inductive electric field accelerates the electrons in the direction prallel to the magnetic field and leads to a convection in velocity space. The equilibrium that is reached between the driving forces of the electric field and the electron cyclotron waves and the restoring force of the collisions is studied in this thesis. The specific geometry of the tokamak is incorporated in the model through an average of the kinetic equation over the electron orbits. (orig./WL).

  2. High power RF heating and nonthermal distributions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis discusses the nonthermal effects in the electron population of a tokamak, that are generated by the inductive electric field and electron cyclotron resonant heating. The kinetic description of the plasma is given by a Boltzmann equation for the electron velocity distribution, in which the many small angle scattering Coulomb collisions that occur in the plasma are modelled by a Fokker-Planck collision term. These collisions drive the distribution towards the Maxwellian distribution of thermodynamic equilibrium. The energy absorption from the electron cyclotron waves and the acceleration by the toroidal electric field lead to deviations from the Maxwellian destribution. The interaction of the electron cyclotron waves with the plasma is treated within quasilinear theory. Resonant interaction occurs when the wave frequency matches one of the harmonics of the gyration frequency of the electrons in the static magnetic field. The waves generate a diffusion of resonant electrons in velocity space. The inductive electric field accelerates the electrons in the direction prallel to the magnetic field and leads to a convection in velocity space. The equilibrium that is reached between the driving forces of the electric field and the electron cyclotron waves and the restoring force of the collisions is studied in this thesis. The specific geometry of the tokamak is incorporated in the model through an average of the kinetic equation over the electron orbits. (orig./WL)

  3. Light-induced nonthermal population of optical phonons in nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Bruno P.; Leitão, Joaquim P.; Correia, Maria R.; Soares, Maria R.; Wiggers, Hartmut; Cantarero, Andrés; Pereira, Rui N.

    2017-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is widely used to study bulk and nanomaterials, where information is frequently obtained from spectral line positions and intensities. In this study, we monitored the Raman spectrum of ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as a function of optical excitation intensity (optical excitation experiments). We observe that in NCs the red-shift of the Raman peak position with increasing light power density is much steeper than that recorded for the corresponding bulk material. The increase in optical excitation intensity results also in an increasingly higher temperature of the NCs as obtained with Raman thermometry through the commonly used Stokes/anti-Stokes intensity ratio. More significantly, the obtained dependence of the Raman peak position on temperature in optical excitation experiments is markedly different from that observed when the same NCs are excited only thermally (thermal excitation experiments). This difference is not observed for the control bulk material. The inefficient diffusion of photogenerated charges in nanoparticulate systems, due to their inherently low electrical conductivity, results in a higher steady-state density of photoexcited charges and, consequently, also in a stronger excitation of optical phonons that cannot decay quickly enough into acoustic phonons. This results in a nonthermal population of optical phonons and thus the Raman spectrum deviates from that expected for the temperature of the system. Our study has major consequences to the general application of Raman spectroscopy to nanomaterials.

  4. Modelling of non-thermal electron cyclotron emission during ECRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribaldos, V.; Krivenski, V.

    1990-01-01

    The existence of suprathermal electrons during Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating experiments in tokamaks is today a well established fact. At low densities the creation of large non-thermal electron tails affects the temperature profile measurements obtained by 2 nd harmonic, X-mode, low-field side, electron cyclotron emission. At higher densities suprathermal electrons can be detected by high-field side emission. In electron cyclotron current drive experiments a high energy suprathermal tail, asymmetric in v, is observed. Non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions are also typically observed during lower-hybrid current drive experiments. Fast electrons have been observed during ionic heating by neutral beams as well. Two distinct approaches are currently used in the interpretation of the experimental results: simple analytical models which reproduce some of the expected non-Maxwellian characteristics of the electron distribution function are employed to get a qualitative picture of the phenomena; sophisticated numerical Fokker-Planck calculations give the electron distribution function from which the emission spectra are computed. No algorithm is known to solve the inverse problem, i.e. to compute the electron distribution function from the emitted spectra. The proposed methods all relay on the basic assumption that the electron distribution function has a given functional dependence on a limited number of free parameters, which are then 'measured' by best fitting the experimental results. Here we discuss the legitimacy of this procedure. (author) 7 refs., 5 figs

  5. Nonthermal Argon Plasma Generator and Some Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunoiu M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory - made nonthermal plasma generator is presented. It has a diameter of 0.020 m and length of 0.155 m and contains two electrodes. The first electrode is a 2% Th-W alloy, 0.002 m in diameter bar, centred inside the generator’s body by means of a four channel teflon piece; the other three channels, 0.003 m in diameter, are used for Ar supply. The second electrode is a nozzle of 0.002 m - 0.008 m diameter and 0.005m length. A ~500 kV/m electric field is generated between the two electrodes by a high frequency source (13.56 MHz ±5%, equipped with a OT-1000 (Tungsram power triode. For Ar flows ranging from 0.00008 m3/s to 0.00056 m3/s, a plasma jet of length not exceeding 0.015 m and temperature below 315 K is obtained. Anthurium andraeanumis sample , blood matrix, human hair and textile fibers may be introduced in the plasma jet. For time periods of 30 s and 60 s, various effects like, cell detexturization, fast blood coagulation or textile fiber or hair cleaning and smoothing are obtained. These effects are presented and discussed in the paper.

  6. Non-thermal plasmas for non-catalytic and catalytic VOC abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, Arne M.; Morent, Rino; De Geyter, Nathalie; Leys, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We review the current status of catalytic and non-catalytic VOC abatement based on a vast number of research papers. → The underlying mechanisms of plasma-catalysis for VOC abatement are discussed. → Critical process parameters that determine the influent are discussed and compared. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent achievements and the current status of non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many reactor configurations have been developed to generate a NTP at atmospheric pressure. Therefore in this review article, the principles of generating NTPs are outlined. Further on, this paper is divided in two equally important parts: plasma-alone and plasma-catalytic systems. Combination of NTP with heterogeneous catalysis has attracted increased attention in order to overcome the weaknesses of plasma-alone systems. An overview is given of the present understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-catalytic processes. In both parts (plasma-alone systems and plasma-catalysis), literature on the abatement of VOCs is reviewed in close detail. Special attention is given to the influence of critical process parameters on the removal process.

  7. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golberg, A; Laufer, S; Rabinowitch, H D; Rubinsky, B

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 deg. C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  8. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golberg, A; Laufer, S [Center for Bioengineering in the Service of Humanity and Society, School of Computer Science and Engineering, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Rabinowitch, H D [Robert H Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Robert H Smith Institute of Plant Science and Genetics in Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76 100 (Israel); Rubinsky, B, E-mail: Rabin@agri.huji.ac.il [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 84720 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 deg. C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  9. Growth and male reproduction improvement of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment on chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao Zhang, Jiao; Luong Huynh, Do; Chandimali, Nisansala; Kang, Tae Yoon; Kim, Nameun; Mok, Young Sun; Kwon, Taeho; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated whether plasma treatment of fertilized eggs before hatching could affect the growth and reproduction of chickens. Three point five-day-incubated fertilized eggs exposed to non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma at 2.81 W of power for 2 min resulted in the highest growth in chickens. Plasma growth-promoting effect was regulated by the reactive oxygen species homeostasis and the improvement of energy metabolism via increasing serum hormones and adenosine triphosphate levels which were resulted from the regulation of genes involved in antioxidant defense, hormone biosynthesis and energetic metabolism. Interestingly, plasma-treated male chickens conspicuously grew faster than females. Further, aspects of male reproductive system (testosterone level and sperm quality) were improved by the plasma treatment but female reproduction (estradiol and progesterone levels, egg-laying rate and egg weight) had no significant changes. Unfortunately, offspring whose parents were the optimal plasma-treated chickens did not show any difference on growth characteristics and failed to inherit excellent growth features from their parents. Our results suggest a new method to improve the growth rate and male reproductive capacity in poultry but it is only effective in the plasma direct-treated generation.

  10. Photobiomodulation with non-thermal lasers: Mechanisms of action and therapeutic uses in dermatology and aesthetic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Mark; Andriessen, Anneke; Berman, Brian; Katz, Bruce E; Gilbert, Dore; Goldberg, David J; Gold, Michael H; Kirsner, Robert S; Lorenc, Paul Z

    2017-08-01

    Non-thermal laser therapy in dermatology, is a growing field in medical technology by which therapeutic effects are achieved by exposing tissues to specific wavelengths of light. The purpose of this review was to gain a better understanding of the science behind non-thermal laser and the evidence supporting its use in dermatology. A group of dermatologists and surgeons recently convened to review the evidence supporting the use of non-thermal laser for body sculpting, improving the appearance of cellulite, and treating onychomycosis. The use of non-thermal laser for body sculpting is supported by three randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled studies (N = 161), one prospective open-label study (N = 54), and two retrospective studies (N = 775). Non-thermal laser application for improving the appearance of cellulite is supported by one randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study (N = 38). The use of non-thermal laser for the treatment of onychomycosis is supported by an analysis of three non-randomized, open-label studies demonstrating clinical improvement of nails (N = 292). Non-thermal laser is steadily moving into mainstream medical practice, such as dermatology. Although present studies have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of non-thermal laser for body sculpting, cellulite reduction and onychomycosis treatment, studies demonstrating the efficacy of non-thermal laser as a stand-alone procedure are still inadequate.

  11. Possibilities of implementing nonthermal processing methods in the dairy industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jeličić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades a lot of research in the field of food science has focused on new, non-thermal processing methods. This article describes the most intensively investigated new processing methodsfor implementation in the dairy industry, like microfiltration, high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasound and pulsed electric fields. For each method an overview is given for the principle of microbial inactivation, the obtained results regarding reduction of microorganisms as well as the positive and undesirable effects on milk composition and characteristics. Most promising methods for further implementation in the dairy industry appeared to be combination of moderate temperatures with high hydrostatic pressure, respectively, pulsed electric fields and microfiltration, since those treatments did not result in any undesirable changes in sensory properties of milk. Additionally, milk treatment with these methodsresulted in a better milk fat homogenization, faster rennet coagulation, shorter duration of milk fermentations, etc. Very good results regarding microbial inactivation were obtained by treating milkwith combination of moderate temperatures and high intensity ultrasound which is also called a process of thermosonification. However, thermosonification treatments often result in undesirablechanges in milk sensory properties, which is most probably due to ultrasonic induced milk fat oxidation. This article also shortly describes the use of natural compounds with antimicrobial effects such as bacteriocins, lactoperoxidase system and lysozime. However their implementation is limited for reasons like high costs, interaction with other food ingredients, poor solubility, narrow activity spectrum, spontaneous loss of bacteriocinogenicity, etc. In addition, principles of antimicrobial effect of microwaves and ultraviolet irradiation are described. However their implementation in the dairy industry failed mostly due to technical and commercial reasons.

  12. Analysis of non-thermal velocities in the solar corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Contesse

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe new ground-based spectroscopic observations made using a 40-cm aperture coronagraph over a whole range of radial distances (up to heights of 12' above the limb and along four different heliocentric directions N, E, S and W. The analysis is limited to the study of the brightest forbidden emission line of Fe XIV at 530.3nm, in order to reach the best possible signal-to-noise ratio. To make the results statistically more significant, the extracted parameters are averaged over the whole length of the slit, and measurements are repeated fives times at each position; the corresponding dispersions in the results obtained along the slit are given. Central line profile intensities and full line widths (FWHM are plotted and compared to measurements published by other authors closer to the limb. We found widths and turbulent (non-thermal velocities of significantly higher values above the polar regions, especially when a coronal hole is present along the line of sight. We do not see a definitely decreasing behaviour of widths and turbulent velocities in equatorial directions for larger radial distances, as reported in the literature, although lower values are measured compared to the values in polar regions. The variation in the high corona is rather flat and a correlation diagram indicates that it is different for different regions and different radial distances. This seems to be the first analysis of the profiles of this coronal line, up to large heights above the limb for both equatorial and polar regions.

  13. A Nonthermal Radio Filament Connected to the Galactic Black Hole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mark R.; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    Using the Very Large Array, we have investigated a nonthermal radio filament (NTF) recently found very near the Galactic black hole and its radio counterpart, Sgr A*. While this NTF—the Sgr A West Filament (SgrAWF)—shares many characteristics with the population of NTFs occupying the central few hundred parsecs of the Galaxy, the SgrAWF has the distinction of having an orientation and sky location that suggest an intimate physical connection to Sgr A*. We present 3.3 and 5.5 cm images constructed using an innovative methodology that yields a very high dynamic range, providing an unprecedentedly clear picture of the SgrAWF. While the physical association of the SgrAWF with Sgr A* is not unambiguous, the images decidedly evoke this interesting possibility. Assuming that the SgrAWF bears a physical relationship to Sgr A*, we examine the potential implications. One is that Sgr A* is a source of relativistic particles constrained to diffuse along ordered local field lines. The relativistic particles could also be fed into the local field by a collimated outflow from Sgr A*, perhaps driven by the Poynting flux accompanying the black hole spin in the presence of a magnetic field threading the event horizon. Second, we consider the possibility that the SgrAWF is the manifestation of a low-mass-density cosmic string that has become anchored to the black hole. The simplest form of these hypotheses would predict that the filament be bi-directional, whereas the SgrAWF is only seen on one side of Sgr A*, perhaps because of the dynamics of the local medium.

  14. Universal scaling for biomolecule desorption induced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenes, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal activation mechanism is proposed for the desorption of biomolecules. Good agreement is found with the experiments in a broad range of the electronic stopping power. The activation energies of desorption U are 0.33, 1.57 and 5.35 eV for positive, negative and neutral leucine molecules, respectively, and 2.05 eV for positive ergosterol molecules. The desorption of valine clusters is analyzed. The magnitude of the specific heat shows that the internal degrees of freedom are not excited up to the moment of desorption. The effect of irradiation temperature and of ion velocity on the desorption yield is discussed on the basis of the author's model. The scaling function derived in the model for the desorption of biomolecules is applied also to the sputtering of SiO 2 and U = 0.42 eV is obtained

  15. Thermal desorption and surface modification of He+ implanted into tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhang; Yoshida, N.; Iwakiri, H.; Xu Zengyu

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten divertor plates in fusion reactors will be subject to helium bombardment. Helium retention and thermal desorption is a concerned issue in controlling helium ash. In the present study, fluence dependence of thermal desorption behavior of helium in tungsten was studied at different irradiation temperatures and ion energies. Results showed that helium desorption could start at ∼400 K with increasing fluence, while no noticeable peaks were detected at low fluence. Total helium desorption reached a saturation value at high fluence range, which was not sensitive to irradiation temperature or ion energy for the conditions evaluated. Surface modifications caused by either ion irradiation or thermal desorption were observed by SEM. The relationship of surface modifications and helium desorption behavior was discussed. Some special features of elevated irradiation temperature and lower ion energy were also indicated

  16. Naima: a Python package for inference of particle distribution properties from nonthermal spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalza, V.

    2015-07-01

    The ultimate goal of the observation of nonthermal emission from astrophysical sources is to understand the underlying particle acceleration and evolution processes, and few tools are publicly available to infer the particle distribution properties from the observed photon spectra from X-ray to VHE gamma rays. Here I present naima, an open source Python package that provides models for nonthermal radiative emission from homogeneous distribution of relativistic electrons and protons. Contributions from synchrotron, inverse Compton, nonthermal bremsstrahlung, and neutral-pion decay can be computed for a series of functional shapes of the particle energy distributions, with the possibility of using user-defined particle distribution functions. In addition, naima provides a set of functions that allow to use these models to fit observed nonthermal spectra through an MCMC procedure, obtaining probability distribution functions for the particle distribution parameters. Here I present the models and methods available in naima and an example of their application to the understanding of a galactic nonthermal source. naima's documentation, including how to install the package, is available at http://naima.readthedocs.org.

  17. An infrared measurement of chemical desorption from interstellar ice analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Y.; Tomaru, T.; Lamberts, T.; Kouchi, A.; Watanabe, N.

    2018-03-01

    In molecular clouds at temperatures as low as 10 K, all species except hydrogen and helium should be locked in the heterogeneous ice on dust grain surfaces. Nevertheless, astronomical observations have detected over 150 different species in the gas phase in these clouds. The mechanism by which molecules are released from the dust surface below thermal desorption temperatures to be detectable in the gas phase is crucial for understanding the chemical evolution in such cold clouds. Chemical desorption, caused by the excess energy of an exothermic reaction, was first proposed as a key molecular release mechanism almost 50 years ago1. Chemical desorption can, in principle, take place at any temperature, even below the thermal desorption temperature. Therefore, astrochemical network models commonly include this process2,3. Although there have been a few previous experimental efforts4-6, no infrared measurement of the surface (which has a strong advantage to quantify chemical desorption) has been performed. Here, we report the first infrared in situ measurement of chemical desorption during the reactions H + H2S → HS + H2 (reaction 1) and HS + H → H2S (reaction 2), which are key to interstellar sulphur chemistry2,3. The present study clearly demonstrates that chemical desorption is a more efficient process for releasing H2S into the gas phase than was previously believed. The obtained effective cross-section for chemical desorption indicates that the chemical desorption rate exceeds the photodesorption rate in typical interstellar environments.

  18. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  19. Electron-stimulated desorption of lithium ions from lithium halide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowski, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption of positive lithium ions from thin layers of lithium halides deposited onto Si(1 1 1) are investigated by the time-of-flight technique. The determined values of isotope effect of the lithium ( 6 Li + / 7 Li + ) are 1.60 ± 0.04, 1.466 ± 0.007, 1.282 ± 0.004, 1.36 ± 0.01 and 1.33 ± 0.01 for LiH, LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI, respectively. The observed most probable kinetic energies of 7 Li + are 1.0, 1.9, 1.1, 0.9 and 0.9 eV for LiH, LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI, respectively, and seem to be independent of the halide component mass. The values of lithium ion emission yield, lithium kinetic energy and lithium isotope effect suggest that the lattice relaxation is only important in the lithium ion desorption process from the LiH system. In view of possible mechanisms and processes involved into lithium ion desorption the obtained results indicate that for LiH, LiCl, LiBr and LiI the ions desorb in a rather classical way. However, for LiF, ion desorption has a more quantum character and the modified wave packet squeezing model has to be taken into account

  20. Desorption of trihalomethanes in gas liquid contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Quesada, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Updated studies show that gastric cancer is related with the existence of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the drinking water. The trihalomethanes are sub products from the degradation of humic acids and your reaction with chlorine and bromine used like decontaminates. The desorption process is used to eliminate the THMs with air in contact with the water. The experimental design was used in three contactors. The contactors selected were: the bubbling's column, the packed column and the shaken tank without screen. There were selected three variable: initial concentration of THMs, the residence time and the turbulence degree (measured with the Reynolds number). The concentrations were made with a gas chromatograph. The objective of this project is to do a comparison with the gas liquid contactors more used in the industrial level to determinate which ones are the best in the desorption process. The conclusion of the experimental design is that the tank is the equipment with the best capacity to eliminate THMs. Too it includes other techniques to eliminate THMs of the water and your treatment [es

  1. Study of the radium sorption/desorption on goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassot, S.; Stammose, D.; Mallet, C.; Lefebvre, C.; Ferreux, J.-M.

    2000-01-01

    The oxi-hydroxides, present at trace level in uranium mill tailings, are responsible of about 70% of the 226 radium sorption, half being fixed on crystallized forms. This radionuclide (half time=1622y), present at high level (50 to 100kBq.kg -1 ), can be released in groundwater, involving a possible contamination of the food chain (actual concentration limit=0.37Bq.1 -1 ). So, it is very important to point out the mechanisms of the radium sorption/desorption on crystallized oxi-hydroxides as a function of chemical conditions of the system. The radium sorption on synthetic goethite α-FeOOH has been studied as a function of contact time, initial radium activity, pH, sodium and calcium concentrations. The results show that, after one hour of contact time (necessary to reach equilibrium), the radium sorption increases widely in a pH range 6-7. The increase of Na + concentration is without influence on the radium sorption, indicating the low interactions between sodium and surface sites. At the opposite, the presence of calcium in solution decreases widely the radium sorption, that indicates a competition between calcium and radium for the same kind of sorption sites of the oxi-hydroxide surface. The percentage of radium desorbed increases widely with time, from 1 to 120h and becomes constant at a time higher than 120h. This long equilibrium time for desorption in comparison with sorption one can be explain by a local evolution of the sorption sites of the solid, which become less accessible for the solution in contact. (author)

  2. RADYN Simulations of Non-thermal and Thermal Models of Ellerman Bombs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jie; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-08-20

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are brightenings in the H α line wings that are believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere. To study the response and evolution of the chromospheric line profiles, we perform radiative hydrodynamic simulations of EBs using both non-thermal and thermal models. Overall, these models can generate line profiles that are similar to observations. However, in non-thermal models we find dimming in the H α line wings and continuum when the heating begins, while for the thermal models dimming occurs only in the H α line core, and with a longer lifetime. This difference in line profiles can be used to determine whether an EB is dominated by non-thermal heating or thermal heating. In our simulations, if a higher heating rate is applied, then the H α line will be unrealistically strong and there are still no clear UV burst signatures.

  3. Advanced oxidation technology for H2S odor gas using non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, ZHU; Ruonan, WANG; Wenjing, BIAN; Yang, CHEN; Weidong, JING

    2018-05-01

    Non-thermal plasma technology is a new type of odor treatment processing. We deal with H2S from waste gas emission using non-thermal plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge. On the basis of two criteria, removal efficiency and absolute removal amount, we deeply investigate the changes in electrical parameters and process parameters, and the reaction process of the influence of ozone on H2S gas removal. The experimental results show that H2S removal efficiency is proportional to the voltage, frequency, power, residence time and energy efficiency, while it is inversely proportional to the initial concentration of H2S gas, and ozone concentration. This study lays the foundations of non-thermal plasma technology for further commercial application.

  4. Formation of negative hydrogen ion: polarization electron capture and nonthermal shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-09-07

    The influence of the nonthermal shielding on the formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H(-)) by the polarization electron capture are investigated in partially ionized generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The Bohr-Lindhard method has been applied to obtain the negative hydrogen formation radius and cross section as functions of the collision energy, de Broglie wave length, Debye length, impact parameter, and spectral index of the plasma. The result shows that the nonthermal character of the plasma enhances the formation radius of the negative hydrogen, especially, for small Debye radii. It is found that the nonthermal effect increases the formation cross section of the negative hydrogen. It is also found that the maximum position of the formation cross section approaches to the collision center with an increase of the spectral index. In addition, it is found that the formation cross section significantly decreases with an increase of the Debye length, especially, for small spectral indices.

  5. Formation of negative hydrogen ion: Polarization electron capture and nonthermal shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the nonthermal shielding on the formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H − ) by the polarization electron capture are investigated in partially ionized generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The Bohr-Lindhard method has been applied to obtain the negative hydrogen formation radius and cross section as functions of the collision energy, de Broglie wave length, Debye length, impact parameter, and spectral index of the plasma. The result shows that the nonthermal character of the plasma enhances the formation radius of the negative hydrogen, especially, for small Debye radii. It is found that the nonthermal effect increases the formation cross section of the negative hydrogen. It is also found that the maximum position of the formation cross section approaches to the collision center with an increase of the spectral index. In addition, it is found that the formation cross section significantly decreases with an increase of the Debye length, especially, for small spectral indices.

  6. RADYN Simulations of Non-thermal and Thermal Models of Ellerman Bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jie; Carlsson, Mats; Ding, M. D.

    2017-08-01

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are brightenings in the Hα line wings that are believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere. To study the response and evolution of the chromospheric line profiles, we perform radiative hydrodynamic simulations of EBs using both non-thermal and thermal models. Overall, these models can generate line profiles that are similar to observations. However, in non-thermal models we find dimming in the Hα line wings and continuum when the heating begins, while for the thermal models dimming occurs only in the Hα line core, and with a longer lifetime. This difference in line profiles can be used to determine whether an EB is dominated by non-thermal heating or thermal heating. In our simulations, if a higher heating rate is applied, then the Hα line will be unrealistically strong and there are still no clear UV burst signatures.

  7. A SUZAKU SEARCH FOR NONTHERMAL EMISSION AT HARD X-RAY ENERGIES IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Matsushita, Kyoko; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Clarke, Tracy E.

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster radio halo known resides in the Coma cluster of galaxies. The relativistic electrons producing this diffuse synchrotron emission should also produce inverse Compton emission that becomes competitive with thermal emission from the intracluster medium (ICM) at hard X-ray energies. Thus far, claimed detections of this emission in Coma are controversial. We present a Suzaku HXD-PIN observation of the Coma cluster in order to nail down its nonthermal hard X-ray content. The contribution of thermal emission to the HXD-PIN spectrum is constrained by simultaneously fitting thermal and nonthermal models to it and a spatially equivalent spectrum derived from an XMM-Newton mosaic of the Coma field. We fail to find statistically significant evidence for nonthermal emission in the spectra which are better described by only a single- or multitemperature model for the ICM. Including systematic uncertainties, we derive a 90% upper limit on the flux of nonthermal emission of 6.0 x 10 -12 erg s -1 cm -2 (20-80 keV, for Γ = 2.0), which implies a lower limit on the cluster-averaged magnetic field of B>0.15 μG. Our flux upper limit is 2.5 times lower than the detected nonthermal flux from RXTE and BeppoSAX. However, if the nonthermal hard X-ray emission in Coma is more spatially extended than the observed radio halo, the Suzaku HXD-PIN may miss some fraction of the emission. A detailed investigation indicates that ∼50%-67% of the emission might go undetected, which could make our limit consistent with that of Rephaeli and Gruber and Fusco-Femiano et al. The thermal interpretation of the hard Coma spectrum is consistent with recent analyses of INTEGRAL and Swift data.

  8. Effects of nonthermal preservation technologies on antioxidant activity of fruits and vegetables: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhaohui; Li, Jiaomei; Yu, Wancong; Lu, Xiaotong; Kou, Xiaohong

    2015-10-05

    Consumer demand for safe and nutritious fruits and vegetables has given rise to the development of a number of nonthermal food preservation techniques. Recent studies have highlighted that antioxidant activity of fruits and vegetables plays an important role in human health. In this paper, the influences of nonthermal preservation technologies, including pulsed electric field, radiation processing, dense phase carbon dioxide, ozone processing, and edible coatings, on the antioxidant capacity and related compounds in fruits and vegetables are reviewed. The proposed mechanisms and future trends are also discussed to accelerate the further commercialization and exploration of these novel technologies, which will, in turn, help to promote human health. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Labany, S. K., E-mail: skellabany@hotmail.com; Zedan, N. A., E-mail: nesreenplasma@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, P.O. 34517 (Egypt); El-Taibany, W. F., E-mail: eltaibany@hotmail.com, E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, P.O. 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, P.O. 960 Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  10. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NOx control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO x control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO x removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNO x operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics

  11. Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed.

  12. Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed

  13. Modeling Organic Contaminant Desorption from Municipal Solid Waste Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, D. R.; Wu, B.; Barlaz, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    Approximately 25% of the sites on the National Priority List (NPL) of Superfund are municipal landfills that accepted hazardous waste. Unlined landfills typically result in groundwater contamination, and priority pollutants such as alkylbenzenes are often present. To select cost-effective risk management alternatives, better information on factors controlling the fate of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in landfills is required. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the effects of HOC aging time, anaerobic sorbent decomposition, and leachate composition on HOC desorption rates, and (2) to simulate HOC desorption rates from polymers and biopolymer composites with suitable diffusion models. Experiments were conducted with individual components of municipal solid waste (MSW) including polyvinyl chloride (PVC), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), newsprint, office paper, and model food and yard waste (rabbit food). Each of the biopolymer composites (office paper, newsprint, rabbit food) was tested in both fresh and anaerobically decomposed form. To determine the effects of aging on alkylbenzene desorption rates, batch desorption tests were performed after sorbents were exposed to toluene for 30 and 250 days in flame-sealed ampules. Desorption tests showed that alkylbenzene desorption rates varied greatly among MSW components (PVC slowest, fresh rabbit food and newsprint fastest). Furthermore, desorption rates decreased as aging time increased. A single-parameter polymer diffusion model successfully described PVC and HDPE desorption data, but it failed to simulate desorption rate data for biopolymer composites. For biopolymer composites, a three-parameter biphasic polymer diffusion model was employed, which successfully simulated both the initial rapid and the subsequent slow desorption of toluene. Toluene desorption rates from MSW mixtures were predicted for typical MSW compositions in the years 1960 and 1997. For the older MSW mixture, which had a

  14. Copper desorption from Gelidium algal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2007-04-01

    Desorption of divalent copper from marine algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal waste (from agar extraction industry) and a composite material (the algal waste immobilized in polyacrylonitrile) was studied in a batch system. Copper ions were first adsorbed until saturation and then desorbed by HNO(3) and Na(2)EDTA solutions. Elution efficiency using HNO(3) increases as pH decreases. At pH=1, for a solid to liquid ratio S/L=4gl(-1), elution efficiency was 97%, 95% and 88%, the stoichiometric coefficient for the ionic exchange, 0.70+/-0.02, 0.73+/-0.05 and 0.76+/-0.06 and the selectivity coefficient, 0.93+/-0.07, 1.0+/-0.3 and 1.1+/-0.3, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. Complexation of copper ions by EDTA occurs in a molar proportion of 1:1 and the elution efficiency increases with EDTA concentration. For concentrations of 1.4, 0.88 and 0.57 mmoll(-1), the elution efficiency for S/L=4gl(-1), was 91%, 86% and 78%, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. The S/L ratio, in the range 1-20gl(-1), has little influence on copper recovery by using 0.1M HNO(3). Desorption kinetics was very fast for all biosorbents. Kinetic data using HNO(3) as eluant were well described by the mass transfer model, considering the average metal concentration in the solid phase and the equilibrium relationship given by the mass action law. The homogeneous diffusion coefficient varied between 1.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for algae Gelidium and 3.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for the composite material.

  15. Experimental studies on removal of airborne haloanisoles by non-thermal plasma air purifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Hallam, David; Bermúdez, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to test the performance of non-thermal plasma air purifiers on its removal effectiveness of two haloanisoles – 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) and 2,4,6-Tribromoanisole (TBA). TCA and TBA are the two major compounds found in wine cellars that can contaminate wine to ...

  16. Non-thermal Plasma Activates Human Keratinocytes by Stimulation of Antioxidant and Phase II Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  17. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna; Moeck, Jonas P.; Roberts, William L.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization

  18. The interplay between biological and physical scenarios of bacterial death induced by non-thermal plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, O.; Zablotskyy, V.; Churpita, O.; Jäger, A.; Polívka, L.; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, mar. (2016), s. 71-83 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bacteria * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 8.402, year: 2016

  19. Relaxation of nonthermal hh and lh excitons in ZnSe quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalt, H.; Hoffmann, J.; Umlauff, M.

    1998-01-01

    The strong exciton-LO phonon coupling in ZnSe QWs gives a direct access to the relaxation dynamics of nonthermal, free heavy-hole and light-hole excitons. Narrow hot-exciton distributions can be generated by LO-phonon assisted exciton formation. The thermalization of these excitons is monitored b...

  20. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, O.; Zablotskyy, V.; Chrupina, O.; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, apr (2017), s. 600 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. Nonthermal food processing alternatives and their effects on taste and flavor compounds of beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Rivas, Enrique; Salmerón-Ochoa, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Food drinks are normally processed to increase their shelf-life and facilitate distribution before consumption. Thermal pasteurization is quite efficient in preventing microbial spoilage of many types of beverages, but the applied heat may also cause undesirable biochemical and nutritious changes that may affect sensory attributes of the final product. Alternative methods of pasteurization that do not include direct heat have been investigated in order to obtain products safe for consumption, but with sensory attributes maintained as unchanged as possible. Food scientists interested in nonthermal food preservation technologies have claimed that such methods of preserving foods are equally efficient in microbial inactivation as compared with conventional thermal means of food processing. Researchers in the nonthermal food preservation area also affirm that alternative preservation technologies will not affect, as much as thermal processes, nutritional and sensory attributes of processed foods. This article reviews research in nonthermal food preservation, focusing on effects of processing of food drinks such as fruit juices and dairy products. Analytical techniques used to identify volatile flavor-aroma compounds will be reviewed and comparative effects for both thermal and nonthermal preservation technologies will be discussed.

  2. Knowledge and Attitudes of Produce and Seafood Processors and Food Safety Educators Regarding Nonthermal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivarnik, Lori F.; Richard, Nicole L.; Gable, Robert K.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2016-01-01

    A needs assessment survey was designed and administered to measure knowledge of and attitudes toward food safety impacts of nonthermal processing technologies of shellfish and produce industry personnel and extension educators. An online survey was sent via e-mail notification with the survey link through professional listserves. The survey…

  3. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activities, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Tsap, Yuri T., E-mail: huangj@nao.cas.cn [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, 98409 Crimea, Nauchny (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  4. Towards the understanding of non-thermal airplasma action: effects on bacteria and fibroblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Jäger, Aleš; Polívka, Leoš; Syková, Eva; Terebova, N.; Kulikov, A.; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 30 (2016), 25286-25292 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bactericidal effects * medical applications Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  5. Nonthermal effect of microwave irradiation on nitrite uptake in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrajas, C.; Cotrino, J.

    1989-01-01

    When cells of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were subjected to microwave irradiation at 2.45 GHz, nitrite uptake kinetics still obeyed the Michaelis-Menten equation, the Km of the process remaining constant, whereas V max increased, which indicates an enhanced nonthermal permeability in irradiated cells. (author)

  6. Coadsorbed species explain the mechanism of methanol temperature-desorption on CeO2(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Jonathan E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steven H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beste, Ariana [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-24

    Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to investigate the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of methanol from CeO2(111). For the first time, low-temperature water formation and high-temperature methanol desorption are explained by our calculations. High coverages of methanol, which correspond to experimental conditions, are required to properly describe these features of the TPD spectrum. We identify a mechanism for the low-temperature formation of water involving the dissociation of two methanol molecules on the same surface O atom and filling of the resulting surface vacancy with one of the methoxy products. After water desorption, methoxy groups are stabilized on the surface and react at higher temperatures to form methanol and formaldehyde by a disproportionation mechanism. Alternatively, the stabilized methoxy groups undergo sequential C–H scission reactions to produce formaldehyde. Calculated energy requirements and methanol/formaldehyde selectivity agree with the experimental data.

  7. Calculation of momentum distribution function of a non-thermal fermionic dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Anirban; Gupta, Aritra, E-mail: anirbanbiswas@hri.res.in, E-mail: aritra@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India)

    2017-03-01

    The most widely studied scenario in dark matter phenomenology is the thermal WIMP scenario. Inspite of numerous efforts to detect WIMP, till now we have no direct evidence for it. A possible explanation for this non-observation of dark matter could be because of its very feeble interaction strength and hence, failing to thermalise with the rest of the cosmic soup. In other words, the dark matter might be of non-thermal origin where the relic density is obtained by the so-called freeze-in mechanism. Furthermore, if this non-thermal dark matter is itself produced substantially from the decay of another non-thermal mother particle, then their distribution functions may differ in both size and shape from the usual equilibrium distribution function. In this work, we have studied such a non-thermal (fermionic) dark matter scenario in the light of a new type of U(1){sub B−L} model. The U(1){sub B−L} model is interesting, since, besides being anomaly free, it can give rise to neutrino mass by Type II see-saw mechanism. Moreover, as we will show, it can accommodate a non-thermal fermionic dark matter as well. Starting from the collision terms, we have calculated the momentum distribution function for the dark matter by solving a coupled system of Boltzmann equations. We then used it to calculate the final relic abundance, as well as other relevant physical quantities. We have also compared our result with that obtained from solving the usual Boltzmann (or rate) equations directly in terms of comoving number density, Y . Our findings suggest that the latter approximation is valid only in cases where the system under study is close to equilibrium, and hence should be used with caution.

  8. Initial screening of thermal desorption for soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yezzi, J.J. Jr.; Tafuri, A.N.; Rosenthal, S.; Troxler, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Petroleum-contaminated soils--caused by spills, leaks, and accidental discharges--exist at many sites throughout the United States. Thermal desorption technologies which are increasingly being employed to treat these soils, have met soil cleanup criteria for a variety of petroleum products. Currently the United States Environmental Protection Agency is finalizing a technical report entitled Use of Thermal Desorption for Treating Petroleum-Contaminated Soils to assist remedial project managers, site owners, remediation contractors, and equipment vendors in evaluating the use of thermal desorption technologies for petroleum-contaminated soil applications. The report will present a three-level screening method to help a reader predict the success of applying thermal desorption at a specific site. The objective of screening level one is to determine the likelihood of success in a specific application of thermal desorption. It will take into account procedures for collecting and evaluating data on site characteristics, contaminant characteristics, soil characteristics, and regulatory requirements. This level will establish whether or not thermal desorption should be evaluated further for site remediation, whether treatment should occur on-site or off-site, and if on-site is a viable option, what system size will be most cost-effective. The scope of this paper addresses only screening level one which provides a preliminary assessment of the applicability of thermal desorption to a particular site. This topic encompasses worksheets that are an integral part of the ''user friendly'' screening process. Level one screening provides a foundation for the subsequent two levels which follow a similar ''user friendly'' worksheet approach to evaluating thermal desorption technologies and establishing costs for thermal desorption in an overall remediation project

  9. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter, Fabiano André; Ferreira, Tamara Santos; Sinhorin, Adilson Paulo; Lima, Larissa Borges de; Morais, Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco, Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diu...

  10. Acoustic emission during hydrogen absorption and desorption in palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, R.; Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission technique has been used to study charging and discharging of hydrogen in palladium. During charging, breaking of oxide film due to surface activation and saturation of hydrogen absorption have been identified by acoustic emission. In the discharging cycle, the desorption of hydrogen from the specimen leads to high AE activity immediately after initiation of discharging, followed by gradual decrease in the acoustic activity, which reaches a minimum upon completion of the desorption. The potential of the acoustic emission technique for studying the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption in metals has been shown. (author)

  11. Inelastic surface collisions and the desorption of massive molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macfarlane, R D [Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of high energy ions in the region of electronic stopping (1 MeV u/sup -1/) stimulates the desorption of massive molecular ions of biomolecules such as insulin. The experimental details of the measurements are given with some examples of application for analytical mass spectrometry. Studies on the role of the incident ion (accelerator beam experiments) are reviewed as well as the contribution of the matrix to the desorption-ionization process. How the electronic relaxation process couples to desorption-ionization is a central question in understanding the overall mechanism of the process.

  12. Effect of Weakly Nonthermal Ion Velocity Distribution on Jeans Instability in a Complex Plasma in Presence of Secondary Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Maity, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the effect of weak nonthermality of ion velocity distribution on Jean’s instability in a complex plasma in presence of secondary electrons and negatively charged dust grains. The primary and secondary electron temperatures are assumed equal. Thus plasma under consideration consists of three components: Boltzman distributed electrons, non-thermal ions and negatively charged inertial dust grains. From the linear dispersion relation we have calculated the real frequency and growth rate of the Jean’s mode. Numerically we have found that secondary electron emission destabilizes Jean’s mode when ion nonthermality is weak. (author)

  13. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper.

  14. Zero-Headspace Coal-Core Gas Desorption Canister, Revised Desorption Data Analysis Spreadsheets and a Dry Canister Heating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Charles E.; Dallegge, Todd A.

    2005-01-01

    Coal desorption techniques typically use the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) canister-desorption method as described by Diamond and Levine (1981), Close and Erwin (1989), Ryan and Dawson (1993), McLennan and others (1994), Mavor and Nelson (1997) and Diamond and Schatzel (1998). However, the coal desorption canister designs historically used with this method have an inherent flaw that allows a significant gas-filled headspace bubble to remain in the canister that later has to be compensated for by correcting the measured desorbed gas volume with a mathematical headspace volume correction (McLennan and others, 1994; Mavor and Nelson, 1997).

  15. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  16. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Allman, S.L.; Sammartano, L.J.; Isola, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications

  17. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surya B.; Thapa Gupta, Tripti; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.; Ayan, Halim

    2017-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  18. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Surya B; Gupta, Tripti Thapa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Ayan, Halim; Eisenmann, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  19. Study on hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of uranium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of two U-Mn intermetallic compounds, U{sub 6}Mn and UMn{sub 2}, were investigated. U{sub 6}Mn absorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen desorption pressure of U{sub 6}Mn obtained from this experiment was higher than that of U, which was considered to be the effect of alloying, whereas UMn{sub 2} was not observed to absorb hydrogen up to 50 atm at room temperature. (author)

  20. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  1. Changes of structural and hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 indused by ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurko Sandra V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in structural and hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 induced by ion irradiation have been investigated. MgH2 powder samples have been irradiated with 45 keV B3+ and 120 keV Ar8+ions, with ion fluence of 1015 ions/cm2. The effects of ion irradiation are estimated by numerical calculations using SRIM package. The induced material modifications and their consequences on hydrogen dynamics in the system are investigated by XRD, particle size distribution and TPD techniques. Changes of TPD spectra with irradiation conditions suggest that there are several mechanisms involved in desorption process which depend on defect concentration and their interaction and ordering. The results confirmed that the near-surface area of MgH2 and formation of a substoichiometric MgHx (x<2 play a crucial role in hydrogen kinetics and that various concentrations of induced defects substantially influence H diffusion and desorption kinetics in MgH2. The results also confirm that there is possibility to control the thermodynamic parameters by controlling vacancies concentration in the system.

  2. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinovev, Alexander V.; Veryovkin, Igor V.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  3. Desorption dynamics of deuterium in CuCrZr alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Nguyen, Lan Anh; Lee, Sanghwa; Noh, S. J.; Lee, S. K.; Park, M. C.; Shu, Wataru; Pitcher, Spencer; Torcy, David; Guillermain, David; Kim, Jaeyong

    2017-12-01

    Desorption behavior of deuterium (D2) in CuCrZr alloy was investigated considering sample thickness, loading and baking temperature of deuterium followed by the ITER scopes. Cylindrical specimens of 1, 3, 5 mm thick with 4 mm diameter were exposed to deuterium at a pressure of 25 bar at 120, 240 and 350 °C for 24 h, then baked at 800 °C in a vacuum chamber maintained at a pressure lower than 10-7 Torr. Deuterium desorption characteristics such as desorption rate and amount of deuterium in the sample were estimated by analyzing the desorption peaks monitored with a residual gas analyzer (RGA), and the trapping energy of deuterium was calculated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) results showed that deuterium atoms embedded in the sample at a depth of less than 15 μm and desorbed as low as 400 °C. All absorbed deuterium atoms in the specimen were completely retrieved by dynamic pumping at 800 °C in 15 min. The desorption rate of deuterium per unit area was inversely proportional to the increment of the thickness of the sample, and was proportional to the loading temperature. Based on the assumption that a uniform distribution of interstitial sites for deuterium follows the Femi-Dirac statistics, the result of TDS demonstrated that the CuCrZr alloy has two types of trapping energies, which were estimated to be 62 and 79 kJ/mol.

  4. Impact of neutron irradiation on thermal helium desorption from iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xunxiang, E-mail: hux1@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Taller, Stephen [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The synergistic effect of neutron irradiation and transmutant helium production is an important concern for the application of iron-based alloys as structural materials in fission and fusion reactors. In this study, we investigated the impact of neutron irradiation on thermal helium desorption behavior in high purity iron. Single crystalline and polycrystalline iron samples were neutron irradiated in HFIR to 5 dpa at 300 °C and in BOR-60 to 16.6 dpa at 386 °C, respectively. Following neutron irradiation, 10 keV He ion implantation was performed at room temperature on both samples to a fluence of 7 × 10{sup 18} He/m{sup 2}. Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) was conducted to assess the helium diffusion and clustering kinetics by analyzing the desorption spectra. The comparison of He desorption spectra between unirradiated and neutron irradiated samples showed that the major He desorption peaks shift to higher temperatures for the neutron-irradiated iron samples, implying that strong trapping sites for He were produced during neutron irradiation, which appeared to be nm-sized cavities through TEM examination. The underlying mechanisms controlling the helium trapping and desorption behavior were deduced by assessing changes in the microstructure, as characterized by TEM, of the neutron irradiated samples before and after TDS measurements.

  5. Effect of secondary electron emission on Jean's instability in a complex plasma in the presence of nonthermal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Susmita; Maity, Saumyen; Banerjee, Soumyajyoti

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the role of secondary electron emission on Jean's instability in a complex plasma in the presence of nonthermal ions. The equilibrium dust surface potential has been considered negative and hence primary and secondary electron temperatures are equal. Such plasma consists of three components: Boltzman distributed electrons, nonthermal ions and negatively charged inertial dust grains. From the linear dispersion relation, we have calculated the real frequency and growth rate of Jean's instability. Numerically, we have shown that for strong ion nonthermality Jean's mode is unstable. Growth of the instability reduces and the real part of the wave frequency increases with increasing secondary electron emission from dust grains. Hence, strong secondary electron emission suppresses Jean's instability in a complex plasma even when ion nonthermality is strong and equilibrium dust charge is negative.

  6. Particle desorption mass spectrometric surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing 252 Cf-Particle Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS) to characterize the surface region of solid samples has been evaluated. The PDMS experiment was adapted to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment and was configured so as to allow the analysis of thick as well as thin samples. This apparatus included an in situ sputter cleaning/depth profiling facility. The mass resolution was variable from 300 to 200 at 133 daltons by changing the drift length from 27 cm to 20 cm. Desorbed ions were focused by using either a dual grid assembly or an einzel lens. The overall instrumental transmission efficiency with the einzel lens operative was approximately 50%. The applicability of 252 Cf-PDMS to samples that were thick and insulating was demonstrated in the analysis of geological specimens. Pollucite, Microcline, Amblygonite, and Lepidolite were analyzed without complications associated with sample thickness or charge accumulation. Substitution occurring between the alkali metals in the environment was observed by PDMS and was corroborated by SIMS, XPS, and EMP analyses. The analysis of NBM SRM glasses addressed the suitability of combining the PDMS technique was sputter etching. This application demonstrated the ability of this technique to sense changes in the chemical environment brought about by sputter cleaning. The analysis of these samples also allowed the estimation of detection limits for lithium, rubidium, and cesium in a glass matrix as 300 ppm, 400 ppm, and 400 ppm, respectively. Sputter depth profiling combined with 252 Cf-PDMS analysis of an aluminum layer on a silicon substrate established the utility of the PDMS technique in surface characterization

  7. Electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons and an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: lakhina@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai (India); University of the Western Cape, Belville (South Africa); Devanandhan, S., E-mail: devanandhan@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai (India); Bharuthram, R., E-mail: rbharuthram@uwc.ac.za [University of the Western Cape, Belville (South Africa)

    2016-08-15

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the obliquely propagating electron acoustic solitary waves having nonthermal hot electrons, cold and beam electrons, and ions in a magnetized plasma. We have employed reductive perturbation theory to derive the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation describing the nonlinear evolution of these waves. The two-dimensional plane wave solution of KdV-ZK equation is analyzed to study the effects of nonthermal and beam electrons on the characteristics of the solitons. Theoretical results predict negative potential solitary structures. We emphasize that the inclusion of finite temperature effects reduces the soliton amplitudes and the width of the solitons increases by an increase in the obliquity of the wave propagation. The numerical analysis is presented for the parameters corresponding to the observations of “burst a” event by Viking satellite on the auroral field lines.

  8. Field induced decrystallization of silicon: Evidence of a microwave non-thermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozariasbmarz, Amin; Dsouza, Kelvin; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2018-02-01

    It is rather strange and not fully understood that some materials decrystallize when exposed to microwave radiation, and it is still debatable if such a transformation is a thermal or non-thermal effect. We hereby report experimental evidences that weight the latter effect. First, a single crystal silicon wafer exposed to microwaves showed strong decrystallization at high temperature. Second, when some areas of the wafer were masked with metal coating, only the exposed areas underwent decrystallization. Transmission electron microscopy analysis, x-ray diffraction data, and thermal conductivity measurements all indicated strong decrystallization, which occurred in the bulk of the material and was not a surface effect. These observations favor the existence of a non-thermal microwave effect.

  9. Optimization of nonthermal fusion power consistent with channeling of charged fusion product energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, P.B.; Herrmann, M.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    If the energy of charged fusion products can be diverted directly to fuel ions, non-Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between species will result. To determine the importance of these nonthermal effects, the fusion power density is optimized at constant-β for non-thermal distributions that are self-consistently maintained by channeling of energy from charged fusion products. For D-T and D- 3 He reactors, with 75% of charged fusion product power diverted to fuel ions, temperature differences between electrons and ions increase the reactivity by 40-70%, while non-Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between ionic species increase the reactivity by an additional 3-15%

  10. State of the art in medical applications using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Hori, Masaru

    2017-12-01

    Plasma medical science is a novel interdisciplinary field that combines studies on plasma science and medical science, with the anticipation that understanding the scientific principles governing plasma medical science will lead to innovations in the field. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been used for medical treatments, such as for cancer, blood coagulation, and wound healing. The interactions that occur between plasma and cells/tissues have been analyzed extensively. Direct and indirect treatment of cells with plasma has broadened the applications of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma in medicine. Examples of indirect treatment include plasma-assisted immune-therapy and plasma-activated medium. Controlling intracellular redox balance may be key in plasma cancer treatment. Animal studies are required to test the effectiveness and safety of these treatments for future clinical applications.

  11. Landau damping of dust acoustic waves in the presence of hybrid nonthermal nonextensive electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taibany, W. F.; Zedan, N. A.; Taha, R. M.

    2018-06-01

    Based on the kinetic theory, Landau damping of dust acoustic waves (DAWs) propagating in a dusty plasma composed of hybrid nonthermal nonextensive distributed electrons, Maxwellian distributed ions and negatively charged dust grains is investigated using Vlasov-Poisson's equations. The characteristics of the DAWs Landau damping are discussed. It is found that the wave frequency increases by decreasing (increasing) the value of nonextensive (nonthermal) parameter, q (α ). It is recognized that α plays a significant role in observing damping or growing DAW oscillations. For small values of α , damping modes have been observed until reaching a certain value of α at which ω i vanishes, then a growing mode appears in the case of superextensive electrons. However, only damping DAW modes are observed in case of subextensive electrons. The present study is useful in the space situations where such distribution exists.

  12. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C

    2004-01-01

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060

  13. Multi-dimensional instability of electrostatic solitary structures in magnetized nonthermal dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamun, A.A.; Russel, S.M.; Mendoza-Briceno, C.A.; Alam, M.N.; Datta, T.K.; Das, A.K.

    1999-05-01

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made of multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating electrostatic solitary structures in a hot magnetized nonthermal dusty plasma which consists of a negatively charged hot dust fluid, Boltzmann distributed electrons, and nonthermally distributed ions. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for the electrostatic solitary structures that exist in such a dusty plasma system is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The multi-dimensional instability of these solitary waves is also studied by the small-k (long wavelength plane wave) perturbation expansion method. The nature of these solitary structures, the instability criterion, and their growth rate depending on dust-temperature, external magnetic field, and obliqueness are discussed. The implications of these results to some space and astrophysical dusty plasma situations are briefly mentioned. (author)

  14. Nonthermal electron-positron pairs and cold matter in the central engines of active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    1992-01-01

    The nonthermal e(+/-) pair model of the central engine of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is discussed. The model assumes that nonthermal e(+/-) pairs are accelerated to highly relativistic energies in a compact region close to the central black hole and in the vicinity of some cold matter. The model has a small number of free parameters and explains a large body of AGN observations from EUV to soft gamma-rays. In particular, the model explains the existence of the UV bump, the soft X-rays excess, the canonical hard X-ray power law, the spectral hardening above about 10 keV, and some of the variability patterns in the soft and hard X-rays. In addition, the model explains the spectral steepening above about 50 keV seen in NGC 4151.

  15. Nonlinear acoustic waves in nonthermal plasmas with negative and positive dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheest, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Using a Sagdeev pseudopotential formalism where nonlinear structures are stationary in a co-moving frame, large dust-acoustic solitary waves and double layers have been studied in plasmas with negative and positive cold dust, in the presence of nonthermal electrons and ions. This has been done in a systematic way, to delimit the compositional parameter space in which such modes can be found. The existence domain of negative/positive solitary waves is limited by infinite compression of the negative/positive dust or by the occurrence of negative/positive double layers. These double layers require a sufficient nonthermality of the electrons/ions and the presence of enough positive/negative dust. There are parameter ranges where both negative and positive solitary structures coexist, sometimes both of the solitary wave type, sometimes one a solitary wave and the other a double layer. Typical Sagdeev pseudopotentials and solitary wave profiles have been presented.

  16. Compressive and rarefactive solitary waves in nonthermal two-component plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.

    2010-01-01

    Using a Sagdeev pseudopotential formalism where nonlinear structures are stationary in a comoving frame, large ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers have been studied in plasmas with positive ions and nonthermal electrons. The velocity range of positive, compressive solitary waves is limited by the ion density reaching infinite compression, whereas negative, rarefactive solitary waves and double layers can exist when the electron nonthermality exceeds a certain minimum. There are even regions of coexistence, the limits of which can be elucidated by considering the properties of the special Sagdeev pseudopotential at the acoustic speed. In particular, when the compositional parameters and Mach numbers admit only compressive or rarefactive solitary structures, these have to be superacoustic, their amplitude vanishing at the acoustic speed. When both compressive and rarefactive modes can occur, one of them is Korteweg-de Vries (KdV)-like, the other having a non-KdV character, with a finite amplitude at the acoustic speed.

  17. Statistical physics of non-thermal phase transitions from foundations to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Abaimov, Sergey G

    2015-01-01

    Statistical physics can be used to better understand non-thermal complex systems—phenomena such as stock-market crashes, revolutions in society and in science, fractures in engineered materials and in the Earth’s crust, catastrophes, traffic jams, petroleum clusters, polymerization, self-organized criticality and many others exhibit behaviors resembling those of thermodynamic systems. In particular, many of these systems possess phase transitions identical to critical or spinodal phenomena in statistical physics. The application of the well-developed formalism of statistical physics to non-thermal complex systems may help to predict and prevent such catastrophes as earthquakes, snow-avalanches and landslides, failure of engineering structures, or economical crises. This book addresses the issue step-by-step, from phenomenological analogies between complex systems and statistical physics to more complex aspects, such as correlations, fluctuation-dissipation theorem, susceptibility, the concept of free ener...

  18. Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

  19. Whither has the nonthermal tail gone in nonrelativistic heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.; Racz, A.

    1990-06-01

    In a simplified model the evolution of the originally nonthermal momentum distribution has been followed. The result is, that, although the final entropy deficiency may be quite substantial at 800 MeV/nucleon beam energy for smaller nuclei, the detected process does not reflect the extent of deviation from equilibrium (quite substantial). The reason is the addition of flow velocities, different in different volume elements. (author) 26 refs.; 11 figs

  20. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-17, č. článku 600. ISSN 2045-2322 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, NOV (2014), "7129-1"-"7129-11" ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : cell death * non-thermal plasma * therapeutic perspectives Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; FH - Neurology (UEM-P); CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 5.578, year: 2014

  2. The Swift BAT Perspective on Non-Thermal Emission in HIFLUGCS Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wik, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal, inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been underway for many years, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Until recently, comprehensive surveys of hard X-ray emission from clusters were not possible; instead, individually proposed-for. long observations would be collated from the archive. With the advent of the Swift BAT all sky survey, any c1u,;ter's emission above 14 keV can be probed with nearly uniform sensitivity. which is comparable to that of RXTE, Beppo-SAX, and Suzaku with the 58-month version of the survey. In this work. we search for non-thermal excess emission above the exponentially decreasing, high energy thermal emission in the flux-limited HIFLUGCS sample. The BAT emission from many of the detected clusters is marginally extended; we are able to extract the total flux for these clusters using fiducial models for their spatial extent. To account for thermal emission at BAT energies, XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are extracted from coincident spatial regions so that both the thermal and non-thermal spectral components can be determined simultaneou,;ly in joint fits. We find marginally significant IC components in 6 clusters, though after closer inspection and consideration of systematic errors we are unable to claim a clear detection in any of them. The spectra of all clusters are also summed to enhance a cumulative non-thermal signal not quite detectable in individual clusters. After constructing a model based on single temperature

  3. Possible wave modes of wideband nonthermal continuum radiation in its source region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grimald, S.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A06209/1-A06209/8 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253; GA MŠk ME09107 Grant - others:ESA(XE) PECS98025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : nonthermal continuum * NTC * wave modes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  4. A review on microbiological decontamination of fresh produce with nonthermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, C; D'Angelo, D; Fea, E; Gilli, G

    2017-06-01

    Food safety is a critical public health issue for consumers and the food industry because microbiological contamination of food causes considerable social and economic burdens on health care. Most foodborne illness comes from animal production, but as of the mid-1990s in the United States and more recently in the European Union, the contribution of fresh produce to foodborne outbreaks has rapidly increased. Recent studies have suggested that sterilization with nonthermal plasma could be a viable alternative to the traditional methods for the decontamination of heat-sensitive materials or food because this technique proves capable of eliminating micro-organisms on surfaces without altering the substrate. In the last 10 years, researchers have used nonthermal plasma in a variety of food inoculated with many bacterial species. All of these experiments were conducted exclusively in a laboratory and, to our knowledge, this technique has not been used in an industrial setting. Thus, the purpose of this review is to understand whether this technology could be used at the industrial level. The latest researches using nonthermal plasma on fresh produce were analysed. These evaluations have focused on the log reduction of micro-organisms and the treatment time. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.

    2016-10-21

    The opportunity for ignition assistance by a pulsed applied voltage is investigated in a canonical one-dimensional configuration. An incipient ignition kernel, formed by localized energy deposition into a lean mixture of methane and air at atmospheric pressure, is subjected to sub-breakdown electric fields (E/N ≈ 100 Td) by a DC potential applied across the domain, resulting in non-thermal behavior of the plasma formed during the discharge. A two-fluid approach is employed to couple thermal neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported from the ignition zone drift rapidly through the domain, augmenting the magnitude of the electric field in the fresh gas during the pulse through a dynamic-electrode effect, which results in an increase in the energy of the electrons in the fresh mixture with increasing time. Enhanced fuel and oxidizer decomposition due to electron impact dissociation and interaction with excited neutrals generate a pool of radicals, mostly O and H, in the fresh gas ahead of the flame\\'s preheat zone. In the configuration considered, the effect of the nanosecond pulse is to increase the mass of fuel burned at equivalent times relative to the unsupported ignition through enhanced radical generation, resulting in an increased heat release rate in the immediate aftermath of the pulse.

  6. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Padrig B.; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Elliott, Christopher T.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30–60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  7. Nonthermal plasma reactors for the production of light hydrocarbon olefins from heavy oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prieto

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, nonthermal plasma technology was applied in many different fields, focusing attention on the destruction of harmful compounds in the air. This paper deals with nonthermal plasma reactors for the conversion of heavy oil into light hydrocarbon olefins, to be employed as gasoline components or to be added in small amounts for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide compounds in the treatment of exhaust gas at power plants. For the process, the plate-plate nonthermal plasma reactor driven by AC high voltage was selected. The reactor was modeled as a function of parameter characteristics, using the methodology provided by the statistical experimental design. The parameters studied were gap distance between electrodes, carrier gas flow and applied power. Results indicate that the reactions occurring in the process of heavy oil conversion have an important selective behavior. The products obtained were C1-C4 hydrocarbons with ethylene as the main compound. Operating the parameters of the reactor within the established operative window of the system and close to the optimum conditions, efficiencies as high as 70 (mul/joule were obtained. These values validate the process as an in-situ method to produce light olefins for the treatment of nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gas from diesel engines.

  8. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  9. Nonthermal x-ray emission from a tungsten z-pinch at 5 MA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The generation of intense bursts of warm x rays with power in the 1-TW regime are of interest for the study of in-depth nuclear radiation effects. Results from high-atomic-number single-wire experiments carried out at 0.8 MA on Gamble II in the 1970s showed 0.25% efficient production of nonthermal, bremsstrahlung-like lines and continuum in the 5- to 100-keV regime. This high efficiency in combination with suggested Z 2 and I 2 scaling of the nonthermal radiation motivated the present experiment to measure and model the radiation from the z pinch formed from compact high-Z wire arrays at high current. In the experiment, tungsten wire arrays of length 20 mm on a mounting radius of 2 mm were imploded over the mass range 1 to 16 mg on the Saturn accelerator operating with a peak discharge current of 5 MA. As in the Gamble-II experiments, bright spots were observed to form at ∼1-mm intervals along the z axis at the time of a first implosion and to be the source of the hard radiation measured. Maximum radiation occurred for masses less than or approximately equal to 4 mg. The experiment was simulated using the LASNEX and TIP numerical codes with a nonthermal model. The timing of the multiple implosions, owing to compression and expansion of the resulting plasma are observed to be in agreement with predictions from both codes and analytic modeling

  10. Effect of nonthermal electrons on oblique electrostatic excitations in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinejad, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The linear and nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma with nonthermal electrons. In the linear regime, the propagation of two possible modes and their evolution are studied via a dispersion relation. In the cases of parallel and perpendicular propagation, it is shown that these two possible modes are always stable. Then, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the dynamics of ion-acoustic solitary waves is derived from a weakly nonlinear analysis. The influence on the solitary wave characteristics of relevant physical parameters such as nonthermal electrons, magnetic field, obliqueness, positron concentration, and temperature ratio is examined. It is observed that the increasing nonthermal electrons parameter makes the solitary structures much taller and narrower. Also, it is revealed that the magnetic field strength makes the solitary waves more spiky. The present investigation contributes to the physics of the nonlinear electrostatic ion-acoustic waves in space and laboratory e-p-i plasmas in which wave damping produces an electron tail.

  11. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states

  12. Hadronic model for the non-thermal radiation from the binary system AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, W.

    2018-05-01

    AR Scorpii is a close binary system containing a rotation powered white dwarf and a low-mass M type companion star. This system shows non-thermal emission extending up to the X-ray energy range. We consider hybrid (lepto-hadronic) and pure hadronic models for the high energy non-thermal processes in this binary system. Relativistic electrons and hadrons are assumed to be accelerated in a strongly magnetised, turbulent region formed in collision of a rotating white dwarf magnetosphere and a magnetosphere/dense atmosphere of the M-dwarf star. We propose that the non-thermal X-ray emission is produced either by the primary electrons or the secondary e± pairs from decay of charged pions created in collisions of hadrons with the companion star atmosphere. We show that the accompanying γ-ray emission from decay of neutral pions, which are produced by these same protons, is expected to be on the detectability level of the present and/or the future satellite and Cherenkov telescopes. The γ-ray observations of the binary system AR Sco should allow us to constrain the efficiency of hadron and electron acceleration and also the details of the radiation processes.

  13. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering

  14. Studying the non-thermal plasma jet characteristics and application on bacterial decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-rawaf, Ali F.; Fuliful, Fadhil Khaddam; Khalaf, Mohammed K.; Oudah, Husham. K.

    2018-04-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet represents an excellent approach for the decontamination of bacteria. In this paper, we want to improve and characterize a non-thermal plasma jet to employ it in processes of sterilization. The electrical characteristics was studied to describe the discharge of the plasma jet and the development of plasma plume has been characterized as a function of helium flow rate. Optical emission spectroscopy was employed to detect the active species inside the plasma plume. The inactivation efficiency of non-thermal plasma jet was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria by measuring the diameter of inhibition zone and the number of surviving cells. The results presented that the plasma plume temperature was lower than 34° C at a flow rate of 4 slm, which will not cause damage to living tissues. The diameter of inhibition zone is directly extended with increased exposure time. We confirmed that the inactivation mechanism was unaffected by UV irradiation. In addition, we concluded that the major reasons for the inactivation process of bacteria is because of the action of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which formed from ambient air, while the charged particles played a minor role in the inactivation process.

  15. IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY ON PREFLARE CORONAL NONTHERMAL SOURCES ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2002 JULY 23 FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Ayumi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimojo, Masumi; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi; Krucker, Saem

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed examination on the coronal nonthermal emissions during the preflare phase of the X4.8 flare that occurred on 2002 July 23. The microwave (17 GHz and 34 GHz) data obtained with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, at Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory and the hard X-ray (HXR) data taken with RHESSI obviously showed nonthermal sources that are located above the flare loops during the preflare phase. We performed imaging spectroscopic analyses on the nonthermal emission sources both in microwaves and in HXRs, and confirmed that electrons are accelerated from several tens of keV to more than 1 MeV even in this phase. If we assume the thin-target model for the HXR emission source, the derived electron spectral indices (∼4.7) is the same value as that from microwaves (∼4.7) within the observational uncertainties, which implies that the distribution of the accelerated electrons follows a single power law. The number density of the microwave-emitting electrons is, however, larger than that of the HXR-emitting electrons, unless we assume low-ambient plasma density of about 1.0 x 10 9 cm -3 for the HXR-emitting region. If we adopt the thick-target model for the HXR emission source, on the other hand, the electron spectral index (∼6.7) is much different, while the gap of the number density of the accelerated electrons is somewhat reduced.

  16. Thermal or nonthermal? That is the question for ultrafast spin switching in GdFeCo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G P; George, Thomas F

    2013-09-11

    GdFeCo is among the most interesting magnets for producing laser-induced femtosecond magnetism, where light can switch its spin moment from one direction to another. This paper aims to set a criterion for the thermal/nonthermal mechanism: we propose to use the Fermi-Dirac distribution function as a reliable criterion. A precise value for the thermalization time is needed, and through a two-level model, we show that since there is no direct connection between the laser helicity and the definition of thermal/nonthermal processes, the helicity is a poor criterion for differentiating a thermal from a nonthermal process. In addition, we propose a four-site model system (Gd2Fe2) for investigating the transient ferromagnetic ordering between Gd and Fe ions. We find that states of two different kinds can allow such an ordering. One state is a pure ferromagnetic state with ferromagnetic ordering among all the ions, and the other is the short-ranged ferromagnetic ordering of a pair of Gd and Fe ions.

  17. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Topical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, H.A.; Schmidt, L.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Sondreal, E.A.; Erjavec, J.; Steadman, E.N.; Fabrycky, W.J.; Wilson, J.S.; Musich, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    This report analyzes three systems engineering (SE) studies performed on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech (VT). The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions taken in the studies might bias the resulting economic evaluations of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to produce sound SE applications

  18. NONTHERMALLY DOMINATED ELECTRON ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN A LOW-β PLASMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaocan; Li, Gang; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    By means of fully kinetic simulations, we investigate electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a nonrelativistic proton–electron plasma with conditions similar to solar corona and flares. We demonstrate that reconnection leads to a nonthermally dominated electron acceleration with a power-law energy distribution in the nonrelativistic low-β regime but not in the high-β regime, where β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure. The accelerated electrons contain most of the dissipated magnetic energy in the low-β regime. A guiding-center current description is used to reveal the role of electron drift motions during the bulk nonthermal energization. We find that the main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-type acceleration accomplished by the particle curvature drift motion along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflows. Although the acceleration mechanism is similar for different plasma β, low-β reconnection drives fast acceleration on Alfvénic timescales and develops power laws out of thermal distribution. The nonthermally dominated acceleration resulting from magnetic reconnection in low-β plasma may have strong implications for the  highly efficient electron acceleration in solar flares and other astrophysical systems

  19. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno Suwarno

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is reactive toward hydrogen forming metal hydride which has a potential application in      energy storage and conversion. Titanium hydride has been widely studied for hydrogen storage, thermal storage, and battery electrodes applications. A special interest is using titanium for hydrogen production in a hydrogen sorption-enhanced steam reforming of natural gas. In the present work, non-isothermal dehydrogenation kinetics of titanium hydride and kinetics of hydrogenation in gaseous flow at isothermal conditions were investigated. The hydrogen desorption was studied using temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS while the hydrogen absorption and desorption in gaseous flow were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The present work showed that the path of dehydrogenation of the TiH2 is d®b®a hydride phase with possible overlapping steps occurred. The fast hydrogen desorption rate observed at the TDS main peak temperature were correlated with the fast transformation of the d-TiH1.41 to b-TiH0.59. In the gaseous flow, hydrogen absorption and desorption were related to the transformation of b-TiH0.59 Û d-TiH1.41 with 2 wt.% hydrogen reversible content. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 20th March 2017; Accepted: 9th April 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Suwarno, S., Yartys, V.A. (2017. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 312-317  (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.810.312-317

  20. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some methylated xanthines and the laser desorption of caffeine and theophylline from thin layer chromatography plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption/laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and xanthine are reported. These mass spectra are compared with published spectra obtained using electron impact ionization. Mass spectra of caffeine and theophylline obtained by IR laser desorption from thin layer chromatography plates are also described. The laser desorption of materials from thin layer chromatography plates is discussed.

  1. An investigation of the treatment of particulate matter from gasoline engine exhaust using non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Dan; Gao Dengshan; Yu Gang; Shen Xianglin; Gu Fan

    2005-01-01

    A plasma reactor with catalysts was used to treat exhaust gas from a gasoline engine in order to decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. The effect of non-thermal plasma (NTP) of the dielectric discharges on the removal of PM from the exhaust gas was investigated experimentally. The removal efficiency of PM was based on the concentration difference in PM for particle diameters ranging from 0.3 to 5.0 μm as measured by a particle counter. Several factors affecting PM conversion, including the density of plasma energy, reaction temperature, flow rate of exhaust gas, were investigated in the experiment. The results indicate that PM removal efficiency ranged approximately from 25 to 57% and increased with increasing energy input in the reactor, reaction temperature and residence time of the exhaust gas in the reactor. Enhanced removal of the PM was achieved by filling the discharge gap of the reactor with Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst pellets. In addition, the removal of unburned hydrocarbons was studied. Finally, available approaches for PM conversion were analyzed involving the interactions between discharge and catalytic reactions

  2. Adsorption and desorption of radioactive inert gases in various materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkus, D.

    1999-01-01

    Peculiarities of the 85 Kr and 133 Xe adsorption and desorption processes in active carbon and paraffin are considered in the work. During the desorption process, the distribution of 85 Kr and 133 Xe atoms in active carbon particles is uneven: atoms in narrow micropores desorb the last. It is shown that by changing adsorption conditions the presence time of radioactive inert gases in an active carbon can be prolonged. The adsorption and desorption processes change in the adsorbent, which changes its aggregation state: adsorption occurs in a liquid absorbent and desorption - in a solid absorbent. Paraffin is just such an absorbent changing its aggregation state with low energy losses. It has been obtained that 133 Xe accumulates less in liquid paraffin that in an active carbon. The absorption of 85 Kr in paraffin is larger than in an active carbon (at 18-20 degrees Celsius), while desorption is slower. The velocity of radioactive inert gas atom motion in different places of a solid paraffin sample is different - it increases approaching the borders of the sample. Prolongation of the desorption time of radioactive inert gases from adsorbents and adsorbents in many cases is of a practical importance. In this work, it has been shown by model experiments that the intensity of adsorption and desorption processes for the same sorbents can be changed. Desorption intensity changes are related to the distribution of gas atoms on the surface of particles and in micropores. Desorption velocity decreases if inert gas atoms having entered micropores are 'closed' by condensed liquids in the environment. In this case an inert gas atom diffuses within the whole particle volume or through the condensed liquid. Radioactive inert gases 85 Kr and 133 Xe are absorbed not only in liquid paraffin but in solid one as well. Therefore, after a paraffin sample is hermetically closed in a glass dish, 85 Kr (gas) having diffused from this sample is repeatedly absorbed in it. The 85 Kr

  3. Sorption-desorption behavior of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshansky, Yaniv; Polubesova, Tamara; Vetter, Walter; Chefetz, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that are commonly found in commercial and household products. These compounds are considered persistent organic pollutants. In this study, we used 4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE-15) as a model compound to elucidate the sorption and desorption behavior of PBDEs in soils. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficient (K OC ) of BDE-15 was more than three times higher for humin than for bulk soils. However, pronounced desorption hysteresis was obtained mainly for bulk soils. For humin, increasing concentration of sorbed BDE-15 resulted in decreased desorption. Our data illustrate that BDE-15 and probably other PBDEs exhibit high sorption affinity to soils. Moreover, sorption is irreversible and thus PBDEs can potentially accumulate in the topsoil layer. We also suggest that although humin is probably a major sorbent for PBDEs in soils, other humic materials are also responsible for their sequestration. - Highlights: → BDE-15 exhibited pronounced desorption hysteresis. → BDE-15 sowed higher sorption affinity to humin as compared to the bulk soils. → Sequestration of PBDEs depends on soil organic matter constitutes other than humin. - Pronounced desorption hysteresis was observed for BDE-15 in natural soils.

  4. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano André Petter

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1. In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron, total organic carbon, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin, pH and partition coefficient to organic carbon were evaluated. The Freundlich isotherm was adjusted appropriately to describe diuron sorption kinetics in all the studied treatments. The application of biochar provided increment in the sorption (Kf and reduction in the desorption of diuron in 64 and 44%, respectively. This effect is attributed to the biochar contribution to the total organic carbon and C-humin and of these to diuron through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The positive correlation between the partition coefficient to organic carbon and Kf confirms the importance of soil organic compartment in the sorption of diuron. There was no competition of NPK fertilizer for the same sorption site of diuron. The increase and reduction in sorption and desorption, respectively, show that the application of biochar is an important alternative for the remediation of soil leaching of diuron, especially in sandy soils.

  5. Desorption of absorbed iron in bean root and leaf tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jooste, J.H.; De Bruyn, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of different desorption media on the amount of absorbed Fe (from a solution of FeCl 3 in 0,5 mM CaCl 2 ) retained by leaf discs and excised root tips of bean plants was investigated. Attempts were also made to determine the effect of desorption on the intracellular distribution of Fe. Desorption in water or an FeCl 3 solution had no pronounced effect on the amount of absorbed Fe retained by either the leaf or root tissues. However, Na 2 -EDTA was able to desorb a considerable portion of the absorbed Fe, especially in root tissue. This applies to Fe absorbed from solutions of FeCl 3 and Fe-EDDHA. Desorption by the chelate removed Fe from practically all the different particulate fractions of both root and leaf tissues, but desorption following the longer absorption periods resulted in an increase in the Fe content of the 'soluble' fraction. The possibility that Na 2 -EDTA causes an increased permeability of cell membranes seems likely. The view that removal of Ca by the chelate causes this increase in permeability could not be confirmed [af

  6. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F., E-mail: francois.dulieu@obspm.fr [LERMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise et Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112 du CNRS. 5, mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  7. Application of pulsed power and power modulation to the non-thermal plasma treatment of hazardous gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1992-10-01

    Acid rain, global warming, ozone depletion, and smog are preeminent environmental problems facing the world today. Non-thermal plasma techniques offer an innovative approach to the cost-effective solution of these problems. Many potential applications of non-thermal plasmas to air pollution control have already been demonstrated. The use of pulsed power and power modulation is essential to the successful implementation of non-thermal plasma techniques. This paper provides an overview of the most recent developments in non-thermal plasma systems that have been applied to gaseous waste treatment. In the non-thermal plasma approach, the nonequilibrium properties of the plasma are fully exploited. These plasmas are characterized by high electron temperatures, while the gas remains at near ambient temperature and pressure. The energy is directed preferentially to the undesirable components, which are often present in very small concentrations. These techniques utilize the dissociation and ionization of the background gas to produce radicals which, in turn, decompose the toxic compounds. The key to success in the non-thermal plasma approach is to produce a discharge in which the majority of the electrical energy goes into the production of energetic electrons, rather than into gas heating. For example, in a typical application to flue gas cleanup, these electrons produce radicals, such as O and OH, through the dissociation or ionization of molecules such as H 2 O or O 2 . The radicals diffuse through the gas and preferentially oxidize the nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides to form acids that can then be easily neutralized to form non-toxic, easily-collectible (and commercially salable) compounds. Non-thermal plasmas can be created in essentially two different ways: by electron-beam irradiation, and by electrical discharges

  8. Study of defects near molybdenum surface using thermal desorption spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectrometry is utilized to study the migration of atoms and defects near molybdenum surface. The thermal desorption spectra of inert gas ions (neon, argon and krypton) injected with various energies (430-1950 eV) into a polycrystalline molybdenum target with various dosages (6.4 x 10sup(12) - 3.9 x 10sup(14) ions/cmsup(2)) are investigated. Four different states of binding of the trapped atoms corresponding to the activation energies for desorption have been revealed from the spectra. The activation energies are found to be relatively insensitive to the species of the bombarding ion, incident ion energy and the dosage. The patterns of the spectra are strongly influenced by the mean projected range of the ions into the solid. The activation energies deduced are in good agreement with those reported for the migration of atoms and defects in molybdenum. (auth.)

  9. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  10. Study of the mechanisms of matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuelli, Pascal

    1995-01-01

    This research thesis aims at a better knowledge of some aspects of a complex mechanism: the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The author first proposes a comparative analysis of results obtained by time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry and by Fourier transform mass spectrometry. He reports the study of the matrix role (notably a polymeric matrix) as a matter submitted to laser desorption. In this respect, the influence of the incident wavelength has been studied. The author also reports a comparative of ions produced by matrix laser desorption (study performed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry) and of neutral molecules (study performed by flash pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and with mass spectrometry). Finally, results obtained on derivatives and complexes based on beta-cyclodextrins highlight benefits as well as limitations of this technique [fr

  11. Analysis of the technique Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) and its Application for the Characterization of Metal -Hydrogen Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental developments made to study the desorption of hydrogen from metallic samples by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS). With this technique gas desorption is stimulated by the programmed heating of the sample. To perform the study we set up a newly designed equipment and develop theoretical models of the kinetic processes involved. The equipment and the models are used to analyze the desorption process in a real system. We begin by analyzing the models developed to interpret the results of the experiments. These models consider simultaneously bulk diffusion and surface reaction processes in metal-hydrogen systems with one or two thermodynamic phases. We present numerical results, computer simulations and analytical approximations of the original models. Based on these results we analyze the main features of the spectra for the different relevant kinetic processes, and determine the changes induced in them when material parameters (activation energies, geometry) or experimental parameters (heating speed, initial concentration) are modified.We present the original equipment, designed and constructed during this work to perform the TDS experiments. We describe its main characteristics, its components, its range of operation and its sensibility. We also offer an analysis of the background spectrum. We use the Pd-H system to test the equipment and the models. The samples chosen, powders, granules, foils and wires, were previously characterized to analyze their composition, their morphology and their characteristic size. We show the results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation, X ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) analysis.We then present and analyze in depth the experimental desorption spectra of the palladium powder. Based on the analysis we determine the rate limiting step for desorption and the characteristic activation energies. When the system is on the b phase (hydride) the rate

  12. Coverage dependent desorption dynamics of deuterium on Si(100) surfaces: interpretation with a diffusion-promoted desorption model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, T; Niida, T; Tsurumaki, H; Namiki, A

    2005-01-08

    We studied coverage dependence of time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of D2 molecules thermally desorbed from the D/Si(100) surface. The mean translational energies Et of desorbed D2 molecules were found to increase from 0.20+/-0.05 eV to 0.40+/-0.04 eV as the desorption coverage window was decreased from 1.0 ML> or =thetaD> or =0.9 ML to 0.2 ML> or =thetaD> or =0 ML, being consistent with the kinetics switch predicted in the interdimer mechanism. The measured TOF spectra were deconvoluted into 2H, 3H, and 4H components by a curve fitting method along the principle of detailed balance. As a result, it turned out that the desorption kinetics changes from the 4H to the 3H situation at high coverage above thetaD=0.9 ML, while the 2H desorption is dominant for a quite wide coverage region up to thetaD=0.8 ML. A dynamic desorption mechanism by which the desorption is promoted by D-atom diffusion to dangling bonds was proposed. 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Sorptive and desorptive fractionation of dissolved organic matter by mineral soil matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Adi; Chefetz, Benny

    2012-01-01

    Interactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with soil minerals, such as metal oxides and clays, involve various sorption mechanisms and may lead to sorptive fractionation of certain organic moieties. While sorption of DOM to soil minerals typically involves a degree of irreversibility, it is unclear which structural components of DOM correspond to the irreversibly bound fraction and which factors may be considered determinants. To assist in elucidating that, the current study aimed at investigating fractionation of DOM during sorption and desorption processes in soil. Batch DOM sorption and desorption experiments were conducted with organic matter poor, alkaline soils. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectroscopy were used to analyze bulk DOM, sorbed DOM, and desorbed DOM fractions. Sorptive fractionation resulted mainly from the preferential uptake of aromatic, carboxylic, and phenolic moieties of DOM. Soil metal-oxide content positively affected DOM sorption and binding of some specific carboxylate and phenolate functional groups. Desorptive fractionation of DOM was expressed by the irreversible-binding nature of some carboxylic moieties, whereas other bound carboxylic moieties were readily desorbed. Inner-sphere, as opposed to outer-sphere, ligand-exchange complexation mechanisms may be responsible for these irreversible, as opposed to reversible, interactions, respectively. The interaction of aliphatic DOM constituents with soil, presumably through weak van der Waals forces, was minor and increased with increasing proportion of clay minerals in the soil. Revealing the nature of DOM-fractionation processes is of great importance to understanding carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils, as well as the overall fate of contaminants that might be associated with DOM. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. Long-term desorption of trichloroethylene from flint clay using multiplexed optical detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stager, M.P.; Perram, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    The long-term desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) from powdered flint clay was examined using a multiplexed, phase sensitive infrared technique which provided a gas phase detection limit of 0.0045 torr for continuous monitoring of the desorption process for at least 3 days. The vapor phase TCE concentrations as a function of desorption time exhibit a significant deviation from Langmuir kinetics. The desorption process is adequately described by bonding sites with a gamma distribution for the desorption rate coefficients. The mean desorption rate for powdered flint clay at 25°C is k d = 0.50 ± 0.02 h −1 . (author)

  15. Modelling of Convective Process of Water Desorption from Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stakic, M.; Nikolic, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a mathematical model developed to evaluate the influence of structural and operational factors on convective dehydration process (desorption of liquid phase from capillary-porous material), as well as the possibility to utilize this model for the case of water desorption from polystyrene cation resin CG-8. The model accounts for unsteady one-dimensional simultaneous heat and mass transfer between the gas (air) and the solid phase (resin). The identification of effective transport properties for the considered fixed bed of material (resin CG 8) is discussed. To this purpose available data from the literature are used. (author)

  16. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter,Fabiano André; Ferreira,Tamara Santos; Sinhorin,Adilson Paulo; Lima,Larissa Borges de; Morais,Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco,Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorpti...

  17. Counterion adsorption and desorption rate of a charged macromolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Yang, Jingfa; Zhao, Jiang

    The rate constant of counterion adsorption to and desorption from a synthetic polyelectrolyte, polystyrene sulfonate (PSS-), is measured in aqueous solution by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that both adsorption and desorption rate of counterions have strong dependence on polymer concentration, salt concentration as well as the molecular weight of polyelectrolytes. The results clearly demonstrate that the contribution of electrostatic interaction and the translational entropy to the distribution of counterions of a polyelectrolyte molecule. The information is helpful to the understanding of polyelectrolyte physics. National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  18. Heavy-Ion-Induced Electronic Desorption of Gas from Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Molvik, A W; Mahner, E; Kireeff Covo, M; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-01-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dEe/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  19. Bulk-mediated surface diffusion: non-Markovian desorption dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, Jorge A; Budde, Carlos E; Prato, Domingo; Wio, Horacio S

    2005-01-01

    Here we analyse the dynamics of adsorbed molecules within the bulk-mediated surface diffusion framework, when the particle's desorption mechanism is characterized by a non-Markovian process, while the particle's adsorption as well as its motion in the bulk is governed by Markovian dynamics. We study the diffusion of particles in both semi-infinite and finite cubic lattices, analysing the conditional probability to find the system on the reference absorptive plane as well as the surface dispersion as functions of time. The results are compared with known Markovian cases showing the differences that can be exploited to distinguish between Markovian and non-Markovian desorption mechanisms in experimental situations

  20. Anomalous low-temperature desorption from preirradiated rare gas solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, E.V.; Gumenchuk, G.B.; Yurtaeva, E.M.; Belov, A.G.; Khyzhniy, I.V.; Frankowski, M.; Beyer, M.K.; Smith-Gicklhorn, A.M.; Ponomaryov, A.N.; Bondybey, V.E.

    2005-01-01

    The role for the exciton-induced defects in the stimulation of anomalous low-temperature desorption of the own lattice atoms from solid Ar and Ne preirradiated by an electron beam is studied. The free electrons from shallow traps-structural defects-was monitored by the measurements of a yield of the thermally induced exoelectron emission (TSEE). The reaction of recombination of self-trapped holes with electrons is considered as a source of energy needed for the desorption of atoms from the surface of preirradiated solids. A key part of the exciton-induced defects in the phenomenon observed is demonstrated

  1. Simultaneous imaging of multiple neurotransmitters and neuroactive substances in the brain by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Strittmatter, Nicole; Nilsson, Anna; Kallbäck, Patrik; Alvarsson, Alexandra; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Svenningsson, Per; Goodwin, Richard J. A.; Andrén, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    With neurological processes involving multiple neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, it is important to have the ability to directly map and quantify multiple signaling molecules simultaneously in a single analysis. By utilizing a molecular-specific approach, namely desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI), we demonstrated that the technique can be used to image multiple neurotransmitters and their metabolites (dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyr...

  2. Accurate estimate of the relic density and the kinetic decoupling in nonthermal dark matter models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    Nonthermal dark matter generation is an appealing alternative to the standard paradigm of thermal WIMP dark matter. We reconsider nonthermal production mechanisms in a systematic way, and develop a numerical code for accurate computations of the dark matter relic density. We discuss, in particular, scenarios with long-lived massive states decaying into dark matter particles, appearing naturally in several beyond the standard model theories, such as supergravity and superstring frameworks. Since nonthermal production favors dark matter candidates with large pair annihilation rates, we analyze the possible connection with the anomalies detected in the lepton cosmic-ray flux by Pamela and Fermi. Concentrating on supersymmetric models, we consider the effect of these nonstandard cosmologies in selecting a preferred mass scale for the lightest supersymmetric particle as a dark matter candidate, and the consequent impact on the interpretation of new physics discovered or excluded at the LHC. Finally, we examine a rather predictive model, the G2-MSSM, investigating some of the standard assumptions usually implemented in the solution of the Boltzmann equation for the dark matter component, including coannihilations. We question the hypothesis that kinetic equilibrium holds along the whole phase of dark matter generation, and the validity of the factorization usually implemented to rewrite the system of a coupled Boltzmann equation for each coannihilating species as a single equation for the sum of all the number densities. As a byproduct we develop here a formalism to compute the kinetic decoupling temperature in case of coannihilating particles, which can also be applied to other particle physics frameworks, and also to standard thermal relics within a standard cosmology.

  3. Non-thermal particle acceleration in collisionless relativistic electron-proton reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic reconnection in relativistic collisionless plasmas can accelerate particles and power high-energy emission in various astrophysical systems. Whereas most previous studies focused on relativistic reconnection in pair plasmas, less attention has been paid to electron-ion plasma reconnection, expected in black hole accretion flows and relativistic jets. We report a comprehensive particle-in-cell numerical investigation of reconnection in an electron-ion plasma, spanning a wide range of ambient ion magnetizations σi, from the semirelativistic regime (ultrarelativistic electrons but non-relativistic ions, 10-3 ≪ σi ≪ 1) to the fully relativistic regime (both species are ultrarelativistic, σi ≫ 1). We investigate how the reconnection rate, electron and ion plasma flows, electric and magnetic field structures, electron/ion energy partitioning, and non-thermal particle acceleration depend on σi. Our key findings are: (1) the reconnection rate is about 0.1 of the Alfvénic rate across all regimes; (2) electrons can form concentrated moderately relativistic outflows even in the semirelativistic, small-σi regime; (3) while the released magnetic energy is partitioned equally between electrons and ions in the ultrarelativistic limit, the electron energy fraction declines gradually with decreased σi and asymptotes to about 0.25 in the semirelativistic regime; and (4) reconnection leads to efficient non-thermal electron acceleration with a σi-dependent power-law index, p(σ _i)˜eq const+0.7σ _i^{-1/2}. These findings are important for understanding black hole systems and lend support to semirelativistic reconnection models for powering non-thermal emission in blazar jets, offering a natural explanation for the spectral indices observed in these systems.

  4. Non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma induces angiogenesis through reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2012-01-07

    Vascularization plays a key role in processes such as wound healing and tissue engineering. Non-thermal plasma, which primarily produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), has recently emerged as an efficient tool in medical applications including blood coagulation, sterilization and malignant cell apoptosis. Liquids and porcine aortic endothelial cells were treated with a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in vitro. Plasma treatment of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and serum-free medium increased ROS concentration in a dose-dependent manner, with a higher concentration observed in serum-free medium compared with PBS. Species concentration inside cells peaked 1 h after treatment, followed by a decrease 3 h post treatment. Endothelial cells treated with a plasma dose of 4.2 J cm(-2) had 1.7 times more cells than untreated samples 5 days after plasma treatment. The 4.2 J cm(-2) plasma dose increased two-dimensional migration distance by 40 per cent compared with untreated control, while the number of cells that migrated through a three-dimensional collagen gel increased by 15 per cent. Tube formation was also enhanced by plasma treatment, with tube lengths in plasma-treated samples measuring 2.6 times longer than control samples. A fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) neutralizing antibody and ROS scavengers abrogated these angiogenic effects. These data indicate that plasma enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation is due to FGF-2 release induced by plasma-produced ROS. Non-thermal plasma may be used as a potential tool for applying ROS in precise doses to enhance vascularization.

  5. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration in 3D Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in Pair Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Gregory R.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A., E-mail: Greg.Werner@colorado.edu [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Physics Department, University of Colorado, 390 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    As a fundamental process converting magnetic to plasma energy in high-energy astrophysical plasmas, relativistic magnetic reconnection is a leading explanation for the acceleration of particles to the ultrarelativistic energies that are necessary to power nonthermal emission (especially X-rays and gamma-rays) in pulsar magnetospheres and pulsar wind nebulae, coronae and jets of accreting black holes, and gamma-ray bursts. An important objective of plasma astrophysics is therefore the characterization of nonthermal particle acceleration (NTPA) effected by reconnection. Reconnection-powered NTPA has been demonstrated over a wide range of physical conditions using large 2D kinetic simulations. However, its robustness in realistic 3D reconnection—in particular, whether the 3D relativistic drift-kink instability (RDKI) disrupts NTPA—has not been systematically investigated, although pioneering 3D simulations have observed NTPA in isolated cases. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of NTPA in 3D relativistic reconnection in collisionless electron–positron plasmas, characterizing NTPA as the strength of 3D effects is varied systematically via the length in the third dimension and the strength of the guide magnetic field. We find that, while the RDKI prominently perturbs 3D reconnecting current sheets, it does not suppress particle acceleration, even for zero guide field; fully 3D reconnection robustly and efficiently produces nonthermal power-law particle spectra closely resembling those obtained in 2D. This finding provides strong support for reconnection as the key mechanism powering high-energy flares in various astrophysical systems. We also show that strong guide fields significantly inhibit NTPA, slowing reconnection and limiting the energy available for plasma energization, yielding steeper and shorter power-law spectra.

  6. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholtz, V.; Khun, J.; Soušková, H.; Čeřovský, M.

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials

  7. ICRF Wave Propagation and Absorption in Plasmas with Non-thermal Populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Smithe, D.N.

    2002-01-01

    Some results obtained with the one dimensional, all orders, full wave code METS, which has been successfully employed in the past to describe a number of experiments, are reported. By using massively parallel computers, this code has been extended to handle non-thermal populations. Various physical situations, in which non-Maxwellian species are expected to be encountered, are studied, such as simultaneous neutral beam injection and high harmonic fast wave electron heating or ion cyclotron resonance heating in the presence of fusion products

  8. The interplay between biological and physical scenarios of bacterial death induced by non-thermal plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Jäger, Aleš; Polívka, Leoš; Syková, E.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, Mar (2016), s. 71-83 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568; AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bacteria * cytotoxicity * apoptosis * bacterial inactivation * reactive oxygen species (ROS) Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 8.402, year: 2016

  9. Nonthermal inactivation of norovirus surrogates on blueberries using atmospheric cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Alison; Niemira, Brendan A; Gurtler, Joshua B; Sites, Joseph; Boyd, Glenn; Kingsley, David H; Li, Xinhui; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-05-01

    Viruses are currently the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks, most of which are associated with foods consumed raw. Cold plasma (CP) is an emerging novel nonthermal technology that can be used to surface decontaminate foods. This study investigated CP technology for the nonthermal inactivation of human norovirus surrogates, Tulane virus (TV) and murine norovirus (MNV), on the surface of blueberries. Blueberries (5 g) were weighed into sterile 4 oz. glass jars and inoculated with TV, 5 log PFU/g. Samples were treated with atmospheric CP for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 s at a working distance of 7.5 cm with 4 cubic feet/minute (cfm) of CP jet. Temperature readings were taken with an infrared camera prior to, and immediately following, CP treatments. In order to establish the impact of air flow during CP treatment (4 cfm), an additional 7 cfm jet of room temperature air was introduced from a separate nozzle. The experiment was repeated with 90 and 120 s as additional treatment time points. Viral titers were measured immediately after each treatment with a plaque assay using LLC-MK2 cells (TV) or RAW 264.7 cells (MNV). TV was significantly reduced 1.5 PFU/g compared to the control after treatment time of 45s, which was achieved regardless of temperature conditions. With the addition of 7 cfm of ambient air, the maximum log reduction for TV was 3.5 log PFU/g after 120s of treatment. MNV was significantly reduced by 0.5 log PFU/g compare to the control at 15s, and further treatment of MNV with ambient air brought the log reduction to greater than 5 log PFU/g at 90 s of treatment (Fig. 3). These results demonstrate that CP viral inactivation does not rely on thermal inactivation, and is therefore nonthermal in nature. With further optimization, CP may be used by food processors as a means of nonthermal inactivation of foodborne viruses. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Study of non-thermal effects from laser radiation on live tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotta, M.A.

    1987-02-01

    The functional biological effects related to the irradiation of live tissues with low power lasers, called non-thermal effects were theoretical and experimentally studied. For the experimental part, a device which allows to: irradiation lesions artificially created on the back of rats by a He-Ne laser, or put a moving ground glass in front of the laser beam, by irradiation of this same laser with its coherence degree decreased. The relevance of the radiation coherence in the lesion cicatrization process was shown. The electrical field distribution and the intensity distribution on a surface with micro-roughness when irradiated by coherent light are theoretically studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. Ion-acoustic supersolitons and double layers in plasmas with nonthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, D.-N.; Zhang, J.; Yang, Y.; Duan, W.-S.

    2017-08-01

    Supersoliton (SS) can be mainly featured in two ways, namely, by focusing on subsidiary maxima on its electric field or by meeting the requirement that the appropriate Sagdeev pseudopotential (SP) has three local extrema between the equilibrium conditions and its amplitude. In this paper, by using the SP method, double layers and ion-acoustic SSs are studied in a plasma with Maxwellian cold electrons, nonthermal hot electrons, and fluid ions. The existence of the SS regime in parameter space is obtained in a methodical fashion. The existence domains for positive solitary waves are also presented. It is found that there is no SSs at the acoustic speed.

  12. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats ?

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Haitham S.; Fahmy, Heba M.; Radwan, Nasr M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susc...

  13. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, V., E-mail: Vladimir.Scholtz@vscht.cz; Khun, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Soušková, H. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Computing and Control Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Čeřovský, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials.

  14. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVisscher, A.; Dewulf, J.; Van Durme, J.; Leys, C.; Morent, R.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2008-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation.

  15. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visscher, A de; Dewulf, J; Durme, J van; Leys, C; Morent, R; Langenhove, H Van

    2008-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation

  16. Ion-acoustic double-layers in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, L. A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas and Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Galvão, R. M. O. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas and Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-900 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    In the present work we investigate the existence of obliquely propagating ion-acoustic double layers in magnetized two-electron plasmas. The fluid model is used to describe the ion dynamics, and the hot electron population is modeled via a κ distribution function, which has been proved to be appropriate for modeling non-Maxwellian plasmas. A quasineutral condition is assumed to investigate these nonlinear structures, which leads to the formation of double-layers propagating with slow ion-acoustic velocity. The problem is investigated numerically, and the influence of parameters such as nonthermality is discussed.

  17. Non-thermal escape rates of atmospheric H and D from Mars using MAVEN data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, M.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Geological evidence suggests that an ocean of liquid water existed on Mars until at least middle to late Noachian era (4.1 to 3.8 Ga) and possibly, at least episodically, as late as Hesperian. Between 67% and 87% of the total primordial amount of water, equal to about 70 to 110 meters equivalent (spread over the entire Mars' surface), is believed to have escape to space, while about 35 meters remains on or beneath the surface as water ice. Establishing better constraints on these numbers and identifying the responsible atmospheric loss processes remains the major objective of NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. The ratio of atmospheric Deuterium and Hydrogen (D/H) on Mars is one of the best indicators of water loss to space. While majority of H and D escape through thermal Jeans escape, up to 10% of D can escape to space via non-thermal mechanisms, such as collisions with superthermal neutral atoms. In this study, we present new estimates of non-thermal escape rates of light molecules of interest to the water evolution, including H2, HD, OH, and OD, based on recent measurements of atmospheric density and temperature profiles by MAVEN. The escape mechanisms considered include photochemical sources of hot O, as well as collisions with energetic neutral atoms produced in charge-exchange of solar wind ions with atmospheric gases1,2. Energy transport and escape rates are modeled using quantum reactive scattering formalism3 and seasonal variations are illustrated. Finally, a simple estimate of the role of the non-thermal escape mechanisms in previous eras is given. We conclude that D escape rates can be affected by the non-thermal processes with consequences on the estimates of primordial water inventory based on the D/H ratio. [1] N. Lewkow and V. Kharchenko, Astroph. J., 790, 98 (2014) [2] M. Gacesa, N. Lewkow, V. Kharchenko, Icarus 284, 90 (2017) [3] M. Gacesa and V. Kharchenko, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L10203 (2012)

  18. Structure of proton centers and associated nonthermal bursts at microwave frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enome, S.; Tanaka, H.

    1972-01-01

    In the flaring region of the sun, a large variety of plasmas with various densities and a wide range of temperatures or energies is implied. These plasmas are heated and accelerated to subrelativistic and relativistic energies. Observational evidence is given on the characteristics of active regions which produced proton flares and on the structure of the associated nonthermal microwave bursts of the sun. The behavior of subrelativistic electrons on the sun is also described. Data are based on observations made with the Toyota interferometers at 3 and 8 cm, which have the same spatial resolution. (U.S.)

  19. Stable Isotope Systematics of Coalbed Gas during Desorption and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Niemann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The stable carbon isotope ratios of coalbed methane (CBM demonstrate diagnostic changes that systematically vary with production and desorption times. These shifts can provide decisive, predictive information on the behaviour and potential performance of CBM operations. Samples from producing CBM wells show a general depletion in 13C-methane with increasing production times and corresponding shifts in δ13C-CH4 up to 35.8‰. Samples from canister desorption experiments show mostly enrichment in 13C for methane with increasing desorption time and isotope shifts of up to 43.4‰. Also, 13C-depletion was observed in some samples with isotope shifts of up to 32.1‰. Overall, the magnitudes of the observed isotope shifts vary considerably between different sample sets, but also within samples from the same source. The δ13C-CH4 values do not have the anticipated signature of methane generated from coal. This indicates that secondary processes, including desorption and diffusion, can influence the values. It is also challenging to deconvolute these various secondary processes because their molecular and isotope effects can have similar directions and/or magnitudes. In some instances, significant alteration of CBM gases has to be considered as a combination of secondary alteration effects.

  20. Solid Waste Decontamination by Thermal Desorption and Catalytic Oxidation Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Olga; Topka, Pavel; Soukup, Karel; Jirátová, Květa; Váňová, H.; Kaštánek, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 9 (2014), s. 1279-1282 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/059 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thermal desorption * catalytic oxidation * soil decontamination Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  1. Bacterial desorption from food container and food processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEldowney, S; Fletcher, M

    1988-03-01

    The desorption ofStaphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and a coryneform from the surfaces of materials used for manufacturing food containers (glass, tin plate, and polypropylene) or postprocess canning factory conveyor belts (stainless steel and nylon) was investigated. The effect of time, pH, temperature, and adsorbed organic layers on desorption was studied.S. aureus did not detach from the substrata at any pH investigated (between pH 5 and 9).A. calcoaceticus and the coryneform in some cases detached, depending upon pH and substratum composition. The degree of bacterial detachment from the substrata was not related to bacterial respiration at experimental pH values. Bacterial desorption was not affected by temperature (4-30°C) nor by an adsorbed layer of peptone and yeast extract on the substrata. The results indicate that bacterial desorption, hence bacterial removal during cleaning or their transfer via liquids flowing over colonized surfaces, is likely to vary with the surface composition and the bacterial species colonizing the surfaces.

  2. Organic contaminants in soil : desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the

  3. Influence of pre-treatments on the desorption isotherm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of pre-treatments on the desorption isotherm characteristics of plaintain. P-N T Johnson. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gjs.v39i1.15851 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  4. Electron Stimulated Desorption of Condensed Gases on Cryogenic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tratnik, H; Hilleret, Noël

    2005-01-01

    In ultra-high vacuum systems outgassing from vacuum chamber walls and desorption from surface adsorbates are usually the factors which in°uence pressure and residual gas composition. In particular in beam vacuum systems of accelerators like the LHC, where surfaces are exposed to intense synchro- tron radiation and bombardment by energetic ions and electrons, properties like the molecular desorption yield or secondary electron yield can strongly in°uence the performance of the accelerator. In high-energy particle accelerators operating at liquid helium temperature, cold surfaces are exposed to the bombardment of energetic photons, electrons and ions. The gases released by the subsequent desorption are re-condensed on the cold surfaces and can be re-desorbed by the impinging electrons and ions. The equilibrium coverage reached on the surfaces exposed to the impact of energetic particles depends on the desorption yield of the condensed gases and can a®ect the operation of the accelerator by modifying th...

  5. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  6. A monoenergetic electron source generated by nuclear stimulated desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelson, I.; Levy, Y.; Nir, D.; Haustein, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    A series of measurements of nuclear stimulated desorption was performed for 103 Ru, using thin ruthenium films irradiated by thermal neutrons. The magnitude, time dependence and electric charge state of the outgoing 103m Rh flux was investigated. The utilization of monoenergetic electrons accompanying the 103 Rh decay for thin film thickness measurement is considered. (Author)

  7. Water absorption and desorption in shuttle ablator and insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Smith, C. F.; Wooden, V. A.; Cothren, B. E.; Gregory, H.

    1982-01-01

    Shuttle systems ablator and insulation materials underwent water soak with subsequent water desorption in vacuum. Water accumulation in these materials after a soak for 24 hours ranged from +1.1% for orbiter tile to +161% for solid rocket booster MSA-1. After 1 minute in vacuum, water retention ranged from none in the orbiter tile to +70% for solid rocket booster cork.

  8. Equilibrium adsorption data from temperature-programmed desorption measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foeth, F.; Mugge, J.M.; van der Vaart, R.; van der Vaart, Rick; Bosch, H.; Reith, T.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes a novel method that enables the calculation of a series of adsorption isotherms basically from a single Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiment. The basic idea is to saturate an adsorbent packed in a fixed bed at a certain feed concentration and temperature and to

  9. PAH desorption from river floodplain soils using supercritical fluid extraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, Y.; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Hofmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 156, č. 3 (2008), s. 745-752 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06156 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : pahs * slow desorption * carbonaceous materials Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.135, year: 2008

  10. Study of boric acid sorption and desorption processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czosnowska, B.; Laren, E.

    1978-01-01

    The results are given of the experimental determination of the effect on the boric acid flow and sorption and desorption efficiency of the flow rate of boric acid at different concentrations through an ion exchange column 10.2 cm 2 in cross section. The strongly alkaline VOFATIT RO ion exchanger was used. (B.S.)

  11. Experimental study on desorption characteristics of SAPO-34 and ZSM-5 zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Z. X.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W. C.; Du, C. X.; Liu, Z. B.; Chen, Y. C.

    2018-03-01

    The dynamic characteristics of SAPO-34 and ZSM-5 zeolite in the desorption process have been experimentally studied with the gravimetric method. The weight change of the test sample was recorded continually for different conditions of temperature and pressure. The curve of the desorption degree with the temperature and the pressure was obtained and discussed. With the intrinsic different micro-structure, the two zeolites showed distinguished characteristics of the desorption. In contrast to an S-shaped desorption curve of the SAPO-34, the ZSM-5 showed an exponential desorption curve. In comparison, the desorption characteristics of the ZSM-5 were better than that of the SAPO-34 in the temperature range of 40 °C 90 °C. Nevertheless, the effect of the pressure on the desorption degree was stronger for the SAPO-34 than for the ZSM-5. Further analysis revealed that the desorption speed was affected more strongly by the temperature than by the pressure.

  12. Onset of turbulence induced by electron nonthermality in a complex plasma in presence of positively charged dust grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Sarkar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper onset of turbulence has been detected from the study of non linear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma considering electrons nonthermal and equilibrium dust charge positive. Dust grains are charged by secondary electron emission process. Our analysis shows that increase in electron nonthermality makes the grain charging process faster by reducing the magnitude of the nonadiabaticity induced pseudo viscosity. Consequently nature of dust charge variation changes from nonadiabatic to adiabatic one. For further increase of electron nonthermality, this pseudo viscosity becomes negative and hence generates a turbulent grain charging behaviour. This turbulent grain charging phenomenon is exclusively the outcome of this nonlinear study which was not found in linear analysis.

  13. Sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihao; Ding, Yunjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2010-11-01

    Carbamazepine is a prescription anticonvulsant and mood stabilizing pharmaceutical administered to humans. Carbamazepine is persistent in the environment and frequently detected in water systems. In this study, sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water was measured for smectite clays with the surface negative charges compensated with K+, Ca2+, NH4+, tetramethylammonium (TMA), trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) cations. The magnitude of sorption followed the order: TMPA-smectite≥HDTMA-smectite>NH4-smectite>K-smectite>Ca-smectite⩾TMA-smectite. The greatest sorption of carbamazepine by TMPA-smectite is attributed to the interaction of conjugate aromatic moiety in carbamazepine with the phenyl ring in TMPA through π-π interaction. Partitioning process is the primary mechanism for carbamazepine uptake by HDTMA-smectite. For NH4-smectite the urea moiety in carbamazepine interacts with exchanged cation NH4+ by H-bonding hence demonstrating relatively higher adsorption. Sorption by K-, Ca- and TMA-smectites from water occurs on aluminosilicate mineral surfaces. These results implicate that carbamazepine sorption by soils occurs primarily in soil organic matter, and soil mineral fractions play a secondary role. Desorption of carbamazepine from the sorbents manifested an apparent hysteresis. Increasing irreversibility of desorption vs. sorption was observed for K-, Ca-, TMA-, TMPA- and HDTMA-clays as aqueous carbamazepine concentrations increased. Desorption hysteresis of carbamazepine from K-, Ca-, NH4-smectites was greater than that from TMPA- and HDTMA-clays, suggesting that the sequestrated carbamazepine molecules in smectite interlayers are more resistant to desorption compared to those sorbed by organic phases in smectite clays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear stimulated desorption as a potential tool for surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nir, Dror.

    1993-03-01

    The described research work constitutes a base for an experimental method to be implemented in the study of solid surfaces. Nuclear Stimulated Desorption (NSD) is a new mode of experimentation in thin film and surface physics. It Is based on the interplay between nuclear phenomena (reactions and spontaneous decays), and atomic - scale induced effects on surfaces and very thin films. One may distinguish between two generically different relationships between the two. First, the dynamics of the nuclear reaction -primarily the recoil of the nucleus - may effect the position of the atom or molecule containing it. Second, the nuclear reaction (or decay) may serve as an analytical indicator of the whereabouts of the atom, or molecule, in question. In nuclear stimulated desorption, both thee aspects combine in an essential way. Namely, one employs a series of two consecutive decays (normally weak decays or isomeric transition) . The first of these decays causes the nucleus to desorb from a surface onto which it had been placed; the second serves to determine the position of the daughter and thereby the characteristics of the primary desorption . The essential feature in NSD is that it occurs almost exclusively from the outermost surface layer. This is because we choose to work with nuclei whose recoil energy Is of the same order of magnitude of the binding energy of the atom to the surface . Furthermore, the desorption probability and its angular (and temporal) characteristics, depend on the features (topology, morphology) of its immediate neighborhood. This work describes experiments which were designed to give relevant, phenomenological information about the outgoing flux of the radioactive daughters (for specifically chosen nuclear species) , and in particular the magnitude of the flux, its time dependence and its charged state. In addition. the basic phenomena itself is being distinguished from competing processes (thermal desorption, in particular). We will now

  15. Phenomena of non-thermal electrons from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu 610200, Sichuan (China); Huang, D.W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lee, S.G.; Shi, Y.J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Tong, R.H.; Wang, S.Y.; Wei, Y.N.; Ma, T.K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Some lines from X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) can be enhanced by non-thermal electrons, such as q, r satellite lines and z lines. • Analyze the non-thermal phenomena can reduce the error of electron temperature deduced from the intensity ratio of different lines of the He-like argon spectra from XICS. • XICS can be a tool to measure the non-thermal phenomena from these enhanced lines. - Abstract: A high spectra resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on J-TEXT Tokamak for the measurements of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. The wavelength range of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon is from 3.9494 Å to 3.9944 Å that includes the resonance line w, intercombination lines x and y, forbidden line z and numerous satellite lines, referenced using standard Gabriel notation. In low-density discharge, the intensity of q, r satellite lines and z lines can be significantly enhanced by non-thermal electrons. Non-thermal electrons are produced due to the low plasma density. The high hard X-ray flux from NaI detector and significant downshift electron cyclotron emissions from energetic runaway electrons also indicated that there is a large population of runaway electrons in the low-density discharge. The non-thermal part of electrons can affect the excitation/transition equilibrium or ionization/recombination equilibrium. The q line is mainly produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon, and the r line is partially produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon and dielectronic recombination of helium-like argon.

  16. The EVE plus RHESSI DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, James; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission in the soft X-ray energy range. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to calculate the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) for solar flares. This improvement over the isothermal approximation helps to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. For this current project we are interested in breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. As in our earlier work, thermal emission is modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature. Non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner.For this study, we have examined the DEM and non-thermal resuidual emission for a sample of relatively large (GOES M class and above) solar flares observed from 2011 to 2014. The results for the DEM and non-thermal parameters found using the combined EVE-RHESSI data are compared with those found using only RHESSI data.

  17. Phenomena of non-thermal electrons from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z.Y.; Jin, W.; Huang, D.W.; Lee, S.G.; Shi, Y.J.; Tong, R.H.; Wang, S.Y.; Wei, Y.N.; Ma, T.K.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Some lines from X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) can be enhanced by non-thermal electrons, such as q, r satellite lines and z lines. • Analyze the non-thermal phenomena can reduce the error of electron temperature deduced from the intensity ratio of different lines of the He-like argon spectra from XICS. • XICS can be a tool to measure the non-thermal phenomena from these enhanced lines. - Abstract: A high spectra resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on J-TEXT Tokamak for the measurements of K_α spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. The wavelength range of K_α spectra of helium-like argon is from 3.9494 Å to 3.9944 Å that includes the resonance line w, intercombination lines x and y, forbidden line z and numerous satellite lines, referenced using standard Gabriel notation. In low-density discharge, the intensity of q, r satellite lines and z lines can be significantly enhanced by non-thermal electrons. Non-thermal electrons are produced due to the low plasma density. The high hard X-ray flux from NaI detector and significant downshift electron cyclotron emissions from energetic runaway electrons also indicated that there is a large population of runaway electrons in the low-density discharge. The non-thermal part of electrons can affect the excitation/transition equilibrium or ionization/recombination equilibrium. The q line is mainly produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon, and the r line is partially produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon and dielectronic recombination of helium-like argon.

  18. Nonlinear structure formation in ion-temperature-gradient driven drift waves in pair-ion plasma with nonthermal electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Javaria; Haque, Q.; Khan, Majid; Bhatti, Adnan Mehmood; Kamran, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear structure formation in ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven waves is investigated in pair-ion plasma comprising ions and nonthermal electrons (kappa, Cairns). By using the transport equations of the Braginskii model, a new set of nonlinear equations are derived. A linear dispersion relation is obtained and discussed analytically as well as numerically. It is shown that the nonthermal population of electrons affects both the linear and nonlinear characteristics of the ITG mode in pair-ion plasma. This work will be useful in tokamaks and stellarators where non-Maxwellian population of electrons may exist due to resonant frequency heating, electron cyclotron heating, runaway electrons, etc.

  19. Nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves in electron-beam plasma system with non-thermal hot electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakil, S. A.; El-hanbaly, A. M.; Elgarayh, A.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Kassem, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    The properties of nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves have been investigated in an unmagnetized collisionless four-component plasma system consisting of a cold electron fluid, non-thermal hot electrons obeying a non-thermal distribution, an electron beam and stationary ions. It is found that the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The dependence of rogue wave profiles on the electron beam and energetic population parameter are discussed. The results of the present investigation may be applicable in auroral zone plasma.

  20. Geometry of the non-thermal emission in SN 1006. Azimuthal variations of cosmic-ray acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenflug, R.; Ballet, J.; Dubner, Gloria Mabel; Giacani, Elsa Beatriz; Decourchelle, A.; Ferrando, P.

    2017-01-01

    SN 1006 is the prototype of shell supernova remnants, in which non-thermal synchrotron emission dominates the X-ray spectrum. The non-thermal emission is due to the cosmic-ray electrons accelerated behind the blast wave. The X-ray synchrotron emission is due to the highest energy electrons, and is thus a tracer of the maximum energy electrons may reach behind a shock. We have put together all XMM-Newton observations to build a full map of SN 1006. The very low brightness a...

  1. Effects of ultrasound energy density on the non-thermal pasteurization of chocolate milk beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Sara H M C; Silva, Eric Keven; Alvarenga, Verônica O; Moraes, Jeremias; Freitas, Mônica Q; Silva, Márcia C; Raices, Renata S L; Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Meireles, M Angela A; Cruz, Adriano G

    2018-04-01

    This study presents the emerging high-intensity ultrasound (HIUS) processing as a non-thermal alternative to high-temperature short-time pasteurization (HTST). Chocolate milk beverage (CMB) was subjected to different ultrasound energy densities (0.3-3.0 kJ/cm 3 ), as compared to HTST pasteurization (72 °C/15 s) aimed to verify the effect of the HIUS processing on the microbiological and physicochemical characteristics of the beverage. The application of HIUS at an energy density of 3.0 kJ/cm 3 was able to reduce 3.56 ± 0.02 logarithmic cycles in the total aerobic counts. In addition, the ultrasound energy density affected the physical properties of the beverage as the size distribution of fat globule and rheological behavior, as well as the chemical properties such as antioxidant activity, ACE inhibitory activity, fatty acid profile, and volatile profile. In general, the different energetic densities used as a non-thermal method of pasteurization of CMB were more effective when compared to the conventional pasteurization by HTST, since they improved the microbiological and physicochemical quality, besides preserving the bioactive compounds and the nutritional quality of the product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016, it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  3. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Nass, Uwe; Dutta-Roy, Robindro; Zoennchen, Jochen H.

    2018-03-01

    In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016), it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs) becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  4. Toluene degradation by non-thermal plasma combined with a ferroelectric catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wen-Jun; Ma, Lin; Liu, Huan; Li, Jian

    2013-08-01

    Degradation of toluene in a gas by non-thermal plasma with a ferroelectric catalyst was studied at normal temperature and atmospheric pressure. Spontaneous polarization material (BaTiO3) and photocatalyst (TiO2) were added into plasma system simultively. Toluene degradation efficiency and specific energy density during the discharge process were investigated. Furthermore, byproducts and degradation mechanisms of toluene were also investigated. The toluene degradation efficiency increased when non-thermal plasma technology was combined with the catalyst. The toluene degradation efficiencies of the different catalysts tested were in the following order: BaTiO3/TiO2>BaTiO3>TiO2>no catalyst. A mass ratio of 2.38:1 was optimum for the BaTiO3 and TiO2 catalyst. The outlet gas was analyzed by gas chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the main compounds detected were CO2, H2O, O3 and benzene ring derivatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Toma, Takashi; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2) L quintuplet and a scalar SU(2) L septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations

  6. A hybrid model for computing nonthermal ion distributions in a long mean-free-path plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xianzhu; McDevitt, Chris; Guo, Zehua; Berk, Herb

    2014-10-01

    Non-thermal ions, especially the suprathermal ones, are known to make a dominant contribution to a number of important physics such as the fusion reactivity in controlled fusion, the ion heat flux, and in the case of a tokamak, the ion bootstrap current. Evaluating the deviation from a local Maxwellian distribution of these non-thermal ions can be a challenging task in the context of a global plasma fluid model that evolves the plasma density, flow, and temperature. Here we describe a hybrid model for coupling such constrained kinetic calculation to global plasma fluid models. The key ingredient is a non-perturbative treatment of the tail ions where the ion Knudsen number approaches or surpasses order unity. This can be sharply constrasted with the standard Chapman-Enskog approach which relies on a perturbative treatment that is frequently invalidated. The accuracy of our coupling scheme is controlled by the precise criteria for matching the non-perturbative kinetic model to perturbative solutions in both configuration space and velocity space. Although our specific application examples will be drawn from laboratory controlled fusion experiments, the general approach is applicable to space and astrophysical plasmas as well. Work supported by DOE.

  7. Large-k exciton dynamics in GaN epilayers: Nonthermal and thermal regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinattieri, Anna; Bogani, Franco; Cavigli, Lucia; Manzi, Donatella; Gurioli, Massimo; Feltin, Eric; Carlin, Jean-François; Martin, Denis; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation performed at low temperature (T<50 K) concerning the exciton dynamics in GaN epilayers grown on c-plane sapphire substrates, focusing on the exciton formation and the transition from the nonthermal to the thermal regime. The time-resolved kinetics of longitudinal-optical-phonon replicas is used to address the energy relaxation in the excitonic band. From picosecond time-resolved spectra, we bring evidence for a long lasting nonthermal excitonic distribution, which accounts for the first 50 ps. Such a behavior is confirmed in different experimental conditions when both nonresonant and resonant excitations are used. At low excitation power density, the exciton formation and their subsequent thermalization are dominated by impurity scattering rather than by acoustic phonon scattering. The estimate of the average energy of the excitons as a function of delay after the excitation pulse provides information on the relaxation time, which describes the evolution of the exciton population to the thermal regime.

  8. Effect of CO on NO and N2O conversions in nonthermal argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Guibing; Argyle, Morris D.; Radosz, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    200-600 ppm of CO inhibit NO conversion in nonthermal Ar plasma, but do not produce N 2 O. However, 1.01% of CO has no effect on NO conversion, but produces N 2 O. In general, N 2 O conversion in Ar plasma decreases with increasing CO concentration. These experimental results cannot be explained by charge transfer reactions of Ar + . Selectivity analysis of all excited states of Ar possibly contributing to NO x conversion without and with CO suggests that only Ar( 3 P 2 ) contributes to NO x conversion and CO dissociation. A kinetic model of 43 reactions is required to model NO conversion or N 2 O conversion in Ar without CO, whereas 81 reactions are required to model NO conversion and N 2 O conversion in Ar with CO. At constant gas pressure, a single set of model parameters can predict NO conversion or N 2 O conversion without and with CO. All experimental results can be explained using a reaction mechanism in which excited neutral states of Ar are the only active species, which supports the conclusion that cations have a negligible impact on these nonthermal plasma reactions

  9. Non-thermal plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatko, N. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Non-thermal plasma is a key component in gas lasers, microelectronics, medical applications, waste gas cleaners, ozone generators, plasma igniters, flame holders, flow control in high-speed aerodynamics and others. A specific feature of non-thermal plasma is its high sensitivity to variations in governing parameters (gas composition, pressure, pulse duration, E/N parameter). This sensitivity is due to complex deformations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) shape induced by variations in electric field strength, electron and ion number densities and gas excitation degree. Particular attention in this article is paid to mechanisms of instabilities based on non-linearity of plasma properties for specific conditions: gas composition, steady-state and decaying plasma produced by the electron beam, or by an electric current pulse. The following effects are analyzed: the negative differential electron conductivity; the absolute negative electron mobility; the stepwise changes of plasma properties induced by the EEDF bi-stability; thermo-current instability and the constriction of the glow discharge column in rare gases. Some of these effects were observed experimentally and some of them were theoretically predicted and still wait for experimental confirmation.

  10. Atmospheric non-thermal argon-oxygen plasma for sunflower seedling growth improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matra, Khanit

    2018-01-01

    Seedling growth enhancement of sunflower seeds by DC atmospheric non-thermal Ar-O2 plasma has been proposed. The plasma reactor was simply designed by the composition of multi-pin electrodes bonded on a solderable printed circuit board (PCB) anode. A stable plasma was exhibited in the non-periodical self-pulsing discharge mode during the seed treatment. The experimental results showed that non-thermal plasma treatment had a significant positive effect on the sunflower seeds. Ar-O2 mixed gas ratio, treatment time and power source voltage are the important parameters affecting growth stimulation of sunflower sprouts. In this research, the sunflower seeds treated with 3:3 liters per minute (LPM) of Ar-O2 plasma at a source voltage of 8 kV for 1 min showed the best results in stimulating the seedling growth. The results in this case showed that the dry weight and average shoot length of the sunflower sprouts were 1.79 and 2.69 times higher and heavier than those of the untreated seeds, respectively.

  11. Human Milk Composition and Preservation: Evaluation of High-pressure Processing as a Nonthermal Pasteurization Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sílvia G; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Saraiva, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Human milk is seen not only as a food, but as a functional and dynamic biologic system. It provides nutrients, bioactive components, and immune factors, promoting adequate and healthy growth of newborn infants. When mothers cannot supply their children, donated breast milk is the nutrition recommended by the World Health Organization, as it is a better alternative than infant formula. However, because of the manner in which donor milk is handled in human milk banks (HMB) many of the properties ascribed to mother's own milk are diminished or destroyed. The major process responsible for these losses is Holder pasteurization. High-pressure processing (HPP) is a novel nonthermal pasteurization technology that is being increasingly applied in food industries worldwide, primarily as an alternative to thermal treatment. This is due to its capacity to inactivate microorganisms while preserving both nutritional and bioactive components of foods. This review describes human milk composition and preservation, and critically discusses HMB importance and practices, highlighting HPP as a potential nonthermal pasteurization technology for human milk preservation. HPP technology is described and the few currently existing studies of its effects in human milk are presented.

  12. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Mayumi [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kanazawa University,Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Toma, Takashi [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS - UMR 8627, Université de Paris-Sud 11,F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Vicente, Avelino [IFPA, Dep. AGO, Université de Liège,Bat B5, Sart-Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València,Apdo. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-09-29

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  13. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Mayumi [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Toma, Takashi [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS - UMR 8627, Université de Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Vicente, Avelino, E-mail: mayumi@hep.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp, E-mail: takashi.toma@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: Avelino.Vicente@ulg.ac.be [IFPA, Dep. AGO, Université de Liège, Bat B5, Sart-Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  14. Galaxy Cluster Outskirts from the Thermal SZ and Non-Thermal Synchrotron Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Basu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy cluster merger shocks are the main agent for the thermalization of the intracluster medium and the energization of cosmic ray particles in it. Shock propagation changes the state of the tenuous intracluster plasma, and the corresponding signal variations are measurable with the current generation of X-ray and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ effect instruments. Additionally, non-thermal electrons (re-energized by the shocks sometimes give rise to extended and luminous synchrotron sources known as radio relics, which are prominent indicators of shocks propagating roughly in the plane of the sky. In this short review, we discuss how the joint modeling of the non-thermal and thermal signal variations across radio relic shock fronts is helping to advance our knowledge of the gas thermodynamical properties and magnetic field strengths in the cluster outskirts. We describe the first use of the SZ effect to measure the Mach numbers of relic shocks, for both the nearest (Coma and the farthest (El Gordo clusters with known radio relics.

  15. Adsorption-desorption and leaching of pyraclostrobin in Indian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Navakishore; Gupta, Suman; Gajbhiye, Vijay T

    2013-01-01

    Pyraclostrobin is a new broad-spectrum foliar applied and seed protectant fungicide of the strobilurin group. In this paper, adsorption-desorption of pyraclostrobin has been investigated in three different soils viz. Inceptisol (sandy loam, Delhi), Vertisol (sandy clay, Hyderabad) and Ultisol (sandy clay loam, Thrissur). Effect of organic matter and clay content on sorption was also studied in Inceptisol of Delhi. Leaching potential of pyraclostrobin as influenced by rainfall was studied in intact soil columns to confirm the results of adsorption-desorption studies. The adsorption studies were carried out at initial concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 μg mL(-1). The distribution coefficient (Kd) values in three test soils ranged from 4.91 to 18.26 indicating moderate to high adsorption. Among the three test soils, adsorption was the highest in Ultisol (Kd 18.26), followed by Vertisol (Kd 9.87) and Inceptisol (Kd 4.91). KF value was also highest for Ultisol soil (66.21), followed by Vertisol (40.88) and Inceptisol (8.59). S-type adsorption isotherms were observed in all the three test soils. Kd values in organic carbon-removed soil and clay-removed soil were 3.57 and 2.83 respectively, indicating lower adsorption than normal Inceptisol. Desorption studies were carried out at initial concentrations of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 μg mL(-1). Desorption was the greatest in Inceptisol, followed by Vertisol and Ultisol. Amounts of pyraclostrobin desorbed in three desorption cycles for different concentrations were 23.1-25.3%, 9.4-20.7% and 8.1-13.6% in Inceptisol, Vertisol and Ultisol respectively. Desorption was higher in clay fraction-removed and organic carbonremoved soils than normal Inceptisol. Desorption was slower than adsorption in all the test soils, indicating hysteresis effect (with hysteresis coefficient values varying from 0.05 to 0.20). Low values of hysteresis coefficient suggest high hysteresis effect indicating easy and strong adsorption, and slow

  16. Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yu-Ri; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Song, Doo-Hoon; Choi, Eun Ha; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2013-01-01

    Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/β-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/β-TCP scaffolds. - Highlights: ► Non-thermal plasma increased OH- and decreased C on biphasic scaffold. ► Non-thermal plasma had no effect on surface roughness. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in hydrophilic surface. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in better cell attachment and proliferation. ► Non-thermal plasma treatment on biphasic scaffold is useful for tissue engineering

  17. Auger decay mechanism in photon-stimulated desorption of ions from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.C.

    1983-11-01

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of positive ions was studied with synchrotron radiation using an angle-integrating time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ion yields as functions of photon energy near core levels were measured from condensed gases, alkali fluorides, and other alkali and alkaline earth halides. These results are compared to bulk photoabsorption measurements with emphasis on understanding fundamental desorption mechanisms. The applicability of the Auger decay mechanism, in which ion desorption is strictly proportional to surface absorption, is discussed in detail. The Auger decay model is developed in detail to describe Na + and F + desorption from NaF following Na(1s) excitation. The major decay pathways of the Na(1s) hole leading to desorption are described and equations for the energetics of ion desorption are developed. Ion desorption spectra of H + , Li + , and F + are compared to bulk photoabsorption near the F(2s) and Li(1s) edges of LiF. A strong photon beam exposure dependence of ion yields from alkali fluorides is revealed, which may indicate the predominance of metal ion desorption from defect sites. The large role of indirect mechanisms in ion desorption condensed N 2 -O 2 multilayers is demonstrated and discussed. Ion desorption spectra from several alkali halides and alkaline earth halides are compared to bulk photoabsorption spectra. Relative ion yields from BaF 2 and a series of alkali halides are discussed in terms of desorption mechanisms

  18. Adsorption and desorption of phosphorus in ceramic capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, J.R.F. de.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to analyse the capacity of adsorving P from water using ceramic capsules with 32P, in the presence and absence of water flow through the capsule. Also studied was the desorption of 32 P from the capsule in water, with and without water flow. The desorption of residual 32 P was analysed by isotopic exchange with 31 P, also with and without water flow. It was observed that, in the presence of a flow, the capsule retained 32 P from the solution, which was weakly desorbed by water but was isotopically exchanged with 31 P. In the absence of a flow, the capsule was not an efficient P adsorber. (Author) [pt

  19. Energetic particle induced desorption of water vapor cryo-condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Owen, L.W.; Simpkins, J.E.; Uckan, T.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    An in-vessel cryo-condensation pump is being designed for the Advanced Divertor configuration of the DIII-D tokamak. To assess the importance of possible desorption of water vapor from the cryogenic surfaces of the pump due to impingement of energetic particles from the plasma, a 77 K surface on which a thin layer of water vapor was condensed was exposed to a tenuous plasma (density = 2 x 10 10 cm -3 , electron temperature = 3 eV). Significant desorption of the condensate occurred, suggesting that impingement of energeticparticles (10 eV) at flux levels of ∼10 16 cm 2 s -1 on cryogenic surfaces could potentially induce impurity problems in the tokamak plasma. A pumping configuration is presented in which this problem is minimized without sacrificing the pumping speed

  20. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A central component of FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, will be the superconducting heavy ion synchrotron SIS100, which is supposed to provide reliable, high intensity beams for various applications. Its beam intensity is governed by the space charge limit, while the maximum energy is determined by the machine's magnetic rigidity. That means, ions with higher charge state can be accelerated to a higher energy, but with less intensity. For highest intensity beams, intermediate charge states have to be used instead of high charge state ions. This alleviates the issue of space charge but gives rise to dynamic vacuum effects, which also limit beam intensity: beam particles collide with residual gas particles, which leads to charge exchange and their subsequent loss. Impacting on the chamber wall, these ions release adsorbed gas particles. This process is called desorption and leads to a localized increase in pressure, which in turn causes more charge exchange. After a few rounds of self amplification, this can lead to total beam loss. This ''runaway-desorption'' is typically the main beam intensity limiting process for intermediate charge state (heavy) ion beams. The extent of this phenomenon is governed by two factors: the initial beam intensity and the desorption yield. The latter is examined within the scope of this thesis. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of the target's temperature, since the SIS100 will be a superconducting machine with cryogenic vacuum chamber walls. In order to investigate this topic, an experimental setup has been devised, built at the SIS18 and taken into commission. Based on the experience gained during operation, it has been continuously improved and extended. Another central innovation presented in this thesis is the use of gas dynamics simulations for an improved method of data analysis. Using this technique, environmental conditions like the chamber geometry and the connected

  1. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  2. Electron stimulated desorption study of oxygen adsorption on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, R.H.; Floyd, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a polycrystalline tungsten surface at approximately 800 K has been studied by means of electron stimulated desorption (ESD). Although precision gas dosing was not employed, the initial sticking probability for dissociative adsorption appears to be essentially unity, while the variation with coverage suggests that a high degree of order exists and that precursor state kinetics are significant. A most noticeable and reproducible discontinuity in ESD parameters occurs at a fractional coverage theta approximately 0.8 (exposure approximately 1.4 X 10 15 molecules/cm 2 incident) which is interpreted as an order-disorder transition within a single (β 1 ) chemisorption state, and results in an increase in the ionic desorption cross-section by a factor of approximately 1.26. A discussion of the adsorption kinetics and the disorder transition is given in terms of current models of dissociative adsoption which include the effects of nearest neighbour lateral interactions. (Auth.)

  3. Unconventional resource's production under desorption-induced effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sina Hosseini Boosari

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a numerical model to study the effect of changes in porosity, permeability and compaction on four major U.S. shale formations considering their Langmuir isotherm desorption behavior. These resources include; Marcellus, New Albany, Barnett and Haynesville Shales. First, we introduced a model that is a physical transport of single-phase gas flow in shale porous rock. Later, the governing equations are implemented into a one-dimensional numerical model and solved using a fully implicit solution method. It is found that the natural gas production is substantially affected by desorption-induced porosity/permeability changes and geomechancis. This paper provides valuable insights into accurate modeling of unconventional reservoirs that is more significant when an even small correction to the future production prediction can enormously contribute to the U.S. economy.

  4. Desorption and ionization processes in laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyl, G.J.Q. van der.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis results are reported from a study on the desorption- and ionization process initiated by infra-red laser irradiation (LDMS) or ion bombardment (SIMS) of thin organic sample layers. The study is especially focused on the formation of quasimolecular ions under these conditions. Results of these investigations can be used for a better optimization of the LDMS and SIMS techniques in organic mass spectrometry. First, an overview is given of laser desorption mass spectrometry. Next, the coupling of the laser energy into the organic sample layer is investigated. It is concluded that the laser energy is primarily absorbed by the substrate material and not by the organic overlayer. The formation of quasi-molecular ions, either in the gas phase or in the substrate surface is investigated. The final section reports kinetic energy distributions for ions sputtered from organic solids and liquids. (Auth.)

  5. Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of U2Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Tanaka, Satoru; Yamawaki, Michio

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of U 2 Ti intermetallic compound was examined over the temperature range of 298 to 973 K and at hydrogen pressures below 10 5 Pa. It absorbs hydrogen up to 7.6 atoms per F.U. (formula unit) by two step reactions and hence each desorption isotherm is separated into two plateau regions. In the first plateau, a newly-found ternary hydride is formed, where the hydrogen concentration, c H , reaches 2.4 H atoms/F.U. In the second plateau, UH 3 is formed and c H reaches 7.6 H atoms/F.U. The specimen is disintegrated into fine powder in the second plateau, while in the first plateau the ternary hydride which was identified to be UTi 2 H x (x=4.8 to 6.2) showed high durability against powdering. It is predicted that UTi 2 can be suitable material for tritium storage. (orig.)

  6. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows

  7. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows the

  8. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanov, A; Fontaine, J; Martin, J-M; Mogne, T L; Nevshupa, R

    2008-01-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H 2 and CH 4 . During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it

  9. Sample and plume luminescence in fast heavy ion induced desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszynski, W.; Koch, K.; Hilf, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The luminescence arising in 252 Cf-fission fragment induced desorption events has been measured using the time-correlated single photon counting technique. Photons emitted from the sample have been guided from a plasma desorption ion source to a photodetector by an optical fibre. Spectra and decay functions have been obtained using thin layers of Coronene or POPOP as samples. The results are strongly dependent on the acceleration field applied for ion extraction. Approximately 10 photons per fission fragment have been produced when applying no accelerating voltage. The results clearly show that these photons come from radiative electronic relaxations of molecules in the solid sample. Considerably more photons per fission fragment have been produced when applying a positive acceleration voltage. The intensity increases almost linearly for acceleration fields below 10 kV/cm and saturates at a nearly 10-fold higher value when compared to no acceleration. The intensity is also affected by the homogeneity of the accelerating field. These additional photons are attributed to radiative electronic relaxations of desorbed neutral molecules in the plume excited by inelastic collisions with accelerated positive ions. No additional photons have been observed when extracting negative ions. The negative ions produced do obviously not hit and/or excite desorbed neutral molecules, presumably due to their specific desorption characteristics. The experimental data have been analyzed by comparing with the cw and time-resolved sample luminescence obtained by optical excitation. The findings demonstrate that valuable information on ion-solid interactions, on specific desorption quantities and on processes in the plume can be obtained by measuring and analyzing the luminescence induced by the impact of high energy primary ions. (orig.)

  10. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma on particulate matter, ozone and CO2 correlation for diesel exhaust emission reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babaie, Meisam; Davari, Pooya; Talebizadeh, Poyan

    2015-01-01

    This study is seeking to investigate the effect of non-thermal plasma technology in the abatement of particulate matter (PM) from the actual diesel exhaust. Ozone (O3) strongly promotes PM oxidation, the main product of which is carbon dioxide (CO2). PM oxidation into the less harmful product (CO2...

  11. Nonthermal processing technologies to improve the safety of raw meat and poultry products and ready-to-eat foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newly emerging nonthermal and advanced thermal processing technologies are now being adopted by the food processing industry for the purpose of providing safe and high quality food products to consumers. Scientists and engineers at USDA’s Eastern Regional Research Center in Wyndmoor, PA are activel...

  12. Fully nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in a plasma with positive-negative ions and nonthermal electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabry, R.; Shukla, P. K.; Moslem, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    Properties of fully nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in a plasma with positive-negative ions and nonthermal electrons are investigated. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the positive-negative ions, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the energy integral equation with a new Sagdeev potential. The latter is analyzed to examine the existence regions of the solitary pulses. It is found that the solitary excitations strongly depend on the mass and density ratios of the positive and negative ions as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Numerical solution of the energy integral equation clears that both positive and negative potentials exist together. It is found that faster solitary pulses are taller and narrower. Furthermore, increasing the electron nonthermality parameter (negative-to-positive ions density ratio) decreases (increases) the localized excitation amplitude but increases (decreases) the pulse width. The present model is used to investigate the solitary excitations in the (H + ,O 2 - ) and (H + ,H - ) plasmas, where they are presented in the D- and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere. This investigation should be helpful in understanding the salient features of the fully nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in space and in laboratory plasmas where two distinct groups of ions and non-Boltzmann distributed electrons are present.

  13. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials; Untersuchung der Mechanismen schwerioneninduzierter Desorption an beschleunigerrelevanten Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-02-22

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  14. The desorptivity model of bulk soil-water evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Available models of bulk evaporation from a bare-surfaced soil are difficult to apply to field conditions where evaporation is complicated by two main factors: rate-limiting climatic conditions and redistribution of soil moisture following infiltration. Both factors are included in the "desorptivity model', wherein the evaporation rate during the second stage (the soil-limiting stage) of evaporation is related to the desorptivity parameter, A. Analytical approximations for A are presented. The approximations are independent of the surface soil moisture. However, calculations using the approximations indicate that both soil texture and soil moisture content at depth significantly affect A. Because the moisture content at depth decreases in time during redistribution, it follows that the A parameter also changes with time. Consequently, a method to calculate a representative value of A was developed. When applied to field data, the desorptivity model estimated cumulative evaporation well. The model is easy to calculate, but its usefulness is limited because it requires an independent estimate of the time of transition between the first and second stages of evaporation. The model shows that bulk evaporation after the transition to the second stage is largely independent of climatic conditions.

  15. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I.; Zaika, Yury V.

    2015-12-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition.

  16. Adsorption, aggregation, and desorption of proteins on smectite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, Krzysztof; Makowski, Marcin M; Golriz, Ali A; Kappl, Michael; Pigłowski, Jacek; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Kiersnowski, Adam

    2014-10-07

    We report on adsorption of lysozyme (LYS), ovalbumin (OVA), or ovotransferrin (OVT) on particles of a synthetic smectite (synthetic layered aluminosilicate). In our approach we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to study the protein-smectite systems in water solutions at pH ranging from 4 to 9. The AFM provided insights into the adhesion forces of protein molecules to the smectite particles, while the QCM measurements yielded information about the amounts of the adsorbed proteins, changes in their structure, and conditions of desorption. The binding of the proteins to the smectite surface was driven mainly by electrostatic interactions, and hence properties of the adsorbed layers were controlled by pH. At high pH values a change in orientation of the adsorbed LYS molecules and a collapse or desorption of OVA layer were observed. Lowering pH to the value ≤ 4 caused LYS to desorb and swelling the adsorbed OVA. The stability of OVT-smectite complexes was found the lowest. OVT revealed a tendency to desorb from the smectite surface at all investigated pH. The minimum desorption rate was observed at pH close to the isoelectric point of the protein, which suggests that nonspecific interactions between OVT and smectite particles significantly contribute to the stability of these complexes.

  17. New perspectives in vacuum high voltage insulation. II. Gas desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1998-01-01

    An examination has been made of gas desorption from unbaked electrodes of copper, niobium, aluminum, and titanium subjected to high voltage in vacuum. It has been shown that the gas is composed of water vapor, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, the usual components of vacuum outgassing, plus an increased yield of hydrogen and light hydrocarbons. The gas desorption was driven by anode conditioning as the voltage was increased between the electrodes. The gas is often desorbed as microdischarges-pulses of a few to hundreds of microseconds-and less frequently in a more continuous manner without the obvious pulsed structure characteristic of microdischarge activity. The quantity of gas released was equivalent to many monolayers and consisted mostly of neutral molecules with an ionic component of a few percent. A very significant observation was that the gas desorption was more dependent on the total voltage between the electrodes than on the electric field. It was not triggered by field-emitted electrons but oft...

  18. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I; Zaika, Yury V

    2015-01-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition. (paper)

  19. Thermal desorption spectroscopy for investigating hydrogen isotope behavior in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Tirui; Yang Hongguang; Zhan Qin; Han Zhibo; He Changshui

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen isotope generated in fusion reactor materials is the key issue for safety and economic operation of fusion reactors and becomes an interesting field. In order to investigate the mechanism of hydrogen isotope such as diffusion, release and retention, a high-sensitivity thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) in combination with a quadruple mass spectrometer (QMS) was developed. A major technical breakthrough in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), low hydrogen background, linear heating and sensitivity calibration of TDS system was made. UHV of l × 10 -7 Pa and low hydrogen background of l × 10 -9 Pa were obtained by combining turbo molecule pump and sputter ion pump. Specimens can be linearly heated up to 1173 K at the rate of 1 to 50 K/min under the MCGS PID software. Sensitivity calibration of the TDS system was accomplished using a special deuterium leak in the detector mode of QMS second electron multiplier. The desorption sensitivity coefficient and the minimum detection limit of deuterium desorption rate are 6.22 × l0 24 s -l · and l.24 × l0 -10 s -1 , respectively. The measurement was also routinely conducted on a specimen of standard, deuterium-containing Zr-4 alloy maintained in the laboratory, so as to validate the TDS method. (authors)

  20. Rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugang Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, laboratory experiments are conducted to investigate the rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal using a shock tube apparatus. Coal specimens are recovered from Colorado at a depth of 610 m. The coal specimens are saturated with the strong sorbing gas CO2 for a certain period and then the rupture disc is suddenly broken on top of the shock tube to generate a shock wave propagating upwards and a rarefaction wave propagating downwards through the specimen. This rapid decompression and desorption has the potential to cause energetic fragmentation in coal. Three types of behaviors in coal after rapid decompression are found, i.e. degassing without fragmentation, horizontal fragmentation, and vertical fragmentation. We speculate that the characteristics of fracture network (e.g. aperture, spacing, orientation and stiffness and gas desorption play a role in this dynamic event as coal can be considered as a dual porosity, dual permeability, dual stiffness sorbing medium. This study has important implications in understanding energetic failure process in underground coal mines such as coal gas outbursts.

  1. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Powell, Brian A.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time which has implications for near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption-desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  2. The Design and Development of Enhanced Thermal Desorption Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Humble

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study is based on a knowledge-transfer collaboration between The National Centre for Product Design and Development Research (PDR and Markes International Ltd. The aim of the two-year collaboration has been to implement design tools and techniques for the development of enhanced thermal desorption products. Thermal desorption is a highly-specialised technique for the analysis of trace-level volatile organic compounds. This technique allows minute quantities of these compounds to be measured; however, there is an increasing demand from customers for greater sensitivity over a wider range of applications, which means new design methodologies need to be evaluated. The thermal desorption process combines a number of disparate chemical, thermal and mechanical disciplines, and the major design constraints arise from the need to cycle the sample through extremes in temperature. Following the implementation of a comprehensive product design specification, detailed design solutions have been developed using the latest 3D CAD techniques. The impact of the advanced design techniques is assessed in terms of improved product performance and reduced development times, and the wider implications of new product development within small companies are highlighted.  

  3. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces; Untersuchungen zu ionenstrahlinduzierter Desorption von kryogenen Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-07-03

    A central component of FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, will be the superconducting heavy ion synchrotron SIS100, which is supposed to provide reliable, high intensity beams for various applications. Its beam intensity is governed by the space charge limit, while the maximum energy is determined by the machine's magnetic rigidity. That means, ions with higher charge state can be accelerated to a higher energy, but with less intensity. For highest intensity beams, intermediate charge states have to be used instead of high charge state ions. This alleviates the issue of space charge but gives rise to dynamic vacuum effects, which also limit beam intensity: beam particles collide with residual gas particles, which leads to charge exchange and their subsequent loss. Impacting on the chamber wall, these ions release adsorbed gas particles. This process is called desorption and leads to a localized increase in pressure, which in turn causes more charge exchange. After a few rounds of self amplification, this can lead to total beam loss. This ''runaway-desorption'' is typically the main beam intensity limiting process for intermediate charge state (heavy) ion beams. The extent of this phenomenon is governed by two factors: the initial beam intensity and the desorption yield. The latter is examined within the scope of this thesis. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of the target's temperature, since the SIS100 will be a superconducting machine with cryogenic vacuum chamber walls. In order to investigate this topic, an experimental setup has been devised, built at the SIS18 and taken into commission. Based on the experience gained during operation, it has been continuously improved and extended. Another central innovation presented in this thesis is the use of gas dynamics simulations for an improved method of data analysis. Using this technique, environmental conditions like the chamber geometry and the connected

  4. Signatures of a Nonthermal Metastable State in Copropagating Quantum Hall Edge Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Ryo; Ota, Tomoaki; Hashisaka, Masayuki; Muraki, Koji; Fujisawa, Toshimasa

    2018-05-01

    A Tomonaga-Luttinger (TL) liquid is known as an integrable system, in which a nonequilibrium many-body state survives without relaxing to a thermalized state. This intriguing characteristic is tested experimentally in copropagating quantum Hall edge channels at bulk filling factor ν =2 . The unidirectional transport allows us to investigate the time evolution by measuring the spatial evolution of the electronic states. The initial state is prepared with a biased quantum point contact, and its spatial evolution is measured with a quantum-dot energy spectrometer. We find strong evidence for a nonthermal metastable state in agreement with the TL theory before the system relaxes to thermal equilibrium with coupling to the environment.

  5. Nonthermal plasma synthesis of size-controlled, monodisperse, freestanding germanium nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gresback, Ryan; Holman, Zachary; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Germanium nanocrystals may be of interest for a variety of electronic and optoelectronic applications including photovoltaics, primarily due to the tunability of their band gap from the infrared into the visible range of the spectrum. This letter discusses the synthesis of monodisperse germanium nanocrystals via a nonthermal plasma approach which allows for precise control of the nanocrystal size. Germanium crystals are synthesized from germanium tetrachloride and hydrogen entrained in an argon background gas. The crystal size can be varied between 4 and 50 nm by changing the residence times of crystals in the plasma between ∼30 and 440 ms. Adjusting the plasma power enables one to synthesize fully amorphous or fully crystalline particles with otherwise similar properties

  6. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Haitham S.; Fahmy, Heba M.; Radwan, Nasr M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested. PMID:25685416

  7. Cyclotron radiation from thermal and non-thermal electrons in the WEGA-stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekaar, H.W.; Rutgers, W.R.

    1980-11-01

    Electron cyclotron radiation measurements on the WEGA-stellarator are reported. Emission spectra around 2ωsub(ce) and 3ωsub(ce) were measured with a far-infra-red spectrometer and InSb detectors. When the plasma loop voltage is high, runaway electrons give rise to intense broad-band emission. Runaway particles can be removed by increasing the plasma density. For low loop voltage discharges the electron temperature profile was deduced from thermal emission around 2ωsub(ce). In spite of the low E-field, runaway particles are still created and pitch-angle scattered because ωsub(pe)/ωsub(ce) approximately 1. From non-thermal emission below 2ωsub(ce) and 3ωsub(ce) the energy and number of particles could be calculated, and was found to be in agreement with existing theories

  8. Non-thermal transitions in a model inspired by moral decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamino, Roberto C

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces a model in which agents of a network act upon one another according to three different kinds of moral decisions. These decisions are based on an increasing level of sophistication in the empathy capacity of the agent, a hierarchy which we name Piaget ’ s ladder . The decision strategy of the agents is non-rational, in the sense they are arbitrarily fixed, and the model presents quenched disorder given by the distribution of its defining parameters. An analytical solution for this model is obtained in the large system limit as well as a leading order correction for finite-size systems which shows that typical realisations of the model develop a phase structure with both continuous and discontinuous non-thermal transitions. (paper)

  9. Non-thermal fixed points and solitons in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Erne, Sebastian; Nowak, Boris; Sexty, Dénes; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Single-particle momentum spectra for a dynamically evolving one-dimensional Bose gas are analysed in the semi-classical wave limit. Representing one of the simplest correlation functions, these provide information on a possible universal scaling behaviour. Motivated by the previously discovered connection between (quasi-) topological field configurations, strong wave turbulence and non-thermal fixed points of quantum field dynamics, soliton formation is studied with respect to the appearance of transient power-law spectra. A random-soliton model is developed for describing the spectra analytically, and the analogies and differences between the emerging power laws and those found in a field theory approach to strong wave turbulence are discussed. The results open a new perspective on solitary wave dynamics from the point of view of critical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium and the possibility of studying this dynamics by experiment without the need for detecting solitons in situ. (paper)

  10. Nonthermal fusion reactor concept based on Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics plasma theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witalis, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The failure of magnetic confinement controlled thermonuclear fusion research to achieve its goal is attributed to its foundation on the incomplete MHD plasma description instead of the more general HMHD (Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics) theory. The latter allows for a certain magnetic plasma self-confinement under described stringent conditions. A reactor concept based on the formation, acceleration, and forced disintegration of magnetized whirl structures, plasmoids, is proposed. The four conventional MHD theory objections, i.e., absence of dynamo action, fast decay caused by resistivity, non-existence of magnetic self-confinement, and negligible non-thermal fusion yield, are shown not to apply. Support for the scheme from dense plasma focus research is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  11. Cosmological bounds on large extra dimensions from nonthermal production of Kaluza-Klein modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Bird, Chris; Groot Nibbelink, Stefan; Pospelov, Maxim

    2004-01-01

    The existing cosmological constraints on theories with large extra dimensions rely on the thermal production of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of gravitons and radions in the early Universe. Successful inflation and reheating, as well as baryogenesis, typically requires the existence of a TeV-scale field in the bulk, most notably the inflaton. The nonthermal production of KK modes with masses of order 100 GeV accompanying the inflaton decay sets the lower bounds on the fundamental scale M * . For a 1-TeV inflaton, the late decay of these modes distorts the successful predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis unless M * >35, 13, 7, 5, and 3 TeV for two, three, four, five, and six extra dimensions, respectively. This improves the existing bounds from cosmology on M * for four, five, and six extra dimensions. Even more stringent bounds are derived for a heavier inflaton

  12. Probing non-thermal density fluctuations in the one-dimensional Bose gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo De Nardis, Miłosz Panfil, Andrea Gambassi, Leticia F. Cugliandolo, Robert Konik, Laura Foini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum integrable models display a rich variety of non-thermal excited states with unusual properties. The most common way to probe them is by performing a quantum quench, i.e., by letting a many-body initial state unitarily evolve with an integrable Hamiltonian. At late times, these systems are locally described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble with as many effective temperatures as their local conserved quantities. The experimental measurement of this macroscopic number of temperatures remains elusive. Here we show that they can be obtained by probing the dynamical structure factor of the system after the quench and by employing a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem that we provide. Our procedure allows us to completely reconstruct the stationary state of a quantum integrable system from state-of-the-art experimental observations.

  13. Non-thermal plasma ethanol reforming in bubbles immersed in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Sharma, Ashish; Raja, Laxminarayan L

    2017-01-01

    Ethanol reforming in non-thermal plasma generated in atmospheric-pressure argon bubbles immersed in liquid ethanol/water solution is studied using a self-consistent multi-species fluid model. The influence of the dielectric constant of the liquid on the plasma dynamics and its effect on the generation of active species is analyzed. Several modes of discharge are obtained for large liquid dielectric constant. In these modes, we obtain either an axial streamer or a combination of two simultaneous streamers propagating along the bubble axis and near the liquid wall. The influence of these modes on the production of active species is also studied. The main reactions responsible for the generation of molecular hydrogen and light hydrocarbon species are analyzed. A possible mechanism of hydrogen generation in liquid phase is discussed. (paper)

  14. Non-thermal effects of 94 GHz radiation on bacterial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitt, Brittany J.

    Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were used to investigate the non-thermal effects of terahertz (THz) radiation exposure on bacterial cells. The THz source used was a 94 GHz (0.94 THz) Millitech Gunn Diode Oscillator with a power density of 1.3 mW/cm2. The cultures were placed in the middle sixty wells of two 96-well microplates, one serving as the experimental plate and one serving as a control. The experimental plate was placed on the radiation source for either two, eighteen, or twenty-four hours and the metabolism of the cells was measured in a spectrophotometer using the tetrazolium dye XTT. The results showed no consistent significant differences in either the growth rates or the metabolism of any of the bacterial species at this frequency and power density.

  15. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham S. Mohammed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day. EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  16. Non-thermal distribution of O(1D) atoms in the night-time thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    1988-01-01

    The 6300 A O(1D-3P) emission has been used for many years to remotely monitor the thermospheric temperature from the Doppler width of its line profile. The O(1D) atoms in the nighttime thermosphere are initially produced by the dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions with kinetic energy much greater than the thermal energy of the ambient neutrals. The validity of the technique to monitor neutral ambient temperature by measuring O(1D) 6300 A emission depends on the degree of thermalization of the O(1D) atoms. The object of this study is to calculate the velocity distribution of the O(1D) atoms and to examine the effect of nonthermal distribution on the nighttime thermospheric neutral temperature determined.

  17. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  18. Non-thermal plasma technology for the development of antimicrobial surfaces: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Anton; Deng, Xiaolong; Xiong, Qing; Cvelbar, U.; DeGeyter, N.; Morent, R.; Leys, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial coatings are in high demand in many fields including the biomaterials and healthcare sectors. Within recent progress in nanoscience and engineering at the nanoscale, preparation of nanocomposite films containing metal nanoparticles (such as silver nanoparticles, copper nanoparticles, zinc oxide nanoparticles) is becoming an important step in manufacturing biomaterials with high antimicrobial activity. Controlled release of antibiotic agents and eliminating free nanoparticles are of equal importance for engineering antimicrobial nanocomposite materials. Compared to traditional chemical ‘wet’ methods, plasma deposition and plasma polymerization are promising approaches for the fabrication of nanocomposite films with the advantages of gas phase dry processes, effective use of chemicals and applicability to various substrates. In this article, we present a short overview of state-of-the-art engineering of antimicrobial materials based on the use of non-thermal plasmas at low and atmospheric pressure.

  19. Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure for ozone generation and volatile organic compounds decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekarek, S.; Khun, J.

    2006-01-01

    The non-thermal plasma technologies based on electrical discharges play an important role in ecological applications. The classical corona discharge is however relatively low power discharge. With the aim to extend its current-voltage range we studied hollow needle-to-plate DC corona discharge enhanced by the flow of a gas through the needle electrode. With this type of the discharge we performed an extensive study of ozone generation and volatile organic compounds decomposition. We found that supply of air through the needle substantially increases current-voltage range of the discharge in comparison with classical pin-to-plate corona discharge. Consequently the ozone generation as well as toluene decomposition efficiency was increased (Authors)

  20. Measurement of the non-thermal properties in a low-pressure spraying plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Ho; Chung, Kyu Sun

    2002-01-01

    The non-thermal properties of a low-pressure spraying plasma have been characterized by using optical emission spectroscopy and single probes installed in a fast scanning probe system. A two-temperature model of the electrons is introduced to explain their non-isothermal properties, which are measured using single probes. The excitation temperatures of the atomic and the ionic lines are calculated from measurements of the emission intensities of Ar (I) and Ar (II), and those temperatures can be explained by using a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) or a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) model. In order to deduce more reasonable values (excitation temperatures), we introduce a multi-thermodynamic equilibrium (MTE) model, which gives different temperatures, depending upon the atomic excitation states

  1. Ignition phase and steady-state structures of a non-thermal air plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Xin Pei

    2003-01-01

    An AC-driven, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure air plasma is generated within the gap separating a disc-shaped metal electrode and a water electrode. The ignition phase and the steady-state are studied by a high-speed CCD camera. It is found that the plasma always initiates at the surface of the water electrode. The plasma exhibits different structures depending on the polarity of the water electrode: when the water electrode plays the role of cathode, a relatively wide but visibly dim plasma column is generated. At the maximum driving voltage, the gas temperature is between 800 and 900 K, and the peak current is 67 mA; when the water electrode is anode, the plasma column narrows but increases its light emission. The gas temperature in this case is measured to be in the 1400-1500 K range, and the peak current is 81 mA.

  2. Removal of dimethyl sulfide by the combination of non-thermal plasma and biological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Z S; Li, H Q; He, J C; Ye, Q H; Huang, Q R; Luo, Y W

    2013-10-01

    A bench scale system integrated with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) and a biotricking filtration (BTF) unit for the treatment of gases containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was investigated. DMS removal efficiency in the integrated system was up to 96%. Bacterial communities in the BTF were assessed by PCR-DGGE, which play the dominant role in the biological processes of metabolism, sulfur oxidation, sulfate-reducing and carbon oxidation. The addition of ozone from NTP made microbial community in BTF more complicated and active for DMS removal. The NTP oxidize DMS to simple compounds such as methanol and carbonyl sulfide; the intermediate organic products and DMS are further oxidized to sulfate, carbon dioxide, water vapors by biological degradation. These results show that NTP-BTF is achievable and open new possibilities for applying the integrated with NTP and BTF to odour gas treatment. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. A green strategy for desorption of trihalomethanes adsorbed by humin and reuse of the fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, G C; Romão, L P C; Santos, M C; Costa, A S; Alexandre, M R

    2012-03-30

    The objective of the present work was to develop a thermal desorption method for the removal of trihalomethanes (THM) adsorbed by humin, followed by multiple recycling of the fixed bed column in order to avoid excessive consumption of materials and reduce operating costs. The results obtained for adsorption on a fixed bed column confirmed the effectiveness of humin as an adsorbent, extracting between 45.9% and 90.1% of the total THM (TTHM). In none of the tests was the column fully saturated after 10h. Experiments involving thermal desorption were used to evaluate the potential of the technique for column regeneration. The adsorptive capacity of the humin bed increased significantly (p<0.05) between the first and fifth desorption cycle, by 18.9%, 18.1%, 24.2%, 20.2% and 24.2% for CHBr(3), CHBr(2)Cl, CHBrCl(2), CHCl(3) and TTHM, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from field-contaminated soil to a two-dimensional hydrophobic surface before and after bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D

    2012-10-01

    Dermal exposure can represent a significant health risk in settings involving potential contact with soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, there is limited work on the ability of PAHs in contaminated soil to reach the skin surface via desorption from the soil. We evaluated PAH desorption from a field-contaminated soil to a two-dimensional hydrophobic surface (C18 extraction disk) as a measure of potential dermal exposure as a function of soil loading (5-100 mg dry soil cm(-2)), temperature (20-40°C), and soil moisture content (2-40%) over periods up to 16d. The efficacy of bioremediation in removing the most readily desorbable PAH fractions was also evaluated. Desorption kinetics were described well by an empirical two-compartment kinetic model. PAH mass desorbed to the C18 disk kept increasing at soil loadings well above the estimated monolayer coverage, suggesting mechanisms for PAH transport to the surface other than by direct contact. Such mechanisms were reinforced by observations that desorption occurred even with dry or moist glass microfiber filters placed between the C18 disk and the soil. Desorption of all PAHs was substantially reduced at a soil moisture content corresponding to field capacity, suggesting that transport through pore air contributed to PAH transport to the C18 disk. The lower molecular weight PAHs had greater potential to desorb from soil than higher molecular weight PAHs. Biological treatment of the soil in a slurry-phase bioreactor completely eliminated PAH desorption to the C18 disks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from field-contaminated soil to a two-dimensional hydrophobic surface before and after bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Dermal exposure can represent a significant health risk in settings involving potential contact with soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, there is limited work on the ability of PAHs in contaminated soil to reach the skin surface via desorption from the soil. We evaluated PAH desorption from a field-contaminated soil to a two-dimensional hydrophobic surface (C18 extraction disk) as a measure of potential dermal exposure as a function of soil loading (5 to 100 mg dry soil/cm2), temperature (20 °C to 40 °C), and soil moisture content (2% to 40%) over periods up to 16 d. The efficacy of bioremediation in removing the most readily desorbable PAH fractions was also evaluated. Desorption kinetics were described well by an empirical two-compartment kinetic model. PAH mass desorbed to the C18 disk kept increasing at soil loadings well above the estimated monolayer coverage, suggesting mechanisms for PAH transport to the surface other than by direct contact. Such mechanisms were reinforced by observations that desorption occurred even with dry or moist glass microfiber filters placed between the C18 disk and the soil. Desorption of all PAHs was substantially reduced at a soil moisture content corresponding to field capacity, suggesting that transport through pore air contributed to PAH transport to the C18 disk. The lower molecular weight PAHs had greater potential to desorb from soil than higher molecular weight PAHs. Biological treatment of the soil in a slurry-phase bioreactor completely eliminated PAH desorption to the C18 disks. PMID:22704210

  6. Local Group dSph radio survey with ATCA - II. Non-thermal diffuse emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Marco; Richter, Laura; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Profumo, Stefano; de Blok, W. J. G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2015-04-01

    Our closest neighbours, the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, are extremely quiescent and dim objects, where thermal and non-thermal diffuse emissions lack, so far, of detection. In order to possibly study the dSph interstellar medium, deep observations are required. They could reveal non-thermal emissions associated with the very low level of star formation, or to particle dark matter annihilating or decaying in the dSph halo. In this work, we employ radio observations of six dSphs, conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in the frequency band 1.1-3.1 GHz, to test the presence of a diffuse component over typical scales of few arcmin and at an rms sensitivity below 0.05 mJy beam-1. We observed the dSph fields with both a compact array and long baselines. Short spacings led to a synthesized beam of about 1 arcmin and were used for the extended emission search. The high-resolution data mapped background sources, which in turn were subtracted in the short-baseline maps, to reduce their confusion limit. We found no significant detection of a diffuse radio continuum component. After a detailed discussion on the modelling of the cosmic ray (CR) electron distribution and on the dSph magnetic properties, we present bounds on several physical quantities related to the dSphs, such that the total radio flux, the angular shape of the radio emissivity, the equipartition magnetic field, and the injection and equilibrium distributions of CR electrons. Finally, we discuss the connection to far-infrared and X-ray observations.

  7. Pyrite-enhanced methylene blue degradation in non-thermal plasma water treatment reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetoli, Luis Otavio de Brito, E-mail: luskywalcker@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cadorin, Bruno Mena; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Geremias, Reginaldo [Departamento de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Goncalvez de Souza, Ivan [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, Nito Angelo, E-mail: debacher@qmc.ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use O{sub 2} as the feed gas and pyrite was added to the non-thermal plasma reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The methylene blue removal by NTP increased in the presence of pyrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The total organic carbon content decreased substantially. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acute toxicity test showed that the treated solution is not toxic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dye degradation occurs via electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation. - Abstract: In this study, methylene blue (MB) removal from an aqueous phase by electrical discharge non-thermal plasma (NTP) over water was investigated using three different feed gases: N{sub 2}, Ar, and O{sub 2}. The results showed that the dye removal rate was not strongly dependent on the feed gas when the electrical current was kept the same for all gases. The hydrogen peroxide generation in the water varied according to the feed gas (N{sub 2} < Ar < O{sub 2}). Using O{sub 2} as the feed gas, pyrite was added to the reactor in acid medium resulting in an accentuated increase in the dye removal, which suggests that pyrite acts as a Fenton-like catalyst. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the dye solution decreased slightly as the plasma treatment time increased, but in the presence of the pyrite catalyst the TOC removal increased substantially. The acute toxicity test using Artemia sp. microcrustaceans showed that the treated solution is not toxic when Ar, O{sub 2} or O{sub 2}-pyrite is employed. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (ESI-MS) of the treated samples indicated that the dye degradation occurs via high energy electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation in the benzene rings of the dye molecules.

  8. Desorption of Benzene, 1,3,5-Trifluorobenzene, and Hexafluorobenzene from a Graphene Surface: The Effect of Lateral Interactions on the Desorption Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2018-05-03

    The desorption of benzene, 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene (TFB), and hexafluorobenzene (HFB) from a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate was investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). All three species have well resolved monolayer and second layer desorption peaks. The desorption spectra for submonolayer coverages of benzene and hexafluorobenzene are consistent with first order desorption kinetics. In contrast, the submonolayer TPD spectra for 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene align on a common leading-edge which is indicative of zero order desorption kinetics. The desorption behavior of the three molecules can be correlated with the strength of the quadrupole moments. Calculations (second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation and density functional theory) show that the potential minimum for coplanar TFB dimers is more than a factor of two greater than that for either benzene or HFB dimers. The calculations support the interpretation that benzene and HFB are less likely to form the two dimensional islands that are needed for submonolayer zero order desorption kinetics.

  9. Non-thermal Processes in the Formation of Mercury's Tenuous Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, M. J.; Bennett, C.; Jones, B. M.; Orlando, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft orbiting Mercury have established that a quasi-trapped population of ions and electrons with 1-10 keV energy exists at a distance of about 1.5 RM (RM is Mercury's radius) around much of the planet. Recent observations from the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS), taken groups). The sources of these ions are not clear. A newly developed global kinetic transport model suggests that electron-stimulated desorption (ESD), and possibly light ion stimulated desorption (ISD), can directly yield ions that can be transported and dynamically accelerated to the plasma cusp regions observed by FIPS. Neutrals desorbed from the surface by ESD, ISD, photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and meteorite impact may also be photoionized and transported/injected into the cusp region. Though the relative importance of these mechanisms in the formation of Mercury's tenuous atmosphere and the subsequent effects on the exosphere/magnetosphere dynamics are not known, it is likely that all of these contribute significantly. The goals of this work are to measure desorption cross-sections and ejection velocities for Na+, O+, and water group ions under relevant electron and ion bombardment energies. This program utilizes state-of-the art surface science capabilities to probe the role of ESD and ISD as a source of ions and neutrals present in the exosphere of Mercury. The experimental chamber is equipped with a dosing system, a cryogenic cooled temperature controlled sample holder, as well as pulsed ion and electron sources. The ESD and ISD ion yields and velocity measurements are obtained directly by sampling with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The measured ESD ion yields from adsorbate covered Mercury surface analogs such as the sulfur bearing minerals MgS, Na2S and K2S are low. Additionally, ISD experiments using incident protons also yielded low ion signals. These results implicate PSD and neutral desorption as dominant processes. The

  10. Desorption Kinetics and Mechanisms of CO2 on Amine-Based Mesoporous Silica Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Teng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA-based mesoporous MCM-41 is used as the adsorbent to determine the CO2 desorption kinetics of amine-modified materials after adsorption. The experimental data of CO2 desorption as a function of time are derived by zero-length column at different temperatures (35, 50, and 70 °C and analyzed by Avrami’s fractional-order kinetic model. A new method is used to distinguish the physical desorption and chemical desorption performance of surface-modified mesoporous MCM-41. The activation energy Ea of CO2 physical desorption and chemical desorption calculated from Arrhenius equation are 15.86 kJ/mol and 57.15 kJ/mol, respectively. Furthermore, intraparticle diffusion and Boyd’s film models are selected to investigate the mechanism of CO2 desorption from MCM-41 and surface-modified MCM-41. For MCM-41, there are three rate-limiting steps during the desorption process. Film diffusion is more prominent for the CO2 desorption rates at low temperatures, and pore diffusion mainly governs the rate-limiting process under higher temperatures. Besides the surface reaction, the desorption process contains four rate-limiting steps on surface-modified MCM-41.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemadpour, R.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: doran@srbiau.ac.ir [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sepehri Javan, N. [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of a circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in the magnetized plasmas whose constituents are superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons is studied theoretically. A nonlinear equation which describes the dynamics of the slowly varying amplitude is obtained using a relativistic two-fluid model. Based on this nonlinear equation and taking into account some nonlinear phenomena such as modulational instability, self-focusing and soliton formation are investigated. Effect of the magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons on these phenomena is considered. It is shown that the nonthermality and superthermality of particles can substantially change the nonlinearity of medium.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemadpour, R.; Dorranian, D.; Sepehri Javan, N.

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in the magnetized plasmas whose constituents are superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons is studied theoretically. A nonlinear equation which describes the dynamics of the slowly varying amplitude is obtained using a relativistic two-fluid model. Based on this nonlinear equation and taking into account some nonlinear phenomena such as modulational instability, self-focusing and soliton formation are investigated. Effect of the magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons on these phenomena is considered. It is shown that the nonthermality and superthermality of particles can substantially change the nonlinearity of medium.

  13. Effect of external magnetic field and variable dust electrical charge on the shape and propagation of solitons in the two nonthermal ions dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghalambor Dezfuly, S.; Dorranian, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, the effect of dust electrical charge, nonthermal ions, and external magnetic field on the shape and propagation of solitons in dusty plasma with two nonthermal ions is studied theoretically. Using the reductive perturbation theory, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for propagation of dust acoustic waves is extracted. Results show that external magnetic field does not affect the amplitude of solitary wave but width of solitons are effectively depend on the magnitude of external magnetic field. With increasing the charge of dust particles the amplitude of solution will increase while their width will decrease. Increasing the nonthermal ions lead to opposite effect.

  14. Modeling Adsorption-Desorption Processes at the Intermolecular Interactions Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeeva, Vera V.; Terentev, Alexey V.

    2018-01-01

    Modeling of the surface adsorption and desorption processes, as well as the diffusion, are of considerable interest for the physical phenomenon under study in ground tests conditions. When imitating physical processes and phenomena, it is important to choose the correct parameters to describe the adsorption of gases and the formation of films on the structural materials surface. In the present research the adsorption-desorption processes on the gas-solid interface are modeled with allowance for diffusion. Approaches are proposed to describe the adsorbate distribution on the solid body surface at the intermolecular interactions level. The potentials of the intermolecular interaction of water-water, water-methane and methane-methane were used to adequately modeling the real physical and chemical processes. The energies calculated by the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ method. Computational algorithms for determining the average molecule area in a dense monolayer, are considered here. Differences in modeling approaches are also given: that of the proposed in this work and the previously approved probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA) method. It has been shown that the main difference is due to certain limitations of the PCA method. The importance of accounting the intermolecular interactions via hydrogen bonding has been indicated. Further development of the adsorption-desorption processes modeling will allow to find the conditions for of surface processes regulation by means of quantity adsorbed molecules control. The proposed approach to representing the molecular system significantly shortens the calculation time in comparison with the use of atom-atom potentials. In the future, this will allow to modeling the multilayer adsorption at a reasonable computational cost.

  15. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Fábio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with KH2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1, with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedure with CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1. Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%, and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content.

  16. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prata, Fabio; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges; Lavorenti, Arquimedes

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh 2 PO 4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha -1 of P 2 O 5 , which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L -1 ), with a 14 C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL -1 . Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl 2 0.01 mol L -1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L -1 ). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm -3 . Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  17. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Fabio [BIOAGRI Labs., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Div. de Quimica. Lab. de Radioquimica; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas; Lavorenti, Arquimedes [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Secao de Toxicologia

    2003-03-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha{sup -1} of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L{sup -1}), with a {sup 14}C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL{sup -1}. Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl{sub 2} 0.01 mol L{sup -1} and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L{sup -1}). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm{sup -3}. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  18. Tribal and stakeholder involvement in systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, L.; Swartz, G.; Cooley, C.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning in early 1995, U.S. Department of Energy began an experiment to link tribal and stakeholder representatives into technology assessment activities related to an Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. The INTS study moved outside the framework of after-the-fact public involvement by providing the opportunity for technical and non-technical stakeholders alike to work together in the early predecision stages of the criteria development and assessment of options for innovative mixed waste treatment. The stakeholders gained an appreciation of the intense level of effort required to complete such an analysis. The engineers and scientists conducting the systems analyses had the opportunity (some for the first time) to learn more about tribal and stakeholder issues and how they might apply to the technical tasks related to technology assessment and selection

  19. Temperature-programmed desorption for membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketola, R.A.; Grøn, C.; Lauritsen, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a novel technique for analyzing volatile organic compounds in air samples using a solid adsorbent together with temperature-programmed desorption and subsequent detection by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (TPD-MIMS). The new system has the advantage of a fast separation of compounds...... to diffuse through the membrane into the mass spectrometer in a few seconds. In this fashion we could completely separate many similar volatile compounds, for example toluene from xylene and trichloroethene from tetrachloroethene. Typical detection limits were at low or sub-nanogram levels, the dynamic range...

  20. Krypton-85 enrichment by adsorption-desorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Ramarathinam, K.

    1975-01-01

    The use of activated charcoal columns in conjunction with cryogenic distillation system for concentration of krypton-85 in fuel reprocessing process off-gas stream is reported. Dynamic adsorption of krypton on activated charcoals and its subsequent desorption by applying vacuum were studied. The possible reduction in the quantity of carrier gas to be liquified in the cryogenic system by utilising this process has been discussed on the basis of results of laboratory evaluations. The possibility of elimination of air and oxygen to avoid explosion hazards associated with radiolytic formation and concentration of ozone has also been considered. (author)

  1. Parental involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra S Simon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Parent-Teacher Associations and other community groups can play a significant role in helping to establish and run refugee schools; their involvement can also help refugee adults adjust to their changed circumstances.

  2. Desorption of large organic molecules by laser-induced plasmon excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I.; Callcott, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    Ejection of large organic molecules from surfaces by laser-induced electronic-excited desorption has attracted considerable interest in recent years. In addition to the importance of this effect for fundamental investigations of the ejection process, this desorption technique has been applied to the study of large, fragile molecules by mass spectrometry. In this paper, we present a new method to induce electronic excitation on the metal surface for the desorption of large organic molecules. 3 refs., 3 figs

  3. Desorption of metals from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. Lichen using solutions simulating acid rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čučulović Ana A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption of metals K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu and Sr from Cetraria islandica (L. with solutions whose composition was similar to that of acid rain, was investigated. Desorption of metals from the lichen was performed by five successive desorption processes. Solution mixtures containing H2SO4, HNO3 and H2SO4-HNO3 were used for desorption. Each solution had three different pH values: 4.61, 5.15 and 5.75, so that the desorptions were performed with nine different solutions successively five times, always using the same solution volume. The investigated metals can be divided into two groups. One group was comprised of K, Ca and Mg, which were desorbed in each of the five desorption processes at all pH values used. The second group included Al, Fe, Zn, Ba, Mn and Sr; these were not desorbed in each individual desorption and not at all pH values, whereas Cu was not desorbed at all under any circumstances. Using the logarithmic dependence of the metal content as a function of the desorption number, it was found that potassium builds two types of links and is connected with weaker links in lichen. Potassium is completely desorbed, 80% in the first desorption, and then gradually in the following desorptions. Other metals are linked with one weaker link (desorption 1-38% and with one very strong link (desorption below the metal detection limit. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009 i br. ON 172019

  4. Site Specificity in Femtosecond Laser Desorption of Neutral H Atoms from Graphite(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigge, R.; Hoger, T.; Siemer, B.

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond laser excitation and density functional theory reveal site and vibrational state specificity in neutral atomic hydrogen desorption from graphite induced by multiple electronic transitions. Multimodal velocity distributions witness the participation of ortho and para pair states...... of chemisorbed hydrogen in the desorption process. Very slow velocities of 700 and 400  ms-1 for H and D atoms are associated with the desorption out of the highest vibrational state of a barrierless potential....

  5. Desorption of Ba and 226Ra from river-borne sediments in the Hudson estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.-H.

    1979-01-01

    The pronounced desorption of Ba and 226 Ra from river-borne sediments in the Hudson estuary can be explained quantitatively by the drastic decrease in the distribution coefficients of both elements from a fresh to a salty water medium. The desorption in estuaries can augment, at least, the total global river fluxes of dissolved Ba and 226 Ra by one and nine times, respectively. The desorption flux of 226 Ra from estuaries accounts for 17-43% of the total 226 Ra flux from coastal sediments. Two mass balance models depicting mixing and adsorption-desorption processes in estuaries are discussed. (Auth.)

  6. Cs-137 sorption and desorption in relation to properties of 17 soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerpen, W.

    1988-01-01

    For Cs-137 sorption and desorption studies material of Ap and Ah horizons from 17 soils with wide varying soil properties was selected. The soils were: Podsol, Luvisol, Chernozem, Cambisol, Phaeozem, Arenosol, Gleysol and other soils. The Cs-137 sorption and desorption experiments were carried out in aqueous solution (20 g of soil) under standardized conditions for two reasons: (1) to determine the amounts of Cs-137 sorption, desorption and remains as a function of different soils and (2) to evaluate the soil parameters which govern the sorption, desorption processes. Concerning the second point the sorption values, the amount of 137 Cs desorbed within four desorption cycles and the 137 Cs remains after four desorption cycles were correlated with pH, grain size, sorption capacity (CEC), and other soil properties. It will be shown that generally Cs-137 sorption, desorption and remains depend primarily on the pH of the soil. The middle sand proved to be an indicator for the strenght of sorption, and desorption processes. Sorption and desorption studies lead to the same results as found in biotest experiments

  7. Adsorption/desorption properties of vacuum materials for the 6 GeV synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable attention must be paid to the vacuum and adsorption/desorption properties of all materials installed inside the vacuum envelope if the design goals of the 6 GeV synchrotron are to be met. Unfortunately, the data is very sparse in several key areas. Additionally, some procedures normally associated with good vacuum practice, such as air baking, may prove to be totally unsuitable on the basis of desorption properties. We present here a brief discussion of the adsorption, outgassing, electron-stimulated desorption (ESD), and photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) properties of vacuum materials as they relate to the design of a 6 GeV synchrotron

  8. Photo-stimulated desorption from water and methane clusters on the surface of solid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa Ichiri; Matsumoto Dairo; Takekuma Shinichi; Tamura Reimi; Miura Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Photo-stimulated desorption of ions from methane and water heterocluster on the surface of solid neon was studied. The desorption yields of the variety of photo-desorbed species showed strong dependence on the composition and the size of the mother cluster. It was found that the presence of a water molecule in the cluster significantly enhanced, or was almost essential for, the desorption of any species observed. Systematic investigation of the correlation between the cluster size and the desorption yield of each ion has revealed the mother cluster which yields the each desorbed ion.

  9. A new theoretical approach to adsorption desorption behavior of Ga on GaAs surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangawa, Y.; Ito, T.; Taguchi, A.; Shiraishi, K.; Ohachi, T.

    2001-11-01

    We propose a new theoretical approach for studying adsorption-desorption behavior of atoms on semiconductor surfaces. The new theoretical approach based on the ab initio calculations incorporates the free energy of gas phase; therefore we can calculate how adsorption and desorption depends on growth temperature and beam equivalent pressure (BEP). The versatility of the new theoretical approach was confirmed by the calculation of Ga adsorption-desorption transition temperatures and transition BEPs on the GaAs(0 0 1)-(4×2)β2 Ga-rich surface. This new approach is feasible to predict how adsorption and desorption depend on the growth conditions.

  10. Electrothermal adsorption and desorption of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, H.K. [Department of Health and Environment, Kosin University, Dong Sam Dong, Young Do Gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Sivakumar, S., E-mail: ssivaphd@yahoo.com [Department of Bioenvironmental Energy, College of Natural Resource and Life Science, Pusan National University, Miryang-si, Gyeongsangnam-do 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Rood, M.J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Kim, B.J. [Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC-CERL), Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • We study the adsorption and desorption of VOCs by an activated carbon fiber cloth. • Desorption concentration was controlled via electrothermal heating. • The desorption rate was successfully equalized and controlled by this system. - Abstract: Adsorption is an effective means to selectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial gas streams and is particularly of use for gas streams that exhibit highly variable daily concentrations of VOCs. Adsorption of such gas streams by activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) and subsequent controlled desorption can provide gas streams of well-defined concentration that can then be more efficiently treated by biofiltration than streams exhibiting large variability in concentration. In this study, we passed VOC-containing gas through an ACFC vessel for adsorption and then desorption in a concentration-controlled manner via electrothermal heating. Set-point concentrations (40–900 ppm{sub v}) and superficial gas velocity (6.3–9.9 m/s) were controlled by a data acquisition and control system. The results of the average VOC desorption, desorption factor and VOC in-and-out ratio were calculated and compared for various gas set-point concentrations and superficial gas velocities. Our results reveal that desorption is strongly dependent on the set-point concentration and that the VOC desorption rate can be successfully equalized and controlled via an electrothermal adsorption system.

  11. Non-thermal emission from young supernova remnants: Implications on cosmic ray acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya-Arguedas, Miguel A.

    For a long time, supernova remnants have been thought to constitute the main source of galactic cosmic rays. Plausible mechanisms have been proposed through which these objects would be able to transfer some of their energy to charged particles. Detailed studies of SNRs, particularly allowed by the spectral and spatial resolution obtained with telescopes such as the Chandra X-Ray Observatory , have permitted us to understand some of the properties of high-energy particles within these objects and their interactions with their environment. In the first part of this work, the basic concepts of particle acceleration in SNRs are outlined, and the main observational tools available today for studying high-energy phenomena in astrophysics are mentioned briefly. In the second part, a study of non-thermal emission from the young SNR Cassiopeia A is presented. Through the use of a very deep one million-second Chandra observation of this remnant, the spectral evolution across non-thermal filaments near the forward shock was studied. A consistent hardening of the spectrum towards the exterior of the remnant was found and explained via a model developed that takes into account particle diffusion, plasma advection and radiation losses. The role of particle diffusion was studied and its effect on the photon spectral index quantified. In the model, the diffusion is included as a fraction of Bohm-type diffusion, which is consistent with the data. The model also allowed an estimation of the electron distribution, the magnetic field and its orientation, as well as the level of magnetic turbulence. In the third part, a multi-wavelength study of two young SNRs is presented. Multi-wavelength modeling of spectral energy distributions (SED) may hold the key to disentangle the nature and content of cosmic rays within these objects. The first model shown presents state of the art measurements gathered for Cassiopeia A, and the modeling is based partly on the results presented in the second

  12. Artificial vesicles as an animal cell model for the study of biological application of non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, S H; Park, J K; Sung, C; Lee, C B; Uhm, H; Choi, E H; Baik, K Y

    2016-01-01

    Artificial cell-like model systems can provide information which is hard to obtain with real biological cells. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) containing intra-membrane DNA or OH radical-binding molecules are used to visualize the cytolytic activity of OH radicals. Changes in the GUV membrane are observed by microscopy or flow cytometry as performed for animal cells after non-thermal plasma treatment. The experimental data shows that OH radicals can be detected inside the membrane, although the biological effects are not as significant as for H 2 O 2 . This artificial model system can provide a systemic means to elucidate the complex interactions between biological materials and non-thermal plasma. (paper)

  13. Relationship between the intensity of nonthermal radiation and widths of Balmer lines in the spectra of quasar-like nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komberg, B.V.; Shefer, E.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The data summarized by Steiner (1981) were used to derive the relationship between the intensity of nonthermal X-ray and radio emission and fullwidths of Balmer emission lines. It is shown that the existence of such dependences does not contradict the assumption on partition equidistribution of nonthermal radiation and motion of gas clouds energy in the region of formation of wide lines. Emphasis is given to similar dependence drived by Vayana (1981) for X-ray radiation from hot coronas of fast-rotating single stars, and a suggestion is made about radiation anisotropy from active nuclei (similar to that observed in the SS 433 system). The latter may imply the double nature of active nuclei

  14. Changing the surface properties on naval steel as result of non-thermal plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Sabău, A.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Crețu, M.; Astanei, D.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of corrosion, related to Biofouling formation, is an issue with very high importance in the maritime domain. According to new rules, the paints and all the technologies for the conditioning of naval materials must fulfil more restrictive environmental conditions. In order to solve this issue, different new clean technologies have been proposed. Among them, the use of non-thermal plasmas produced at atmospheric pressure plays a very important role. This study concerns the opportunity of plasma treatment for preparation or conditioning of naval steel OL36 type. The plasma reactors chosen for the experiments can operate at atmospheric pressure and are easy to use in industrial conditions. They are based on electrical discharges GlidArc and Spark, which already proved their efficiency for the surface activation or even for coatings of the surface. The non-thermal character of the plasma is ensured by a gas flow blown through the electrical discharges. One power supply has been used for reactors that provide a 5 kV voltage and a maximum current of 100 mA. The modifications of the surface properties and composition have been studied by XPS technique (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). There were taken into consideration 5 samples: 4 of them undergoing a Mini-torch plasma, a Gliding Spark, a GlidArc with dry air and a GlidArc with CO2, respectively the fifth sample which is the untreated witness. Before the plasma treatment, samples of naval steel were processed in order to obtain mechanical gloss. The time of treatment was chosen to 12 minutes. In the spectroscopic analysis, done on a ULVAC-PHI, Inc. PHI 5000 Versa Probe scanning XPS microprobe, a monocromated Al Kα X-ray source with a spot size of 100 μm2 was used to scan each sample while the photoelectrons were collected at a 45-degree take-off angle. Differences were found between atomic concentrations in each individual case, which proves that the active species produced by each type of plasma affects

  15. Measuring hydrophobic micropore volumes in geosorbents from trichloroethylene desorption data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Reinhard, Martin

    2006-06-01

    Hydrophobic micropores can play a significant role in controlling the long-term release of organic contaminants from geosorbents. We describe a technique for quantifying the total and the hydrophobic mineral micropore volumes based on the mass of trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbed in the slow-releasing pores under dry and wet conditions, respectively. Micropore desorption models were used to differentiate the fast- and slow-desorbing fractions in desorption profiles. The micropore environment in which organic molecules were sorbed in the presence of water was probed by studying the transformation of a water-reactive compound (2,2-dichloropropane or 2,2-DCP). For sediment from an alluvial aquifer, the total and hydrophobic micropore volumes estimated using this technique were 4.65 microL/g and 0.027 microL/g (0.58% of total), respectively. In microporous silica gel A, a hydrophobic micropore volume of 0.038 microL/g (0.035% of reported total) was measured. The dehydrohalogenation rate of 2,2-DCP sorbed in hydrophobic micropores of the sediment was slower than that reported in bulk water, indicating an environment of low water activity. The results suggest that hydrolyzable organic contaminants sorbed in hydrophobic micropores react slower than in bulk water, consistent with the reported persistence of reactive contaminants in natural soils.

  16. 3rd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Knotek, Michael

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of the third international workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions, DIET III, which took place on Shelter Island, NY, May. 20-22, 1987. The work contained in this volume is an excellent summary of the current status of the field and should be a valuable reference text for both "seasoned" researchers and newcomers in the field of DIET. Based on the success of the meeting it seems clear that interest and enthusiasm in the field is strong. It is also apparent, from the many lively discussions during the meeting, that many unanswered questions (and controversies) remain to be solved. It was particularly pleasing to see many new participants from new and rapidly advancing fields, ranging from gas phase dynamics to semiconductor processing. The resulting cross-fertilization from these separate but related fields is playing an important role in helping us understand desorption processes at solid surfaces. In general, the topics covered during the course of the worksh...

  17. 2nd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Dietrich

    1985-01-01

    The second workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET II) took place October 15-17, 1984, in SchloB Elmau, Bavaria. DIET II, fol­ lowing the great success of DIET I (edited by N. H. Tolk, M. M. Traum, J. C. Tully, T. E. Madey and published in Springer Ser. Chem. Phys. , Vol. 24), again brought together over 60 workers in this exciting field. The "hard co­ re of experts" was essentially the same as in DIET I but the general overlap of participants between the two meetings was small. While DIET I had the function of an exposition of the status of the field DIET II focussed more on new developments. The main emphasis was again on the microscopic under­ standing of DIET but a number of side aspects and the application of DIET ideas to other fields such as sputtering, laser-induced desorption, fractu­ re, erosion, etc. were considered, too. New mechanisms and new refined expe­ rimental techniques were proposed and discussed at the meeting critically but with great enthusiasm. In addition t...

  18. Sorption-desorption of samarium in Febex bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Guinart, O.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Fernandez-Poyatos, P.; Alba, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The chemical and physical nature of the clay is a key issue in the design of engineered barriers. The FEBEX bentonite is one of the clays candidates to be used in engineered barriers in deep geology repositories (DGR). Here, its performance was tested with respect to the sorption-desorption of samarium, which is a lanthanide that, besides being considered as a natural analogue of actinides, may also be present in high level radioactive waste in the form of the radioactive isotope 151 Sm. FEBEX bentonite was used in this study. This is a di-octahedral smectite, with isomorphic substitutions in tetrahedral and octahedral sheets. Its theoretical cation exchange capacity value is 1500 meq kg -1 . Sorption isotherms were obtained for Sm in the range of initial concentrations of 0.01 and 9 meq l -1 . Tests were carried out in deionized water and in a medium simulating the composition of interstitial water. Sorption tests were performed equilibrating 30 ml of the Sm solution with 0.2 g of clay. After a contact time of 24 hours, supernatants were decanted off after centrifugation. The quantification of the concentration of Sm in the initial and final solutions allowed us to quantify the Sm equilibrium concentration (C eq ), the fraction sorbed in the FEBEX bentonite (C sorb ) and to derive the sorption K d data. Desorption tests were applied to determine the desorption K d and the percentage of Sm reversibly sorbed. Desorption tests were performed with the bentonite residue from the sorption step, under the same experimental conditions, but without Sm. Powder X-ray diffractograms were obtained from 3 to 70 deg. 2θ with a step of 0.05 deg. and a counting time of 3 s. The crystalline phases were identified using the computer program X'Pert HighScore. The morphology of the samples was analyzed by SEM at 20 kV. An EDX system was fitted to the SEM equipment to perform chemical analyses of the samples using a Si/Li detector

  19. Adsorption and desorption of 14C-chlorsulfuron in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zuyi; Cheng Wei; Mi Chunyun

    1995-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of the 4 concentrations of 14 C-chlorsulfuron in 10 soils were studied. As a result the soils had weak adsorptions of chlorsulfuron and the adsorptions varied with different type of soils tested. Adsorption rate of paddy soil (infant red earth) from Hunan and latosol red earth from Hainan was 3%∼4%; Yellow-brown earth from Nanjing and red earth from Jiangxi was 6%∼9%; black soil from Jilin, paddy soil (infant red earth) from Jiangxi and red earth from Anhui was 10%∼14%; Albic bleached soil from Jilin and yellow fluvo-aquatic soil from Jiangsu was 19%∼23%. pH value had an influence on the adsorption and organic matter had not obvious influence on the adsorption. Chlorsulfuron absorbed in soil could be desorbed through water. The relation between the adsorption and desorption was negative. The weak adsorption in soil shows that chlorsulfuron is active movable and diffusible and likely to pollute the ecological environment

  20. On factors controlling activity of submonolayer bimetallic catalysts: Nitrogen desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G., E-mail: vlachos@udel.edu [Center for Catalytic Science and Technology, Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-01-07

    We model N{sub 2} desorption on submonolayer bimetallic surfaces consisting of Co clusters on Pt(111) via first-principles density functional theory-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that submonolayer structures are essential to rationalize the high activity of these bimetallics in ammonia decomposition. We show that the N{sub 2} desorption temperature on Co/Pt(111) is about 100 K higher than that on Ni/Pt(111), despite Co/Pt(111) binding N weaker at low N coverages. Co/Pt(111) has substantially different lateral interactions than single metals and Ni/Pt. The lateral interactions are rationalized with the d-band center theory. The activity of bimetallic catalysts is the result of heterogeneity of binding energies and reaction barriers among sites, and the most active site can differ on various bimetallics. Our results are in excellent agreement with experimental data and demonstrate for the first time that the zero-coverage descriptor, used until now, for catalyst activity is inadequate due not only to lacking lateral interactions but importantly to presence of multiple sites and a complex interplay of thermodynamics (binding energies, occupation) and kinetics (association barriers) on those sites.

  1. Magnesium growth in magnesium deuteride thin films during deuterium desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchetto, R., E-mail: riccardo.checchetto@unitn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Miotello, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Mengucci, P.; Barucca, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Università Politecnica delle Marche, I-60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: ► Highly oriented Pd-capped magnesium deuteride thin films. ► The MgD{sub 2} dissociation was studied at temperatures not exceeding 100 °C. ► The structure of the film samples was analyzed by XRD and TEM. ► The transformation is controlled by the re-growth velocity of the Mg layers. ► The transformation is thermally activated, activation energy value of 1.3 ± 0.1 eV. -- Abstract: Pd- capped nanocrystalline magnesium thin films having columnar structure were deposited on Si substrate by e-gun deposition and submitted to thermal annealing in D{sub 2} atmosphere to promote the metal to deuteride phase transformation. The kinetics of the reverse deuteride to metal transformation was studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) while the structure of the as deposited and transformed samples was analyzed by X-rays diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In Pd- capped MgD{sub 2} thin films the deuteride to metal transformation begins at the interface between un-reacted Mg and transformed MgD{sub 2} layers. The D{sub 2} desorption kinetics is controlled by MgD{sub 2}/Mg interface effects, specifically the re-growth velocity of the Mg layers. The Mg re-growth has thermally activated character and shows an activation energy value of 1.3 ± 0.1 eV.

  2. Investigation of polyelectrolyte desorption by single molecule force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedsam, C; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E

    2004-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the investigation of intra- and intermolecular interactions at the level of individual molecules. Many examples, including the investigation of the dynamic properties of complex biological systems as well as the properties of covalent bonds or intermolecular transitions within individual polymers, are reported in the literature. The technique has recently been extended to the systematic investigation of desorption processes of individual polyelectrolyte molecules adsorbed on generic surfaces. The stable covalent attachment of polyelectrolyte molecules to the AFM-tip provides the possibility of performing long-term measurements with the same set of molecules and therefore allows the in situ observation of the impact of environmental changes on the adsorption behaviour of individual molecules. Different types of interactions, e.g. electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions, that determine the adsorption process could be identified and characterized. The experiments provided valuable details that help to understand the nature and the properties of non-covalent interactions, which is helpful with regard to biological systems as well as for technical applications. Apart from this, desorption experiments can be utilized to characterize the properties of surfaces or polymer coatings. Therefore they represent a versatile tool that can be further developed in terms of various aspects

  3. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K.; Li, Anyin; Soparawalla, Santosh; Roqan, Iman S.; Cooks, Robert Graham

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Modeling photo-desorption in high current storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    High luminosity flavor factories are characterized by high fluxes of synchrotron radiation that lead to thermal management difficulties. The associated photo-desorption from the vacuum chamber walls presents an additional design challenge, providing a vacuum system suitable for maintaining acceptable beam-gas lifetimes and low background levels of scattered radiation in the detector. Achieving acceptable operating pressures (1-10 nTorr) with practical pumping schemes requires the use of materials with low photodesorption efficiency operating in a radiation environment beyond that of existing storage rings. Extrapolating the existing photo-desorption data base to the design requirements of high luminosity colliders requires a physical model of the differential cleaning in the vacuum chamber. The authors present a simple phenomenological model of photodesorption that includes effects of dose dependence and diffuse photon reflection to compute the leveling of gas loads in beamlines of high current storage rings that typify heavy flavor factories. This model is also used to estimate chamber commissioning times

  5. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Thermal desorption remediation in relation to landfill disposal at isolated sites in northern Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, G.; Henze, M.; Fernuik, N.; MacKinnon, B.; Nelson, D.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal desorption (TD) involves the application of heat to organic-contaminated soil to release and thermally destruct contaminants using high temperatures. An overview of the technique used in the remediation of diesel-contaminated sites was presented. The paper was divided into 2 parts, the first of which provided an overview of TD at 2 electric company sites with a total of 29,000 tonnes of diesel-contaminated soil. Site contamination occurred mainly through the loading, storage and dispensing of diesel fuel. Petroleum lubricants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), glycols and metals were among the other contaminants. Remediation work was comprised of dig and dump (DD) or thermal desorption (TD) treatment of contaminated soils as well as the removal of underground facilities including concrete foundations, screw anchors, storage tanks, pipelines and grounding grids. The TD process, and productivity with both clay and sand soil types was reviewed, and an analysis of direct, indirect and total costs was presented. Issues concerning planning, production rates, practical field experience and quality control procedures were discussed, in addition to limitations such the treatment's inability to remediate metals, sensitivity to soil water content, and water demands for soil processing. The second section described the role of TD in a staged remediation for 46,000 tonnes of diesel-contaminated soil at Fox Lake, a remote northern community accessible by winter road and ice bridges. The challenges of ice bridge construction and maintenance, excavation backfilling and soil transport at low temperature were reviewed. An outline of consultation processes with First Nations was presented, as well as details of site operations and soil hauling, truck restrictions and coordination over the ice bridge, alternate backfill sources, and TD soil treatment of the contaminated soil. 2 tabs

  7. Sorption/Desorption Interactions of Plutonium with Montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, J.; Zavarin, M.; Zhao, P.; Kersting, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    Plutonium (Pu) release to the environment through nuclear weapon development and the nuclear fuel cycle is an unfortunate legacy of the nuclear age. In part due to public health concerns over the risk of Pu contamination of drinking water, predicting the behavior of Pu in both surface and sub-surface water is a topic of continued interest. Typically it was assumed that Pu mobility in groundwater would be severely restricted, as laboratory adsorption studies commonly show that naturally occurring minerals can effectively remove plutonium from solution. However, evidence for the transport of Pu over significant distances at field sites highlights a relative lack of understanding of the fundamental processes controlling plutonium behavior in natural systems. At several field locations, enhanced mobility is due to Pu association with colloidal particles that serve to increase the transport of sorbed contaminants (Kersting et al., 1999; Santschi et al., 2002, Novikov et al., 2006). The ability for mineral colloids to transport Pu is in part controlled by its oxidation state and the rate of plutonium adsorption to, and desorption from, the mineral surface. Previously we have investigated the adsorption affinity of Pu for montmorillonite colloids, finding affinities to be similar over a wide range of Pu concentrations. In the present study we examine the stability of adsorbed Pu on the mineral surface. Pu(IV) at an initial concentration of 10-10 M was pre-equilibrated with montmorillonite in a background electrolyte at pH values of 4, 6 and 8. Following equilibration, aliquots of the suspensions were placed in a flow cell and Pu-free background electrolyte at the relevant pH was passed through the system. Flow rates were varied in order to investigate the kinetics of desorption and hence gain a mechanistic understanding of the desorption process. The flow cell experiments demonstrate that desorption of Pu from the montmorillonite surface cannot be modeled as a simple

  8. THE NON-THERMAL, TIME-VARIABLE RADIO EMISSION FROM Cyg OB2 no. 5: A WIND-COLLISION REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Leon, Gisela N.; Loinard, Laurent; RodrIguez, Luis F.; Dzib, Sergio A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.

    2011-01-01

    The radio emission from the well-studied massive stellar system Cyg OB2 no. 5 is known to fluctuate with a period of 6.7 years between a low-flux state, when the emission is entirely of free-free origin, and a high-flux state, when an additional non-thermal component (of hitherto unknown nature) appears. In this paper, we demonstrate that the radio flux of that non-thermal component is steady on timescales of hours and that its morphology is arc-like. This shows that the non-thermal emission results from the collision between the strong wind driven by the known contact binary in the system and that of an unseen companion on a somewhat eccentric orbit with a 6.7 year period and a 5-10 mas semimajor axis. Together with the previously reported wind-collision region located about 0.''8 to the northeast of the contact binary, so far Cyg OB2 no. 5 appears to be the only multiple system known to harbor two radio-imaged wind-collision regions.

  9. Non-thermal emission in the core of Perseus: results from a long XMM-Newton observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.

    2009-01-01

    We employ a long XMM-Newton observation of the core of the Perseus cluster to validate claims of a non-thermal component discovered with Chandra. From a meticulous analysis of our dataset, which includes a detailed treatment of systematic errors, we find the 2-10 keV surface brightness of the non-thermal component to be less than about 5 × 10-16 erg~cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2. The most likely explanation for the discrepancy between the XMM-Newton and Chandra estimates is a problem in the effective area calibration of the latter. Our EPIC-based magnetic field lower limits do not disagree with Faraday rotation measure estimates on a few cool cores and with a minimum energy estimate on Perseus. In the not too distant future Simbol-X may allow detection of non-thermal components with intensities more than 10 times lower than those that can be measured with EPIC; nonetheless even the exquisite sensitivity within reach for Simbol-X might be insufficient to detect the IC emission from Perseus.

  10. Relationship between carbohydrate composition and fungal deterioration of functional strawberry juices preserved using non-thermal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Lucía; Quintana, Gabriel; Moreira, María R; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2017-12-12

    The quantification of the main carbohydrates present in strawberry juices enriched with inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and preserved by non-thermal techniques (vanillin and ultrasound) was conducted, in addition to an investigation of the evolution of these compounds and their relationship with fungal deterioration over 14 days of refrigerated storage. A simple and environmentally friendly analytical approach based on high-performance liquid chromatography with a reflection index detector was developed for simultaneous determination of inulin, FOS and mono- and disaccharides present in the juices. When analyzing the evolution of carbohydrates during storage, a direct relationship between the consumption of sucrose and the growth of yeasts and molds (main spoilage flora in strawberry) was observed, especially in untreated samples (control). By contrast, no sucrose consumption was observed during storage of the treated sample, thus demonstrating the efficiency of the non-thermal treatments for controlling yeasts and mold growth. In turn, inulin and FOS added to juices were not degraded during storage. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate that non-thermal treatments are adequate for preventing the growth of deteriorative flora in strawberry juices and that the addition of inulin and FOS can be a good strategy for functionalizing them, as well as improving their nutritional properties. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Time-resolved investigations of the non-thermal ablation process of graphite induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalupka, C., E-mail: christian.kalupka@llt.rwth-aachen.de; Finger, J. [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Reininghaus, M. [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Steinbachstraße 15, Aachen 52074 (Germany)

    2016-04-21

    We report on the in-situ analysis of the ablation dynamics of the, so-called, laser induced non-thermal ablation process of graphite. A highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is excited by femtosecond laser pulses with fluences below the classic thermal ablation threshold. The ablation dynamics are investigated by axial pump-probe reflection measurements, transversal pump-probe shadowgraphy, and time-resolved transversal emission photography. The combination of the applied analysis methods allows for a continuous and detailed time-resolved observation of the non-thermal ablation dynamics from several picoseconds up to 180 ns. Formation of large, μm-sized particles takes place within the first 3.5 ns after irradiation. The following propagation of ablation products and the shock wave front are tracked by transversal shadowgraphy up to 16 ns. The comparison of ablation dynamics of different fluences by emission photography reveals thermal ablation products even for non-thermal fluences.

  12. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  13. Mirage in the sky: Nonthermal dark matter, gravitino problem, and cosmic ray anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Sinha, Kuver; Leblond, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Recent anomalies in cosmic rays could be due to dark matter annihilation in our galaxy. In order to get the required large cross section to explain the data while still obtaining the right relic density, we rely on a nonstandard thermal history between dark matter freeze out and big-bang nucleosynthesis. We show that through a reheating phase from the decay of a heavy moduli or even the gravitino, we can produce the right relic density of dark matter if its self-annihilation cross section is large enough. In addition to fitting the recent data, this scenario solves the cosmological moduli and gravitino problems. We illustrate this mechanism with a specific example in the context of U(1) B-L extended minimal supersymmetric standard model where supersymmetry is broken via mirage mediation. These string motivated models naturally contain heavy moduli decaying to the gravitino, whose subsequent decay to the LSP can reheat the Universe at a low temperature. The right-handed sneutrino and the B-L gaugino can both be viable dark matter candidates with a large cross section. They are leptophilic because of B-L charges. We also show that it is possible to distinguish the nonthermal from the thermal scenario (using Sommerfeld enhancement) in direct detection experiments for certain regions of parameter space.

  14. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surya B; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Ayan, Halim

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  15. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya B. Karki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  16. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation Driven by Nonthermal Electrons around One Footpoint of a Solar Flare Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Q. M., E-mail: lidong@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-05-20

    We explore the temporal relationship between microwave/hard X-ray (HXR) emission and Doppler velocity during the impulsive phase of a solar flare on 2014 October 27 (SOL2014-10-27) that displays a pulse on the light curves in the microwave (34 GHz) and HXR (25–50 keV) bands before the flare maximum. Imaging observation shows that this pulse mainly comes from one footpoint of a solar flare loop. The slit of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) stays at this footpoint during this solar flare. The Doppler velocities of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å and Si iv 1402.77 Å are extracted from the Gaussian fitting method. We find that the hot line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å (log T ∼ 7.05) in the corona exhibits blueshift, while the cool line of Si iv 1402.77 Å (log T ∼ 4.8) in the transition region exhibits redshift, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. Evaporative upflows along the flare loop are also observed in the AIA 131 Å image. To our knowledge, this is the first report of chromospheric evaporation evidence from both spectral and imaging observations in the same flare. Both microwave and HXR pulses are well correlated with the Doppler velocities, suggesting that the chromospheric evaporation is driven by nonthermal electrons around this footpoint of a solar flare loop.

  17. Analysis of the biological effects of a non-thermal plasma on saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gyung S.; Baik, Ku Y.; Kim, Jung G.; Kim, Yun J.; Lee, Kyung A.; Jung, Ran J.; Cho, Guang S.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and the molecular responses of eukaryotic yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to a non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure are analyzed. A plasma device with a dielectric barrier discharge is used in order to understand the mechanisms of the plasma action on eukaryotic microbes. When the yeast cells are exposed to a plasma (at a 2-mm distance) and then cultured on a YPD (yeast extract, peptone, and dextrose) - agar plate, the number of surviving cells is reduced over exposure time. More than a 50% reduction in number is observed after two exposures of 5 minutes' duration. In addition, very small whitish colonies appear after the two exposures. The microscopic analysis indicates that the yeast cells treated with this plasma exposure have rough and shrunken shapes in comparison to the oval shapes with smooth surfaces of the control cells. The profile of proteins analyzed by using 2-dimentional electrophoresis demonstrates that the level of proteins with high molecular weights is increased in plasma-treated cells.

  18. Treatment of oral cancer cells with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James; Han, Xu; Coffey, Benjamin; Klas, Matej; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are specialized types of plasma that are proposed as a new agent to induce death in cancer cells. The experimental phase of this study will test the application of such plasma to SCC-25 oral cancer cells to determine if it is possible to induce apoptosis or necrosis. Different sources are used on the cells to find a configuration which kills cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells. The sources have been developed based on the dielectric barrier discharge between two external electrodes surrounding a dielectric tube; such a configuration has been shown to induce breaks in DNA strands. Each configuration is characterized using an optical emission spectrophotometer and iCCD camera to determine the optimal conditions for inducing cell death. The cells are incubated after irradiation with plasma, and cell death is determined using microscopy imaging to identify antibody interaction within the cells. These studies are important for better understanding of plasma species interactions with cancer cells and mechanisms of DNA damage and at latter stage they will be useful for the development of advanced cancer therapy.

  19. Synergistic Effect of Nanophotocatalysis and Nonthermal Plasma on the Removal of Indoor HCHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanwei Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalysis is an effective method of air purification at the condition of a higher pollutant concentration. However, its wide application in indoor air cleaning is limited due to the low level of indoor air contaminants. Immobilizing the nanosized TiO2 particles on the surface of activated carbon filter (TiO2/AC film could increase the photocatalytic reaction rate as a local high pollutant concentration can be formed on the surface of TiO2 by the adsorption of AC. However, the pollutant removal still decreased quickly with the increase in flow velocity, which results in a decrease in air treatment capacity. In order to improve the air treatment capacity by the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO method, this paper used formaldehyde (HCHO as a contaminant to study the effect of combination of PCO with nonthermal plasma technology (NTP on the removal of HCHO. The experimental results show that HCHO removal is more effective with line-to-plate electrode discharge reactor; the HCHO removal and the reaction rate can be enhanced and the amount of air that needs to be cleaned can be improved. Meanwhile, the results show that there is the synergistic effect on the indoor air purification by the combination of PCO with NTP.

  20. Effects of gap and elevated pressure on ethanol reforming in a non-thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Trung Q; Zhu Xinli; Lobban, Lance L; Mallinson, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, mobile power generators and for hydrogen-enhanced combustion from ethanol is demonstrated using energy-efficient non-thermal plasma reforming. A tubular reactor with a multipoint electrode system operated in pulsed mode was used. Complete conversion can be achieved with high selectivity (based on ethanol) of H 2 and CO of 111% and 78%, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. An elevated pressure of 15 psig shows improvement of selectivity of H 2 and CO to 120% and 87%, with a significant reduction of C 2 H x side products. H 2 selectivity increased to 127% when a high ratio (29.2) of water-to-ethanol feed was used. Increasing CO 2 selectivity is observed at higher water-to-ethanol ratios indicating that the water gas shift reaction occurs. A higher productivity and lower C 2 H x products were observed at larger gas gaps. The highest overall energy efficiency achieved, including electrical power consumption, was 82% for all products or 66% for H 2 only.

  1. Non-thermal Power-Law Distributions in Solar and Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, M.; Battaglia, M.; Birn, J.; Chaston, C. C.; Effenberger, F.; Eriksson, E.; Fletcher, L.; Hatch, S.; Imada, S.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Kuhar, M.; Livadiotis, G.; Miyoshi, Y.; Retino, A.

    2017-12-01

    Particles are accelerated to very high, non-thermal energies in solar and space plasma environments. While energy spectra of accelerated particles often exhibit a power-law and are characterized by the power-law index δ, it remains unclear how particles are accelerated to high energies and how δ is determined. Here, we review previous observations of the power-law index δ in a variety of different plasma environments with a particular focus on sub-relativistic electrons. It appears that in regions more closely related to magnetic reconnection (such as the "above-the-looptop" solar hard X-ray source and the plasma sheet in Earth's magnetotail), the spectra are typically soft (δ> 4). This is in contrast to the typically hard spectra (δuniform in the plasma sheet, while power-law distributions still exist even in quiet times. The role of magnetotail reconnection in the electron power-law formation could therefore be confounded with these background conditions. Because different regions have been studied with different instrumentations and methodologies, we point out a need for more systematic and coordinated studies of power-law distributions for a better understanding of possible scaling laws in particle acceleration as well as their universality.

  2. Interpretation of the microwave non-thermal radiation of the Moon during impact events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Grimalsky

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of recent observations of the non-thermal electromagnetic (EM emission at wavelengths of 2.5cm, 13cm, and 21cm are summarized. After strong impacts of meteorites or spacecrafts (Lunar Prospector with the Moon's surface, the radio emissions in various frequency ranges were recorded. The most distinctive phenomenon is the appearance of quasi-periodic oscillations with amplitudes of 3–10K during several hours. The mechanism concerning the EM emission from a propagating crack within a piezoactive dielectric medium is considered. The impact may cause the global acoustic oscillations of the Moon. These oscillations lead to the crackening of the Moon's surface. The propagation of a crack within a piezoactive medium is accompanied by the excitation of an alternative current source. It is revealed that the source of the EM emission is the effective transient magnetization that appears in the case of a moving crack in piezoelectrics. The moving crack creates additional non-stationary local mechanical stresses around the apex of the crack, which generate the non-stationary electromagnetic field. For the cracks with a length of 0.1–1µm, the maximum of the EM emission may be in the 1–10GHz range.

  3. Disinfection effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for foodborne bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Mohammad Rasel; Inomata, Takanori; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Kakikawa, Makiko; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Yasunori; Yano, Toshihiro; Miwa, Shoji; Noguchi, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NAPP) exposure can be a suitable alternative for bacteria inactivation in food processing industry. Specimen placed in the enclosure are exposed to various reactive radicals produced within the discharge chamber. It is also exposed to the periodic variation of the electric field strength in the chamber. Dielectric barrier discharge is produced by high voltage pulse (Vpp = 18 kV, pulse width 20 μs, repetition frequency 10 kHz) in a polypropylene box (volume = 350 cm3) using helium as main feed gas. Inactivation efficiency of NAPP depends on the duration of NAPP exposure, applied voltage pulse strength and type, pulse duration, electrode separation and feed gas composition. In this study we have investigated inactivation of Bacillus lichenformis spore as an example of food borne bacteria. Keeping applied voltage, electrode configuration and total gas flow rate constant, spores are exposed to direct NAPP for different time duration while O2 concentration in the feed gas composition is varied. 10 minutes NAPP exposure resulted in ~ 3 log reduction of Bacillus lichenformis spores for 1% O2concentration (initial concentration ~ 106 / specimen). This work is supported by research and development promotion grant provided by the Hokuriku Industrial Advancement Center.

  4. Non-thermal hydrogen plasma processing effectively increases the antibacterial activity of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zhigang; Ma, Yulong; Zhu, Zhongjie; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Graphene-based materials (GMs) are promising antibacterial agents which provide an alternative route to treat pathogenic bacteria with resistance to conventional antibiotics. To further improve their antibacterial activity, many methods have been developed to functionalize the GMs with chemicals. However, the application of additional chemicals may pose potential risks to the environment and human being. Herein, a radio-frequency-driven inductively coupled non-thermal hydrogen plasma was used to treat and reduce graphene oxide (GO) without using any other chemicals, and we found that the plasma-reduced GO (prGO) is with significantly higher bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli. The mechanism of the increased antibacterial activity of prGO is due to that plasma processing breaks down the GO sheets into smaller layers with more rough surface defects, which can thus induce more destructive membrane damages to the bacteria. This work sets another good example, showing that plasma processing is a green and low-cost alternative for GM modification for biomedical applications.

  5. Nonthermal leptogenesis via direct inflaton decay without SU(2)L triplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, Thomas; Lazarides, George; Ruiz de Austri, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We present a nonthermal leptogenesis scenario following standard supersymmetric hybrid inflation, in the case where light neutrinos acquire mass via the usual seesaw mechanism and inflaton decay to heavy right-handed neutrino superfields is kinematically disallowed, or the right-handed neutrinos which can be decay products of the inflaton are unable to generate sufficient baryon asymmetry via their subsequent decay. The primordial lepton asymmetry is generated through the decay of the inflaton into light particles by the interference of one-loop diagrams with exchange of different right-handed neutrinos. The mechanism requires superpotential couplings explicitly violating a U(1) R-symmetry and R-parity. We take into account the constraints from neutrino masses and mixing and the preservation of the primordial asymmetry. We consider two models, one without and one with SU(2) R gauge symmetry. We show that the former is viable, whereas the latter is ruled out. Although the broken R-parity need not have currently observable low-energy signatures, some R-parity-violating slepton decays may be detectable in the future colliders

  6. The origin of stellar winds: Subatmospheric nonthermal storage modes versus radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.J.; Thomas, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    Most current models of matter-flux in hot stars place its origin in radiation pressure, and then model the flow explicitly to produce no chromosphere-corona. Our model of the stellar atmosphere as a transition zone between stellar interior and interstellar medium places the origin of matter-flux, chromosphere-corona, and spectral ''emission classes'' in subatmospheric nonthermal kinetic energy storage, equally for all stars, hot or cold. Current observations of both hot and cold stars suggest chromospheres to be a universal phenomenon, correlated with matter-fluxes, and enhanced in ''emission-class'' stars. To clarify the difference between the two kinds of models above, we reformulate the wind-tunnel analogy to stellar winds, suggesting that stars satisfy and ''imperfect,'' such model;i.e., transsonic shocks occur before the throat, corresponding to an imposed outward velocity in the storage section, or subatmosphere. We then investigate the stability of an arbitrary stellar atmosphere, hot or cold, to suggest a cause for such an outward subatmospheric velocity

  7. FLARE STARS—A FAVORABLE OBJECT FOR STUDYING MECHANISMS OF NONTHERMAL ASTROPHYSICAL PHENOMENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oks, E. [Physics Department, 206 Allison Lab., Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Gershberg, R. E. [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Nauchny, Bakhchisaray region, Crimea, 298409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-01

    We present a spectroscopic method for diagnosing a low-frequency electrostatic plasma turbulence (LEPT) in plasmas of flare stars. This method had been previously developed by one of us and successfully applied to diagnosing the LEPT in solar flares. In distinction to our previous applications of the method, here we use the latest advances in the theory of the Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines. By analyzing observed emission Balmer lines, we show that it is very likely that the LEPT was developed in several flares of AD Leo, as well as in one flare of EV Lac. We found the LEPT (though of different field strengths) both in the explosive/impulsive phase and at the phase of the maximum, as well as at the gradual phase of the stellar flares. While for solar flares our method allows diagnosing the LEPT only in the most powerful flares, for the flare stars it seems that the method allows revealing the LEPT practically in every flare. It should be important to obtain new and better spectrograms of stellar flares, allowing their analysis by the method outlined in the present paper. This can be the most favorable way to the detailed understanding of the nature of nonthermal astrophysical phenomena.

  8. Novel Therapeutic Effects of Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for Muscle Regeneration and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Won; Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Yang Eun; Park, Ju Kyeong; Yang, Sang Sik; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yun Sang; Lee, Yuijina; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can repair muscle tissue damage, but significant loss of muscle tissue or its long-lasting chronic degeneration makes injured skeletal muscle tissue difficult to restore. It has been demonstrated that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) can be used in many biological areas including regenerative medicine. Therefore, we determined whether NTP, as a non-contact biological external stimulator that generates biological catalyzers, can induce regeneration of injured muscle without biomaterials. Treatment with NTP in the defected muscle of a Sprague Dawley (SD) rat increased the number of proliferating muscle cells 7 days after plasma treatment (dapt) and rapidly induced formation of muscle tissue and muscle cell differentiation at 14 dapt. In addition, in vitro experiments also showed that NTP could induce muscle cell proliferation and differentiation of human muscle cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NTP promotes restoration of muscle defects through control of cell proliferation and differentiation without biological or structural supporters, suggesting that NTP has the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies. PMID:27349181

  9. Integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, L.A.; Schafer, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) authorized studies on alternative systems for treating contact-handled DOE mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW). The on-going Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems' (ITTS) and the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems' (INTS) studies satisfy this request. EM-50 further authorized supporting studies including this technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis. This analysis identifies areas where technology development could have the greatest impact on total life cycle system costs. These areas are determined by evaluating the sensitivity of system life cycle costs relative to changes in life cycle component or phase costs, subsystem costs, contingency allowance, facility capacity, operating life, and disposal costs. For all treatment systems, the most cost sensitive life cycle phase is the operations and maintenance phase and the most cost sensitive subsystem is the receiving and inspection/preparation subsystem. These conclusions were unchanged when the sensitivity analysis was repeated on a present value basis. Opportunity exists for technology development to reduce waste receiving and inspection/preparation costs by effectively minimizing labor costs, the major cost driver, within the maintenance and operations phase of the life cycle

  10. Experimental studies of thermal and non-thermal electron cyclotron phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, F.S.

    1984-12-01

    A direct measurement of wave absorption in the ISX-B tokamak at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency is reported. Measurements of the absorption of a wave polarized in the extraordinary mode and propagating perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field are in agreement with the absorption predicted by the linearized Vlasov equation for a thermal plasma. Agreement is found both for an analytic approximation to the wave absorption and for a numerical simulation of ray propagation in toroidal geometry. Observations are also reported on a non-linear, three-wave interaction process occurring during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating in the Versator II tokamak. The measured spectra and the threshold power are consistent with a model in which the incident power in the extraordinary mode of polarization decays at the upper hybrid resonance layer into a lower hybrid wave and an electron Bernstein wave. Finally, measurements of non-thermal emission at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency and below the electron plasma frequency are reported from low density, non-Maxwellian plasma in the Versator II tokamak. The emission spectra are in agreement with a model in which waves are driven unstable at the anomalous Doppler resonance, while only weakly damped at the Cerenkov resonance

  11. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Xiaolong [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China); Zhou Ming Hua [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China); Lei Lecheng [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China)]. E-mail: lclei@zju.edu.cn

    2007-03-22

    TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst (P-25) (50 mg L{sup -1}) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO{sub 2} were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO{sub 2} had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10 x 10{sup -6} to 1.50 x 10{sup -6} M s{sup -1}, the ozone formation rate from 1.99 x 10{sup -8} to 2.35 x 10{sup -8} M s{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO{sub 2}. The introduction of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants.

  12. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiao Long; Zhou, Ming Hua; Lei, Le Cheng

    2007-03-22

    TiO(2) photocatalyst (P-25) (50mgL(-1)) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO(2) were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO(2) had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10x10(-6) to 1.50x10(-6)Ms(-1), the ozone formation rate from 1.99x10(-8) to 2.35x10(-8)Ms(-1), respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO(2). The introduction of TiO(2) photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants.

  13. Direct chemical oxidation: a non-thermal technology for the destruction of organic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, G.B.; Cooper, J. F.; Lewis, P. R.; Adamson, M. G.

    1998-02-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment and chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992, and is applicable to the destruction of virtually all solid or liquid organics, including: chlorosolvents, oils and greases, detergents, organic-contaminated soils or sludges, explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and PCB's. [1-15] The process normally operates at 80-100 C, a heating requirement which increases the difficulty of surface decontamination of large objects or, for example, treatment of a wide area contaminated soil site. The driver for DCO work in FY98 was thus to investigate the use of catalysts to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technology for organics destruction at temperatures closer to ambient. In addition, DCO is at a sufficiently mature stage of development that technology transfer to a commercial entity was a logical next step, and was thus included in FY98 tasks.

  14. Effects of non-thermal mobile phone radiation on breast adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Fourie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone usage currently exceeds landline communication in Africa. The extent of this usage has raised concerns about the long-term health effects of the ongoing use of mobile phones. To assess the physiological effects of radiation from mobile phones in vitro, MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells were exposed to 2W/kg non-thermal 900-MHz mobile phone radiation. The effects investigated were those on metabolic activity, cell morphology, cell cycle progression, phosphatidylserine (PS externalisation and the generation of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen species. Statistically insignificant increases in mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity were observed in irradiated cells when compared to controls. Fluorescent detection of F-actin demonstrated an increase in F-actin stress fibre formation in irradiated MCF-7 cells. Cell cycle progression revealed no statistically significant variation. A small increase in early and late apoptotic events in irradiated MCF-7 cells was observed. No statistically significant changes were observed in reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species generation. In addition, quantitative and qualitative analyses of cell cycle activity and nuclear and cytosolic changes, respectively, revealed no significant changes. In conclusion, exposure to 1 h of 900-MHz irradiation induced an increase in PS externalisation and an increase in the formation of F-actin stress fibres in MCF-7 cells. Data obtained from this study, and their correlation with other studies, provides intriguing links between radio frequency radiation and cellular events and warrant further investigation.

  15. Improved oxidation of air pollutants in a non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, U.; Holzer, F.; Kopinke, F.-D.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of non-thermal plasma (NTP) for the removal of organic air pollutants (especially in low concentrations) is improved by the introduction of ferroelectric and catalytically active materials into the discharge zone of an NTP reactor. Experiments with model systems (various contaminants and packed-bed materials) have shown that such a modification of a homogeneous gas-phase plasma can overcome the most serious restrictions of the NTP technique at its present state of the art: the incomplete total oxidation (i.e. the low selectivity to CO 2 ) and the energetic inefficiency. Placing a ferroelectric packed-bed material in the discharge zone was shown to result in a lowering of the energy input required. The main effects of plasma catalysis enabled by the introduction of a catalytically active material were an enhanced conversion of pollutants and a higher CO 2 selectivity. These improvements are based on the presence of short-lived oxidising species in the inner volume of porous catalysts. Additionally, the formation of a reservoir of adsorbed oxidants in the NTP zone could be shown. The combination of both modifications (ferroelectric packed-bed materials and plasma catalysis) is a promising method to support the NTP-initiated oxidation of air pollutants

  16. Multiple-wavelength analysis of energy release during a solar flare - Thermal and nonthermal electron populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Kerdraon, Alain; Trottet, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    Collaborative solar investigations by Tufts University and the Observatoire de Paris have resulted in simultaneous radio observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Nancay Radioheliograph (NR), comparisons of this radio data with X-ray observations, and theoretical interpretations of the dominant radiation mechanisms during a weak impulsive solar flare observed on May 28, 1988. The VLA has mapped the flaring structures at time intervals of 3.3 s, showing that the preflash and flash-phase components of the impulsive emission originate in spatially separated sources. The 20.7 cm preflash source is ascribed to thermal gyroresonance emission from coronal loops with typical magnetic field strengths of up to 270 G; this emission is associated with heating and exhibits no detectable hard X-ray radiation above 30 keV. The flash-phase 20.7 cm source and the hard X-ray emission are attributed to nonthermal electrons in the coronal and chromospheric portions of a magnetic loop. The combination of imaging observations at 20.7 and 91.6 cm excludes emission from a confined hot plasma during the flash phase.

  17. A universal mirror wave-mode threshold condition for non-thermal space plasma environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Leubner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fluctuations are recognized in a large variety of space plasmas by increasingly high resolution, in situ observations as mirror wave mode structures. A typical requirement for the excitation of mirror modes is a dominant perpendicular pressure in a high-beta plasma environment. Contrary, we demonstrate from a realistic kinetic analysis how details of the velocity space distributions are of considerable significance for the instability threshold. Introducing the most common characteristics of observed ion and electron distributions by a mixed suprathermal-loss-cone, we derive a universal mirror instability criterion from an energy principle for collisionless plasmas. As a result, the transition from two temperature Maxwellians to realistic non-thermal features provides a strong source for the generation of mirror wave mode activity, reducing drastically the instability threshold. In particular, a number of space-related examples illuminate how the specific structure of the velocity space distribution dominates as a regulating excitation mechanism over the effects related to changes in the plasma parameters.

  18. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2016-07-16

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization of the flame in a V-shape or an M-shape geometry, over a central stainless steel rod. The plasma is produced by short pulses of 10-ns duration, 8-kV maximum voltage amplitude, applied at 10 kHz. The central rod is used as a cathode, while the anode is a stainless steel ring, fixed on the outer surface of the quartz tube. Plasma forcing is produced by positive or negative steps of plasma. The step response of the flame is investigated through heat release rate (HRR) fluctuations, to facilitate comparisons with flame response to acoustic perturbations. The chemiluminescence of CH* between two consecutive pulses was recorded using an intensified camera equipped with an optical filter to estimate the HRR fluctuations. First, the results show that the flame does not respond to each single plasma pulse, but is affected only by the average plasma power, confirming the step nature of the forcing. The temporal evolutions of HRR are analyzed and the flame transfer functions are determined. A forcing mechanism, as a local increase in the reactivity of the fluid close to the rod, is proposed and compared with numerical simulations. Experiments and numerical simulations are in good qualitative agreement. © 2016.

  19. Non-thermal production of neutralino cold dark matter from cosmic string decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeannerot, R.; Zhang, X.; Brandenberger, R.

    1998-12-01

    We propose a mechanism of nonthermal production of a neutralino cold dark matter particle, χ, from the decay of cosmic strings which form from the spontaneous breaking of a U(1) gauge symmetry, such as U B-L (1), in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). By explicit calculation, we point out that with a symmetry breaking scale η of around 10 8 GeV, the decay of cosmic strings can give rise to Ω χ ≅ 1. This gives a new constraint on supersymmetric models. For example, the dark matter produced from strings will over close the universe if η is near the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. To be consistent with Ω χ ≤ 1, the mass of the new U(1) gauge boson must be much larger than the Fermi scale which makes it unobservable in upcoming accelerator experiments. In a supersymmetric model with an extra U B-L (1) symmetry, the requirement of Ω χ ≤ 1 puts an upper bound on the neutrino mass of about 30eV provided neutrino masses are generated by the see-saw mechanisms. (author)

  20. Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guoqing; Zhang Guanjun; Zhang Wenyuan

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy by non-thermal plasma treatment is presented, using a nanosecond-positive-edge repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge generator in atmospheric air. The electrical parameters including discharging power, peak and density of micro-discharge current were calculated, and the electron energy was estimated. Surface treatment experiments of polytetrafluoroethylene films were conducted for both different applied voltages and different treating durations. Results show that the surface energy of polytetrafluoroethylene film could be improved to 40 mJ/m 2 or more by plasma treatment. Surface roughness measurement and surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicate that there are chemical etching and implantation of polar oxygen groups in the sample surface treating process, resulting in the improvement of the sample surface energy. Compared with an AC source of 50 Hz, the dielectric barrier discharges generated by a repetitive pulsed source could provide higher peak power, lower mean power, larger micro-discharge current density and higher electron energy. Therefore, with the same applied peak voltage and treating duration, the improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy using repetitive pulsed plasma is more effective, and the plasma treatment process based on repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in air is thus feasible and applicable.

  1. Nonthermal pasteurization of fermented green table olives by means of high hydrostatic pressure processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyri, Anthoula A; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Nychas, George-John E; Tassou, Chrysoula C

    2014-01-01

    Green fermented olives cv. Halkidiki were subjected to different treatments of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing (400, 450, and 500 MPa for 15 or 30 min). Total viable counts, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts/moulds, and the physicochemical characteristics of the product (pH, colour, and firmness) were monitored right after the treatment and after 7 days of storage at 20(°)C to allow for recovery of injured cells. The treatments at 400 MPa for 15 and 30 min, 450 MPa for 15 and 30 min, and 500 MPa for 15 min were found insufficient as a recovery of the microbiota was observed. The treatment at 500 MPa for 30 min was effective in reducing the olive microbiota below the detection limit of the enumeration method after the treatment and after 1 week of storage and was chosen as being more appropriate for storing olives for an extended time period (5 months). After 5 months of storage at 20(°)C, no microbiota was detected in treated samples, while significant changes for both HHP treated and untreated olives were observed for colour parameters only (minor degradation). In conclusion, HHP treatment may introduce a reliable nonthermal pasteurization method to extend the microbiological shelf-life of fermented table olives.

  2. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaolong; Zhou Ming Hua; Lei Lecheng

    2007-01-01

    TiO 2 photocatalyst (P-25) (50 mg L -1 ) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO 2 were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO 2 had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10 x 10 -6 to 1.50 x 10 -6 M s -1 , the ozone formation rate from 1.99 x 10 -8 to 2.35 x 10 -8 M s -1 , respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO 2 . The introduction of TiO 2 photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants

  3. Universal self-similar dynamics of relativistic and nonrelativistic field theories near nonthermal fixed points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro Orioli, Asier; Boguslavski, Kirill; Berges, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    We investigate universal behavior of isolated many-body systems far from equilibrium, which is relevant for a wide range of applications from ultracold quantum gases to high-energy particle physics. The universality is based on the existence of nonthermal fixed points, which represent nonequilibrium attractor solutions with self-similar scaling behavior. The corresponding dynamic universality classes turn out to be remarkably large, encompassing both relativistic as well as nonrelativistic quantum and classical systems. For the examples of nonrelativistic (Gross-Pitaevskii) and relativistic scalar field theory with quartic self-interactions, we demonstrate that infrared scaling exponents as well as scaling functions agree. We perform two independent nonperturbative calculations, first by using classical-statistical lattice simulation techniques and second by applying a vertex-resummed kinetic theory. The latter extends kinetic descriptions to the nonperturbative regime of overoccupied modes. Our results open new perspectives to learn from experiments with cold atoms aspects about the dynamics during the early stages of our universe.

  4. Urinary Tract Effects After Multifocal Nonthermal Irreversible Electroporation of the Kidney: Acute and Chronic Monitoring by Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Intravenous Urography and Urinary Cytology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, Johann Jakob, E-mail: johann.wendler@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Pech, Maciej [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Porsch, Markus; Janitzky, Andreas [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Fischbach, Frank [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Buhtz, Peter; Vogler, Klaus [University of Magdeburg, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Huehne, Sarah [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Borucki, Katrin [University of Magdeburg, Institute of Clinical Chemistry (Germany); Strang, Christof [University of Magdeburg, Department of Anaesthesiology (Germany); Mahnkopf, Dirk [Institute of Medical Technology and Research (Germany); Ricke, Jens [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Liehr, Uwe-Bernd [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a novel potential ablation modality for renal masses. The aim of this study was the first evaluation of NTIRE's effects on the renal urine-collecting system using intravenous urography (IVU) and urinary cytology in addition to histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Eight percutaneous NTIRE ablations of the renal parenchyma, including the calyxes or pelvis, were performed in three male swine. MRI, IVU, histology, and urinary cytology follow-ups were performed within the first 28 days after treatment. Results: MRI and histological analysis demonstrated a localized necrosis 7 days and a localized scarification of the renal parenchyma with complete destruction 28 days after NTIRE. The urine-collecting system was preserved and showed urothelial regeneration. IVU and MRI showed an unaltered normal morphology of the renal calyxes, pelvis, and ureter. A new urinary cytology phenomenon featured a temporary degeneration by individual vacuolization of detached transitional epithelium cells within the first 3 days after NTIRE. Conclusions: This first urographical, urine-cytological, and MRI evaluation after porcine kidney NTIRE shows multifocal parenchyma destruction while protecting the involved urine-collecting system with regenerated urothelial tissue. NTIRE could be used as a targeted ablation method of centrally located renal masses.

  5. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E.C.; Rein, Arno; Winding, Anne; Wollensen de Jonge, Lis; Trapp, Stefan; Karlson, Ulrich G.

    2013-01-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg −1 ) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC), biochar or compost. Total amounts of phenanthrene desorbed were similar between the different soils, but the amendment type had a large influence. Complete desorption was observed in the unamended and compost amended soils, but this reduced for biochar (41% desorbed) and AC (8% desorbed). Cumulative amounts mineralized were 28% for the unamended control, 19% for compost, 13% for biochar and 4% for AC. Therefore, the effects of the amendments in soil in reducing desorption were also reflected in the extents of mineralization. Modeling was used to analyze key processes, indicating that for the AC and charcoal treatments bacterial activity did not limit mineralization, but rather desorption into the dissolved phase. -- Highlights: •Phenanthrene desorption and mineralization compared in soils with activated carbon, charcoal or compost. •Only activated charcoal and biochar hindered both desorption and mineralization. •A linear relationship was found between the extents desorbed and mineralized. •Modelling indicated that bacterial activity was not limiting but that desorption was. -- Extraction into an exhaustive silicone sink measures the maximum phenanthrene desorption from soils with amendments, and this is reflected in the extent of mineralization

  6. Temperature suppression of STM-induced desorption of hydrogen on Si(100) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Nakayama, T.

    1999-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen (H) desorption from Si(100) H-terminated surfaces by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is reported for negative sample bias. It is found that the STM induced H desorption rate (R) decreases several orders of magnitude when the substrate temperature...

  7. Scattering, Adsorption, and Langmuir-Hinshelwood Desorption Models for Physisorptive and Chemisorptive Gas-Surface Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    quantum effects by incorporating Zero- Point Energy ( ZPE ) in the initial conditions [19; 108]. Desorption calculations, in order to be incorporated...TST Transition State Theory TTPD Threshold Temperature-Programmed Desorption UHV Ultra-High Vacuum XHV Extreme-High Vacuum ZPE Zero-Point Energy 141

  8. Desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Sakane, Kohji; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on the desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent by the batch process. The rate of desorption of uranium with acidic eluent depended on temperature, showing an increase as the temperature was raised. But the rate of desorption with acidic eluent was less dependent on temperature than that obtained when mixed eluent of sodium carbonate-sodium hydrogencarbonate was used. The rate of desorption of uranium did not vary in the range of concentration from 0.3 to 0.5 N, and the rate of desorption with sulfuric acid was slightly higher than that obtained when hydrochloric acid was used. The amount of dissolved titanium decreased as the ratio of adsorbent to eluent (RAE) was increased. At RAE of 10 %, the percentage of dissolved titanium (DTI) was below 0.38 % with sulfuric acid, below 0.7 % with hydrochloric acid. These values were found to be higher than the ones with the carbonate eluent. The elements except uranium, which were adsorbed on the adsorbent, were eluted simultaneously with acidic eluent. The regeneration of the adsorbent after desorption, therefore, was found to be unnecessary. In a repeated test of adsorption-desorption treatment up to five times, the percentage of uranium adsorbed from natural sea water was approximately constant of 85 %. From these results, the application of column process to the desorption of uranium with acidic eluent at room temperature was proposed to be feasible. (author)

  9. Desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Sakane, Kohji; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on the desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent by the batch process. The rate of desorption of uranium with acidic eluent depended on temperature, showing an increase as the temperature was raised. But the rate of desorption with acidic eluent was less dependent on temperature than that obtained when mixed eluent of sodium carbonate-sodium hydrogencarbonate was used. The difference of the rate of desorption of uranium in the range of concentration from 0.3 to 0.5N was not found, and the rate of desorption with sulfuric acid was slightly higher than that obtained when hydrochloric acid was used. The amount of dissolved titanium decreased as the ratio of adsorbent to eluent (RAE) was increased. At RAE of 10%, the percentage of dissolved titanium (DTI) was below 0.38% with sulfuric acid, below 0.7% with hydrochloric acid. These values were found to be higher than the ones with the carbonate eluent. The elements except uranium, which were adsorbed on the adsorbent, were eluted simultaneously with acidic eluent. The regeneration of the adsorbent after desorption, therefore, was found to be unnecessary. In a repeated test of adsorption-desorption treatment up to five times, the percentage of uranium adsorbed from natural sea water was approximately constant of 85%. From these results, the application of column process to the desorption of uranium with acidic eluent at room temperature was proposed to be feasible. (author)

  10. Hydrogen Temperature-Programmed Desorption (H2 TPD) of Supported Platinum Catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Meyers, B.L.; Modica, F.S.; Lane, G.S.; Vaarkamp, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of supported platinum catalysts, Pt/KLTL, Pt/H-LTL, Pt/K-MAZ, Pt/H-MAZ, Pt/-Al2O3, and Pt/SiO2, was performed after hydrogen reduction at 300, 450, or 650°C. For all catalysts, reversible desorption of chemisorbed hydrogen occurred at approximately

  11. Equilibrium moisture content (EMC) in Norway spruce during the first and second desorptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Engelund, Emil Tang; Thygesen, Lisbeth G.

    2011-01-01

    It is a commonly accepted notion that the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood at a given relative humidity (RH) is highest during initial desorption of green wood due to an irreversible loss of hygroscopicity during the 1st desorption. The basis for this notion is investigated by assessing...

  12. Probing the crossover in CO desorption from single crystal to nanoparticulate Ru model catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Shane; Strebel, Christian Ejersbo; Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm

    2011-01-01

    Crossover in CO desorption behavior and nanoscale structure probed with STM from ruthenium single crystals to PVD and mass-selected nanoparticles.......Crossover in CO desorption behavior and nanoscale structure probed with STM from ruthenium single crystals to PVD and mass-selected nanoparticles....

  13. Thermal desorption of deuterium from modified carbon nanotubes and its correlation to the microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.F.; Keim, Enrico G.; van den Berg, A.H.J.; Smithers, Mark A.; Smithers, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The process of deuterium desorption from single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) modified by atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium treatment was investigated in an ultrahigh vacuum environment using thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). Microstructural and chemical analyses of SWNT material,

  14. Desorption of radioactive cesium by seawater from the suspended particles in river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Masaki; Kirishima, Akira; Nagao, Seiya; Takamiya, Kouichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Daisuke; Sato, Nobuaki

    2017-10-01

    In 2011, the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant dispersed radioactive cesium throughout the environment, contaminating the land, rivers, and sea. Suspended particles containing clay minerals are the transportation medium for radioactive cesium from rivers to the ocean because cesium is strongly adsorbed between the layers of clay minerals, forming inner sphere complexes. In this study, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of radioactive cesium from suspended clay particles in river water have been investigated. The radioactive cesium adsorption and desorption experiments were performed with two kinds of suspended particulate using a batch method with 137 Cs tracers. In the cesium adsorption treatment performed before the desorption experiments, simulated river water having a total cesium concentration ([ 133+137 Cs + ] total ) of 1.3 nM (10 -9  mol/L) was used. The desorption experiments were mainly conducted at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 0.17 g/L. The desorption agents were natural seawater collected at 10 km north of the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, artificial seawater, solutions of NaCl, KCl, NH 4 Cl, and 133 CsCl, and ultrapure water. The desorption behavior, which depends on the preloaded cesium concentration in the suspended particles, was also investigated. Based on the cesium desorption experiments using suspended particles, which contained about 1000 ng/g loaded cesium, the order of cesium desorption ratios for each desorption agent was determined as 1 M NaCl (80%) > 470 mM NaCl (65%) > 1 M KCl (30%) ≈ seawater (natural seawater and Daigo artificial seawater) > 1 M NH 4 Cl (20%) > 1 M 133 CsCl (15%) ≫ ultrapure water (2%). Moreover, an interesting result was obtained: The desorption ratio in the 470 mM NaCl solution was much higher than that in seawater, even though the Na + concentrations were identical. These results indicate that the cesium desorption mechanism is not a simple ion exchange reaction

  15. Experimental Study on Methane Desorption from Lumpy Coal under the Action of Hydraulic and Thermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisture and thermal are the key factors for influencing methane desorption during CBM exploitation. Using high-pressure water injection technology into coalbed, new fractures and pathways are formed to transport methane. A phenomenon of water-inhibiting gas flow existed. This study is focused on various water pressures impacted on gas-adsorbed coal samples, and then the desorption capacity could be revealed under different conditions. And the results are shown that methane desorption capacity was decreased with the increase in water pressure at room temperature and the downtrend would be steady until water pressure was large enough. Heating could promote gas desorption capacity effectively, with the increasing of water injection pressures, and the promotion of thermal on desorption became more obvious. These results are expected to provide a clearer understanding of theoretical efficiency of heat water or steam injection into coalbed, and they can provide some theoretical and experimental guidance on CBM production and methane control.

  16. Study of adsorption and desorption of water on Li4SiO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, V.; Schumacher, G.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH

    1989-01-01

    Lithium orthosilicate is one of the candidate materials for tritium breeding in a fusion reactor blanket. The release of tritium from this material depens on diffusion in the bulk and on desorption from the surface of the material which is usually covered by adsorbed water. Adsorption and desorption of water was examined to gain an insight into the release of tritium from the surface. Temperature controlled desorption experiments with lithium orthosilicate powder show desorption peaks which are assigned to the desorption of physisorbed water. At temperatures above 390 K and partial pressures up to 1.6 mbar water is absorbed in the first layer on the surface only. Immersion experiments gave much too high values of the heat of immersion for spray dried powder but reasonable 82 kJ/mol of water for spheres of 0.5 mm diameter produced from molten orthosilicate. (orig.)

  17. Oxygen Sorption and Desorption Properties of Selected Lanthanum Manganites and Lanthanum Ferrite Manganites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Skou, Eivind M.; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Temperature‐programmed desorption (TPD) with a carrier gas was used to study the oxygen sorption and desorption properties of oxidation catalysts and solid‐oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode materials (La0.85Sr0.15)0.95MnO3+δ (LSM) and La0.60Sr0.40Fe0.80Mn0.20O3‐δ (LSFM). The powders were characterized...... by X‐ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and BET surface adsorption. Sorbed oxygen could be distinguished from oxygen originating from stoichiometry changes. The results indicated that there is one main site for oxygen sorption/desorption. The amount of sorbed oxygen was monitored over...... time at different temperatures. Furthermore, through data analysis it was shown that the desorption peak associated with oxygen sorption is described well by second‐order desorption kinetics. This indicates that oxygen molecules dissociate upon adsorption and that the rate‐determining step...

  18. Radiotracer experiments on the desorption of iodine from paddy soil with and without rice plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Uchida, Shigeo; Yoshida, Satoshi

    1991-01-01

    In order to assess the behavior of radioiodine in rice fields, we have performed laboratory experiments, using 125 I tracer, on the desorption phenomena of iodine from soil during rice cultivation. Most of the 125 I added to the soil was adsorbed by the soil solid phase at the beginning of the experiment. However, the iodine started to desorb into the soil solution with the growth of rice plants. The highest desorption rate of iodine was found around the flowering period, i.e. nearly 30% of the 125 I was desorbed from Ando soil into the soil solution. In contrast to this, no particular increase in the iodine desorption was observed from the uncultivated flooded soil. It was suggested that rice plants had some influence upon iodine desorption from soil and the desorption also depended on the soil types. (author)

  19. Sorption and desorption of insecticides in Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchini, L.C.; Lord, K.A.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The sorption from aqueous solution of ten Brazilian soil types of four organochlorine, two organophosphorus and one carbamate insecticide was determined in the laboratory using gas chromatographic and radiometric techniques. Measurements showed that soils richest in organic matter, sorbed all substances except aldrin more strongly than the other soils. DDT was the most and aldrin the least sorbed organochlorine pesticide, being dieldrin sorbed two to four times more strongly than aldrin. Sorption of lindane varied in different soils. The organophosphate insecticides malathion and parathion were strongly sorbed in the soils richest in organic matter and weakly sorbed in the poorest soils heing moderately sorbed by the other soils. Sorption of carbaryl by all soils is small. Lindane was desorbed from the soil richest in organic matter and the extent of desorption was dependent on the sorption time. (Author) [pt

  20. Sorption-desorption of radiocesium interception potential in tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, Mario L.; Boaretto, Rodrigo M.; Boaretto, Antonio E.; Smolders, Erik E.T.

    2000-01-01

    A study of sorption of radiocaesium in soils of tropical climate (Brazil) was carried. The values of definitive fixation of the radiocaesium were determined by analytic methodology of sorption-desorption and the availability to plants were calculated by the determination of radiocesium interception potential (RIP). The values of sorption varied from 1,2 to 74,8% and the fixation varied from 3,2% to 32,2%. The results shown that the radiocaesium did remain adsorbed mainly to the frayed edge site. The low values of interception potential and definitive fixation demonstrated high capacity of the tropical soils in disposal the radionuclide for the solution and, consequently, to plants. (author)

  1. Probe-Substrate Distance Control in Desorption Electrospray Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarger, Tyler J.; Yuill, Elizabeth M.; Baker, Lane A.

    2018-03-01

    We introduce probe-substrate distance (Dps)-control to desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and report a systematic investigation of key experimental parameters. Examination of voltage, flow rate, and nebulizing gas pressure suggests as Dps decreases, the distance-dependent spray current increases, until a critical point. At the critical point the relationship inverts, and the spray current decreases as the probe moves closer to the surface due to constriction of solution flow by the nebulizing gas. Dps control was used to explore the use of spray current as a signal for feedback positioning, while mass spectrometry imaging was performed simultaneously. Further development of this technique is expected to find application in study of structure-function relationships for clinical diagnostics, biological investigation, and materials characterization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Light-induced atomic desorption and related phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchianti, A; Bogi, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Moi, L [CNISM and Physics Department, University of Siena, 53100 Siena (Italy)], E-mail: burchianti@unisi.it

    2009-07-15

    We review some recent studies on light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) from dielectric surfaces. Alkali-metal atoms adsorbed either on organic films or on porous glass are released into the vapor phase under illumination. The measurements were performed in Pyrex resonance cells either coated with siloxane films or containing a porous glass sample. In both cases, the experimental results show that LIAD can be used to produce atomic densities suitable for most atomic physics experiments. Moreover, we find that photoinduced effects, correlated with LIAD, produce reversible formation and evaporation of alkali-metal clusters in porous glass. These processes depend on the light frequency, making the porous glass transmittance controllable by light.

  3. Laser induced desorption as hydrogen retention diagnostic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobinski, Miroslaw

    2016-07-15

    Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is a diagnostic method to measure the hydrogen content in the surface of a material exposed to a hydrogen isotope (H,D,T) plasma. It is developed mainly to monitor hydrogen retention in the walls of magnetic fusion devices that have to limit the amount of their fuel tritium mainly due to safety reasons. The development of fusion increasingly focusses on plasma-wall interactions for which in situ diagnostics like LIDS are required that work during plasma operation and without tile removal. The method has first been developed for thin amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H < 500 nm) layers successfully and is studied in the present work on thick (15 μm) layers, carbon fibre composites (CFCs), bulk tungsten (W), W fuzz and mixed C/W materials. In LID a 3 ms Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser pulse heats a spot of diameter 3 mm with 500 {sup MW}/{sub m{sup 2}} on W to 1800 K at the surface and thus above 1300 K within ca. 0.2 mm depth. On C materials (graphite, CFC, a-C:H) this temperature guarantees a nearly complete (>95%) desorption already within 1.5 ms pulse duration. The retained hydrogen atoms are desorbed locally, recombine to molecules and migrate promptly to the surface via internal channels like pores and grain boundaries. Whereas, in W the retained hydrogen atoms have to diffuse through the bulk material, which is a relatively slow process also directed into the depth. The desorbed hydrogen fraction can thus be strongly reduced to 18-91% as observed here. This fraction is measured by melting the central part of a previously heated spot ca. 40 μm deep with a diameter 2 mm, 3 ms laser pulse, releasing the remaining hydrogen. W samples exposed to different plasmas in TEXTOR, Pilot-PSI, PSI-2, PADOS and PlaQ show that the desorption fraction of LID mainly decreases due to higher sample temperature during plasma exposure. The heat causes deeper hydrogen diffusion and/or stronger hydrogen trapping due to creation of traps with higher

  4. Laser induced desorption as hydrogen retention diagnostic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlobinski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is a diagnostic method to measure the hydrogen content in the surface of a material exposed to a hydrogen isotope (H,D,T) plasma. It is developed mainly to monitor hydrogen retention in the walls of magnetic fusion devices that have to limit the amount of their fuel tritium mainly due to safety reasons. The development of fusion increasingly focusses on plasma-wall interactions for which in situ diagnostics like LIDS are required that work during plasma operation and without tile removal. The method has first been developed for thin amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H < 500 nm) layers successfully and is studied in the present work on thick (15 μm) layers, carbon fibre composites (CFCs), bulk tungsten (W), W fuzz and mixed C/W materials. In LID a 3 ms Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser pulse heats a spot of diameter 3 mm with 500 MW / m 2 on W to 1800 K at the surface and thus above 1300 K within ca. 0.2 mm depth. On C materials (graphite, CFC, a-C:H) this temperature guarantees a nearly complete (>95%) desorption already within 1.5 ms pulse duration. The retained hydrogen atoms are desorbed locally, recombine to molecules and migrate promptly to the surface via internal channels like pores and grain boundaries. Whereas, in W the retained hydrogen atoms have to diffuse through the bulk material, which is a relatively slow process also directed into the depth. The desorbed hydrogen fraction can thus be strongly reduced to 18-91% as observed here. This fraction is measured by melting the central part of a previously heated spot ca. 40 μm deep with a diameter 2 mm, 3 ms laser pulse, releasing the remaining hydrogen. W samples exposed to different plasmas in TEXTOR, Pilot-PSI, PSI-2, PADOS and PlaQ show that the desorption fraction of LID mainly decreases due to higher sample temperature during plasma exposure. The heat causes deeper hydrogen diffusion and/or stronger hydrogen trapping due to creation of traps with higher binding energy

  5. Field desorption mass spectroscopy monitoring of changes in hydrocarbon type composition during petroleum biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huesemann, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive petroleum hydrocarbon characterization procedure involving group type separation, boiling point distribution, and hydrocarbon typing by field desorption mass spectroscopy (FDMS) has been developed to quantify changes in hydrocarbon type composition during bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soils. FDMS is able to quantify the concentration of hundreds of specific hydrocarbon types based on their respective hydrogen deficiency (z-number) and molecular weight (carbon number). Analytical results from two bioremediation experiments involving soil contaminated with crude oil and motor oil indicate that alkanes and two-ring saturates (naphthenes) were readily biodegradable. In addition, low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons generally were biodegraded to a larger extent than those of high molecular weight. More importantly, it was found that the extent of biodegradation of specific hydrocarbon types was comparable between treatments and appeared to be unaffected by the petroleum contaminant source, soil type, or experimental conditions. It was therefore concluded that in these studies the extent of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) biodegradation is primarily affected by the molecular composition of the petroleum hydrocarbons present in the contaminated soil

  6. The use of angle resolved electron and photon stimulated desorption for the determination of molecular structure at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, T.E.; Stockbauer, R.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review of recent data related to the use of angle-resolved electron stimulated desorption and photon stimulated desorption in determining the structures of molecules at surfaces is made. Examples include a variety of structural assignments based on ESIAD (electron stimulated desorption ion angular distributions), the observation of short-range local ordering effects induced in adsorbed molecules by surface impurities, and the application of photon stimulated desorption to both ionic and covalent adsorbate systems. (Author) [pt

  7. Induction of Immunogenic Cell Death with Non-Thermal Plasma for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Abraham G.

    Even with the recent advancements in cancer immunotherapy, treatments are still associated with debilitating side effects and unacceptable fail rates. Induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD) in tumors is a promising approach to cancer treatment that may overcome these deficiencies. Cells undergoing ICD pathways enhance the interactions between cancerous cells and immune cells of the patient, resulting in the generation of anti-cancer immunity. The goal of this therapy relies on the engagement and reestablishment of the patient's natural immune processes to target and eliminate cancerous cells systemically. The main objective of this research was to determine if non-thermal plasma could be used to elicit immunogenic cancer cell death for cancer immunotherapy. My hypothesis was that plasma induces immunogenic cancer cell death through oxidative stress pathways, followed by development of a specific anti-tumor immune response. This was tested by investigating the interactions between plasma and multiple cancerous cells in vitro and validating anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. Following plasma treatment, two surrogate ICD markers, secreted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and surface exposed calreticulin (ecto-CRT), were emitted from all three cancerous cell lines tested: A549 lung carcinoma cell line, CNE-1 radiation-resistant nasopharyngeal cell line and CT26 colorectal cancer cell line. When these cells were co-cultured with macrophages, cells of the innate immune system, the tumoricidal activity of macrophages was enhanced, thus demonstrating the immunostimulatory activity of cells undergoing ICD. The underlying mechanisms of plasma-induced ICD were also evaluated. When plasma is generated, four major components are produced: electromagnetic fields, ultraviolet radiation, and charged and neutral reactive species. Of these, we determined that plasma-generated charged and short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) were the major effectors of ICD. Following plasma

  8. Simulating three-dimensional nonthermal high-energy photon emission in colliding-wind binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O., E-mail: klaus.reitberger@uibk.ac.at [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ rays. The emission is principally thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and accelerate relativistic particles which subsequently emit γ rays. On the basis of a three-dimensional distribution function of high-energy particles in the wind collision region—as obtained by a numerical hydrodynamics and particle transport model—we present the computation of the three-dimensional nonthermal photon emission for a given line of sight. Anisotropic inverse Compton emission is modeled using the target radiation field of both stars. Photons from relativistic bremsstrahlung and neutral pion decay are computed on the basis of local wind plasma densities. We also consider photon-photon opacity effects due to the dense radiation fields of the stars. Results are shown for different stellar separations of a given binary system comprising of a B star and a Wolf-Rayet star. The influence of orbital orientation with respect to the line of sight is also studied by using different orbital viewing angles. For the chosen electron-proton injection ratio of 10{sup –2}, we present the ensuing photon emission in terms of two-dimensional projections maps, spectral energy distributions, and integrated photon flux values in various energy bands. Here, we find a transition from hadron-dominated to lepton-dominated high-energy emission with increasing stellar separations. In addition, we confirm findings from previous analytic modeling that the spectral energy distribution varies significantly with orbital orientation.

  9. A Non-thermal Pulsed X-Ray Emission of AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, J.; Hu, C.-P.; Lin, L. C. C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Pal, P. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, A. K. H.; Cheng, K. S.

    2018-02-01

    We report the analysis result of UV/X-ray emission from AR Scorpii, which is an intermediate polar (IP) composed of a magnetic white dwarf and an M-type star, with the XMM-Newton data. The X-ray/UV emission clearly shows a large variation over the orbit, and their intensity maximum (or minimum) is located at the superior conjunction (or inferior conjunction) of the M star orbit. The hardness ratio of the X-ray emission shows a small variation over the orbital phase and shows no indication of the absorption by an accretion column. These properties are naturally explained by the emission from the M star surface rather than that from the accretion column on the white dwarf’s (WD) star, which is similar to usual IPs. Additionally, the observed X-ray emission also modulates with the WD’s spin with a pulse fraction of ∼14%. The peak position is aligned in the optical/UV/X-ray band. This supports the hypothesis that the electrons in AR Scorpii are accelerated to a relativistic speed and emit non-thermal photons via the synchrotron radiation. In the X-ray bands, evidence of the power-law spectrum is found in the pulsed component, although the observed emission is dominated by the optically thin thermal plasma emissions with several different temperatures. It is considered that the magnetic dissipation/reconnection process on the M star surface heats up the plasma to a temperature of several keV and also accelerates the electrons to the relativistic speed. The relativistic electrons are trapped in the WD’s closed magnetic field lines by the magnetic mirror effect. In this model, the observed pulsed component is explained by the emissions from the first magnetic mirror point.

  10. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor and Fenton reaction for degradation of ibuprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marković, Marijana [Center of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jović, Milica; Stanković, Dalibor [Innovation Center, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia); Kovačević, Vesna [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 44, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Roglić, Goran [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia); Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana [Center of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Manojlović, Dragan, E-mail: manojlo@chem.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia)

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected frequently in surface and ground water. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were reported as very efficient for removal of various organic compounds. Nevertheless, due to incomplete degradation, toxic intermediates can induce more severe effects than the parent compound. Therefore, toxicity studies are necessary for the evaluation of possible uses of AOPs. In this study the effectiveness and capacity for environmental application of three different AOPs were estimated. They were applied and evaluated for removal of ibuprofen from water solutions. Therefore, two treatments were performed in a non-thermal plasma reactor with dielectric barrier discharge with and without a homogenous catalyst (Fe{sup 2+}). The third treatment was the Fenton reaction. The degradation rate of ibuprofen was measured by HPLC-DAD and the main degradation products were identified using LC–MS TOF. Twelve degradation products were identified, and there were differences according to the various treatments applied. Toxicity effects were determined with two bioassays: Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina. The efficiency of AOPs was demonstrated for all treatments, where after 15 min degradation percentage was over 80% accompanied by opening of the aromatic ring. In the treatment with homogenous catalyst degradation reached 99%. V. fischeri toxicity test has shown greater sensitivity to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment in comparison to A. salina. - Highlights: • Twelve ibuprofen degradation products were identified in total. • The degradation percentage differed between treatments (DBD/Fe{sup 2+} was 99%). • In DBD/Fe{sup 2+} only aliphatic degradation products were identified. • V. fischeri was sensitive to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment. • A. salina showed no toxic effect when exposed to all post treatment solutions.

  11. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  12. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue, E-mail: zhangjue@pku.edu.cn [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  13. NON-THERMAL EMISSION FROM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES: IMPLICATIONS ON ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtech Šimon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the lines of evidence that some cataclysmic variables (CVs are the sources of non-thermal radiation. It was really observed in some dwarf novae in outburst, a novalike CV in the high state, an intermediate polar, polars, and classical novae (CNe during outburst. The detection of this radiation suggests the presence of highly energetic particles in these CVs. The conditions for the observability of this emission depend on the state of activity, and the system parameters. We review the processes and conditions that lead to the production of this radiation in various spectral bands, from gamma-rays including TeV emission to radio. Synchrotron and cyclotron emissions suggest the presence of strong magnetic fields in CV. In some CVs, e.g. during some dwarf nova outbursts, the magnetic field generated in the accretion disk leads to the synchrotron jets radiating in radio. The propeller effect or a shock in the case of the magnetized white dwarf (WD can lead to a strong acceleration of the particles that produce gamma-ray emission via pi0 decay; even Cherenkov radiation is possible. In addition, a gamma-ray production via pi0 decay was observed in the ejecta of an outburst of a symbiotic CN. Nuclear reactions during thermonuclear runaway in the outer layer of the WD undergoing CN outburst lead to the production of radioactive isotopes; their decay is the source of gamma-ray emission. The production of accelerated particles in CVs often has episodic character with a very small duty cycle; this makes their detection and establishing the relation of the behavior in various bands difficult.

  14. Temperature diagnostics of a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The study reflects the concept of the temperature as a physical quantity resulting from the second thermodynamic law. The reliability of different approaches of the temperature diagnostics of open non-equilibrium systems is discussed using examples of low temperature atmospheric pressure discharges. The focus of this work is a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for local surface treatment at ambient atmosphere. The micro-discharge is driven with a capacitively coupled radio frequency electric field at 27.12 MHz and fed with argon at rates of about 1 slm through the capillary with an inner diameter of 4 mm. The discharge consists of several contracted filaments with diameter around 300 μm which are rotating azimuthally in the capillary in a self-organized manner. While the measured temperatures of the filament core exceed 700 K, the heat impact on a target below the plasma jet remains limited leading to target temperatures below 400 K. Different kinds of temperatures and energy transport processes are proposed and experimentally investigated. Nevertheless, a reliable and detailed temperature diagnostics is a challenge. We report on a novel diagnostics approach for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the gas temperature based on the optical properties of the plasma. Laser Schlieren Deflectometry is adapted to explore temperature profiles of filaments and their behaviour. In parallel, the method demonstrates a fundamental Fermat's principle of minimal energy. Information acquired with this method plays an important role for the optimization of local thin film deposition and surface functionalization by means of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB-TR 24.

  15. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor and Fenton reaction for degradation of ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marković, Marijana; Jović, Milica; Stanković, Dalibor; Kovačević, Vesna; Roglić, Goran; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana; Manojlović, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected frequently in surface and ground water. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were reported as very efficient for removal of various organic compounds. Nevertheless, due to incomplete degradation, toxic intermediates can induce more severe effects than the parent compound. Therefore, toxicity studies are necessary for the evaluation of possible uses of AOPs. In this study the effectiveness and capacity for environmental application of three different AOPs were estimated. They were applied and evaluated for removal of ibuprofen from water solutions. Therefore, two treatments were performed in a non-thermal plasma reactor with dielectric barrier discharge with and without a homogenous catalyst (Fe 2+ ). The third treatment was the Fenton reaction. The degradation rate of ibuprofen was measured by HPLC-DAD and the main degradation products were identified using LC–MS TOF. Twelve degradation products were identified, and there were differences according to the various treatments applied. Toxicity effects were determined with two bioassays: Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina. The efficiency of AOPs was demonstrated for all treatments, where after 15 min degradation percentage was over 80% accompanied by opening of the aromatic ring. In the treatment with homogenous catalyst degradation reached 99%. V. fischeri toxicity test has shown greater sensitivity to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment in comparison to A. salina. - Highlights: • Twelve ibuprofen degradation products were identified in total. • The degradation percentage differed between treatments (DBD/Fe 2+ was 99%). • In DBD/Fe 2+ only aliphatic degradation products were identified. • V. fischeri was sensitive to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment. • A. salina showed no toxic effect when exposed to all post treatment solutions

  16. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments

  17. Desorption isotherms of cementitious materials: study of an accelerated protocol and estimation of RVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qier

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of French radioactive waste management and storage, the durability evaluation and prediction of concrete structures requires the knowledge of desorption isotherm of concrete. The aim of the present study is to develop an accelerated experimental method to obtain desorption isotherm of cementitious materials more quickly and to estimate the Representative Volume Element (RVE) size related to the desorption isotherm of concrete. In order to ensure that experimental results can be statistically considered representative, a great amount of sliced samples of cementitious materials with three different thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm) have been de-saturated. The effect of slice thickness and the saturation condition on the mass variation kinetics and the desorption isotherms is analyzed. The influence of the aggregate distribution on the water content and the water saturation degree is also analyzed. A method based on statistical analysis of water content and water saturation degree is proposed to estimate the RVE for water desorption experiment of concrete. The evolution of shrinkage with relative humidity is also followed for each material during the water desorption experiment. A protocol of cycle of rapid desaturation-re-saturation is applied and shows the existence of hysteresis between desorption and adsorption. (author)

  18. Non-isothermal desorption and nucleate boiling in a water-salt droplet LiBr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura Sergey Ya.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental data on desorption and nucleate boiling in a droplet of LiBr-water solution were obtained. An increase in salt concentration in a liquid-layer leads to a considerable decrease in the rate of desorption. The significant decrease in desorption intensity with a rise of initial mass concentration of salt has been observed. Evaporation rate of distillate droplet is constant for a long time period. At nucleate boiling of a water-salt solution of droplet several characteristic regimes occur: heating, nucleate boiling, desorption without bubble formation, formation of the solid, thin crystalline-hydrate film on the upper droplet surface, and formation of the ordered crystalline-hydrate structures during the longer time periods. For the final stage of desorption there is a big difference in desorption rate for initial salt concentration, C0, 11% and 51%. This great difference in the rate of desorption is associated with significantly more thin solution film for C0 = 11% and higher heat flux.

  19. Desorption behaviors of BDE-28 and BDE-47 from natural soils with different organic carbon contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenxin; Cheng Fangfang; Li Weibo; Xing Baoshan; Tao Shu

    2012-01-01

    Desorption kinetic and isothermal characteristics of BDE-28 and BDE-47 were investigated using natural soils with different organic carbon fractions. The results indicated that a two-compartment first-order model with dominant contribution of slow desorption could adequately describe the released kinetics of studied PBDEs. Desorption isotherms of different samples could be fitted well by linear distribution model or nonlinear Freundlich model. Moreover, most desorption procedures roughly exhibited hysteresis with respect to preceding sorption ones. At the statistically significant level of 0.05 or 0.1, total organic carbon content (f OC ) exhibited significant correlations with the fitted parameters by the isothermal models. The correlations of f OC and SOM fractions (e.g., fulvic acid and humin) with the single point desorption coefficients at lower aqueous concentrations of studied PBDEs were significant; while at higher aqueous concentrations, the relationships were less significant or insignificant. Our findings may facilitate a comprehensive understanding on behaviors of PBDEs in soil systems. - Highlights: ► A two-compartment first-order kinetic model for the PBDEs studied was established. ► Isotherm was fitted well by a linear distribution or a nonlinear Freundlich model. ► Desorption commonly exhibited somewhat hysteresis relative to sorption. ► Soil organic carbon fractions showed close correlations with the model parameters. - Two-compartment first-order model, and linear distribution model or nonlinear Freundlich model could well elucidate desorption kinetics and isotherms of PBDEs in natural soils, respectively.

  20. Involving women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, J

    1994-01-01

    I am a primary health care (PHC) coordinator working with the May Day Rural project, a local NGO involved in integrated approaches and programs with rural communities in the Ga District of the Greater-Accra region in Ghana. When we talk about the community development approach we must first and foremost recognize that we are talking about women, because in the developing world frequent childbirths mean that her burden of mortality is higher than a man's; her workload is extremely heavy--whether in gardening, farming, other household duties, caring for the sick, or the rearing of children; she has a key role in PHC and community development, because men are always looking for greener pastures elsewhere, leaving the women behind. Women's concerns are critical in most health care projects and women and children are their main beneficiaries. Why not include women in the management team, project design, implementation and evaluation processes? That is what the May Day Rural project is practicing, encouraging women's participation and creating a relationship of trust. full text

  1. The efficacy of a combination non-thermal focused ultrasound and radiofrequency device for noninvasive body contouring in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Samantha Y N; Yeung, Chi K; Chan, Johnny C Y; Chan, Henry H L

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have been published on the first generation non-thermal focused ultrasound with an average improvement of 0-3.95 cm reported. We aim to investigate the efficacy of the second-generation non-thermal focused ultrasound device with a combined radiofrequency hand piece. With the addition of radiofrequency energy, the temperature of the adipose tissue is raised before focused ultrasound is applied. This facilitates the mechanical disruption of fat cells by focused ultrasound. Twenty subjects were recruited and underwent three treatments biweekly. Caliper reading, abdominal circumference, and standardized photographs were taken with the Vectra(®) system at all visits. We aim to have the subjects stand and hold the same position and the photograph taken after exhalation. Caliper and circumference measurements carry uncertainty. It is impossible to eliminate all uncertainties but can be improved by having the same trained physician assistant perform the measurement at the same site and taking an average of three readings. Pain score and satisfaction were recorded by means of the visual analogue scale. The efficacy is defined by a statistically significant improvement in circumferential improvement based on intention-to-treat analysis. Seventeen subjects completed the treatment schedule. Abdominal circumference showed statistically significant improvement at 2 weeks post-second treatment (P = 0.023) and almost all subsequent follow-ups. Caliper readings were statistically significant at 2 weeks post-second treatment (P = 0.013) and almost all follow-ups. The mean pain score reported was 2.3 on the visual analog scale and 6% were unsatisfied with the overall treatments. Six incidents of wheal formation appeared immediately after treatment all of which subsided spontaneously within several hours. The combination non-thermal focused ultrasound and radiofrequency device is effective for improving body contour in Asians. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. IRIS , Hinode , SDO , and RHESSI Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Non-thermal Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun [Hinode Science Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Imada, Shinsuke [Institute for Space–Earth Environmental Research (ISEE), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Watanabe, Kyoko [National Defense Academy of Japan, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka 239-8686 (Japan); Bamba, Yumi [Hinode team, ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Brooks, David H., E-mail: ksun.lee@nao.ac.jp [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    An X1.6 flare occurred in active region AR 12192 on 2014 October 22 at 14:02 UT and was observed by Hinode , IRIS , SDO , and RHESSI . We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode /EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred, even though the intensity enhancement in hotter lines is quite weak. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. To understand the WL emission process, we calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI ) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg ii triplet) observed by IRIS . The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3–7.7) × 10{sup 10} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} for a given low-energy cutoff of 30–40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg ii subordinate line is about (4.6–6.7) × 10{sup 9} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}: ∼6%–22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  3. On the Origins of Mars' Exospheric Nonthermal Oxygen Component as Observed by MAVEN and Modeled by HELIOSARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, F.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Modolo, R.; Leclercq, L.; Curry, S.; Luhmann, J.; Lillis, R.; Hara, T.; McFadden, J.; Halekas, J.; Schneider, N.; Deighan, J.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Johnson, R. E.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.; Forget, F.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Eparvier, F. G.; Jakosky, B.

    2017-12-01

    The first measurements of the emission brightness of the oxygen atomic exosphere by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission have clearly shown that it is composed of a thermal component produced by the extension of the upper atmosphere and of a nonthermal component. Modeling these measurements allows us to constrain the origins of the exospheric O and, as a consequence, to estimate Mars' present oxygen escape rate. We here propose an analysis of three periods of MAVEN observations based on a set of three coupled models: a hybrid magnetospheric model (LATmos HYbrid Simulation (LatHyS)), an Exospheric General Model (EGM), and the Global Martian Circulation model of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD-GCM), which provide a description of Mars' environment from the surface up to the solar wind. The simulated magnetosphere by LatHyS is in good agreement with MAVEN Plasma and Field Package instruments data. The LMD-GCM modeled upper atmospheric profiles for the main neutral and ion species are compared to Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer/MAVEN data showing that the LMD-GCM can provide a satisfactory global view of Mars' upper atmosphere. Finally, we were able to reconstruct the expected emission brightness intensity from the oxygen exosphere using EGM. The good agreement with the averaged measured profiles by Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph during these three periods suggests that Mars' exospheric nonthermal component can be fully explained by the reactions of dissociative recombination of the O2+ ion in Mars' ionosphere, limiting significantly our ability to extract information from MAVEN observations of the O exosphere on other nonthermal processes, such as sputtering.

  4. A wide low-mass binary model for the origin of axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kool, M. de; Heuvel, E.P.J. van den

    1985-01-01

    An accreting binary model has been proposed by recent workers to account for the origin of the axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources. The authors show that the only type of binary system that can produce the observed structural properties, is a relatively wide neutron star binary, in which the companion of the neutron star is a low-mass giant. Binaries of this type are expected to resemble closely the eight brightest galactic bulge X-ray sources as well as the progenitors of the two wide radio pulsar binaries. (U.K.)

  5. Theoretical-experimental study of the non-thermal effects of the polarized laser radiation in living tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present research we had as a fundamental objective to analyse the non-thermal effects of the laser polarized light in biological tissues. These effects were performed with low power laser output. The theoretical procedure consisted in looking for a simple model which connects the effect of light polarized with microscopically rough tissues using well established physical concepts. Experimentally, we created artificial wounds on the back of animals using liquid nitrogen (this method was chosen because it does not interfere in the biochemistry of the animal tissue). For the wound irradiation we have utilized a He-Ne attached to an optical system. (author)

  6. Phenotypic and genetic differentiation among yellow monkeyflower populations from thermal and non-thermal soils in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekberg, Ylva; Roskilly, Beth; Hendrick, Margaret F; Zabinski, Catherine A; Barr, Camille M; Fishman, Lila

    2012-09-01

    In flowering plants, soil heterogeneity can generate divergent natural selection over fine spatial scales, and thus promote local adaptation in the absence of geographic barriers to gene flow. Here, we investigate phenotypic and genetic differentiation in one of the few flowering plants that thrives in both geothermal and non-thermal soils in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Yellow monkeyflowers (Mimulus guttatus) growing at two geothermal ("thermal") sites in YNP were distinct in growth form and phenology from paired populations growing nearby ( 0.34), which were only weakly differentiated from each other (all F (ST) geothermal gradient in Yellowstone.

  7. Positron-annihilation-induced ion desorption from TiO2(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, T.; Hirayama, T.; Nagashima, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We have investigated the positron-stimulated desorption of ions from a TiO2(110) surface. Desorbed O+ ions were detected in coincidence with the emission of annihilation γ rays. The energy dependence of the ion yields shows that the O+ ions were detected at energies much lower than the previously reported threshold for electron impact desorption corresponding to the excitation energy of Ti(3p) core electrons. These results provide evidence that core-hole creation by positron annihilation with electrons in the core levels leads to ion desorption.

  8. First-principles calculations of helium and neon desorption from cavities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddin, A Charaf; Pizzagalli, L

    2012-01-01

    Combining density functional theory, the nudged elastic band technique, and the ultradense fluid model, we investigated the desorption process of He and Ne in silicon. Our results show that the internal surfaces of gas-filled bubbles are not a limiting factor during desorption experiments, since the surface reconstruction opens diffusion paths easier than in the bulk. We show that the vibrational contribution to the energy of helium in the bulk has to be considered in order to determine realistic pressures in the bubbles, when comparing experiments and simulations. At the maximum of desorption, an average pressure of 1-2 GPa is computed. (paper)

  9. Silver nanostructures in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekuła, Justyna; Nizioł, Joanna; Rode, Wojciech; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-09-21

    Silver nanoparticles have been successfully applied as a matrix replacement for the laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). Nanoparticles, producing spectra with highly reduced chemical background in the low m/z region, are perfectly suited for low-molecular weight compound analysis and imaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can efficiently absorb ultraviolet laser radiation, transfer energy to the analyte and promote analyte desorption, but also constitute a source of silver ions suitable for analyte cationisation. This review provides an overview of the literature on silver nanomaterials as non-conventional desorption and ionization promoters in LDI-MS and mass spectrometry imaging.

  10. Desorption dynamics of deuterium molecules from the Si(100)-(3×1) dideuteride surface

    OpenAIRE

    Niida, T; Tsurumaki, Hiroshi; Namiki, Akira

    2006-01-01

    We measured polar angle ()-resolved time-of-flight spectra of D2 molecules desorbing from the Si(100)-(3×1) dideuteride surface. The desorbing D2 molecules exhibit a considerable translational heating with mean desorption kinetic energies of 0.25 eV, which is mostly independent of the desorption angles for 0°30°. The observed desorption dynamics of deuterium was discussed along the principle of detailed balance to predict their adsorption dynamics onto the monohydride Si surface.

  11. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  12. Desorption of H atoms from graphite (0001) using XUV free electron laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemer, B.; Olsen, Thomas; Hoger, T.

    2010-01-01

    The desorption of neutral H atoms from graphite with femtosecond XUV pulses is reported. The velocity distribution of the atoms peaks at extremely low kinetic energies. A DFT-based electron scattering calculation traces this distribution to desorption out of specific adsorption sites on graphite......, and identifies the highest vibrational state in the adsorbate potential as a major source for the slow atoms. It is evident that multiple electron scattering processes are required for this desorption. A direct electronic excitation of a repulsive hydrogen-carbon bond seems not to be important....

  13. Protein adsorption/desorption and antibody binding stoichiometry on silicon interferometric biosensors examined with TOF-SIMS

    KAUST Repository

    Gajos, Katarzyna

    2018-03-05

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been employed to examine, with biomolecular discrimination, sensing arm areas (20 μm x 600 μm) of integrated onto silicon chips Mach-Zehnder interferometers aiming to optimize their biofunctionalization with regard to indirect immunochemical (competitive) detection of ochratoxin A. Sensing areas are examined after: modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, spotting of OTA-ovalbumin conjugate (probe) from solutions with different concentration, blocking with bovine serum albumin, reaction with OTA-specific mouse monoclonal antibody followed by goat anti-mouse IgG secondary antibody. Component mass loadings of all proteins involved in immunodetection are determined from TOF-SIMS micro-analysis combined with ellipsometry of planar surfaces. These data show that partial desorption of surface-bound probe and blocking protein takes place upon primary immunoreaction to a degree that depends on probe concentration in spotting solution. Taking into account this desorption, apparent binding stoichiometry of both antibodies in immune complexes formed onto chip surface is determined more accurately than the respective evaluation based on real-time sensor response. In addition, mass loadings for probe and secondary antibody is observed to saturate for optimum probe concentrations. Also, principal component analysis of TOF-SIMS data could resolve both immunoreactions and biofunctionalization and discriminate surfaces prepared with optimum probe concentrations from those prepared using suboptimum ones.

  14. Protein adsorption/desorption and antibody binding stoichiometry on silicon interferometric biosensors examined with TOF-SIMS

    KAUST Repository

    Gajos, Katarzyna; Budkowski, Andrzej; Petrou, Panagiota; Pagkali, Varvara; Awsiuk, Kamil; Rysz, Jakub; Bernasik, Andrzej; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Raptis, Ioannis; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2018-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been employed to examine, with biomolecular discrimination, sensing arm areas (20 μm x 600 μm) of integrated onto silicon chips Mach-Zehnder interferometers aiming to optimize their biofunctionalization with regard to indirect immunochemical (competitive) detection of ochratoxin A. Sensing areas are examined after: modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, spotting of OTA-ovalbumin conjugate (probe) from solutions with different concentration, blocking with bovine serum albumin, reaction with OTA-specific mouse monoclonal antibody followed by goat anti-mouse IgG secondary antibody. Component mass loadings of all proteins involved in immunodetection are determined from TOF-SIMS micro-analysis combined with ellipsometry of planar surfaces. These data show that partial desorption of surface-bound probe and blocking protein takes place upon primary immunoreaction to a degree that depends on probe concentration in spotting solution. Taking into account this desorption, apparent binding stoichiometry of both antibodies in immune complexes formed onto chip surface is determined more accurately than the respective evaluation based on real-time sensor response. In addition, mass loadings for probe and secondary antibody is observed to saturate for optimum probe concentrations. Also, principal component analysis of TOF-SIMS data could resolve both immunoreactions and biofunctionalization and discriminate surfaces prepared with optimum probe concentrations from those prepared using suboptimum ones.

  15. Protein adsorption/desorption and antibody binding stoichiometry on silicon interferometric biosensors examined with TOF-SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajos, Katarzyna; Budkowski, Andrzej; Petrou, Panagiota; Pagkali, Varvara; Awsiuk, Kamil; Rysz, Jakub; Bernasik, Andrzej; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Raptis, Ioannis; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2018-06-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been employed to examine, with biomolecular discrimination, sensing arm areas (20 μm × 600 μm) of integrated onto silicon chips Mach-Zehnder interferometers aiming to optimize their biofunctionalization with regard to indirect immunochemical (competitive) detection of ochratoxin A. Sensing areas are examined after: modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, spotting of OTA-ovalbumin conjugate (probe) from solutions with different concentration, blocking with bovine serum albumin, reaction with OTA-specific mouse monoclonal antibody followed by goat anti-mouse IgG secondary antibody. Component mass loadings of all proteins involved in immunodetection are determined from TOF-SIMS micro-analysis combined with ellipsometry of planar surfaces. These data show that partial desorption of surface-bound probe and blocking protein takes place upon primary immunoreaction to a degree that depends on probe concentration in spotting solution. Taking into account this desorption, apparent binding stoichiometry of both antibodies in immune complexes formed onto chip surface is determined more accurately than the respective evaluation based on real-time sensor response. In addition, mass loadings for probe and secondary antibody is observed to saturate for optimum probe concentrations. Also, principal component analysis of TOF-SIMS data could resolve both immunoreactions and biofunctionalization and discriminate surfaces prepared with optimum probe concentrations from those prepared using suboptimum ones.

  16. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  17. Mechanism of NH{sub 3} desorption during the reaction of H{sub 2} with nitrogen containing carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan F. Espinal; Thanh N. Truong; Fanor Mondragon [University of Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia). Institute of Chemistry

    2005-07-01

    The continued increase in demand for natural gas has stimulated the interest in coal conversion to methane as synthetic natural gas by hydropyrolysis of coal (pyrolysis in a H{sub 2} atmosphere). Because the produced raw gas contains considerable amounts of gaseous N-containing products that have to be removed before delivering to final users, the information on distribution of coal-N is important for designing purification processes. It has been reported in the literature that NH{sub 3} is the main nitrogen containing gas that is released during the hydropyrolysis process. Other gases such as HCN and N{sub 2} are also released but in a much smaller amount. To the best of our knowledge, the mechanism for NH{sub 3} desorption during hydrogen reaction with carbonaceous materials has not been studied. We carried out a molecular modeling study using Density Functional Theory in order to get an insight of the mechanism and thermodynamics for NH{sub 3} evolution using pyridinic nitrogen as a model of N-containing carbonaceous material. We propose a mechanism that involves consecutive hydrogenation steps that lead to C-N bond breakage and NH{sub 3} desorption to the gas phase. It was found that the first hydrogenation reaction is highly exothermic. However, further hydrogenations are endothermic. Several pathways for NH{sub 3} evolution were proposed and most of them show high exothermicity. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  18. An investigation of liquid secondary ion and laser desorption mass spectroscopy for the analysis of planar chromatograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunphy, J.C.

    1990-11-01

    In the work described in this dissertation, interfaces between two mass spectrometric methods, liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (LSIMS) and laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LD/FTMS), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and slab gel electrophoresis were developed for bioanalytical applications. In an investigation of direct LSIMS for TLC analysis (TLC/LSIMS), mass spectra of bile acids and bile salts were characterized directly from high-performance TLC plates. The scanning ability of the LSIMS instrument was used to generate spatial profiles of the characteristic bile acid ions in the mass spectra. A procedure for the analysis of bile salts in dog bile was developed involving an extraction step, followed by TLC separation and direct TLC/LSIMS detection and semi-quantitation. For peptides, an experiment called selected-sequence monitoring'' was developed to locate target peptides related in structure in complex mixtures developed on TLC plates. Ions characteristic of the bradykinin and enkephalin peptides were used to generate spatial profiles of members of those peptide families on TLC plates. Using a Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS), a fundamental investigation was conducted into the factors affecting the quality of analytical data obtained using direct laser desorption/ionization to produce mass spectra from TLC plates.

  19. High throughput reaction screening using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wleklinski, Michael; Loren, Bradley P; Ferreira, Christina R; Jaman, Zinia; Avramova, Larisa; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Thompson, David H; Cooks, R Graham

    2018-02-14

    We report the high throughput analysis of reaction mixture arrays using methods and data handling routines that were originally developed for biological tissue imaging. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is applied in a continuous on-line process at rates that approach 10 4 reactions per h at area densities of up to 1 spot per mm 2 (6144 spots per standard microtiter plate) with the sprayer moving at ca. 10 4 microns per s. Data are analyzed automatically by MS using in-house software to create ion images of selected reagents and products as intensity plots in standard array format. Amine alkylation reactions were used to optimize the system performance on PTFE membrane substrates using methanol as the DESI spray/analysis solvent. Reaction times can be screening of processes like N -alkylation and Suzuki coupling reactions as reported herein. Products and by-products were confirmed by on-line MS/MS upon rescanning of the array.

  20. PAHs soil decontamination in two steps: desorption and electrochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, M Teresa; Gómez, Jose; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, M Angeles

    2009-07-15

    The presence of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils poses a potential threat to human health if exposure levels are too high. Nevertheless, the removal of these contaminants presents a challenge to scientists and engineers. The high hydrophobic nature of PAHs enables their strong sorption onto soil or sediments. Thus, the use of surfactants could favour the release of sorbed hydrophobic organic compounds from contaminated soils. In this work, five surfactants, namely Brij 35, Tergitol NP10, Tween 20, Tween 80 and Tyloxapol, are evaluated on the desorption of PAHs [benzanthracene (BzA), fluoranthene (FLU), and pyrene (PYR), single and in mixture] from a model sample such as kaolin. In all cases, the best results were obtained when Tween 80 was employed. In order to obtain the global decontamination of PAHs, their electrochemical degradation is investigated. It is concluded that the order of increasing degradation for single compounds is BzA>FLU>PYR when they are subject to the same electrochemical treatment. In addition, there is a direct relationship between the ionization potential and the electrochemical degradation of PAH.